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Sample records for brain liver mitochondria

  1. Distinct characteristics of Ca(2+)-induced depolarization of isolated brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vergun, Olga; Reynolds, Ian J

    2005-09-05

    Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarization was studied in single isolated rat brain and liver mitochondria. Digital imaging techniques and rhodamine 123 were used for mitochondrial membrane potential measurements. Low Ca(2+) concentrations (about 30--100 nM) initiated oscillations of the membrane potential followed by complete depolarization in brain mitochondria. In contrast, liver mitochondria were less sensitive to Ca(2+); 20 microm Ca(2+) was required to depolarize liver mitochondria. Ca(2+) did not initiate oscillatory depolarizations in liver mitochondria, where each individual mitochondrion depolarized abruptly and irreversibly. Adenine nucleotides dramatically reduced the oscillatory depolarization in brain mitochondria and delayed the onset of the depolarization in liver mitochondria. In both type of mitochondria, the stabilizing effect of adenine nucleotides completely abolished by an inhibition of adenine nucleotide translocator function with carboxyatractyloside, but was not sensitive to bongkrekic acid. Inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid also delayed Ca(2+)-depolarization. We hypothesize that the oscillatory depolarization in brain mitochondria is associated with the transient conformational change of the adenine nucleotide translocator from a specific transporter to a non-specific pore, whereas the non-oscillatory depolarization in liver mitochondria is caused by the irreversible opening of the pore.

  2. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-07

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue.

  3. Effects of Various Kynurenine Metabolites on Respiratory Parameters of Rat Brain, Liver and Heart Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Halina; Staniek, Katrin; Bertignol-Spörr, Melanie; Attam, Martin; Kronsteiner, Carina; Kepplinger, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid dose-dependently and significantly affected rat heart mitochondria. Now we have investigated the effects of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic, anthranilic, 3-hydroxyanthranilic, xanthurenic and quinolinic acids on respiratory parameters (ie, state 2, state 3), respiratory control index (RC) and ADP/oxygen ratio in brain, liver and heart mitochondria of adult rats. Mitochondria were incubated with glutamate/malate (5 mM) or succinate (10 mM) and in the presence of L-tryptophan metabolites (1 mM) or in the absence, as control. Kynurenic and anthranilic acids significantly reduced RC values of heart mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Xanthurenic acid significantly reduced RC values of brain mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Furthermore, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid decreased RC values of brain, liver and heart mitochondria using glutamate/malate. In the presence of succinate, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid affected RC values of brain mitochondria, whereas in liver and heart mitochondria only 3-hydroxykynurenine lowered RC values significantly. Furthermore, lowered ADP/oxygen ratios were observed in brain mitochondria in the presence of succinate with 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and to a lesser extent with glutamate/malate. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid significantly lowered the ADP/oxygen ratio in heart mitochondria exposed to glutamate/malate, while in the liver mitochondria only a mild reduction was found. Tests of the influence of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on complex I in liver mitochondria showed that only 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-kynurenine led to a significant acceleration of NADH-driven complex I activities. The data indicate that L-tryptophan metabolites had different effects on brain, liver and heart

  4. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction induced by isoniazid: study on isolated rat liver and brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahadpour, Morteza; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Mashayekhi, Vida; Haj Mohammad Ebrahim Tehrani, Kamaleddin; Jafarian, Iman; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH or isonicotinic hydrazide) is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Liver and brain are two important target organs in INH toxicity. However, the exact mechanisms behind the INH hepatotoxicity or neurotoxicity have not yet been completely understood. Considering the mitochondria as one of the possible molecular targets for INH toxicity, the aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of INH mitochondrial toxicity on isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria were isolated by differential ultracentrifugation from male Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with different concentrations of INH (25-2000 μM) for the investigation of mitochondrial parameters. The results indicated that INH could interact with mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibit its activity. Our results showed an elevation in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse after exposure of isolated liver mitochondria in INH. However, different results were obtained in brain mitochondria. Noteworthy, significant glutathione oxidation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and lipid peroxidation were observed in higher concentration of INH, as compared to liver mitochondria. In conclusion, our results suggest that INH may initiate its toxicity in liver mitochondria through interaction with electron transfer chain, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential decline and cytochrome c expulsion which ultimately lead to cell death signaling.

  5. Energetic, oxidative and ionic exchange in rat brain and liver mitochondria at experimental audiogenic epilepsy (Krushinsky-Molodkina model).

    PubMed

    Venediktova, Natalya I; Gorbacheva, Olga S; Belosludtseva, Natalia V; Fedotova, Irina B; Surina, Natalia M; Poletaeva, Inga I; Kolomytkin, Oleg V; Mironova, Galina D

    2017-01-09

    The role of brain and liver mitochondria at epileptic seizure was studied on Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) rats which respond to sound with an intensive epileptic seizure (audiogenic epilepsy). We didn't find significant changes in respiration rats of brain and liver mitochondria of KM and control rats; however the efficiency of АТР synthesis in the KM rat mitochondria was 10% lower. In rats with audiogenic epilepsy the concentration of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde in mitochondria of the brain (but not liver) was 2-fold higher than that in the control rats. The rate of H2O2 generation in brain mitochondria of КМ rats was twofold higher than in the control animals when using NAD-dependent substrates. This difference was less pronounced in liver mitochondria. In KM rats, the activity of mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel was lower than in liver mitochondria of control rats. The comparative study of the mitochondria ability to retain calcium ions revealed that in the case of using the complex I and complex II substrates, permeability transition pore is easier to trigger in brain and liver mitochondria of KM and КМs rats than in the control ones. The role of the changes in the energetic, oxidative, and ionic exchange in the mechanism of audiogenic epilepsy generation in rats and the possible correction of the epilepsy seizures are discussed.

  6. An analysis of the effects of Mn{sup 2+} on oxidative phosphorylation in liver, brain, and heart mitochondria using state 3 oxidation rate assays

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Gerstner, Brent; Lester, Tobias; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Malecki, Jon; Swarts, Steven G.; Brookes, Paul S.; Gavin, Claire E. Gunter, Karlene K.

    2010-11-15

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is partially mediated by reduced ATP production. We have used oxidation rate assays-a measure of ATP production-under rapid phosphorylation conditions to explore sites of Mn{sup 2+} inhibition of ATP production in isolated liver, brain, and heart mitochondria. This approach has several advantages. First, the target tissue for Mn toxicity in the basal ganglia is energetically active and should be studied under rapid phosphorylation conditions. Second, Mn may inhibit metabolic steps which do not affect ATP production rate. This approach allows identification of inhibitions that decrease this rate. Third, mitochondria from different tissues contain different amounts of the components of the metabolic pathways potentially resulting in different patterns of ATP inhibition. Our results indicate that Mn{sup 2+} inhibits ATP production with very different patterns in liver, brain, and heart mitochondria. The primary Mn{sup 2+} inhibition site in liver and heart mitochondria, but not in brain mitochondria, is the F{sub 1}F{sub 0} ATP synthase. In mitochondria fueled by either succinate or glutamate + malate, ATP production is much more strongly inhibited in brain than in liver or heart mitochondria; moreover, Mn{sup 2+} inhibits two independent sites in brain mitochondria. The primary site of Mn-induced inhibition of ATP production in brain mitochondria when succinate is substrate is either fumarase or complex II, while the likely site of the primary inhibition when glutamate plus malate are the substrates is either the glutamate/aspartate exchanger or aspartate aminotransferase.

  7. Effect of the CRAC Peptide, VLNYYVW, on mPTP Opening in Rat Brain and Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Azarashvili, Tamara; Krestinina, Olga; Baburina, Yulia; Odinokova, Irina; Akatov, Vladimir; Beletsky, Igor; Lemasters, John; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDa) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein located in the outer membrane of mitochondria. A domain in the C-terminus of TSPO was characterized as the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC). The ability of the CRAC domain to bind to cholesterol led us to hypothesize that this peptide may participate in the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Herein, we report the effect of the synthetic CRAC peptide, VLNYYVW, on mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. It was found that the CRAC peptide alone prevents the mPTP from opening, as well as the release of apoptotic factors (cytochrome c, AIF, and EndoG) in rat brain mitochondria (RBM). Co-incubation of CRAC, together with the TSPO drug ligand, PK 11195, resulted in the acceleration of mPTP opening and in the increase of apoptotic factor release. VLNYYVW did not induce swelling in rat liver mitochondria (RLM). 3,17,19-androsten-5-triol (19-Atriol; an inhibitor of the cholesterol-binding activity of the CRAC peptide) alone and in combination with the peptide was able to stimulate RLM swelling, which was Ca2+- and CsA-sensitive. Additionally, a combination of 19-Atriol with 100 nM PK 11195 or with 100 µM PK 11195 displayed the opposite effect: namely, the addition of 19-Atriol with 100 µM PK 11195 in a suspension of RLM suppressed the Ca2+-induced swelling of RLM by 40%, while the presence of 100 nM PK 11195 with 19-Atriol enhanced the swelling of RLM by 60%. Taken together, these data suggest the participation of the TSPO’s CRAC domain in the regulation of permeability transition. PMID:27983605

  8. Ameliorating reactive oxygen species-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation in brain, liver, mitochondria and DNA damage by Zingiber officinale Roscoe.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A

    2010-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for a number of cellular activities. However, excess cellular iron can be toxic by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion (O(2) (-)) and hydroxyl radical (HO(·)) that damage proteins, lipids and DNA. Mutagenic and genotoxic end products of lipid peroxidation can induce the decline of mitochondrial respiration and are associated with various human ailments including aging, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer etc. Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger) is a widely used spice around the world. The protective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against ROS-induced in vitro lipid peroxidation and DNA damage was evaluated in this study. The lipid peroxidation was induced by hydroxyl radical generated from Fenton's reaction in rat liver and brain homogenates and mitochondrial fraction (isolated from rat liver). The DNA protection was evaluated using H(2)O(2)-induced changes in pBR-322 plasmid and Fenton reaction-induced DNA fragmentation in rat liver. The results indicated that Z. officinale significantly (P<0.001) protected the lipid peroxidation in all the tissue homogenate/mitochondria. The extract at 2 and 0.5 mg/ml could protect 92 % of the lipid peroxidation in brain homogenate and liver mitochondria respectively. The percent inhibition of lipid peroxidation at 1mg/ml of Z. officinale in the liver homogenate was 94 %. However, the extract could partially alleviate the DNA damage. The protective mechanism can be correlated to the radical scavenging property of Z. officinale. The results of the study suggest the possible nutraceutical role of Z. officinale against the oxidative stress induced human ailments.

  9. OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION IN MITOCHONDRIA FROM LIVERS SHOWING CLOUDY SWELLING

    PubMed Central

    Fonnesu, Alberto; Severi, Clara

    1956-01-01

    Using succinate and α-ketoglutarate as substrates, oxidative phosphorylation has been measured in mitochondria isolated from livers showing cloudy swelling. This cellular change was obtained by injecting rats with S. typhi murium toxin and guinea pigs with diphtheria toxin. It has been found that phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of either of these substrates was partially inhibited in mitochondria from livers showing cloudy swelling, while the oxygen consumption was unchanged. Thus, the P:O ratios for both succinate and α-ketoglutarate were lower in mitochondria from treated animals than they were in normal mitochondria. Dephosphorylation of ATP was not significantly modified in mitochondria from livers showing cloudy swelling as compared with normal controls. No dephosphorylation of AMP and G-6-P was observed either in normal mitochondria or in mitochondria from treated animals. PMID:13331961

  10. Transferring Xenogenic Mitochondria Provides Neural Protection Against Ischemic Stress in Ischemic Rat Brains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Shen, Ching-I; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Wu, Shih-Fang; Chang, Jui-Chih; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Liu, Chin-San; Su, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Transferring exogenous mitochondria has therapeutic effects on damaged heart, liver, and lung tissues. Whether this protective effect requires the symbiosis of exogenous mitochondria in host cells remains unknown. Here xenogenic mitochondria derived from a hamster cell line were applied to ischemic rat brains and rat primary cortical neurons. Isolated hamster mitochondria, either through local intracerebral or systemic intra-arterial injection, significantly restored the motor performance of brain-ischemic rats. The brain infarct area and neuronal cell death were both attenuated by the exogenous mitochondria. Although internalized mitochondria could be observed in neurons and astrocytes, the low efficacy of mitochondrial internalization could not completely account for the high rate of rescue of the treated neural cells. We further illustrated that disrupting electron transport or ATPase synthase in mitochondria significantly attenuated the protective effect, suggesting that intact respiratory activity is essential for the mitochondrial potency on neural protection. These results emphasize that nonsymbiotic extracellular mitochondria can provide an effective cell defense against acute injurious ischemic stress in the central nervous system.

  11. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Nada; Prip-Buus, Carina; Vons, Corinne; Lenoir, Véronique; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lombès, Anne; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter discovered. Sulfide shares with the two others (NO and CO) the same inhibiting properties towards mitochondrial respiration. However, in contrast with NO or CO, sulfide at concentrations lower than the toxic (μM) level is an hydrogen donor and a substrate for mitochondrial respiration. This is due to the activity of a sulfide quinone reductase found in a large majority of mitochondria. An ongoing study of the metabolic state of liver in obese patients allowed us to evaluate the sulfide oxidation capacity with twelve preparations of human liver mitochondria. The results indicate relatively high rates of sulfide oxidation with a large variability between individuals. These observations made with isolated mitochondria appear in agreement with the main characteristics of sulfide oxidation as established before with the help of cellular models.

  12. Citrate synthesis in intact rat-liver mitochondria is irreversible.

    PubMed

    Greksák, M; Lopes-Cardozo, M; van den Bergh, S G

    1982-02-01

    Rat-liver mitochondria were incubated with [1,5-14C]citrate in the presence of fluorocitrate to block its oxidation in the Krebs cycle. The reaction products were analysed enzymatically and by anion-exchange chromatography. Incorporation of 14C into acetyl-L-carnitine or ketone bodies via a backward action of citrate synthase was not observed. The optimal rate of citrate synthesis from pyruvate and malate in the presence of fluorocitrate was 15 nmol . mg-1 min-1. In the absence of fluorocitrate, but in the presence of malonate, citrate was oxidized to succinate at a rate of 4 nmol . mg-1 . min-1. We conclude that the synthesis of citrate by intact rat liver mitochondria is an irreversible process. The possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon and the consequence for metabolic regulation are discussed.

  13. Proteomic analysis of liver mitochondria from rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Lu, De-Zhao; Li, You-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Qun; Zhou, Xin-Xin; Jin, Xi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore mitochondrial dysfunction in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by analyzing the proteome of liver mitochondria from a NASH model. METHODS: The NASH rat model was established by feeding rats a fat-rich diet for 24 wk and was confirmed using hematoxylin and eosin staining of liver tissue and by changes in the levels of serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglyceride, total cholesterol and other markers. Liver mitochondria from each group were isolated using differential centrifugation. The mitochondrial samples were lyzed, purified and further analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Bioinformatic analyses of assigned gene ontology and biological pathway was used to study functional enrichments in the abundant proteomic data. RESULTS: Eight up-regulated and sixteen down-regulated proteins were identified that showed greater than 1.5-fold differences between the controls and the NASH group. These dysregulated proteins were predicted to be involved in different metabolic processes including fatty acid β-oxidation processes, lipid metabolic processes, cell-cycle arrest, cell polarity maintenance, and adenosine triphosphate/sex hormone metabolic processes. Novel proteins that may be involved in NASH pathogenesis including the trifunctional enzyme Hadha, thyroxine, prohibitin, aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH1L2, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B31, and carbamoyl-phosphate synthase were identified using bioinformatics tools. The decreased expression of Hadha in NASH liver was verified by Western blotting, which was used as a complementary technique to confirm the proteomic results. CONCLUSION: This novel report on the liver mitochondrial proteome of a NASH model may provide a reservoir of information on the pathogenesis and treatment of NASH. PMID:24782632

  14. Transport and oxidation of choline by liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rapid choline oxidation and the onset of Pi-induced swelling by liver mitochondria, incubated in a sucrose medium at or above pH7.0, required the addition of both Pi and an uncoupling agent. Below pH7.0, Pi alone was required for rapid choline oxidation and swelling. 2. Choline oxidation was inhibited by each of several reagents that also inhibited Pi-induced swelling under similar conditions of incubation, including EGTA, mersalyl, Mg2+, the Ca2+-ionophore A23187, rotenone and nupercaine. None of these reagents had any significant effect on the rate of choline oxidation by sonicated mitochondria. There was therefore a close correlation between the conditions required for rapid choline oxidation and for Pi-induced swelling to occur, suggesting that in the absence of mitochondrial swelling the rate of choline oxidation is regulated by the rate of choline transport across the mitochondrial membrane. 3. Respiratory-chain inhibitors, uncoupling agents (at pH6.5) and ionophore A23187 caused a loss of endogenous Ca2+ from mitochondria, whereas nupercaine and Mg2+ had no significant effect on the Ca2+ content. Inhibition of choline oxidation and mitochondrial swelling by ionophore A23187 was reversed by adding Ca2+, but not by Mg2+. It is concluded that added Pi promotes the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial membrane phospholipase activity in respiring mitochondria, causing an increase in the permeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane to choline and therefore enabling rapid choline oxidation to occur. Nupercaine and Mg2+ appear to block choline oxidation and swelling by inhibiting phospholipase activity. 4. Choline was oxidized slowly by tightly coupled mitochondria largely depleted of their endogenous adenine nucleotides, suggesting that these compounds are not directly concerned in the regulation of choline oxidation. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the possible mechanism of choline transport across the mitochondrial membrane in vivo and

  15. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jesina, P; Kholová, D; Bolehovská, R; Cervinková, Z; Drahota, Z; Houstek, J

    2004-01-01

    We studied the extent to which hormonally-induced mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) activity contributes to the supply of reducing equivalents to the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the rat liver. The activity of glycerophosphate oxidase was compared with those of NADH oxidase and/or succinate oxidase. It was found that triiodothyronine-activated mGPDH represents almost the same capacity for the saturation of the respiratory chain as Complex II. Furthermore, the increase of mGPDH activity induced by triiodothyronine correlated with an increase of capacity for glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production. As a result of hormonal treatment, a 3-fold increase in glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by liver mitochondria was detected by polarographic and luminometric measurements.

  16. Enhanced oxidative capacity of ground squirrel brain mitochondria during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Mallory A; Schwartz, Christine; Andrews, Matthew T

    2017-03-01

    During hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) regularly cycle between bouts of torpor and interbout arousal (IBA). Most of the brain is electrically quiescent during torpor but regains activity quickly upon arousal to IBA, resulting in extreme oscillations in energy demand during hibernation. We predicted increased functional capacity of brain mitochondria during hibernation compared with spring to accommodate the variable energy demands of hibernation. To address this hypothesis, we examined mitochondrial bioenergetics in the ground squirrel brain across three time points: spring (SP), torpor (TOR), and IBA. Respiration rates of isolated brain mitochondria through complex I of the electron transport chain were more than twofold higher in TOR and IBA than in SP (P < 0.05). We also found a 10% increase in membrane potential between hibernation and spring (P < 0.05), and that proton leak was lower in TOR and IBA than in SP. Finally, there was a 30% increase in calcium loading in SP brain mitochondria compared with TOR and IBA (P < 0.01). To analyze brain mitochondrial abundance between spring and hibernation, we measured the ratio of copy number in a mitochondrial gene (ND1) vs. a nuclear gene (B2M) in frozen cerebral cortex samples. No significant differences were observed in DNA copies between SP and IBA. These data show that brain mitochondrial bioenergetics are not static across the year and suggest that brain mitochondria function more effectively during the hibernation season, allowing for rapid production of energy to meet demand when extreme physiological changes are occurring.

  17. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkova, Natalia N.; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50–70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200–2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction. PMID:25248416

  18. Calcium-induced precipitate formation in brain mitochondria: composition, calcium capacity, and retention.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Tibor; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Fiskum, Gary; Andrews, S Brian

    2007-08-01

    Both isolated brain mitochondria and mitochondria in intact neurons are capable of accumulating large amounts of calcium, which leads to formation in the matrix of calcium- and phosphorus-rich precipitates, the chemical composition of which is largely unknown. Here, we have used inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) to determine how the amount and rate of mitochondrial calcium uptake relate to mitochondrial morphology, precipitate composition, and precipitate retention. Using isolated rat brain (RBM) or liver mitochondria (RLM) Ca(2+)-loaded by continuous cation infusion, precipitate composition was measured in situ in parallel with Ca(2+) uptake and mitochondrial swelling. In RBM, the endogenous MPT inhibitors adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading capacity and facilitated formation of precipitates. In the presence of ADP, the Ca/P ratio approached 1.5, while ATP or reduced infusion rates decreased this ratio towards 1.0, indicating that precipitate chemical form varies with the conditions of loading. In both RBM and RLM, the presence of cyclosporine A in addition to ADP increased the Ca(2+) capacity and precipitate Ca/P ratio. Following MPT and/or depolarization, the release of accumulated Ca(2+) is rapid but incomplete; significant residual calcium in the form of precipitates is retained in damaged mitochondria for prolonged periods.

  19. Characterization of cationic acid phosphatase isozyme from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Murakami, K; Hosoda, T; Yamamoto, Y; Watanabe, K; Morinaka, Y; Ohara, A

    1992-05-01

    Acid phosphatase isozyme was highly purified from rat liver mitochondrial fraction. The enzyme showed an isoelectric point value of above 9.5 on isoelectric focusing, and the apparent molecular weight was estimated to be 32000 by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration or 16000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, thiamine pyrophosphate, inorganic pyrophosphate, and phosphoprotein such as casein and phosvitin, but not of several phosphomonoesters, except for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and o-phosphotyrosine. The enzyme was not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate, and was significantly activated by Fe2+ and reducing agents such as ascorbic acid, L-cysteine,and dithiothreitol. The enzyme was found to be distributed in various rat tissues including liver, spleen, kidney, small intestine, lung, stomach, brain and heart, but not in skeletal muscle.

  20. The energy blockers 3-bromopyruvate and lonidamine: effects on bioenergetics of brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Macchioni, Lara; Davidescu, Magdalena; Roberti, Rita; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2014-10-01

    Tumor cells favor abnormal energy production via aerobic glycolysis and show resistance to apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction. The differences between normal and cancer cells in their energy metabolism provide a biochemical basis for developing new therapeutic strategies. The energy blocker 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) can eradicate liver cancer in animals without associated toxicity, and is a potent anticancer towards glioblastoma cells. Since mitochondria are 3BP targets, in this work the effects of 3BP on the bioenergetics of normal rat brain mitochondria were investigated in vitro, in comparison with the anticancer agent lonidamine (LND). Whereas LND impaired oxygen consumption dependent on any complex of the respiratory chain, 3BP was inhibitory to malate/pyruvate and succinate (Complexes I and II), but preserved respiration from glycerol-3-phosphate and ascorbate (Complex IV). Accordingly, although electron flow along the respiratory chain and ATP levels were decreased by 3BP in malate/pyruvate- and succinate-fed mitochondria, they were not significantly influenced from glycerol-3-phosphate- or ascorbate-fed mitochondria. LND produced a decrease in electron flow from all substrates tested. No ROS were produced from any substrate, with the exception of 3BP-induced H(2)O(2) release from succinate, which suggests an antimycin-like action of 3BP as an inhibitor of Complex III. We can conclude that 3BP does not abolish completely respiration and ATP synthesis in brain mitochondria, and has a limited effect on ROS production, confirming that this drug may have limited harmful effects on normal cells.

  1. Proton leak in hepatocytes and liver mitochondria from archosaurs (crocodiles) and allometric relationships for ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J; Else, P L; Manolis, S C; Brand, M D

    2002-07-01

    It has previously been shown that mitochondrial proton conductance decreases with increasing body mass in mammals and is lower in a 250-g lizard than the laboratory rat. To examine whether mitochondrial proton conductance is extremely low in very large reptiles, hepatocytes and mitochondria were prepared from saltwater crocodiles ( Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles ( Crocodylus johnstoni). Respiration rates of hepatocytes and liver mitochondria were measured at 37 degrees C and compared with values obtained for rat or previously measured for other species. Respiration rates of hepatocytes from either species of crocodile were similar to those reported for lizards and approximately one fifth of the rates measured using cells from mammals (rat and sheep). Ten-to-thirty percent of crocodile hepatocyte respiration was used to drive mitochondrial proton leak, similar to the proportion in other species. Respiration rates of crocodile liver mitochondria were similar to those of mammalian species. Proton leak rate in isolated liver mitochondria was measured as a function of membrane potential. Contrary to our prediction, the mitochondrial proton conductance of liver mitochondria from crocodiles was greater than that of liver mitochondria from lizards and was similar to that of rats. The acyl composition of liver mitochondrial phospholipids from the crocodiles was more similar to that in mitochondria from rats than in mitochondria from lizards. The relatively high mitochondrial proton conductance was associated with a relatively small liver, which seems to be characteristic of crocodilians. Comparison of data from a number of diverse ectothermic species suggested that hepatocyte respiration rate may decrease with body mass, with an allometric exponent of about -0.2, similar to the exponent in mammalian hepatocytes. However, unlike mammals, liver mitochondrial proton conductance in ectotherms showed no allometric relationship with body size.

  2. Thiamine triphosphate synthesis in rat brain occurs in mitochondria and is coupled to the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Gangolf, Marjorie; Wins, Pierre; Thiry, Marc; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2010-01-01

    In animals, thiamine deficiency leads to specific brain lesions, generally attributed to decreased levels of thiamine diphosphate, an essential cofactor in brain energy metabolism. However, another far less abundant derivative, thiamine triphosphate (ThTP), may also have a neuronal function. Here, we show that in the rat brain, ThTP is essentially present and synthesized in mitochondria. In mitochondrial preparations from brain (but not liver), ThTP can be produced from thiamine diphosphate and P(i). This endergonic process is coupled to the oxidation of succinate or NADH through the respiratory chain but cannot be energized by ATP hydrolysis. ThTP synthesis is strongly inhibited by respiratory chain inhibitors, such as myxothiazol and inhibitors of the H(+) channel of F(0)F(1)-ATPase. It is also impaired by disruption of the mitochondria or by depolarization of the inner membrane (by protonophores or valinomycin), indicating that a proton-motive force (Deltap) is required. Collapsing Deltap after ThTP synthesis causes its rapid disappearance, suggesting that both synthesis and hydrolysis are catalyzed by a reversible H(+)-translocating ThTP synthase. The synthesized ThTP can be released from mitochondria in the presence of external P(i). However, ThTP probably does not accumulate in the cytoplasm in vivo, because it is not detected in the cytosolic fraction obtained from a brain homogenate. Our results show for the first time that a high energy triphosphate compound other than ATP can be produced by a chemiosmotic type of mechanism. This might shed a new light on our understanding of the mechanisms of thiamine deficiency-induced brain lesions.

  3. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  4. The effects of ammonium chloride and bicarbonate on the activity of glutaminase in isolated liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S K; McGivan, J D

    1978-01-01

    1. Glutamine hydrolysis in liver mitochondria was studied by measuring the production of glutamate under conditions where this compound could not be further metabolized. 2. Glutaminase activity in intact mitochondria was very low in the absence of activators. 3. Glutamine hydrolysis was markedly stimulated by NH4Cl and also by HCO3- ions. 4. The stimulation by each of these compounds was much decreased if the mitochondria were uncoupled. 5. Maximum rates of glutamine hydrolysis required the addition of phosphate. A correlation was observed between the activity of glutaminase in the presence of NH4Cl plus HCO3- and the intramitochondrial content of ATP. 6. In disrupted mitochondria, NH4Cl stimulated glutaminase to a much smaller extent than in intact mitochondria. The NH4Cl stimulation in disrupted mitochondria was much increased by the addition of ATP. KHCO3 also stimulated glutaminase activity in disrupted mitochondria, and ATP increased the magnitude of this stimulation. 7. It was concluded that maximum rates of glutaminase activity in liver mitochondria require the presence of phosphate, ATP and either HCO3- or NH4+. A comparison of the results obtained on intact and broken mitochondria indicates that these effectors have a direct effect on the glutaminase enzyme system rather than an indirect effect mediated by changes in transmembrane ion gradients or in the concentrations of intramitochondrial metabolites. PMID:747656

  5. Mouse Liver Mitochondria Isolation, Size Fractionation, and Real-time MOMP Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Thibaud T.; Luna-Vargas, Mark P.A.; Chipuk, Jerry E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis involves a complex interplay between dozens of proteins and lipids, and is also dependent on the shape and size of mitochondria. The use of cellular models in past studies has not been ideal for investigating how the complex multi-factor interplay regulates the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Isolated systems have proven to be a paradigm to deconstruct MOMP into individual steps and to study the behavior of each subset of MOMP regulators. In particular, isolated mitochondria are key to in vitro studies of the BCL-2 family proteins, a complex family of pro-survival and pro-apoptotic proteins that directly control the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis (Renault et al., 2013). In this protocol, we describe three complementary procedures for investigating in real-time the effects of MOMP regulators using isolated mitochondria. The first procedure is “Liver mitochondria isolation” in which the liver is dissected from mice to obtain mitochondria. “Mitochondria labeling with JC-1 and size fractionation” is the second procedure that describes a method to label, fractionate by size and standardize subpopulations of mitochondria. Finally, the “Real-time MOMP measurements” protocol allows to follow MOMP in real-time on isolated mitochondria. The aforementioned procedures were used to determine in vitro the role of mitochondrial membrane shape at the level of isolated cells and isolated mitochondria (Renault et al., 2015). PMID:28093578

  6. 3-nitropropionic acid-induced mitochondrial permeability transition: comparative study of mitochondria from different tissues and brain regions.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Sandra R; Melo, Daniela R; Saito, Angela; Castilho, Roger F

    2010-02-15

    The adult rat striatum is particularly vulnerable to systemic administration of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), which is known to induce degeneration of the caudate-putamen, as occurs in Huntington's disease. The aim of the present study was to compare the susceptibility of isolated mitochondria from different rat brain regions (striatum, cortex, and cerebellum) as well as from the liver, kidney, and heart to mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) induced by 3NP and Ca(2+). In the presence of micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, 3NP induces MPT in a dose-dependent manner, as estimated by mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the transmembrane electrical potential. A 3NP concentration capable of promoting a 10% inhibition of ADP-stimulated, succinate-supported respiration was sufficient to stimulate Ca(2+)-induced MPT. Brain and heart mitochondria were generally more sensitive to 3NP and Ca(2+)-induced MPT than mitochondria from liver and kidney. In addition, a partial inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by 3NP resulted in more pronounced MPT in striatal mitochondria than in cortical or cerebellar organelles. A similar inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity was observed in rat tissue homogenates obtained from various brain regions as well as from liver, kidney, and heart 24 hr after a single i.p. 3NP dose. Mitochondria isolated from forebrains of 3NP-treated rats were also more susceptible to Ca(2+)-induced MPT than those of control rats. We propose that the increased susceptibility of the striatum to 3NP-induced neurodegeneration may be partially explained by its susceptibility to MPT, together with the greater vulnerability of this brain region to glutamate receptor-mediated Ca(2+) influx.

  7. Pig Brain Mitochondria as a Biological Model for Study of Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation is a key process of intracellular energy transfer by which mitochondria produce ATP. Isolated mitochondria serve as a biological model for understanding the mitochondrial respiration control, effects of various biologically active substances, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate pig brain mitochondria as a proper biological model for investigation of activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Oxygen consumption rates of isolated pig brain mitochondria were measured using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration of crude mitochondrial fraction, mitochondria purified in sucrose gradient, and mitochondria purified in Percoll gradient were assayed as a function of storage time. Oxygen flux and various mitochondrial respiratory control ratios were not changed within two days of mitochondria storage on ice. Leak respiration was found higher and Complex I-linked respiration lower in purified mitochondria compared to the crude mitochondrial fraction. Damage to both outer and inner mitochondrial membrane caused by the isolation procedure was the greatest after purification in a sucrose gradient. We confirmed that pig brain mitochondria can serve as a biological model for investigation of mitochondrial respiration. The advantage of this biological model is the stability of respiratory parameters for more than 48 h and the possibility to isolate large amounts of mitochondria from specific brain areas without the need to kill laboratory animals. We suggest the use of high-resolution respirometry of pig brain mitochondria for research of the neuroprotective effects and/or mitochondrial toxicity of new medical drugs.

  8. Dynamic Adaptation of Liver Mitochondria to Chronic Alcohol Feeding in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Derick; Ybanez, Maria D.; Johnson, Heather S.; McDonald, Jeniece N.; Mesropyan, Lusine; Sancheti, Harsh; Martin, Gary; Martin, Alanna; Lim, Atalie M; Dara, Lily; Cadenas, Enrique; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Liver mitochondria undergo dynamic alterations following chronic alcohol feeding to mice. Intragastric alcohol feeding to mice resulted in 1) increased state III respiration (109% compared with control) in isolated liver mitochondria, probably due to increased levels of complexes I, IV, and V being incorporated into the respiratory chain; 2) increased mitochondrial NAD+ and NADH levels (∼2-fold), with no change in the redox status; 3) alteration in mitochondrial morphology, with increased numbers of elongated mitochondria; and 4) enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the liver, which corresponded with an up-regulation of PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α). Oral alcohol feeding to mice, which is associated with less liver injury and steatosis, slightly enhanced respiration in isolated liver mitochondria (30.8% compared with control), lower than the striking increase caused by intragastric alcohol feeding. Mitochondrial respiration increased with both oral and intragastric alcohol feeding despite extensive N-acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The alcohol-induced mitochondrial alterations are probably an adaptive response to enhance alcohol metabolism in the liver. Isolated liver mitochondria from alcohol-treated mice had a greater rate of acetaldehyde metabolism and respiration when treated with acetaldehyde than control. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 levels were unaltered in response to alcohol, suggesting that the greater acetaldehyde metabolism by isolated mitochondria from alcohol-treated mice was due to increased mitochondrial respiration that regenerated NAD+, the rate-limiting substrate in alcohol/acetaldehyde metabolism. Overall, our work suggests that mitochondrial plasticity in the liver may be an important adaptive response to the metabolic stress caused by alcohol intake and could potentially play a role in many other vital functions performed by the liver. PMID:23086958

  9. Influence of aging on membrane permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Toman, Julia; Fiskum, Gary

    2011-02-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition (MPT) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute disorders of the central nervous systems, including ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and possibly in neurodegenerative diseases. Opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) by a combination of abnormally elevated intramitochondrial Ca2+ and oxidative stress induces the collapse of transmembrane ion gradients, resulting in membrane depolarization and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. This loss of ATP synthesis eventually results in cellular metabolic failure and necrotic cell death. Drugs, e.g., cyclosporin A, can inhibit the permeability transition through their interaction with the mitochondria-specific protein, cyclophilin D, and demonstrate neuroprotection in several animal models. These characteristics of the MPT were developed almost exclusively from experiments performed with young, mature rodents whereas the neuropathologies associated with the MPT are most prevalent in the elderly population. Some evidence indicates that the sensitivity of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced PTP opening is greater in the aged compared to the young mature brain; however, the basis for this difference is unknown. Based on knowledge of factors that regulate the MPT and on other comparisons between cells and mitochondria from young and old animals, several features may be important. These aging-related features include impaired neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, increased cyclophilin D protein levels, oxidative modification of the adenine nucleotide translocase and of cardiolipin, and changes in the levels of anti-death mitochondrial proteins, e.g., Bcl-2. The influence of aging on both the contribution of the MPT to neuropathology and the neuroprotective efficacy of MPT inhibitors is a substantial knowledge gap that requires extensive research at the subcellular, cellular, and animal model levels.

  10. Synaptic Mitochondria Sustain More Damage than Non-Synaptic Mitochondria after Traumatic Brain Injury and Are Protected by Cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hill, Rachel L; Singh, Indrapal N; Wang, Juan A; Hall, Edward D

    2016-10-13

    Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of those with traumatic brain injury (TBI). As central mediators of the secondary injury cascade, mitochondria are promising therapeutic targets for prevention of cellular death and dysfunction after TBI. One of the most promising and extensively studied mitochondrial targeted TBI therapies is inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) by the FDA-approved drug, cyclosporine A (CsA). A number of studies have evaluated the effects of CsA on total brain mitochondria after TBI; however, no study has investigated the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria. Synaptic mitochondria are considered essential for proper neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction has been implicated in neurodegeneration. Synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria have heterogeneous characteristics, but their heterogeneity can be masked in total mitochondrial (synaptic and non-synaptic) preparations. Therefore, it is essential that mitochondria targeted pharmacotherapies, such as CsA, be evaluated in both populations. This is the first study to examine the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria after experimental TBI. We conclude that synaptic mitochondria sustain more damage than non-synaptic mitochondria 24 h after severe controlled cortical impact injury (CCI), and that intraperitoneal administration of CsA (20 mg/kg) 15 min after injury improves synaptic and non-synaptic respiration, with a significant improvement being seen in the more severely impaired synaptic population. As such, CsA remains a promising neuroprotective candidate for the treatment of those with TBI.

  11. Effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the maximal respiratory capacity of rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Spach, P.I.; Cunningham, C.C.

    1986-05-01

    Previous observations suggest strongly that lowered ATP synthetase activity is responsible for the decrease in succinate-driven state 3 (+ ADP) respiration in liver mitochondria from rats fed ethanol chronically (ethanol mitochondria). In the present study uncoupler-stimulated respiration was measured to determine if ethanol-induced decreases in the concentrations of electron transport components were rate limiting for respiration in coupled ethanol mitochondria. Mitochondria were isolated from pair fed rats. Lowered state 3 respiration was observed in ethanol mitochondria with succinate, glutamate-malate, ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, and ascorbate-TMPD; cytochrome oxidase activity was decreased 25%. In contrast, uncoupler-stimulated rates were unchanged. These results demonstrate that maximal respiratory capacity is maintained in ethanol mitochondria, even when cytochrome oxidase is lowered. State 3 respiration at site 3, while significantly lowered in ethanol mitochondria, is still significantly higher than succinate-driven state 3 respiration in control mitochondria. These observations are, therefore, consistent with the suggestion that respiratory activity in coupled ethanol mitochondria (state 3 respiration) is limited by activities of other components of the oxidative-phosphorylation system, possibly the ATP synthetase complex.

  12. Mitochondria-controlled signaling mechanisms of brain protection in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lukyanova, Ludmila D.; Kirova, Yulia I.

    2015-01-01

    The article is focused on the role of the cell bioenergetic apparatus, mitochondria, involved in development of immediate and delayed molecular mechanisms for adaptation to hypoxic stress in brain cortex. Hypoxia induces reprogramming of respiratory chain function and switching from oxidation of NAD-related substrates (complex I) to succinate oxidation (complex II). Transient, reversible, compensatory activation of respiratory chain complex II is a major mechanism of immediate adaptation to hypoxia necessary for (1) succinate-related energy synthesis in the conditions of oxygen deficiency and formation of urgent resistance in the body; (2) succinate-related stabilization of HIF-1α and initiation of its transcriptional activity related with formation of long-term adaptation; (3) succinate-related activation of the succinate-specific receptor, GPR91. This mechanism participates in at least four critical regulatory functions: (1) sensor function related with changes in kinetic properties of complex I and complex II in response to a gradual decrease in ambient oxygen concentration; this function is designed for selection of the most efficient pathway for energy substrate oxidation in hypoxia; (2) compensatory function focused on formation of immediate adaptive responses to hypoxia and hypoxic resistance of the body; (3) transcriptional function focused on activated synthesis of HIF-1 and the genes providing long-term adaptation to low pO2; (4) receptor function, which reflects participation of mitochondria in the intercellular signaling system via the succinate-dependent receptor, GPR91. In all cases, the desired result is achieved by activation of the succinate-dependent oxidation pathway, which allows considering succinate as a signaling molecule. Patterns of mitochondria-controlled activation of GPR-91- and HIF-1-dependent reaction were considered, and a possibility of their participation in cellular-intercellular-systemic interactions in hypoxia and adaptation was

  13. Xanthommatin formation in rat liver mitochondria and its inhibition by respiratory chain substrates.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, H; Nagamura, Y; Ishiguro, I

    1983-11-01

    3-Hydroxykynurenine is condensed to xanthommatin by cytochrome c and cytochrome oxidase in rat liver mitochondria. In intact mitochondria the reaction is inhibited by respiratory chain substrates. However, this was not the case with preincubated mitochondria or with isolated cytochrome c and cytochrome oxidase. The inhibition of xanthommatin formation in native mitochondria by succinate was abolished by addition of antimycin A or malonate, whereas the inhibition by citrate, glutamate or fumarate was not impaired by antimycin A or amobarbital. However, after preincubation of mitochondria at 37 degrees C for 30 min the inhibition disappeared in these cases too. It is suggested that the inhibition by succinate is due to the supply of reduced cytochrome b which competes with 3-hydroxykynurenine for ferricytochrome c, while the other respiratory chain substrates inhibit xanthommatin formation only in the case of intact mitochondria by a yet unknown mechanism. These inhibition mechanisms prevent xanthommatin formation in rat liver mitochondria, even though 3-hydroxykynurenine is synthesized in the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  14. Cannabinoid-induced changes in respiration of brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk; Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana

    2014-11-18

    Cannabinoids exert various biological effects that are either receptor-mediated or independent of receptor signaling. Mitochondrial effects of cannabinoids were interpreted either as non-receptor-mediated alteration of mitochondrial membranes, or as indirect consequences of activation of plasma membrane type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1). Recently, CB1 receptors were confirmed to be localized to the membranes of neuronal mitochondria, where their activation directly regulates respiration and energy production. Here, we performed in-depth analysis of cannabinoid-induced changes of mitochondrial respiration using both an antagonist/inverse agonist of CB1 receptors, AM251 and the cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, anandamide, and WIN 55,212-2. Relationships were determined between cannabinoid concentration and respiratory rate driven by substrates of complex I, II or IV in pig brain mitochondria. Either full or partial inhibition of respiratory rate was found for the tested drugs, with an IC50 in the micromolar range, which verified the significant role of non-receptor-mediated mechanism in inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Effect of stepwise application of THC and AM251 evidenced protective role of AM251 and corroborated the participation of CB1 receptor activation in the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We proposed a model, which includes both receptor- and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms of cannabinoid action on mitochondrial respiration. This model explains both the inhibitory effect of cannabinoids and the protective effect of the CB1 receptor inverse agonist.

  15. Liver and heart mitochondria obtained from Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) offers high resistance to lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Mariana; Marmunti, Mónica; Montalti, D; Gutiérrez, Ana María

    2008-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation is generally thought to be a major mechanism of cell injury in aerobic organisms subjected to oxidative stress. All cellular membranes are especially vulnerable to oxidation due to their high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, birds have special adaptations for preventing membrane damage caused by reactive oxygen species. This study examines fatty acid profiles and susceptibility to lipid peroxidation in liver and heart mitochondria obtained from Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae). The saturated fatty acids in these organelles represent approximately 40-50% of total fatty acids whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acid composition was highly distinctive, characterized by almost equal amounts of 18:2 n-6; 20:4 n-6 and 22:6 n-3 in liver mitochondria, and a higher proportion of 18:2 n-6 compared to 20:4 n-6 and 22:6 n-3 in heart mitochondria. The concentration of total unsaturated fatty acids of liver and heart mitochondria was approximately 50% and 60%, respectively, with a prevalence of oleic acid C18:1 n9. The rate C20:4 n6/C18:2 n6 and the unsaturation index was similar in liver and heart mitochondria; 104.33 +/- 6.73 and 100.09 +/- 3.07, respectively. Light emission originating from these organelles showed no statistically significant differences and the polyunsaturated fatty acid profiles did not change during the lipid peroxidation process.

  16. Isolation and Functional Assessment of Mitochondria from Small Amounts of Mouse Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F.; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7–12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format. PMID:21913109

  17. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  18. Inducible cytochrome P-450 from rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Shayiq, F.M.; Avadhani, N.G.

    1987-05-01

    In the present study they have purified US -naphthoflavone (BNF, which induces isotypes similar to 3-MC) and PB induced mitochondrial isoforms. They have been able to purify two isoforms with molecular weights of 54 Kd and 52 Kd from BNF induced mitochondria. Only the 54 KD form, but not the 52 KD species reacts with the polyclonal antibody to microsomal P-450c, though, both show arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in an in vitro system reconstituted with adrenodoxin and adrenodoxin-reductase. Fingerprint analyses, N-terminal sequencing and use of monoclonal antibody probes show that the two mitochondrial isoforms are different from the microsomal P-450c. Further, the 54 Kd mitochondrial isoform is not detected in control mitochondria indicating that it is truly an induced form. Similarly, a PB induced mitochondrial form which exhibits physical, immunochemical and enzymatic properties different from the microsomal P-450b has also been purified.

  19. EFFECT OF ACTIVE ACCUMULATION OF CALCIUM AND PHOSPHATE IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA.

    PubMed

    GREENAWALT, J W; ROSSI, C S; LEHNINGER, A L

    1964-10-01

    Rat liver mitochondria allowed to accumulate maximal amounts of Ca(++) and HPO(4) (=) ions from the suspending medium in vitro during respiration have a considerably higher specific gravity than normal mitochondria and may be easily separated from the latter by isopycnic centrifugation in density gradients of sucrose or cesium chloride. When the mitochondria are allowed to accumulate less than maximal amounts of Ca(++) and HPO(4) (=) from the medium, they have intermediate specific gravities which are roughly proportional to their content of calcium phosphate. Maximally "loaded" mitochondria are relatively homogeneous with respect to specific gravity. Correlated biochemical and electron microscopic studies show that Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria contain numerous dense granules, of which some 85 per cent are over 500 A in diameter. These granules are electron-opaque not only following fixation and staining with heavy metal reagents, but also following fixation with formaldehyde, demonstrating that the characteristic granules in Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria have intrinsic electron-opacity. The dense granules are almost always located within the inner compartment of the mitochondria and not in the space between the inner and outer membranes. They are frequently located at or near the cristae and they often show electron-transparent "cores." Such granules appear to be made up of clusters of smaller dense particles, but preliminary x-ray diffraction analysis and electron diffraction studies have revealed no evidence of crystallinity in the deposits. The electron-opaque granules decrease in number when the Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria are incubated with 2,4-dinitrophenol; simultaneously there is discharge of Ca(++) and phosphate from the mitochondria into the medium.

  20. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Amal . E-mail: asantra2000@yahoo.co.in; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  1. Calcium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in brain mitochondria is mediated by permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus J; Månsson, Roland; Morota, Saori; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Kallur, Thérese; Sumi, Tetsuo; Ishii, Nagao; Shimazu, Motohide; Keep, Marcus F; Jegorov, Alexandr; Elmér, Eskil

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of calcium in excitotoxicity is associated with subsequent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and delayed cellular calcium deregulation in ischemic and neurodegenerative insults. The mechanisms linking mitochondrial calcium uptake and ROS production remain unknown but activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) may be one such mechanism. In the present study, calcium increased ROS generation in isolated rodent brain and human liver mitochondria undergoing mPT despite an associated loss of membrane potential, NADH and respiration. Unspecific permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane by alamethicin likewise increased ROS independently of calcium, and the ROS increase was further potentiated if NAD(H) was added to the system. Importantly, calcium per se did not induce a ROS increase unless mPT was triggered. Twenty-one cyclosporin A analogs were evaluated for inhibition of calcium-induced ROS and their efficacy clearly paralleled their potency of inhibiting mPT-mediated mitochondrial swelling. We conclude that while intact respiring mitochondria possess powerful antioxidant capability, mPT induces a dysregulated oxidative state with loss of GSH- and NADPH-dependent ROS detoxification. We propose that mPT is a significant cause of pathological ROS generation in excitotoxic cell death.

  2. Study on Biological Effects of La(3+) on Rat Liver Mitochondria by Microcalorimetric and Spectroscopic Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man; Gao, Jia-Ling; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-09-01

    The effects of lanthanum on heat production of mitochondria isolated from Wistar rat liver were investigated with microcalorimetry; simultaneously, the effects on mitochondrial swelling and membrane potential (Δψ) were determined by spectroscopic methods. La(3+) showed only inhibitory action on mitochondrial energy turnover with IC50 being 55.8 μmol L(-1). In the spectroscopic experiments, La(3+), like Ca(2+), induced rat liver mitochondrial swelling and decreased membrane potential (Δψ), which was inhibited by the specific permeability transition inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). The induction ability of La(3+) was stronger than that of Ca(2+). These results demonstrated that La(3+) had some biotoxicity effect on mitochondria; the effects of La(3+) and Ca(2+) on rat liver mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) are different, and La represents toxic action rather than Ca analogy.

  3. [The effect of fenibut on the ultrastructure of the brain mitochondria in traumatic edema and swelling].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Naperstnikov, V V

    1994-01-01

    Rat experiments using electron microscopy have established that profound destructive changes occur in the mitochondria in the intra- and perifocal traumatic area in dynamics of traumatic edema-swelling. With phenibut, 50 mg/kg, there is an increase in the number of mitochondria in the brain tissue of the perifocal area, their destructive changes are less pronounced. It is assumed that the positive effect of phenibut on brain bioenergetic processes in the posttraumatic period is associated with the changes.

  4. Membrane effects of Vitamin E deficiency: bioenergetic and surface-charge-density studies of skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilha, A.T.; Packer, L.; Szyszlo Davies, J.M.; Racanelli, T.L.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin E (dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol) deficiency in rats increased the sensitivity of liver and muscle mitochondria to damage during incubation at various temperatures, irradiation with visible light, or steady state respiration with substrates. In all cases, vitamin E deficient mitochondria exhibited increased lipid peroxidation, reduced transmembrane potential, decreased respiratory coupling, and lower rates of electron transport, compared to control mitochondria. Muscle mitochondria always showed greater negative inner membrane surface charge density, and were also more sensitive to damage than were liver mitochondria. Vitamin E deficient mitochondria also showed slightly more negative inner membrane surface charge density compared to controls. The relationship between greater negative surface potential and increased sensitivity to damage observed, provides for a new and sensitive method to further probe the role of surface charge in membrane structure and function. Implications of these new findings for the well known human muscle myopathies and those experimentally induced by Vitamin E deficiency in animals, are discussed.

  5. CONTROL OF GLUTAMATE OXIDATION IN BRAIN AND LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL SYSTEMS.

    PubMed

    BALAZS, R

    1965-05-01

    1. Glutamate oxidation in brain and liver mitochondrial systems proceeds mainly through transamination with oxaloacetate followed by oxidation of the alpha-oxoglutarate formed. Both in the presence and absence of dinitrophenol in liver mitochondria this pathway accounted for almost 80% of the uptake of glutamate. In brain preparations the transamination pathway accounted for about 90% of the glutamate uptake. 2. The oxidation of [1-(14)C]- and [5-(14)C]-glutamate in brain preparations is compatible with utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either after the formation of alpha-oxoglutarate or after decarboxylation to form gamma-aminobutyrate. There is no indication of gamma-decarboxylation of glutamate. 3. The high respiratory control ratio obtained with glutamate as substrate in brain mitochondrial preparations is due to the low respiration rate in the absence of ADP: this results from the low rate of formation of oxaloacetate under these conditions. When oxaloacetate is made available by the addition of malate or of NAD(+), the respiration rate is increased to the level obtained with other substrates. 4. When the transamination pathway of glutamate oxidation was blocked with malonate, the uptake of glutamate was inhibited in the presence of ADP or ADP plus dinitrophenol by about 70 and 80% respectively in brain mitochondrial systems, whereas the inhibition was only about 50% in dinitrophenol-stimulated liver preparations. In unstimulated liver mitochondria in the presence of malonate there was a sixfold increase in the oxidation of glutamate by the glutamate-dehydrogenase pathway. Thus the operating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is much less than the ;free' (non-latent) activity. 5. The following explanation is put forward for the control of glutamate metabolism in liver and brain mitochondrial preparations. The oxidation of glutamate by either pathway yields alpha-oxoglutarate, which is further metabolized. Since aspartate aminotransferase is

  6. Effects of butyric acid and arsenic on isolated pancreatic islets and liver mitochondria of male mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Rezae, Mohsen; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Alboghobeish, Soheila; Zeinvand, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different doses of Butyric acid (BA) and Arsenic (As) in liver mitochondria oxidative stress and pancreatic islet insulin secretion of male mouse. Background: BA is found in many foods and As as a toxic metal is present in drinking water. They can induce oxidative stress in tissues. Methods: In this experimental study, Liver mitochondria were isolated by administration of the different centrifugation method and pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase method. Mitochondria were incubated by BA (35, 75, 150, 300 μM) and As (20, 50, 100, 200 μM) as the islets were incubated by BA (250, 500, 1000, 1500 μM) and As (50, 100, 200 μM) for 1 hour. At the end of the experiment, mitochondrial viability and membrane potential, ROS, MDA, GSH and islets insulin secretion were measured by their specific methods. Results: BA and As administration increased mitochondrial levels of ROS, MDA and decreased GSH and pancreatic islet insulin secretion in a dose dependent manner (p<0.05). The doses of BA 75μM and As 100μM have been revealed the most mitochondria toxic concentrations. Also, the doses of 1000μM for BA and 100μM for As were considered as reducing concentrations for islets insulin secretion. Additionally, co administration of them intensified more these effects Conclusion: Alone or in combination administration of BA and As induced oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and decreased insulin secretion of pancreatic islets. PMID:28331564

  7. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  8. Reversible depression of oxygen consumption in isolated liver mitochondria during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Martin, S L; Maniero, G D; Carey, C; Hand, S C

    1999-01-01

    The biochemical mechanisms by which hibernators cool as they enter torpor are not fully understood. In order to examine whether rates of substrate oxidation vary as a function of hibernation, liver mitochondria were isolated from telemetered ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis) in five phases of their annual hibernation cycle: summer active, and torpid, interbout aroused, entrance, and arousing hibernators. Rates of state 3 and state 4 respiration were measured in vitro at 25 degrees C. Relative to mitochondria from summer-active animals, rates of state 3 respiration were significantly depressed in mitochondria from torpid animals yet fully restored during interbout arousals. These findings indicate that a depression of ADP-dependent respiration in liver mitochondria occurs during torpor and is reversed during the interbout arousals to euthermia. Because this inhibition was determined to be temporally independent of entrance and arousal, it is unlikely that active suppression of state 3 respiration causes entrance into torpor by facilitating metabolic depression. In contrast to the observed depression of state 3 respiration in torpid animals, state 4 respiration did not differ significantly among any of the five groups, suggesting that alterations in proton leak are not contributing appreciably to downregulation of respiration in hibernation.

  9. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Therapeutics from a Mitochondria-Centric Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gusdon, Aaron M.; Song, Ke-xiu; Qu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a spectrum of disorders characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides within the liver. The global prevalence of NAFLD has been increasing as the obesity epidemic shows no sign of relenting. Mitochondria play a central role in hepatic lipid metabolism and also are affected by upstream signaling pathways involved in hepatic metabolism. This review will focus on the role of mitochondria in the pathophysiology of NAFLD and touch on some of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria as well as metabolically important signaling pathways. Mitochondria are able to adapt to lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by increasing rates of beta-oxidation; however increased substrate delivery to the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) leads to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and eventually ETC dysfunction. Decreased ETC function combined with increased rates of fatty acid beta-oxidation leads to the accumulation of incomplete products of beta-oxidation, which combined with increased levels of ROS contribute to insulin resistance. Several related signaling pathways, nuclear receptors, and transcription factors also regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, many of which are redox sensitive and regulated by ROS. PMID:25371775

  10. Toxicity of Arsenic (III) on Isolated Liver Mitochondria: A New Mechanistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Shaki, Fatemeh; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic exposure mainly through food and water has been shown to be associated with increased incidence of numerous cancers and non-cancer harmful health. It is also used in cancer chemotherapy and treatment of several cancer types due to its apoptogenic effects in the various cancer and normal cell lines. We have already reported that liver is the storage site and important target organ in As (III) toxicity and recently, it has been suggested that hepatic toxicity of arsenic could be resulted from impairment of the liver mitochondria. In this study, interaction of As (III) with freshly isolated rat mitochondria was investigated. We determined different mitochondrial toxicity factors as well as mitochondrial sources of ROS formation using specific substrates and inhibitors following addition of As (III) to the mitochondria. Our results showed that arsenic (III) increased mitochondrial ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c release and mitochondrial swelling in a concentration dependent manner. Addition of As (III) in to the isolated mitochondria, inhibited complexes I and II leading to disruption of mitochondrial electron transfer chain, decreased mitochondrial ATP content and ROS formation. PMID:24250680

  11. [The antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria after nanosecond pulsed periodic X-ray exposure].

    PubMed

    Kniazeva, I R; Ivanov, V V; Bol'shakov, M A; Zharkova, L P; Kereia, A V; Kutenkov, O P; Rostov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The effect of repetitive pulsed X-ray (4 ns pulse duration, 300 kV accelerating voltage; 2.5 kA electron beam current) on the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria has been investigated. The mitochondrial suspension was exposed to single 4000 pulse X-ray radiation with repetition rates ranging between 10 and 22 pps (pulsed dose was 0.3-1.8 x 10(-6) Gy/pulse, the total absorbed dose following a single exposure was 7.2 x 10(-3) Gy). It was shown that a short-time exposure to X-ray radiation changes the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria. The greatest effect was observed in the changes of the activity of the metal-containing enzymes: superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The effect depends on the pulse repetition frequency and radiation dose.

  12. Studies on essential fatty acid deficiency. Effect of the deficiency on the lipids in liver mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Biran, L. A.; Bartley, W.; Carter, C. W.; Renshaw, A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Dietary deficiency of essential fatty acids results in a twofold increase in the neutral lipid content of liver mitochondria as compared with the corresponding value for stock-fed rats. 2. Deficiency produces changes in the pattern of the constituent fatty acids of the main phospholipid fractions of liver mitochondria which are similar to those previously reported for the lipids of whole liver. There is a fall in the content of C18:2 acid and to a smaller extent of C20:4 acid associated with a rise of C16:1, C18:1 and C20:3 acids. 3. Deficiency results in small decreases in the phosphorylation quotients of liver mitochondria during oxidation of succinate and pyruvate, but the values lie within the range reported for normal mitochondria. Mitochondrial respiration with succinate is decreased as a result of deficiency but no change was observed with pyruvate as substrate. PMID:14342237

  13. One-year high fat diet affects muscle-but not brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Tenna; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that few weeks of high fat (HF) diet may induce metabolic disturbances and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. However, little is known about the effects of long-term HF exposure and effects on brain mitochondria are unknown. Wistar rats were fed either chow (13E% fat) or HF diet (60E% fat) for 1 year. The HF animals developed obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and dysfunction of isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria: state 3 and state 4 were 30% to 50% increased (P<0.058) with palmitoyl carnitine (PC), while there was no effect with pyruvate as substrate. Adding also succinate in state 3 resulted in a higher substrate control ratio (SCR) with PC, but a lower SCR with pyruvate (P<0.05). The P/O2 ratio was lower with PC (P<0.004). However, similar tests on isolated brain mitochondria from the same animal showed no changes with the substrates relevant for brain (pyruvate and 3-hydroxybutyrate). Thus, long-term HF diet was associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and significantly altered mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Yet, brain mitochondria were unaffected. We suggest that the relative isolation of the brain due to the blood-brain barrier may play a role in this strikingly different phenotype of mitochondria from the two tissues of the same animal.

  14. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Background Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR’s hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. Results ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Conclusions Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production. PMID:27019222

  15. Catalase, a target of glycation damage in rat liver mitochondria with aging.

    PubMed

    Bakala, Hilaire; Hamelin, Maud; Mary, Jean; Borot-Laloi, Caroline; Friguet, Bertrand

    2012-10-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline of major cell functions, associated with accumulation of altered macromolecules, particularly proteins. This deterioration parallels age-related dysfunction of mitochondria, thought to be a major determinant of this decline in cell function, since these organelles are both the main sources of reactive oxygen species and targets for their damaging effects. To investigate the link between glycation damages that accumulate with aging and the status of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, we identified, by mass spectrometry after two dimensional-gel electrophoresis and western blotting, advanced glycation end product-modified matrix proteins in rat liver mitochondria. Catalase appeared to be the only antioxidant enzyme markedly glycated in old rats. Immunogold labeling performed on isolated mitochondria confirmed the mitochondrial matrix location of this enzyme. The content of catalase protein in mitochondrial extract increased with aging whereas the catalase activity was not significantly modified, in spite of a significant increase rate of glycation. Treatment of catalase with the glycating agent fructose led to significant time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme, while methylglyoxal had no noticeable effect. Catalase was co-identified with unglycated glutathione peroxidase-1 in the mitochondrial extracts. Taken together, these results indicate that both anti-oxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase-1 housed in liver mitochondria, exhibited a differential sensitivity to glycation; moreover, they lend support to the hypothesis that glycation damages targeting catalase with aging may severely affect its activity, suggesting a link between glycation stress and the age-related decline in antioxidant defense in the mitochondria.

  16. Calcium uptake in rat liver mitochondria accompanied by activation of ATP-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Akopova, O V; Nosar, V I; Mankovskaya, I N; Sagach, V F

    2008-10-01

    The influence of potassium ions on calcium uptake in rat liver mitochondria is studied. It is shown that an increase in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations in the incubation medium leads to a decrease in calcium uptake in mitochondria together with a simultaneous increase in potassium uptake due to the potential-dependent transport of K+ in the mitochondrial matrix. Both effects are more pronounced in the presence of an ATP-dependent K+-channel (K+(ATP)-channel) opener, diazoxide (Dz). Activation of the K+(ATP)-channel by Dz alters the functional state of mitochondria and leads to an increase in the respiration rate in state 2 and a decrease in the oxygen uptake and the rate of ATP synthesis in state 3. The effect of Dz on oxygen consumption in state 3 is mimicked by valinomycin, but it is opposite to that of the classical protonophore uncoupler CCCP. It is concluded that the potential-dependent uptake of potassium is closely coupled to calcium transport and is an important parameter of energy coupling responsible for complex changes in oxygen consumption and Ca2+-transport properties of mitochondria.

  17. Expression of mitochondria-related genes is elevated in overfeeding-induced goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Shao, Dan; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Yun; Wang, Laidi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yihui; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrion, the power house of the cell, is an important organelle involving in energy homeostasis. Change in mitochondrial mass and function may lead to metabolic disorders. Previous studies indicate that mitochondrial mass loss and dysfunction are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial genes are involved in the development of goose fatty liver. To address this, we determined the response of goose mitochondrial genes to overfeeding and other fatty liver-related factors (e.g., hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia). We first employed RNA-seq technology to determine the differentially expressed genes in the livers from normally-fed vs. overfed geese, followed by bioinformatics analysis and quantitative PCR validation. Data indicated that a majority of mitochondrial genes in the liver were induced by overfeeding. To understand how these genes are regulated in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with high levels of glucose, fatty acids and insulin. The results indicated that these factors had an influence on the expression of some mitochondria related genes. Together, these findings suggest that the induction of mitochondrial gene expression by overfeeding is required for the development of goose fatty liver, and this induction is partially attributable to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  18. Mitochondria-associated microRNAs in rat hippocampus following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Visavadiya, Nishant P.; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Springer, Joe E.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. However, the molecular events contributing to the pathogenesis are not well understood. Mitochondria serve as the powerhouse of cells, respond to cellular demands and stressors, and play an essential role in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. There is clear evidence of compromised mitochondrial function following TBI, however, the underlying mechanisms and consequences are not clear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, and function as important mediators of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Several miRNAs show altered expression following TBI, however, the relevance of mitochondria in these pathways is unknown. Here, we present evidence supporting the association of miRNA with hippocampal mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondria-associated miRNA expression following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury in rats. Specifically, we found that the miRNA processing proteins Argonaute (AGO) and Dicer are present in mitochondria fractions from uninjured rat hippocampus, and immunoprecipitation of AGO associated miRNA from mitochondria suggests the presence of functional RNA-induced silencing complexes. Interestingly, RT-qPCR miRNA array studies revealed that a subset of miRNA is enriched in mitochondria relative to cytoplasm. At 12 hour following CCI, several miRNAs are significantly altered in hippocampal mitochondria and cytoplasm. In addition, levels of miR-155 and miR-223, both of which play a role in inflammatory processes, are significantly elevated in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. We propose that mitochondria-associated miRNAs may play an important role in regulating the response to TBI. PMID:25562527

  19. Mitochondria-associated microRNAs in rat hippocampus following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Visavadiya, Nishant P; Pandya, Jignesh D; Nelson, Peter T; Sullivan, Patrick G; Springer, Joe E

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. However, the molecular events contributing to the pathogenesis are not well understood. Mitochondria serve as the powerhouse of cells, respond to cellular demands and stressors, and play an essential role in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. There is clear evidence of compromised mitochondrial function following TBI; however, the underlying mechanisms and consequences are not clear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, and function as important mediators of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Several miRNAs show altered expression following TBI; however, the relevance of mitochondria in these pathways is unknown. Here, we present evidence supporting the association of miRNA with hippocampal mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondria-associated miRNA expression following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury in rats. Specifically, we found that the miRNA processing proteins Argonaute (AGO) and Dicer are present in mitochondria fractions from uninjured rat hippocampus, and immunoprecipitation of AGO associated miRNA from mitochondria suggests the presence of functional RNA-induced silencing complexes. Interestingly, RT-qPCR miRNA array studies revealed that a subset of miRNA is enriched in mitochondria relative to cytoplasm. At 12h following CCI, several miRNAs are significantly altered in hippocampal mitochondria and cytoplasm. In addition, levels of miR-155 and miR-223, both of which play a role in inflammatory processes, are significantly elevated in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. We propose that mitochondria-associated miRNAs may play an important role in regulating the response to TBI.

  20. A Search for Mitochondrial Damage in Alzheimer’s Disease Using Isolated Rat Brain Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Seydi, Enayatollah; Abarghuyi, Sadegh; Salimi, Ahmad; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects regions of the brain that control cognition, memory, language, speech and awareness to one’s physical surroundings. The pathological initiation and progression of AD is highly complex and its prevalence is on the rise. In his study, Alzheimer's disease was induced with single injection of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (30ng, by stereotaxy) in each hemisphere of the Wistar rat brain. Then memory dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by Aβ peptide were investigated on isolated brain mitochondria obtained from infected rat. Our results showed memory impairment in rats after receiving an Aβ peptide. We also found significant rise (P<0.05) at ROS formation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, mitochondria swelling, cytochrome c release and significant decrease in ATP/ADP ratio on mitochondria isolated from brain of these memory impaired rats compared with those of untreated control rat group. Activation of caspase-3 the final mediator of apoptosis in the brain homogenate of the memory impaired rats was another justification for occurrence of neuron loss in the experimental model of AD. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondria mediated apoptosis in brain neurons play very important role in initiation of AD. PMID:28228816

  1. Superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake supported by hydrolysis of endogenous ATP in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1975-10-10

    The nature of the energy store causing rapid superstoichiometric leads to H+/2e minus ejection and leads to Ca2+/2e minus uptake ratios in rat liver mitochondria pulsed with Ca2+ has been investigated. The extent and the rate of the initial fast superstoichiometric phase of H plus ejection were greatly reduced by oligomycin and other ATPase inhibitors; the subsequent shoichiometric phase was unaffected. No such inhibition was seen with atractyloside. Similarly, the initial fast phase of Ca2+ uptake was reduced in extent by oligomycin, whereas the slower stoichiometric phase was unaffected. Moreover, the ATP content of mitochondria previously incubated with succinate decreased by about 80% within 5 s after pulsing with Ca2+. The energy store for superstoichiometric Ca2+ uptake and H plus injection is thus identified as endogenous ATP.

  2. Oxidative phosphorylation accompanying oxidation of short-chain fatty acids by rat-liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hird, F. J. R.; Weidemann, M. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The factors concerned in the estimation of P/O ratios when fatty acids are oxidized by rat-liver mitochondria have been assessed. 2. The oxidation of butyrate, hexanoate and octanoate is accompanied by ATP synthesis. At low concentrations of the fatty acids, P/O ratios approximately 2·5 are obtained. 3. Oxidative phosphorylation is uncoupled, respiratory control ratios are lowered and respiration is inhibited when the concentration of the fatty acid in the incubating medium is raised (to 5–10mm); octanoate is a more potent uncoupler than either hexanoate or butyrate. 4. Serum albumin and carnitine, either singly or in combination, protect the mitochondria from the effect exerted by the fatty acids. 5. The rate of oxidation of short-chain fatty acids in the presence of ADP is increased in the presence of carnitine. PMID:4223170

  3. Brain mitochondria from rats treated with sulforaphane are resistant to redox-regulated permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Tiffany; Fiskum, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress promotes Ca2+-dependent opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), causing bioenergetic failure and subsequent cell death in many paradigms, including those related to acute brain injury. One approach to pre-conditioning against oxidative stress is pharmacologic activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway of antioxidant gene expression by agents such as sulforaphane (SFP). This study tested the hypothesis that administration of SFP to normal rats increases resistance of isolated brain mitochondria to redox-sensitive PTP opening. SFP or DMSO vehicle was administered intraperitoneally to adult male rats at 10 mg/kg 40 h prior to isolation of non-synaptic brain mitochondria. Mitochondria were suspended in medium containing a respiratory substrate and were exposed to an addition of Ca2+ below the threshold for PTP opening. Subsequent addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) resulted in a cyclosporin A-inhibitable release of accumulated Ca2+ into the medium, as monitored by an increase in fluorescence of Calcium Green 5N within the medium, and was preceded by a decrease in the autofluorescence of mitochondrial NAD(P)H. SFP treatment significantly reduced the rate of tBOOH-induced Ca2+ release but did not affect NAD(P)H oxidation or inhibit PTP opening induced by the addition of phenylarsine oxide, a direct sulfhydryl oxidizing agent. SFP treatment had no effect on respiration by brain mitochondria and had no effect on PTP opening or respiration when added directly to isolated mitochondria. We conclude that SFP confers resistance of brain mitochondria to redox-regulated PTP opening, which could contribute to neuroprotection observed with SFP.

  4. Taurine treatment preserves brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of fulminant hepatic failure and hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Heidari, Reza; Abasvali, Mozhgan; Zarei, Mehdi; Ommati, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdoli, Narges; Khodaei, Forouzan; Yeganeh, Yasaman; Jafari, Faezeh; Zarei, Azita; Latifpour, Zahra; Mardani, Elnaz; Azarpira, Negar; Asadi, Behnam; Najibi, Asma

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis is known as a critical consequence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Hence, mitochondria are potential targets of therapy in HE. The current investigation was designed to evaluate the role of taurine treatment on the brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. The animals received thioacetamide (400mg/kg, i.p, for three consecutive days at 24-h intervals) as a model of acute liver failure and hyperammonemia. Several biochemical parameters were investigated in the serum, while the animals' cognitive function and locomotor activity were monitored. Mitochondria was isolated from the rats' brain and liver and several indices were assessed in isolated mitochondria. Liver failure led to cognitive dysfunction and impairment in locomotor activity in the rats. Plasma and brain ammonia was high and serum markers of liver injury were drastically elevated in the thioacetamide-treated group. An assessment of brain and liver mitochondrial function in the thioacetamide-treated animals revealed an inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), collapsed mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial swelling, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, a significant decrease in mitochondrial ATP was detected in the brain and liver mitochondria isolated from thioacetamide-treated animals. Taurine treatment (250, 500, and 1000mg/kg) decreased mitochondrial swelling, ROS, and LPO. Moreover, the administration of this amino acid restored brain and liver mitochondrial ATP. These data suggest taurine to be a potential protective agent with therapeutic capability against hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis.

  5. Brain cortex mitochondrial bioenergetics in synaptosomes and non-synaptic mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Lombardi, Paulina; Karadayian, Analía G; Orgambide, Federico; Cicerchia, Daniela; Bustamante, Juanita

    2016-02-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have been associated with brain aging. In order to evaluate the susceptibility of brain cortex synaptosomes and non-synaptic mitochondria to aging-dependent dysfunction, male Swiss mice of 3 or 17 months old were used. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by oxygen consumption, mitochondrial membrane potential and respiratory complexes activity, together with UCP-2 protein expression. Basal respiration and respiration driving proton leak were decreased by 26 and 33 % in synaptosomes from 17-months old mice, but spare respiratory capacity was not modified by aging. Succinate supported state 3 respiratory rate was decreased by 45 % in brain cortex non-synaptic mitochondria from 17-month-old mice, as compared with young animals, but respiratory control was not affected. Synaptosomal mitochondria would be susceptible to undergo calcium-induced depolarization in 17 months-old mice, while non-synaptic mitochondria would not be affected by calcium overload. UCP-2 was significantly up-regulated in both synaptosomal and submitochondrial membranes from 17-months old mice, compared to young animals. UCP-2 upregulation seems to be a possible mechanism by which mitochondria would be resistant to suffer oxidative damage during aging.

  6. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  7. [Respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in liver mitochondria of bass (Morone labrax) and their dependence on temperature].

    PubMed

    Ventrella, V; Pagliarani, A; Trigari, G; Borgatti, A R

    1982-12-15

    In the present paper the respiratory function in bass liver mitochondria is studied over the temperature range 6-34 degrees C. The respiratory rate in state 3 and state 4 at the temperatures examined agrees with data from poikiloterms reported elsewhere by other investigators ICR and ADP/O values with glutamate and succinate as substrates are considered and their variations as a function of the experimental temperature are discussed. ICR shows a maximum at 20 degrees C which approximatively corresponds with the temperature of the seawater where these fishes were bred. On the contrary ADP/O ratio does not show any meaningful variation.

  8. [Arrhenius diagrams of respiratory enzymes of liver mitochondria from bass (Morone labrax)].

    PubMed

    Borgatti, A R; Trigari, G; Pagliarani, A; Ventrella, V

    1982-12-15

    Arrhenius plot of glutamate, succinate and ascorbate+TMPD oxidation in bass liver mitochondria show a break at different temperatures. Above the break activation energies (Ea) of the three enzymes. Above the break activation energies (Ea) of the three enzymes examined are similar and comparable with literature data in poikilotermic and homeothermic animals. Below the break the Ea are again comparable with poikiloterm and homeotherm ones except for succinate-oxidase whose Ea is surprisingly higher. The data are suggested to be due to the features of the enzymes or to the microenvironmental physical state.

  9. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) links the substrate requirement in brain mitochondria for hydrogen peroxide removal to the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system.

    PubMed

    Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are implicated in the etiology of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are known to be net producers of ROS, but recently we have shown that brain mitochondria can consume mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a respiration-dependent manner predominantly by the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system. Here, we sought to determine the mechanism linking mitochondrial respiration with H2O2 catabolism in brain mitochondria and dopaminergic cells. We hypothesized that nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt), which utilizes the proton gradient to generate NADPH from NADH and NADP(+), provides the link between mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 detoxification through the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system. Pharmacological inhibition of Nnt in isolated brain mitochondria significantly decreased their ability to consume H2O2 in the presence, but not absence, of respiration substrates. Nnt inhibition in liver mitochondria, which do not require substrates to detoxify H2O2, had no effect. Pharmacological inhibition or lentiviral knockdown of Nnt in N27 dopaminergic cells (a) decreased H2O2 catabolism, (b) decreased NADPH and increased NADP(+) levels, and (c) decreased basal, spare, and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. Nnt-deficient cells possessed higher levels of oxidized mitochondrial Prx, which rendered them more susceptible to steady-state increases in H2O2 and cell death following exposure to subtoxic levels of paraquat. These data implicate Nnt as the critical link between the metabolic and H2O2 antioxidant function in brain mitochondria and suggests Nnt as a potential therapeutic target to improve the redox balance in conditions of oxidative stress associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Butylated hydroxytoluene prevents cumene hydroperoxide-induced Ca2+ release from liver mitochondria by inhibiting pyridine nucleotide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gogvadze, V; Kass, G E; Boyer, C S; Zhukova, A; Kim, Y; Orrenius, S

    1992-06-15

    The mechanism by which the free radical scavenger butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) prevents cumene hydroperoxide-induced Ca2+ release from rat liver mitochondria was studied. In Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria cumene hydroperoxide induced a rapid oxidation and subsequent hydrolysis of the pyridine nucleotides. In the presence of BHT, pyridine nucleotide oxidation by cumene hydroperoxide occurred but was reversible as hydrolysis was prevented by BHT. However, the addition of BHT directly to rat liver submitochondrial particles did not inhibit NAD+ hydrolysis or the formation of ADP-ribose from NAD+. Thus, whilst BHT prevented NAD+ hydrolysis in isolated mitochondria, this appeared not to be due to a direct effect of BHT on the NADase. It is concluded that the mechanism of action of BHT on cumene hydroperoxide-induced Ca2+ release from mitochondria involves the inhibition of pyridine nucleotide hydrolysis by an indirect mechanism rather than the radical scavenging properties of BHT.

  11. Protective effect of Cichorium glandulosum seeds from ultraviolet B-induced damage in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Chen, Yuxin; Ma, Bingxin; Zhou, Gao; Tong, Jing; He, Jingsheng; Wang, Youwei

    2014-05-01

    Cichorium glandulosum Boiss. et Huet, a common herb for treating hepatitis, is indigenous to Europe, Western Asia, and the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. This study aims at evaluating the protective activity of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds against experimental oxidation- and ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage in rat liver mitochondria. The antioxidant property of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds was investigated by employing various established in vitro systems, such as α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), and reducing power assay. The protective effects of different C. glandulosum seed extracts against UVB-induced phototoxicity in a mitochondria model were also evaluated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glutathione, lipid hydroperoxide, conjugated diene, and 4-hydroxynonenal. The main compounds in C. glandulosum seeds were identified by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that C. glandulosum seed extracts have strong antioxidant activity, in which the ethyl acetate extract (EE) and n-butanol extract (BE) showed better activity than other extracts. In a UVB-induced mitochondria model, both EE and BE have better antioxidant activity and protective effects against phototoxicity than the petroleum ether extract, chloroform extract, and water extract. The differences in antioxidant activity and photoprotective capacity among these five extracts are associated with their phenolic compound content. Therefore, research on this function of C. glandulosum seeds may broaden their applications in the food and medical industry.

  12. Glucagon treatment of rats activates the respiratory chain of liver mitochondria at more than one site.

    PubMed

    Halestrap, A P

    1987-02-18

    The rate of reduction of ferricyanide in the presence and absence of antimycin and ubiquinone-1 was measured using liver mitochondria from control and glucagon treated rats. Glucagon treatment was shown to increase electron flow from both NADH and succinate to ubiquinone, and from ubiquinone to cytochrome c. 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was shown to inhibit the oxidation of glutamate + malate to a much greater extent than that of succinate or duroquinol. Spectral and kinetic studies confirmed that electron flow between NADH and ubiquinone was the primary site of action but that the interaction of the ubiquinone pool with complex 3 was also affected. The effects of various respiratory chain inhibitors on the rate of uncoupled oxidation of succinate and glutamate + malate by control and glucagon treated mitochondria were studied. The stimulation of respiration seen in the mitochondria from glucagon treated rats was maintained or increased as respiration was progressively inhibited with DCMU, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB), 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-n-oxide (HQNO) and colletotrichin, but greatly reduced when inhibition was produced with malonate or antimycin. These data were also shown to support the conclusion that glucagon treatment may cause some stimulation of electron flow through NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and through the bc1 complex, probably at the point of interaction of the complexes with the ubiquinone pool. The effects of glucagon treatment on duroquinol oxidation and the inhibitor titrations could not be mimicked by increasing the matrix volume, nor totally reversed by aging of mitochondria. These are both processes that have been suggested as the means by which glucagon exerts its effects on the respiratory chain (Armston, A.E., Halestrap, A.P. and Scott, R.D., 1982, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 681, 429-439). It is concluded that an additional mechanism for regulating electron flow must exist and a

  13. Characteristics of alpha-glycerophosphate-evoked H2O2 generation in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Laszlo; Takacs, Katalin; Hegedus, Vera; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2007-02-01

    Characteristics of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in isolated guinea-pig brain mitochondria respiring on alpha-glycerophosphate (alpha-GP) were investigated and compared with those supported by succinate. Mitochondria established a membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) and released H(2)O(2) in parallel with an increase in NAD(P)H fluorescence in the presence of alpha-GP (5-40 mm). H(2)O(2) formation and the increase in NAD(P)H level were inhibited by rotenone, ADP or FCCP, respectively, being consistent with a reverse electron transfer (RET). The residual H(2)O(2) formation in the presence of FCCP was stimulated by myxothiazol in mitochondria supported by alpha-GP, but not by succinate. ROS under these conditions are most likely to be derived from alpha-GP-dehydrogenase. In addition, huge ROS formation could be provoked by antimycin in alpha-GP-supported mitochondria, which was prevented by myxothiazol, pointing to the generation of ROS at the quinol-oxidizing center (Q(o)) site of complex III. FCCP further stimulated the production of ROS to the highest rate that we observed in this study. We suggest that the metabolism of alpha-GP leads to ROS generation primarily by complex I in RET, and in addition a significant ROS formation could be ascribed to alpha-GP-dehydrogenase in mammalian brain mitochondria. ROS generation by alpha-GP at complex III is evident only when this complex is inhibited by antimycin.

  14. Regulation of free Ca2+ by liver mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Becker, G L; Fiskum, G; Lehninger, A L

    1980-10-10

    Electrode measurements were made of the free Ca2+ concentration maintained by suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria and microsomes, as well as by hepatocytes whose plasma membranes had been made permeable by treatment with digitonin. When the KCl, ATP, Mg2+, and phosphate concentrations were made similar to that of cytosol, the steady state free Ca2+ concentration in the presence of respiring mitochondria alone was about 0.5 microM. The additional presence of rat liver microsomes resulted in a steady state level of close to 0.2 microM, which was maintaied for greater than 1 h at 25 degrees C. This concentration of Ca2+ was also maintained by suspensions of hepatocytes permeabilized by digitonin and thus may approximate the actual cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration in vivo. The "set point" for free Ca2+ homeostasis in these systems is determined by mitochondrial Ca2+ influx-efflux cycling, which is dependent on the level of intramitochondrial Ca2+ and can be adjusted by sequestration of Ca2+ in microsomes.

  15. Glucagon effects on the membrane potential and calcium uptake rate of rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Wingrove, D.E.; Amatruda, J.M.; Gunter, T.E.

    1984-08-10

    It has been widely reported that the in vivo administration of glucagon to rats results in the stimulation of calcium influx in subsequently isolated liver mitochondria. The mechanism of this effect is investigated through simultaneous measurements of calcium uptake rate and mitochondrial membrane potential. This allows the measurement of the calcium uniporter conductance independent of hormonal effects on electron transport or respiration. Two experimental approaches are used. The first involves measuring the uptake of 40-50 nmol of Ca/sup 2 +//mg of mitochondrial protein with the calcium dye antipyrylazo III; the second uses /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ to follow uptake in the presence of 0.5 to 1.5 ..mu..M free calcium, buffered with HEDTA. In both cases a tetraphenyl phosphonium electrode is used to follow membrane potential, and membrane potential is varied using either malonate or butylmalonate in the presence of rotenone. The relative merits of these two approaches are discussed. The conductance of the calcium uniporter is found not to be stimulated by glucagon pretreatment. Also, the relative glucagon stimulation of both calcium influx and membrane potential is found to increase with increasing malonate concentration. These results imply that there is no direct stimulation of calcium uptake into liver mitochondria following glucagon treatment. The results are consistent with a glucagon stimulation of substrate transport, substrate oxidation, or a stimulation of electron transport resulting in an increased membrane potential and secondary stimulation of calcium uptake.

  16. Catabolism of 5-aminolevulinic acid to CO2 by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, M H; Di Mascio, P; Gründel, S; Soboll, S; Sies, H; Bechara, E J

    1994-04-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the heme precursor accumulated in plasma and several organs of carriers of acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia, and saturnism, was previously shown to yield reactive oxygen species upon metal-catalyzed aerobic oxidation and to cause the in vivo and in vitro impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions. We have studied the uptake and catabolism of [5-14C]ALA to CO2 by isolated rat liver mitochondria (RLM) with the aim of determining whether possible ALA-driven oxidative injury to mitochondria can also occur into the matrix. Using silicone oil centrifugation of [5-14C]ALA-treated RLM, ALA was found to partition evenly into the intra- and extramatrix space of the mitochondrial preparations. The yield of evolved 14CO2 is very low (0.2%), responds to the concentration of added ADP, and is inhibited by malonate (75% at 2 mM), iproniazid (45% at 2 mM), beta-chloroalanine (36% at 1 mM), and aminooxyacetate (55% at 0.1 mM). With both iproniazid and aminooxyacetate, the percentage of inhibition is the same as that observed with the latter inhibitor alone. These data indicate that ALA decarboxylation by the Krebs cycle is a minor process and that it is initiated enzymically (transaminase) and not by metal-catalyzed ALA autoxidation.

  17. Inhibition of ATP synthesis by fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-03-01

    Fenbufen is an arylpropionic acid derivative belonging to the group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Even though fenbufen is considered a safe drug, some adverse reactions including hepatic events have been reported. To investigate whether mitochondrial damage could be involved in the drug induced liver injury (DILI) by fenbufen, the inhibitory effect of fenbufen and its conjugated metabolites on oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria was investigated. Fenbufen glucuronide (F-GlcA), fenbufen-N-acetyl cysteine-thioester (F-NAC) and fenbufen-S-glutathione thioester (F-SG) were found to be more potent inhibitors compared to parent fenbufen (F), whereas fenbufen-O-carnitine (F-carn), fenbufen-glycine (F-gly) and fenbufen-N-acetyl lysine amide (F-NAL) were less potent compared to fenbufen. Fenbufen-CoA thioester (F-CoA) was equally potent as fenbufen in inhibiting ATP synthesis. Fenbufen showed time and concentration dependent inhibition of ATP synthesis with Kinact of 4.4 min(-1) and KI of 0.88 μM and Kinact/KI ratio of 5.01 min(-1) μM(-1). Data show that fenbufen did not act through opening MPT pore, nor did incubation of mitochondria with reduced GSH and fenbufen show any protective effect on fenbufen mediated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Inclusion of NADPH in mitochondrial preparations with fenbufen did not modulate the inhibitory effects, suggesting no role of CYP mediated oxidative metabolites on the ATP synthesis in isolated mitochondria. The results from the present experiments provide evidence that fenbufen and its metabolites could be involved in mitochondrial toxicity through inhibition of ATP synthesis.

  18. Comparison of three methods for mitochondria isolation from the human liver cell line (HepG2)

    PubMed Central

    Azimzadeh, Pedram; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Tarban, Peyman; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare three available methods for mitochondrial isolation from a human cell line to predict the best method for each probable application. Background: Organelle isolation is gaining importance in experimental laboratory settings. Mitochondrial dysfunction may affect tumorgenesis process. There are some evidences that transplantation of healthy, intact and active mitochondria into cells containing defective mitochondria may reduce the proliferation. Therefore, isolated mitochondria could be considered as an effective tool for assessment and management of mitochondrial related disorders. Patients and methods: Mitochondrial isolation from the human liver cell line (HepG2) was performed using two commercially available kits, including Qproteome (Qiagen) and MITOISO2 (Sigma-Aldrich), as well as a manual method. Integrity of inner membrane of mitochondria was assessed by JC-1 staining. Activity of isolated mitochondria was evaluated by DCFH-DA staining, and total yield of isolated mitochondria determined by micro-Lowry method. Finally, relative quantification using Real-time PCR was conducted to compare the mtDNA copy number of mitochondria isolated by three different methods. Results: Compared to other methods, manual kit resulted in higher yields of total amount of mitochondrial protein and mtDNA copy numbers. Isolated mitochondria by Qproteome kit, showed a higher activity. Finally, the integrity of inner-membrane of isolated mitochondria was significantly higher in Qproteome when compared with the other two methods. Conclusion: Due to differences in quality, quantity and activity of isolated mitochondria using three techniques discussed here, the method in which best-suited to each research project should be selected according to the distinct features of isolated mitochondria. PMID:27099670

  19. An Isolation Method for Assessment of Brain Mitochondria Function in Neonatal Mice with Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Caspersen, Casper S.; Sosunov, Alexander; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2010-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a method for the isolation of mitochondria from a single cerebral hemisphere in neonatal mice. Mitochondria from the normal mouse brain hemisphere isolated by the proposed method exhibited a good respiratory control ratio of 6.39 ± 0.53 during glutamate-malate-induced phosphorylating respiration. Electron microscopy showed intact mitochondria. The applicability of this method was tested on mitochondria isolated from naïve mice and their littermates subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insult prior to reperfusion resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of phosphorylating respiration compared to naïve littermates. This was associated with a profound depletion of the ATP content in the ischemic hemisphere. The expression for Mn superoxide dismutase and cytochrome C (markers for the integrity of the mitochondrial matrix and outer membrane) was determined by Western blot to control for mitochondrial integrity and quantity in the compared samples. Thus, we have developed a method for the isolation of the cerebral mitochondria from a single hemisphere adapted to neonatal mice. This method may serve as a valuable tool to study mitochondrial function in a mouse model of immature brain injury. In addition, the suggested method enables us to examine the mitochondrial functional phenotype in immature mice with a targeted genetic alteration. PMID:18349523

  20. Proton leak and hydrogen peroxide production in liver mitochondria from energy-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Jon J; Hagopian, Kevork; Kenny, Teresa M; Koomson, Edward K; Bevilacqua, Lisa; Weindruch, Richard; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Energy restriction (ER), without malnutrition, is the only environmental intervention that consistently increases maximum life span in laboratory rodents. One theory proposes that a reduction in energy expenditure and reactive oxygen species production is the mechanism responsible for this action of ER. To further test this theory, proton leak, H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyls were measured in mitochondria from FBNF1 rats fed either a control or 40% ER diet (onset at 6 mo of age). Liver mitochondria were isolated at 7 and 12 mo of age. Liver weight decreased 25 and 36% at 1 and 6 mo of ER, respectively (P < 0.05). ER resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in percent total polyunsaturates, n-6 polyunsaturates, and total unsaturates (6 mo only) in mitochondrial lipids. These changes, however, were not associated with significant alterations in mitochondrial function. State 4 respiration and membrane potential were not different (P > 0.05) between groups at either assessment period. Similarly, proton leak kinetics were not different between control and ER animals. Top-down metabolic control analysis and its extension, elasticity analysis, were used at the 6-mo assessment and revealed no difference in control of the oxidative phosphorylation system between control and ER rats. H2O2 production with either succinate or pyruvate/malate substrates was also not different (P > 0.05) between groups at either time point. In conclusion, ER did not alter proton leak or H2O2 production at this age or stage of restriction in liver.

  1. Demethyleneberberine, a natural mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, inhibits mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and steatosis in alcoholic liver disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Qiang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Miao; Ma, Dongshen; Zhao, Zheng; Zhou, Cuisong; Liu, Xie; Li, Ruiyan; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption induces oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in the liver. Mitochondria have long been recognized as the key target for alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Recently, the artificial mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ has been used to treat ALD effectively in mice. Here, we introduce the natural mitochondria-targeted antioxidant demethyleneberberine (DMB), which has been found in Chinese herb Cortex Phellodendri chinensis. The protective effect of DMB on ALD was evaluated with HepG2 cells and acutely/chronically ethanol-fed mice, mimicking two common patterns of drinking in human. The results showed that DMB, which is composed of a potential antioxidant structure, could penetrate the membrane of mitochondria and accumulate in mitochondria either in vitro or in vivo. Consequently, the acute drinking-caused oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly ameliorated by DMB. Moreover, we also found that DMB suppressed CYP2E1, hypoxia inducible factor α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which contributed to oxidative stress and restored sirtuin 1/AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α pathway-associated fatty acid oxidation in chronic ethanol-fed mice, which in turn ameliorated lipid peroxidation and macrosteatosis in the liver. Taking these findings together, DMB could serve as a novel and potential therapy for ALD in human beings.

  2. Protein targets for carbonylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Ngyuen, Vien; Rauniyar, Navin; Ughy, Bettina; Prokai, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Protein carbonylation has been associated with various pathophysiological processes. A representative reactive carbonyl species (RCS), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been implicated specifically as a causative factor for the initiation and/or progression of various diseases. To date, however, little is known about the proteins and their modification sites susceptible to “carbonyl stress” by this RCS, especially in the liver. Using chemoprecipitation based on a solid phase hydrazine chemistry coupled with LC-MS/MS bottom-up approach and database searching, we identified several protein-HNE adducts in isolated rat liver mitochondria upon HNE exposure. The identification of selected major protein targets, such as the ATP synthase β-subunit, was further confirmed by immunoblotting and a gel-based approach in combination with LC–MS/MS. A network was also created based on the identified protein targets that showed that the main protein interactions were associated with cell death, tumor morphology and drug metabolism, implicating the toxic nature of HNE in the liver mitoproteome. The functional consequence of carbonylation was illustrated by its detrimental impact on the activity of ATP synthase, a representative major mitochondrial protein target for HNE modifications. PMID:21801862

  3. Kinetics and control of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria after chronic ethanol feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkeviciute, A; Mildaziene, V; Crumm, S; Demin, O; Hoek, J B; Kholodenko, B

    2000-01-01

    Changes in the kinetics and regulation of oxidative phosphorylation were characterized in isolated rat liver mitochondria after 2 months of ethanol consumption. Mitochondrial energy metabolism was conceptually divided into three groups of reactions, either producing protonmotive force (Deltap) (the respiratory subsystem) or consuming it (the phosphorylation subsystem and the proton leak). Manifestation of ethanol-induced mitochondrial malfunctioning of the respiratory subsystem was observed with various substrates; the respiration rate in State 3 was inhibited by 27+/-4% with succinate plus amytal, by 20+/-4% with glutamate plus malate, and by 17+/-2% with N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine/ascorbate. The inhibition of the respiratory activity correlated with the lower activities of cytochrome c oxidase, the bc(1) complex, and the ATP synthase in mitochondria of ethanol-fed rats. The block of reactions consuming the Deltap to produce ATP (the phosphorylating subsystem) was suppressed after 2 months of ethanol feeding, whereas the mitochondrial proton leak was not affected. The contributions of Deltap supply (the respiratory subsystem) and Deltap demand (the phosphorylation and the proton leak) to the control of the respiratory flux were quantified as the control coefficients of these subsystems. In State 3, the distribution of control exerted by different reaction blocks over respiratory flux was not significantly affected by ethanol diet, despite the marked changes in the kinetics of individual functional units of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This suggests the operation of compensatory mechanisms, when control redistributes among the different components within the same subsystem. PMID:10880351

  4. Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain mitochondria and cultured neurons derived from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jessica J; Hamilton, James; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2015-08-01

    We investigated Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria and in cultured striatal neurons from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Both synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria from 2- and 12-month-old YAC128 mice had larger Ca(2+) uptake capacity than mitochondria from YAC18 and wild-type FVB/NJ mice. Synaptic mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice had further augmented Ca(2+) capacity compared with mitochondria from 2-month-old YAC128 mice and age-matched YAC18 and FVB/NJ mice. This increase in Ca(2+) uptake capacity correlated with an increase in the amount of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) associated with mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice. We speculate that this may happen because of mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage. In experiments with striatal neurons from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice, brief exposure to 25 or 100 μM glutamate produced transient elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+) followed by recovery to near resting levels. Following recovery of cytosolic Ca(2+), mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP produced comparable elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+), suggesting similar Ca(2+) release and, consequently, Ca(2+) loads in neuronal mitochondria from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice. Together, our data argue against a detrimental effect of mHtt on Ca(2+) handling in brain mitochondria of YAC128 mice. We demonstrate that mutant huntingtin (mHtt) binds to brain synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria and the amount of mitochondria-bound mHtt correlates with increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity. We propose that this may happen due to mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage.

  5. [Effect of cold and cool herbs on liver mitochondria proteome of rats with heat symptom].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lu, De-Zhao; Tang, Li-Hua; Wo, Xing-De; Yang, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    In the 1960s, modern science began involving the essence of heat syndrome, but there have still no in-depth systematic studies on pathological mechanisms of heat syndrome and action mechanisms of cold and cool herbs. In this study, the animal model with heat syndrome was set up by feeding herbs with hot property, and then cold and cool herbs was applied in the experimental therapy. The two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry technologies were adopted to compare the liver mitochondria proteome of the rats of the heat syndrome model and the ones treated with cold and cool herbs, so as to discover specificity-related proteins after heat syndrome and treatment with cold and cool herbs.

  6. Intramitochondrial localization of alanine aminotransferase in rat-liver mitochondria: comparison with glutaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Masola, B; Devlin, T M

    1995-12-01

    The removal of the outer mitochondrial membrane and hence of constituents of the intermembrane space in rat-liver mitochondria using digitonin showed that phosphate-dependent glutaminase, alanine and aspartate aminotransferase were localized in the mitoplasts. Further fractionation of mitoplasts following their sonication resulted in 90% of glutaminase, 98% of alanine aminotransferase and 48% of aspartate aminotransferase being recovered in the soluble fraction while the remainder of each enzyme was recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction. These results indicated that glutaminase and alanine aminotransferase were soluble matrix enzymes, the little of each enzyme recovered in the sonicated vesicles fraction being probably due to entrapment in the vesicles. Aspartate aminotransferase had dual localization, in the inner membrane and matrix with the high specific activity in sonicated vesicles confirming its association with the membrane. Activation experiments suggested that the membrane-bound enzyme was localized on the inner side of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  7. Depleted uranium induces disruption of energy homeostasis and oxidative stress in isolated rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2013-06-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is emerging as an environmental pollutant primarily due to its military applications. Gulf War veterans with embedded DU showed cognitive disorders that suggest that the central nervous system is a target of DU. Recent evidence has suggested that DU could induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in brain tissue. However, the underlying mechanisms of DU toxicity in brain mitochondria are not yet well understood. Brain mitochondria were obtained using differential centrifugation and were incubated with different concentrations (50, 100 and 200 μM) of uranyl acetate (UA) as a soluble salt of U(238) for 1 h. In this research, mitochondrial ROS production, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial swelling were examined by flow cytometry following the addition of UA. Meanwhile, mitochondrial sources of ROS formation were determined using specific substrates and inhibitors. Complex II and IV activity and also the extent of lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) oxidation were detected via spectroscopy. Furthermore, we investigated the concentration of ATP and ATP/ADP ratio using luciferase enzyme and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which was detected by ELISA kit. UA caused concentration-dependent elevation of succinate-linked mitochondrial ROS production, lipid peroxidation, GSH oxidation and inhibition of mitochondrial complex II. UA also induced mitochondrial permeability transition, ATP production decrease and increase in cytochrome c release. Pre-treatment with antioxidants significantly inhibited all the above mentioned toxic effects of UA. This study suggests that mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment of oxidative phosphorylation in brain mitochondria may play a key role in DU neurotoxicity as reported in Gulf War Syndrome.

  8. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  9. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  10. Energy metabolism in rat brain: inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation by 3-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Booth, R F; Clark, J B

    1981-07-01

    The effect of 3-hydroxybutyrate on pyruvate decarboxylation by neonatal rat brain mitochondria and synaptosomes was investigated. The rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation (1 mM final concentration) by brain synaptosomes derived from 8-day-old rats was inhibited by 10% in the presence of 2 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate and by more than 20% in the presence of 20 mM D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate. The presence of 2 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate did not affect the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation (1 mM final concentration) by brain mitochondria; however, at a concentration of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate, a marked inhibition was seen in preparations from both 8-hydroxybutyrate, a marked inhibition was seen in preparations from both 8-day-old (35% inhibition) and 21-day-old (24% inhibition) but not in those from adult rats. Although the presence of 100 mM-K+ in the incubation medium stimulated the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation by approximately 50% compared with the rate in presence of 1 mM-K+, the presence of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate still caused a marked inhibition in both media (1 and 100 mM-K+). The presence of 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate during the incubation caused an approximately 20% decrease in the level of the active form of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in brain mitochondria from 8-day-old rats. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, NAD+, NADH, acetyl CoA, and CoA were measured in brain mitochondria from 8-day-old rats incubated in the presence of 1 mM-pyruvate alone or 1 mM-pyruvate plus 20 mM-D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate. Neither the APT/ADP nor the NADH/NAD+ ratio showed significant changes. The acetyl CoA/CoA ratio was significantly increased by more than twofold in the presence of 3-hydroxybutyrate. The possible mechanisms and physiological significance of 3-hydroxybutyrate inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation in neonatal rat brain rat mitochondria are discussed.

  11. Brain cholinergic impairment in liver failure

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Cauli, Omar; Silveyra, María-Ximena; Rodrigo, Regina; Candela, Asunción; Compañ, Antonio; Jover, Rodrigo; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Martínez, Salvador; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The cholinergic system is involved in specific behavioural responses and cognitive processes. Here, we examined potential alterations in the brain levels of key cholinergic enzymes in cirrhotic patients and animal models with liver failure. An increase (∼30%) in the activity of the acetylcholine-hydrolyzing enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is observed in the brain cortex from patients deceased from hepatic coma, while the activity of the acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, remains unaffected. In agreement with the human data, AChE activity in brain cortical extracts of bile duct ligated (BDL) rats was increased (∼20%) compared to controls. A hyperammonemic diet did not result in any further increase of AChE levels in the BDL model, and no change was observed in hyperammonemic diet rats without liver disease. Portacaval shunted rats which display increased levels of cerebral ammonia did not show any brain cholinergic abnormalities, confirming that high ammonia levels do not play a role in brain AChE changes. A selective increase of tetrameric AChE, the major AChE species involved in hydrolysis of acetylcholine in the brain, was detected in both cirrhotic humans and BDL rats. Histological examination of BDL and non-ligated rat brains shows that the subcellular localization of both AChE and choline acetyltransferase, and thus the accessibility to their substrates, appears unaltered by the pathological condition. The BDL-induced increase in AChE activity was not parallelled by an increase in mRNA levels. Increased AChE in BDL cirrhotic rats leads to a pronounced decrease (∼50–60%) in the levels of acetylcholine. Finally, we demonstrate that the AChE inhibitor rivastigmine is able to improve memory deficits in BDL rats. One week treatment with rivastigmine (0.6 mg/kg; once a day, orally, for a week) resulted in a 25% of inhibition in the enzymatic activity of AChE with no change in protein composition, as assessed by sucrose density

  12. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological processes converge on the mitochondria. In such systems, where many pathways converge, manipulation of the components can produce varied and far-reaching effects. Due to the centrality of the mitochondria in many cellular pathways, we decided to investigate the brain mitochondrial proteome during early development. Using a SWATH mass spectrometry-based technique, we were able to identify vast proteomic alterations between whole brain mitochondria from rats at embryonic day 18 compared to postnatal day 7. These findings include statistically significant alterations in proteins involved in glycolysis and mitochondrial trafficking/dynamics. Additionally, bioinformatic analysis enabled the identification of HIF1A and XBP1 as upstream transcriptional regulators of many of the differentially expressed proteins. These data suggest that the cell is rearranging mitochondria to accommodate special energy demands and that cytosolic proteins exert mitochondrial effects through dynamic interactions with mitochondria. PMID:25046836

  13. Oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, proton conductance and reactive oxygen species production of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in frogs.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Damien; Salin, Karine; Dumet, Adeline; Romestaing, Caroline; Rey, Benjamin; Voituron, Yann

    2015-10-01

    Body size is a central biological parameter affecting most biological processes (especially energetics) and the mitochondrion is a key organelle controlling metabolism and is also the cell's main source of chemical energy. However, the link between body size and mitochondrial function is still unclear, especially in ectotherms. In this study, we investigated several parameters of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver of three closely related species of frog (the common frog Rana temporaria, the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus and the bull frog Lithobates catesbeiana). These particular species were chosen because of their differences in adult body mass. We found that mitochondrial coupling efficiency was markedly increased with animal size, which led to a higher ATP production (+70%) in the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) compared with the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). This was essentially driven by a strong negative dependence of mitochondrial proton conductance on body mass. Liver mitochondria from the larger frogs (L. catesbeiana) displayed 50% of the proton conductance of mitochondria from the smaller frogs (R. temporaria). Contrary to our prediction, the low mitochondrial proton conductance measured in L. catesbeiana was not associated with higher reactive oxygen species production. Instead, liver mitochondria from the larger individuals produced significantly lower levels of radical oxygen species than those from the smaller frogs. Collectively, the data show that key bioenergetics parameters of mitochondria (proton leak, ATP production efficiency and radical oxygen species production) are correlated with body mass in frogs. This research expands our understanding of the relationship between mitochondrial function and the evolution of allometric scaling in ectotherms.

  14. Effects of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rat Liver Mitochondria and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Endlicher, Rene; Sobotka, Ondrej; Drahota, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a green tea antioxidant with adverse effects on rat liver mitochondria and hepatocytes at high doses. Here, we assessed whether low doses of EGCG would protect these systems from damage induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP). Rat liver mitochondria or permeabilized rat hepatocytes were pretreated with EGCG and then exposed to tBHP. Oxygen consumption, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and mitochondrial retention capacity for calcium were measured. First, 50 μM EGCG or 0.25 mM tBHP alone increased State 4 Complex I-driven respiration, thus demonstrating uncoupling effects; tBHP also inhibited State 3 ADP-stimulated respiration. Then, the coexposure to 0.25 mM tBHP and 50 μM EGCG induced a trend of further decline in the respiratory control ratio beyond that observed upon tBHP exposure alone. EGCG had no effect on MMP and no effect, in concentrations up to 50 μM, on mitochondrial calcium retention capacity. tBHP led to a decline in both MMP and mitochondrial retention capacity for calcium; these effects were not changed by pretreatment with EGCG. In addition, EGCG dose-dependently enhanced hydrogen peroxide formation in a cell- and mitochondria-free medium. Conclusion. Moderate nontoxic doses of EGCG were not able to protect rat liver mitochondria and hepatocytes from tBHP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:28074116

  15. ATP synthase-mediated proton fluxes and phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria: dependence on delta mu H.

    PubMed

    Zoratti, M; Petronilli, V; Azzone, G F

    1986-08-13

    The dependence of the proton flux through the ATP synthases of rat liver mitochondria on a driving force composed mainly of a potassium diffusion potential was determined and compared with the relationship between rate of phosphorylation and delta mu H given by titrations with the respiratory inhibitor malonate. The two functions are in good agreement in the lower part of the delta mu H range covered. However, the maximal proton fluxes through the ATP synthases are much lower than needed to account for the rate of State 3 phosphorylation sustained by the same mitochondria oxidizing succinate. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  16. In aging, the vulnerability of rat brain mitochondria is enhanced due to reduced level of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) and subsequently increased permeability transition in brain mitochondria in old animals.

    PubMed

    Krestinina, Olga; Azarashvili, Tamara; Baburina, Yulia; Galvita, Anastasia; Grachev, Dmitry; Stricker, Rolf; Reiser, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by progressive dysfunction of mitochondria associated with a continuous decrease of their capacity to produce ATP. Mitochondria isolated from brain of aged animals show an increased mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. We recently detected new regulators of mPTP function in brain mitochondria, the enzyme 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) and its substrates 2', 3'-cAMP and 2', 3'-cNADP, and the neuronal protein p42(IP4). Here, we compared parameters of mPTP opening in non-synaptic brain mitochondria isolated from young and old rats. In mitochondria from old rats (>18 months), mPTP opening occurred at a lower threshold of Ca(2+) concentration than in mitochondria from young rats (<3 months). mPTP opening in mitochondria from old rats was accelerated by 2', 3'-cAMP, which further lowered the threshold Ca(2+) concentration. In non-synaptic mitochondria from old rats, the CNP level was decreased by 34%. Lowering of the CNP level in non-synaptic mitochondria with aging was accompanied by decreased levels of voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC; by 69%) and of p42(IP4) (by 59%). Thus, reduced levels of CNP in mitochondria could lead to a rise in the concentration of the mPTP promoter 2', 3'-cAMP. The level of CNP and p42(IP4) and, probably VDAC, might be essential for myelination and electrical activity of axons. We propose that in aging the reduction in the level of these proteins leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, in particular, to a decreased threshold Ca(2+) concentration to induce mPTP opening. This might represent initial steps of age-related mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in myelin and axonal pathology.

  17. Melatonin attenuates brain mitochondria DNA damage induced by potassium cyanide in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiro-aki; Mohanan, Parayanthala V

    2002-09-30

    The effect of potassium cyanide on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) in mouse brain was investigated in vivo and in vitro. When potassium cyanide (0, 0.1, 1.0 or 2.0 mM) was incubated with a crude mitochondria fraction prepared from mouse brain at 37 degrees C for 60 min, the damage of mtDNA was observed in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the mtDNA damage was prevented by a co-treatment with melatonin (1.5 mM), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (*OH). Furthermore, a subcutaneous injection of potassium cyanide (7mg/kg) caused both brain mtDNA damage and severe seizures in mouse. The damage of mtDNA and seizures induced by potassium cyanide were abolished by the pre-injection of melatonin (20 mg/kg). Hydrogen peroxide (1.5 mM) inflicted damage to brain mtDNA in the presence of Fe(2+) (3.0 microM). The damage was abolished by the co-treatment with melatonin. Furthermore, when cyanide (0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM) was incubated with the crude mitochondria fraction prepared from mouse brain, the lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited by the co-treatment with melatonin (1.0 mM). These results suggest that reactive oxygen species including the *OH may play a cardinal role for mtDNA damage induced by potassium cyanide. Hence, the present study concluded that melatonin protects against DNA damage induced by the *OH produced by cyanide or hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Mitochondria: A crossroads for lipid metabolism defect in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation diseases.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of brain iron deposition syndromes that lead to mixed extrapyramidal features and progressive dementia. Exact pathologic mechanism of iron deposition in NBIA remains unknown. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are hallmarked by metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid profile. Among the identified disease genes, four encode for proteins localized in mitochondria, which are directly or indirectly implicated in lipid metabolism: PANK2, CoASY, PLA2G6 and C19orf12. Mutations in PANK2 and CoASY, both implicated in CoA biosynthesis that acts as a fatty acyl carrier, lead, respectively, to PKAN and CoPAN forms of NBIA. Mutations in PLA2G6, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis and remodeling of membrane phospholipids including cardiolipin, lead to PLAN. Mutations in C19orf12 lead to MPAN, a syndrome similar to that caused by mutations in PANK2 and PLA2G6. Although the function of C19orf12 is largely unknown, experimental data suggest its implication in mitochondrial homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Altogether, the identified mutated proteins localized in mitochondria and associated with different NBIA forms support the concept that dysfunctions in mitochondria and lipid metabolism play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  19. Mechanism of the acceleration of CO2 production from pyruvate in liver mitochondria by HCO3-.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Y; Ono, Y; Lin, L; Storey, B T; Dodgson, S J; Forster, R E

    1997-07-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which HCO3- accelerates pyruvate metabolism in guinea pig liver mitochondria, we measured continuously, at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, 13C16O2 production from [1-13C]pyruvate by mass spectrometry and NADH concentration by fluorescence and analyzed total malate, citrate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate produced by standard biochemical methods. When [1-13C]pyruvate is added to the mitochondrial suspension, 13C16O2 concentration rises steeply in the first seconds and then slows to a steady lower rate. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) eliminates this initial phase, which shows that decarboxylation of pyruvate produces CO2, not HCO3-, and it does this more rapidly than it can equilibrate without CA. HCO3- (25 mM) increased 13C16O2 production, O2 consumption and total malate and citrate production and decreased NADH concentration and total beta-hydroxybutyrate production. After obtaining the total amount of 13C16O2, malate, citrate, and beta-hydroxybutyrate produced, we calculated that the addition of 25 mM HCO3- to the suspension medium increased the amount of pyruvate decarboxylated by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) 16% and increased the amount carboxylated by pyruvate carboxylase 300%. This supports our initial proposal that HCO3- accelerates the pyruvate carboxylation, which in turn consumes ATP directly and NADH and acetyl CoA secondarily, all of which increase PDH activity. However, we found no acceleration of pyruvate decarboxylation by 0.5 and 1 microM free Ca2+ concentration, unless the mitochondria were uncoupled and ATP was added.

  20. Extracellular Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Components Act as Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Koppel, Scott J; Weidling, Ian W; Roy, Nairita; Ryan, Lauren N; Stanford, John A; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial debris are found in the brain's extracellular space, and extracellular mitochondrial components can act as damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules. To characterize the effects of potential mitochondrial DAMP molecules on neuroinflammation, we injected either isolated mitochondria or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into hippocampi of C57BL/6 mice and seven days later measured markers of inflammation. Brains injected with whole mitochondria showed increased Tnfα and decreased Trem2 mRNA, increased GFAP protein, and increased NFκB phosphorylation. Some of these effects were also observed in brains injected with mtDNA (decreased Trem2 mRNA, increased GFAP protein, and increased NFκB phosphorylation), and mtDNA injection also caused several unique changes including increased CSF1R protein and AKT phosphorylation. To further establish the potential relevance of this response to Alzheimer's disease (AD), a brain disorder characterized by neurodegeneration, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation we also measured App mRNA, APP protein, and Aβ1-42 levels. We found mitochondria (but not mtDNA) injections increased these parameters. Our data show that in the mouse brain extracellular mitochondria and its components can induce neuroinflammation, extracellular mtDNA or mtDNA-associated proteins can contribute to this effect, and mitochondria derived-DAMP molecules can influence AD-associated biomarkers.

  1. Comparative studies on mitochondria isolated from neuron-enriched and glia-enriched fractions of rabbit and beef brain.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, A; Blomstrand, C; Lehninger, A L

    1970-05-01

    Fractions enriched in neuronal and glial cells were obtained from dispersions of whole beef brain and rabbit cerebral cortex by large-scale density gradient centrifugation procedures. The fractions were characterized by appropriate microscopic observation. Mitochondria were then isolated from these fractions by differential centrifugation of their homogenates. The two different types of mitochondria were characterized with respect to certain enzyme activities, respiratory rate, rate of protein synthesis, and their buoyant density in sucrose gradients. The mitochondria from the neuron-enriched fraction were distinguished by a higher rate of incorporation of amino acids into protein, higher cytochrome oxidase activity, and a higher buoyant density in sucrose density gradients. Mitochondria from the glia-enriched fraction showed relatively high monoamine oxidase and Na(+)- and K(+)-stimulated ATPase activities. The rates of oxidation of various substrates and the acceptor control ratios did not differ appreciably between the two types of mitochondria. The difference in the buoyant density of mitochondria isolated from the neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cell fractions was utilized in attempts to separate neuronal and glial mitochondria from the mixed mitochondria obtained from whole brain homogenates in shallow sucrose gradients. The appearance of two peaks of cytochrome oxidase, monoamine oxidase, and protein concentration in such gradients shows the potential feasibility of such an approach.

  2. Dithiothreitol abrogates the effect of arsenic trioxide on normal rat liver mitochondria and human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Manash K. Kumar, Rajinder; Mukhopadhyay, Anup K.

    2008-01-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a known environmental toxicant and a potent chemotherapeutic agent. Significant correlation has been reported between consumption of arsenic-contaminated water and occurrence of liver cancer; moreover, ATO-treated leukemia patients also suffers from liver toxicity. Hence, modulation of ATO action may help to prevent populations suffering from arsenic toxicity as well as help reduce the drug-related side effects. Dithiothreitol (DTT) is a well-known dithiol agent reported to modulate the action of ATO. Controversial reports exist regarding the effect of DTT on ATO-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. To the best of our knowledge, no report illustrates the modulatory effect of DTT on ATO-induced liver toxicity, the prime target for arsenic. Mitochondria serve as the doorway to apoptosis and have been implicated in ATO-induced cell death. Hence, we attempted to study the modulatory effect of DTT on ATO-induced dysfunction of mammalian liver mitochondria and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Hep3B). We, for the first time, report that ATO produces complex I-mediated electron transfer inhibition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, respiration inhibition, and ATO-induced ROS-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) opening. DTT at low concentration (100 {mu}M and less) prevents the effect of ATO-induced complex I-malfunctions. DTT protects mitochondria from ATO-mediated opening of MPT and membrane potential depolarization. DTT also prevented ATO-induced Hep3B cell death. Thus, at low concentrations DTT abrogates the effect of ATO on rat liver mitochondria and Hep3B cell line. Therefore, the present result suggests, that use of low concentration of dithiols as food supplement may prevent arsenic toxicity in affected population.

  3. Effects of salvianolic acid B on liver mitochondria of rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun; Kong, Wei-Zong; Jin, Qing-Mei; Chen, Juan; Dong, Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on the morphological characteristics and functions of liver mitochondria of rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). METHODS: A total of 60 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) a normal group fed a normal diet; (2) an NASH model group; and (3) a Sal B-treated group fed a high-fat diet. Two rats from each group were executed at the end of the 12th week to detect pathological changes. The rats in the Sal B-treated group were gavaged with 20 mL/kg Sal B (1 mg/mL) daily. The model group received an equal volume of distilled water as a control. At the end of the 24th weekend, the remaining rats were executed. Serum biochemical parameters and liver histological characteristics were observed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the liver were determined. Protein expression of CytC and caspase-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA transcripts of mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) and NF-κB in the liver tissue were detected by real-time PCR. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Mitochondrial respiratory function was detected using a Clark oxygen electrode. RESULTS: The model group showed significantly higher ALT, AST, TG, TC and MDA but significantly lower SOD than the normal group. In the model group, the histological characteristics of inflammation and steatosis were also evident; mitochondrial swelling and crest were shortened or even disappeared. CytC (18.46 ± 1.21 vs 60.01 ± 3.43, P < 0.01) and caspase-3 protein expression (30.26 ± 2.56 vs 83.31 ± 5.12, P < 0.01) increased significantly. The mRNA expression of NF-κB increased (0.81 ± 0.02 vs 0.91 ± 0.03, P < 0.05), whereas the mRNA expression of Mfn2 decreased (1.65 ± 0.31 vs 0.83 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). Mitochondrial membrane potential also decreased and breathing of rats was weakened. Steatosis and inflammation degrees in the treatment group were

  4. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  5. Spectrophotometric studies of acyl-coenzyme A synthetases of rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Yates, D. W.; Haddock, B. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Deca-2,4,6,8-tetraenoic acid is a substrate for both ATP-specific (EC 6.2.1.2 or 3) and GTP-specific (EC 6.2.1.–) acyl-CoA synthetases of rat liver mitochondria. The enzymic synthesis of decatetraenoyl-CoA results in new spectral characteristics. The difference spectrum for the acyl-CoA minus free acid has a maximum at 376nm with εmM 34. Isosbestic points are at 345nm and 440nm. 2. The acylation of CoA by decatetraenoate in mitochondrial suspensions can be continuously measured with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. 3. By using this technique, three distinct types of acyl-CoA synthetase activity were demonstrated in rat liver mitochondria. One of these utilized added CoA and ATP, required added Mg2+ and corresponded to a previously described `external' acyl-CoA synthetase. The other two acyl-CoA synthetase activities utilized intramitochondrial CoA and did not require added Mg2+. Of these two `internal' acyl-CoA synthetases, one was insensitive to uncoupling agents, was inhibited by phosphate or arsenate, and corresponded to the GTP-specific enzyme. The other corresponded to the ATP-specific enzyme. 4. Atractylate inhibited the activity of the two internal acyl-CoA synthetases only when the energy source was added ATP. 5. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA acylated by decatetraenoate was independent of whether the internal ATP-specific or GTP-specific acyl-CoA synthetase was active. It is concluded that these two internal acyl-CoA synthetases have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA. 6. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA that could be acylated with decatetraenoate was decreased by the addition of palmitoyl-dl-carnitine, 2-oxoglutarate, or pyruvate. These observations indicated that pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1), oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.–), citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), and succinyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.4) all have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA as do

  6. The influence of dietary iodine and enviromental temperature on the activity of mitochondria in liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, N; Jakobsen, P E

    1978-08-01

    It was found that both effect of temperatures and diets influence metabolic changes in rabbits. In animals fed basal and PTU diets (propyl-thiouracil diets) at 34 degrees C for 4 weeks the metabolic response showed a marked reduction in feed intake and body weight, compared with animals fed at normal temperatures. In the animals fed the iodine diet, there was an increase in daily food consumption and weekly body weight gain at 34 degrees C. This indicates a rise in metabolic activity in this case. Studying the activity of kidney mitochondria of the three groups of animals using succinate as a substrate revealed that the P/O ratio tends to decrease in animals kept at 6 degrees C while the RCR value was not altered by changing conditions or produced by the different diets. At the temperature of 6 degrees C both the P/O ratios and the RCR values of liver mitochondria using succinate as a substrate decreased in the group of rabbits fed the basal and iodine diets, but were not significantly different in the group fed the PTU diet. In the experiment on kidney mitochondrial activity using alpha-ketoglutarate as a substrate it was found that both the P/O ratios and the RCR values from animals fed basal and PTU diets at 6 degrees C decreased slightly as compared with animals fed at 20 degrees C and 34 degrees C. In liver mitochondria, using alpha-ketoglutarate as a substrate a significant decrease in the P/O ratio and the RCR value was found for both rabbits fed the basal and the iodine diets at 6 degrees C. In the group of rabbits fed the PTU diet, the P/O ratio also decreased but the fall was not significant. These results suggested that the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in liver mitochondria increases in animals fed basal and iodine diets at 6 degrees C. The enzyme dehydrogenase involved in oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate which is localized in the outer membrane of mitochondria seems to be affected by different temperatures and diets as compared with succinate

  7. On the mechanism(s) of membrane permeability transition in liver mitochondria of lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: insights from cadmium.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Savina, Margarita V

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L.) during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring). To further elucidate the mechanism(s) of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca(2+) plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated "winter" mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd(2+) did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd(2+) enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the "winter" mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd(2+) or Ca(2+) plus Pi in the "winter" mitochondria were only weakly (if so) sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore) added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent). Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the "spring" lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd(2+) produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed.

  8. The effect of diet on the fatty acid compositions of serum, brain, brain mitochondria and myelin in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Rathbone, L.

    1965-01-01

    1. Three groups of female rats (8–12 weeks old) were maintained respectively on a linoleic acid-rich diet, a linoleic acid-poor predominantly saturated-fatty acid diet and a normal diet. Changes in the fatty acid compositions of serum, brain, brain mitochondria-rich fraction and myelin were observed. 2. Of the serum fatty acids, linoleic acid showed the greatest change in the percentage of the total acids in response to diet; the change in the proportion of oleic acid was considerable. The percentages of arachidonic acid in serum fatty acids in the groups on the linoleic acid-rich and linoleic acid-poor diets were similar, but higher than those in the normal group. 3. Changes in the proportions of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid occurred in brain fatty acids that to some extent paralleled those occurring in the serum. Changes in the proportions of most other acids in the serum fatty acids were not accompanied by corresponding changes in the brain fatty acids. 4. The percentage fatty acid compositions of a mitochondria-rich fraction and myelin are given, and changes in the relative proportions of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and possibly some docosapolyenoic acids were demonstrated to occur as a result of diet. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the possible aetiology of multiple sclerosis. PMID:5881652

  9. THE LARGE-SCALE SEPARATION OF PEROXISOMES, MITOCHONDRIA, AND LYSOSOMES FROM THE LIVERS OF RATS INJECTED WITH TRITON WR-1339

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Federico; Poole, Brian; Beaufay, Henri; Baudhuin, Pierre; Coffey, John W.; Fowler, Stanley; De Duve, Christian

    1968-01-01

    Improved, largely automated methods are described for the purification and analysis o peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria from the livers of rats injected with Triton WR-1339. With these new methods, it has become possible to obtain, in less than 6 hr and with reliable reproducibility, mitochondria practically free of contaminants, as well as the rarer cytoplasmic particles in amounts (about 100 mg of protein) and in a state of purity (95%) that make them suitable for detailed biochemical studies. The results obtained so far on these preparations have made more conclusive and precise previous estimates of the biochemical and morphological properties of the three groups of cytoplasmic particles. In addition, peroxisomes were found to contain essentially all the L-α-hydroxy acid oxidase of the liver, as well as a small, but significant fraction of its NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. Another small fraction of the latter enzyme is present in the mitochondria, the remainder being associated with the cell sap. The mitochondrial localization of the metabolically active cytoplasmic DNA could be verified. The relative content of the fractions in mitochondria, whole peroxisomes, peroxisome cores, lysosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum was estimated independently by direct measurements on electron micrographs, and by linear programming (based on the assumption that the particles are biochemically homogeneous) of the results of enzyme assays. The two types of estimates agreed very well, except for one fraction in which low cytochrome oxidase activity was associated with mitochondrial damage. PMID:4297786

  10. Entry and exit pathways of CO2 in rat liver mitochondria respiring in a bicarbonate buffer system.

    PubMed

    Balboni, E; Lehninger, A L

    1986-03-15

    The dynamics and pathways of CO2 movements across the membranes of mitochondria respiring in vitro in a CO2/HCO-3 buffer at concentrations close to that in intact rat tissues were continuously monitored with a gas-permeable CO2-sensitive electrode. O2 uptake and pH changes were monitored simultaneously. Factors affecting CO2 entry were examined under conditions in which CO2 uptake was coupled to electrophoretic influx of K+ (in the presence of valinomycin) or Ca2+. The role of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (EC 4.2.1.1) in CO2 entry was evaluated by comparison of CO2 uptake by rat liver mitochondria, which possess carbonic anhydrase, versus rat heart mitochondria, which lack carbonic anhydrase. Such studies showed that matrix carbonic anhydrase activity is essential for rapid net uptake of CO2 with K+ or Ca2+. Studies with acetazolamide (Diamox), a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, confirmed the requirement of matrix carbonic anhydrase for net CO2 uptake. It was shown that at pH 7.2 the major species leaving respiring mitochondria is dissolved CO2, rather than HCO-3 or H2CO3 suggested by earlier reports. Efflux of endogenous CO2/HCO-3 is significantly inhibited by inhibitors of the dicarboxylate and tricarboxylate transport systems of the rat liver inner membrane. The possibility that these anion carriers mediate outward transport of HCO-3 is discussed.

  11. Studies on the mechanism of pyrophosphate-mediated uptake of iron from transferrin by isolated rat-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K; Romslo, I

    1981-07-01

    1. Respiring rat liver mitochondria accumulate iron released from transferrin by pyrophosphate. The amount of iron accumulated is 1--1.5 nmol mg protein-1 h-1, or approximately 60% of the amount of iron mobilized from transferrin. 2. The uptake declines if respiration is inhibited, substrate is deleted, or the experiments are run under anaerobic conditions. Substrate depletion and respiratory inhibitors are less inhibitory under anaerobic conditions. 3. More than 80% of the amount of iron accumulated by aerobic, actively respiring mitochondria can be chelated by bathophenanthroline sulphonate, and with deuteroporphyrin included, up to 30% of the amount of iron accumulated is recovered as deuteroheme. Iron accumulated by respiration-inhibited mitochondria under aerobic conditions is not available for heme synthesis. 4. With time the uptake of iron increases eightfold relative to the uptake of pyrophosphate. 5. The results are compatible with a model in which ferric iron is mobilized from transferrin by pyrophosphate, ferric iron pyrophosphate is bound to the mitochondria, iron is reduced, dissociates from pyrophosphate and is taken up by the mitochondria. Ferrous iron thus formed is available for heme synthesis.

  12. Reduction in energy efficiency induced by expression of the uncoupling protein, UCP1, in mouse liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, Pedro; Milagro, Fermín I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2006-04-01

    Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) is an inner mitochondrial membrane protein, uniquely expressed in brown adipocytes, which uncouples the mitochondrial respiration impairing ATP production and energy efficiency. The aim of the present study was to express UCP1 in liver mitochondria using a non-viral system in order to affect energy utilization. The effect of ectopic protein expression on liver energy metabolism, which was evaluated 42 h after DNA transfer, showed that mitochondria expressing UCP1 presented decreased ATP production, lasted more time in membrane potential state 3, and consumed more molecular oxygen to produce the same amount of ATP than the control group. In summary, the successful functionality of the mitochondrial protein, UCP1, after hydrodynamic delivery is a novel and significant finding. This approach could be useful to ectopically express mitochondrial proteins and, in this particular case, to manage metabolic disorders related to energy efficiency and expenditure, such as obesity.

  13. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine inhibits proton motive force in energized liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Y.; Bhatnagar, R.; Sidhu, G.S.; Batra, J.K.; Krishna, G. )

    1989-05-15

    It is known that 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces Parkinson's-like disease in primates and humans, depletes hepatocytes of ATP and subsequently causes cell death. Incubation of rat liver mitochondria with MPTP and 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium ion (MPP+) significantly inhibited incorporation of {sup 32}Pi into ATP. MPTP and MPP+ inhibited the development of membrane potential and pH gradient in energized rat liver mitochondria, suggesting that reduction of the proton motive force may have reduced ATP synthesis. Since deprenyl, an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, prevented the formation of MPP+ and inhibited the decrease in membrane potential caused by MPTP, but not that caused by MPP+, these effects of MPTP, as well as cell death, probably were mediated by MPP+. This mechanism may play a role in the specific loss of dopaminergic neurons resulting in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease.

  14. Mevalonolactone disrupts mitochondrial functions and induces permeability transition pore opening in rat brain mitochondria: Implications for the pathogenesis of mevalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Gonçalves, Aline de Mello; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2017-03-09

    Mevalonic aciduria (MVA) is caused by severe deficiency of mevalonic kinase activity leading to tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of mevalonic acid (MA) and mevalonolactone (ML). Patients usually present severe neurologic symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the major accumulating metabolites are toxic by investigating the in vitro effects of MA and ML on important mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver mitochondria. ML, but not MA, markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), NAD(P)H content and the capacity to retain Ca(2+) in the brain, besides inducing mitochondrial swelling. These biochemical alterations were totally prevented by the classical inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, indicating the involvement of MPT and an important role for mitochondrial Ca(2+) in these effects. ML also induced lipid peroxidation and markedly inhibited aconitase activity, an enzyme that is highly susceptible to free radical attack, in brain mitochondrial fractions, indicating that lipid and protein oxidative damage may underlie some of ML-induced deleterious effects including MTP induction. In contrast, ML and MA did not compromise oxidative phosphorylation in the brain and all mitochondrial functions evaluated in the liver, evidencing a selective toxicity of ML towards the central nervous system. Our present study provides for the first time evidence that ML impairs essential brain mitochondrial functions with the involvement of MPT pore opening. It is therefore presumed that disturbance of brain mitochondrial homeostasis possibly contributes to the neurologic symptoms in MVA.

  15. Death receptor and mitochondria-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis underlies liver dysfunction in rats exposed to organic pollutants from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghong; Zhou, Zhiwei; Cen, Yanli; Gui, Xiaolin; Zeng, Qibing; Ao, Yunxia; Li, Qian; Wang, Shiran; Li, Jun; Zhang, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants in drinking water impose a substantial risk to the health of human beings, but the evidence for liver toxic effect and the underlying mechanism is scarce. This study aimed to examine the liver toxicity and elucidate the molecular mechanism of organic pollutants in drinking water in normal human liver cell line L02 cells and rats. The data showed that organic extraction from drinking water remarkably impaired rat liver function, evident from the increase in the serum level of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and cholinesterase, and decrease in the serum level of total protein and albumin. Organic extraction dose-dependently induced apoptotic cell death in rat liver and L02 cells. Administration of rats with organic extraction promoted death receptor signaling pathway through the increase in gene and protein expression level of Fas and FasL. Treatment of rats with organic extraction also induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis via increasing the expression level of proapoptotic protein, Bax, but decreasing the expression level of antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-2, resulting in an upregulation of cytochrome c and activation of caspase cascade at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, organic extraction enhanced rat liver glutathione S-transferases activity and reactive oxygen species generation, and upregulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glutathione S-transferase A1 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Collectively, the results indicate that organic extraction from drinking water impairs liver function, with the involvement of death receptor and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in rats. The results provide evidence and molecular mechanisms for organic pollutants in drinking water-induced liver dysfunction, which may help prevent and treat organic extraction-induced liver injury.

  16. Purification and characterization of a benzene hydroxylase: A cytochrome P-450 from rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Karaszkiewicz, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This laboratory previously demonstrated that incubation of ({sup 14}C)benzene with isolated mitochondria resulted in the formation of mtDNA adducts. Since benzene is incapable of spontaneously covalently binding to nuclei acids, it was hypothesized that enzyme(s) present in the organelle metabolized benzene to reactive derivatives. We have purified, to electrophoretic homogeneity, a 52 kDa cytochrome P-450 from liver mitoplasts which metabolizes benzene to phenol. The enzyme has a K{sub M} for benzene of 0.012 mM, and a V{sub MAX} of 22.6 nmol phenol/nmol P-450/10 min, and requires NADPH, adrenodoxin, and adrenodoxin reductase for activity. Activity also can be reconstituted with microsomal cytochrome P-450 reductase. Benzene hydroxylase activity could be inhibited by carbon monoxide and SKF-525A, and by specific inhibitors of microsomal benzene metabolism. The purified enzyme oxidized phenol, forming catechol; aminopyrine N-demethylase activity was also demonstrated. These data confirm that a cytochrome P-450 of mitochondrial origin is involved in benzene metabolism, and indicate a role for the mitochondrion in xenobiotic activation.

  17. Malaria parasite liver stages render host hepatocytes susceptible to mitochondria-initiated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, A; Metzger, P G; Douglass, A N; Mikolajczak, S A; Lakshmanan, V; Kain, H S; Kappe, S HI

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular eukaryotic parasites and their host cells constitute complex, coevolved cellular interaction systems that frequently cause disease. Among them, Plasmodium parasites cause a significant health burden in humans, killing up to one million people annually. To succeed in the mammalian host after transmission by mosquitoes, Plasmodium parasites must complete intracellular replication within hepatocytes and then release new infectious forms into the blood. Using Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites, we show that some liver stage (LS)-infected hepatocytes undergo apoptosis without external triggers, but the majority of infected cells do not, and can also resist Fas-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, apoptosis is dramatically increased in hepatocytes infected with attenuated parasites. Furthermore, we find that blocking total or mitochondria-initiated host cell apoptosis increases LS parasite burden in mice, suggesting that an anti-apoptotic host environment fosters parasite survival. Strikingly, although LS infection confers strong resistance to extrinsic host hepatocyte apoptosis, infected hepatocytes lose their ability to resist apoptosis when anti-apoptotic mitochondrial proteins are inhibited. This is demonstrated by our finding that B-cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors preferentially induce apoptosis in LS-infected hepatocytes and significantly reduce LS parasite burden in mice. Thus, targeting critical points of susceptibility in the LS-infected host cell might provide new avenues for malaria prophylaxis. PMID:23928701

  18. Liposomes from mammalian liver mitochondria are more polyunsaturated and leakier to protons than those from reptiles.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Couture, P; Hulbert, A J

    1994-06-01

    Liposomes were prepared from phospholipids extracted from liver mitochondria of the rat (Rattus norvegicus) and an agamid lizard, the bearded dragon (Amphibolurus vitticeps) and liposome proton conductance was measured at an imposed membrane potential of 160 mV as well as the fatty acid composition of the liposomes. Despite presumed changes in fatty acid composition during liposome preparation, the mammalian liposomes had a significantly lower content of the monounsaturated oleic acid and a significantly greater content of the omega-3 polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid. There were significant direct correlations between the liposome arachidonic and docosahexanoic acid content and bilayer proton flux and a significant inverse correlation between liposome oleic acid content and bilayer proton flux. "Apparent valinomycin-catalysed proton flux" was significantly directly correlated with liposome docosahexaenoic acid content and inversely correlated with oleic acid content. It is suggested that the high content of long-chain polyunsaturates in the mammalian mitochondrial membrane is responsible for an increased proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thus partly responsible for the high metabolic rate in endothermic mammals compared to their ectothermic reptilian predecessors.

  19. Stoichiometry of H+ ejection during respiration-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Chen, C H; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-25

    We have investigated the energy-dependent uptake of Ca2+ by rat liver mitochondria with succinate as respiratory substrate with rotenone added to block NAD-linked electron transport. In the presence of 3-hydroxybutyric or other permeant monocarboxylic acids Ca2+ was taken up to extents approaching those seen in the presence of phosphate. The quantitative relationship between cation and anion uptake was determined from the slope of a plot of 3-hydroxybutyrate uptake against Ca2+ uptake, a method which allowed determination of the stoichiometry without requiring ambiguous corrections for early nonenergized or nonstoichiometric binding events. This procedure showed that 2 molecules of 3-hydroxtbutyrate were accumulated with each Ca2+ ion. Under these conditions close to 2 Ca2+ ions and 4 molecules of 3-hydroxybutyrate were accumulated per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Since 3-hydroxybutyrate must be protonated to pass the membrane as the undissociated free acid, it is concluded that 4 protons were ejected (and subsequently reabsorbed) per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site, in contrast to the value 2.0 postulated by the chemiosmotic hypothesis.

  20. Effect of free malonate on the utilization of glutamate by rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, A H; Riley, K M

    1987-05-01

    Malonate is an effective inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase in preparations from brain and other organs. This property was reexamined in isolated rat brain mitochondria during incubation with L-glutamate. The biosynthesis of aspartate was determined by a standard spectrofluorometric method and a radiometric technique. The latter was suitable for aspartate assay after very brief incubations of mitochondria with glutamate. At a concentration of 1 mM or higher, malonate totally inhibited aspartate biosynthesis. At 0.2 mM, the inhibitory effect was still present. It is thus possible that the natural concentration of free malonate in adult rat brain of 192 nmol/g wet weight exerts an effect on citric acid cycle reactions in vivo. The inhibition of glutamate utilization by malonate was readily overcome by the addition of malate which provided oxaloacetate for the transamination of glutamate. The reaction was accompanied by the accumulation of 2-oxoglutarate. The metabolism of glutamate was also blocked by inclusion of arsenite and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid but again added malate allowed transamination to resume. When arsenite and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid were present, the role of malonate as an inhibitor of malate entry into the mitochondrial interior could be determined without considering the inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. The apparent Km and Vmax values for uninhibited malate entry were 0.01 mM and 100 nmol/mg protein/min, respectively. Malonate was a competitive inhibitor of malate transport (Ki = 0.75 mM).

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in brain cortex mitochondria of STZ-diabetic rats: effect of l-Arginine.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M Del Carmen; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Albertoni Borghese, M Florencia; Balonga, Sabrina; Lavagna, Agustina; Filipuzzi, Ana Laura; Cicerchia, Daniela; Majowicz, Monica; Bustamante, Juanita

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many diseases, including diabetes. It is well known that oxygen free radical species are produced endogenously by mitochondria, and also nitric oxide (NO) by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) associated to mitochondrial membranes, in consequence these organelles constitute main targets for oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to analyze mitochondrial physiology and NO production in brain cortex mitochondria of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats in an early stage of diabetes and the potential effect of L-arginine administration. The diabetic condition was characterized by a clear hyperglycaemic state with loose of body weight after 4 days of STZ injection. This hyperglycaemic state was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction that was evident by an impairment of the respiratory activity, increased production of superoxide anion and a clear mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, the alteration in mitochondrial physiology was associated with a significant decrease in both NO production and nitric oxide synthase type I (NOS I) expression associated to the mitochondrial membranes. An increased level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in brain cortex homogenates from STZ-diabetic rats indicated the presence of lipid peroxidation. L-arginine treatment to diabetic rats did not change blood glucose levels but significantly ameliorated the oxidative stress evidenced by lower TBARS and a lower level of superoxide anion. This effect was paralleled by improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function and a partial mitochondrial repolarization.In addition, the administration of L-arginine to diabetic rats prevented the decrease in NO production and NOSI expression. These results could indicate that exogenously administered L-arginine may have beneficial effects on mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and NO production in brain cortex mitochondria of STZ-diabetic rats.

  2. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  3. Methylene blue improves sensorimotor phenotype and decreases anxiety in parallel with activating brain mitochondria biogenesis in mid-age mice.

    PubMed

    Gureev, Artem P; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail Yu; Gorbacheva, Tatyana M; Starkov, Anatoly A; Popov, Vasily N

    2016-12-01

    Age-related brain dysfunctions are associated with mitochondria malfunctions and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Recently, a mitochondria-targeting drug methylene blue has been drawing considerable interest as a potential treatment for ND. We found that aged mice manifested a decrease in physical endurance, spontaneous locomotor activity, and exploration concomitant with an increase in anxiety-related behavior, as compared to adult mice. Treating mice for 60 days with MB slowed down these changes. There were no significant changes in the animals' body weight, oxygen consumption rates, or respiratory quotient index, in adult or aged MB-treated mice. However, MB treatment significantly increased the generation of reactive oxygen species in brain mitochondria. The expression of several genes relevant to mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and antioxidant defense (NRF1, MTCOX1, TFAM, and SOD2) was greatly suppressed in aged mice; it was restored by MB treatment. It seems plausible that the effects of MB could be mediated by its ability to increase H2O2 production in brain mitochondria, thereby activating Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway and mitochondria biogenesis. Our data and earlier findings support the idea that MB can be an attractive prototype drug for developing safe and efficient gerontoprotective compounds.

  4. The Cratylia mollis seed lectin induces membrane permeability transition in isolated rat liver mitochondria and a cyclosporine a-insensitive permeability transition in Trypanosoma cruzi mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Mariana P; Leite, Ana C R; Araújo, Flavia F B; Saad, Sara T O; Baratti, M O; Correia, M T S; Coelho, Luana C B B; Gadelha, Fernanda R; Vercesi, Anibal E

    2014-01-01

    Previous results provided evidence that Cratylia mollis seed lectin (Cramoll 1,4) promotes Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes death by necrosis via a mechanism involving plasma membrane permeabilization to Ca(2+) and mitochondrial dysfunction due to matrix Ca(2+) overload. In order to investigate the mechanism of Ca(2+) -induced mitochondrial impairment, experiments were performed analyzing the effects of this lectin on T. cruzi mitochondrial fraction and in isolated rat liver mitochondria (RLM), as a control. Confocal microscopy of T. cruzi whole cell revealed that Cramoll 1,4 binding to the plasma membrane glycoconjugates is followed by its internalization and binding to the mitochondrion. Electrical membrane potential (∆Ψm ) of T. cruzi mitochondrial fraction suspended in a reaction medium containing 10 μM Ca(2+) was significantly decreased by 50 μg/ml Cramoll 1,4 via a mechanism insensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, membrane permeability transition (MPT) inhibitor), but sensitive to catalase or 125 mM glucose. In RLM suspended in a medium containing 10 μM Ca(2+) this lectin, at 50 μg/ml, induced increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide release, mitochondrial swelling, and ∆Ψm disruption. All these mitochondrial alterations were sensitive to CsA, catalase, and EGTA. These results indicate that Cramoll 1, 4 leads to inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through Ca(2+) dependent mechanisms in both mitochondria. The sensitivity to CsA in RLM characterizes this lectin as a MPT inducer and the lack of CsA effect identifies a CsA-insensitive MPT in T. cruzi mitochondria.

  5. Increased potassium conductance of brain mitochondria induces resistance to permeability transition by enhancing matrix volume.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus J; Morota, Saori; Teilum, Maria; Mattiasson, Gustav; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Elmér, Eskil

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of K(+) conductance of the inner mitochondrial membrane has been proposed to mediate preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion injury. The mechanism is not entirely understood, but it has been linked to a decreased activation of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). In the present study K(+) channel activity was mimicked by picomolar concentrations of valinomycin. Isolated brain mitochondria were exposed to continuous infusions of calcium. Monitoring of extramitochondrial Ca(2+) and mitochondrial respiration provided a quantitative assay for mPT sensitivity by determining calcium retention capacity (CRC). Valinomycin and cyclophilin D inhibition separately and additively increased CRC. Comparable degrees of respiratory uncoupling induced by increased K(+) or H(+) conductance had opposite effects on mPT sensitivity. Protonophores dose-dependently decreased CRC, demonstrating that so-called mild uncoupling was not beneficial per se. The putative mitoK(ATP) channel opener diazoxide did not mimic the effect of valinomycin. An alkaline matrix pH was required for mitochondria to retain calcium, but increased K(+) conductance did not result in augmented DeltapH. The beneficial effect of valinomycin on CRC was not mediated by H(2)O(2)-induced protein kinase Cepsilon activation. Rather, increased K(+) conductance reduced H(2)O(2) generation during calcium infusion. Lowering the osmolarity of the buffer induced an increase in mitochondrial volume and improved CRC similar to valinomycin without inducing uncoupling or otherwise affecting respiration. We propose that increased potassium conductance in brain mitochondria may cause a direct physiological effect on matrix volume inducing resistance to pathological calcium challenges.

  6. Advanced In Vivo Heteronuclear MRS Approaches for Studying Brain Bioenergetics Driven by Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Du, Fei; Zhang, Nanyin; Zhang, Yi; Lei, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Qiao, Hongyan; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The greatest merit of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methodology used in biomedical research is its ability for noninvasively measuring a variety of metabolites inside a living organ. It, therefore, provides an invaluable tool for determining metabolites, chemical reaction rates and bioenergetics, as well as their dynamic changes in the human and animal. The capability of in vivo MRS is further enhanced at higher magnetic fields because of significant gain in detection sensitivity and improvement in the spectral resolution. Recent progress of in vivo MRS technology has further demonstrated its great potential in many biomedical research areas, particularly in brain research. Here, we provide a review of new developments for in vivo heteronuclear 31P and 17O MRS approaches and their applications in determining the cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and ATP inside the mitochondria, in both animal and human brains. PMID:18839099

  7. Acetyl-CoA deficit in brain mitochondria in experimental thiamine deficiency encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Kulawy, Agnieszka; Bielarczyk, Hanna; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz; Wróblewska, Małgorzata; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    Several pathologic conditions are known to cause thiamine deficiency, which induce energy shortages in all tissues, due to impairment of pyruvate decarboxylation. Brain is particularly susceptible to these conditions due to its high rate of glucose to pyruvate-driven energy metabolism. However, cellular compartmentalization of a key energy metabolite, acetyl-CoA, in this pathology remains unknown. Pyrithiamine-evoked thiamine deficiency caused no significant alteration in pyruvate dehydrogenase and 30% inhibition of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activities in rat whole forebrain mitochondria. It also caused 50% reduction of the metabolic flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase, 78% inhibition of its flux through α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase steps, and nearly 60% decrease of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA content, irrespective of the metabolic state. State 3 caused a decrease in citrate and an increase in α-ketoglutarate accumulation. These alterations were more evident in thiamine-deficient mitochondria. Simultaneously thiamine deficiency caused no alteration of relative, state 3-induced increases in metabolic fluxes through pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase steps. These data indicate that a shortage of acetyl-CoA in the mitochondrial compartment may be a primary signal inducing impairment of neuronal and glial cell functions and viability in the thiamine-deficient brain.

  8. Alcohol stimulates Na sup + /Ca sup 2+ exchange in brain mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Rottenberg, H.; Marbach, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol, at low concentrations, specifically stimulates the Na{sup +}-dependent Ca{sup 2+}-efflux in brain mitochondria. In addition, at higher concentrations, ethanol inhibits the Na{sup +}-independent Ca{sup 2+}-efflux. The electrogenic Ca{sup 2+}-uptake system is not affected by ethanol. The specific stimulation of Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange reaches a maximum of 60% stimulation, with half-maximal stimulation at 130 mM ethanol. The inhibition of the Na{sup +}-independent efflux is proportional to the ethanol concentration, becoming significant only above 200 mM, with 50% inhibition at 0.5 M. The inhibition of the Na{sup +}-independent efflux is, in large part, due to an inhibition of the activation of the Cyclosporin-sensitive pore. Long-term ethanol-feeding had no effect on the Ca{sup 2+} transport systems and their sensitivity to acute ethanol treatment. It is suggested that the stimulation of the Na{sup +}-dependent Ca{sup 2+}-efflux, which is the dominant Ca{sup 2+} efflux pathway in brain mitochondria, contributes to the intoxicating effects of ethanol.

  9. Ascorbate and low concentrations of FeSO4 induce Ca2+-dependent pore in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Brailovskaya, I V; Starkov, A A; Mokhova, E N

    2001-08-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the most frequent causes of tissue and cell injury in various pathologies. The molecular mechanism of mitochondrial damage under conditions of oxidative stress induced in vitro with low concentrations of FeSO4 and ascorbate (vitamin C) was studied. FeSO4 (1-4 microM) added to rat liver mitochondria that were incubated in the presence of 2.3 mM ascorbate induced (with a certain delay) a decrease in membrane potential and high-amplitude swelling. It also significantly decreased the ability of mitochondria to accumulate exogenous Ca2+. All the effects of FeSO4 + ascorbate were essentially prevented by cyclosporin A, a specific inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+-dependent pore (also known as the mitochondrial permeability transition). EGTA restored the membrane potential of mitochondria de-energized with FeSO4 + ascorbate. We hypothesize that oxidative stress induced in vitro with FeSO4 and millimolar concentrations of ascorbate damages mitochondria by inducing the cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+-dependent pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  10. Control of the effective P/O ratio of oxidative phosphorylation in liver mitochondria and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Harper, M E; Taylor, H C

    1993-05-01

    The control exerted by substrate oxidation reactions, by ATP turnover and by the proton leak over the oxygen consumption rate, the phosphorylation rate, the proton leak rate and the protonmotive force (delta p) in isolated rat liver mitochondria under a range of conditions between non-phosphorylating (State 4) and maximum phosphorylation (State 3) was investigated by using the top-down approach of metabolic control analysis. The experiments were carried out with saturating concentrations of the substrates succinate, glutamate with malate, or pyruvate with malate. The distribution of control was very similar with each of the three substrates. The effective P/O ratio (i.e. not corrected for leak reactions) was also measured; it varied from zero in State 4 to 80-90% of the maximum theoretical P/O ratio in State 3. Under most conditions control over the effective P/O ratio was shared between proton leak (which had negative control) and the phosphorylating subsystem (which had roughly equal positive control); near State 4, substrate oxidation reactions also acquired some control over this ratio. In resting hepatocytes the effective P/O ratio was only 50% of its maximum theoretical value, corresponding to an effective P/O ratio of only 1.3 for complete oxidation of glucose. The effective P/O ratio for intracellular mitochondrial oxygen consumption was 64% of the maximum value. The control coefficient of the mitochondrial proton leak over the effective P/O ratio in cells was -0.34; the control coefficient of phosphorylation reactions over this ratio was 0.31 and the control coefficient of substrate oxidation reactions over the ratio was 0.03, showing how the coupling efficiency in cells can respond sensitively to agents that change the proton leak or the ATP demand, but not to those that change substrate oxidation.

  11. Long-term calorie restriction reduces proton leak and hydrogen peroxide production in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Ram, Jesmon J; Humble, Stephen J; Weindruch, Richard; Ramsey, Jon J

    2005-04-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases maximal life span in diverse species. It has been proposed that reduction in energy expenditure and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production could be a mechanism for life span extension with CR. As a step toward testing this theory, mitochondrial proton leak, H2O2 production, and markers of oxidative stress were measured in liver from FBNF1 rats fed control or 40% CR diets for 12 or 18 mo. CR was initiated at 6 mo of age. Proton leak kinetics curves, generated from simultaneous measures of oxygen consumption and membrane potential, indicated a decrease in proton leak after 18 mo of CR, while only a trend toward a proton leak decrease was observed after 12 mo. Significant shifts in phosphorylation and substrate oxidation curves also occurred with CR; however, these changes occurred in concert with the proton leak changes. Metabolic control analysis indicated no difference in the overall pattern of control of the oxidative phosphorylation system between control and CR animals. At 12 mo, no significant differences were observed between groups for H2O2 production or markers of oxidative stress. However, at 18 mo, protein carbonyl content was lower in CR animals, as was H2O2 production when mitochondria were respiring on either succinate alone or pyruvate plus malate in the presence of rotenone. These results indicate that long-term CR lowers mitochondrial proton leak and H2O2 production, and this is consistent with the idea that CR may act by decreasing energy expenditure and ROS production.

  12. Role of Mitochondria in HIV Infection and Associated Metabolic Disorders: Focus on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lipodystrophy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Matute, P.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Blanco, J. R.; Oteo, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has considerably improved the prognosis of HIV-infected patients. However, prolonged use of HAART has been related to long-term adverse events that can compromise patient health such as HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). There is consistent evidence for a central role of mitochondrial dysfunction in these pathologies. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) have been described to be mainly responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue and liver although nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs) have also showed mitochondrial toxicity, which is a major concern for the selection and the long-term adherence to a particular therapy. Several mechanisms explain these deleterious effects of HAART on mitochondria, and evidence points to other mechanisms beyond the “Pol-γ hypothesis.” HIV infection has also direct effects on mitochondria. In addition to the negative effects described for HIV itself and/or HAART on mitochondria, HIV-infected patients are more prone to develop a premature aging and, therefore, to present an increased oxidative state that could lead to the development of these metabolic disturbances observed in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23970949

  13. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  14. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation. PMID:26043077

  15. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-06-04

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation.

  16. Ca(2+)-loading modulates potencies of cyclosporin A, Mg2+ and ADP to recouple permeabilized rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Andreyev AYu; Mikhaylova, L M; Starkov, A A; Kushnareva YuE

    1994-09-01

    We studied the relative potencies of cyclosporin A and endogenous effectors (Mg2+ and ADP) to recouple rat liver mitochondria permeabilized by different Ca(2+)-loading in a P(i)-containing medium. Recoupling efficiency of cyclosporin A dramatically decreased at high Ca(2+)-loading (approx. 100 nM of Ca2+/mg protein and more). Mitochondria permeabilized by high Ca2+ were recoupled with approximately equal efficiency by higher cyclosporin A concentrations or by adding 1-5 mM Mg2+ together with low concentrations of cyclosporin A while potentiating effect of ADP on the cyclosporin A recoupling potency was insignificant. Mg2+ ions at concentrations of 3 mM and higher also prevented the carboxyatractylate-induced reversion of cyclosporin A recoupling effect. The data point to competitive relationships between cyclosporin A and/or Mg2+ ions and Ca2+ ions for the site(s) regulating permeability state of the pore.

  17. Effects of methylglyoxal and pyridoxamine in rat brain mitochondria bioenergetics and oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Susana; Carvalho, Cristina; Marinho, Ricardo; Simões, Anabel; Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Santos, Maria S; Seiça, Raquel M; Moreira, Paula I

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and methylglyoxal (MG), an important intermediate in AGEs synthesis, are thought to contribute to protein aging and to the pathogenesis of age-and diabetes-associated complications. This study was intended to investigate brain mitochondria bioenergetics and oxidative status of rats previously exposed to chronic treatment with MG and/or with pyridoxamine (PM), a glycation inhibitor. Brain mitochondrial fractions were obtained and several parameters were analyzed: respiratory chain [states 3 and 4 of respiration, respiratory control ratio (RCR), and ADP/O index] and phosphorylation system [transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), ADP-induced depolarization, repolarization lag phase, and ATP levels]; hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production levels, mitochondrial aconitase activity, and malondialdehyde levels as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses (vitamin E and glutathione levels) and enzymatic antioxidant defenses (glutathione disulfide reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activities). MG treatment induced a statistical significant decrease in RCR, aconitase and GR activities, and an increase in H2O2 production levels. The administration of PM did not counteract MG-induced effects and caused a significant decrease in ΔΨm. In mitochondria from control animals, PM caused an adaptive mechanism characterized by a decrease in aconitase and GR activities as well as an increase in both α-tocopherol levels and GPx and MnSOD activities. Altogether our results show that high levels of MG promote brain mitochondrial impairment and PM is not able to reverse MG-induced effects.

  18. Spermine binding to liver mitochondria deenergized by ruthenium red plus either FCCP or antimycin A.

    PubMed

    Dalla Via, L; Di Noto, V; Toninello, A

    1998-01-23

    Thermodynamic analysis of spermine binding to mitochondria treated with ruthenium red and deenergized with either FCCP or antimycin A confirms the presence of two polyamine binding sites, S1 and S2, both with monocoordination, as previously observed in energized mitochondria [Dalla Via et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1284 (1996) 247-252]. Both sites undergo a marked change in binding capacity and binding affinity upon mitochondrial deenergization. This change is most likely responsible for the incomplete or delayed spermine-mediated inhibition of the permeability transition induced in deenergized mitochondria.

  19. Decreased proteolytic activity of the mitochondrial amyloid-β degrading enzyme, PreP peptidasome, in Alzheimer's disease brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Nyosha; Guo, Lan; Yan, Shiqiang; Du, Heng; Pinho, Catarina Moreira; Chen, John Xi; Glaser, Elzbieta; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been shown in brain mitochondria of AD patients and of AD transgenic mouse models. The presence of Aβ in mitochondria leads to free radical generation and neuronal stress. Recently, we identified the presequence protease, PreP, localized in the mitochondrial matrix in mammalian mitochondria as the novel mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme. In the present study, we examined PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of the human brain's temporal lobe, an area of the brain highly susceptible to Aβ accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We found significantly lower hPreP activity in AD brains compared with non-AD age-matched controls. By contrast, in the cerebellum, a brain region typically spared from Aβ accumulation, there was no significant difference in hPreP activity when comparing AD samples to non-AD controls. We also found significantly reduced PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of AD transgenic mouse brains (Tg mAβPP and Tg mAβPP/ABAD) when compared to non-transgenic aged-matched mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial fractions isolated from AD brains and Tg mAβPP mice had higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, an oxidative product, as compared with those from non-AD and nonTg mice. Accordingly, activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly reduced in the AD mitochondria. These findings suggest that decreased PreP proteolytic activity, possibly due to enhanced ROS production, contributes to Aβ accumulation in mitochondria leading to the mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal death that is exacerbated in AD. Clearance of mitochondrial Aβ by PreP may thus be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  20. Increased Susceptibility of Gracilinanus microtarsus Liver Mitochondria to Ca2+-Induced Permeability Transition Is Associated with a More Oxidized State of NAD(P)

    PubMed Central

    Ronchi, Juliana A.; Henning, Barbara; Ravagnani, Felipe G.; Figueira, Tiago R.; Castilho, Roger F.; dos Reis, Sergio F.; Vercesi, Anibal E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to be the cell's powerhouse, mitochondria also contain a cell death machinery that includes highly regulated processes such as the membrane permeability transition pore (PTP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In this context, the results presented here provide evidence that liver mitochondria isolated from Gracilinanus microtarsus, a small and short life span (one year) marsupial, when compared to mice, are much more susceptible to PTP opening in association with a poor NADPH dependent antioxidant capacity. Liver mitochondria isolated from the marsupial are well coupled and take up Ca2+ but exhibited a much lower Ca2+ retention capacity than mouse mitochondria. Although the known PTP inhibitors cyclosporin A, ADP, and ATP significantly increased the marsupial mitochondria capacity to retain Ca2+, their effects were much larger in mice than in marsupial mitochondria. Both fluorescence and HPLC analysis of mitochondrial nicotinamide nucleotides showed that both content and state of reduction (mainly of NADPH) were lower in the marsupial mitochondria than in mice mitochondria despite the similarity in the activity of the glutathione peroxidase/reductase system. Overall, these data suggest that PTP opening is an important event in processes of Ca2+ signalling to cell death mediated by mitochondrial redox imbalance in G. microtarsus. PMID:26583063

  1. Microglia-aging: roles of microglial lysosome- and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in brain aging.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Wu, Zhou

    2009-07-19

    The accumulation of lysosome- and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the most important causative factors for aging. Autophagic dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage in the central nervous system (CNS) are prominently found in microglia, the resident mononuclear phagocyte population within the CNS. The autophagic dysfunction may induce the defective turnover of mitochondria, which results in the accumulation of ROS-hypergenerating older mitochondria in microglia. ROS activate redox-dependent transduction cascades and transcription factors, including nuclear factor-kappaB, which induce the expression of inflammatory genes. Therefore, "microglia-aging" could function as a major driver for brain aging. Furthermore, the prevention of lysosomal autophagic dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage in microglia may therefore be a potentially effective new pharmaceutical intervention against brain aging.

  2. Oxidant stress, mitochondria, and cell death mechanisms in drug-induced liver injury: lessons learned from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Hartmut; McGill, Mitchell R; Ramachandran, Anup

    2012-02-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a serious problem during drug development and for the use of many established drugs. For example, acetaminophen overdose is currently the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain. Evaluation of the mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury indicates that mitochondria are critical targets for drug toxicity, either directly or indirectly through the formation of reactive metabolites. The consequence of these modifications is generally a mitochondrial oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, which leads to structural alterations of proteins and mitochondrial DNA and, eventually, to the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) pores. MPT pore formation results in a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and cessation of adenosine triphosphate synthesis. In addition, the release of intermembrane proteins, such as apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G, and their translocation to the nucleus, leads to nuclear DNA fragmentation. Together, these events trigger necrotic cell death. Alternatively, the release of cytochrome c and other proapoptotic factors from mitochondria can promote caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Drug toxicity can also induce an inflammatory response with the formation of reactive oxygen species by Kupffer cells and neutrophils. If not properly detoxified, these extracellularly generated oxidants can diffuse into hepatocytes and trigger mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress, which then induces MPT and necrotic cell death. This review addresses the formation of oxidants and the defense mechanisms available for cells and applies this knowledge to better understand mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity, especially acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  3. Proteomic analysis of rat brain mitochondria following exposure to dopamine quinone: implications for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Van Laar, Victor S; Dukes, April A; Cascio, Michael; Hastings, Teresa G

    2008-03-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been linked to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson disease. We have previously shown that dopamine oxidation leads to selective dopaminergic terminal degeneration in vivo and alters mitochondrial function in vitro. In this study, we utilized 2-D difference in-gel electrophoresis to assess changes in the mitochondrial proteome following in vitro exposure to reactive dopamine quinone. A subset of proteins exhibit decreased fluorescence labeling following dopamine oxidation, suggesting a rapid loss of specific proteins. Amongst these proteins are mitochondrial creatine kinase, mitofilin, mortalin, the 75 kDa subunit of NADH dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase 2. Western blot analyses for mitochondrial creatine kinase and mitofilin confirmed significant losses in isolated brain mitochondria exposed to dopamine quinone and PC12 cells exposed to dopamine. These results suggest that specific mitochondrial proteins are uniquely susceptible to changes in abundance following dopamine oxidation, and carry implications for mitochondrial stability in Parkinson disease neurodegeneration.

  4. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  5. Brain mitochondria as a primary target in the development of treatment strategies for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Palacios, Hector H; Walrafen, Brianna; Lipsitt, Amanda E; Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis

    2009-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents are two leading causes of age-related dementia. Increasing evidence supports the idea that chronic hypoperfusion is primarily responsible for the pathogenesis that underlies both disease processes. In this regard, hypoperfusion appears to induce oxidative stress (OS), which is largely due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), and over time initiates mitochondrial failure which is known as an initiating factor of AD. Recent evidence indicates that chronic injury stimulus induces hypoperfusion seen in vulnerable brain regions. This reduced regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) then leads to energy failure within the vascular endothelium and associated brain parenchyma, manifested by damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure (the formation of large number of immature, electron-dense "hypoxic" mitochondria) and by overproduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Additionally, these mitochondrial abnormalities co-exist with increased redox metal activity, lipid peroxidation, and RNA oxidation. Interestingly, vulnerable neurons and glial cells show mtDNA deletions and oxidative stress markers only in the regions that are closely associated with damaged vessels, and, moreover, brain vascular wall lesions linearly correlate with the degree of neuronal and glial cell damage. We summarize the large body of evidence which indicates that sporadic, late-onset AD results from a vascular etiology by briefly reviewing mitochondrial damage and vascular risk factors associated with the disease and then we discuss the cerebral microvascular changes reason for the energy failure that occurs in normal aging and, to a much greater extent, AD.

  6. Alteration of SLP2-like immunolabeling in mitochondria signifies early cellular damage in developing and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yury M; Sun, Yu-Yo; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Rakic, Pasko

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in various pathways of regulated cell death. Here we propose a novel method for detection of initial derangement of mitochondria in degenerating and dying neuronal cells. The method is based on our recent finding that antibodies directed against the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) also bind the mitochondrial stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP2) that belongs to an inner mitochondrial membrane protein complex. It is well established that SLP2 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and respiratory functions. We now show that anti-CB1 antibodies recognize conformational epitopes but not the linear amino acid sequence of SLP2. In addition we found that anti-CB1 serum mostly labels swollen mitochondria with early or advanced stages of pathology in mouse brain while other proteins of the complex may mask epitopes of SLP2 in the normal mitochondria. Although neurons and endothelial cells in healthy brains contain occasional immunopositive mitochondria detectable with anti-CB1 serum, their numbers increase significantly after hypoxic insults in parallel with signs of cellular damage. Moreover, use of electron microscopy suggests relocation of SLP2 from its normal functional position in the inner mitochondrial membrane into the mitochondrial matrix in pathological cells. Thus, SLP2-like immunolabeling serves as an in situ histochemical target detecting early derangement of mitochondria. Anti-CB1 serum is crucial for this purpose because available anti-SLP2 antibodies do not provide selective labeling of mitochondria in the fixed tissue. This new method of detecting mitochondrial dysfunction can benefit the in vitro research of human diseases and developmental disorders by enabling analysis in live animal models.

  7. Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes-related alterations in brain mitochondria, autophagy and synaptic markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristina; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy in the brain of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. Isolated brain mitochondria and homogenates from cerebral cortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT), triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) and T2D mice were used to evaluate mitochondrial functional parameters and protein levels of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and synaptic integrity markers, respectively. A significant decrease in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and energy levels was observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Also, a significant decrease in the levels of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) and glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) was observed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. Moreover, both brain regions of 3xTg-AD mice present lower levels of nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) 1 while the levels of NRF2 are lower in both brain regions of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice. A decrease in mitochondrial encoded, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) was also observed in T2D and 3xTg-AD mice although only statistically significant in T2D cortex. Furthermore, a decrease in the levels of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) in the cerebral cortex of 3xTg-AD mice and in hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice and a decrease in the levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP 25) in the hippocampus of T2D and 3xTg-AD mice were observed suggesting synaptic integrity loss. These results support the idea that alterations in mitochondrial function, biogenesis and autophagy cause synaptic damage in AD and T2D.

  8. Effects of La(III) and Ca(II) on isolated Carassius auratus liver mitochondria: heat production and mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man; Gao, Jia-Ling; Sun, Mei-Xiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The effects of lanthanum and calcium on heat production of mitochondria isolated from Carassius auratus liver were investigated by microcalorimetry, and their effects on mitochondrial swelling and membrane potential (Δψ) were determined by spectroscopic methods. La(3+) showed only inhibitory action on mitochondrial energy turnover with inhibition concentration of 50 % (IC50) being 71.2 μmol L(-1). Similarly, Ca(2+) restrained the heat production of mitochondria, and the IC50 of Ca(2+) was much higher than that of La(3+). In the spectroscopic experiments, La(3+) and Ca(2+) induced fish liver mitochondrial swelling and decreased membrane potential (Δψ), and the induction ability of La(3+) was stronger than that of Ca(2+). It is concluded that the effects of La(3+) and Ca(2+) on fish liver mitochondria differ, and La represents toxic action rather than Ca analogy.

  9. Diamide accelerates opening of the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane is due to matrix Ca(2+) overload and matrix glutathione loss. Fixing the 'm' conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) by ADP or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibits opening of the MPTP. Oxidants (diamide or tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP)) fix the ANT in 'c' conformation, and the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP is thus attenuated. Earlier we found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria resulted in Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening, which was accompanied by a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration, as well as increased swelling and membrane potential dissipation. These effects, which were increased by diamide and tBHP, were visibly reduced in the presence of the MPTP inhibitors (ADP, NEM, and cyclosporine A). Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT and matrix glutathione loss may be directly involved in opening the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

  10. The antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen protects against isotretinoin-induced permeability transition and bioenergetic dysfunction of liver mitochondria: comparison with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena S G; Ribeiro, Mariana P C; Santos, Maria S; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Santos-Silva, Alice; Custódio, José B A

    2013-08-01

    The combination of isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) with antiestrogens seems to be a promising strategy for cancer chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of isotretinoin alone or in combination with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and with its prodrug tamoxifen (TAM), on the functions of rat liver mitochondria, i.e., mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), bioenergetic functions and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT). Isotretinoin (5 nmol/mg protein) induced the Ca²⁺-dependent MPT pore opening in mitochondria energized with succinate, which was prevented by OHTAM, cyclosporine A, TAM and ANT ligands. When mitochondria were energized with glutamate/malate and in the absence of added Ca²⁺ isotretinoin decreased the state 3 respiration, the ATP levels, the active ANT content and increased the lag phase of the phosphorylation cycle, demonstrating that isotretinoin decreased the mitochondrial phosphorylation efficiency. These changes of isotretinoin in bioenergetic parameters were not significant in the presence of succinate. The effects of isotretinoin at 5 nmol/mg protein on the Ca²⁺-dependent MPT and phosphorylative efficacy may be related with interactions with the ANT. Above 10 nmol/mg protein isotretinoin strongly diminished the active ANT content, decreased the Δψ, inhibited the complex I and induced proton leak through the Fo fraction of complex V. The combination of OHTAM with isotretinoin only induced significant changes in the energy production systems at concentrations ≥5 nmol isotretinoin/mg protein. Therefore, our results suggest that isotretinoin-associated liver toxicity is possibly related with mitochondrial dysfunctions and that the combination with OHTAM may contribute to decrease its toxicity.

  11. Decreased mTOR signalling reduces mitochondrial ROS in brain via accumulation of the telomerase protein TERT within mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Tengfei; Bell, Amy; Hill, Kirsten N.; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase in its canonical function maintains telomeres in dividing cells. In addition, the telomerase protein TERT has non-telomeric functions such as shuttling to mitochondria resulting in a decreased oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. TERT protein persists in adult neurons and can co-localise to mitochondria under various stress conditions. We show here that TERT expression decreased in mouse brain during aging while release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased. Dietary restriction (DR) caused accumulation of TERT protein in mouse brain mitochondria correlating to decreased ROS release and improved learning and spatial short-term memory. Decreased mTOR signalling is a mediator of DR. Accordingly, feeding mice with rapamycin increased brain mitochondrial TERT and reduced ROS release. Importantly, the beneficial effects of rapamycin on mitochondrial function were absent in brains and fibroblasts from first generation TERT −/− mice, and when TERT shuttling was inhibited by the Src kinase inhibitor bosutinib. Taken together, our data suggests that the mTOR signalling pathway impinges on the mitochondrial localisation of TERT protein, which might in turn contribute to the protection of the brain by DR or rapamycin against age-associated mitochondrial ROS increase and cognitive decline. PMID:27777385

  12. Biapigenin modulates the activity of the adenine nucleotide translocator in isolated rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Cristóvão, Armando; Dias, Alberto C P; Malva, João O

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of biapigenin, a biflavone present in the extracts of Hypericum perforatum, in rat brain mitochondrial bioenergetics and calcium homeostasis. We found that biapigenin significantly decreased adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced membrane depolarization and increased repolarization (by 68 and 37%, respectively). These effects were blocked by atractyloside and bongkrekic acid, but not oligomycin. In the presence of biapigenin, an ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration was still noticeable, which did not happen in the presence of adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) inhibitors. Taking in consideration the relevance of the ANT in the modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), mitochondrial calcium homeostasis was evaluated alone or in the presence of biapigenin. We found that biapigenin reduces mitochondrial calcium retention by increasing calcium efflux, an effect that was blocked by ADP plus oligomycin, an efficient blocker of the mPTP in brain mitochondria. Taken together, the results in this article suggest that biapigenin modulates mPTP opening, possibly by modulating ANT function, contributing for enhanced mitochondrial calcium efflux, thereby reducing calcium burden and contributing for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity.

  13. Proteomic profiling of mitochondria: what does it tell us about the ageing brain?

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Thomas; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in numerous neurodegenerative and age-related disorders. It has also been linked to cellular ageing, however our current understanding of the mitochondrial changes that occur are unclear. Functional studies have made some progress reporting reduced respiration, dynamic structural modifications and loss of membrane potential, though there are conflicts within these findings. Proteomic analyses, together with functional studies, are required in order to profile the mitochondrial changes that occur with age and can contribute to unravelling the complexity of the ageing phenotype. The emergence of improved protein separation techniques, combined with mass spectrometry analyses has allowed the identification of age and cell-type specific mitochondrial changes in energy metabolism, antioxidants, fusion and fission machinery, chaperones, membrane proteins and biosynthesis pathways. Here, we identify and review recent data from the analyses of mitochondria from rodent brains. It is expected that knowledge gained from understanding age-related mitochondrial changes of the brain should lead to improved biomarkers of normal ageing and also age-related disease progression. PMID:27992860

  14. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  15. Proteomic profiling of mitochondria: what does it tell us about the ageing brain?

    PubMed

    Ingram, Thomas; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-12-13

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is evident in numerous neurodegenerative and age-related disorders. It has also been linked to cellular ageing, however our current understanding of the mitochondrial changes that occur are unclear. Functional studies have made some progress reporting reduced respiration, dynamic structural modifications and loss of membrane potential, though there are conflicts within these findings. Proteomic analyses, together with functional studies, are required in order to profile the mitochondrial changes that occur with age and can contribute to unravelling the complexity of the ageing phenotype. The emergence of improved protein separation techniques, combined with mass spectrometry analyses has allowed the identification of age and cell-type specific mitochondrial changes in energy metabolism, antioxidants, fusion and fission machinery, chaperones, membrane proteins and biosynthesis pathways. Here, we identify and review recent data from the analyses of mitochondria from rodent brains. It is expected that knowledge gained from understanding age-related mitochondrial changes of the brain should lead to improved biomarkers of normal ageing and also age-related disease progression.

  16. A Mitofusin-2-dependent inactivating cleavage of Opa1 links changes in mitochondria cristae and ER contacts in the postprandial liver.

    PubMed

    Sood, Aditi; Jeyaraju, Danny Vijey; Prudent, Julien; Caron, Alexandre; Lemieux, Philippe; McBride, Heidi May; Laplante, Mathieu; Tóth, Katalin; Pellegrini, Luca

    2014-11-11

    Hepatic metabolism requires mitochondria to adapt their bioenergetic and biosynthetic output to accompany the ever-changing anabolic/catabolic state of the liver cell, but the wiring of this process is still largely unknown. Using a postprandial mouse liver model and quantitative cryo-EM analysis, we show that when the hepatic mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway disengages, the mitochondria network fragments, cristae density drops by 30%, and mitochondrial respiratory capacity decreases by 20%. Instead, mitochondria-ER contacts (MERCs), which mediate calcium and phospholipid fluxes between these organelles, double in length. These events are associated with the transient expression of two previously unidentified C-terminal fragments (CTFs) of Optic atrophy 1 (Opa1), a mitochondrial GTPase that regulates cristae biogenesis and mitochondria dynamics. Expression of Opa1 CTFs in the intermembrane space has no effect on mitochondria morphology, supporting a model in which they are intermediates of an Opa1 degradation program. Using an in vitro assay, we show that these CTFs indeed originate from the cleavage of Opa1 at two evolutionarily conserved consensus sites that map within critical folds of the GTPase. This processing of Opa1, termed C-cleavage, is mediated by the activity of a cysteine protease whose activity is independent from that of Oma1 and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), two known Opa1 regulators. However, C-cleavage requires Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), a key factor in mitochondria-ER tethering, thereby linking cristae remodeling to MERC assembly. Thus, in vivo, mitochondria adapt to metabolic shifts through the parallel remodeling of the cristae and of the MERCs via a mechanism that degrades Opa1 in an Mfn2-dependent pathway.

  17. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney.

  18. Stimulation of H(2)O(2) generation by calcium in brain mitochondria respiring on alpha-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Laszlo; Takacs, Katalin; Kövér, Kinga; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2007-11-15

    It has been reported recently (Tretter et al., 2007b) that in isolated guinea pig brain mitochondria supported by alpha-glycerophosphate (alpha-GP) reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced through the reverse electron transport (RET) in the respiratory chain and by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH). We studied the effect of calcium on the generation of H(2)O(2) as measured by the Amplex Red fluorescent assay in this model. H(2)O(2) production in alpha-GP-supported mitochondria was increased significantly in the presence of 100, 250, and 500 nM Ca(2+), respectively. In addition, Ca(2+) enhanced the membrane potential, the rate of oxygen consumption, and the NAD(P)H autofluorescence in these mitochondria. Direct measurement of alpha-GPDH activity showed that Ca(2+) stimulated the enzyme by decreasing the Km for alpha-GP. In those mitochondria where RET was eliminated by the Complex I inhibitor rotenone (2 microM) or due to depolarization by ADP (1 mM), the rate of H(2)O(2) formation was smaller and the stimulation of H(2)O(2) generation by Ca(2+) was prevented partly, but the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+) was still significant. These data indicate that in alpha-GP-supported mitochondria activation of alpha-GPDH by Ca(2+) leads to an accelerated RET-mediated ROS generation as well as to a stimulated ROS production by alpha-GPDH.

  19. Inhibitory effect of added adenosine diphosphate on palmitate oxidation in mitochondria from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, N.

    1986-05-01

    It is generally accepted that fatty acids are poor substrates for the oxidation in brain because plasma fatty acids do not traverse the blood-brain barrier. However, a regional difference in the barrier suggests that fatty acids are available for oxidation. Why most of fatty acids are not oxidized is not certain. For this reason, regulation of oxidation of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate (pal) in rat brain has been studied in nonsynaptic mitochondria (mit) prepared by use of Ficoll/sucrose density gradient. The authors found two contrasting oxidations with respect to ATP concentration; Type A at 2 mM and Type B at 0.5 mM. The rate of Type A was 50% of the level of B. Type A was inhibited by high levels of L-carnitine (car) and Mg/sup 2 +/. Added ADP inhibited Type A, but stimulated B. Addition of carboxyatractyloside was stimulatory for Type A, but inhibitory for B. The rate of Type A showed a downward curvature with increasing protein concentration while that of B showed a linear relationship. Addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ to Type A stimulated the rate and reduced the inhibitory effects of both added ADP and high levels of car. These results suggest that under the normal level of ATP, the carnitine-dependent transport of pal is inhibited (thereby resulting in the inhibition in pal oxidation) by the transport of ADP into mit mediated by the ATP-ADP translocase, but that the inhibition is not observed under the specified conditions or regions where ATP levels are low or ammonia levels are high.

  20. 1,3-dinitrobenzene induces age- and region-specific oxidation to mitochondria-related proteins in brain.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Laura L; Landis, Rory W; Remmer, Henriette; Bergin, Ingrid L; Philbert, Martin A

    2015-05-01

    Regions of the brain with high energy requirements are especially sensitive to perturbations in mitochondrial function. Hence, neurotoxicant exposures that target mitochondria in regions of high energy demand have the potential to accelerate mitochondrial damage inherently occurring during the aging process. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is a model neurotoxicant that selectively targets mitochondria in brainstem nuclei innervated by the eighth cranial nerve. This study investigates the role of age in the regional susceptibility of brain mitochondria-related proteins (MRPs) to oxidation following exposure to DNB. Male F344 rats (1 month old [young], 3 months old [adult], 18 months old [aged]) were exposed to 10 mg/kg DNB prior to mitochondrial isolation and histopathology experiments. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, 3 important region- and age-related increases in DNB-induced MRP oxidation were determined: (1) brainstem mitochondria are ×3 more sensitive to DNB-induced oxidation than cortical mitochondria; (2) oxidation of brainstem MRPs is significantly higher than in cortical counterparts; and (3) MRPs from the brainstems of older rats are significantly more oxidized than those from young or adult rats. Furthermore, lower levels of DNB cause signs of intoxication (ataxia, chromodacryorrhea) and vacuolation of the susceptible neuropil in aged animals, while neither is observed in DNB-exposed young rats. Additionally, methemoglobin levels increase significantly in DNB-exposed adult and aged animals, but not young DNB-exposed animals. This suggests that oxidation of key MRPs observed in brainstem of aged animals is necessary for DNB-induced signs of intoxication and lesion formation. These results provide compelling evidence that environmental chemicals such as DNB may aid in the acceleration of injury to specific brain regions by inducing oxidation of sensitive mitochondrial proteins.

  1. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-05

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells.

  2. Role of mitochondria in apoptotic and necroptotic cell death in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Claire; Hagberg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy induces secondary brain injury characterized by delayed energy failure. Currently, therapeutic hypothermia is the sole treatment available after severe intrapartum asphyxia in babies and acts to attenuate secondary loss of high energy phosphates improving both short- and long-term outcome. In order to develop the next generation of neuroprotective therapies, we urgently need to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to cell death. Hypoxia–ischemia creates a toxic intracellular environment including accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrosative species and intracellular calcium after the insult, inducing mitochondrial impairment. More specifically mitochondrial respiration is suppressed and calcium signaling is dysregulated. At a certain threshold, Bax-dependent mitochondrial permeabilization will occur leading to activation of caspase-dependent and apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent apoptotic cell death. In addition, hypoxia–ischemia induces inflammation, which leads to the release of TNF-α, TRAIL, TWEAK, FasL and Toll-like receptor agonists that will activate death receptors on neurons and oligodendroglia. Death receptors trigger apoptotic death via caspase-8 and necroptotic cell death through formation of the necrosome (composed of RIP1, RIP3 and MLKL), both of which converge at the mitochondria. PMID:25661091

  3. Closure of mitochondrial potassium channels favors opening of the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Shumakov, Anton R; Emelyanova, Larisa V

    2015-06-01

    It is known that a closure of ATP sensitive (mitoKATP) or BK-type Ca(2+) activated (mitoKCa) potassium channels triggers opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in cells and isolated mitochondria. We found earlier that the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria was accompanied by a decrease of 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration and increase of mitochondrial swelling and ΔΨmito dissipation in the medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3. On the other hand, our study showed that the mitoKATP inhibitor, 5-hydroxydecanoate favored the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat heart mitochondria (Korotkov et al. 2013). Here we showed that 5-hydroxydecanoate increased the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the membrane of rat liver mitochondria regardless of the presence of mitoKATP modulators (diazoxide and pinacidil). This manifested in more pronounced decrease in the uncoupled respiration and acceleration of both the swelling and the ΔΨmito dissipation in isolated rat liver mitochondria, incubated in the medium containing TlNO3, KNO3, and Ca(2+). A slight delay in Ca(2+)-induced swelling of the mitochondria exposed to diazoxide could be result of an inhibition of succinate oxidation by the mitoKATP modulator. Mitochondrial calcium retention capacity (CRC) was markedly decreased in the presence of the mitoKATP inhibitor (5-hydroxydecanoate) or the mitoKCa inhibitor (paxilline). We suggest that the closure of mitoKATP or mitoKCa in calcium loaded mitochondria favors opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  4. High Ca2+ load promotes hydrogen peroxide generation via activation of α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Laszlo; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2012-12-01

    H(2)O(2) generation associated with α-glycerophosphate (α-GP) oxidation was addressed in guinea pig brain mitochondria challenged with high Ca(2+) load (10 μM). Exposure to 10 μM Ca(2+) induced an abrupt 2.5-fold increase in H(2)O(2) release compared to that measured in the presence of a physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (100 nM) from mitochondria respiring on 5 mM α-GP in the presence of ADP (2 mM). The Ca(2+)-induced stimulation of H(2)O(2) generation was reversible and unaltered by the uniporter blocker Ru 360, indicating that it did not require Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria. Enhanced H(2)O(2) generation by Ca(2+) was also observed in the absence of ADP when mitochondria exhibited permeability transition pore opening with a decrease in the NAD(P)H level, dissipation of membrane potential, and mitochondrial swelling. Furthermore, mitochondria treated with the pore-forming peptide alamethicin also responded with an elevated H(2)O(2) generation to a challenge with 10 μM Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-induced promotion of H(2)O(2) formation was further enhanced by the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol. With 20 mM α-GP concentration, stimulation of H(2)O(2) formation by Ca(2+) was detected only in the presence, not in the absence, of ADP. It is concluded that α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, which is accessible to and could be activated by a rise in the level of cytosolic Ca(2+), makes a major contribution to Ca(2+)-stimulated H(2)O(2) generation. This work highlights a unique high-Ca(2+)-stimulated reactive oxygen species-forming mechanism in association with oxidation of α-GP, which is largely independent of the bioenergetic state and can proceed even in damaged, functionally incompetent mitochondria.

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of Mitochondria-Targeted Plastoquinone and Thymoquinone in a Rat Model of Brain Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Silachev, Denis N; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Zorova, Ljubava D; Pevzner, Irina B; Sumbatyan, Natalia V; Korshunova, Galina A; Gulyaev, Mikhail V; Pirogov, Yury A; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2015-08-11

    We explored the neuroprotective properties of natural plant-derived antioxidants plastoquinone and thymoquinone (2-demethylplastoquinone derivative) modified to be specifically accumulated in mitochondria. The modification was performed through chemical conjugation of the quinones with penetrating cations: Rhodamine 19 or tetraphenylphosphonium. Neuroprotective properties were evaluated in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. We demonstrate that the mitochondria-targeted compounds, introduced immediately after reperfusion, possess various neuroprotective potencies as judged by the lower brain damage and higher neurological status. Plastoquinone derivatives conjugated with rhodamine were the most efficient, and the least efficiency was shown by antioxidants conjugated with tetraphenylphosphonium. Antioxidants were administered intraperitoneally or intranasally with the latter demonstrating a high level of penetration into the brain tissue. The therapeutic effects of both ways of administration were similar. Long-term administration of antioxidants in low doses reduced the neurological deficit, but had no effect on the volume of brain damage. At present, cationic decylrhodamine derivatives of plastoquinone appear to be the most promising anti-ischemic mitochondria-targeted drugs of the quinone family. We suggest these antioxidants could be potentially used for a stroke treatment.

  6. Mitochondrial toxicity of diclofenac and its metabolites via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria: Possible role in drug induced liver injury (DILI).

    PubMed

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-03-01

    Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID, which by itself and its reactive metabolites (Phase-I and Phase-II) may be involved in serious idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Mitochondrial injury is one of the mechanisms of drug induced liver injury (DILI). In the present work, an investigation of the inhibitory effects of diclofenac (Dic) and its phase I [4-hydroxy diclofenac (4'-OH-Dic) and 5-hydroxy diclofenac (5-OH-dic)] and Phase-II [diclofenac acyl glucuronide (DicGluA) and diclofenac glutathione thioester (DicSG)] metabolites, on ATP synthesis in rat liver mitochondria was carried out. A mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis is exerted by diclofenac and its metabolites. Phase-I metabolite (4'-OH-Dic) and Phase-II metabolites (DicGluA and DicSG) showed potent inhibition (2-5 fold) of ATP synthesis, where as 5-OH-Dic, one of the Phase-I metabolite, was a less potent inhibitor as compared to Dic. The calculated kinetic constants of mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis by Dic showed maximal rate of inactivation (Kinact) of 2.64 ± 0.15 min(-1) and half maximal rate of inactivation (KI) of 7.69 ± 2.48 μM with Kinact/KI ratio of 0.343 min(-1) μM(-1). Co-incubation of mitochondria with Dic and reduced GSH exhibited a protective effect on Dic mediated inhibition of ATP synthesis. Our data from this study strongly indicate that Dic as well as its metabolites could be involved in the hepato-toxic action through inhibition of ATP synthesis.

  7. Mitochondria are the source of hydrogen peroxide for dynamic brain-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Li; Avshalumov, Marat V.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Miller, Evan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is emerging as a ubiquitous small-molecule messenger in biology, particularly in the brain, but underlying mechanisms of peroxide signaling remain an open frontier for study. For example, dynamic dopamine transmission in dorsolateral striatum is regulated on a subsecond timescale by glutamate via H2O2 signaling, which activates ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels to inhibit dopamine release. However, the origin of this modulatory H2O2 has been elusive. Here we addressed three possible sources of H2O2 produced for rapid neuronal signaling in striatum: mitochondrial respiration; monoamine oxidase (MAO); and NADPH oxidase (Nox). Evoked dopamine release in guinea-pig striatal slices was monitored with carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Using direct fluorescence imaging of H2O2 and tissue analysis of ATP, we found that co-application of rotenone (50 nM), a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, and succinate (5 mM), a complex II substrate, limited H2O2 production, but maintained tissue ATP content. Strikingly, co-application of rotenone and succinate also prevented glutamate-dependent regulation of dopamine release, implicating mitochondrial H2O2 in release modulation. By contrast, inhibitors of MAO or Nox had no effect on dopamine release, suggesting a limited role for these metabolic enzymes in rapid H2O2 production in the striatum. These data provide the first demonstration that respiring mitochondria are the primary source of H2O2 generation for dynamic neuronal signaling. PMID:19605638

  8. Mitochondria are the source of hydrogen peroxide for dynamic brain-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Li; Avshalumov, Marat V; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Miller, Evan W; Chang, Christopher J; Rice, Margaret E

    2009-07-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is emerging as a ubiquitous small-molecule messenger in biology, particularly in the brain, but underlying mechanisms of peroxide signaling remain an open frontier for study. For example, dynamic dopamine transmission in dorsolateral striatum is regulated on a subsecond timescale by glutamate via H(2)O(2) signaling, which activates ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels to inhibit dopamine release. However, the origin of this modulatory H(2)O(2) has been elusive. Here we addressed three possible sources of H(2)O(2) produced for rapid neuronal signaling in striatum: mitochondrial respiration, monoamine oxidase (MAO), and NADPH oxidase (Nox). Evoked dopamine release in guinea-pig striatal slices was monitored with carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Using direct fluorescence imaging of H(2)O(2) and tissue analysis of ATP, we found that coapplication of rotenone (50 nM), a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, and succinate (5 mM), a complex II substrate, limited H(2)O(2) production, but maintained tissue ATP content. Strikingly, coapplication of rotenone and succinate also prevented glutamate-dependent regulation of dopamine release, implicating mitochondrial H(2)O(2) in release modulation. In contrast, inhibitors of MAO or Nox had no effect on dopamine release, suggesting a limited role for these metabolic enzymes in rapid H(2)O(2) production in the striatum. These data provide the first demonstration that respiring mitochondria are the primary source of H(2)O(2) generation for dynamic neuronal signaling.

  9. Oxidative Inactivation of Liver Mitochondria in High Fructose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats: Effect of Glycyrrhizin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sil, Rajarshi; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a serious health problem in the present world. Glycyrrhizin, a triterpenoid saponin of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, has been reported to ameliorate the primary complications and hepatocellular damage in rats with the syndrome. In this study, we have explored metabolic syndrome-induced changes in liver mitochondrial function and effect of glycyrrhizin against the changes. Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by high fructose (60%) diet for 6 weeks. The rats were then treated with glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight) by single intra-peritoneal injection. After 2 weeks of the treatment, the rats were sacrificed to collect liver tissue. Elevated mitochondrial ROS, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl, and decreased reduced glutathione content indicated oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome. Loss of mitochondrial inner membrane cardiolipin was observed. Mitochondrial complex I activity did not change but complex IV activity decreased significantly. Mitochondrial MTT reduction ability, membrane potential, phosphate utilisation and oxygen consumption decreased in metabolic syndrome. Reduced mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased aconitase carbonyl content suggested oxidative damage of the enzyme. Elevated Fe(2+) ion level in mitochondria might be associated with increased ROS generation in metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizin effectively attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress and aconitase degradation, and improved electron transport chain activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Dysfunction of mouse liver mitochondria induced by 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, a radical initiator, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kanno, T; Utsumi, T; Ide, A; Takehara, Y; Saibara, T; Akiyama, J; Yoshioka, T; Utsumi, K

    1994-09-01

    Mouse liver mitochondria were uncoupled in a time dependent by intraperitoneal injection of a radical initiator, 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) (100 mg/kg). State 3 respiration, ADP/O ratio and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were decreased 30 min after injection but there was no effect on state 4 respiration. Lipid peroxidation was increased and oxidative phosphorylation was uncoupled at one hr after drug injection but gradually recovered to normal levels after 14 hr in vivo. State 3 respiration, RCR and ADP/O ratio but not state 4 respiration of isolated mouse mitochondria were inhibited by short term incubation with AAPH in vitro. This inhibitory action was concentration dependent (ID50 = 5 mM) but was not prevented by alpha-tocopherol. AAPH had no effect on electron transport or the membrane potential of these isolated mitochondria. However, mitochondria were uncoupled via lipid peroxidation and swelling by long term incubation with AAPH. These inhibitory effects of AAPH were reduced by its spontaneous degradation not only in vitro but also in vivo. Thus AAPH induces mitochondrial dysfunction by direct action in the early period of treatment and free radicals produced from AAPH mediate mitochondrial swelling via lipid peroxidation in the late period. From these findings, it is concluded that mitochondrial phosphorylation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver injury induced by AAPH and that radicals generated by AAPH might be a source of liver injury and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo.

  11. Topological probes of monoamine oxidases A and B in rat liver mitochondria: inhibition by TEMPO-substituted pargyline analogues and inactivation by proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Edmondson, Dale E

    2011-04-05

    TEMPO-substituted pargyline analogues differentially inhibit recombinant human monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) and B (MAO B) in intact yeast mitochondria, suggesting these membrane-bound enzymes are located on differing faces of the mitochondrial outer membrane [Upadhyay, A., and Edmondson, D. E. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 3928]. This approach is extended to the recombinant rat enzymes and to rat liver mitochondria. The differential specificities exhibited for human MAO A and MAO B by the m- and p-amido TEMPO pargylines are not as absolute with the rat enzymes. Similar patterns of reactivity are observed for rat MAO A and B in mitochondrial outer membrane preparations expressed in Pichia pastoris or isolated from rat liver. In intact yeast mitochondria, recombinant rat MAO B is inhibited by the pargyline analogue whereas MAO A activity shows no inhibition. Intact rat liver mitochondria exhibit an inhibition pattern opposite to that observed in yeast where MAO A is inhibited and MAO B activity is unaffected. Protease inactivation studies show specificity in that MAO A is sensitive to trypsin whereas MAO B is sensitive to β-chymotrypsin. In intact mitochondrial preparations, MAO A is readily inactivated in rat liver but not in yeast upon trypsin treatment and MAO B is readily inactivated by β-chymotrypsin in yeast but not in rat liver. These data show MAO A is oriented on the cytosolic face and MAO B is situated on the surface facing the intermembrane space of the mitochondrial outer membrane in rat liver. The differential mitochondrial outer membrane topology of MAO A and MAO B is relevant to their inhibition by drugs designed to be cardioprotectants or neuroprotectants.

  12. Cinnamon intake alleviates the combined effects of dietary-induced insulin resistance and acute stress on brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Poulet, Laurent; Anderson, Richard A; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Canini, Frédéric; Batandier, Cécile

    2016-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), which is a leading cause of the metabolic syndrome, results in early brain function alterations which may alter brain mitochondrial functioning. Previously, we demonstrated that rats fed a control diet and submitted to an acute restraint stress exhibited a delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of dietary and emotional stressors as found in western way of life. We studied, in rats submitted or not to an acute stress, the effects of diet-induced IR on brain mitochondria, using a high fat/high fructose diet (HF(2)), as an IR inducer, with addition or not of cinnamon as an insulin sensitizer. We measured Ca(2+) retention capacity, respiration, ROS production, enzymatic activities and cell signaling activation. Under stress, HF(2) diet dramatically decreased the amount of Ca(2+) required to open the mPTP (13%) suggesting an adverse effect on mitochondrial survival. Cinnamon added to the diet corrected this negative effect and resulted in a partial recovery (30%). The effects related to cinnamon addition to the diet could be due to its antioxidant properties or to the observed modulation of PI3K-AKT-GSK3β and MAPK-P38 pathways or to a combination of both. These data suggest a protective effect of cinnamon on brain mitochondria against the negative impact of an HF(2) diet. Cinnamon could be beneficial to counteract deleterious dietary effects in stressed conditions.

  13. Rat MYH, a glycosylase for repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, has brain-specific isoforms that localize to neuronal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W; Hu, Zhaoyong; Sharma, Abha; Lee, Heung-Man; Wu, Zhao-Hui; Greeley, George H

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are exposed to a heavy load of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage DNA. Since in neurons, mitochondrial DNA integrity must be maintained over the entire mammalian life span, neuronal mitochondria most likely repair oxidatively damaged DNA. We show that the Escherichia coli MutY DNA glycosylase homolog (MYH) in rat (rMYH) involved in repair of oxidative damage is abundantly expressed in the rat brain, with isoforms that are exclusive to brain tissue. Confocal microscopy and western analyses reveal localization of rMYH in neuronal mitochondria. To assess involvement of MYH in the neuronal response to oxidative DNA damage, we used a rat model of respiratory hypoxia, in which acutely reduced blood oxygenation leads to generation of superoxide, and formation and subsequent removal of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). Removal of 8OHdG is accompanied by a spatial increase in rMYH immunoreactivity in the brain and an increase in levels of one of the three mitochondrial MYH isoforms, suggesting that inducible and non-inducible MYH isoforms exist in the brain. The mitochondrial localization of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in neurons may represent a specialized neuronal mechanism that safeguards mitochondrial genomes in the face of routine and accidental exposures to heavy loads of injurious ROS.

  14. Rotenone exerts similar stimulatory effects on H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Luiz G B; Figueira, Tiago R; Siqueira-Santos, Edilene S; Castilho, Roger F

    2015-03-04

    Chronic and systemic treatment of rodents with rotenone, a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, results in neurochemical, behavioral, and neuropathological features of Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain mitochondria from old rats (24 months old) would be more susceptible to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and increased generation of H2O2 than mitochondria from young-adult rats (3-4 months old). Isolated brain mitochondria were incubated in the presence of different rotenone concentrations (5, 10, and 100nM), and oxygen consumption and H2O2 production were measured during respiratory states 3 (ADP-stimulated respiration) and 4 (resting respiration). Respiratory state 3 and citrate synthase activity were significantly lower in mitochondria from old rats. Mitochondria from young-adult and old rats showed similar sensitivity to rotenone-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. Similarly, H2O2 production rates by both types of mitochondria were dose-dependently stimulated to the same extent by increasing concentrations of rotenone. We conclude that rotenone exerts similar effects on oxygen consumption and H2O2 production by isolated brain mitochondria from young-adult and old rats. Therefore, aging does not increase the mitochondrial H2O2 generation in response to complex I inhibition.

  15. Effective protection of Terminalia catappa L. leaves from damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinhui; Gao, Jing; Wang, Yanping; Fan, Yi-Mei; Xu, Li-Zhi; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Qiang; Qian, Zhong Ming

    2006-03-01

    The protective effects of chloroform extracts of Terminalia catappa L. leaves (TCCE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage and the possible mechanisms involved in the protection were investigated in mice. We found that increases in the activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase and the level of liver lipid peroxidation (2.0-fold, 5.7-fold and 2.8-fold) induced by CCl4 were significantly inhibited by oral pretreatment with 20, 50 or 100 mg/kg of TCCE. Morphological observation further confirmed the hepatoprotective effects of TCCE. In addition, the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (14.8%), intramitochondrial Ca2+ overload (2.1-fold) and suppression of mitochondrial Ca2+-ATPase activity (42.0%) in the liver of CCl4-insulted mice were effectively prevented by pretreatment with TCCE. It can be concluded that TCCE have protective activities against liver mitochondrial damage induced by CCl4, which suggests a new mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of TCCE.

  16. Pathological characteristics of liver allografts from donation after brain death followed by cardiac death in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wang, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Zhao; Zhang, Long-Juan; Wang, Hao-Chen; Li, Zhuo-Hui; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Chang-Jie; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Ma, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Yong; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-10-01

    Donation after brain death followed by circulatory death (DBCD) is a unique practice in China. The aim of this study was to define the pathologic characteristics of DBCD liver allografts in a porcine model. Fifteen male pigs (25-30 kg) were allocated randomly into donation after brain death (DBD), donation after circulatory death (DCD) and DBCD groups. Brain death was induced by augmenting intracranial pressure. Circulatory death was induced by withdrawal of life support in DBCD group and by venous injection of 40 mL 10% potassium chloride in DCD group. The donor livers were perfused in situ and kept in cold storage for 4 h. Liver tissue and common bile duct samples were collected for hematoxylin and eosin staining, TUNEL testing and electron microscopic examination. Spot necrosis was found in hepatic parenchyma of DBD and DBCD groups, while a large area of necrosis was shown in DCD group. The apoptosis rate of hepatocytes in DBD [(0.56±0.30)%] and DBCD [(0.50 ± 0.11)%] groups was much lower than that in DCD group [(3.78±0.33)%] (P<0.05). And there was no significant difference between DBD group and DBCD group (P>0.05)). The structures of bile duct were intact in both DBD and DBCD groups, while the biliary epithelium was totally damaged in DCD group. Under electron microscope, the DBD hepatocytes were characterized by intact cell membrane, well-organized endoplasmic reticulum, mild mitochondria edema and abundant glycogens. Broken cell membrane, mild inflammatory cell infiltration and sinusoidal epithelium edema, as well as reduced glycogen volume, were found in the DBCD hepatocytes. The DCD hepatocytes had more profound cell organelle injury and much less glycogen storage. In conclusion, the preservation injury of DBCD liver allografts is much less severe than that of un-controlled DCD, but more severe than that of DBD liver allografts under electron microscope, which might reflect post-transplant liver function to some extent.

  17. Complement Component C1q Mediates Mitochondria-Driven Oxidative Stress in Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ten, Vadim S.; Yao, Jun; Ratner, Veniamin; Sosunov, Sergey; Fraser, Deborah A.; Botto, Marina; Baalasubramanian, Sivasankar; Morgan, B. Paul; Silverstein, Samuel; Stark, Raymond; Polin, Richard; Vannucci, Susan J.; Pinsky, David; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury in infants is a leading cause of lifelong disability. We report a novel pathway mediating oxidative brain injury after hypoxia–ischemia in which C1q plays a central role. Neonatal mice incapable of classical or terminal complement activation because of C1q or C6 deficiency or pharmacologically inhibited assembly of membrane attack complex were subjected to hypoxia–ischemia. Only C1q−/− mice exhibited neuroprotection coupled with attenuated oxidative brain injury. This was associated with reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C1q−/− brain mitochondria and preserved activity of the respiratory chain. Compared with C1q+/+ neurons, cortical C1q−/− neurons exhibited resistance to oxygen– glucose deprivation. However, postischemic exposure to exogenous C1q increased both mitochondrial ROS production and mortality of C1q−/− neurons. This C1q toxicity was abolished by coexposure to antioxidant Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid). Thus, the C1q component of complement, accelerating mitochondrial ROS emission, exacerbates oxidative injury in the developing HI brain. The terminal complement complex is activated in the HI neonatal brain but appeared to be nonpathogenic. These findings have important implications for design of the proper therapeutic interventions against HI neonatal brain injury by highlighting a pathogenic priority of C1q-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress over the C1q deposition-triggered terminal complement activation. PMID:20147536

  18. The role of ADP in the modulation of the calcium-efflux pathway in rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Vitorica, J; Satrústegui, J

    1985-01-01

    The role of ADP in the regulation of Ca2+ efflux in rat brain mitochondria was investigated. ADP was shown to inhibit Ruthenium-Red-insensitive H+- and Na+-dependent Ca2+-efflux rates if Pi was present, but had no effect in the absence of Pi. The primary effect of ADP is an inhibition of Pi efflux, and therefore it allows the formation of a matrix Ca2+-Pi complex at concentrations above 0.2 mM-Pi and 25 nmol of Ca2+/mg of protein, which maintains a constant free matrix Ca2+ concentration. ADP inhibition of Pi and Ca2+ efflux is nucleotide-specific, since in the presence of oligomycin and an inhibitor of adenylate kinase ATP does not substitute for ADP, is dependent on the amount of ADP present, and requires ADP concentrations in excess of the concentrations of translocase binding sites. Brain mitochondria incubated with 0.2 mM-Pi and ADP showed Ca2+-efflux rates dependent on Ca2+ loads at Ca2+ concentrations below those required for the formation of a Pi-Ca2+ complex, and behaved as perfect cytosolic buffers exclusively at high Ca2+ loads. The possible role of brain mitochondrial Ca2+ in the regulation of the tricarboxylic acid-cycle enzymes and in buffering cytosolic Ca2+ is discussed. PMID:3977831

  19. Inflammation decreases the level of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain mitochondria and makes them more susceptible to apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Lykhmus, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Zouridakis, Marios; Tzartos, Socrates; Komisarenko, Sergiy; Skok, Maryna

    2015-11-01

    α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs) are involved in regulating inflammatory reactions, as well as the cell viability. They are expressed in both the plasma membrane and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. Previously we found that neuroinflammation resulted in the decrease of α7 nAChR density in the brain of mice and was accompanied by accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides and memory impairment. In the present paper, it is shown that inflammation induced by either regular bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections or immunizations with α7 nAChR extracellular domain (1-208) affected also the brain cell mitochondria. Using various modifications of sandwich ELISA, we observed the decrease of α7 nAChRs and accumulation of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) in mitochondria of immunized or LPS-treated mice compared to control ones. Mitochondria of treated mice responded with cytochrome c release to lower Ca(2+) concentrations than mitochondria of control mice and were less sensitive to its attenuation with α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987. It is concluded that inflammation decreases α7 nAChR expression in both mitochondria and cell plasma membrane and makes mitochondria more susceptible to apoptosis induction.

  20. Adverse effects of high doses of intravenous alpha lipoic Acid on liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Michael; Berkson, Burton M; Garcia, Ana Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Alpha lipoic acid (ALA, thioctic acid), among other actions, is an essential coenzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl co-enzyme A. Therefore, it is necessary for the production of energy for aerobic organisms. Scientists have found that it can be used medically to help regenerate liver tissue, reverse the complications of diabetes mellitus, slow or stop the growth of cancer cells, and chelate heavy metals, among other actions. In this article, the authors describe the cellular mitochondrial damage from excessively high doses of this beneficial agent.

  1. A comparison of Zn2+- and Ca2+- triggered depolarization of liver mitochondria reveals no evidence of Zn2+-induced permeability transition

    PubMed Central

    Devinney, Michael J.; Malaiyandi, Latha M.; Vergun, Olga; DeFranco, Donald B.; Hastings, Teresa G.; Dineley, Kirk E.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular Zn2+ toxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Zn2+ depolarizes mitochondria in assays using isolated organelles as well as cultured cells. Some reports suggest that Zn2+-induced depolarization results from the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). For a more detailed analysis of this relationship, we compared Zn2+-induced depolarization with the effects of Ca2+ in single isolated rat liver mitochondria monitored with the potentiometric probe Rhodamine123. Consistent with previous work, we found that relatively low levels of Ca2+ caused rapid, complete and irreversible loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect that was diminished by classic inhibitors of mPT, including high Mg2+, ADP and cyclosporine A. Zn2+ also depolarized mitochondria, but only at relatively high concentrations. Furthermore Zn2+-induced depolarization was slower, partial and sometimes reversible, and was not affected by inhibitors of mPT. We also compared the effects of Ca2+ and Zn2+ in a calcein-retention assay. Consistent with the well-documented ability of Ca2+ to induce mPT, we found that it caused rapid and substantial loss of matrix calcein. In contrast, calcein remained in Zn2+-treated mitochondria. Considered together, our results suggest that Ca2+ and Zn2+ depolarize mitochondria by considerably different mechanisms, that opening of the mPTP is not a direct consequence of Zn2+-induced depolarization, and that Zn2+ is not a particularly potent mitochondrial inhibitor. PMID:19349076

  2. Effect of plasma exchange on hepatocyte oxidative stress, mitochondria function, and apoptosis in patients with acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wanxin; Huang, Zhongying; Wang, Yufang; Bo, Hong; Fu, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is an uncommon but clinically severe hepatopathy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis may be its key pathogenesis. Traditional therapy is inadequate for patients with severe conditions so the application of plasma exchange (PE) has been attempted. The present study aims to determine whether or not PE can lessen injuries to hepatocytes by ameliorating ROS and mitochondrial functions. Thirteen patients with AFLP were included in the experimental group, while fifteen patients made up the case-control group. PE was applied to patients in the PE group once a day for 1-3 days. Cultured hepatocytes were treated with serum or replacement fluid from patients and controls, respectively. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase (SOD), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase-3, caspase-9, and apoptosis of hepatocytes were measured. The clinical details and prognoses were also assessed. Patients in the experimental group had shorter durations of hepatic function recovery, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and hospitalization than those in the case-control group, although both groups showed the same mortality. PE could induce the production of SOD, inhibit the production of malondialdehyde, and recover MMP. The upregulation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression, as well as increase in apoptosis rate in the AFLP group, could be inhibited by PE. Moreover, PE also appeared to have a dose-dependent effect. PE protects hepatocytes by reducing damage to the mitochondria caused by oxidative stress; thus, it could be beneficial in the treatment of patients with severe AFLP and induce liver function recovery.

  3. A novel PGC-1α isoform in brain localizes to mitochondria and associates with PINK1 and VDAC

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Joungil; Batchu, Vera Venkatanaresh Kumar; Schubert, Manfred; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Russell, James W.

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Novel 35 kDa PGC-1α localizes to mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix in brain. •Mitochondrial localization of 35 kDa PGC-1α depends on VDAC protein. •Mitochondrial localization of 35 kDa PGC-1α depends on membrane potential. •The 35 kDa PGC-1α associates and colocalizes with PINK in brain mitochondria. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) are powerful regulators of mitochondrial function. Here, we report that a previously unrecognized, novel 35 kDa PGC-1α isoform localizes to the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix in brain as determined by protease protection and carbonate extraction assays, as well as by immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoelectron microscopy and import experiments in vitro revealed that 35 kDa PGC-1α colocalizes and interacts with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), and that its import depends on VDAC. Valinomycin treatment which depolarizes the membrane potential, abolished mitochondrial localization of the 35 kDa PGC-1α. Using blue native-PAGE, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy analyses, we found that the 35 kDa PGC-1α binds and colocalizes with PINK1 in brain mitochondria. This is the first report regarding mitochondrial localization of a novel 35 kDa PGC-1α isoform and its association with PINK1, suggesting possible regulatory roles for mitochondrial function in the brain.

  4. Studies on the Mechanism of Action of the in vitro PGB(x) Effect. III. The Interaction between PGB(x) and Rat Liver Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-17

    previously reported (2, 3 ). Note: Abbreviations used in this report are: RIM, rat liver mitochondria; Pi, inorganic phosphate ; PG-, prostaglandin; PGBx... dimethyl POPOP, 1,4-BIS (2-( 4 -methyl-5-phenyloxazoly 1)) benzene ’ar NADC-81243-60 EXPERIMENTAL The bast method for the measurement of the PGBx-RLM...DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS I BEFORE COMPLETING FORM A. REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 . FIECIPIEN~r5 CATALOG NUMBER NADC-8 1243-60

  5. The effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) extract on respiratory chain system activity in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Juzyszyn, Z; Czerny, B; Myśliwiec, Z; Pawlik, A; Droździk, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of artichoke extract on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (including reaction kinetics) was studied. The effect of the extract on the activity of isolated cytochrome oxidase was also studied. Extract in the range of 0.68-2.72 microg/ml demonstrated potent and concentration-dependent inhibitory activity. Concentrations > or =5.4 microg/ml entirely inhibited MRC activity. The succinate oxidase system (MRC complexes II-IV) was the most potently inhibited, its activity at an extract concentration of 1.36 microg/ml being reduced by 63.3% compared with the control (p < 0.05). The results suggest a complex inhibitory mechanism of the extract. Inhibition of the succinate oxidase system was competitive (K(i) = 0.23 microg/ml), whereas isolated cytochrome oxidase was inhibited noncompetitively (K(i) = 126 microg/ml). The results of this study suggest that the salubrious effects of artichoke extracts may rely in part on the effects of their active compounds on the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain system.

  6. Tl(+) showed negligible interaction with inner membrane sulfhydryl groups of rat liver mitochondria, but formed complexes with matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Kormilitsyn, Boris N; Furaev, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    The effects of Tl(+) on protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups, swelling, and respiration of rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were studied in a medium containing TlNO3 and sucrose, or TlNO3 and KNO3 as well as glutamate plus malate, or succinate plus rotenone. Detected with Ellman's reagent, an increase in the content of the SH groups was found in the inner membrane fraction, and a simultaneous decline was found in the content of the matrix-soluble fraction for RLM, incubated and frozen in 25-75 mM TlNO3 . This increase was greater in the medium containing KNO3 regardless of the presence of Ca(2+) . It was eliminated completely for RLM injected in the medium containing TlNO3 and then washed and frozen in the medium containing KNO3 . Calcium-loaded RLM showed increased swelling and decreased respiration. These results suggest that a ligand interaction of Tl(+) with protein SH groups, regardless of the presence of calcium, may underlie the mechanism of thallium toxicity.

  7. Dual coenzyme activities of high-Km aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Senior, D J

    1990-04-01

    Various kinetic approaches were carried out to investigate kinetic attributes for the dual coenzyme activities of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver. The enzyme catalyses NAD(+)- and NADP(+)-dependent oxidations of ethanal by an ordered bi-bi mechanism with NAD(P)+ as the first reactant bound and NAD(P)H as the last product released. The two coenzymes presumably interact with the kinetically identical site. NAD+ forms the dynamic binary complex with the enzyme, while the enzyme-NAD(P)H complex formation is associated with conformation change(s). A stopped-flow burst of NAD(P)H formation, followed by a slower steady-state turnover, suggests that either the deacylation or the release of NAD(P)H is rate limiting. Although NADP+ is reduced by a faster burst rate, NAD+ is slightly favored as the coenzyme by virtue of its marginally faster turnover rate.

  8. The use of choline acetyltransferase for measuring the synthesis of acetyl-coenzyme A and its release from brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S

    1967-09-01

    1. A method for measuring small amounts of acetyl-CoA synthesized in subcellular fractions of the brain from pyruvate and released from particles into the incubation medium has been developed by using placental choline acetyltransferase and choline in the incubation medium to transform acetyl-CoA into acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is measured by biological assay. Optimum conditions of incubation are described. 2. With fresh mitochondria, a decrease of acetyl-CoA output into the medium is observed in the presence of ATP or ADP, and an increase in the presence of calcium chloride or 2,4-dinitrophenol. Fluorocitrate and malonate have little or no effect. 3. After the mitochondria had been treated with ether, the release of acetyl-CoA into the medium is much larger; presumably, nearly all acetyl-CoA synthesized is then released and transformed into acetylcholine under the conditions used. The release of acetyl-CoA is diminished in the presence of Krebs-cycle intermediates and ADP. 4. Of all subcellular fractions, the highest acetyl-CoA production from pyruvate is found in the crude mitochondria; rates up to 51 mumoles of acetyl-CoA/g. of original tissue/hr. are observed in ether-treated samples. 5. The activities of acetyl-CoA synthetase and ATP citrate lyase found in homogenates and nerve-ending fractions of brain tissue are considerably lower than those of pyruvate oxidase complex and choline acetyltransferase. 6. The bearing of some of the findings on the question of the source of acetyl radicals for the synthesis of acetylcholine in vivo is discussed.

  9. Ca2+ Handling in Isolated Brain Mitochondria and Cultured Neurons Derived from the YAC128 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellman, Jessica J.; Hamilton, James; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2015-01-01

    We investigated Ca2+ handling in isolated brain synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria and in cultured striatal neurons from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington’s disease (HD). Both synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria from 2- and 12-month-old YAC128 mice had larger Ca2+ uptake capacity than mitochondria from YAC18 and wild-type FVB/NJ mice. Synaptic mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice had further augmented Ca2+ capacity compared with mitochondria from 2-month-old YAC128 mice and age-matched YAC18 and FVB/NJ mice. This increase in Ca2+ uptake capacity correlated with an increase in the amount of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) associated with mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice. We speculate that this may happen due to mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced damage. In experiments with striatal neurons from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice, brief exposure to 25 or 100μM glutamate produced transient elevations in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by recovery to near resting levels. Following recovery of cytosolic Ca2+, mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP produced comparable elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, suggesting similar Ca2+ release and, consequently, Ca2+ loads in neuronal mitochondria from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice. Together, our data argue against a detrimental effect of mHtt on Ca2+ handling in brain mitochondria of YAC128 mice. PMID:25963273

  10. The effect of chronic tianeptine administration on the brain mitochondria: direct links with an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Głombik, Katarzyna; Stachowicz, Aneta; Olszanecki, Rafał; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Lasoń, Władysław; Kubera, Marta; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Spedding, Michael; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of evidence has focused on the impact of mitochondrial disturbances in the development of depression, but little data exist regarding the effects of chronic administration of antidepressant drugs on the brain's mitochondrial protein profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of chronic treatment with an atypical antidepressant drug-tianeptine-on the mitochondria-enriched subproteome profile in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of 3-month-old male rats following a prenatal stress procedure. Rats that were exposed to a prenatal stress procedure displayed depressive- and anxiety-like disturbances based on the elevated plus-maze and Porsolt tests. Moreover, two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry showed structure-dependent mitoproteome changes in brains of prenatally stressed rats after chronic tianeptine administration. A component of 2-oxoglutarate and succinate flavoprotein subunit dehydrogenases, isocitrate subunit alpha, was upregulated in the hippocampus. In the frontal cortex, there was a striking increase in the expression of glutamate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bc1 complex subunit 2. These findings suggest that mitochondria are underappreciated targets for therapeutic interventions, and mitochondrial function may be crucial for the effective treatment of stress-related diseases.

  11. Protections of SMND-309, a novel derivate of salvianolic acid B, on brain mitochondria contribute to injury amelioration in cerebral ischemia rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingwei; Fu, Fenghua; Li, Guisheng; Gao, Yubai; Zhang, Yunjuan; Meng, Qingsheng; Li, Changlu; Liu, Fu

    2009-08-01

    SMND-309, a novel compound named (2E)-2-{6-[(E)-2-carboxylvinyl]-2,3-dihydroxyphenyl}-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propenoic acid, is a new derivate of salvianolic acid B. The present study was conducted to investigate whether SMND-309 has a protective effect on brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia, and if it did so, to investigate its effects on brain mitochondria. Adult male SD rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) by bipolar electro-coagulation. Behavioral tests and brain patho-physiological tests were used to evaluate the damage to central nervous system. Origin targets including mitochondria production of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant potentia, membrane potential, energy metabolism, mitochondrial respiratory enzymes activities and mitochondria swelling degree were evaluated. The results showed that SMND-309 decreased neurological deficit scores, reduced the number of dead hippocampal neuronal cells in accordance with its depression on mitochondria swelling degree, reactive oxygen species production, improvements on mitochondria swelling, energy metabolism, membrane potential level and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities. All of these findings indicate that SMND-309 exerted potent neuroprotective effects in the model of permanent cerebral ischemia, contributed to its protections on brain mitochondrial structure and function.

  12. Effects of treating old rats with an aqueous Agaricus blazei extract on oxidative and functional parameters of the brain tissue and brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B; Soares, Andréia A; de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane M; Bracht, Adelar

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and increased oxidative stress is a striking phenomenon in the brain of aged individuals. For this reason there has been a constant search for drugs and natural products able to prevent or at least to mitigate these problems. In the present study the effects of an aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei, a medicinal mushroom, on the oxidative state and on the functionality of mitochondria from the brain of old rats (21 months) were conducted. The extract was administered intragastrically during 21 days at doses of 200 mg/kg. The administration of the A. blazei extract was protective to the brain of old rats against oxidative stress by decreasing the lipid peroxidation levels and the reactive oxygen species content and by increasing the nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidant capacities. Administration of the A. blazei extract also increased the activity of several mitochondrial respiratory enzymes and, depending on the substrate, the mitochondrial coupled respiration.

  13. Effects of Treating Old Rats with an Aqueous Agaricus blazei Extract on Oxidative and Functional Parameters of the Brain Tissue and Brain Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B.; Soares, Andréia A.; de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; Fernando Comar, Jurandir; Peralta, Rosane M.; Bracht, Adelar

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and increased oxidative stress is a striking phenomenon in the brain of aged individuals. For this reason there has been a constant search for drugs and natural products able to prevent or at least to mitigate these problems. In the present study the effects of an aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei, a medicinal mushroom, on the oxidative state and on the functionality of mitochondria from the brain of old rats (21 months) were conducted. The extract was administered intragastrically during 21 days at doses of 200 mg/kg. The administration of the A. blazei extract was protective to the brain of old rats against oxidative stress by decreasing the lipid peroxidation levels and the reactive oxygen species content and by increasing the nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidant capacities. Administration of the A. blazei extract also increased the activity of several mitochondrial respiratory enzymes and, depending on the substrate, the mitochondrial coupled respiration. PMID:24876914

  14. Oxidative stress is involved in the permeabilization of the inner membrane of brain mitochondria exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation and low micromolar Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Schild, Lorenz; Reiser, Georg

    2005-07-01

    From in vivo models of stroke it is known that ischemia/reperfusion induces oxidative stress that is accompanied by deterioration of brain mitochondria. Previously, we reported that the increase in Ca2+ induces functional breakdown and morphological disintegration in brain mitochondria subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). Protection by ADP indicated the involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the mechanism of membrane permeabilization. Until now it has been unclear how reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to this process. We now report that brain mitochondria which had been subjected to H/R in the presence of low micromolar Ca2+ display low state 3 respiration (20% of control), loss of cytochrome c, and reduced glutathione levels (75% of control). During reoxygenation, significant mitochondrial generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected. The addition of the membrane permeant superoxide anion scavenger TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) suppressed the production of H2O2 by brain mitochondria metabolizing glutamate plus malate by 80% under normoxic conditions. TEMPOL partially protected brain mitochondria exposed to H/R and low micromolar Ca2+ from decrease in state 3 respiration (from 25% of control to 60% of control with TEMPOL) and permeabilization of the inner membrane. Membrane permeabilization was obvious, because state 3 respiration could be stimulated by extramitochondrial NADH. Our data suggest that ROS and Ca2+ synergistically induce permeabilization of the inner membrane of brain mitochondria exposed to H/R. However, permeabilization can only partially be prevented by suppressing mitochondrial generation of ROS. We conclude that transient deprivation of oxygen and glucose during temporary ischemia coupled with elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration triggers ROS generation and mitochondrial permeabilization, resulting in neural cell death.

  15. Mitochondrial superoxide mediates labile iron level: evidence from Mn-SOD-transgenic mice and heterozygous knockout mice and isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wissam H; Habib, Hosam M; Kamal, Hina; St Clair, Daret K; Chow, Ching K

    2013-12-01

    Superoxide is the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by aerobic cells primarily in mitochondria. It is also capable of producing other ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Moreover, superoxide has the potential to release iron from its protein complexes. Unbound or loosely bound cellular iron, known as labile iron, can catalyze the formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. ROS/RNS can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and damage. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) is the chief ROS-scavenging enzyme and thereby the primary antioxidant involved in protecting mitochondria from oxidative damage. To investigate whether mitochondrial superoxide mediates labile iron in vivo, the levels of labile iron were determined in the tissues of mice overexpressing Mn-SOD and heterozygous Mn-SOD-knockout mice. Furthermore, the effect of increased mitochondrial superoxide generation on labile iron levels was determined in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to various electron transport inhibitors. The results clearly showed that increased expression of Mn-SOD significantly lowered the levels of labile iron in heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle, whereas decreased expression of Mn-SOD significantly increased the levels of labile iron in the same organs. In addition, the data showed that peroxidative damage to membrane lipids closely correlated with the levels of labile iron in various tissues and that altering the status of Mn-SOD did not alter the status of other antioxidant systems. Results also showed that increased ROS production in isolated liver mitochondria significantly increased the levels of mitochondrial labile iron. These findings constitute the first evidence suggesting that mitochondrial superoxide is capable of releasing iron from its protein complexes in vivo and that it could also release iron from protein complexes contained within the organelle.

  16. Mitochondria modify exercise-induced development of stem cell-derived neurons in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Steib, Kathrin; Schäffner, Iris; Jagasia, Ravi; Ebert, Birgit; Lie, D Chichung

    2014-05-07

    Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian hippocampus continuously generate new functional neurons, which modify the hippocampal network and significantly contribute to cognitive processes and mood regulation. Here, we show that the development of new neurons from stem cells in adult mice is paralleled by extensive changes to mitochondrial mass, distribution, and shape. Moreover, exercise-a strong modifier of adult hippocampal neurogenesis-accelerates neuronal maturation and induces a profound increase in mitochondrial content and the presence of mitochondria in dendritic segments. Genetic inhibition of the activity of the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibits neurogenesis under basal and exercise conditions. Conversely, enhanced Drp1 activity furthers exercise-induced acceleration of neuronal maturation. Collectively, these results indicate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires adaptation of the mitochondrial compartment and suggest that mitochondria are targets for enhancing neurogenesis-dependent hippocampal plasticity.

  17. Papyriferic acid, an antifeedant triterpene from birch trees, inhibits succinate dehydrogenase from liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    McLean, Stuart; Richards, Stephen M; Cover, Siow-Leng; Brandon, Sue; Davies, Noel W; Bryant, John P; Clausen, Thomas P

    2009-10-01

    Papyriferic acid (PA) is a triterpene that is secreted by glands on twigs of the juvenile ontogenetic phase of resin producing tree birches (e.g., Betula neoalaskana, B. pendula) and that deters browsing by mammals such as the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus). We investigated the pharmacology of PA as a first step in understanding its antifeedant effect. After oral administration to rats, PA and several metabolites were found in feces but not urine, indicating that little was absorbed systemically. Metabolism involved various combinations of hydrolysis of its acetyl and malonyl ester groups, and hydroxylation of the terpene moiety. The presence of a malonyl group suggested a possible interaction with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme known to be competitively inhibited by malonic acid. The effect of PA on the oxidation of succinate by SDH was examined in mitochondrial preparations from livers of ox, rabbit, and rat. In all three species, PA was a potent inhibitor of SDH. Kinetic analysis indicated that, unlike malonate, PA acted by an uncompetitive mechanism, meaning that it binds to the enzyme-substrate complex. The hydrolysis product of PA, betulafolienetriol oxide, was inactive on SDH. Overall, the evidence suggests that PA acts as the intact molecule and interacts at a site other than the succinate binding site, possibly binding to the ubiquinone sites on complex II. Papyriferic acid was potent (K(iEIS) ranged from 25 to 45 microM in the three species) and selective, as malate dehydrogenase was unaffected. Although rigorous proof will require further experiments, we have a plausible mechanism for the antifeedant effect of PA: inhibition of SDH in gastrointestinal cells decreases mitochondrial energy production resulting in a noxious stimulus, 5-HT release, and sensations of nausea and discomfort. There is evidence that the co-evolution of birches and hares over a large and geographically-diverse area in Northern Europe and America has

  18. Mitochondria in White, Brown, and Beige Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Kripnerová, Michaela; Dvorakova, Jana; Pitule, Pavel; Grundmanova, Martina; Babuska, Vaclav; Mullerova, Dana; Kuncova, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in energy metabolism in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle, brain, liver, and adipose tissue. Three types of adipose depots can be identified in mammals, commonly classified according to their colour appearance: the white (WAT), the brown (BAT), and the beige/brite/brown-like (bAT) adipose tissues. WAT is mainly involved in the storage and mobilization of energy and BAT is predominantly responsible for nonshivering thermogenesis. Recent data suggest that adipocyte mitochondria might play an important role in the development of obesity through defects in mitochondrial lipogenesis and lipolysis, regulation of adipocyte differentiation, apoptosis, production of oxygen radicals, efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of conversion of white adipocytes into brown-like adipocytes. This review summarizes the main characteristics of each adipose tissue subtype and describes morphological and functional modifications focusing on mitochondria and their activity in healthy and unhealthy adipocytes. PMID:27073398

  19. Coenzyme Q10 remarkably improves the bio-energetic function of rat liver mitochondria treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Najibi, Asma; Amirzadegan, Najmeh; Gharibi, Raziyeh; Dashti, Ayat; Omidi, Mahmoud; Saeedi, Arastoo; Ghafarian-Bahreman, Ali; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-09-05

    CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol therefore it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Statins are the most widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs with the ability to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. Preclinical and clinical safety data have shown that statins do not cause serious adverse effects in humans. However, their long-term administration is associated with a variety of myopatic complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CoQ10 supplementation of animals under high fat diet (HFD) treated with statins is able to bypass the mitochondrial metabolic defects or not? Animals were divided into 7 groups and fed with either regular (RD) or HFD during experiments. The first group considered as regular control and fed with a RD. Groups 2-7 including HFD control, CoQ10 (10mg/kg), simvastatin (30mg/kg), atorvastatin (30mg/kg), simvastatin+CoQ10 or atorvastatin+CoQ10 treated orally for 30 days and fed with HFD. At the end of treatments, the animals were killed and blood samples were collected for biochemical examinations. The rat liver mitochondria were isolated and several mitochondrial indices including succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPP) were determined. We found that triglyceride (Tg), cholesterol (Chol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were augmented with HFD compared to RD and treatment with statins remarkably lowered the Tg, Chol and LDL levels. Mitochondrial parameters including, SDA, ATP levels, MMP and MPP were reduced with statin treatment and improved by co-administration with CoQ10.

  20. [Activity of oil isolated from Amaranth seeds on energetic functions of rat liver mitochondria after adrenaline introduction].

    PubMed

    Sirota, T V; Eliseeva, O P; Khunderiakova, N V; Kaminskiĭ, D V; Makhotina, O A; Kondrashova, M N

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that a three-week feeding of rats with oil derived from seeds of amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.) leads to a moderate activation of respiration of coupled and uncoupled rat liver mitochondria (MCh) that oxidize succinate and succinate + glutamate, as well as alpha-ketoglutarate and alpha-ketoglutarate + malonate. In animals receiving the amaranth oil, the injection of adrenaline did not affect the oil-activated respiration of MCh during succinate oxidation; i. e., animals prepared by an oil-enriched diet were resistant to the action of adrenaline, which prevented from possible hyperactivation of mitochondrial functions. In the group of control animals, which received no oil, the injection of adrenaline activated the rate of phosphorylating respiration of MCh during oxidation of succinate or succinate + glutamate: the rate of oxygen uptake in state 3 respiration (by Chance) increased, and the phosphorylation time decreased. The injection of adrenaline did not affect the parameters of respiration of MCh that oxidize a-ketoglutarate; however, in the presence of malonate, the oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate in state 3 and uncoupled respiration have shown mild but significant increase in response to adrenaline. In animals receiving the amaranth oil, the oil-induced activation of respiration of MCh in response to adrenaline retained but did not increase; however, the phosphorylation time significantly decreased. Thus, concentrated oil of seeds activates the respiration of MCh. In addition, it enhances an energetic function of MCh, which prevents from the hyper-activation of mitochondrial respiration by adrenaline. Therefore an activation of energetic function of MCh by amaranth oil could explain its adaptogenic effect on rats.

  1. Cobalt induces oxidative stress in isolated liver mitochondria responsible for permeability transition and intrinsic apoptosis in hepatocyte primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Valentina; Compagnone, Alessandra; Bandino, Andrea; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Rossi, Carlo Alberto; Zanetti, Filippo; Colombatto, Sebastiano; Grillo, Maria Angelica; Toninello, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    It is well established that cobalt mediates the occurrence of oxidative stress which contributes to cell toxicity and death. However, the mechanisms of these effects are not fully understood. This investigation aimed at establishing if cobalt acts as an inducer of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and at clarifying the mechanism of this process. Cobalt, in the ionized species Co(2+), is able to induce the phenomenon of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in rat liver mitochondria (RLM) with the opening of the transition pore. In fact, Co(2+) induces mitochondrial swelling, which is prevented by cyclosporin A and other typical MPT inhibitors such as Ca(2+) transport inhibitors and bongkrekic acid, as well as anti-oxidant agents. In parallel with mitochondrial swelling, Co(2+) also induces the collapse of electrical membrane potential. However in this case, cyclosporine A and the other MPT inhibitors (except ruthenium red and EGTA) only partially prevent DeltaPsi drop, suggesting that Co(2+) also has a proton leakage effect on the inner mitochondrial membrane. MPT induction is due to oxidative stress, as a result of generation by Co(2+) of the highly damaging hydroxyl radical, with the oxidation of sulfhydryl groups, glutathione and pyridine nucleotides. Co(2+) also induces the release of the pro-apoptotic factors, cytochrome c and AIF. Incubation of rat hepatocyte primary cultures with Co(2+) results in apoptosis induction with caspase activation and increased level of expression of HIF-1alpha. All these observations allow us to state that, in the presence of calcium, Co(2+) is an inducer of apoptosis triggered by mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  2. Effect of salicylic acid and diclofenac on the medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA formation in the liver and brain of mouse.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Fumiyo; Kazumi, Maya; Tatsuki, Takao; Suzuki, Risa

    2009-07-01

    Medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in fatty acid metabolism. Effects of salicylic acid on the in vivo formation of acyl-CoAs in mouse liver and brain were investigated. Further, inhibition of the medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases by salicylic acid and diclofenac was determined in mouse liver and brain mitochondria. Acyl-CoA esters were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The amounts of medium-chain acyl-CoAs (C(6), C(8) and C(10)) were less than long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(16:0), C(18:0), C(18:1) and C(20:4)) in both liver and brain. The administration of salicylic acid decreased the levels of both the medium-chain (C(6), C(8) and C(10)) and long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(16:0), C(18:0), C(18:1) and C(20:4)) in liver. In brain, however, only long-chain acyl-CoAs were decreased. The level of salicylyl-CoA detected in brain was about 12% of that in liver. Salicylic acid had a strong inhibitory activity (IC(50) = 0.1 mm) for the liver mitochondrial formation of hexanoyl-CoA from hexanoic acid, whereas diclofenac was weak (IC(50) = 4.4 mm). In contrast, diclofenac (IC(50) = 1.4 mm) inhibited the liver mitochondrial long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases more potently than salicylic acid (IC(50) = 25.5 mm). Similar inhibitory activities for the acyl-CoA synthetases were obtained in the case of the brain and liver mitochondria, except for the weak inhibition of brain medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetases by salicylic acid (IC(50) = 1.8 mm). These findings suggest that salicylic acid and diclofenac exhibit different mechanisms of inhibition of fatty acid metabolism depending on the length of the acyl chain and tissues, and they may contribute to the further understanding of the toxic effects associated with these drugs.

  3. Imaging Plasmodium Immunobiology in Liver, Brain, and Lung

    PubMed Central

    Frevert, Ute; Nacer, Adéla; Cabrera, Mynthia; Movila, Alexandru; Leberl, Maike

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is responsible for the deaths of over half a million African children annually. Until a decade ago, dynamic analysis of the malaria parasite was limited to in vitro systems with the typical limitations associated with 2D monocultures or entirely artificial surfaces. Due to extremely low parasite densities, the liver was considered a black box in terms of Plasmodium sporozoite invasion, liver stage development, and merozoite release into the blood. Further, nothing was known about the behavior of blood stage parasites in organs such as brain where clinical signs manifest and the ensuing immune response of the host that may ultimately result in a fatal outcome. The advent of fluorescent parasites, advances in imaging technology, and availability of an ever-increasing number of cellular and molecular probes have helped illuminate many steps along the pathogenetic cascade of this deadly tropical parasite. PMID:24076429

  4. Imaging Plasmodium immunobiology in the liver, brain, and lung.

    PubMed

    Frevert, Ute; Nacer, Adéla; Cabrera, Mynthia; Movila, Alexandru; Leberl, Maike

    2014-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is responsible for the deaths of over half a million African children annually. Until a decade ago, dynamic analysis of the malaria parasite was limited to in vitro systems with the typical limitations associated with 2D monocultures or entirely artificial surfaces. Due to extremely low parasite densities, the liver was considered a black box in terms of Plasmodium sporozoite invasion, liver stage development, and merozoite release into the blood. Further, nothing was known about the behavior of blood stage parasites in organs such as the brain where clinical signs manifest and the ensuing immune response of the host that may ultimately result in a fatal outcome. The advent of fluorescent parasites, advances in imaging technology, and availability of an ever-increasing number of cellular and molecular probes have helped illuminate many steps along the pathogenetic cascade of this deadly tropical parasite.

  5. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chupin, Stéphanie; Baron, Stéphanie; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Vessières, Emilie; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM), resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM) it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed. PMID:26684010

  6. EFFECTS OF AGE, DIETARY AND BEHAVIORAL ENRICHMENT ON BRAIN MITOCHONDRIA IN A CANINE MODEL OF HUMAN AGING

    PubMed Central

    Head, E.; Nukala, V. N.; Fenoglio, K.A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Cotman, C. W.; Sullivan, P. G.

    2009-01-01

    Dogs develop cognitive decline and a progressive accumulation of oxidative damage. In a previous longitudinal study, we demonstrated that aged dogs treated with either an antioxidant diet or with behavioral enrichment show cognitive improvement. The antioxidant diet included cellular antioxidants (Vitamins E, C, fruits and vegetables) and mitochondrial co-factors (lipoic acid and carnitine). Behavioral enrichment consisted of physical exercise, social enrichment and cognitive training. We hypothesized that the antioxidant treatment improved neuronal function through increased mitochondrial function. Thus, we measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and bioenergetics in mitochondria isolated from young, aged and treated aged animals. Aged canine brain mitochondria show significant increases in ROS production and a reduction in NADH-linked respiration. Mitochondrial function (ROS and NADH-linked respiration) was improved selectively in aged dogs treated with an antioxidant diet. In contrast behavioral enrichment had no effect on any mitochondrial parameters. These results suggest that an antioxidant diet improves cognition by maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, which may be an independent molecular pathway not engaged by behavioral enrichment. PMID:19703441

  7. Depletion of mitochondrial enzyme system in liver, lung, brain, stomach and kidney induced by benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoying; Li, Yongfei; He, Jianlong; Shah, Walayat; Xue, Xiaochang; Feng, Guodong; Zhang, Huqin; Gao, Meili

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has recently received considerable attention as it plays an important role in adult human pathology caused by various drugs, endogenous agents and environmental agents. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant mainly derived from anthropogenic activity during incomplete combustion of organic materials from various sources. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) on mitochondrial enzymes in the multiple organs including liver, lung, brain, stomach and kidney. ICR mice were exposed to different doses of BaP (2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg body weight) through oral gavage and intraperitoneal injection treatment for 13 weeks consecutively. The induced mitochondrial damage in the examined organs was assayed in terms of significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and prominent decrease in antioxidant enzymes. Non enzymatic antioxidants and Krebs cycle's enzymes were also significantly decreased in mitochondria. Additionally, BaP induced the body growth retardation and decrease in relative liver weight, increase in relative lung, stomach, kidney and brain weights, and this was further certified through histopathological lesions. Liver and lungs were more prominently damaged by BaP. The mitochondrial depletion increased in BaP dose-dependent manner.

  8. Biochemical mechanism of GSH depletion induced by 1,2-dibromoethane in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Evidence of a GSH conjugation process.

    PubMed

    Botti, B; Ceccarelli, D; Tomasi, A; Vannini, V; Muscatello, U; Masini, A

    1989-09-15

    HPLC measurements of GSH and GSSG levels in isolated rat liver mitochondria, on addition of 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE), revealed the presence of a glutathione (GSH)-conjugating pathway of DBE. This process required the structural integrity of the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane complex and was inhibited by the uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, particularly 2,4-dinitrophenol. On the other hand it was not affected by the energetic state of the mitochondria, since other mitochondrial inhibitors like KCN and oligomycin did not have any effect on it. This process also did not require the involvement of mitochondrial inner membrane transport systems, based on the measurement of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The involvement of mitochondrial GSH-S-transferases, located either in the matrix or in the intermembrane space, is discussed.

  9. Selective Toxicity of Persian Gulf Sea Cucumber (Holothuria parva) and Sponge (Haliclona oculata) Methanolic Extracts on Liver Mitochondria Isolated from an Animal Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seydi, Enayatollah; Motallebi, Abbasali; Dastbaz, Maryam; Dehghan, Sahar; Salimi, Ahmad; Nazemi, Melika; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural products isolated from marine environments are well known for their pharmacodynamic potential in diverse disease treatments, such as for cancer or inflammatory conditions. Sea cucumbers are marine animals of the phylum Echinoderm and the class Holothuroidea, with leathery skin and gelatinous bodies. Sponges are important components of Persian Gulf animal communities, and the marine sponges of the genus Haliclona have been known to display broad-spectrum biological activity. Many studies have shown that sea cucumbers and sponges contain antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the selective toxicity of Persian Gulf sea cucumber (Holothuria parva) and sponge (Haliclona oculata) methanolic extracts on liver mitochondria isolated from an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma, as part of a national project that hopes to identify novel potential anticancer candidates among Iranian Persian Gulf flora and fauna. Materials and Methods: To induce hepatocarcinogenesis, rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injections (200 mg/kg i.p. by a single dose), and then the cancer was promoted with 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) (0.02 w/w) for two weeks. Histopathological evaluations were performed, and levels of liver injury markers and a specific liver cancer marker (alpha-fetoprotein), were determined for confirmation of hepatocellular carcinoma induction. Finally, mitochondria were isolated from cancerous and non-cancerous hepatocytes. Results: Our results showed that H. parva methanolic extracts (250, 500, and 1000 µg/mL) and H. oculata methanolic extracts (200, 400, and 800 µg/mL) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial swelling, and cytochrome c release in the mitochondria obtained from cancerous hepatocytes, but not in mitochondria obtained from non-cancerous liver hepatocytes. These extracts also induced caspase-3 activation, which is

  10. Effect of thyroid state on enzymatic and non-enzymatic processes in H2O2 removal by liver mitochondria of male rats.

    PubMed

    Venditti, P; Napolitano, G; Barone, D; Coppola, I; Di Meo, S

    2015-03-05

    We investigated thyroid state effect on capacity of rat liver mitochondria to remove exogenously produced H2O2, determining their ability to decrease fluorescence generated by an H2O2 detector system. The rate of H2O2 removal by both non respiring and respiring mitochondria was increased by hyperthyroidism and decreased by hypothyroidism. However, the rate was higher in the presence of respiratory substrates, in particular pyruvate/malate, indicating a respiration-dependent process. Generally, the changes in H2O2 removal rates mirrored those in H2O2 release rates excluding the possibility that endogenous and exogenous H2O2 competed for the removing system. Pharmacological inhibition revealed thyroid state-linked differences in antioxidant enzyme contribution to H2O2 removal which were consistent with those in antioxidant system activities. The H2O2 removal was only in part due to enzymatic systems and that imputable to non-enzymatic processes was higher in hyperthyroid and lower in hypothyroid mitochondria. The levels of cytochrome c and the light emissions, due to luminol oxidation catalyzed by cytochrome/H2O2, exhibited similar changes with thyroid state supporting the idea that non-enzymatic scavenging was mainly due to hemoprotein action, which produces hydroxyl radicals. Further support was obtained showing that the whole antioxidant capacity, which provides an evaluation of capacity of the systems, different from cytochromes, assigned to H2O2 scavenging, was lower in hyperthyroid than in hypothyroid state. In conclusion, our results show that mitochondria from hyperthyroid liver have a high capacity for H2O2 removal, which, however, leading in great part to more reactive oxygen species, results harmful for such organelles.

  11. Cardiolipin-mediated procoagulant activity of mitochondria contributes to traumatic brain injury-associated coagulopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zilong; Wang, Min; Tian, Ye; Hilton, Tristan; Salsbery, Breia; Zhou, Eric Z; Wu, Xiaoping; Thiagarajan, Perumal; Boilard, Eric; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-06-02

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid located exclusively in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Its presence in blood indicates mitochondrial damage and release from injured cells. Here, we report the detection of CL-exposed brain-derived mitochondrial microparticles (mtMPs) at 17 547 ± 2677/μL in the peripheral blood of mice subjected to fluid percussion injury to the brain. These mtMPs accounted for 55.2% ± 12.6% of all plasma annexin V-binding microparticles found in the acute phase of injury. They were also released from cultured neuronal and glial cells undergoing apoptosis. The mtMPs synergized with platelets to facilitate vascular leakage by disrupting the endothelial barrier. The disrupted endothelial barrier allowed the release of mtMPs into the systemic circulation to promote coagulation in both traumatically injured and mtMP- or CL-injected mice, leading to enhanced fibrinolysis, vascular fibrin deposition, and thrombosis. This mtMP-induced coagulation was mediated by CL transported from the inner to the outer mitochondrial membrane and was blocked by the scavenging molecule lactadherin. The mtMP-bound CL was ∼1600 times as active as purified CL in promoting coagulation. This study uncovered a novel procoagulant activity of CL and CL-exposed mitochondria that may contribute to traumatic brain injury-associated coagulopathy and identified potential pathways to block this activity.

  12. cis-4-Decenoic and decanoic acids impair mitochondrial energy, redox and Ca(2+) homeostasis and induce mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in rat brain and liver: Possible implications for the pathogenesis of MCAD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of octanoic (OA), decanoic (DA) and cis-4-decenoic (cDA) acids, as well as by their carnitine by-products. Untreated patients present episodic encephalopathic crises and biochemical liver alterations, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. We investigated the effects of OA, DA, cDA, octanoylcarnitine (OC) and decanoylcarnitine (DC) on critical mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver. DA and cDA increased resting respiration and diminished ADP- and CCCP-stimulated respiration and complexes II-III and IV activities in both tissues. The data indicate that these compounds behave as uncouplers and metabolic inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Noteworthy, metabolic inhibition was more evident in brain as compared to liver. DA and cDA also markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, NAD(P)H content and Ca(2+) retention capacity in Ca(2+)-loaded brain and liver mitochondria. The reduction of Ca(2+) retention capacity was more pronounced in liver and totally prevented by cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, demonstrating the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and Ca(2+). Furthermore, cDA induced lipid peroxidation in brain and liver mitochondria and increased hydrogen peroxide formation in brain, suggesting the participation of oxidative damage in cDA-induced alterations. Interestingly, OA, OC and DC did not alter the evaluated parameters, implying lower toxicity for these compounds. Our results suggest that DA and cDA, in contrast to OA and medium-chain acylcarnitines, disturb important mitochondrial functions in brain and liver by multiple mechanisms that are possibly involved in the neuropathology and liver alterations observed in MCAD deficiency.

  13. Decline in cytochrome c oxidase activity in rat-brain mitochondria with aging. Role of peroxidized cardiolipin and beneficial effect of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Petrosillo, Giuseppe; De Benedictis, Valentina; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Paradies, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered a key factor in mitochondrial dysfunction associated with brain aging process. Mitochondrial respiration is an important source of ROS and hence a potential contributor to brain functional changes with aging. In this study, we examined the effect of aging on cytochrome c oxidase activity and other bioenergetic processes such as oxygen consumption, membrane potential and ROS production in rat brain mitochondria. We found a significant age-dependent decline in the cytochrome c oxidase activity which was associated with parallel changes in state 3 respiration, membrane potential and with an increase in H2O2 generation. The cytochrome aa3 content was practically unchanged in mitochondria from young and aged animals. The age-dependent decline of cytochrome c oxidase activity could be restored, in situ, to the level of young animals, by exogenously added cardiolipin. In addition, exposure of brain mitochondria to peroxidized cardiolipin resulted in an inactivation of this enzyme complex. It is suggested that oxidation/depletion of cardiolipin could be responsible, at least in part, for the decline of cytochrome c oxidase and mitochondrial dysfunction in brain aging. Melatonin treatment of old animals largely prevented the age-associated alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters. These results may prove useful in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction associated with brain aging process, and may have implications in etiopathology of age-associated neurodegenerative disorders and in the development of potential treatment strategies.

  14. Cocaine and mitochondria-related signaling in the brain: A mechanistic view and future directions.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Jardim, Fernanda Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is extensively used as a psychostimulant among subjects at different ages worldwide. Cocaine causes neuronal dysfunction and, consequently, negatively affects human behavior and decreases life quality severely. Cocaine acts through diverse mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and activation of cell signaling pathways associated to stress response. There is some controversy regarding the effect of cocaine in inducing cell death through apoptosis in different experimental models. The aim of the present work is to discuss data associated to the mitochondrial consequences of cocaine exposure of mammalian cells in several experimental models from in vitro to in vivo, including postmortem human tissue analyses. Furthermore, future directions are proposed in order to serve as a suggestive guide in relation to the next steps towards the complete elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity elicited by cocaine upon mitochondria of neuronal cells.

  15. Sulfurtransferases and cyanide detoxification in mouse liver, kidney, and brain.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, M; Jurkowska, H; Sliwa, L; Srebro, Z

    2004-01-01

    The activity of rhodanese, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) and cystathionase in mouse liver, kidney, and four brain regions: tele-, meso-, di- and rhombencephalon was studied 30 min and 2 h following a sublethal dose of cyanide (4 mg/ kg body weight) intraperitoneal injection. Simultaneously, sulfane sulfur levels and total sulfur content, a direct or indirect source of sulfur for CN(-) conversion to SCN(-), were also investigated in these tissues. In the liver this dose of cyanide seemed to impair the process of cyanide detoxification by MPST, as well as rhodanese inhibition. The effects of cyanide administration to mice proved to be totally different in the liver and kidney. In the kidney, a significant increase in the rhodanese activity was observed as early as 30 min following cyanide intoxication, and an elevated cystathionase activity after 2 h was detected. This suggests the involvement of cystathionase in cyanide detoxification in the kidney. The activity of MPST remained at the same level as in the control group. In the rhombencephalon, similarly as in the kidney, L-cysteine desulfuration pathways, which generate sulfane sulfur and sulfurtransferases that transfer sulfane sulfur atoms to CN(-), seemed to play an important role as a defense system against cyanide. The stable level of sulfane sulfur and total sulfur content was accompanied in the rhombencephalon by an increased activity of MPST, cystathionase and rhodanese. In other brain regions the role of these three sulfurtransferases was not so clear and it seemed that in the telencephalon, where the total sulfur content, but not the sulfane sulfur level, was significantly increased, some sulfur-containing compounds, such as GSH and/or cysteine, appeared in response to cyanide.

  16. Clinical science workshop: targeting the gut-liver-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vishal C; White, Helen; Støy, Sidsel; Bajaj, Jasmohan S; Shawcross, Debbie L

    2016-12-01

    A clinical science workshop was held at the ISHEN meeting in London on Friday 11th September 2014 with the aim of thrashing out how we might translate what we know about the central role of the gut-liver-brain axis into targets which we can use in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This review summarises the integral role that inter-organ ammonia metabolism plays in the pathogenesis of HE with specific discussion of the roles that the small and large intestine, liver, brain, kidney and muscle assume in ammonia and glutamine metabolism. Most recently, the salivary and gut microbiome have been shown to underpin the pathophysiological changes which culminate in HE and patients with advanced cirrhosis present with enteric dysbiosis with small bowel bacterial overgrowth and translocation of bacteria and their products across a leaky gut epithelial barrier. Resident macrophages within the liver are able to sense bacterial degradation products initiating a pro-inflammatory response within the hepatic parenchyma and release of cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 into the systemic circulation. The endotoxemia and systemic inflammatory response that are generated predispose both to the development of infection as well as the manifestation of covert and overt HE. Co-morbidities such as diabetes and insulin resistance, which commonly accompany cirrhosis, may promote slow gut transit, promote bacterial overgrowth and increase glutaminase activity and may need to be acknowledged in HE risk stratification assessments and therapeutic regimens. Therapies are discussed which target ammonia production, utilisation or excretion at an individual organ level, or which reduce systemic inflammation and endotoxemia which are known to exacerbate the cerebral effects of ammonia in HE. The ideal therapeutic strategy would be to use an agent that can reduce hyperammonemia and reduce systemic inflammation or perhaps to adopt a combination of

  17. Decrease of rotenone inhibition is a sensitive parameter of complex I damage in brain non-synaptic mitochondria of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Genova, M L; Bovina, C; Marchetti, M; Pallotti, F; Tietz, C; Biagini, G; Pugnaloni, A; Viticchi, C; Gorini, A; Villa, R F; Lenaz, G

    1997-06-30

    We investigated NADH oxidation in non-synaptic and synaptic mitochondria from brain cortex of 4- and 24-month-old rats. The NADH oxidase activity was significantly lower in non-synaptic mitochondria from aged rats; we also found a significant decrease of sensitivity of NADH oxidation to the specific Complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Since the rotenone-binding site encompasses Complex I subunits encoded by mtDNA, these results are in accordance with the mitochondrial theory of aging, whereby somatic mtDNA mutations are at the basis of cellular senescence. Accordingly, a 5 kb deletion was detected only in the cortex of the aged animals.

  18. Effect of the general anaesthetics, alphaxalone, hexobarbitone and halothane on calcium uptake into rat brain mitochondria in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, A J; Esmail, A F

    1982-01-01

    In vitro studies of the effect of alphaxalone on ADP-stimulated respiration and Ca2+ uptake in rat brain mitochondria showed that the anesthetic was a potent inhibitor of both reactions. In vivo measurements showed that although alphaxalone did not inhibit oxidative phosphorylation during anaesthesia, the uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial fraction was strongly inhibited. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the dose of anaesthetic administered and was reversed by the CNS stimulant, bemigride. Halothane and hexobarbitone also inhibited mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in vivo. The levels of anaesthetic in the brain were determined after the administration of 14C-alphaxalone. There was no significant difference between the brain regions examined, but the levels reached were equal to those required to block CA2+ transport in isolated mitochondria.

  19. Evolution of energy metabolism. Proton permeability of the inner membrane of liver mitochondria is greater in a mammal than in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Couture, P; Else, P L; Withers, K W; Hulbert, A J

    1991-04-01

    Standard metabolic rate is 7-fold greater in the rat (a typical mammal) than in the bearded dragon, Amphibolurus vitticeps (a reptile with the same body mass and temperature). Rat hepatocytes respire 4-fold faster than do hepatocytes from the lizard. The inner membrane of isolated rat liver mitochondrial has a proton permeability that is 4-5-fold greater than the proton permeability of the lizard liver mitochondrial membrane per mg of mitochondrial protein. The greater permeability of rat mitochondria is not caused by differences in the surface area of the mitochondrial inner membrane, but differences in the fatty acid composition of the mitochondrial phospholipids may be involved in the permeability differences. Greater proton permeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane may contribute to the greater standard metabolic rate of mammals.

  20. Effect of high-intensity exercise on aged mouse brain mitochondria, neurogenesis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    E, Lezi; Burns, Jeffrey M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-11-01

    In aged mice, we assessed how intensive exercise affects brain bioenergetics, inflammation, and neurogenesis-relevant parameters. After 8 weeks of a supra-lactate threshold treadmill exercise intervention, 21-month-old C57BL/6 mice showed increased brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α protein, mammalian target of rapamycin and phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin protein, citrate synthase messenger RNA, and mitochondrial DNA copy number. Hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) gene expression trended higher, and a positive correlation between VEGF-A and PRC messenger RNA levels was observed. Brain doublecortin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and CCL11 gene expression, as well as plasma CCL11 protein levels, were unchanged. Despite these apparent negative findings, a negative correlation between plasma CCL11 protein levels and hippocampal doublecortin gene expression was observed; further analysis indicated exercise may mitigate this relationship. Overall, our data suggest supra-lactate threshold exercise activates a partial mitochondrial biogenesis in aged mice, and a gene (VEGF-A) known to support neurogenesis. Our data are consistent with another study that found systemic inflammation in general, and CCL11 protein specifically, suppresses hippocampal neurogenesis. Our study supports the view that intense exercise above the lactate threshold may benefit the aging brain; future studies to address the extent to which exercise-generated lactate mediates the observed effects are warranted.

  1. Effects of polyphenols on brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease: focus on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Sebastian; Asseburg, Heike; Kuntz, Sabine; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2012-08-01

    The global trend of the phenomenon of population ageing has dramatic consequences on public health and the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. Physiological changes that occur during normal ageing of the brain may exacerbate and initiate pathological processes that may lead to neurodegenerative disorders, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, the risk of AD rises exponentially with age. While there is no cure currently available, sufficient intake of certain micronutrients and secondary plant metabolites may prevent disease onset. Polyphenols are highly abundant in the human diet, and several experimental and epidemiological evidences indicate that these secondary plant products have beneficial effects on AD risks. This study reviews current knowledge on the potential of polyphenols and selected polyphenol-rich diets on memory and cognition in human subjects, focusing on recent data showing in vivo efficacy of polyphenols in preventing neurodegenerative events during brain ageing and in dementia. Concentrations of polyphenols in animal brains following oral administration have been consistently reported to be very low, thus eliciting controversial discussion on their neuroprotective effects and potential mechanisms. Whether polyphenols exert any direct antioxidant effects in the brain or rather act by evoking alterations in regulatory systems of the brain or even the body periphery is still unclear. To understand the mechanisms behind the protective abilities of polyphenol-rich foods, an overall understanding of the biotransformation of polyphenols and identification of the various metabolites arising in the human body is also urgently needed.

  2. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds.

  3. The influence of thyroxine administered in vivo on the transmembrane protonic electrochemical potential difference in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Shears, S B; Bronk, J R

    1979-02-15

    When mitochondria from normal and thyroxine-treated rats were energized by incubation with succinate, phosphate and MgCl2, it was found that the hormone treatment increased the transmembrane protonic electrochemical potential difference by 16mV and the respiration rate by 46%. Other experiments show these changes to be associated with increases in the intramitochondrial K+ and phosphate concentrations.

  4. The effect of dianabol on certain cell energy processes in postirradiation disease. III. The effect of chronic administration of dianabol and irradiation on oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sierakowski, S; Mackowiak, J

    1979-10-01

    Chronic administration of Dianabol did not prevent the radiation-induced changes of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria. Irradiation of rats with X-rays, in a dose of 600 R for the whole body, causes damage of oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria. Progressive reducation of oxygen consumption, decrease of high-energy bond formation and a drop of the P/O coefficient were observed in irradiated animals. The presumable role of the postirradiation damage of oxidative phosphorylation and the effects of radioprotective compounds on this process are discussed.

  5. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Sunakawa, Hajime; Aniya, Yoko

    2008-10-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore.

  6. Protective effects of taurine in traumatic brain injury via mitochondria and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Fan, Weijia; Cai, Ying; Wu, Qiaoli; Mo, Lidong; Huang, Zhenwu; Huang, Huiling

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian tissues, taurine is an important natural component and the most abundant free amino acid in the heart, retina, skeletal muscle, brain, and leukocytes. This study is to examine the taurine's protective effects on neuronal ultrastructure, the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex, and on cerebral blood flow (CBF). The model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was made for SD rats by a fluid percussion device, with taurine (200 mg/kg) administered by tail intravenous injection once daily for 7 days after TBI. It was found that CBF was improved for both left and right brain at 30 min and 7 days post-injury by taurine. Reaction time was prolonged relative to the TBI-only group. Neuronal damage was prevented by 7 days taurine. Mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I and II showed greater activity with the taurine group. The improvement by taurine of CBF may alleviate edema and elevation in intracranial pressure. Importantly taurine improved the hypercoagulable state.

  7. A Fast Method for the Segmentation of Synaptic Junctions and Mitochondria in Serial Electron Microscopic Images of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Márquez Neila, Pablo; Baumela, Luis; González-Soriano, Juncal; Rodríguez, Jose-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2016-04-01

    Recent electron microscopy (EM) imaging techniques permit the automatic acquisition of a large number of serial sections from brain samples. Manual segmentation of these images is tedious, time-consuming and requires a high degree of user expertise. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing automatic segmentation methods. However, currently available methods are computationally demanding in terms of computer time and memory usage, and to work properly many of them require image stacks to be isotropic, that is, voxels must have the same size in the X, Y and Z axes. We present a method that works with anisotropic voxels and that is computationally efficient allowing the segmentation of large image stacks. Our approach involves anisotropy-aware regularization via conditional random field inference and surface smoothing techniques to improve the segmentation and visualization. We have focused on the segmentation of mitochondria and synaptic junctions in EM stacks from the cerebral cortex, and have compared the results to those obtained by other methods. Our method is faster than other methods with similar segmentation results. Our image regularization procedure introduces high-level knowledge about the structure of labels. We have also reduced memory requirements with the introduction of energy optimization in overlapping partitions, which permits the regularization of very large image stacks. Finally, the surface smoothing step improves the appearance of three-dimensional renderings of the segmented volumes.

  8. Study of the Effects of ATP Suppliers and Thiol Reductants on Toxicity of Pioglitazone in Isolated Rat Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Rezaiean Mehrabadi, Abbas; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pioglitazone (PG) is one of thiazolidinediones used for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. Some reports of its hepatotoxicity exist, but the mechanism of its hepatotoxicity is not well known. In the present study, the protective effect of some ATP suppliers are investigated against mitochondrial toxicity of PG in isolated rat mitochondria. Mitochondrial viability was investigated by MTT assay. The effects of PG on superoxide dismutase activity, ATP production, mitochondrial swelling and oxidative stress were also investigated. PG reduced mitochondrial viability with an LC50 of 880±32 µM. It reduced ATP production and superoxide dismutase activity in mitochondria and increased mitochondrial swelling, but no oxidant effect was present as measured by TBARS formation. Fructose, dihydroxyacetone, dithioteritol, and N-acetylcysteine reduced mitochondrial toxicity of PG. Therefore, PG toxicity may be due to its mitochondrial toxicity and energy depletion, and ATP suppliers could be effective in preventing its toxicity. PMID:26330870

  9. In situ rat brain and liver spontaneous chemiluminescence after acute ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Boveris, A; Llesuy, S; Azzalis, L A; Giavarotti, L; Simon, K A; Junqueira, V B; Porta, E A; Videla, L A; Lissi, E A

    1997-09-19

    The influence of acute ethanol administration on the oxidative stress status of rat brain and liver was assessed by in situ spontaneous organ chemiluminescence (CL). Brain and liver CL was significantly increased after acute ethanol administration to fed rats, a response that is time-dependent and evidenced at doses higher than 1 g/kg. Ethanol-induced CL development is faster in liver compared with brain probably due to the greater ethanol metabolic capacity of the liver, whereas the net enhancement in brain light emission at 3 h after ethanol treatment is higher than that of the liver, which could reflect the greater susceptibility of brain to oxidative stress. The effect of ethanol on brain and liver CL seems to be mediated by acetaldehyde, due to its abolishment by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole and exacerbation by the aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram. In brain, these findings were observed in the absence of changes in the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. However, the content of brain glutathione was significantly decreased by 31%, by ethanol, thus establishing an enhanced oxidative stress in this tissue.

  10. Uncoupling, metabolic inhibition and induction of mitochondrial permeability transition in rat liver mitochondria caused by the major long-chain hydroxyl monocarboxylic fatty acids accumulating in LCHAD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hickmann, Fernanda Hermes; Cecatto, Cristiane; Kleemann, Daniele; Monteiro, Wagner Oliveira; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-01-01

    Patients with long-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency commonly present liver dysfunction whose pathogenesis is unknown. We studied the effects of long-chain 3-hydroxylated fatty acids (LCHFA) that accumulate in LCHAD deficiency on liver bioenergetics using mitochondrial preparations from young rats. We provide strong evidence that 3-hydroxytetradecanoic (3HTA) and 3-hydroxypalmitic (3HPA) acids, the monocarboxylic acids that are found at the highest tissue concentrations in this disorder, act as metabolic inhibitors and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. These conclusions are based on the findings that these fatty acids decreased ADP-stimulated (state 3) and uncoupled respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and NAD(P)H content, and, in contrast, increased resting (state 4) respiration. We also verified that 3HTA and 3HPA markedly reduced Ca2+ retention capacity and induced swelling in Ca2+-loaded mitochondria. These effects were mediated by mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) induction since they were totally prevented by the classical MPT inhibitors cyclosporin A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, a Ca2+ uptake blocker. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the major monocarboxylic LCHFA accumulating in LCHAD deficiency disrupt energy mitochondrial homeostasis in the liver. It is proposed that this pathomechanism may explain at least in part the hepatic alterations characteristic of the affected patients.

  11. Modulation of oxidative phosphorylation machinery signifies a prime mode of anti-ageing mechanism of calorie restriction in male rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dani, Diksha; Shimokawa, Isao; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Higami, Yoshikazu; Warnken, Uwe; Schokraie, Elham; Schnölzer, Martina; Krause, Frank; Sugawa, Michiru D; Dencher, Norbert A

    2010-06-01

    Mitochondria being the major source and target of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role during ageing. We analyzed ageing and calorie restriction (CR)-induced changes in abundance of rat liver mitochondrial proteins to understand key aspects behind the age-retarding mechanism of CR. The combination of blue-native (BN) gel system with fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) facilitated an efficient analysis of soluble and membrane proteins, existing as monomers or multi-protein assemblies. Changes in abundance of specific key subunits of respiratory chain complexes I, IV and V, critical for activity and/or assembly of the complexes were identified. CR lowered complex I assembly and complex IV activity, which is discussed as a molecular mechanism to minimize ROS production at mitochondria. Notably, the antioxidant system was found to be least affected. The GSH:GSSG couple could be depicted as a rapid mean to handle the fluctuations in ROS levels led by reversible metabolic shifts. We evaluated the relative significance of ROS generation against quenching. We also observed parallel and unidirectional changes as effect of ageing and CR, in subunits of ATP synthase, cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase. This is the first report on such 'putatively hormetic' ageing-analogous effects of CR, besides the age-retarding ones.

  12. Ageing and inflammation - A central role for mitochondria in brain health and disease.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    To develop successful therapies that prevent or treat neurodegenerative diseases requires an understanding of the upstream events. Ageing is by far the greatest risk factor for most of these diseases, and to clarify their causes will require an understanding of the process of ageing itself. Starting with the question Why do we age as individual organisms, but the line of pluripotent embryonic stem cells and germ cells carried by individuals and transmitted to descendants is immortal? this review discusses how the process of cellular differentiation leads to the accumulation of biological imperfections with ageing, and how these imperfections may be the cause of chronic inflammatory responses to stress that undermine cellular function. Both differentiation and inflammation involve drastic metabolic changes associated with alterations in mitochondrial dynamics that shift the balance between aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. With ageing, mitochondrial dysfunction can be both the cause and consequence of inflammatory processes and elicit metabolic adaptations that might be either protective or become progressively detrimental. It is argued here that an understanding of the relationship between metabolism, differentiation and inflammation is essential to understand the pathological mechanisms governing brain health and disease during ageing.

  13. Y3+, La3+, and some bivalent metals inhibited the opening of the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey; Konovalova, Svetlana; Emelyanova, Larisa; Brailovskaya, Irina

    2014-12-01

    We showed earlier that diminution of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-stimulated respiration and increase of both mitochondrial swelling and electrochemical potential (ΔΨmito) dissipation in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 were caused by opening of Tl(+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. The MPTP opening was studied in the presence of bivalent metal ions (Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+)), trivalent metal ions (Y(3+) and La(3+)), and ruthenium red. We found that these metal ions (except Ba(2+) and Co(2+)) as well as ruthenium red inhibited to the MPTP opening that manifested in preventing both diminution of the DNP-stimulated respiration and increase of the swelling and of the ΔΨmito dissipation in medium containing TlNO3, KNO3, and Ca(2+). Inhibition of the MPTP opening by Sr(2+) and Mn(2+) is suggested because of their interaction with high affinity Ca(2+) sites, facing the matrix side and participating in the MPTP opening. The inhibitory effects of metal ions (Y(3+), La(3+), and Ni(2+)), and ruthenium red are accordingly discussed in regard to competitive and noncompetitive inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca(2+)-uniporter. High concentrations (50μM) of Y(3+) and La(3+) favored of MPTP opening in the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria in Ca(2+) free medium containing TlNO3. The latter MPTP opening was markedly eliminated by MPTP inhibitors (cyclosporine A and ADP).

  14. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development. PMID:26719341

  15. Epigenomic Landscape of Human Fetal Brain, Heart, and Liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Guo, Hongshan; Hu, Boqiang; Li, Rong; Yong, Jun; Zhao, Yangyu; Zhi, Xu; Fan, Xiaoying; Guo, Fan; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Wen, Lu; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-02-26

    The epigenetic regulation of spatiotemporal gene expression is crucial for human development. Here, we present whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses of a wide variety of histone markers in the brain, heart, and liver of early human embryos shortly after their formation. We identified 40,181 active enhancers, with a large portion showing tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific patterns, pointing to their roles in controlling the ordered spatiotemporal expression of the developmental genes in early human embryos. Moreover, using sequential ChIP-seq, we showed that all three organs have hundreds to thousands of bivalent domains that are marked by both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, probably to keep the progenitor cells in these organs ready for immediate differentiation into diverse cell types during subsequent developmental processes. Our work illustrates the potentially critical roles of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific epigenomes in regulating the spatiotemporal expression of developmental genes during early human embryonic development.

  16. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  17. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  18. Protective effects of dietary avocado oil on impaired electron transport chain function and exacerbated oxidative stress in liver mitochondria from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Gallegos-Corona, Marco Alonso; Sánchez-Briones, Luis Alberto; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Campos-García, Jesús; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Electron transport chain (ETC) dysfunction, excessive ROS generation and lipid peroxidation are hallmarks of mitochondrial injury in the diabetic liver, with these alterations also playing a role in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Enhanced mitochondrial sensitivity to lipid peroxidation during diabetes has been also associated to augmented content of C22:6 in membrane phospholipids. Thus, we aimed to test whether avocado oil, a rich source of C18:1 and antioxidants, attenuates the deleterious effects of diabetes on oxidative status of liver mitochondria by decreasing unsaturation of acyl chains of membrane lipids and/or by improving ETC functionality and decreasing ROS generation. Streptozocin-induced diabetes elicited a noticeable increase in the content of C22:6, leading to augmented mitochondrial peroxidizability index and higher levels of lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial respiration and complex I activity were impaired in diabetic rats with a concomitant increase in ROS generation using a complex I substrate. This was associated to a more oxidized state of glutathione, All these alterations were prevented by avocado oil except by the changes in mitochondrial fatty acid composition. Avocado oil did not prevented hyperglycemia and polyphagia although did normalized hyperlipidemia. Neither diabetes nor avocado oil induced steatosis. These results suggest that avocado oil improves mitochondrial ETC function by attenuating the deleterious effects of oxidative stress in the liver of diabetic rats independently of a hypoglycemic effect or by modifying the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. These findings might have also significant implications in the progression of NAFLD in experimental models of steatosis.

  19. Rhein Elicits In Vitro Cytotoxicity in Primary Human Liver HL-7702 Cells by Inducing Apoptosis through Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bounda, Guy-Armel; Zhou, Wang; Wang, Dan-dan; Yu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study rhein-induced apoptosis signaling pathway and to investigate its molecular mechanisms in primary human hepatic cells. Results. Cell viability of HL-7702 cells treated with rhein showed significant decrease in dose-dependent manner. Following rhein treatment (25 μM, 50 μM, and 100 μM) for 12 h, the detection of apoptotic cells was significantly analyzed by flow cytometry and nuclear morphological changes by Hoechst 33258, respectively. Fatty degeneration studies showed upregulation level of the relevant hepatic markers (P < 0.01). Caspase activities expressed significant upregulation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8. Moreover, apoptotic cells by rhein were significantly inhibited by Z-LEHD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK, caspase-9 inhibitor, and caspase-3 inhibitor, respectively. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by fluorometry. Additionally, NAC, a ROS scavenger, significantly attenuated rhein-induced oxidative damage in HL-7702 cells. Furthermore, real-time qPCR results showed significant upregulation of p53, PUMA, Apaf-1, and Casp-9 and Casp-3 mRNA, with no significant changes of Fas and Cytochrome-c. Immunoblotting revealed significant Cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into cytosol and no change in Fas expression. Conclusion. Taken together, these observations suggested that rhein could induce apoptosis in HL-7702 cells via mitochondria-mediated signal pathway with involvement of oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:26221172

  20. Brain death is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cao, S; Wang, T; Yan, B; Lu, Y; Zhao, Y; Zhang, S

    2014-12-01

    Cell death pathways initiated by stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have been implicated in a variety of common diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the contribution of ER stress to apoptosis and liver injury after brain death is not known. In the present study, we found that brain death induces a variety of signature ER stress markers, including ER stress-specific X box-binding protein 1 and up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78. Furthermore, brain death causes up-regulation of C/EBP homologous protein and caspase-12. Consistent with this, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick-end labeling assay and transmission electron microscopy confirmed apoptosis in the liver after brain death. Taken together, the present study provides strong evidence supporting the presence and importance of ER stress and response in mediating brain death-induced apoptosis and liver injury.

  1. Alteration in glutathione content and associated enzyme activities in the synaptic terminals but not in the non-synaptic mitochondria from the frontal cortex of Parkinson's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Harish, G; Mahadevan, Anita; Srinivas Bharath, M M; Shankar, S K

    2013-01-01

    Altered redox dynamics contribute to physiological aging and Parkinson's disease (PD). This is reflected in the substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients as lowered antioxidant levels and elevated oxidative damage. Contrary to this observation, we previously reported that non-SN regions such as caudate nucleus and frontal cortex (FC) exhibited elevated antioxidants and lowered mitochondrial and oxidative damage indicating constitutive protective mechanisms in PD brains. To investigate whether the sub-cellular distribution of antioxidants could contribute to these protective effects, we examined the distribution of antioxidant/oxidant markers in the neuropil fractions [synaptosomes, non-synaptic mitochondria and cytosol] of FC from PD (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). In the control FC, all the antioxidant activities [Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase (GPx), GSH-S-transferase (GST)] except glutathione reductase (GR) were the highest in cytosol, but several fold lower in mitochondria and much lower in synaptosomes. However, FC synaptosomes from PD brains had significantly higher levels of GSH (p = 0.01) and related enzymes [GPx (p = 0.02), GR (p = 0.06), GST (p = 0.0001)] compared to controls. Conversely, mitochondria from the FC of PD cases displayed elevated SOD activity (p = 0.02) while the GSH and related enzymes were relatively unaltered. These changes in the neuropil fractions were associated with unchanged or lowered oxidative damage. Further, the mitochondrial content in the synaptosomes of both PD and control brains was ≥five-fold lower compared to the non-synaptic mitochondrial fraction. Altered distribution of oxidant/antioxidant markers in the neuropil fractions of the human brain during aging and PD has implications for (1) degenerative and protective mechanisms (2) distinct antioxidant mechanisms in synaptic terminals compared to other compartments.

  2. Long-chain α,ω-dioic acids as inducers of cyclosporin A-insensitive nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane of liver mitochondria loaded with calcium or strontium ions.

    PubMed

    Dubinin, M V; Adakeeva, S I; Samartsev, V N

    2013-04-01

    Long-chain saturated monocarboxylic fatty acids can induce nonspecific permeability of the inner membrane (open pores) of liver mitochondria loaded with Ca2+ or Sr(2+) by the mechanism insensitive to cyclosporin A. In this work we investigated the effect of their metabolites - α,ω-dioic (dicarboxylic) acids - as potential inducers of pore opening by a similar mechanism. It was established that the addition of α,ω-hexadecanedioic acid (HDA) at a concentration of 10-30 µM to liver mitochondria loaded with Ca2+ or Sr(2+) leads to swelling of the organelles and release of these ions from the matrix. The maximum effect of HDA is observed at 50 µM Ca2+ concentration. Cyclosporin A at a concentration of 1 µM, previously added to the mitochondria, did not inhibit the observed processes. The calcium uniporter inhibitor ruthenium red, which blocks influx of Ca2+ and Sr(2+) to the matrix of mitochondria, prevented HDA-induced swelling. The effect of HDA as inducer of swelling of mitochondria was compared with similar effects of α,ω-tetradecanedioic and α,ω-dodecanedioic acids whose acyl chains are two and four carbon atoms shorter than HDA, respectively. It was found that the efficiency of these α,ω-dioic acids decreases with reducing number of carbon atoms in their acyl chains. It was concluded that in the presence of Ca2+ or Sr(2+) long-chain saturated α,ω-dioic acids can induce a cyclosporin A-insensitive permeability of the inner membrane (open pores) of liver mitochondria as well as their monocarboxylic analogs.

  3. Effect of chronic heroin and cocaine administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Fragou, Domniki; Zanos, Panos; Kouidou, Sofia; Njau, Samuel; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Kovatsi, Leda

    2013-04-26

    Drug abuse is associated with epigenetic changes, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of chronic cocaine and heroin administration on global DNA methylation in brain and liver. Male, 8 week old, C57BL/6J mice received heroin in a chronic 'intermittent' escalating dose paradigm, or cocaine in a chronic escalating dose 'binge' paradigm, which mimic the human pattern of opioid or cocaine abuse respectively. Following sacrifice, livers and brains were removed and DNA was extracted from them. The extracted DNA was hydrolyzed and 2'-deoxycytidine and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine were determined by HPLC-UV. The % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA was significantly higher in the brain compared to the liver. There were no differences between the control animals and the cocaine or heroin treated animals in neither of the tissues examined, which is surprising since cocaine administration induced gross morphological changes in the liver. Moreover, there was no difference in the % 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine content of DNA between the cocaine and the heroin treated animals. The global DNA methylation status in the brain and liver of mice chronically treated with cocaine or heroin remains unaffected, but this finding cannot exclude the existence of anatomical region or gene-specific methylation differences. This is the first time that global DNA methylation in the liver and whole brain has been studied following chronic cocaine or heroin treatment.

  4. Evaluation of the inhibitory effects of quercetin-related flavonoids and tea catechins on the monoamine oxidase-A reaction in mouse brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bandaruk, Yauhen; Mukai, Rie; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Terao, Junji

    2012-10-17

    Quercetin, a typical dietary flavonoid, is thought to exert antidepressant effects by inhibiting the monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) reaction, which is responsible for regulation of the metabolism of the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. This study compared the MAO-A inhibitory activity of quercetin with those of O-methylated quercetin (isorhamnetin, tamarixetin), luteolin, and green tea catechins ((-)-epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate) by measuring the formation of the oxidative deamination product of 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindole aldehyde (5-HIAL), in mouse brain mitochondria. Quercetin was inferior to luteolin in the inhibition of MAO-A activity, whereas isorhamnetin, tamarixetin, and tea catechins scarcely exerted inhibitory activity. Quercetin did not affect MAO-A activity in mouse intestinal mitochondria, indicating that it does not evoke side effects on the metabolism of dietary monoamines in the gut. These data suggest that quercetin is a weak (but safe) MAO-A inhibitor in the modulation of 5-HT levels in the brain.

  5. Exendin-4 attenuates brain death-induced liver damage in the rat.

    PubMed

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Lemos, Natalia E; Dias, Ana L; Brondani, Leticia A; Oliveira, Jarbas R; Bauer, Andrea C; Leitão, Cristiane B; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-11-01

    The majority of liver grafts destined for transplantation originate from brain dead donors. However, significantly better posttransplantation outcomes are achieved when organs from living donors are used, suggesting that brain death (BD) causes irreversible damage to the liver tissue. Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogues were shown to possess interesting hepatic protection effects in different liver disease models. We hypothesized that donor treatment with the GLP1 analogue exendin-4 (Ex-4) could alleviate BD-induced liver damage. A rat model of BD was employed in order to estimate BD-induced liver damage and Ex-4's potential protective effects. Liver damage was assessed by biochemical determination of circulating hepatic markers. Apoptosis in the hepatic tissue was assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using an antibody that only recognizes the active form of caspase-3. Gene expression changes in inflammation and stress response genes were monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Here, we show that Ex-4 administration to the brain dead liver donors significantly reduces levels of circulating aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase. This was accompanied by a remarkable reduction in hepatocyte apoptosis. In this model, BD caused up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor and stress-related genes, confirming previous findings in clinical and animal studies. In conclusion, treatment of brain dead rats with Ex-4 reduced BD-induced liver damage. Further investigation is needed to determine the molecular basis of the observed liver protection. After testing in a randomized clinical trial, the inclusion of GLP1 analogues in organ donor management might help to improve organ quality, maximize organ donation, and possibly increase liver transplantation success rates.

  6. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  7. Antioxidant effects of JM-20 on rat brain mitochondria and synaptosomes: mitoprotection against Ca²⁺-induced mitochondrial impairment.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Ramírez-Sánchez, Jeney; Delgado-Hernández, René; Ochoa-Rodríguez, Estael; Verdecia-Reyes, Yamila; Naal, Zeki; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Portela, Luis Valmor; Souza, Diogo O

    2014-10-01

    Because mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment are important mediators of neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases and in brain ischemia/reperfusion, in the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant and mitoprotective effect of a new promising neuroprotective molecule, JM-20, in mitochondria and synaptosomes isolated from rat brains. JM-20 inhibited succinate-mediated H₂O₂ generation in both mitochondria and synaptosomes incubated in depolarized (high K(+)) medium at extremely low micromolar concentration and with identical IC₅₀ values of 0.91 μM. JM-20 also repressed glucose-induced H₂O₂ generation stimulated by rotenone or by antimycin A in synaptosomes incubated in high sodium-polarized medium at extremely low IC₅₀ values of 0.395 μM and 2.452 μM, respectively. JM-20 was unable to react directly with H₂O₂ or with superoxide anion radicals but displayed a cathodic reduction peak at -0.71V, which is close to that of oxygen (-0.8V), indicating high electron affinity. JM-20 also inhibited uncoupled respiration in mitochondria or synaptosomes and was a more effective inhibitor in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate than in the presence of succinate. JM-20 also prevented Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, membrane potential dissipation and cytochrome c release, which are key pathogenic events during stroke. This molecule also prevented Ca(2+) influx into synaptosomes and mitochondria; the former effect was a consequence of the latter because JM-20 inhibition followed the patterns of carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP), which is a classic mitochondrial uncoupler. Because the mitochondrion is considered an important source and target of neuronal cell death signaling after an ischemic insult, the antioxidant and protective effects of JM-20 against the deleterious effects of Ca(2+) observed at the mitochondrial level in this study may endow this molecule

  8. Toxicity of the Flame-Retardant BDE-49 on Brain Mitochondria and Neuronal Progenitor Striatal Cells Enhanced by a PTEN-Deficient Background

    PubMed Central

    Giulivi, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) represent an important group of flame retardants extensively used, tonnage of which in the environment has been steadily increasing over the past 25 years. PBDEs or metabolites can induce neurotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) through a variety of mechanisms. Recently, PBDEs with < 5 Br substitutions (i.e., 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-47] and 2,2′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-49]) have gained interest because of their high bioaccumulation. In particular, congeners such as BDE-49 arise as one of the most biologically active, with concentrations typically lower than those observed for BDE-47 in biological tissues; however, its potential to cause MD at biologically relevant concentrations is unknown. To this end, the effect of BDE-49 was studied in brain mitochondria and neuronal progenitor striatal cells (NPC). BDE-49 uncoupled mitochondria at concentrations < 0.1 nM, whereas at > 1 nM, it inhibited the electron transport at Complex V (mixed type inhibition; IC50 = 6 nM) and Complex IV (noncompetitive inhibition; IC50 = 40 nM). These concentrations are easily achieved in plasma concentrations considering that BDE-49 (this study, 400-fold) and other PBDEs accumulate 1–3 orders of magnitude in the cells, particularly in mitochondria and microsomes. Similar effects were observed in NPC and exacerbated with PTEN (negative modulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway) deficiency, background associated with autism-like behavior, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. PBDE-mediated MD per se or enhanced by a background that confers susceptibility to this exposure may have profound implications in the energy balance of brain. PMID:23288049

  9. Salsalate (Salicylate) Uncouples Mitochondria, Improves Glucose Homeostasis, and Reduces Liver Lipids Independent of AMPK-β1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brennan K.; Ford, Rebecca J.; Desjardins, Eric M.; Green, Alex E.; Hughes, Meghan C.; Houde, Vanessa P.; Day, Emily A.; Marcinko, Katarina; Crane, Justin D.; Mottillo, Emilio P.; Perry, Christopher G.R.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2017-01-01

    Salsalate is a prodrug of salicylate that lowers blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and reduces nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in animal models; however, the mechanism mediating these effects is unclear. Salicylate directly activates AMPK via the β1 subunit, but whether salsalate requires AMPK-β1 to improve T2D and NAFLD has not been examined. Therefore, wild-type (WT) and AMPK-β1–knockout (AMPK-β1KO) mice were treated with a salsalate dose resulting in clinically relevant serum salicylate concentrations (~1 mmol/L). Salsalate treatment increased VO2, lowered fasting glucose, improved glucose tolerance, and led to an ~55% reduction in liver lipid content. These effects were observed in both WT and AMPK-β1KO mice. To explain these AMPK-independent effects, we found that salicylate increases oligomycin-insensitive respiration (state 4o) and directly increases mitochondrial proton conductance at clinical concentrations. This uncoupling effect is tightly correlated with the suppression of de novo lipogenesis. Salicylate is also able to stimulate brown adipose tissue respiration independent of uncoupling protein 1. These data indicate that the primary mechanism by which salsalate improves glucose homeostasis and NAFLD is via salicylate-driven mitochondrial uncoupling. PMID:27554471

  10. Purification of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain and liver and from ox brain.

    PubMed Central

    Rivett, A J; Smith, I L; Tipton, K F

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described that yields an apparently homogeneous preparation of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain. This procedure is also applicable to the purification of this enzyme from rat liver and ox brain. In the latter case, however, the purified preparation could be resolved into two protein bands, both of which had enzyme activity, by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Since a sample of the ox brain enzyme from an earlier step in the purification procedure only showed the presence of a single band of activity after electrophoresis, this apparent multiplicity probably results from modification of the enzyme, possibly by oxidation, during the final step of the purification. A number of properties of the rat brain enzyme were determined and these were compared with those of the enzyme from rat liver. The two preparations were similar in their stabilities, behaviour during purification, kinetic properties, electrophoretic mobilities and amino acid compositions. Antibodies to the rat liver enzyme cross-reacted with that from brain and the inhibition of both these preparations by the antiserum was similar, further supporting the view that the enzymes from these two sources were closely similar if not identical. PMID:6798966

  11. Brain death induces the alteration of liver protein expression profiles in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Du, Bing; Li, Ling; Zhong, Zhibiao; Fan, Xiaoli; Qiao, Bingbing; He, Chongxiang; Fu, Zhen; Wang, Yanfeng; Ye, Qifa

    2014-08-01

    At present, there is no accurate method for evaluating the quality of liver transplant from a brain-dead donor. Proteomics are used to investigate the mechanisms involved in brain death‑induced liver injury and to identify sensitive biomarkers. In the present study, age‑ and gender‑matched rabbits were randomly divided into the brain death and sham groups. The sham served as the control. A brain‑death model was established using an intracranial progressive pressurized method. The differentially expressed proteins extracted from the liver tissues of rabbits that were brain‑dead for 6 h in the two groups were determined by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix‑assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Although there was no obvious functional and morphological difference in 2, 4 and 6 h after brain death, results of the proteomics analysis revealed 973±34 and 987±38 protein spots in the control and brain death groups, respectively. Ten proteins exhibited a ≥2‑fold alteration. The downregulated proteins were: aldehyde dehydrogenase, runt‑related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), inorganic pyrophosphatase, glutamate‑cysteine ligase regulatory subunit and microsomal cytochrome B5. By contrast, the expression of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4, peroxiredoxin‑6, 3‑phosphoinositide‑dependent protein kinase‑1, 3-mercaptopyruvate and alcohol dehydrogenase were clearly upregulated. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis results revealed that the expression of RUNX1 was gradually increased in a time‑dependent manner in 2, 4, and 6 h after brain death. In conclusion, alteration of the liver protein expression profile induced by brain death indicated the occurrence of complex pathological changes even if no functional or morphological difference was identified. Thus, RUNX1 may be a sensitive predict factor for evaluating the quality of brain death donated liver.

  12. Acetaminophen from liver to brain: New insights into drug pharmacological action and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Pérez, María J; Manautou, José E; Mottino, Aldo D

    2016-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a well-known analgesic and antipyretic drug. It is considered to be safe when administered within its therapeutic range, but in cases of acute intoxication, hepatotoxicity can occur. APAP overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the northern hemisphere. Historically, studies on APAP toxicity have been focused on liver, with alterations in brain function attributed to secondary effects of acute liver failure. However, in the last decade the pharmacological mechanism of APAP as a cannabinoid system modulator has been documented and some articles have reported "in situ" toxicity by APAP in brain tissue at high doses. Paradoxically, low doses of APAP have been reported to produce the opposite, neuroprotective effects. In this paper we present a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of hepatic toxicity as well as a thorough review of both toxic and beneficial effects of APAP in brain.

  13. [Thiamine triphosphatase activity in mammalian mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Rusina, I M; Makarchikov, A F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial preparations isolated from bovine kidney and brain as well as the liver and the brain of rat show thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase) activity. The activity was determined from the particles by freezing-thawing suggesting that a soluble enzyme is involved. The liberation patterns of ThTPase and marker enzyme activities from mitochondria under osmotic shock or treatment with increasing Triton X-100 concentrations indicate the presence of ThTPase both in the matrix and intermembrane space. It was found, basing on gel filtration behavior, that the mitochondrial ThTPase has the same molecular mass as specific cytosolic ThTPase (EC 3.6.1.28). The enzymes, however, were clearly distinguishable in Km values, the mitochondrial one showing a higher apparent affinity for substrate. These results imply the existence of ThTPase multiple forms in mammalian cells.

  14. Case report: brain and liver abscesses caused by oral infection with Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kai Wolfgang; Schön, Ralf; Schumacher, Martin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Schulze, Dirk

    2006-10-01

    Organ abscesses are a rare and life-threatening complication mostly of hematogenously disseminated infections. We report a case of brain and liver abscesses. Identification of the lesions was made by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. An oral examination comprised an oral focus of infection. Streptococcus intermedius was isolated from oral smear, liver and ventricular drainage, and blood sample. After the commencement of antibiotic therapy, drainage of abscesses and oral rehabilitation, complete recovery was noted.

  15. Lactate administration reproduces specific brain and liver exercise-related changes.

    PubMed

    E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Selfridge, J Eva; Burns, Jeffrey M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2013-10-01

    The effects of exercise are not limited to muscle, and its ability to mitigate some chronic diseases is under study. A more complete understanding of how exercise impacts non-muscle tissues might facilitate design of clinical trials and exercise mimetics. Here, we focused on lactate's ability to mediate changes in liver and brain bioenergetic-associated parameters. In one group of experiments, C57BL/6 mice underwent 7 weeks of treadmill exercise sessions at intensities intended to exceed the lactate threshold. Over time, the mice dramatically increased their lactate threshold. To ensure that plasma lactate accumulated during the final week, the mice were run to exhaustion. In the liver, mRNA levels of gluconeogenesis-promoting genes increased. While peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) expression increased, there was a decrease in PGC-1β expression, and overall gene expression changes favored respiratory chain down-regulation. In the brain, PGC-1α and PGC-1β were unchanged, but PGC-1-related co-activator expression and mitochondrial DNA copy number increased. Brain tumor necrosis factor alpha expression fell, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor A expression rose. In another group of experiments, exogenously administered lactate was found to reproduce some but not all of these observed liver and brain changes. Our data suggest that lactate, an exercise byproduct, could mediate some of the effects exercise has on the liver and the brain, and that lactate itself can act as a partial exercise mimetic.

  16. Cross-talk between branched-chain amino acids and hepatic mitochondria is compromised in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Bril, Fernando; Garrett, Timothy J.; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T.; Williams, Caroline M.; Cusi, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in the setting of insulin resistance have been relevant in predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) onset, but their role in the etiology of hepatic insulin resistance remains uncertain. We determined the link between BCAA and dysfunctional hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is a central feature of hepatic insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Plasma metabolites under basal fasting and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (insulin stimulation) were measured in 94 human subjects with varying degrees of insulin sensitivity to identify their relationships with insulin resistance. Furthermore, the impact of elevated BCAA on hepatic TCA cycle was determined in a diet-induced mouse model of NAFLD, utilizing targeted metabolomics and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic flux analysis. Insulin stimulation revealed robust relationships between human plasma BCAA and indices of insulin resistance, indicating chronic metabolic overload from BCAA. Human plasma BCAA and long-chain acylcarnitines also showed a positive correlation, suggesting modulation of mitochondrial metabolism by BCAA. Concurrently, mice with NAFLD failed to optimally induce hepatic mTORC1, plasma ketones, and hepatic long-chain acylcarnitines, following acute elevation of plasma BCAA. Furthermore, elevated BCAA failed to induce multiple fluxes through hepatic TCA cycle in mice with NAFLD. Our data suggest that BCAA are essential to mediate efficient channeling of carbon substrates for oxidation through mitochondrial TCA cycle. Impairment of BCAA-mediated upregulation of the TCA cycle could be a significant contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction in NAFLD. PMID:26058864

  17. Cross-talk between branched-chain amino acids and hepatic mitochondria is compromised in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sunny, Nishanth E; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Bril, Fernando; Garrett, Timothy J; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T; Williams, Caroline M; Cusi, Kenneth

    2015-08-15

    Elevated plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in the setting of insulin resistance have been relevant in predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) onset, but their role in the etiology of hepatic insulin resistance remains uncertain. We determined the link between BCAA and dysfunctional hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is a central feature of hepatic insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Plasma metabolites under basal fasting and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (insulin stimulation) were measured in 94 human subjects with varying degrees of insulin sensitivity to identify their relationships with insulin resistance. Furthermore, the impact of elevated BCAA on hepatic TCA cycle was determined in a diet-induced mouse model of NAFLD, utilizing targeted metabolomics and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic flux analysis. Insulin stimulation revealed robust relationships between human plasma BCAA and indices of insulin resistance, indicating chronic metabolic overload from BCAA. Human plasma BCAA and long-chain acylcarnitines also showed a positive correlation, suggesting modulation of mitochondrial metabolism by BCAA. Concurrently, mice with NAFLD failed to optimally induce hepatic mTORC1, plasma ketones, and hepatic long-chain acylcarnitines, following acute elevation of plasma BCAA. Furthermore, elevated BCAA failed to induce multiple fluxes through hepatic TCA cycle in mice with NAFLD. Our data suggest that BCAA are essential to mediate efficient channeling of carbon substrates for oxidation through mitochondrial TCA cycle. Impairment of BCAA-mediated upregulation of the TCA cycle could be a significant contributor to mitochondrial dysfunction in NAFLD.

  18. Concurrent Low Brain and High Liver Uptake on FDG PET Are Associated with Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun-Yeol; Jun, Sungmin; Pak, Kyoungjune

    2017-01-01

    Objective Concurrent low brain and high liver uptake are sometimes observed on fluorine-18-labeled fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the potential clinical significance of this uptake pattern related to metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed data from 264 consecutive males who had undergone general health check-ups, including FDG PET/CT scans. After an overnight fast, the men had their peripheral blood drawn and the levels of various laboratory parameters measured; an FDG PET/CT scan was performed on the same day. We measured the maximum standardized uptake values of the brain and liver from regions of interest manually placed over the frontal cortex at the level of the centrum semiovale and the right lobe of the liver parenchyma, respectively. Results Fasting blood glucose (FBG; odds ratio [OR] = 1.063, p < 0.001) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; OR = 3.634, p = 0.010) were the strongest predictive factors for low brain FDG uptake, whereas waist circumference (OR = 1.200, p < 0.001) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR = 1.012, p = 0.001) were the strongest predictive factors for high liver uptake. Eleven subjects (4.2%) showed concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake, and all but one of these subjects (90.9%) had MS. Systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, FBG, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, insulin resistance (measured by homeostasis model assessment), insulin, HbA1c, and body mass index were higher in subjects with this FDG uptake pattern than in those without (all, p < 0.001). Conclusion Concurrent low brain and high liver FDG uptake were closely associated with MS. Moreover, subjects with this pattern had higher values for various cardiovascular risk factors than did those without. PMID:28246520

  19. Morpho-pathological and physiological changes of the brain and liver after ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Creţu, Denisa Ioana; Sovrea, Alina; Ignat, R M; Filip, Adriana; Bidian, Cristina; Creţu, Aurica

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the consequences of long exposure to ozone in order to draw attention to this matter as far as the brain and liver are concerned. The material used was represented by two batches of 10 rats each that were daily exposed to ozone for 10 minutes at 0.5 ppm O3. From the first group blood was collected after two weeks to determine the indicators of oxidative stress and samples of brain and liver were drawn for histological studies. Tissue changes were highlighted using Hematoxylin-Eosin and argentic impregnation. In addition, the brain and liver samples taken from study subjects were turned into homogeneous preparations in order to determine the intensity of oxidative stress occurred in these organs compared with the witness group. The second batch was exposed for a further two weeks, after which the same sampling techniques and determining methods as for the first group were applied. The results show a correlation between the values of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH), obtained both in blood and in the homogeneous preparations, and the microscopic changes that implicate a pathological state. Therefore, cerebral edema was discovered in the brain hemispheres and the cerebellum indicating necrotic signs accompanied by a reduction in the molecular layer and Purkinje cells with pale core. The liver presented hepatocellular necrosis, extended from the port area to the centrolobular vein.

  20. Detection of Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Transition Metal Complexes in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Moore, Michael J.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography was used with an on-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to detect low-molecular-mass (LMM) transition metal complexes in mitochondria isolated from fermenting yeast cells, human Jurkat cells, and mouse brain and liver. These complexes constituted 20 – 40% of total mitochondrial Mn, Fe, Zn, and Cu ions. The major LMM Mn complex in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1100 Da and a concentration of ~ 2 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second Mn species with a mass of ca. 2000 Da at a comparable concentration. The major Fe complex in mitochondria isolated from exponentially growing yeast cells had a mass of ca. 580 Da; the concentration of Fe580 in mitochondria was ca. 100 μM. When mitochondria were isolated from fermenting cells in post-exponential phase, the mass of the dominant LMM Fe complex was ca. 1100 Da. Upon incubation, the intensity of Fe1100 declined and Fe580 increased, suggesting that the two are interrelated. Mammalian mitochondria contained Fe580 and 2 other Fe species (Fe2000 and Fe1100) at concentrations of ca. 50 μM each. The dominant LMM Zn species in mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1200 Da and a concentration of ca. 110 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second major LMM Zn species at 1500 Da. The dominant LMM Cu species in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 5000 Da and a concentration in yeast mitochondria of ca. 16 μM; Cu5000 was not observed in mammalian mitochondria. The dominant Co species in mitochondria, Co1200, had a concentration of 20 nM and was probably a cobalamin. Mammalian but not yeast mitochondria contained a LMM Mo species, Mo730, at ca. 1 μM concentration. Increasing Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn concentrations 10 fold in the medium increased the concentration of the same element in the corresponding isolated mitochondria. Treatment with metal chelators confirmed that these LMM species were labile. The dominant S species at 1100 Da was not free GSH or GSSG. PMID:26018429

  1. Converging actions of alcohol on liver and brain immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Gyongyi; Lippai, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption results in inflammation in multiple organs, including the brain. While the contribution of neuroinflammation to alcohol-related cognitive dysfunction and behavioral alterations is established, the mechanisms by which alcohol triggers inflammation in the brain are only partially understood. There are acute and long-term alterations in brain function due to intercellular and intracellular changes of different cell types as a result of alcohol consumption. This review focuses on the alcohol-induced proinflammatory cellular and molecular changes in the central nervous system. Alcohol passes through the blood-brain barrier and alters neurotransmission. Alcohol use activates microglia and astrocyte, contributing to neurodegeneration and impaired regeneration. Alcohol-induced cell injury in the brain results in release of damage-associated molecular patterns, such as high mobility group box 1, that trigger inflammatory changes through activation of pattern recognition receptors. In addition, alcohol consumption increases intestinal permeability and results in increased levels of pathogen-associated molecular pattern such as endotoxin in the systemic circulation that triggers PRRs and inflammation. The Toll-like receptor-4 pathway that activates nuclear factor-κB and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1-beta, and chemokines, including monocyte chemotactic protein-1, has been suggested to contribute to alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. Alcohol-induced IL-1β secretion also requires Nod-like receptor-mediated inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and, consistent with this, disruption of IL-1/IL-1-receptor signaling prevents alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. Delicate regulators of inflammatory gene expressions are micro-RNAs (miRs) that have recently been identified in alcohol-related neuroinflammation. Alcohol induces miR155, a regulator of inflammation in the brain, and deficiency in mi

  2. Distribution of labeled products from (1-/sup 14/C), (U-/sup 14/C) and (16-/sup 14/C)-palmitate in isolated rat hepatocytes and liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzidakis, C.; Otto, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    Fatty acids (FA) labeled in different carbon positions are used to study the distribution of labeled oxidation products. With rat hepatocytes (Hep) the authors observed significant differences in the distribution of label into products from (1-/sup 14/C) and (U-/sup 14/C)-palmitate (P). The total recovery of label in products (/sup 14/CO/sub 2/ + acid soluble fraction (ASF)) was identical between the two labeled FA. However, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from (U-/sup 14/C)-P was only 40% of that from (1-/sup 14/C)-P. A recent report showed that approximately = 95% of succinate (Suc) utilized by Hep does not complete one full turn through the citric acid cycle. The authors observed that /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution from (2,3-/sup 14/C)-Suc was approximately = 9% of that from (1,4-/sup 14/C)-Suc, indicating that the differences in label distribution between (1-/sup 14/C) and (U-/sup 14/C)-P are partially due to less /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from label in the even carbon positions of the FA with consequently more label remaining in the ASF. The /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from (16-/sup 14/C)-P was only 4% of that from (1-/sup 14/C)-P a value less than expected from the Suc experiments. Ketone bodies (KB) comprised 78% of total labeled products from (16-/sup 14/C)-P as compared to 28% from (1-/sup 14/C)-P and 41% from (U-/sup 14/C)-P, giving support to the previously reported preferential use of the omega-C/sub 2/ unit for KB synthesis without entry into the acetyl-CoA pool. Studies with isolated rat liver mitochondria gave results similar to those with Hep, indicating minimal involvement of perioxisomal ..beta..-oxidation.

  3. Citric Acid Effects on Brain and Liver Oxidative Stress in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Eman R.; Mohammed, Nadia A.; Morsy, Safaa M. Youssef; Omara, Enayat A.; Sleem, Amany A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1–2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1–2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1–2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:24433072

  4. High resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human brain and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, M.; Spigos, D.G.; Mok, E.; Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Wilbur, A.C.; Langer, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    Water-suppressed and slice-selective proton spectra of live human brain exhibited several resonances that were tentatively assigned to metabolites such as N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine and creatine, choline derivatives, and taurine. In the liver spectrum of a healthy volunteer, the major resonance was tentatively assigned to a fatty acyl methylene and the minor resonances to protons in carnitine, taurine, glutamate, and glutamine. In the spectrum of a cancerous liver, resonances in addition to those present in the normal liver were seen. Protein degradation in the liver with cancer was indicated by resonances from urea and from the ring protons in tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Furthermore, increased nucleic acid synthesis was indicated by resonances from nucleotide protons.

  5. Pituitary and Brain Dopamine D2 Receptors Regulate Liver Gene Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria Cecilia; Ornstein, Ana Maria; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Garcia-Tornadu, Isabel; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Liver sexual gene dimorphism, which depends mainly on specific patterns of GH secretion, may underlie differential susceptibility to some liver diseases. Because GH and prolactin secretion are regulated by dopaminergic pathways, we studied the participation of brain and lactotrope dopamine 2 receptors (D2Rs) on liver gene sexual dimorphism, to explore a link between the brain and liver gene expression. We used global D2R knockout mice (Drd2−/−) and conducted a functional dissection strategy based on cell-specific Drd2 inactivation in neurons (neuroDrd2KO) or pituitary lactotropes. Disruption of neuronal D2Rs (which impaired the GH axis) decreased most of male or female-predominant class I liver genes and increased female–predominant class II genes in males, consistent with the positive (class I) or negative (class II) regulation of these genes by GH. Notably, sexual dimorphism was lost for class I and II genes in neuroDrd2KO mice. Disruption of lactotrope D2Rs did not modify class I or II genes in either sex, because GH axis was preserved. But surprisingly, 1 class II gene (Prlr) and female-predominant class I genes were markedly up-regulated in lacDrd2KO females, pointing to direct or indirect effects of prolactin in the regulation of selected female-predominant liver genes. This suggestion was strengthened in the hyperprolactinemic Drd2−/− female mouse, in which increased expression of the same 4 liver genes was observed, despite a decreased GH axis. We hereby demonstrate endocrine-mediated D2R actions on sexual dimorphic liver gene expression, which may be relevant during chronic dopaminergic medications in psychiatric disease. PMID:25545383

  6. Waterborne manganese exposure alters plasma, brain, and liver metabolites accompanied by changes in stereotypic behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Fordahl, Steve; Cooney, Paula; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; Erikson, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Overexposure to waterborne manganese (Mn) is linked with cognitive impairment in children and neurochemical abnormalities in other experimental models. In order to characterize the threshold between Mn-exposure and altered neurochemistry, it is important to identify biomarkers that positively correspond with brain Mn-accumulation. The objective of this study was to identify Mn-induced alterations in plasma, liver, and brain metabolites using liquid/gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses; and to monitor corresponding Mn-induced behavior changes. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats had access to deionized drinking water either Mn-free or containing 1g Mn/L for six weeks. Behaviors were monitored during the sixth week for a continuous 24h period while in a home cage environment using video surveillance. Mn-exposure significantly increased liver, plasma, and brain Mn concentrations compared to control, specifically targeting the globus pallidus (GP). Mn significantly altered 98 metabolites in the brain, liver, and plasma; notably shifting cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the brain (increased oleic and palmitic acid; 12.57 and 15.48 fold change (FC), respectively), and liver (increased oleic acid, 14.51 FC; decreased hydroxybutyric acid, −14.29 FC). Additionally, Mn-altered plasma metabolites homogentisic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and aspartic acid correlated significantly with GP and striatal Mn. Total distance traveled was significantly increased and positively correlated with Mn-exposure, while nocturnal stereotypic and exploratory behaviors were reduced with Mn-exposure and performed largely during the light cycle compared to unexposed rats. These data provide putative biomarkers for Mn-neurotoxicity and suggest that Mn disrupts the circadian cycle in rats. PMID:22056924

  7. Waterborne manganese exposure alters plasma, brain, and liver metabolites accompanied by changes in stereotypic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fordahl, Steve; Cooney, Paula; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; Erikson, Keith M

    2012-01-01

    Overexposure to waterborne manganese (Mn) is linked with cognitive impairment in children and neurochemical abnormalities in other experimental models. In order to characterize the threshold between Mn-exposure and altered neurochemistry, it is important to identify biomarkers that positively correspond with brain Mn-accumulation. The objective of this study was to identify Mn-induced alterations in plasma, liver, and brain metabolites using liquid/gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses; and to monitor corresponding Mn-induced behavior changes. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats had access to deionized drinking water either Mn-free or containing 1g Mn/L for 6 weeks. Behaviors were monitored during the sixth week for a continuous 24h period while in a home cage environment using video surveillance. Mn-exposure significantly increased liver, plasma, and brain Mn concentrations compared to control, specifically targeting the globus pallidus (GP). Mn significantly altered 98 metabolites in the brain, liver, and plasma; notably shifting cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the brain (increased oleic and palmitic acid; 12.57 and 15.48 fold change (FC), respectively), and liver (increased oleic acid, 14.51 FC; decreased hydroxybutyric acid, -14.29 FC). Additionally, Mn-altered plasma metabolites homogentisic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and aspartic acid correlated significantly with GP and striatal Mn. Total distance traveled was significantly increased and positively correlated with Mn-exposure, while nocturnal stereotypic and exploratory behaviors were reduced with Mn-exposure and performed largely during the light cycle compared to unexposed rats. These data provide putative biomarkers for Mn-neurotoxicity and suggest that Mn disrupts the circadian cycle in rats.

  8. Protein restriction during pregnancy affects maternal liver lipid metabolism and fetal brain lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Bautista, Claudia J; Tovar, Armando R; Ordáz, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Ortiz, Victor; Granados, Omar; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Larrea, Fernando; Zambrano, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Suboptimal developmental environments program offspring to lifelong metabolic problems. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of protein restriction in pregnancy on maternal liver lipid metabolism at 19 days of gestation (dG) and its effect on fetal brain development. Control (C) and restricted (R) mothers were fed with isocaloric diets containing 20 and 10% of casein. At 19 dG, maternal blood and livers and fetal livers and brains were collected. Serum insulin and leptin levels were determinate in mothers. Maternal and fetal liver lipid and fetal brain lipid quantification were performed. Maternal liver and fetal brain fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography. In mothers, liver desaturase and elongase mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Maternal body and liver weights were similar in both groups. However, fat body composition, including liver lipids, was lower in R mothers. A higher fasting insulin at 19 dG in the R group was observed (C = 0.2 +/- 0.04 vs. R = 0.9 +/- 0.16 ng/ml, P < 0.01) and was inversely related to early growth retardation. Serum leptin in R mothers was significantly higher than that observed in C rats (C = 5 +/- 0.1 vs. R = 7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml, P < 0.05). In addition, protein restriction significantly reduced gene expression in maternal liver of desaturases and elongases and the concentration of arachidonic (AA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids. In fetus from R mothers, a low body weight (C = 3 +/- 0.3 vs. R = 2 +/- 0.1 g, P < 0.05), as well as liver and brain lipids, including the content of DHA in the brain, was reduced. This study showed that protein restriction during pregnancy may negatively impact normal fetal brain development by changes in maternal lipid metabolism.

  9. Hepatic glycogen can regulate hypoglycemic counterregulation via a liver-brain axis

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Guillaume; Williams, Phillip; Hajizadeh, Ian A.; Kamal, Maahum Z.; Smith, Marta; Farmer, Ben; Scott, Melanie; Neal, Doss; Donahue, E. Patrick; Allen, Eric; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver glycogen is important for the counterregulation of hypoglycemia and is reduced in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we examined the effect of varying hepatic glycogen content on the counterregulatory response to low blood sugar in dogs. During the first 4 hours of each study, hepatic glycogen was increased by augmenting hepatic glucose uptake using hyperglycemia and a low-dose intraportal fructose infusion. After hepatic glycogen levels were increased, animals underwent a 2-hour control period with no fructose infusion followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic/hypoglycemic clamp. Compared with control treatment, fructose infusion caused a large increase in liver glycogen that markedly elevated the response of epinephrine and glucagon to a given hypoglycemia and increased net hepatic glucose output (NHGO). Moreover, prior denervation of the liver abolished the improved counterregulatory responses that resulted from increased liver glycogen content. When hepatic glycogen content was lowered, glucagon and NHGO responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were reduced. We conclude that there is a liver-brain counterregulatory axis that is responsive to liver glycogen content. It remains to be determined whether the risk of iatrogenic hypoglycemia in T1D humans could be lessened by targeting metabolic pathway(s) associated with hepatic glycogen repletion. PMID:27140398

  10. Brain endogenous liver X receptor ligands selectively promote midbrain neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Wang, Yuqin; Kitambi, Satish Srinivas; Sacchetti, Paola; Sousa, Kyle M; Bodin, Karl; Kirk, Jayne; Saltó, Carmen; Gustafsson, Magnus; Toledo, Enrique M; Karu, Kersti; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Ernfors, Patrik; Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J; Arenas, Ernest

    2013-02-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrα and Lxrβ) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors critical for ventral midbrain neurogenesis in vivo. However, no endogenous midbrain Lxr ligand has so far been identified. Here we used LC/MS and functional assays to identify cholic acid as a new Lxr ligand. Moreover, 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol (24,25-EC) was found to be the most potent and abundant Lxr ligand in the developing mouse midbrain. Both Lxr ligands promoted neural development in an Lxr-dependent manner in zebrafish in vivo. Notably, each ligand selectively regulated the development of distinct midbrain neuronal populations. Whereas cholic acid increased survival and neurogenesis of Brn3a-positive red nucleus neurons, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic neurogenesis. These results identify an entirely new class of highly selective and cell type-specific regulators of neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Moreover, 24,25-EC promoted dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells, suggesting that Lxr ligands may thus contribute to the development of cell replacement and regenerative therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  11. Effect of pesticides on cell survival in liver and brain rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Astiz, Mariana; de Alaniz, María J T; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2009-10-01

    Pesticides are the main environmental factor associated with the etiology of human neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the treatment of rats with low doses of dimethoate, zineb or glyphosate alone or in combination induces oxidative stress (OS) in liver and brain. The aim of the present work was to investigate if the pesticide-induced OS was able to affect brain and liver cell survival. The treatment of Wistar rats with the pesticides (i.p. 1/250 LD50, three times a week for 5 weeks) caused loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cardiolipin content, especially in substantia nigra (SN), with a concomitant increase of fatty acid peroxidation. The activation of calpain apoptotic cascade (instead of the caspase-dependent pathway) would be responsible for the DNA fragmentation pattern observed. Thus, these results may contribute to understand the effect(s) of chronic and simultaneous exposure to pesticides on cell survival.

  12. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array.

  13. Thyroid hormone therapy and procurement of livers from brain-dead donors.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, Dimitri; Mi, Zhibao; Videla, Luis A; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David K C

    2016-08-01

    Hormonal therapy to brain-dead potential organ donors remains controversial. A retrospective study was carried out of hormonal therapy on procurement of organs in 63,593 donors in whom information on T3/T4 therapy was available. In 40,124 donors, T3/T4 and all other hormonal therapy was recorded. The percentages of all organs procured, except livers, were greater in T3/T4-treated donors. Nevertheless, if T3/T4 therapy had been administered to the donor, liver transplantation was associated with significantly increased graft and recipient survival at 1 month and 12 months. The potential reasons for the lack of effect of T3/T4 therapy on the number of livers procured are discussed.

  14. Submitochondrial fragments of brain mitochondria: general characteristics and catalytic properties of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, D S; Grivennikova, V G; Vinogradov, A D

    2011-02-01

    A number of genetic or drug-induced pathophysiological disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases, have been reported to correlate with catalytic impairments of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (mitochondrial complex I). The vast majority of the data on catalytic properties of this energy-transducing enzyme have been accumulated from studies on bovine heart complex I preparations of different degrees of resolution, whereas almost nothing is known about the functional activities of the enzyme in neuronal tissues. Here a procedure for preparation of coupled inside-out submitochondrial particles from brain is described and their NADH oxidase activity is characterized. The basic characteristics of brain complex I, particularly the parameters of A/D-transition are found to be essentially the same as those previously reported for heart enzyme. The results show that coupled submitochondrial particles prepared from either heart or brain can equally be used as a model system for in vitro studies aimed to delineate neurodegenerative-associated defects of complex I.

  15. Evidence of oxidative stress in brain and liver of young rats submitted to experimental galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Castro, Márcia B; Ferreira, Bruna K; Cararo, José Henrique; Chipindo, Adália E; Magenis, Marina L; Michels, Monique; Danielski, Lucinéia G; de Oliveira, Marcos R; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L; Petronilho, Fabricia; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2016-12-01

    Galactosemia is a disorder of galactose metabolism, leading to the accumulation of this carbohydrate. Galactosemic patients present brain and liver damage. For evaluated oxidative stress, 30-day-old males Wistar rats were divided into two groups: galactose group, that received a single injection of this carbohydrate (5 μmol/g), and control group, that received saline 0.9 % in the same conditions. One, twelve or twenty-four hours after the administration, animals were euthanized and cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and liver were isolated. After one hour, it was found a significant increase in TBA-RS levels, nitrate and nitrite and protein carbonyl contents in cerebral cortex, as well as protein carbonyl content in the cerebellum and in hepatic level of TBA-RS, and a significant decrease in nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebellum. TBA-RS levels were also found increased in all studied tissues, as well as nitrate and nitrite contents in cerebral cortex and cerebellum, that also present increased protein carbonyl content and impairments in the activity of antioxidant enzymes of rats euthanized at twelve hours. Finally, animals euthanized after twenty-four hours present an increase of TBA-RS levels in studied tissues, as well as the protein carbonyl content in cerebellum and liver. These animals also present an increased nitrate and nitrite content and impairment of antioxidant enzymes activities. Taken together, our data suggest that acute galactose administration impairs redox homeostasis in brain and liver of rats.

  16. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Edward L.; Alberti, Marie Hebert; Flood, James F.

    1980-07-01

    The uptake of [ring A-4-{sup 3}H] colchicine and [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H]colchicine has been compared in mice from 1 to 24 hr after administration. Less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of ring-labeled colchicine than after administration of the methoxy-labeled colchicine. Three hr after administration of ring-labeled colchicine, 5% of the label was in liver and about 0.01% of the label was present in brain. Forty percent of the brain radioactivity was bound to tubulin as determined by vinblastine precipitation. After 3 hr, an average of 8% of the radioactivity from methoxy-labeled colchicine was found in the liver and 0.16% in brain. However, less than 5% of the activity in brain was precipitated by vinblastine, and the colchicine equivalent was comparable to that found after administration of the ring-labeled colchicine. The amount of colchicine entering mouse brain after subcutaneous injection is comparable to the minimum behaviorally effective dose when administered to the caudate. The metabolism of [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H] and [ring A-{sup 3}H]colchicine was also studied in rats. the general pattern was similar to mice; less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of the ring-labeled alkoloid than after administration of methoxy-labeled colchicine. Again, 40-50% of ring-labeled colchicine was precipitated by vinblastine. A much smaller percentage of the methoxy-labeled drug was precipitated by vinblastine than of the ring A-labeled colchicine. These experiments, together with behavioral experiments [7], support the hypotheses that structural alteration in synapses by recently synthesized proteins which are transported down the axons and dendrites may be an essential process for long-term memory formation.

  17. Bumetanide increases manganese accumulation in the brain of rats with liver damage.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Castro-Chávez, Armando; Florian-Soto, Circe; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Ríos, Camilo; Rivera-Mancía, Susana

    2016-03-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication in cases of liver damage; it results from several factors, including the accumulation of toxic substances in the brain, e.g. manganese, ammonia and glutamine. We have previously reported that manganese favors ammonia and glutamine accumulation in the brain of cirrhotic rats, and we suggested that such effect could be mediated by manganese-elicited activation of the NKCC1 (Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter 1). To test this hypothesis, we used bumetanide, an NKCC1 blocker prescribed to treat ascites in cirrhotic patients; we expected that if NKCC1 was responsible for manganese-mediated ammonia buildup and the subsequent glutamine accumulation, bumetanide could counteract such effect and improve motor coordination. In addition, we considered essential to test the effect of bumetanide on manganese brain levels. We used a model of liver damage in rats, consisting in bile-duct ligation. Animals were exposed to manganese in the drinking water (1 mg/ml) for two weeks and ammonia in the food (20% w/w of ammonia acetate) during the second week after surgery. Bumetanide was administered intraperitoneally in the course of the ammonia treatment. We measured glutamine and manganese in three brain regions: frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum. Bumetanide produced no effect on glutamine accumulation; however, because of bumetanide treatment, manganese was increased in the brain, and also the activity of gamma-glutamyl transferase in plasma; thus, we consider that the influence of bumetanide and similar diuretics on liver function and manganese homeostasis should be further studied.

  18. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) induces protein oxidation and nitration in brain and liver of chicken: Ameliorative effect of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Venkata Subbaiah, Kadiam C; Valluru, Lokanatha; Rajendra, Wudayagiri; Ramamurthy, Chiteti; Thirunavukkarusu, Chinnasamy; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the therapeutic efficacy of vitamin E on oxidative injury in brain and liver of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) challenged chickens. We have analyzed the xanthine oxidase (XOD) activity; uric acid (UA) levels and superoxide radical generation by using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Further, protein oxidation, nitration and apoptosis were evaluated in the brain and liver of the control, NDV-infected and NDV+Vit. E treated groups. A significant elevation was observed in XOD activity and UA levels in brain (p<0.001) and liver (p<0.05) of NDV infected birds when compared to controls. Further, significant increase in the production of superoxides, enhanced intracellular protein carbonyls and nitrates were observed in the brain and liver of NDV-infected birds over healthy subjects. Apoptosis studies also suggested that a larger number of TUNEL positive cells were observed in brain and a moderately in liver of NDV-infected chickens. However, all these perturbations were significantly ameliorated in NDV+Vit. E treated chickens as compared to NDV-infected birds. Taken together, our results suggested that NDV-induced neuronal and hepatic damage at least in part mediates oxidative stress and on the other hand, supplementation of vitamin E mitigates NDV-induced oxidative damage thereby protects brain and liver of chickens. These findings could provide new insights into the understanding of NDV pathogenesis and therapeutic effects of dietary antioxidants.

  19. The effect of cortisol in rat steatotic and non-steatotic liver transplantation from brain-dead donors.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, Mónica B; Negrete-Sánchez, Elsa; Casillas-Ramírez, Araní; Gulfo, Jose; Álvarez-Mercado, Ana I; Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Rodés, Juan; Peralta, Carmen

    2017-04-25

    In the present study, we examined the effects of cortisol on steatotic and non-steatotic liver grafts from brain-dead donors and characterized the underlying mechanisms involved. Non-steatotic liver grafts showed reduced cortisol and increased cortisone levels in association with up-regulation of enzymes that inactivate cortisol. Conversely, steatotic liver grafts exhibited increased cortisol and reduced cortisone levels. The enzymes involved in cortisol generation were overexpressed, and those involved in cortisol inactivation or clearance were down-regulated in steatotic liver grafts. Exogenous administration of cortisol negatively affected hepatic damage and survival rate in non-steatotic liver transplantation (LT); however, cortisol treatment up-regulated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, resulting in protection against the deleterious effects of brain-dead donors on damage and inflammatory response in steatotic LT as well as in increased survival of recipients. The present study highlights the differences in the role of cortisol and hepatic mechanisms that regulate cortisol levels based on the type of liver. Our findings suggest that cortisol treatment is a feasible and highly protective strategy to reduce the adverse effects of brain-dead donor livers in order to ultimately improve liver graft quality in the presence of steatosis, whereas cortisol treatment would not be recommended for non-steatotic liver grafts.

  20. Lactate oxidation in human skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robert A; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    Lactate is an important intermediate metabolite in human bioenergetics and is oxidized in many different tissues including the heart, brain, kidney, adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle. The mechanism(s) explaining the metabolism of lactate in these tissues, however, remains unclear. Here, we analyze the ability of skeletal muscle to respire lactate by using an in situ mitochondrial preparation that leaves the native tubular reticulum and subcellular interactions of the organelle unaltered. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis muscle in 16 human subjects. Samples were chemically permeabilized with saponin, which selectively perforates the sarcolemma and facilitates the loss of cytosolic content without altering mitochondrial membranes, structure, and subcellular interactions. High-resolution respirometry was performed on permeabilized muscle biopsy preparations. By use of four separate and specific substrate titration protocols, the respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondria were capable of oxidizing lactate in the absence of exogenous LDH. The titration of lactate and NAD(+) into the respiration medium stimulated respiration (P ≤ 0.003). The addition of exogenous LDH failed to increase lactate-stimulated respiration (P = 1.0). The results further demonstrate that human skeletal muscle mitochondria cannot directly oxidize lactate within the mitochondrial matrix. Alternately, these data support previous claims that lactate is converted to pyruvate within the mitochondrial intermembrane space with the pyruvate subsequently taken into the mitochondrial matrix where it enters the TCA cycle and is ultimately oxidized.

  1. Wheat Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Raison, John K.; Chapman, Elza A.; White, P. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative activity and membrane lipid structure of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were measured as a function of temperature. The Arrhenius activation energy for the oxidation of both succinate and α-ketoglutarate was constant over the temperature range of 3 to 27 C. The activation energy for succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity was also constant over the same temperature range. The concentration of mitochondria in the reaction, the degree of initial inhibition of state 3 respiration, and the time after isolation of mitochondria were each shown to be capable of causing a disproportionate decrease in the rate of oxidation at low temperatures which resulted in an apparent increase in the activation energy of oxidative activity. Using three spin-labeling techniques, wheat membrane lipids were shown to undergo phase changes at about 0 C and 30 C. It is concluded that the membrane lipids of wheat, a chillingresistant plant, undergo a phase transition similar to the transition observed in the membrane lipids of chilling-sensitive plants. For wheat, however, the transition is initiated at a lower temperature and extends over a wider temperature range. PMID:16659906

  2. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 contributes to the astrocyte swelling and brain edema in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, A R; Valdes, V; Tong, X Y; Shamaladevi, N; Gonzalez, W; Norenberg, M D

    2014-02-01

    Astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic brain edema) is the major neurological complication of acute liver failure (ALF), a condition in which ammonia has been strongly implicated in its etiology. Ion channels and transporters are known to be involved in cell volume regulation, and a disturbance in these systems may result in cell swelling. One ion channel known to contribute to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in other neurological disorders is the ATP-dependent, nonselective cation (NCCa-ATP) channel. We therefore examined its potential role in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema associated with ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with 5 mM ammonia showed a threefold increase in the sulfonylurea receptor type 1 (SUR1) protein expression, a marker of NCCa-ATP channel activity. Blocking SUR1 with glibenclamide significantly reduced the ammonia-induced cell swelling in cultured astrocytes. Additionally, overexpression of SUR1 in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes was significantly reduced by cotreatment of cells with BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, indicating the involvement of an NF-κB-mediated SUR1 upregulation in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Brain SUR1 mRNA level was also found to be increased in the thioacetamide (TAA) rat model of ALF. Additionally, we found a significant increase in SUR1 protein expression in rat brain cortical astrocytes in TAA-treated rats. Treatment with glibenclamide significantly reduced the brain edema in this model of ALF. These findings strongly suggest the involvement of NCCa-ATP channel in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in ALF and that targeting this channel may represent a useful approach for the treatment of the brain edema associated with ALF.

  3. Aquaporin-4 Deletion in Mice Reduces Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Experimental Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Verkman, A. S.; Curtis, Kevin M.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema and associated astrocyte swelling leading to increased intracranial pressure are hallmarks of acute liver failure (ALF). Elevated blood and brain levels of ammonia have been implicated in the development of brain edema in ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with ammonia have been shown to undergo cell swelling and such swelling was associated with an increase in the plasma membrane expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein. Further, silencing the AQP4 gene in cultured astrocytes was shown to prevent the ammonia-induced cell swelling. Here, we examined the evolution of brain edema in AQP4-null mice and their wild type counterparts (WT-mice) in different models of ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA) or acetaminophen (APAP). Induction of ALF with TAA or APAP significantly increased brain water content in WT mice (by 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.4 %, respectively). AQP4 protein was significantly increased in brain plasma membranes of WT mice with ALF induced by either TAA or APAP. In contrast to WT-mice, brain water content did not increase in AQP4-null mice. Additionally, AQP4-null mice treated with either TAA or APAP showed a remarkably lesser degree of neurological deficits as compared to WT mice; the latter displayed an inability to maintain proper gait, and demonstrated a markedly reduced exploratory behavior, with the mice remaining in one corner of the cage with its head tilted downwards. These results support a central role of AQP4 in the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24321433

  4. Cannabidiol improves brain and liver function in a fulminant hepatic failure-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiev, L; Magen, I; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric disorder of complex pathogenesis caused by acute or chronic liver failure. We investigated the effects of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory properties that activates the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5-HT1A, on brain and liver functions in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure induced in mice by thioacetamide. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Female Sabra mice were injected with either saline or thioacetamide and were treated with either vehicle or cannabidiol. Neurological and motor functions were evaluated 2 and 3 days, respectively, after induction of hepatic failure, after which brains and livers were removed for histopathological analysis and blood was drawn for analysis of plasma liver enzymes. In a separate group of animals, cognitive function was tested after 8 days and brain 5-HT levels were measured 12 days after induction of hepatic failure. KEY RESULTS Neurological and cognitive functions were severely impaired in thioacetamide-treated mice and were restored by cannabidiol. Similarly, decreased motor activity in thioacetamide-treated mice was partially restored by cannabidiol. Increased plasma levels of ammonia, bilirubin and liver enzymes, as well as enhanced 5-HT levels in thioacetamide-treated mice were normalized following cannabidiol administration. Likewise, astrogliosis in the brains of thioacetamide-treated mice was moderated after cannabidiol treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol restores liver function, normalizes 5-HT levels and improves brain pathology in accordance with normalization of brain function. Therefore, the effects of cannabidiol may result from a combination of its actions in the liver and brain. PMID:21182490

  5. The antiestrogen endoxifen protects rat liver mitochondria from permeability transition pore opening and oxidative stress at concentrations that do not affect the phosphorylation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Silva, Filomena S.G.; Santos, Armanda E.; Santos, Maria S.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2013-02-15

    Endoxifen (EDX) is a key active metabolite of tamoxifen (TAM) with higher affinity and specificity to estrogen receptors that also inhibits aromatase activity. It is safe and well tolerated by healthy humans, but its use requires toxicological characterization. In this study, the effects of EDX on mitochondria, the primary targets for xenobiotic-induced toxicity, were monitored to clarify its potential side effects. EDX up to 30 nmol/mg protein did not affect the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. At 50 nmol EDX/mg protein, EDX decreased the ADP phosphorylation rate and a partial collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), that parallels a state 4 stimulation, was observed. As the stimulation of state 4 was not inhibited by oligomycin and 50 nmol EDX/mg protein caused a slight decrease in the light scattering of mitochondria, these data suggest that EDX promotes membrane permeabilization to protons, whereas TAM at the same concentration induced mitochondrial membrane disruption. Moreover, EDX at 10 nmol/mg protein prevented and reversed the Ca{sup 2+}-induced depolarization of ΔΨ and the release of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, similarly to cyclosporine A, indicating that EDX did not affect Ca{sup 2+} uptake, but directly interfered with the proteins of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) megacomplex, inhibiting MPT induction. At this concentration, EDX exhibited antioxidant activity that may account for the protective effect against MPT pore opening. In conclusion, EDX within the range of concentrations reached in tissues did not significantly damage the bioenergetic functions of mitochondria, contrarily to the prodrug TAM, and prevented the MPT pore opening and the oxidative stress in mitochondria, supporting that EDX may be a less toxic drug for women with breast carcinoma. - Highlights: ► Mitochondria are important targets of Endoxifen. ► Endoxifen prevents mitochondrial permeability transition. ► Endoxifen prevents oxidative

  6. The role of brain noradrenergic system in the regulation of liver cytochrome P450 expression.

    PubMed

    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Haduch, Anna; Rysz, Marta; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Daniel, Władysława A

    2013-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the brain noradrenergic system on the expression of cytochrome P450 in the liver. The experiment was carried out on male Wistar rats. Intracerebroventricular injection of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 diminished noradrenaline level in the brain. Simultaneously, significant decreases in the serum concentration of the growth hormone, testosterone and the thyroid hormone thyroxine, as well as an increase in corticosterone level were observed. The concentrations of triiodothyronine and the cytokines interleukine 2 (IL-2) and 6 (IL-6) were not changed by DSP-4. The neurotoxin produced complex changes in the functioning of cytochrome P450. Significant decreases in the activity of liver CYP2C11 (measured as a rate of the 2α- and 16α-hydroxylation of testosterone) and CYP3A (measured as a rate of the 2β- and 6β-hydroxylation of testosterone) were found. In contrast, the activity of CYP1A (measured as a rate of caffeine metabolism) rose, while that of CYP2A (measured as a rate of the 7α-hydroxylation of testosterone), CYP2C6 (measured as a rate of the 7-hydroxylation of warfarin) and CYP2D (the 1'-hydroxylation of bufuralol) remained unchanged. The changes in the activity of CYP1A, CYP2C11 and CYP3A correlated positively with those in CYP protein levels and with the CYP mRNA levels of CYP1A1, CYP2C11 and CYP3A1/2 genes, respectively. The obtained results indicate an important role of the brain noradrenergic system in the neuroendocrine regulation of liver cytochrome P450 expression, which may be of significance in pathological states involving this system, or during pharmacotherapy with drugs affecting noradrenergic transmission.

  7. Targeting mitochondria: strategies, innovations and challenges: The future of medicine will come through mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Edeas, Marvin; Weissig, Volkmar

    2013-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with the aging process and a large variety of human disorders, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, migraine, infertility, kidney and liver diseases, toxicity of drugs and many more. It is well recognized that the physiological role of mitochondria widely exceeds that of solely being the biochemical power plant of our cells. Over the recent years, mitochondria have become an interesting target for drug therapy, and the research field aimed at "targeting mitochondria" is active and expanding as witnessed by this already third edition of the world congress on targeting mitochondria. It is becoming a necessity and an urge to know why and how to target mitochondria with bioactive molecules and drugs in order to treat and prevent mitochondria-based pathologies and chronic diseases. This special issue covers a variety of new strategies and innovations as well as clinical applications in mitochondrial medicine.

  8. Cobalt-induced oxidative stress in brain, liver and kidney of goldfish Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Kubrak, Olha I; Husak, Viktor V; Rovenko, Bohdana M; Storey, Janet M; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt is an essential element, but at high concentrations it is toxic. In addition to its well-known function as an integral part of cobalamin (vitamin B₁₂), cobalt has recently been shown to be a mimetic of hypoxia and a stimulator of the production of reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the responses of goldfish, Carassius auratus, to 96 h exposure to 50, 100 or 150 mg L⁻¹ Co²⁺ in aquarium water (administered as CoCl₂). The concentrations of cobalt in aquaria did not change during fish exposure. Exposure to cobalt resulted in increased levels of lipid peroxides in brain (a 111% increase after exposure to 150 mg L⁻¹ Co²⁺) and liver (30-66% increases after exposure to 50-150 mg L⁻¹ Co²⁺), whereas the content of protein carbonyls rose only in kidney (by 112%) after exposure to 150 mg L⁻¹ cobalt. Low molecular mass thiols were depleted by 24-41% in brain in response to cobalt treatment. The activities of primary antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were substantially suppressed in brain and liver as a result of Co²⁺ exposure, whereas in kidney catalase activity was unchanged and SOD activity increased. The activities of glutathione-related enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase, did not change as a result of cobalt exposure, but glutathione reductase activity increased by ∼40% and ∼70% in brain and kidney, respectively. Taken together, these data show that exposure of fish to Co²⁺ ions results in the development of oxidative stress and the activation of defense systems in different goldfish tissues.

  9. Expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in the liver are differently correlated to different parts of the brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lishi; Huang, Yue; Jiao, Yan; Chen, Hong; Cao, Yanhong; Bennett, Beth; Wang, Yongjun; Gu, Weikuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether expression profiles of alcoholism-relevant genes in different parts of the brain are correlated differently with those in the liver. Four experiments were conducted. First, we used gene expression profiles from five parts of the brain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, and cerebellum) and from liver in a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains to examine the expression association of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Second, we conducted the same association analysis between brain structures and the lung. Third, using five randomly selected, nonalcoholism-relevant genes, we conducted the association analysis between brain and liver. Finally, we compared the expression of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes in hippocampus and cerebellum between an alcohol preference strain and a wild-type control. We observed a difference in correlation patterns in expression levels of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes between different parts of the brain with those of liver. We then examined the association of gene expression between alcohol dehydrogenases (Adh1, Adh2, Adh5, and Adh7) and different parts of the brain. The results were similar to those of the 10 genes. Then, we found that the association of those genes between brain structures and lung was different from that of liver. Next, we found that the association patterns of five alcoholism-nonrelevant genes were different from those of 10 alcoholism-relevant genes. Finally, we found that the expression level of 10 alcohol-relevant genes is influenced more in hippocampus than in cerebellum in the alcohol preference strain. Our results show that the expression of alcoholism-relevant genes in liver is differently associated with the expression of genes in different parts of the brain. Because different structural changes in different parts of the brain in alcoholism have been reported, it is important to investigate whether those structural differences in

  10. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated modulation of brain mitochondria function: new target proteins for JNK signalling in mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Hagen; Boyd, Clinton S; Ahmed, Ruhi; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Duncan, Roger F; Rice-Evans, Catherine; Cadenas, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and control of the release of cytochrome c during mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis are thought to involve the phosphorylation of mitochondrial Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L). Although the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been proposed to mediate the phosphorylation of Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) the mechanisms linking the modification of these proteins and the release of cytochrome c remain to be elucidated. This study was aimed at establishing interdependency between JNK signalling and mitochondrial apoptosis. Using an experimental model consisting of isolated, bioenergetically competent rat brain mitochondria, these studies show that (i) JNK catalysed the phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) as well as other mitochondrial proteins, as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/SDS/PAGE; (ii) JNK-induced cytochrome c release, in a process independent of the permeability transition of the inner mitochondrial membrane (imPT) and insensitive to cyclosporin A; (iii) JNK mediated a partial collapse of the mitochondrial inner-membrane potential (Deltapsim) in an imPT- and cyclosporin A-independent manner; and (iv) JNK was unable to induce imPT/swelling and did not act as a co-inducer, but as an inhibitor of Ca-induced imPT. The results are discussed with regard to the functional link between the Deltapsim and factors influencing the permeability transition of the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. Taken together, JNK-dependent phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins including, but not limited to, Bcl-2/Bcl-x(L) may represent a potential of the modulation of mitochondrial function during apoptosis. PMID:12614194

  11. Immunodetection of Outer Membrane Proteins by Flow Cytometry of Isolated Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, Sarah; Arbour, Nathalie; Vande Velde, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Methods to detect and monitor mitochondrial outer membrane protein components in animal tissues are vital to study mitochondrial physiology and pathophysiology. This protocol describes a technique where mitochondria isolated from rodent tissue are immunolabeled and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mitochondria are isolated from rodent spinal cords and subjected to a rapid enrichment step so as to remove myelin, a major contaminant of mitochondrial fractions prepared from nervous tissue. Isolated mitochondria are then labeled with an antibody of choice and a fluorescently conjugated secondary antibody. Analysis by flow cytometry verifies the relative purity of mitochondrial preparations by staining with a mitochondrial specific dye, followed by detection and quantification of immunolabeled protein. This technique is rapid, quantifiable and high-throughput, allowing for the analysis of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria per sample. It is applicable to assess novel proteins at the mitochondrial surface under normal physiological conditions as well as the proteins that may become mislocalized to this organelle during pathology. Importantly, this method can be coupled to fluorescent indicator dyes to report on certain activities of mitochondrial subpopulations and is feasible for mitochondria from the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) as well as liver. PMID:25285411

  12. Oxygen consumption by mitochondria from an endotherm and an ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Berner, N J

    1999-09-01

    Comparisons of metabolic properties of mitochondria from an endothermic and an ectothermic vertebrate were performed. Oxygen (O2) consumption rates of liver mitochondria from laboratory mice and western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) were determined over a range of temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 37 degrees C) and in the presence of a variety of substrates. At 37 degrees C the O2 consumption rate of mouse mitochondria was 4-11 times higher than lizard mitochondria in the presence of five of eight substrates. This range of differences is similar to differences reported for O2 consumption of endothermic animals, tissues and cells over those of ectotherms. Thermal sensitivity of mitochondria was measured by calculation of Q10s for O2 consumption. Q10s were highest for mouse mitochondria overall. The range that showed the highest Q10s for the mouse mitochondria was 30-20 degrees C, whereas for the lizard mitochondria it was 20-10 degrees C. Thus, mitochondria from the ectotherm showed a lower degree of temperature sensitivity than did mitochondria from the endotherm. The preferred substrate for all mitochondria at all temperatures was succinate, but mouse mitochondria then showed some preference for alpha-ketoglutarate and citrate, whereas lizard mitochondria showed a preference for pyruvate and malate + pyruvate.

  13. Base-resolution DNA methylation landscape of zebrafish brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Stockwell, Peter A; Horsfield, Julia A; Morison, Ian M; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2014-12-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate model organism that is widely used for studying a plethora of biological questions, including developmental processes, effects of external cues on phenotype, and human disease modeling. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that contributes to gene regulation, and is prevalent in all vertebrates. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) is a cost-effective technique to generate genome-wide DNA methylation maps and has been used in mammalian genomes (e.g., human, mouse and rat) but not in zebrafish. High-resolution DNA methylation data in zebrafish are limited: increased availability of such data will enable us to model and better understand the roles, causes and consequences of changes in DNA methylation. Here we present five high-resolution DNA methylation maps for wild-type zebrafish brain (two pooled male and two pooled female methylomes) and liver. These data were generated using the RRBS technique (includes 1.43 million CpG sites of zebrafish genome) on the Illumina HiSeq platform. Alignment to the reference genome was performed using the Zv9 genome assembly. To our knowledge, these datasets are the only RRBS datasets and base-resolution DNA methylation data available at this time for zebrafish brain and liver. These datasets could serve as a resource for future studies to document the functional role of DNA methylation in zebrafish. In addition, these datasets could be used as controls while performing analysis on treated samples.

  14. Heavy Metals in Liver and Brain of Waterfowl from the Evros Delta, Greece.

    PubMed

    Aloupi, Maria; Karagianni, Asimina; Kazantzidis, Savas; Akriotis, Triantaphyllos

    2017-02-01

    The concentrations of six heavy metals (cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], manganese [Mn], lead [Pb], and zinc [Zn]) were determined in liver and brain of nine species of waterfowl from the Evros Delta, one of the most important wetlands in Greece, to assess metal contamination and potential risk to waterfowl. Significant differences among species were found for hepatic Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn; the highest levels of all metals were found in liver of mute swans. Cd increased significantly with age in both organs of wigeon; some differences were also observed between males and females of the same species. Feeding habits were found to significantly affect hepatic Cr, Zn, and Cu concentrations with greater concentrations found in herbivorous than omnivorous species. Several significant positive correlations between metals were detected mainly in liver samples, which were attributable either to their association to metallothioneins or to common routes of exposure of waterfowl. Hepatic and cerebral concentrations of Cd and Pb correlated positively. Given the discrepancies in the thresholds or critical levels of metals in tissues of waterfowl, our survey showed that environmental exposure to increased levels of heavy metals may threaten, at least to some degree, the populations of waterfowl wintering in the Evros Delta. In a small percentage of birds, values indicative of severe adverse effects were determined. Swans that had been found dead showed some of the highest values, whereas accumulation levels did not follow a consistent pattern among the ducks examined.

  15. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-07

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ∼60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  16. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ˜60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  17. A relevant exposure to a food matrix contaminated environmentally by polychlorinated biphenyls induces liver and brain disruption in rats.

    PubMed

    Ounnas, Fayçal; Privé, Florence; Lamarche, Fréderic; Salen, Patricia; Favier-Hininger, Isabelle; Marchand, Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Venisseau, Anais; Batandier, Cécile; Fontaine, Eric; de Lorgeril, Michel; Demeilliers, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants present in dietary fats. Most studies evaluating PCB effects have been conducted with a single compound or a mixture of PCBs given as a single acute dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo PCB toxicity in a realistic model of exposure: a low daily dose of PCBs (twice the tolerable daily intake (TDI)), chronically administered (8 weeks) to rats in contaminated goat milk. Liver and brain PCB toxicities were investigated by evaluating oxidative stress status and mitochondrial function. PCB toxicity in the liver was also estimated by transaminase enzymatic activity. This study shows that even at low doses, chronic PCB exposure resulted in a statistically significant reduction of mitochondrial function in liver and brain. In the liver, oxygen consumption in the condition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production (state 3) decreased by 22-29% (p < 0.01), according to the respiratory substrates. In the brain, respiratory chain complexes II and III were reduced by 24% and 39%, respectively (p < 0.005). The exposed rats presented higher lipid peroxidation status (+20%, p < 0.05) and transaminase activity (+30%, p < 0.05) in the blood. Thus, our study showed that exposure of rats to a daily realistic dose of PCBs (twice the TDI in a food complex mixture of environmental origin) resulted in multiple disruptions in the liver and brain.

  18. [Deceased organ donors, legal regulations governing diagnosis of brain death, overview of donors and liver transplants in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Pokorná, E

    2013-08-01

    The key restriction of transplantation medicine globally, as well as in the Czech Republic, concerns the lack of organs. The number of deceased donors, and thus the availability of organ transplants, has been stagnating in our country. The paper describes current legal regulations governing the dia-gnosis of brain death and primary legal and medical criteria for the contraindication of the deceased for organ explantation, gives an overview of the number of liver transplants, age structure, and diagnosis resulting in brain death of the deceased liver donors in the Czech Republic.

  19. In vitro effect of copper chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complex activities of mitochondria isolated from broiler liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Rongsheng; Wang, Rongmei; Guo, Shining; Cao, Huabin; Pan, Jiaqiang; Li, Chengmei; Shi, Dayou; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2011-12-01

    This study is to examine if Cu(2+) can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated broiler hepatic mitochondria were exposed to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (10, 30, 50 μM). Respiratory chain complex activities, ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed, which coincided with decreasing RCR both with glutamate + malate or succinate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by rhodamine 123 release decreased after CuCl(2) exposure at 30 and 50 μM. In addition, the effects of the antioxidants NAC (200 μM) and GSH (200 μM) were studied at 50 μM Cu(2+). The results indicate that Cu can induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose and the effect of Cu(2+) exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free radicals.

  20. F1F0-ATPase, early target of the radical initiator 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in rat liver mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Beauseigneur, F; Goubern, M; Chapey, M F; Gresti, J; Vergely, C; Tsoko, M; Demarquoy, J; Rochette, L; Clouet, P

    1996-12-01

    This study was designed to determine which enzyme activities were first impaired in mitochondria exposed to 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), a known radical initiator. EPR spin-trapping revealed generation of reactive oxygen species although malondialdehyde formation remained very low. With increasing AAPH concentrations, State-3 respiration was progressively depressed with unaltered ADP/O ratios. A top-down approach demonstrated that alterations were located at the phosphorylation level. As shown by inhibitor titrations, ATP/ADP translocase activity was unaffected in the range of AAPH concentrations used. In contrast, AAPH appeared to exert a deleterious effect at the level of F1F0-ATPase, comparable with dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide, which alters Fo proton channel. A comparison of ATP hydrolase activity in uncoupled and broken mitochondria reinforced this finding. In spite of its pro-oxidant properties, AAPH was shown to act as a dose-dependent inhibitor of cyclosporin-sensitive permeability transition initiated by Ca2+, probably as a consequence of its effect on F1F0-ATPase. Resveratrol, a potent antiperoxidant, completely failed to prevent the decrease in State-3 respiration caused by AAPH. The data suggest that AAPH, when used under mild conditions, acted as a radical initiator and was capable of damaging F1F0-ATPase, thereby slowing respiratory chain activity and reducing mitochondrial antioxidant defences.

  1. Oxidative stress of brain and liver is increased by Wi-Fi (2.45GHz) exposure of rats during pregnancy and the development of newborns.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ömer; Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    An excessive production of reactive oxygen substances (ROS) and reduced antioxidant defence systems resulting from electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure may lead to oxidative brain and liver damage and degradation of membranes during pregnancy and development of rat pups. We aimed to investigate the effects of Wi-Fi-induced EMR on the brain and liver antioxidant redox systems in the rat during pregnancy and development. Sixteen pregnant rats and their 48 newborns were equally divided into control and EMR groups. The EMR groups were exposed to 2.45GHz EMR (1h/day for 5 days/week) from pregnancy to 3 weeks of age. Brain cortex and liver samples were taken from the newborns between the first and third weeks. In the EMR groups, lipid peroxidation levels in the brain and liver were increased following EMR exposure; however, the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and vitamin A, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations were decreased in the brain and liver. Glutathione (GSH) and vitamin C concentrations in the brain were also lower in the EMR groups than in the controls; however, their concentrations did not change in the liver. In conclusion, Wi-Fi-induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver of developing rats was the result of reduced GSH-Px, GSH and antioxidant vitamin concentrations. Moreover, the brain seemed to be more sensitive to oxidative injury compared to the liver in the development of newborns.

  2. Oxidative stress in rat brain but not in liver following oral administration of a low dose of nanoparticulate silver.

    PubMed

    Skalska, Joanna; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-11-01

    While it is known that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can enter the brain, our knowledge of AgNP-induced neurotoxicity remains incomplete. We investigated the ability of 10 nm citrate-stabilized AgNPs to generate oxidative stress in brain and liver of adult male Wistar rats after repeated oral exposure for 14 days, using a low dose of 0.2 mg/kg b.w. as compared with the same dose of ionic silver (silver citrate). In AgNP-exposed animals, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were found to be significantly higher in brain relative to the control group receiving saline. Administration of ionic silver (silver citrate) increased ROS and MDA levels in both tissues. Activities of GPx in brain so as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in liver of exposed animals were also elevated. Besides, AgNPs and silver ions were both found to cause statistically significant decrease in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) in brain. The results show that exposure to a very low dose of particulate silver generates mild oxidative stress in the brain but not in the liver of rats, indicating a role of oxidative stress in AgNP-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Anti-oxidative effects of curcumin on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain, liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz

    2017-03-01

    Restraint stress has been indicated to induce oxidative damage in tissues. Several investigations have reported that curcumin (CUR) may have a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CUR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver and kidneys. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 1h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CUR daily for 21days. In order to evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities superoxide dismutase (SOD) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) were measured in the brain, liver and kidney of rats after the end of restraint stress. The restraint stress significantly increased MDA level, but decreased the level of GSH and activists of SOD, GPx, GR, and CAT the brain, liver and kidney of rats in comparison to the normal rats (P<0.001). Intraperitoneal administration of CUR significantly attenuated oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, prevented apoptosis, and increased antioxidant defense mechanism activity in the tissues versus the control group (P<0.05). This study shows that CUR can prevent restraint stress-induced oxidative damage in the brain, liver and kidney of rats and propose that CUR may be useful agents against oxidative stress in the tissues.

  4. Noninvasive assessment of the rheological behavior of human organs using multifrequency MR elastography: a study of brain and liver viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Dieter; Hamhaber, Uwe; Asbach, Patrick; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2007-12-21

    MR elastography (MRE) enables the noninvasive determination of the viscoelastic behavior of human internal organs based on their response to oscillatory shear stress. An experiment was developed that combines multifrequency shear wave actuation with broad-band motion sensitization to extend the dynamic range of a single MRE examination. With this strategy, multiple wave images corresponding to different driving frequencies are simultaneously received and can be analyzed by evaluating the dispersion of the complex modulus over frequency. The technique was applied on the brain and liver of five healthy volunteers. Its repeatability was tested by four follow-up studies in each volunteer. Five standard rheological models (Maxwell, Voigt, Zener, Jeffreys and fractional Zener model) were assessed for their ability to reproduce the observed dispersion curves. The three-parameter Zener model was found to yield the most consistent results with two shear moduli mu(1) = 0.84 +/- 0.22 (1.36 +/- 0.31) kPa, mu(2) = 2.03 +/- 0.19 (1.86 +/- 0.34) kPa and one shear viscosity of eta = 6.7 +/- 1.3 (5.5 +/- 1.6) Pa s (interindividual mean +/- SD) in brain (liver) experiments. Significant differences between the rheological parameters of brain and liver were found for mu(1) and eta (P < 0.05), indicating that human brain is softer and possesses a higher viscosity than liver.

  5. Generation and characterization of the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax brain and liver transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Magnanou, Elodie; Klopp, Christophe; Noirot, Celine; Besseau, Laurence; Falcón, Jack

    2014-07-01

    The sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax is the center of interest of an increasing number of basic or applied research investigations, even though few genomic or transcriptomic data is available. Current public data only represent a very partial view of its transcriptome. To fill this need, we characterized brain and liver transcriptomes in a generalist manner that would benefit the entire scientific community. We also tackled some bioinformatics questions, related to the effect of RNA fragment size on the assembly quality. Using Illumina RNA-seq, we sequenced organ pools from both wild and farmed Atlantic and Mediterranean fishes. We built two distinct cDNA libraries per organ that only differed by the length of the selected mRNA fragments. Efficiency of assemblies performed on either or both fragments size differed depending on the organ, but remained very close reflecting the quality of the technical replication. We generated more than 19,538Mbp of data. Over 193million reads were assembled into 35,073 contigs (average length=2374bp; N50=3257). 59% contigs were annotated with SwissProt, which corresponded to 12,517 unique genes. We compared the Gene Ontology (GO) contig distribution between the sea bass and the tilapia. We also looked for brain and liver GO specific signatures as well as KEGG pathway coverage. 23,050 putative micro-satellites and 134,890 putative SNPs were identified. Our sampling strategy and assembly pipeline provided a reliable and broad reference transcriptome for the sea bass. It constitutes an indisputable quantitative and qualitative improvement of the public data, as it provides 5 times more base pairs with fewer and longer contigs. Both organs present unique signatures consistent with their specific physiological functions. The discrepancy in fragment size effect on assembly quality between organs lies in their difference in complexity and thus does not allow prescribing any general strategy. This information on two key organs will facilitate

  6. Brain, liver and plasma unsaturated aldehydes in nutritional encephalomalacia of chicks.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, H; Sallmann, H P

    2000-04-01

    Vitamin E deficiency and linoleic acid-feeding lead to nutritional encephalomalacia (NE) in chicks, affecting the cerebellum exclusively. The relevance of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products to the pathogenesis of the disease was studied. Laying hens received a diet low in vitamin E. Resulting chicks were assigned to four groups fed either with linoleic (C18: 2n-6) or linolenic (C18: 3n-3) acid together with 1 or 50 p.p.m. vitamin E. Nine days post-hatching NE occurred in the vitamin E-deficient group fed linoleic acid. With each chick showing NE, a healthy one from all four groups was killed. Unsaturated aldehydes were determined in plasma, liver, cerebrum and cerebellum. Results underlined that the type of dietary fat is decisive for the aldehyde pattern. In the liver of linoleic acid-fed animals total aldehydes were increased. Diseased animals had increased aldehydes stemming from n-3 fatty acids. In plasma, vitamin E deficiency led to higher malondialdehyde and OH-nonenal concentrations. In brain, neither vitamin E deficiency nor NE were accompanied by increased aldehyde concentrations. In consequence a direct role of unsaturated aldehydes for the development of NE in the cerebellum is not probable.

  7. Green tea extract improves the oxidative state of the liver and brain in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Gonçalves, Geferson; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the possible effects of the administration of a green tea extract on the oxidative state of the liver and brain of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, a model for human rheumatoid arthritis. Daily doses of 250 mg kg(-1) (59.8 mg catechins per kg) for 23 days were administered. This treatment produced significant diminutions in protein and lipid damage in liver, brain and plasma. It also diminished the tissue ROS contents and increased the antioxidant capacity of the plasma. The antioxidant defenses, which are diminished by arthritis, were improved by the green tea treatment, as revealed by the restoration of the GSH and protein thiol levels and by the strong tendency for normalizing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes. The activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is increased by arthritis in the liver, was also almost normalized by the treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that green tea consumption is possibly beneficial for the liver and brain of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis because it attenuates the pronounced oxidative stress that accompanies the disease and, thus, diminishes the injury to lipids and proteins in both liver and brain. There are also indications that, in the liver, the green tea can contribute to normalize the metabolic functions that are substantially modified by arthritis. For example, the green tea normalized the activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme of an important metabolic route (pentose monophosphate pathway). It is expected that the green tea treatment is equally able to normalize the activity of other enzymes (e.g., glucokinase and glucose 6-phosphatase), a hypothesis to be tested by future work.

  8. Organochlorine contaminants in the muscle, liver and brain of seabirds (Larus) from the coastal area of the Southern Baltic.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Lucyna; Reindl, Andrzej R; Grajewska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita U

    2016-11-01

    The presence of persistent organic pollutants in the environment manifests itself most strongly in the marine trophic chain, where the highest link is comprised of seabirds. At the same time, seabirds are excellent indicators of contamination in their habitat. The present study concentrates on toxic substances: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorinated organic pesticides (OCPs) accumulated in the livers, pectoral muscles and brains of dead gulls collected along the Polish coast of the Baltic Sea in the years 2010-12. The highest toxic equivalence was determined in the livers of Larus argentatus (TEQ(birds TEF)-28.3pgg(-1) ww) and Larus marinus (TEQ(birds TEF)-29.9pgg(-1) ww.). However, the toxic equivalence of muscles was lower and amounted to 3.9pgg(-1) ww. and 7.8pgg(-1) ww. respectively for the two species. The lowest toxic equivalence was found in the brains of birds, where only one, the most toxic, 2,3,7,8 TCDD congener was found (TEQ(birds TEF) 0.87pgg(-1) ww). The highest concentration of chloroorganic pesticides was determined in the brains of the birds (total OCP 167.8pgg(-1) ww.), lower concentrations were found in the livers (total OCP 92.1pgg(-1) ww.) and muscles (total OCP 43.1pgg(-1) ww.). With regard to pesticides, the highest proportion in the total OCP content was constituted by DDT and its isomers (liver 81%, muscles 77% and brain 55%). High concentrations of the studied pollutants in the livers of gulls found dead on the coast of the Southern Baltic could have been effected by levels of contamination in the birds' last meals, which resulted in a seven-fold increase of the liver's toxic equivalence and a two-fold increase in OCP concentration in relation to muscles.

  9. Isolation and characterization of extrachromosomal circular DNAs in mouse heart, brain and liver tissues at various ages

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Eucaryotic cells contains extrachromosomal circular (eccDNAs) which can be separated and distinguished from chromosomal DNA. Using alkaline denaturation-renaturation, exonuclease III digestion and density gradient centrifugations, covalently closed circular DNA (cc-cDNA) molecules were isolated from 1-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month C57BL/6 mouse heart, brain and liver organs. Restriction enzyme analyses and other enzymatic treatments established the covalently closed nature of the isolated molecules. Electron microscopic analyses of heart eccDNAs showed similar size distributions at all ages, but more discrete size classes and slightly larger circles were observed in 24-month heart eccDNA preparations. Heart contained more circles per cell than either liver or brain, which contained approximately the same amount of eccDNAs per genome. Furthermore, ({sup 3}H)-pBR322 recovery studies revealed no endogenous factors that might have affected the yields of eccDNAs from young and old tissues. To determine if there were any age-related or tissue-specific differences in repetitive sequences in eccDNAs, heart, brain and liver eccDNAs were probed with B1, B2, IAP, L1 and satellite sequences of the mouse genome. The hybridization results showed that these sequence families were differentially represented at all ages in eccDNAs. B2 sequences were the highest in heart, while satellite sequences were the highest in liver and brain. In heart, very little age-related change was observed in the quantity of repetitive sequences. Nevertheless, a tendency to decrease for B1 and B2 sequences at 24 months was observed. In liver, repetitive sequences decreased from 1 to 8 months of age, with very little change beyond that time point. Brain eccDNA repetitive sequences did not change significantly with age.

  10. Anti-oxidative responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) gill, liver and brain tissues upon acute cold shock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Su Mei; Liu, Jia-Hao; Shu, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ching Hsein

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to detect oxidative damage and to compare anti-oxidative responses among liver, gills and brain of adult zebrafish that were cooled from 28 °C (control) to 12 °C (treatment) for 0-24 h. The lipid peroxidation of liver, gill and brain tissues significantly increased at 1h after transfer, but reactive oxygen species in the treatment group increased significantly after 24 h as compared to the control. The fish were found to develop a cascading anti-oxidative mechanism beginning with an increase in Cu/Zn-SOD levels, followed by increased CAT and GPx mRNA expressions in the three tissue types. Both smtB and mt2 mRNAs increased in the hepatic and brain tissues following 1h of cold stress, but only smtB exhibited a significant increase in the gills at 1 h and 6 h after transfer to 12 °C. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis in the brain was not evident after cold shock, but liver and gills showed cellular apoptosis at 1-3 h, with another peak in the liver at 6 h after cold shock. The results suggest that the cold shock induced oxidative stress, and the enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) and non-enzymatic (mt-2 and smt-B) mRNA expressions all play a role in the resulting anti-oxidation within 1-6 h of cold shock. A functional comparison showed that the brain had the most powerful antioxidant defense system of the three tissue types since it had the highest smtB mRNA expression and a lower level of cell apoptosis than the liver and gills after exposure to cold stress.

  11. Longitudinal Intrinsic Brain Activity Changes in Cirrhotic Patients before and One Month after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yue; Huang, Li-Xiang; Zhang, Li; Ma, Ming; Xie, Shuang-Shuang; Ji, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Gao-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Ning; Ni, Hong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the spontaneous brain activity alterations in liver transplantation (LT) recipients using resting-state functional MRI. Materials and Methods Twenty cirrhotic patients as transplant candidates and 25 healthy controls (HCs) were included in this study. All patients repeated the MRI study one month after LT. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) values were compared between cirrhotic patients (both pre- and post-LT) and HCs as well as between the pre- and post-LT groups. The relationship between ALFF changes and venous blood ammonia levels and neuropsychological tests were investigated using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results In the cirrhotic patients, decreased ALFF in the vision-related regions (left lingual gyrus and calcarine), sensorimotor-related regions (left postcentral gyrus and middle cingulate cortex), and the default-mode network (bilateral precuneus and left inferior parietal lobule) were restored, and the increased ALFF in the temporal and frontal lobe improved in the early period after LT. The ALFF decreases persisted in the right supplementary motor area, inferior parietal lobule, and calcarine. The ALFF changes in the right precuneus were negatively correlated with changes in number connection test-A scores (r = 0.507, p < 0.05). Conclusion LT improved spontaneous brain activity and the results for associated cognition tests. However, decreased ALFF in some areas persisted, and new-onset abnormal ALFF were possible, indicating that complete cognitive function recovery may need more time. PMID:28246517

  12. Encephalitozoon cuniculi: Grading the Histological Lesions in Brain, Kidney, and Liver during Primoinfection Outbreak in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Trejo-Chávez, Armando; Hernández-Martínez, Carlos A.; Zarate-Ramos, Juan J.; Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel

    2016-01-01

    This is the first confirmed report of Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) in farm meat rabbits located in Northern Mexico. Eighty young rabbits exhibited clinical signs of this zoonotic emerging disease, like torticollis, ataxia, paresis, circling, and rolling. Samples of brain, kidney, and liver were examined for histology lesions. For the first time the lesions caused by E. cuniculi were graded according to their severity (I, II, and III) and the size of the granulomas (Types A, B, and C). The main cerebral injuries were Grade III, coinciding with the presence of Type C granulomas. The cerebral lesions were located in the cortex, brain stem, and medulla. The renal lesions were also Grade III distributed throughout cortex and renal medulla, with no granuloma formation. The involvement of hypersensitivity Types III and IV is suggested. All of the rabbits were seropositive to E. cuniculi by CIA testing, suggesting that this zoonotic and emerging pathogen is widely distributed among animals intended for human consumption. We believe this work could be used as a guide when examining E. cuniculi and will provide direction to confirm the diagnosis of this pathogen. PMID:27022485

  13. Encephalitozoon cuniculi: Grading the Histological Lesions in Brain, Kidney, and Liver during Primoinfection Outbreak in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M; Trejo-Chávez, Armando; Hernández-Martínez, Carlos A; Hernández-Vidal, Gustavo; Zarate-Ramos, Juan J; Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel

    2016-01-01

    This is the first confirmed report of Encephalitozoon cuniculi (E. cuniculi) in farm meat rabbits located in Northern Mexico. Eighty young rabbits exhibited clinical signs of this zoonotic emerging disease, like torticollis, ataxia, paresis, circling, and rolling. Samples of brain, kidney, and liver were examined for histology lesions. For the first time the lesions caused by E. cuniculi were graded according to their severity (I, II, and III) and the size of the granulomas (Types A, B, and C). The main cerebral injuries were Grade III, coinciding with the presence of Type C granulomas. The cerebral lesions were located in the cortex, brain stem, and medulla. The renal lesions were also Grade III distributed throughout cortex and renal medulla, with no granuloma formation. The involvement of hypersensitivity Types III and IV is suggested. All of the rabbits were seropositive to E. cuniculi by CIA testing, suggesting that this zoonotic and emerging pathogen is widely distributed among animals intended for human consumption. We believe this work could be used as a guide when examining E. cuniculi and will provide direction to confirm the diagnosis of this pathogen.

  14. [Effects of low doses of essential oil on the antioxidant state of the erythrocytes, liver, and the brains of mice].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Fatkullina, L D; Alinkina, E S; Kozachenko, A I; Nagler, L G; Medvedeva, I B; Goloshchapov, A N; Burlakova, E B

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of essential oil from oregano and clove and a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract on the antioxidant state of organs in intact and three experimental groups of Bulb mice. We found that the essential oil was an efficient in vivo bioantioxidant when mice were treated with it for 6 months even at very low doses, such as 300 ng/day. All essential oil studied inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the membranes of erythrocytes that resulted in increased membrane resistance to spontaneous hemolysis, decreased membrane microviscosity, maintenance of their structural integrity, and functional activity. The essential oil substantially decreased the LPO intensity in the liver and the brains of mice and increased the resistance of liver and brain lipids to oxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver. The most expressed bioantioxidant effect on erythrocytes was observed after clove oil treatment, whereas on the liver and brain, after treatment with a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract.

  15. Experimental Periodontitis Results in Prediabetes and Metabolic Alterations in Brain, Liver and Heart: Global Untargeted Metabolomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ilievski, Vladimir; Kinchen, Jason M; Prabhu, Ramya; Rim, Fadi; Leoni, Lara; Unterman, Terry G.; Watanabe, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Results from epidemiological studies suggest that there is an association between periodontitis and prediabetes, however, causality is not known. The results from our previous studies suggest that induction of periodontitis leads to hyperinsulinemia glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, all hallmarks of prediabetes. However, global effects of periodontitis on critical organs in terms of metabolic alterations are unknown. We determined the metabolic effects of periodontitis on brain, liver, heart and plasma resulting from Porphyromonas gingivalis induced periodontitis in mice. Periodontitis was induced by oral application of the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis for 22 weeks. Global untargeted biochemical profiles in samples from these organs/plasma were determined by liquid and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and compared between controls and animals with periodontitis. Oral application of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic periodontitis and hallmarks of prediabetes. The results of sample analyses indicated a number of changes in metabolic readouts, including changes in metabolites related to glucose and arginine metabolism, inflammation and redox homeostasis. Changes in biochemicals suggested subtle systemic effects related to periodontal disease, with increases in markers of inflammation and oxidative stress most prominent in the liver. Signs of changes in redox homeostasis were also seen in the brain and heart. Elevated bile acids in liver were suggestive of increased biosynthesis, which may reflect changes in liver function. Interestingly, signs of decreasing glucose availability were seen in the brain. In all three organs and plasma, there was a significant increase in the microbiome-derived bioactive metabolite 4-ethylphenylsulfate sulfate in animals with periodontitis. The results of metabolic profiling suggest that periodontitis/bacterial products alter metabolomic signatures of brain, heart, liver, and plasma in the

  16. Normal Organ Weights in Women: Part II-The Brain, Lungs, Liver, Spleen, and Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2015-09-01

    Organomegaly can be a sign of disease and pathology, although standard tables defining organomegaly have yet to be established and universally accepted. This study was designed to address the issue and to determine a normal weight for the major organs in adult human females. A prospective study was undertaken of healthy females who had sudden, traumatic deaths at age 18 to 35 years. Cases were excluded if there was a history of medical illness including illicit drug use, prolonged medical treatment was performed, there was a prolonged period between the time of injury and death, body length and weight could not be accurately assessed, or if any illness or intoxication was identified after gross and microscopic analysis including evidence of systemic disease. Individual organs were excluded if there was significant injury to the organ that could have affected the weight. A total of 102 cases met criteria for inclusion in the study during the approximately 10-year period of data collection from 2004 to 2014. The decedents had an average age of 24.4 years and ranged in length from 141 to 182 cm (56.4-72.8 inches) with an average length of 160 cm (64 inches). The weight ranged from 35.9 to 152 kg (79-334 lb) with an average weight of 65.3 kg (143 lb). The majority of the decedents (86%) died of either ballistic or blunt force (including craniocerebral) injuries. The mean brain weight was 1233 g (range, 1000-1618 g); liver mean weight, 1288 g (range, 775-2395 g); spleen mean weight, 115 g (range, 51-275 g); right lung mean weight, 340 g (range, 142-835 g); left lung mean, 299 g (range, 108-736 g); right kidney mean weight, 108 g (range, 67-261 g); and the left kidney mean weight, 116 g (range, 55-274 g). Regression analysis was performed and showed that there were insufficient associations between organ weight and body length, body weight, and body mass index to allow for predictability. The authors therefore propose establishing a reference range for organ weights in

  17. Normal organ weights in men: part II-the brain, lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2012-12-01

    Organomegaly can be a sign of disease and pathologic abnormality, although standard tables defining organomegaly have yet to be established and universally accepted. This study was designed to address the issue and to determine a normal weight for the major organs in adult human males. A prospective study of healthy men aged 18 to 35 years who died of sudden, traumatic deaths was undertaken. Cases were excluded if there was a history of medical illness including illicit drug use, if prolonged medical treatment was performed, if there was a prolonged period between the time of injury and death, if body length and weight could not be accurately assessed, or if any illness or intoxication was identified after gross and microscopic analysis including evidence of systemic disease. Individual organs were excluded if there was significant injury to the organ, which could have affected the weight. A total of 232 cases met criteria for inclusion in the study during the approximately 6-year period of data collection from 2005 to 2011. The decedents had a mean age of 23.9 years and ranged in length from 146 to 193 cm, with a mean length of 173 cm. The weight ranged from 48.5 to 153 kg, with a mean weight of 76.4 kg. Most decedents (87%) died of either ballistic or blunt force (including craniocerebral) injuries. The mean weight of the brain was 1407 g (range, 1070-1767 g), that of the liver was 1561 g (range, 838-2584 g), that of the spleen was 139 g (range, 43-344 g), that of the right lung was 445 g (range, 185-967 g), that of the left lung was 395 g (range, 186-885 g), that of the right kidney was 129 g (range, 79-223 g), and that of the left kidney was 137 g (range, 74-235 g). Regression analysis was performed and showed that there were insufficient associations between organ weight and body length, body weight, and body mass index to allow for predictability. The authors, therefore, propose establishing a reference range for organ weights in men, much like those in use

  18. Targeted transplantation of mitochondria to hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Catherine H; Wu, George Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial defects in hepatocytes can result in liver dysfunction and death. Hepatocytes have cell-surface asialoglycoprotein receptors (AsGRs) which internalize AsGs within endosomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondria could be targeted to hepatocytes by AsGR-mediated endocytosis. Materials and methods An AsG, AsOR, was linked to polylysine to create a conjugate, AsOR-PL, and complexed with healthy and functional mitochondria (defined by normal morphology, cytochrome c assays, and oxygen-consumption rates). Huh7 (AsGR+) and SK Hep1 (AsGR−) cells were treated with a mitochondrial toxin to form Huh7-Mito− and SK Hep1-Mito− cells, lacking detectable mitochondrial DNA. An endosomolytic peptide, LLO, was coupled to AsOR to form AsOR-LLO. A lysosomal inhibitor, amantadine, was used in mitochondria-uptake studies as a control for nonspecific endosomal release. Results Coincubation of complexed mitochondria and AsOR-LLO with Huh7-Mito− cells increased mitochondrial DNA to >9,700-fold over control at 7 days (P<0.001), and increased mitochondrial oxygen-consumption rates to >90% of control by 10 days. Conclusion Rescue of mitochondria-damaged hepatocytes can be achieved by targeted uptake of normal mitochondria through receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27942238

  19. Targeting drugs to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heller, Anne; Brockhoff, Gero; Goepferich, Achim

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria are of an increasing interest in pharmaceutical and medical research since it has been reported that dysfunction of these organelles contributes to several diseases with a great diversity of clinical appearance. By the fact that mitochondria are located inside the cell and, in turn, origins of mitochondrial diseases or targets of drugs are located inside mitochondria, a drug molecule has to cross several barriers. This is a severe drawback for the selective accumulation of drug molecules in mitochondria. Therefore, targeting strategies such as direct drug modification or encapsulation into nanocarriers have to be applied to achieve an accumulation of drug molecules in these organelles. In this review, it will be demonstrated how properties and dysfunctions of mitochondria are generating a need for the development of mitochondria specific therapies. Furthermore, intracellular targets of mitochondrial diseases, strategies to utilize mitochondrial specificities and targeting approaches will be discussed. Finally, techniques to investigate mitochondrial characteristics and functionality are reviewed.

  20. [Effect of L-arginine and the nitric oxide synthase blocker L-NNA on calcium capacity in rat liver mitochondria with differing resistance to hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Kurhaliuk, N M; Ikkert, O V; Vovkanych, L S; Horyn', O V; Hal'kiv, M O; Hordiĭ, S K

    2001-01-01

    The effect of L-arginine and blockator of nitric oxide synthase L-NNA on processes of calcium mitochondrial capacity in liver with different resistance to hypoxia in the experiments with Wistar rats has been studied using the followrng substrates of energy support: succinic, alpha-ketoglutaric acids, alpha-ketolutarate and inhibitor succinatedehydrogenase malonate. As well we used substrates mixtures combination providing for activation of aminotransferase mechanism: glutamate and piruvate, glutamate and malate. It has been shown that L-arginine injection increases calcium mitochondrial capacity of low resistant rats using as substrates the succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate to control meanings of high resistance rats. Effects of donors nitric oxide on this processes limit NO-synthase inhibitor L-NNA.

  1. Kinetics of eicosapentaenoic acid in brain, heart and liver of conscious rats fed a high n-3 PUFA containing diet.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Miki; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), a precursor of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may benefit cardiovascular and brain health. Quantifying EPA's in vivo kinetics might elucidate these effects. [1-(14)C]EPA was infused i.v. for 5min in unanesthetized male rats fed a standard EPA-DHA diet. Plasma and microwaved tissue were analyzed. Kinetic parameters were calculated using our compartmental model. At 5min, 31-48% of labeled EPA in brain and heart was oxidized, 7% in liver. EPA incorporation rates from brain and liver precursor EPA-CoA pools into lipids, mainly phospholipids, were 36 and 2529nmol/s/g×10(-4), insignificant for heart. Deacylation-reacylation half-lives were 22h and 38-128min. Conversion rates to DHA equaled 0.65 and 25.1nmol/s/g×10(-4), respectively. The low brain concentration and incorporation rate and high oxidation of EPA suggest that, if EPA has a beneficial effect in brain, it might result from its suppression of peripheral inflammation and hepatic conversion to bioactive DHA.

  2. Effect of chromium supplementation on the diabetes induced-oxidative stress in liver and brain of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Refaie, Fawzia M; Esmat, Amr Y; Mohamed, Aly F; Aboul Nour, Wael H

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the susceptibility of liver and brain tissues, as insulinin-dependent tissues, of normal adult male rats to the oxidative challenge of subchronic supplementation with chromium picolinate (CrPic) at low (human equivalent) and high doses (2.90 and 13.20 μg Cr kg(-1) day(-1), respectively). Also, the modulative effect of CrPic administration on the enhanced oxidative stress in the liver and brain tissues of alloxan-diabetic rats was studied. Fasting serum glucose level was not modified in normal rats but significantly reduced in diabetic rats that had received CrPic supplement. A mild oxidative stress was observed in the liver and brain of CrPic-supplemented normal rats confirmed by the dose-dependent reductions in the levels of hepatic and cerebral free fatty acids, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and in contrast increased tissue malondialdehyde concentration. On the other hand, hepatic and cerebral catalase activity was reduced in the high dose group only. CrPic supplementation did not act as a peroxisome proliferator confirmed by the significant reductions in liver and brain peroxisomal palmitoyl CoA oxidase activity. The non significant alterations in liver protein/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios indicate that CrPic did not affect protein synthesis per cell, and that mild elevations in hepatic total protein and RNA concentrations might be due to block or decrease in the export rate of synthesized proteins from the liver to the plasma. In diabetic rats, elevated levels of hepatic and cerebral free fatty acids and malondialdehyde, and in contrast the overwhelmed antioxidant enzymes, were significantly modulated in the low dose group and near-normalized in the high dose group. The significant increases observed in liver total protein and RNA concentrations, as well as protein/DNA and RNA/ DNA ratios in diabetic rats supplemented with the high dose of Cr, compared to untreated diabetics, may be related to the

  3. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Larkin, Patrick; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  4. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Elshenawy, Osama H; Shoieb, Sherif M; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2017-02-20

    Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal 19 ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%-75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future.

  5. Clinical Implications of 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid in the Kidney, Liver, Lung and Brain: An Emerging Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Elshenawy, Osama H.; Shoieb, Sherif M.; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) is an important pathway for the formation of eicosanoids. The ω-hydroxylation of AA generates significant levels of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in various tissues. In the current review, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in the kidney, liver, lung, and brain during physiological and pathophysiological states. Moreover, we discussed the role of 20-HETE in tumor formation, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In the kidney, 20-HETE is involved in modulation of preglomerular vascular tone and tubular ion transport. Furthermore, 20-HETE is involved in renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and polycystic kidney diseases. The role of 20-HETE in the liver is not clearly understood although it represents 50%–75% of liver CYP-dependent AA metabolism, and it is associated with liver cirrhotic ascites. In the respiratory system, 20-HETE plays a role in pulmonary cell survival, pulmonary vascular tone and tone of the airways. As for the brain, 20-HETE is involved in cerebral I/R injury. Moreover, 20-HETE has angiogenic and mitogenic properties and thus helps in tumor promotion. Several inhibitors and inducers of the synthesis of 20-HETE as well as 20-HETE analogues and antagonists are recently available and could be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of many disease states in the future. PMID:28230738

  6. [Carnitine - mitochondria and beyond].

    PubMed

    Nałęcz, Katarzyna A; Nałęcz, Maciej J

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine [(3R)-3-hydroxy-4-(trimethylazaniumyl)butanoate] in mammals is mainly delivered with diet. It enters the cell due to the activity of organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5), it can be as well transported by CT2 (SLC22A16) and a transporter of neutral and basic amino acids ATB(0, +) (SLC6A14). The hydroxyl group of carnitine is able to form esters with organic acids (xenobiotics, fatty acids) due to the activity of acylcarnitine transferases. Carnitine is necessary for transfer of fatty acids to mitochondria: in functioning of the so-called carnitine shuttle an essential role is fulfilled by palmitoylcarnitine transferase 1, carnitine carrier (SLC25A20) in the inner mitochondrial membrane and palmitoylcarnitine transferase 2. Oxidation of fatty acids takes also place in peroxisomes. The produced medium-chain acyl derivatives are exported as acylcarnitines, most probably by OCTN3 (Slc22a21). It has been postulated that acylcarnitines can cross the outer mitochondrial membrane through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and/or through the palmitoycarnitine transferase 1 oligomer. Mutations of genes coding carnitine plasma membrane transporters result in the primary carnitine deficiency, with symptoms affecting normal functioning of muscles (including heart) and brain. Mechanisms regulating functioning of these transporters have been presented with emphasis on their role as potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Chrysin treatment improves diabetes and its complications in liver, brain, and pancreas in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Chrysin (CH) is a natural flavonoid with pharmacological influences. The purpose of the current study was the assessment of possible protective effects of CH against oxidative damage in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas of streptozotocin (STZ)- induced diabetic rats. In the present study, the rats were divided into the following groups of 8 animals each: control, untreated diabetic, 3 CH (20, 40, 80 mg/kg/day)-treated diabetic groups. To find out the modulations of cellular antioxidant defense systems, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and antioxidant enzymes including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were determined in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas. STZ caused an elevation of glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and with reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas (p < 0.01). The findings showed that the significant elevation in the glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST were ameliorated in the CH-treated diabetic groups versus to the untreated groups, in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). The current study offers that CH may be recovered diabetes and its complications by modification of oxidative stress.

  8. Fetal liver blood flow distribution: role in human developmental strategy to prioritize fat deposition versus brain development.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Keith M; Haugen, Guttorm; Kiserud, Torvid; Inskip, Hazel M; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C W; Crozier, Sarah R; Robinson, Sian M; Davies, Lucy; Hanson, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Among primates, human neonates have the largest brains but also the highest proportion of body fat. If placental nutrient supply is limited, the fetus faces a dilemma: should resources be allocated to brain growth, or to fat deposition for use as a potential postnatal energy reserve? We hypothesised that resolving this dilemma operates at the level of umbilical blood distribution entering the fetal liver. In 381 uncomplicated pregnancies in third trimester, we measured blood flow perfusing the fetal liver, or bypassing it via the ductus venosus to supply the brain and heart using ultrasound techniques. Across the range of fetal growth and independent of the mother's adiposity and parity, greater liver blood flow was associated with greater offspring fat mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, both in the infant at birth (r = 0.43, P<0.001) and at age 4 years (r = 0.16, P = 0.02). In contrast, smaller placentas less able to meet fetal demand for essential nutrients were associated with a brain-sparing flow pattern (r = 0.17, p = 0.02). This flow pattern was also associated with a higher degree of shunting through ductus venosus (P = 0.04). We propose that humans evolved a developmental strategy to prioritize nutrient allocation for prenatal fat deposition when the supply of conditionally essential nutrients requiring hepatic inter-conversion is limited, switching resource allocation to favour the brain if the supply of essential nutrients is limited. Facilitated placental transfer mechanisms for glucose and other nutrients evolved in environments less affluent than those now prevalent in developed populations, and we propose that in circumstances of maternal adiposity and nutrient excess these mechanisms now also lead to prenatal fat deposition. Prenatal developmental influences play important roles in the human propensity to deposit fat.

  9. Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Comparison of Liver Grafts from Donors after Circulatory Death (DCD) and Donors after Brain Death (DBD) Used in Human Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Richard; Kirwan, Jennifer; Silva, Michael A.; Richards, Douglas A.; Murphy, Nick; Mirza, Darius F.; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Use of marginal liver grafts, especially those from donors after circulatory death (DCD), has been considered as a solution to organ shortage. Inferior outcomes have been attributed to donor warm ischaemic damage in these DCD organs. Here we sought to profile the metabolic mechanisms underpinning donor warm ischaemia. Non-targeted Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry metabolomics was applied to biopsies of liver grafts from donors after brain death (DBD; n = 27) and DCD (n = 10), both during static cold storage (T1) as well as post-reperfusion (T2). Furthermore 6 biopsies from DBD donors prior to the organ donation (T0) were also profiled. Considering DBD and DCD together, significant metabolic differences were discovered between T1 and T2 (688 peaks) that were primarily related to amino acid metabolism, meanwhile T0 biopsies grouped together with T2, denoting the distinctively different metabolic activity of the perfused state. Major metabolic differences were discovered between DCD and DBD during cold-phase (T1) primarily related to glucose, tryptophan and kynurenine metabolism, and in the post-reperfusion phase (T2) related to amino acid and glutathione metabolism. We propose tryptophan/kynurenine and S-adenosylmethionine as possible biomarkers for the previously established higher graft failure of DCD livers, and conclude that the associated pathways should be targeted in more exhaustive and quantitative investigations. PMID:27835640

  10. Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Comparison of Liver Grafts from Donors after Circulatory Death (DCD) and Donors after Brain Death (DBD) Used in Human Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hrydziuszko, Olga; Perera, M Thamara P R; Laing, Richard; Kirwan, Jennifer; Silva, Michael A; Richards, Douglas A; Murphy, Nick; Mirza, Darius F; Viant, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Use of marginal liver grafts, especially those from donors after circulatory death (DCD), has been considered as a solution to organ shortage. Inferior outcomes have been attributed to donor warm ischaemic damage in these DCD organs. Here we sought to profile the metabolic mechanisms underpinning donor warm ischaemia. Non-targeted Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry metabolomics was applied to biopsies of liver grafts from donors after brain death (DBD; n = 27) and DCD (n = 10), both during static cold storage (T1) as well as post-reperfusion (T2). Furthermore 6 biopsies from DBD donors prior to the organ donation (T0) were also profiled. Considering DBD and DCD together, significant metabolic differences were discovered between T1 and T2 (688 peaks) that were primarily related to amino acid metabolism, meanwhile T0 biopsies grouped together with T2, denoting the distinctively different metabolic activity of the perfused state. Major metabolic differences were discovered between DCD and DBD during cold-phase (T1) primarily related to glucose, tryptophan and kynurenine metabolism, and in the post-reperfusion phase (T2) related to amino acid and glutathione metabolism. We propose tryptophan/kynurenine and S-adenosylmethionine as possible biomarkers for the previously established higher graft failure of DCD livers, and conclude that the associated pathways should be targeted in more exhaustive and quantitative investigations.

  11. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  12. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  13. Perchlorate exposure induces hypothyroidism and affects thyroid-responsive genes in liver but not brain of quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; McNabb, F M Anne; Sible, Jill C

    2009-10-01

    Ground-dwelling birds in perchlorate-contaminated areas are exposed to perchlorate ion, a known thyroid disruptor, and might be vulnerable to the developmental effects of perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism would alter the expression of thyroid-responsive genes involved in thyroid hormone (TH) regulation and in the development of target organ function. Japanese quail chicks were exposed to 2000 mg/L ammonium perchlorate in drinking water for 7.5 weeks beginning on day 5 posthatch. Hypothyroidism was evident after 2 weeks of exposure as lower plasma THs and lower TH content in exposed chicks than in controls. The degree of hypothyroidism was increased at 7.5 weeks, as indicated by significant thyroid gland hypertrophy and sustained changes in thyroid function. After 2 weeks of exposure, hypothyroidism increased type 2 5'-deiodinase (D2) mRNA level and decreased Spot 14 (SP14) mRNA level in the liver, whereas D2 mRNA and RC3 mRNA levels in brain were not affected. After 7.5 weeks of exposure, mRNA levels in the exposed group did not differ from those in controls in either the liver or brain, suggesting the responsiveness of these genes to THs decreased during development. These results suggest that the brain, but not the liver, was protected from the effects of hypothyroidism, probably by changes in D2 activity at the protein level and/or regulation of TH entry and exit from the brain. We concluded that perchlorate exposure caused hypothyroidism in young Japanese quail and affected the expression of thyroid-responsive genes during early posthatch development.

  14. Effect of ethanol intake during lactation on male and female pups' liver and brain metabolism during the suckling-weaning transition period.

    PubMed

    Oyama, L M; Oller Do Nascimento, C M

    2003-06-01

    In rats, a high degree of brain development and myelination occurs during the first 15 days after birth. Ethanol intake by lactating rats modified 12 day-old pups' brain development and metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion during lactation on prepubertal (24-day-old) pups' brain and liver metabolism. Lactating rats (4 male and 4 female litters) were divided into 2 groups: control--received control liquid diet, and ethanol--received liquid diet containing 4% of ethanol. On postnatal day 24, the pups were killed by decapitation. Liver and brain were utilized for measuring Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase and malic enzymes activities. Brain slices were incubated in medium containing glucose to determine glucose consumption and oxidation, and lipid synthesis. The ethanol intake decreased male and female pups' body, brain and liver weight. Liver Adenosine Tri-phosphate-citrate lyase activity was decreased only in male pups of the ethanol group. The intake of ethanol solution by the dams increased glucose consumption and oxidation by the incubated female pups' brain slices and decreased glucose oxidation by the male pups' brain slices. It can be concluded that the effects of maternal ethanol intake on pups' development and metabolism are gender-related.

  15. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  16. SEROTONIN BINDING TO PREPARATIONS FROM RAT BRAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BRAIN , SEROTONIN, SEROTONIN, OXIDOREDUCTASES, LYSERGIC ACIDS, RESERPINE, CHLORPROMAZINE, ACETYLCHOLINE, FATTY ACIDS, NOREPINEPHRINE, LEARNING, PERMEABILITY, MITOCHONDRIA, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), DRUGS, PHYSIOLOGY.

  17. Roles of PINK1, mTORC2, and mitochondria in preserving brain tumor-forming stem cells in a noncanonical Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Wu, Zhihao; Song, Yan; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Cheshier, Samuel H; Lu, Bingwei

    2013-12-15

    The self-renewal versus differentiation choice of Drosophila and mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) requires Notch (N) signaling. How N regulates NSC behavior is not well understood. Here we show that canonical N signaling cooperates with a noncanonical N signaling pathway to mediate N-directed NSC regulation. In the noncanonical pathway, N interacts with PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) to influence mitochondrial function, activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)/AKT signaling. Importantly, attenuating noncanonical N signaling preferentially impaired the maintenance of Drosophila and human cancer stem cell-like tumor-forming cells. Our results emphasize the importance of mitochondria to N and NSC biology, with important implications for diseases associated with aberrant N signaling.

  18. Brain penetrant liver X receptor (LXR) modulators based on a 2,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole core.

    PubMed

    Tice, Colin M; Noto, Paul B; Fan, Kristi Yi; Zhao, Wei; Lotesta, Stephen D; Dong, Chengguo; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Ya-Jun; Chen, Guozhou; Wu, Zhongren; Van Orden, Rebecca; Zhou, Jing; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lipinski, Kerri; Howard, Lamont; Guo, Joan; Kandpal, Geeta; Meng, Shi; Hardy, Andrew; Krosky, Paula; Gregg, Richard E; Leftheris, Katerina; McKeever, Brian M; Singh, Suresh B; Lala, Deepak; McGeehan, Gerard M; Zhuang, Linghang; Claremon, David A

    2016-10-15

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been reported to lower brain amyloid beta (Aβ) and thus to have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Structure and property based design led to the discovery of a series of orally bioavailable, brain penetrant LXR agonists. Oral administration of compound 18 to rats resulted in significant upregulation of the expression of the LXR target gene ABCA1 in brain tissue, but no significant effect on Aβ levels was detected.

  19. Microwave digestion methods for the determination of trace elements in brain and liver samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Krachler, M; Radner, H; Irgolic, K J

    1996-05-01

    Two microwave digestion systems (open-focused and closed-pressurized) were tested for the mineralization of human brain and bovine liver (NIST SRM 1577a) as dissolution steps prior to the determination of 16 trace elements (Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Sr, Tl, and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Digestion parameters (mass of sample, digestion mixture, and power/time steps) were optimized using temperature and pressure sensors. Digestions with the open-focused microwave system require larger volumes of conc. HNO(3) and 30% H(2)O(2) than digestions with the closed-pressurized system. Both systems produce correct results for the bovine liver samples. The concentrations obtained for the digests of the open-focused system tend to be less precise than the concentrations from the "closed-pressurized" digests. Because the "open-focused" digests must be diluted to 50 mL to bring the acid concentration to 0.7-2.0 mol/L required by the ICP-MS (closed-pressurized digests need to be diluted to only 20 mL), the detection limits for the system with the open-focused digestion are higher than for the system with the closed-pressurized digestor. The open-focused digestor cannot handle more than 150 mg brain tissue, whereas the closed-pressurized system can mineralize 470 mg. The latter method gave better results with brain tissue than the open-focused system. The preparation of brain tissue as reference material for the determination of trace elements in brain samples is described.

  20. The dimethylarginine (ADMA)/nitric oxide pathway in the brain and periphery of rats with thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure: Modulation by histidine.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Krzysztof; Hilgier, Wojciech; Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is related to variations in the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). In the present study we compared the effects of acute liver failure (ALF) in the rat TAA model on ADMA concentration in plasma and cerebral cortex, and on the activity and expression of the ADMA degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), in brain and liver. ALF increased blood and brain ADMA, and the increase was correlated with decreased DDAH activity in both brain and liver. An i.p. administration of histidine (His), an amino acid reported to alleviate oxidative stress associated with HE (100 mg/kg b.w.), reversed the increase of brain ADMA, which was accompanied by the recovery of brain DDAH activity (determined ex vivo), and with an increase of the total NOS activity. His also activated DDAH ex vivo in brain homogenates derived from control and TAA rats. ALF in this model was also accompanied by increases of blood cyclooxygenase activity and blood and brain TNF-α content, markers of the inflammatory response in the periphery, but these changes were not affected by His, except for the reduction of TNF-α mRNA transcript in the brain. His increased the total antioxidant capacity of the brain cortex, but not of the blood, further documenting its direct neuroprotective power.

  1. The Mancozeb-containing carbamate fungicide tattoo induces mild oxidative stress in goldfish brain, liver, and kidney.

    PubMed

    Atamaniuk, Tetiana M; Kubrak, Olga I; Husak, Viktor V; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-11-01

    Tattoo belongs to the group of carbamate fungicides and contains Mancozeb (ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate) as its main constituent. The toxicity of Mancozeb to living organisms, particularly fish, is not resolved. This work investigated the effects of 96 h of exposure to 3, 5, or 10 mg L(-1) of Tattoo (corresponding to 0.9, 1.5, or 3 mg L(-1) of Mancozeb) on the levels of oxidative stress markers and the antioxidant enzyme system of brain, liver, and kidney of goldfish, Carassius auratus). In liver, Tattoo exposure resulted in increased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 70%-79%, catalase by 23%-52% and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) by 49%. The content of protein carbonyls (CP) in liver was also enhanced by 92%-125% indicating extensive damage to proteins. Similar increases in CP levels (by 98%-111%) accompanied by reduced glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (by 13%-15%) was observed in kidney of fish exposed to Tattoo; however, SOD activity increased by 37% in this tissue after treatment with 10 mg L(-1) Tattoo. In brain, a rise in lipid peroxide level (by 29%) took place after exposure to 10 mg L(-1) Tattoo and was accompanied by elevation of high-molecular mass thiols (by 14%). Tattoo exposure also resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in glutathione reductase activity (by 26%-37%) in brain. The data collectively show that exposure of goldfish to 3-10 mg L(-1) of the carbamate fungicide Tattoo resulted in the development of mild oxidative stress and activation of antioxidant defense systems in goldfish tissues.

  2. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system in the brain and liver of zebra-seabreams exposed to waterborne methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Branco, Vasco; Canario, Joao; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Mercury compounds were recently found to interact in vitro with the thioredoxin system, inhibiting both Thioredoxin (Trx) and Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In order to evaluate if Trx and TrxR are affected in vivo by methylmercury (MeHg), we exposed juvenile zebra-seabreams to different concentrations of this toxicant in water for 28 days followed by a 14-day depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated to a larger extent in the kidney and liver of fishes, but decreased significantly during the depuration. During the exposure, MeHg percentage in the liver reached levels above 90% of total mercury (HgT) decreasing to 60% of HgT by the end of the depuration period. In the kidney, MeHg accounted for 50-70% of HgT. In the brain and muscle, mercury accumulated throughout the exposure with all mercury being MeHg. The total mercury kept increasing in these organs during the depuration period. However, in the brain, this increase in HgT was accompanied by a decrease in the MeHg percentage ({approx} 10%). In the liver, both Trx and TrxR activities were significantly reduced (TrxR - 40%; Trx - 70%) by the end of the exposure, but recovered to control levels (100%) during the depuration. In the brain, both enzymes where inhibited during the depuration period (TrxR - 75%; Trx - 70%) when some production of inorganic mercury was detected. Activity of glutathione reductase showed increased levels when TrxR activity was low, suggesting complementarity between both systems. These results indicate that in vivo the thioredoxin system is a toxicological target for MeHg with TrxR being particularly affected.

  3. Quantification of DNA adducts in lungs, liver and brain of rats exposed to acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Camila C M; Batista, Guilherme L; Freitas, Florêncio P; Lopes, Fernando S; Sanchez, Angélica B; Gutz, Ivano G R; Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Air pollution is a major risk for human health. Acetaldehyde is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke, vehicle exhaust and several food products. Formation of DNA adducts has been regarded as a critical factor in the mechanisms of acetaldehyde mutagenicity and carcinogenesis. Acetaldehyde reacts with 2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA to primarily form N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dGuo). The subsequent reaction of N(2)-ethylidene-dGuo with another molecule of acetaldehyde gives rise to 1,N(2)-propano-2´-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-propanodGuo). In this study, on-line reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation with tandem mass spectrometry detection was utilized for the accurate quantification of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-edGuo) in tissues of rats exposed to 12 ppb, 33 ppb and 96 ppb acetaldehyde in atmospheric air for 50 days. A significant increase in the levels of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo was observed in lung tissues of rats exposed to 12 ppb (7.8/10(8) dGuo); 33 ppb (8.9/10(8) dGuo) and 96 ppb (11.6/10(8) dGuo) compared to controls (4.2/10(8) dGuo). For comparative purposes, the levels of 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-edGuo), which is produced from a,b-unsaturated aldehydes formed during the lipid peroxidation process were also measured. Elevated levels of 1,N(2)-edGuo were observed only in lung tissues of animals exposed to 96 ppb acetaldehyde. 1,N(2)-propanodGuo also differed quantitatively in liver but not in brain. The monitoring of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo levels in tissues provides important information on acetaldehyde genotoxicity and may contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms associated with acetaldehyde exposure and cancer risk. Supported byFAPESP:2011/10048-5, CAPES, INCT Redoxoma:573530/2008-4,NAP Redoxoma: 2011.1.9352.1.8, CEPID Redoxoma:2013/07937-8.

  4. Brain choline acetyltransferase and muscarinic receptor sites, brain and liver cholinesterases in precocial Acomys cahirinus and altricial rat during post-natal development.

    PubMed

    Michalek, H; Pintor, A; Fortuna, S; Bisso, G M

    1988-01-01

    Brain choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase with its molecular forms, and muscarinic receptor sites, as well as liver total cholinesterases were evaluated during the first postnatal month in pups of a precocial (Acomys cahirinus) and altricial (rat) murid species. At birth the levels of brain cholinergic markers were higher in the Acomys than in the rat, but in adulthood the differences were smaller or even reversed. The postnatal increase up in the markers to weaning was considerably more pronounced in the rat. However, substantial variations in the patterns of development of the three cholinergic markers within and between species were observed. Liver cholinesterases were considerably higher in Acomys than in rats at all ages investigated. These and literature data are discussed in relation to postnatal, post-conception and post-organogenesis age of pups belonging to the two species. The variability of the ontogenetic patterns between the enzymes suggests that there is some biological control of individual rates of maturation and that it is necessary to be careful in broadly interpreting growth patterns across organs within the same species and across species.

  5. Expression of insulin-like growth factor system genes in liver and brain tissue during embryonic and post-hatch development of the turkey.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark P; Poch, Stephen M; McMurtry, John P

    2005-05-01

    A molecular cloning strategy employing primer-directed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was devised to sequence 1300 bp of a turkey liver-derived cDNA corresponding to the complete coding region and the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II mRNA transcript (GenBank accession no. ). The turkey IGF-II gene codes for a 187 amino acid precursor protein that includes a signal peptide, the mature IGF-II hormone, and a C-terminal extension peptide comprised of 24, 67 and 96 amino acids, respectively. Turkey IGF-II showed greater than 95% sequence identity at both the nucleotide and amino acid level with chicken IGF-II. Expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR), and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and -5 genes was quantified relative to an internal 18S rRNA standard by RT-PCR in liver and whole brain tissue on days 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 and 26 of embryonic development, as well as at hatch (H, day 28) and at 3 weeks post-hatching (PH). Expression of liver IGF-I was low throughout embryonic development, but increased more than 8-fold by 3 weeks PH. In contrast, IGF-I was expressed in brain tissue at much higher levels than liver throughout development and this level of expression in brain increased gradually, reaching its highest point at 3 weeks PH. IGF-II was expressed at comparable levels in brain and liver tissue during embryonic development, except for transient increases in liver just prior to hatching (days 24 and 26) and at 3 weeks PH. Expression of IGF-IR declined in brain throughout development reaching its lowest level at 3 weeks PH. In liver, IGF-IR expression was lower than that of brain throughout development. An inverse relationship was observed for the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR genes in brain, but not in liver, through 3 weeks PH. Expression of the IGFBP-2 gene increased in liver around the time of hatch (days 26-28) and declined by 3 weeks PH, whereas the level of expression of

  6. Acute exposure to waterborne cadmium induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the brain, ovary and liver of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Wu, Chang-Wen; Lv, Zhen-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental contaminant that poses serious risks to aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem. The mechanisms underlying Cd-induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in fish remain largely unknown. In this study, adult female zebrafish were exposed to 0 (control), 1mgL(-1) Cd for 24h and 96h, and the oxidative stress and inflammatory responses induced by Cd were evaluated in the brain, liver and ovary. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in a time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in the brain and liver. The increase may result from the disturbance of genes including copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and ciclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Although ROS, NO and MDA were not significantly affected by Cd in the ovary, the up-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, iNOS, and COX-2 was observed. Exposure to Cd induced a sharp increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the brain, liver and ovary, possibly contributing to activate inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we also found a dramatic increase in mRNA levels of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) at 24h in the liver and ovary. The corresponding changes in the mRNA levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1a and Keap1b) and the inhibitor of κBα (IκBαa and IκBαb) may contribute to regulate the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 and NF-κB, respectively. Contrarily, mRNA levels of Nrf2, NF-κB, Keap1, Keap1b, IκBαa and IκBαb remained stable at 24 and 96h in the brain. Taken together, we demonstrated Cd-induced oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in fish, possibly through transcriptional regulation of Nrf2 and NF-κB and gene modifications at transcriptional, translational, post-translational levels, which would greatly extend our understanding on the Cd

  7. Liver X receptor β controls thyroid hormone feedback in the brain and regulates browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yifei; Wu, Wanfu; Dai, Yubing; Maneix, Laure; Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has raised great research interest because of its significant potential in counteracting obesity and type 2 diabetes. Browning is the result of the induction in WAT of a newly discovered type of adipocyte, the beige cell. When mice are exposed to cold or several kinds of hormones or treatments with chemicals, specific depots of WAT undergo a browning process, characterized by highly activated mitochondria and increased heat production and energy expenditure. However, the mechanisms underlying browning are still poorly understood. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are one class of nuclear receptors, which play a vital role in regulating cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose metabolism. Following our previous finding that LXRs serve as repressors of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in classic brown adipose tissue in female mice, we found that LXRs, especially LXRβ, also repress the browning process of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) in male rodents fed a normal diet. Depletion of LXRs activated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH)-positive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus area of the hypothalamus and thus stimulated secretion of TSH from the pituitary. Consequently, production of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland and circulating thyroid hormone level were increased. Moreover, the activity of thyroid signaling in SAT was markedly increased. Together, our findings have uncovered the basis of increased energy expenditure in male LXR knockout mice and provided support for targeting LXRs in treatment of obesity. PMID:26504234

  8. C-Phycocyanin protects SH-SY5Y cells from oxidative injury, rat retina from transient ischemia and rat brain mitochondria from Ca2+/phosphate-induced impairment.

    PubMed

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Rodrigues, Fernando Postalli; Alberici, Luciane Carla; Stringhetta, Karina; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Naal, Zeki; Polizello, Ana Cristina Morseli; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Rosa, Marcela Nunes; Liberato, José Luiz; Santos, Wagner Ferreira Dos; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo; Curti, Carlos; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment are essential in the ischemic stroke cascade and eventually lead to tissue injury. C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) has previously been shown to have strong antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. In the present study, we assessed the effects of C-PC on oxidative injury induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, on transient ischemia in rat retinas, and in the calcium/phosphate-induced impairment of isolated rat brain mitochondria (RBM). In SH-SY5Y cells, t-BOOH induced a significant reduction of cell viability as assessed by an MTT assay, and the reduction was effectively prevented by treatment with C-PC in the low micromolar concentration range. Transient ischemia in rat retinas was induced by increasing the intraocular pressure to 120mmHg for 45min, which was followed by 15min of reperfusion. This event resulted in a cell density reduction to lower than 50% in the inner nuclear layer (INL), which was significantly prevented by the intraocular pre-treatment with C-PC for 15min. In the RBM exposed to 3mM phosphate and/or 100μM Ca(2+), C-PC prevented in the low micromolar concentration range, the mitochondrial permeability transition as assessed by mitochondrial swelling, the membrane potential dissipation, the increase of reactive oxygen species levels and the release of the pro-apoptotic cytochrome c. In addition, C-PC displayed a strong inhibitory effect against an electrochemically-generated Fenton reaction. Therefore, C-PC is a potential neuroprotective agent against ischemic stroke, resulting in reduced neuronal oxidative injury and the protection of mitochondria from impairment.

  9. Chronic Opium Treatment Can Differentially Induce Brain and Liver Cells Apoptosis in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Asiabanha, Majid; Rahnema, Amir; Mahmoodi, Mehdi; Hasanshahi, Gholamhosein; Hashemi, Mohammad; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that some opium derivatives promote cell death via apoptosis. This study was designed to examine the influence of opium addiction on brain and liver cells apoptosis in male and female diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar rats. This experimental study was performed on normal, opium-addicted, diabetic and diabetic opium-addicted male and female rats. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL and DNA fragmentation assays. Results of this study showed that apoptosis in opium-addicted and diabetic opium-addicted brain and liver cells were significantly higher than the both normal and diabetic rats. In addition, we found that apoptosis in brain cells of opium-addicted and diabetic opium-addicted male rats were significantly higher than opium-addicted and diabetic opium-addicted female, whereas apoptosis in liver cells of opium-addicted and diabetic opium-addicted female rats were significantly higher than opium-addicted and diabetic opium-addicted male. Overall, these results indicate that opium probably plays an important role in brain and liver cells apoptosis, therefore, leading neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. These findings also in away possibly means that male brain cells are more susceptible than female and interestingly liver of females are more sensitive than males in induction of apoptosis by opium. PMID:22359469

  10. In vitro covalent binding of new brain tracer, para-125I-amphetamine, to rat liver and lung microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Joulin, Y.; Delaforge, M.; Hoellinger, H.; Moretti, J.L.; Sonnier, M.; Cesaro, P. )

    1990-01-01

    p-125I-amphetamine (I-Amp) is retained significantly in liver and lung during brain tomoscintigraphy. To attempt to explain this clinical observation, we have investigated the interaction of I-Amp with rat liver and lung microsomal proteins. Studies using spectral shift technique indicate that low concentration of I-Amp gives a type I complex and high concentration appears very stable type II complex with cytochrome P-450 Fe III. In the presence of NADPH, I-Amp gives rise to a 455 nm absorbing complex with similar properties to the Fe-RNO complexes. This complex formation was greatly enhanced with phenobarbital treated liver microsomes. The in vitro binding study shows that I-Amp and/or its metabolites was covalently bound to macromolecules in the presence of the molecular oxygen and NADPH-generating system. Incubation in the presence of glutathione, cystein and radical scavengers decreases binding. Mixed function oxydase (MFO) inhibitors diminish the amount of covalent binding and alter the extent of metabolite formation. The total covalent binding level increased with liver microsomes from PB pretreated rats as it was observed with the 455nm complex formation. The radioactivity distribution on microsomal proteins was examinated with SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. This experiment proves that the radiolabelled compounds are bound on the cytochrome P-450. The radioactivity bound increased when the PB induced rat liver microsomes were used. All these results indicate that I-Amp was activated by an oxydative process dependent on the MFO system which suggests a N-oxydation of I-Amp and the formation of reactive entities which covalently bind to proteins.

  11. Mitochondrial energy deficiency leads to hyperproliferation of skeletal muscle mitochondria and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Ryan M; Picard, Martin; Derbeneva, Olga; Leipzig, Jeremy; McManus, Meagan J; Gouspillou, Gilles; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Dos Santos, Carlos; Hepple, Russell T; Murdock, Deborah G; Wallace, Douglas C

    2017-03-07

    Diabetes is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in the presence of excess insulin. Glucose and fatty acids provide reducing equivalents to mitochondria to generate energy, and studies have reported mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes patients. If mitochondrial dysfunction can cause diabetes, then we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial metabolism should render animals resistant to diabetes. This was confirmed in mice in which the heart-muscle-brain adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 1 (ANT1) was inactivated. ANT1-deficient animals are insulin-hypersensitive, glucose-tolerant, and resistant to high fat diet (HFD)-induced toxicity. In ANT1-deficient skeletal muscle, mitochondrial gene expression is induced in association with the hyperproliferation of mitochondria. The ANT1-deficient muscle mitochondria produce excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are partially uncoupled. Hence, the muscle respiration under nonphosphorylating conditions is increased. Muscle transcriptome analysis revealed the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, down-regulation of diabetes-related genes, and increased expression of the genes encoding the myokines FGF21 and GDF15. However, FGF21 was not elevated in serum, and FGF21 and UCP1 mRNAs were not induced in liver or brown adipose tissue (BAT). Hence, increased oxidation of dietary-reducing equivalents by elevated muscle mitochondrial respiration appears to be the mechanism by which ANT1-deficient mice prevent diabetes, demonstrating that the rate of mitochondrial oxidation of calories is important in the etiology of metabolic disease.

  12. Mitochondrial energy deficiency leads to hyperproliferation of skeletal muscle mitochondria and enhanced insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Ryan M.; Picard, Martin; Derbeneva, Olga; Leipzig, Jeremy; McManus, Meagan J.; Gouspillou, Gilles; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Dos Santos, Carlos; Hepple, Russell T.; Murdock, Deborah G.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in the presence of excess insulin. Glucose and fatty acids provide reducing equivalents to mitochondria to generate energy, and studies have reported mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes patients. If mitochondrial dysfunction can cause diabetes, then we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial metabolism should render animals resistant to diabetes. This was confirmed in mice in which the heart–muscle–brain adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 1 (ANT1) was inactivated. ANT1-deficient animals are insulin-hypersensitive, glucose-tolerant, and resistant to high fat diet (HFD)-induced toxicity. In ANT1-deficient skeletal muscle, mitochondrial gene expression is induced in association with the hyperproliferation of mitochondria. The ANT1-deficient muscle mitochondria produce excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are partially uncoupled. Hence, the muscle respiration under nonphosphorylating conditions is increased. Muscle transcriptome analysis revealed the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis, down-regulation of diabetes-related genes, and increased expression of the genes encoding the myokines FGF21 and GDF15. However, FGF21 was not elevated in serum, and FGF21 and UCP1 mRNAs were not induced in liver or brown adipose tissue (BAT). Hence, increased oxidation of dietary-reducing equivalents by elevated muscle mitochondrial respiration appears to be the mechanism by which ANT1-deficient mice prevent diabetes, demonstrating that the rate of mitochondrial oxidation of calories is important in the etiology of metabolic disease. PMID:28223503

  13. A cannabinoid link between mitochondria and memory.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Desprez, Tifany; Serrat, Román; Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Delamarre, Anna; Cannich, Astrid; Vincent, Peggy; Varilh, Marjorie; Robin, Laurie M; Terral, Geoffrey; García-Fernández, M Dolores; Colavita, Michelangelo; Mazier, Wilfrid; Drago, Filippo; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Dupuy, Jean-William; Cota, Daniela; Lopez-Rodriguez, Maria-Luz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Massa, Federico; Grandes, Pedro; Bénard, Giovanni; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-11-24

    Cellular activity in the brain depends on the high energetic support provided by mitochondria, the cell organelles which use energy sources to generate ATP. Acute cannabinoid intoxication induces amnesia in humans and animals, and the activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors present at brain mitochondria membranes (mtCB1) can directly alter mitochondrial energetic activity. Although the pathological impact of chronic mitochondrial dysfunctions in the brain is well established, the involvement of acute modulation of mitochondrial activity in high brain functions, including learning and memory, is unknown. Here, we show that acute cannabinoid-induced memory impairment in mice requires activation of hippocampal mtCB1 receptors. Genetic exclusion of CB1 receptors from hippocampal mitochondria prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of mitochondrial mobility, synaptic transmission and memory formation. mtCB1 receptors signal through intra-mitochondrial Gαi protein activation and consequent inhibition of soluble-adenylyl cyclase (sAC). The resulting inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of specific subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system eventually leads to decreased cellular respiration. Hippocampal inhibition of sAC activity or manipulation of intra-mitochondrial PKA signalling or phosphorylation of the Complex I subunit NDUFS2 inhibit bioenergetic and amnesic effects of cannabinoids. Thus, the G protein-coupled mtCB1 receptors regulate memory processes via modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. By directly linking mitochondrial activity to memory formation, these data reveal that bioenergetic processes are primary acute regulators of cognitive functions.

  14. Comparative protective effects of royal jelly and cod liver oil against neurotoxic impact of tartrazine on male rat pups brain.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amany Abdel-Rahman; Galal, Azza A A; Elewa, Yaser H A

    2015-09-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the possible neurotoxic effect of tartrazine (T), an extensively used synthetic azo dye, as well as to determine the potential modulatory role of cod liver oil (CLO) or royal jelly (RJ) against such effects. For this purpose, thirty-six male rat pups were allocated into six groups. The 1st group received distilled water (control group), the 2nd group was given 300 mg RJ/kg bw (RJ group), the 3rd group was given 0.4 ml CLO/kg bw (CLO group), the 4th was given 500 mg T/kg bw (T group). The 5th group was given T concurrently with RJ (TRJ group) and the 6th group was given T concurrently with CLO (TCLO group), at the same doses as the former groups. All treatments were given orally for 30 consecutive days. The concentrations of different brain neurotransmitters, gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) as well as the antioxidant and oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in the brain homogenates. An immunohistochemical staining of the cerebral cortex was applied with the anti-ssDNA antibody (an apoptotic cell marker) to reveal the changes in brain structure. The T group revealed a significant decrease in the concentration of the brain neurotransmitters, a sharp shortage in the level of antioxidant biomarkers (super oxide dismutase, catalase and the reduced glutathione), a marked increase in malondialdehyde levels, and numerous apoptotic cells in the brain cortex compared with the other groups. Interestingly, all the previously mentioned parameters were almost retrieved in both the TRJ and TCLO groups compared to the T group. These results conclusively demonstrate that RJ and CLO administration provides sufficient protection against the ruinous effects of T on rat pups brain tissue function and structure.

  15. Effects of an Agaricus blazei Aqueous Extract Pretreatment on Paracetamol-Induced Brain and Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Andréia A.; de Oliveira, Andrea L.; Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B.; Comar, Jurandir F.; Rampazzo, Ana P. S.; Vicentini, Fernando A.; Natali, Maria R. M.; Gomes da Costa, Sandra M.; Peralta, Rosane M.

    2013-01-01

    The action of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol injury in rats was examined not only in terms of the classical indicators (e.g., levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma) but also in terms of functional and metabolic parameters (e.g., gluconeogenesis). Considering solely the classical indicators for tissue damage, the results can be regarded as an indication that the A. blazei extract is able to provide a reasonable degree of protection against the paracetamol injury in both the hepatic and brain tissues. The A. blazei pretreatment largely prevented the increased levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma (ASP, ALT, LDH, and ALP) and practically normalized the TBARS levels in both liver and brain tissues. With respect to the functional and metabolic parameters of the liver, however, the extract provided little or no protection. This includes morphological signs of inflammation and the especially important functional parameter gluconeogenesis, which was impaired by paracetamol. Considering these results and the long list of extracts and substances that are said to have hepatoprotective effects, it would be useful to incorporate evaluations of functional parameters into the experimental protocols of studies aiming to attribute or refute effective hepatoprotective actions to natural products. PMID:23984368

  16. Effects of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol-induced brain and liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andréia A; de Oliveira, Andrea L; Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B; Comar, Jurandir F; Rampazzo, Ana P S; Vicentini, Fernando A; Natali, Maria R M; Gomes da Costa, Sandra M; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane M

    2013-01-01

    The action of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol injury in rats was examined not only in terms of the classical indicators (e.g., levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma) but also in terms of functional and metabolic parameters (e.g., gluconeogenesis). Considering solely the classical indicators for tissue damage, the results can be regarded as an indication that the A. blazei extract is able to provide a reasonable degree of protection against the paracetamol injury in both the hepatic and brain tissues. The A. blazei pretreatment largely prevented the increased levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma (ASP, ALT, LDH, and ALP) and practically normalized the TBARS levels in both liver and brain tissues. With respect to the functional and metabolic parameters of the liver, however, the extract provided little or no protection. This includes morphological signs of inflammation and the especially important functional parameter gluconeogenesis, which was impaired by paracetamol. Considering these results and the long list of extracts and substances that are said to have hepatoprotective effects, it would be useful to incorporate evaluations of functional parameters into the experimental protocols of studies aiming to attribute or refute effective hepatoprotective actions to natural products.

  17. Protective Effects of Carvacrol against Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Stress in Rat's Brain, Liver, and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz; Borji, Abasalt

    2016-01-01

    Restraint stress may be associated with elevated free radicals, and thus, chronic exposure to oxidative stress may cause tissue damage. Several studies have reported that carvacrol (CAR) has a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CAR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver, and kidney. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 6 h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CAR daily for 21 days. To evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the brain, liver, and kidney. In the stressed animals that received vehicle, the MDA level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower than the nonstressed animals (P < 0.001). CAR ameliorated the changes in the stressed animals as compared with the control group (P < 0.001). This study indicates that CAR can prevent restraint stress induced oxidative damage. PMID:26904286

  18. Mutation frequency and specificity with age in liver, bladder and brain of lacI transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, G R; Oda, Y; de Boer, J G; Glickman, B W

    2000-01-01

    Mutation frequency and specificity were determined as a function of age in nuclear DNA from liver, bladder, and brain of Big Blue lacI transgenic mice aged 1.5-25 months. Mutations accumulated with age in liver and accumulated more rapidly in bladder. In the brain a small initial increase in mutation frequency was observed in young animals; however, no further increase was observed in adult mice. To investigate the origin of mutations, the mutational spectra for each tissue and age were determined. DNA sequence analysis of mutant lacI transgenes revealed no significant changes in mutational specificity in any tissue at any age. The spectra of mutations found in aging animals were identical to those in younger animals, suggesting that they originated from a common set of DNA lesions manifested during DNA replication. The data also indicated that there were no significant age-related mutational changes due to oxidative damage, or errors resulting from either changes in the fidelity of DNA polymerase or the efficiency of DNA repair. Hence, no evidence was found to support hypotheses that predict that oxidative damage or accumulation of errors in nuclear DNA contributes significantly to the aging process, at least in these three somatic tissues. PMID:10757770

  19. Biochemical characteristics of the outer membranes of plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mannella, C A; Bonner, W D

    1975-12-01

    Like the outer membranes of liver mitochondria, those of plant mitochondria are impermeable to cytochrome c when intact and can be ruptured by osmotic shock. Isolated plant outer mitochondrial membranes are also similar to the corresponding liver membranes in terms of phospholipid and sterol content. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a single class of proteins (apparent molecular weight 30 000) comprises the bulk of the plant outer membrane protein. There are also considerable amounts of polysaccharide associated with these membranes, which may contribute to their osmotic stability.

  20. (Neuro)degenerated Mitochondria-ER contacts.

    PubMed

    De Mario, Agnese; Quintana-Cabrera, Rubén; Martinvalet, Denis; Giacomello, Marta

    2017-02-19

    In the last years, a considerable amount of experimental evidence has highlighted the association between neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) and the biology of mitochondria-Endoplasmic Reticulum contacts (MERCs). In this review, we summarize the most recent findings on this topic. We underline that dysregulation of MERCs can contribute to the neurodegenerative process either by altering directly the functionality of neurons and their response to stress stimuli and metabolic shifts or by indirectly influencing the neuroinflammatory response that accompanies NDD. Our overview of the current literature suggest that defective MERCs could be a common determinant to the "hypergeneration" and "neurodegeneration" programs, leading respectively to tumours and NDD.

  1. Effect of electromagnetic radiofrequency radiation on the rats' brain, liver and kidney cells measured by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Trosić, Ivancica; Pavicić, Ivan; Milković-Kraus, Sanja; Mladinić, Marin; Zeljezić, Davor

    2011-12-01

    The goal of study was to evaluate DNA damage in rat's renal, liver and brain cells after in vivo exposure to radiofrequency/microwave (Rf/Mw) radiation of cellular phone frequencies range. To determine DNA damage, a single cell gel electrophoresis/comet assay was used. Wistar rats (male, 12 week old, approximate body weight 350 g) (N = 9) were exposed to the carrier frequency of 915 MHz with Global System Mobile signal modulation (GSM), power density of 2.4 W/m2, whole body average specific absorption rate SAR of 0.6 W/kg. The animals were irradiated for one hour/day, seven days/week during two weeks period. The exposure set-up was Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode Cell (GTEM--cell). Sham irradiated controls (N = 9) were apart of the study. The body temperature was measured before and after exposure. There were no differences in temperature in between control and treated animals. Comet assay parameters such as the tail length and tail intensity were evaluated. In comparison with tail length in controls (13.5 +/- 0.7 microm), the tail was slightly elongated in brain cells of irradiated animals (14.0 +/- 0.3 microm). The tail length obtained for liver (14.5 +/- 0.3 microm) and kidney (13.9 +/- 0.5 microm) homogenates notably differs in comparison with matched sham controls (13.6 +/- 0.3 microm) and (12.9 +/- 0.9 microm). Differences in tail intensity between control and exposed animals were not significant. The results of this study suggest that, under the experimental conditions applied, repeated 915 MHz irradiation could be a cause of DNA breaks in renal and liver cells, but not affect the cell genome at the higher extent compared to the basal damage.

  2. STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETES PARTIALLY ATTENUATES THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH-FAT DIET ON LIVER AND BRAIN FATTY ACID COMPOSITION IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Levant, Beth; Ozias, Marlies K.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    The current study addresses the effects of a high-fat diet on liver and brain fatty acid compositions and the interaction of that diet with diabetes in a type 1 mouse model. Adult, male, normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice were fed standard (14% kcals from fat) or high-fat (54% kcals from fat, hydrogenated vegetable shortening and corn oil) diets for 8 weeks. Liver and whole brain total phospholipid fatty acid compositions were then determined by TLC/GC. In the liver of non-diabetic mice, the high-fat diet increased the percentages of 18:1n-9, 20:4n-6, and 22:5n-6 and decreased 18:2n-6 and 22:6n-3. Diabetes increased 16:0 in liver, and decreased 18:1n-7 and 20:4n-6. The effects of the high-fat diet on liver phospholipids in diabetic mice were similar to those in non-diabetic mice, or were of smaller magnitude. In the brain, the high-fat diet increased 18:0 and 20:4n-6 of non-diabetic, but not diabetic mice. Brain 22:5n-6 acid was increased by the high-fat diet in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice, but this increase was smaller in diabetic mice. Diabetes alone did not alter the percentage of any individual fatty acid in brain. This indicates that the effects of a high-fat diet on liver and brain phospholipid fatty acid compositions are mitigated by concomitant hyperglycemia with hypoinsulinemia. PMID:23893338

  3. Distribution of carbon-14 and associated radiation dose in rat fetal brain and liver after maternal injection of [{sup 14}C]thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Hatashita, Shizuo

    1994-10-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with [{sup 14}C]thymidine on day 13.5 of gestation, and the concentrations and radiation doses of {sup 14}C in the fetal brain and liver were determined by liquid scintillation counting were 1.01% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 h after injection and decreased to 0.39% g{sup {minus}1} at 48 h after injection. A significant accumulation of {sup 14}C was observed in the fetal liver: 3.8 and 0.51% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 and 48 h after injection, respectively. Autoradiography showed that, especially at earlier periods after injection, there was remarkable concentration of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the brain and the central region of the liver. With increasing time after injection, the distribution of {sup 14}C became relatively uniform. The concentrations of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the fetal brain, determined by autoradiography, were much higher than those in the whole brain as determined by liquid scintillation counting. Cumulative radiation doses for 6-48 h after injection were 1.27 mGy for the whole fetus and 1.45 mGy for the whole brain. In contrast, the cumulative radiation dose for the ventricular zone of the brain which was determined by autoradiography was approximately 2.2 times that for the whole brain. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Reversible import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Hakvoort, T.B.M.; Sprinkle, J.R.; Margoliash, E. )

    1990-07-01

    {sup 35}S-labeled Drosophila melanogaster apocytochrome c was made by in vitro transcription/translation of the gene and purified to the monomeric, fully reduced form. It was found that in the presence of a wheat germ extract factor there was a high-affinity phase of the uptake into mouse liver mitochondria at 10-300 pM apocytochrome c, and a lower-affinity phase through 4,000 pM. Without the factor, the high-affinity phase was absent. The stimulatory effect of the factor could not be elicited with various reductants, such as NADH, FMN, and ferrous protoheme IX. Conversely, when mitochondria loaded with apocytochrome c was resuspended in fresh medium, the protein readily reequilibrated. Successive washings depleted >95% of the associated apoprotein but removed no holoprotein. Proteases (proteinase K or trypsin) added to a suspension of mitochondria loaded with apoprotein digested an amount of apoprotein similar to that which would have been dissociated during the same time, as measured by successive washings in the absence of protease. Mitochondria loaded with apoprotein and similarly treated with protease continued exporting the apoprotein, even after the protease was inhibited and removed, suggesting that most of the apoprotein associated with the organelle was in a protease-resistant compartment. Apocytochrome c mutants in which serines or alanines replaced cysteines 14 and 17, which bind the prosthetic group, behaved like the cysteine-containing protein, indicating that the covalent attachment of the heme is unrelated to the translocation of the apoprotein.

  5. [Evolution of mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Litoshenko, A Ia

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, the origin and evolution of mitochondria was explained by the serial endosymbiosis hypothesis. This hypothesis posits that contemporary mitochondria are the direct descendants of a bacterial endosymbiont, which was settled in a nucleus-containing amitochondriate host cell. Results of the mitochondrial gene sequences support a monophyletic origin of the mitochondria from a single eubacterial ancestor shared with a subdivision of the alpha-proteobacteria. In recent years, the complete sequences of the vast variety of mitochondrial and eubacterial genomes were determined. These data indicate that the mitochondrial genome evolved from a common ancestor of all extant eukaryotes and assume a possibility that the mitochondrial and nuclear constituents of the eukaryotic cell originated simultaneously.

  6. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; White, Eileen

    2016-03-03

    Decades ago, Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events that drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation also alter biochemical metabolism, including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy; provide building blocks for new cells; and control redox homeostasis, oncogenic signaling, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Indeed, mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control are often upregulated in cancers. While some cancers have mutations in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes that produce oncogenic metabolites, there is negative selection for pathogenic mitochondrial genome mutations. Eliminating mtDNA limits tumorigenesis, and rare human tumors with mutant mitochondrial genomes are relatively benign. Thus, mitochondria play a central and multifunctional role in malignant tumor progression, and targeting mitochondria provides therapeutic opportunities.

  7. A study of metal concentrations and metallothionein binding capacity in liver, kidney and brain tissues of three Arctic seal species.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Aspholm, Ole; Dietz, Rune; Andersen, Steen; Berntssen, Marc H G; Hylland, Ketil

    2009-12-01

    Arctic seals are known to accumulate relatively high concentrations of potential toxic heavy metals in their vital organs, such as livers and kidneys, as well as in their central nervous system. We therefore decided to determine whether mercury, copper, cadmium and zinc levels in liver, kidney and brain tissues of three Arctic seal species were associated with the intracellular metal-binding protein metallothionein (MT) as a sign of toxic exposure. Samples from four ringed (Phoca hispida), five harp (P.groenlandica) and five hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals taken during field trips to Central West Greenland (Godhavn) and the Barents Sea in the spring of 1999 were used for the present study. In all three seal species concentrations of mercury, zinc and copper were highest in the liver, except for cadmium which was highest in the kidneys. Metal concentrations increased significantly in the order: ringed sealliver tissues. MT concentrations were highest in the kidneys and the concentrations increased in the order: ringed seal

  8. Comparative biochemical characterization of the monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor KML29 in brain, spinal cord, liver, spleen, fat and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Pasquarelli, Noemi; Porazik, Christoph; Hanselmann, Johannes; Weydt, Patrick; Ferger, Boris; Witting, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is part of the endocannabinoid and the prostaglandin signaling system. MAGL degrades the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) into glycerol and arachidonic acid. MAGL-induced arachidonic acid is the primary source for prostaglandin synthesis in the brain. 2-AG mainly induces neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects, whereas prostaglandins are related to pro-inflammatory effects inducing neurotoxicity. Therefore, inhibition of MAGL represents a promising target for neurological diseases characterized by inflammation. However, as 2-AG is an agonist for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), inhibition of MAGL might be associated with unwanted cannabimimetic effects. Here, we show that oral administration of KML29, a highly selective inhibitor of MAGL, induced large and dose-dependent changes in 2-AG levels in vivo in brain and spinal cord of mice. Of note, MAGL inhibition by KML29 induced a decrease in prostaglandin levels in brain and most peripheral tissues but not in the spinal cord. MAGL expression was highest in fat, liver and brain, whereas the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), a further enzyme responsible for arachidonic acid production, was highly expressed in spinal cord, muscle and spleen. In addition, high doses (10 mg/kg) of KML29 induced some cannabimimetic effects in vivo in the tetrad test, including hypothermia, analgesia and hypomotility without induction of cataleptic behavior. In summary, inhibition of MAGL by KML29 represents a promising strategy for targeting the cannabinoid and prostaglandin system of the brain with only a moderate induction of cannabimimetic effects.

  9. On Cellular Darwinism: Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The significant role of mitochondria within cells is becoming increasingly clear. This letter uses the NKCS model of coupled fitness landscapes to explore aspects of organelle-nucleus coevolution. The phenomenon of mitochondrial diversity is allowed to emerge under a simple intracellular evolutionary process, including varying the relative rate of evolution by the organelle. It is shown how the conditions for the maintenance of more than one genetic variant of mitochondria are similar to those previously suggested as needed for the original symbiotic origins of the relationship using the NKCS model.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  11. Low concentration toxic metal mixture interactions: Effects on essential and non-essential metals in brain, liver, and kidneys of mice on sub-chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Mao, Guanghua; Xu, Hai; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-08-01

    The deleterious effects of long term exposure to individual toxic metals in low doses are well documented. There is however, a paucity of information on interaction of low dose toxic metal mixtures with toxic and essential metals. This study reports on interactions between low dose mixtures of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) and toxic and essential metals. For 120d, six groups of forty mice each were exposed to metal mixtures, however, the control group was given distilled water. Exposure to Pb+Cd increased brain Pb by 479% in 30d, whiles Pb+Hg+As+Cd reduced liver Hg by 46.5%, but increased kidney As by 130% in 30d. Brain Cu, increased by 221% on Pb+Hg+As+Cd exposure, however, liver Ca reduced by 36.1% on Pb+Hg exposure in 60-d. Interactions within metal mixtures were largely synergistic. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that low dose metal exposures influenced greatly levels of Hg (in brain and liver) and As (brain). The influence exerted on essential metals was highest in liver (PC1) followed by kidney (PC2) and brain (PC3). Exposure to low dose metal mixtures affected homeostasis of toxic and essential metals in tissues of mice.

  12. Free fatty acids profile of the fetal brain and the plasma, liver, brain and kidneys of pregnant rats treated with sodium arsenite at mid-organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ivan A; Boyle, Thomas; Johnson, Widmark D; Sprando, Robert L; O'Donnell, Michael W; Ruggles, Dennis; Kim, Chung S

    2010-11-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are known to be markers of cellular membrane degradation through lipid peroxidation and are substrates for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress, due to overproduction of ROS, may facilitate cellular insult by various toxicants. The ability of the rat conceptus to respond to toxic stress may be critical for normal development. In this study, the effects of the environmental toxicant sodium arsenite (NaAsO₂) on FFAs were investigated after administering a single oral dose, in water and in a lipid medium, to pregnant rats on gestational day (GD) 10, a time point at mid-organogenesis. NaAsO₂ was administered in deionized water (AsH₂O) or in half and half dairy cream (AsHH) at a dose of 41 mg sodium arsenite (NaAsO₂)/kg body weight. Control animals were treated with either dairy cream (HH) or deionized water (H₂O). The animals were sacrificed on GD 20. The fetal brain and the maternal liver, brain, plasma and kidneys were harvested. The FFAs were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography. In the liver, there was an increase of myristic acid (1200%), myristoleic acid (174%), palmitic acid (47%), elaidic acid (456%), oleic acid (165%) and docosahexaenoic acid (224%) in the AsH₂O group as compared to the AsHH group. Oleic acid and arachidonic acid were increased by 192% and 900%, respectively, in the AsH₂O group as compared to the H₂O group, and myristic acid was decreased by 90% in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. In the maternal brain, myristoleic acid was decreased by 91% in the AsH₂O group as compared to the H₂O group, and DHA increased by 148% in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. In the fetal brain, myristic and stearic acids were decreased by 87% and 89%, respectively, in the AsH₂O group as compared to the AsHH group. Myristic, stearic and arachidonic acids were increased by 411%, 265%, and 144%, respectively, in the AsHH group as compared to the HH group. There was no

  13. Reduced brain activity in female patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Kono, Soichi; Wada, Akira; Oshima, Sachie; Abe, Kazumichi; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Fujita, Masashi; Hayashi, Manabu; Okai, Ken; Miura, Itaru; Yabe, Hirooki; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2017-01-01

    Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have impaired health-related quality of life including physical and mental state. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful tool for evaluation of brain activity and depressive state. This study aimed to determine the brain activity of female NAFLD patients using NIRS. Cerebral oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration during a verbal fluency task (VFT) was measured using NIRS in 24 female NAFLD patients and 15 female healthy controls. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) questionnaire was administered to both groups before NIRS. There was no significant difference in CES-D score between groups. However, the oxy-Hb concentration and number of words during the VFT were less in NAFLD compared to healthy controls. The mean value of oxy-Hb concentration during 0-60 s VFT in the frontal lobe was also smaller in NAFLD patients compared to healthy controls (0.082 ± 0.126 vs. 0.183 ± 0.145, P < 0.001). Cerebral oxygen concentration is poorly reactive in response to VFT in female NAFLD patients. This may indicate an association between decreased brain activity and NAFLD regardless of depression.

  14. Brain and Liver Glutamine Synthetase of Rana catesbeiana and Rana cancrivora.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    glutamine synthetase in the liver is clear for most groups. The lungfishes (Dipnoids) do not retain urea except to avoid ammonia toxicity during...York. 11. Janssens, P.A. and Cohen, P.P. 1968. Nitrogen meta- bolism in the African lungfish . Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 24, 879-886. 9 12. Pickford, G.E

  15. A survey of the interaction of calcium ions with mitochondria from different tissues and species.

    PubMed

    Carafoli, E; Lehninger, A L

    1971-05-01

    A survey was made of the capacity of mitochondria isolated from a number of different tissues and species to accumulate Ca(2+) from the suspending medium during electron transport. The species examined included the rat, mouse, rabbit, hamster, guinea pig, cow, chicken, turtle, blowfly, yeast and Neurospora crassa. The tissues examined included vertebrate liver, kidney, brain, heart, spleen, thyroid and adrenal cortex, and the flight muscle of the blowfly. The mitochondria from all vertebrate tissues examined showed: (a) stimulation of State 4 respiration by added Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)/~ activation ratio about 2.0), accompanied by accumulation of Ca(2+) and ejection of H(+), with a H(+)/Ca(2+) ratio about 1.0; (b) a requirement of phosphate for accumulation of large amounts of Ca(2+); (c) respiration-independent high-affinity binding sites for Ca(2+); (d) endogenous Ca(2+), which is largely released by uncoupling agents. However, mitochondria from yeast and blowfly flight muscle are unable to accumulate Ca(2+) in a respiration-dependent process and possess no high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. These findings support the view that the high-affinity sites represent the ligand-binding sites of a specific Ca(2+) ;permease' or transport system in the membrane. The relatively high affinity for Ca(2+), which equals or exceeds the affinity for ADP, and the generally uniform characteristics of Ca(2+) transport in all the vertebrate mitochondria tested strongly suggest that respiration-linked Ca(2+) accumulation plays a general and fundamental role in vertebrate cell physiology.

  16. Amyloid-β peptides are generated in mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Bernadette; Hedskog, Louise; Wiehager, Birgitta; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are a hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Recent findings suggest that Aβ is generated intracellularly and potential production sites include endosomes and trans-Golgi network. We determined the production of Aβ in subcellular fractions isolated from mouse brain. We found that a considerable amount of Aβ is produced at mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites including outer mitochondrial membrane and mitochondria-associated ER membranes. Enhanced Aβ production at this site may disturb ER, mitochondrial and mitochondria-ER contact site function. This may be one key step in the cascade of events eventually leading to neurodegeneration in AD.

  17. Mitochondria in lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell’s most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:26928034

  18. Mitochondria in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Suzanne M; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell's most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  19. Simultaneous alterations of brain and plasma serotonin concentrations and liver cytochrome P450 in rats fed on a tryptophan-free diet.

    PubMed

    Kot, Marta; Pilc, Andrzej; Daniel, Władysława A

    2012-10-01

    Our previous study suggested involvement of the brain serotonergic system in the regulation of liver cytochrome P450 (CYP). The aim of the present study was to demonstrate simultaneous responsiveness of liver CYP and the peripheral and brain serotonergic systems to a tryptophan deficient diet during three days and one or three weeks of ingestion. The concentrations of serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine and their metabolites were measured in blood plasma, the hypothalamus and brain stem of male rats. The enzyme activity and protein levels in the liver were determined for isoforms CYP1A, CYP2A, CYP2B, CYP2C6, CYP2C11, CYP2D and CYP3A. A three-day tryptophan-free diet increased serotonin content in the hypothalamus (but not in the brain stem or plasma). After one week, the level of serotonin was not changed in the brain, but was markedly increased in the plasma. A three week tryptophan restriction significantly reduced the concentration of serotonin in the brain and plasma. Changes in CYP2C6 and CYP2C11 (an increase and a decrease, respectively) were maintained throughout the experiment, while those found in other CYP isoforms varied, which usually resulted in a gradual increase in the enzyme activity within three weeks. The observed alterations in liver CYPs suggest involvement of both central and peripheral serotonin in the regulation of liver CYP expression whose mechanism is discussed. In conclusion, a deficit in tryptophan in the diet may be responsible for very serious food-cytochrome P450 and food-drug metabolism interactions. Interactions of this type may also refer to drugs acting via serotonergic system.

  20. Technical note: assessing the functional capacity of mitochondria isolated from lactating mammary tissue: choose your chelating agent wisely.

    PubMed

    Hadsell, D L; George, J; Abraham, P A; Collier, R J; Lambert, B D

    2009-05-01

    Previous work has indicated that respiratory activity of mitochondrial preparations prepared from lactating mammary tissue is often much lower than that of mitochondria isolated from other organs such as the liver. Initial studies in our own laboratory also found that mammary mitochondria prepared from lactating mice had much lower ATP synthesis activity than those isolated from liver tissue obtained from the same animals. In this paper, we describe an improved procedure for obtaining coupled mitochondria from the mammary tissue of lactating mice. Using a high-throughput assay for mitochondrial ATP synthesis, we demonstrated that mammary mitochondria, unlike liver mitochondria, are sensitive to the concentration of bovine serum albumin and to the choice of chelating agent used in the preparation and assay buffers. Mammary mitochondria prepared and assayed in buffers containing 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N' tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 0.4% bovine serum albumin have a similar ATP synthesis activity as liver mitochondria. In addition, we show that the chelating agent EDTA ablates the ATP synthesis capacity of mammary mitochondria through a mechanism that does not involve the release of cytochrome c. We also demonstrate that these improved isolation and assay procedures are both scalable and applicable to bovine mammary tissue, and we describe optimal conditions for cryopreservation and recovery of functionally active mitochondria. This work will facilitate future studies aimed at determining the importance of mammary mitochondria to milk production.

  1. Distribution of tributyltin, dibutyltin and monobutyltin in the liver, brain and fat of rats: two-generation toxicity study of tributyltin chloride.

    PubMed

    Omura, Minoru; Shimasaki, Youhei; Oshima, Yuji; Nakayama, Kei; Kubo, Kazuhiko; Aou, Shuji; Ogata, Rika; Hirata, Miyuki; Inoue, Naohide

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of tributyltin (TBT) and its metabolites, dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT), was examined in the liver, brain and fat tissues in a two-generation reproductive toxicity study of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) in rats using dietary supplementation at concentrations of 5, 25 and 125 ppm. In the liver, irrespective of TBTCl dietary concentration, gender or generation, the highest concentration of metabolite was consistently MBT, followed by DBT, and then TBT. In contrast, TBT was consistently present at the highest concentration in the brain, nearly always followed by DBT and MBT. In fat tissues, the concentrations of the three butyltin compounds showed similar relationships to those observed in the brain, although the concentrations were much lower. In the liver, the concentration of TBT was higher in females, and those of DBT and MBT were higher in males. Factorial ANOVA also suggested the effect of gender on the concentrations of the three butyltin compounds in the liver. The results of this study suggest tissue-dependent distribution of TBT, DBT and MBT and gender-dependent distribution of the three metabolites in the liver of rats.

  2. Tyrosine phosphatase activity in mitochondria: presence of Shp-2 phosphatase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, M; Stringaro, A; Brunati, A M; Agostinelli, E; Arancia, G; Clari, G; Toninello, A

    2004-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation by unidentified enzymes has been observed in mitochondria, with recent evidence indicating that non-receptorial tyrosine kinases belonging to the Src family, which represent key players in several transduction pathways, are constitutively present in mitochondria. The extent of protein phosphorylation reflects a coordination balance between the activities of specific kinases and phophatases. The present study demonstrates that purified rat brain mitochondria possess endogenous tyrosine phosphatase activity. Mitochondrial phosphatases were found to be capable of dephosphorylating different exogenous substrates, including paranitrophenylphosphate, (32)P-poly(Glu-Tyr)(4:1) and (32)P-angiotensin. These activities are strongly inhibited by peroxovanadate, a well-known inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by inhibitors of alkali or Ser/Thr phosphatases, and mainly take place in the intermembrane space and outer mitochondrial membrane. Using a combination of approaches, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2 in mitochondria. Shp-2 plays a crucial role in a number of intracellular signalling cascades and is probably involved in several human diseases. It thus represents the first tyrosine phosphatase shown to be present in mitochondria.

  3. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  4. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects. PMID:27032815

  5. COMMENTS ON "EFFECT OF PRENATAL EXPOSURE OF DELTAMETHRIN ON THE ONTOGENY OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING CYTOCHROME P450S IN THE BRAIN AND LIVER OF OFFSPRINGS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comments on: Effect of prenatal exposure of deltamethrin on the ontogeny of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450s in the brain and liver of offsprings [Johri et al. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 214:279-289, 2006]

    Johri and colleagues recently reported that maternal exposur...

  6. Selective increases of extracellular brain concentrations of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids in relation to deterioration of neurological status in acute (ischemic) liver failure.

    PubMed

    Michalak, A; Butterworth, R F

    1997-12-01

    Previous reports based on studies in brain tissue from humans and experimental animals suggest that aromatic amino acids (AAAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA's) accumulate in brain in acute liver failure. In order to assess these changes in relation to the severity of neurological impairment and to the degree of hyperammonemia, AAAs and BCAAs were measured in vivo by cerebral microdialysis in frontal cortex of rats at various stages during the development of hepatic encephalopathy due to acute liver failure resulting from portacaval anastomosis followed by hepatic artery ligation. Extracellular brain concentrations of AAAs and of valine and leucine were elevated 2 to 4-fold following hepatic devascularization and these increases were significantly correlated to arterial ammonia concentration (r= 0.71-0.84, p<0.05). Extracellular concentrations of tyrosine paralleled the deterioration of neurological status in acute liver failure rats. In view of their role as precursors of monoamine neurotransmitters, ammonia-induced alterations of intracellular/extracellular brain concentration ratios for AAAs could account for altered neuronal excitability and contribute to the encephalopathy characteristic of acute liver failure.

  7. Genotoxicity of Styrene–Acrylonitrile Trimer in Brain, Liver, and Blood Cells of Weanling F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Cheryl A.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.; Recio, Leslie; Streicker, Michael; Witt, Kristine L.

    2012-01-01

    Styrene–acrylonitrile Trimer (SAN Trimer), a by-product in production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics, was identified at a Superfund site in Dover Township, NJ, where childhood cancer incidence rates were elevated for a period of several years. SAN Trimer was therefore tested by the National Toxicology Program in a 2-year perinatal carcinogenicity study in F344/N rats and a bacterial mutagenicity assay; both studies gave negative results. To further characterize its genotoxicity, SAN Trimer was subsequently evaluated in a combined micronucleus (MN)/Comet assay in juvenile male and female F344 rats. SAN Trimer (37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg/day) was administered by gavage once daily for 4 days. Micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood were determined by flow cytometry, and DNA damage in blood, liver, and brain cells was assessed using the Comet assay. Highly significant dose-related increases (P < 0.0001) in MN-RET were measured in both male and female rats administered SAN Trimer. The RET population was reduced in high dose male rats, suggesting chemical-related bone marrow toxicity. Results of the Comet assay showed significant, dose-related increases in DNA damage in brain cells of male (P < 0.0074) and female (P < 0.0001) rats; increased levels of DNA damage were also measured in liver cells and leukocytes of treated rats. Chemical-related cytotoxicity was not indicated in any of the tissues examined for DNA damage. The results of this subacute MN/Comet assay indicate induction of significant genetic damage in multiple tissues of weanling F344 male and female rats after oral exposure to SAN Trimer. PMID:22351108

  8. Genotoxicity of styrene-acrylonitrile trimer in brain, liver, and blood cells of weanling F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Cheryl A; Chhabra, Rajendra S; Recio, Leslie; Streicker, Michael; Witt, Kristine L

    2012-04-01

    Styrene-acrylonitrile Trimer (SAN Trimer), a by-product in production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics, was identified at a Superfund site in Dover Township, NJ, where childhood cancer incidence rates were elevated for a period of several years. SAN Trimer was therefore tested by the National Toxicology Program in a 2-year perinatal carcinogenicity study in F344/N rats and a bacterial mutagenicity assay; both studies gave negative results. To further characterize its genotoxicity, SAN Trimer was subsequently evaluated in a combined micronucleus (MN)/Comet assay in juvenile male and female F344 rats. SAN Trimer (37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg/day) was administered by gavage once daily for 4 days. Micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood were determined by flow cytometry, and DNA damage in blood, liver, and brain cells was assessed using the Comet assay. Highly significant dose-related increases (P < 0.0001) in MN-RET were measured in both male and female rats administered SAN Trimer. The RET population was reduced in high dose male rats, suggesting chemical-related bone marrow toxicity. Results of the Comet assay showed significant, dose-related increases in DNA damage in brain cells of male (P < 0.0074) and female (P < 0.0001) rats; increased levels of DNA damage were also measured in liver cells and leukocytes of treated rats. Chemical-related cytotoxicity was not indicated in any of the tissues examined for DNA damage. The results of this subacute MN/Comet assay indicate induction of significant genetic damage in multiple tissues of weanling F344 male and female rats after oral exposure to SAN Trimer.

  9. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chung-ha O.; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A.; Mills, Elizabeth A.; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Nguyen, Judy V.; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered. PMID:24979790

  10. Identification of Anthocyanins in the Liver, Eye, and Brain of Blueberry-fed Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary intervention with anthocyanins may confer benefits in brain function, including vision. Research to date indicates that animals have only a limited capacity to absorb anthocyanins, compared to other types of flavonoids. Pigs, which are a suitable model for human digestive absorption, were us...

  11. Sunitinib-ibuprofen drug interaction affects the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of sunitinib to brain, liver, and kidney in male and female mice differently.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christine Li Ling; Chan, Sook Tyng; Selvaratanam, Manimegahlai; Khoo, Hui Wen; Lim, Adeline Yi Ling; Modamio, Pilar; Mariño, Eduardo L; Segarra, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib (used in GIST, advanced RCC, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) undergoes CYP3A4 metabolism and is an ABCB1B and ABCG2 efflux transporters substrate. We assessed the pharmacokinetic interaction with ibuprofen (an NSAID used by patients with cancer) in Balb/c male and female mice. Mice (study group) were coadministered (30 min apart) 30 mg/kg of ibuprofen and 60 mg/kg of sunitinib PO and compared with the control groups, which received sunitinib alone (60 mg/kg, PO). Sunitinib concentration in plasma, brain, kidney, and liver was measured by HPLC as scheduled and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters estimated. In female control mice, sunitinib AUC0→∞ decreased in plasma (P < 0.05), was higher in liver and brain (P < 0.001), and lower in kidney (P < 0.001) vs. male control mice. After ibuprofen coadministration, female mice showed lower AUC0→∞ in plasma (P < 0.01), brain, liver, and kidney (all P < 0.001). However, in male mice, AUC0→∞ remained unchanged in plasma, increased in liver and kidney, and decreased in brain (all P < 0.001). The tissue-to-plasma AUC0→∞ ratio was similar between male and female control mice, but changed after ibuprofen coadministration: Male mice showed 1.6-fold higher liver-to-plasma ratio (P < 0.001) while remained unchanged in female mice and in kidney (male and female mice) but decreased 55% in brain (P < 0.05). The tissue-to-plasma partial AUC ratio, the drug tissue targeting index, and the tissue-plasma hysteresis-like plots also showed sex-based ibuprofen-sunitinib drug interaction differences. The results illustrate the relevance of this DDI on sunitinib pharmacokinetics and tissue uptake. These may be due to gender-based P450 and efflux/transporters differences.

  12. Macro- and microelements in the rat liver, kidneys, and brain tissues; sex differences and effect of blood removal by perfusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orct, Tatjana; Jurasović, Jasna; Micek, Vedran; Karaica, Dean; Sabolić, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Concentrations of macro- and microelements in animal organs indicate the animal health status and represent reference data for animal experiments. Their levels in blood and tissues could be different between sexes, and could be different with and without blood in tissues. To test these hypotheses, in adult female and male rats the concentrations of various elements were measured in whole blood, blood plasma, and tissues from blood-containing (nonperfused) and blood-free liver, kidneys, and brain (perfused in vivo with an elements-free buffer). In these samples, 6 macroelements (Na, Mg, P, S, K, Ca) and 14 microelements (Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, I, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Li, B, Sr) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following nitric acid digestion. In blood and plasma, female- or male-dominant sex differences were observed for 6 and 5 elements, respectively. In nonperfused organs, sex differences were observed for 3 (liver, brain) or 9 (kidneys) elements, whereas in perfused organs, similar differences were detected for 9 elements in the liver, 5 in the kidneys, and none in the brain. In females, perfused organs had significantly lower concentrations of 4, 5, and 2, and higher concentrations of 10, 4, and 7 elements, respectively, in the liver, kidneys, and brain. In males, perfusion caused lower concentrations of 4, 7, and 2, and higher concentrations of 1, 1, and 7 elements, respectively, in the liver, kidneys, and brain. Therefore, the residual blood in organs can significantly influence tissue concentrations of various elements and their sex-dependency.

  13. Sparteine monooxygenase in brain and liver: Identified by the dopamine uptake blocker ( sup 3 H)GBR-12935

    SciTech Connect

    Kalow, W.; Tyndale, R.F.; Niznik, H.B.; Inaba, T. )

    1990-02-26

    P450IID6 (human sparteine monooxygenase) metabolizes many drugs including neuroleptics, antidepressants, and beta-blockers. The P450IID6 exists in human, bovine, rat and canine brains, but in very low quantities causing methodological difficulties in its assessment. Work with ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935; 1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy) ethyl)-4-(3-phenyl propyl) piperazine has shown that it binds a neuronal/hepatic protein with high affinity ({approximately}7nM) and a rank order of inhibitory potency suggesting that the binding protein is cytochrome P450IID6. The binding was used to predict that d-amphetamine and methamphetamine would interact with P450IID6. Inhibition studies indicated that these compounds were competitive inhibitors of P450IID6. Haloperidol (HAL) and it's metabolite hydroxy-haloperidol (RHAL) are both competitive inhibitors of P450IID6 activity and were found to inhibit ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding. K{sub i} values of twelve compounds (known to interact with the DA transporter or P450IID6) for ({sup 3}H)GRB-12935 binding and P450IID6 activity. The techniques are now available for measurements of cytochrome P450IID6 in healthy and diseased brain/liver tissue using radio-receptor binding assay techniques with ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935.

  14. Rapid efflux of Ca2+ from heart mitochondria in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, A; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-13

    Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in the intracellular concentration range causes rapid efflux of Ca2+ from rat heart mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate + malate in a low Na+ medium. Half-maximal rates of Ca2+ efflux were given by 20 microM PPi. During and after PPi-stimulated Ca2+ efflux the mitochondria retain their structural integrity and complete respiratory control. Carboxyatractyloside inhibits PPi-stimulated Ca2+ efflux, indicating PPi must enter the matrix in order to promote Ca2+ efflux. Heart mitochondria have a much higher affinity for PPi uptake and PPi-induced Ca2+ efflux than liver mitochondria.

  15. Mitochondria and Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to providing ATP thereby satisfying the energy demand of the incessant electrical activity and contractile action of cardiac muscle. Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction can adversely impact cardiac electrical functioning by impairing the intracellular ion homeostasis and membrane excitability through reduced ATP production and excessive reactive oxidative species (ROS) generation, resulting in increased propensity to cardiac arrhythmias. In this review, the molecular mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to cardiac arrhythmias are discussed with an emphasis on the impact of increased mitochondrial ROS on the cardiac ion channels and transporters that are critical to maintaining normal electromechanical functioning of the cardiomyocytes. The potential of using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as a novel anti-arrhythmia therapy is highlighted. PMID:24713422

  16. Mitochondria in teleost spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Rodríguez, Patricio; Figueroa, Elías; Díaz, Rommy; Lee-Estevez, Manuel; Short, Stefania; Farías, Jorge G

    2017-01-06

    There is an extraordinary diversity of reproductive modes in teleost and this variability is related to the phylogenetic relationships and adaption to very different biotopes. As in all vertebrates, sperm is produced as the end product of the process of spermatogenesis, and regarding teleost the spermatozoa lack an acrosome in almost all species and motility is activated as a response to osmolarity and ion content of the aquatic medium where the sperm is released. In this context, mitochondria possess a fundamental role for fish spermatozoa motility and integrity, hence, fertilizing potential; they are the energy supplier that allows flagellar movement and their dysfunction could play a main role in structural and functional damage to the spermatozoa. The ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation provides not only energy for cell activities, which includes Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump, endocytosis, protein synthesis and many other cell processes; but also produces reactive oxygen species, that under mitochondrial dysfunction causes oxidative stress. The assessment of mitochondrial function (e.g. through measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential) as well as ATP content (mostly supplied by mitochondrial respiration) can be useful as quality markers of fish spermatozoa. Also quantification of ROS and antioxidant status, strongly influenced by mitochondria, are used as complementary measurements. There is much information about sperm mitochondria and their function but studies of these aspects on fish reproduction are still required for applications in aquaculture. The real role of fish sperm mitochondria under short and long term storage and in vitro manipulation is not fully understood yet. Thus future research should focus on these matters.

  17. Effect of prenatal exposure of deltamethrin on the ontogeny of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450s in the brain and liver of offsprings

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Dhawan, Alok; Lakhan Singh, Ram; Parmar, Devendra . E-mail: parmar_devendra@hotmail.com

    2006-08-01

    Prenatal exposure to low doses (0.25 or 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid insecticide, to pregnant dams from gestation days 5 to 21 (GD5-21) produced dose-dependent alterations in the ontogeny of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms in brain and liver of the offsprings. RT-PCR analysis revealed dose-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of cerebral and hepatic CYP1A1, 1A2, 2B1, 2B2, and 2E1 isoenzymes in the offsprings exposed prenatally to deltamethrin. Similar increase in the activity of the marker enzymes of these CYP isoforms has indicated that placental transfer of the pyrethroid, a mixed type of CYP inducer, even at these low doses may be sufficient to induce the CYPs in brain and liver of the offsprings. Our data have further revealed persistence in the increase in expression of xenobiotics metabolizing CYPs up to adulthood in brain and liver of the exposed offsprings, suggesting the potential of deltamethrin to imprint the expression of CYPs in brain and liver of the offsprings following its in utero exposure. Furthermore, though the levels of CYPs were several fold lower in brain, almost equal magnitude of induction in cerebral and hepatic CYPs has further suggested that brain CYPs are responsive to the induction by environmental chemicals. The present data indicating alterations in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs during development following prenatal exposure to deltamethrin may be of significance as these CYP enzymes are not only involved in the neurobehavioral toxicity of deltamethrin but have a role in regulating the levels of ligands that modulate growth, differentiation, and neuroendocrine functions.

  18. Mitochondria and neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aiwu; Hou, Yan; Mattson, Mark P

    2010-01-01

    The production of neurons from neural progenitor cells, the growth of axons and dendrites and the formation and reorganization of synapses are examples of neuroplasticity. These processes are regulated by cell-autonomous and intercellular (paracrine and endocrine) programs that mediate responses of neural cells to environmental input. Mitochondria are highly mobile and move within and between subcellular compartments involved in neuroplasticity (synaptic terminals, dendrites, cell body and the axon). By generating energy (ATP and NAD+), and regulating subcellular Ca2+ and redox homoeostasis, mitochondria may play important roles in controlling fundamental processes in neuroplasticity, including neural differentiation, neurite outgrowth, neurotransmitter release and dendritic remodelling. Particularly intriguing is emerging data suggesting that mitochondria emit molecular signals (e.g. reactive oxygen species, proteins and lipid mediators) that can act locally or travel to distant targets including the nucleus. Disturbances in mitochondrial functions and signalling may play roles in impaired neuroplasticity and neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, psychiatric disorders and stroke. PMID:20957078

  19. Comparison of thiol redox state of mitochondria and homogenates of various tissues between two strains of mice with different longevities

    PubMed Central

    Rebrin, Igor; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine if differences in life spans of two different strains of mice are associated with the thiol redox state of their tissues and mitochondria. A comparison, based on amounts of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH, GSSG) and reactive protein thiols, was made between short-lived SAM (P8) mice and the longer-lived C57BL/6 mice at 13 months of age. The average life span of the latter mouse strain is approximately 48% longer than the former strain. Analyses of plasma, tissue homogenates and mitochondria of liver, kidney, heart, brain and skeletal muscle indicated that, in general, amounts of GSH and reactive protein sulfhydryls and GSH:GSSG ratios were lower and concentrations of GSSG were higher in the SAM than the C57BL/6 mice. Differences in the redox state between the two strains were more consistent and pronounced in skeletal muscle than in other tissues, and in mitochondria than in their respective tissue homogenates. Overall, the results support the view that the shorter-lived SAM mice exhibit a relatively higher level of oxidative stress than the longer-lived C57BL/6 mice, which is consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging. Intra-species comparisons may be useful for the identification of biochemical characteristics associated with the variations in life spans. PMID:15501021

  20. Lineage-specific regulation of epigenetic modifier genes in human liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Weng, Matthias K; Natarajan, Karthick; Scholz, Diana; Ivanova, Violeta N; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hengstler, Jan G; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite an abundance of studies on chromatin states and dynamics, there is an astonishing dearth of information on the expression of genes responsible for regulating histone and DNA modifications. We used here a set of 156 defined epigenetic modifier genes (EMG) and profiled their expression pattern in cells of different lineages. As reference value, expression data from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) were used. Hepatocyte-like cells were generated from hESC, and their EMG expression was compared to primary human liver cells. In parallel, we generated postmitotic human neurons (Lu d6), and compared their relative EMG expression to human cortex (Ctx). Clustering analysis of all cell types showed that neuronal lineage samples grouped together (94 similarly regulated EMG), as did liver cells (61 similarly-regulated), while the two lineages were clearly distinct. The general classification was followed by detailed comparison of the major EMG groups; genes that were higher expressed in differentiated cells than in hESC included the acetyltransferase KAT2B and the methyltransferase SETD7. Neuro-specific EMGs were the histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and the arginine-methyltransferase PRMT8. Comparison of young (Lu d6) and more aged (Ctx) neuronal samples suggested a maturation-dependent switch in the expression of functionally homologous proteins. For instance, the ratio of the histone H3 K27 methyltransfereases, EZH1 to EZH2, was high in Ctx and low in Lu d6. The same was observed for the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) subunits CBX7 and CBX8. A large proportion of EMGs in differentiated cells was very differently expressed than in hESC, and absolute levels were significantly higher in neuronal samples than in hepatic cells. Thus, there seem to be distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in EMG expression between cell lineages.

  1. Changes of the thioredoxin system, glutathione peroxidase activity and total antioxidant capacity in rat brain cortex during acute liver failure: modulation by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione and thioredoxin are complementary antioxidants in the protection of mammalian tissues against oxidative-nitrosative stress (ONS), and ONS is a principal cause of symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with acute liver failure (ALF). We compared the activities of the thioredoxin system components: thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the expression of the thioredoxin-interacting protein, and of the key glutathione metabolizing enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the cerebral cortex of rats with ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA). ALF increased the Trx and TrxR activity without affecting Trip protein expression, but decreased GPx activity in the brains of TAA-treated rats. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the brain was increased by ALF suggesting that upregulation of the thioredoxin may act towards compensating impaired protection by the glutathione system. Intraperitoneal administration of L-histidine (His), an amino acid that was earlier reported to prevent acute liver failure-induced mitochondrial impairment and brain edema, abrogated most of the acute liver failure-induced changes of both antioxidant systems, and significantly increased TAC of both the control and ALF-affected brain. These observations provide further support for the concept of that His has a potential to serve as a therapeutic antioxidant in HE. Most of the enzyme activity changes evoked by His or ALF were not well correlated with alterations in their expression at the mRNA level, suggesting complex translational or posttranslational mechanisms of their modulation, which deserve further investigations.

  2. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  3. Mitochondria and metazoan epigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, James A.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial activity controls ATP production, calcium dynamics, and redox state, thereby establishing physiological parameters governing the transduction of biochemical signals that regulate nuclear gene expression. However, these activities are commonly assumed to fulfill a ‘housekeeping’ function: necessary for life, but an epiphenomenon devoid of causal agency in the developmental flow of genetic information. Moreover, it is difficult to perturb mitochondrial function without generally affecting cell viability. For these reasons little is known about the extent of mitochondrial influence on gene activity in early development. Recent discoveries pertaining to the redox regulation of key developmental signaling systems together with the fact that mitochondria are often asymmetrically distributed in animal embryos suggests that they may contribute spatial information underlying differential specification of cell fate. In many cases such asymmetries correlate with localization of genetic determinants (i.e., mRNAs or proteins), particularly in embryos that rely heavily on cell-autonomous means of cell fate specification. In such embryos the localized genetic determinants play a dominant role, and any developmental information contributed by the mitochondria themselves is likely to be less obvious and more difficult to isolate experimentally. Hence, ‘regulative’ embryos that make more extensive use of conditional cell fate specification are better suited to experimental investigation of mitochondrial impacts on developmental gene regulation. Recent studies of the sea urchin embryo, which is a paradigmatic example of such a system, suggest that anisotropic distribution of mitochondria provides a source gradient of spatial information that directs epigenetic specification of the secondary axis via Nodal-Lefty signaling. PMID:19429498

  4. Protein Biosynthesis in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, A. V.; Levitskii, S. A.; Vinogradova, E. N.; Atkinson, G. C.; Hauryliuk, V.; Zenkin, N.; Kamenski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis. PMID:24228873

  5. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  6. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases.

  7. [MITOCHONDRIA RESPIRATION AND OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORILATION OF RAT TISSUES AT TAURINE PER ORAL INJECTION].

    PubMed

    Ostapiv, R D; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    Taurine--sulphur-containing amino acid is a necessary component of mitochondrial matrix, where it maintains pH and is included in mitochondrial transport RNA. But still it is unclear how taurine influences on ATP synthesis and mitochondrial respiration chain components activity. Thus, the aim of the work was to study the effect of long-term per oral taurine injection on mitochondrial respiration intensity in rat tissues: liver, brain, testes and thigh muscle. For this purpose male Wistar rats, that weighted 190-220 g, were divided in three groups, daily during 28 days they were injected drinking water (control group) or taurine solution 40 and 100 mg per kg of body weight (I and II research groups, correspondingly). Respiration intensity was measured polarogrifically with use of Clark electrode at endogenic substrates oxidation (V₁), with exogenic α-ketoglutarate (5 mmol/l) or succinate (1 mmol/l;V₄S) addition, at ADP addition to concentration 200 µmol/l (V₃), and after ADP depletion (V₄ATP). Phosphorylation time, oxidative phosphorilation efficacy (ADP/O), respiratory controls by Lardy (V₃/V₄S) and Chance (V₃/V₄ATP) were calculated. It was found that long term taurine injection increased V₁ in animal brain and liver of both research groups, but it decreased in testes and muscles of I research group. In liver of I research group animals, when both α-ketoglutarate and succinate were oxidated, V₄S, V₃ and V₄ATP were 4-7 times larger than in control. At the same time, Lardy respiratory control increased at succinate oxidation, this may indirectly point on increased coupling between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. In liver of II research group animals V₄S, V₃ and V₄/ATP when α-ketoglutarate was oxidated were significantly higher than in control. In muscles of I research group V₄S, V₃ and V₄ATP when α-ketoglutarate and succinate was added were lower than in control. In thigh muscle of II research group animals at

  8. Effects of the continuous administration of an Agaricus blazei extract to rats on oxidative parameters of the brain and liver during aging.

    PubMed

    de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B; Soares, Andréia A; Natali, Maria R M; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane M; Bracht, Adelar

    2014-11-13

    An investigation of the effects of an aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei, a medicinal mushroom, on the oxidative state of the brain and liver of rats during aging (7 to 23 months) was conducted. The treatment consisted in the daily intragastric administration of 50 mg/kg of the extract. The A. blazei treatment tended to maintain the ROS contents of the brain and liver at lower levels, but a significant difference was found only at the age of 23 months and in the brain. The TBARS levels in the brain were maintained at lower levels by the A. blazei treatment during the whole aging process with a specially pronounced difference at the age of 12 months. The total antioxidant capacity in the brain was higher in treated rats only at the age of 12 months. Compared with previous studies in which old rats (21 months) were treated during a short period of 21 days with 200 mg/kg, the effects of the A. blazei extract in the present study tended to be less pronounced. The results also indicate that the long and constant treatment presented a tendency of becoming less effective at ages above 12 months.

  9. [Statins and mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Broniarek, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to report on influence of statins on mitochondria function. Statins are serum cholesterol-lowering drugs. They act by competitively inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (EC 1.1.1.88), the first committed enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. In this way, statins inhibit the endogenous cholesterol synthesis. Emerging evidence suggest that statins impair mitochondria, which is demonstrated by abnormal mitochondrial morphology, decreased oxidative phosphorylation capacity and yield, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Mechanisms of statin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are not fully understood. The following causes are proposed: (i) deficiency of coenzyme Q10, an important electron carrier of mitochondrial respiratory chain; (ii) inhibition of respiratory chain complexes; (iii) inhibitory effect on protein prenylation; and (iv) induction of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. These phenomena could play a significant role in the etiology of statin-induced disease, especially myopathy. Studies on statin-induced mitochondrial apoptosis could be useful in developing a new cancer therapy.

  10. Regulation of xenobiotic transporter genes in liver and brain of juvenile thicklip grey mullets (Chelon labrosus) after exposure to Prestige-like fuel oil and to perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    de Cerio, Oihane Diaz; Bilbao, Eider; Cajaraville, Miren P; Cancio, Ibon

    2012-04-25

    Xenobiotic transport proteins are involved in cellular defence against accumulation of xenobiotics participating in multixenobiotic resistance (MXR). In order to study the transcriptional regulation of MXR genes in fish exposed to common chemical pollutants we selected the thicklip grey mullet (Chelon labrosus), since mugilids are widespread in highly degraded estuarine environments where they have to survive through development and adulthood. Partial sequences belonging to genes coding for members of 3 different families of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins (ABCB1; ABCB11; ABCC2; ABCC3; ABCG2) and a vault protein (major vault protein, MVP) were amplified and sequenced from mullet liver. Their liver and brain transcription levels were examined in juvenile mullets under exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and to fresh (F) and weathered (WF) Prestige-like heavy fuel oil for 2 and 16 days. In liver, PFOS significantly up-regulated transcription of abcb1, abcb11 and abcg2 while in brain only abcb11 was up-regulated. Both fuel treatments significantly down-regulated abcb11 in liver at day 2 while abcc2 was only down-regulated by WF. mvp was significantly up-regulated by F and down-regulated by WF at day 2 in the liver. At day 16 only a significant up-regulation of abcb1 in the F group was recorded. Brain abcc3 and abcg2 were down-regulated by both fuels at day 2, while abcb1 and abcc2 were only down-regulated by F exposure. After 16 days of exposure only abcb11 and abcg2 were regulated. In conclusion, exposure to organic xenobiotics significantly alters transcription levels of genes participating in xenobiotic efflux, especially after short periods of exposure. Efflux transporter gene transcription profiling could thus constitute a promising tool to assess exposure to common pollutants.

  11. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) decreases hydrogen sulfide tissue concentration in brain but increases it in the heart, liver and kidney in mice.

    PubMed

    Wiliński, Bogdan; Wiliński, Jerzy; Somogyi, Eugeniusz; Góralska, Marta; Piotrowska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The biological action ofN-acetyl-p-aminophenol - paracetamol (acetaminophen) has been demonstrated to involve different mechanisms and is still not clear. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes including nociception. The interaction between acetaminophen and endogenous H2S is unknown. Twenty four female CBA strain mice were administered intraperitoneal injections of N-acetyl-p-aminophenol solution: paracetemol in doses of 30 mg/kg b.w. per day (group D1, n = 8) or 100 mg/kg b.w. per day (group D2, n = 8).. The control group (n = 8) received physiological saline in portions of the same volume--0.2 ml. The measurements of tissue H2S concentration were performed with the Siegel spectrophotometric modified method. In the brain, the H2S tissue level decreased, but more significantly in the lower drug dose group. Conversely, there was a significant rise in the H2S tissue concentration in D1 and D2 groups in heart and kidney with the increase more pronounced in the group with the lower paracetamol dose. In the liver only the higher acetaminophen dose elicited a change in H2S concentration, increasing after administration of acetaminophen at 100 mg/kg. Our study demonstrates that paracetamol induces H2S tissue concentration changes in different mouse organs.

  12. Functional Coupling of Human Microphysiology Systems: Intestine, Liver, Kidney Proximal Tubule, Blood-Brain Barrier and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vernetti, Lawrence; Gough, Albert; Baetz, Nicholas; Blutt, Sarah; Broughman, James R.; Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Hasan, Nesrin; In, Julie; Kelly, Edward; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Repper, Jonathan; Senutovitch, Nina; Stabb, Janet; Yeung, Catherine; Zachos, Nick C.; Donowitz, Mark; Estes, Mary; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Truskey, George; Wikswo, John P.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2017-01-01

    Organ interactions resulting from drug, metabolite or xenobiotic transport between organs are key components of human metabolism that impact therapeutic action and toxic side effects. Preclinical animal testing often fails to predict adverse outcomes arising from sequential, multi-organ metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics. Human microphysiological systems (MPS) can model these interactions and are predicted to dramatically improve the efficiency of the drug development process. In this study, five human MPS models were evaluated for functional coupling, defined as the determination of organ interactions via an in vivo-like sequential, organ-to-organ transfer of media. MPS models representing the major absorption, metabolism and clearance organs (the jejunum, liver and kidney) were evaluated, along with skeletal muscle and neurovascular models. Three compounds were evaluated for organ-specific processing: terfenadine for pharmacokinetics (PK) and toxicity; trimethylamine (TMA) as a potentially toxic microbiome metabolite; and vitamin D3. We show that the organ-specific processing of these compounds was consistent with clinical data, and discovered that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) crosses the blood-brain barrier. These studies demonstrate the potential of human MPS for multi-organ toxicity and absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME), provide guidance for physically coupling MPS, and offer an approach to coupling MPS with distinct media and perfusion requirements. PMID:28176881

  13. Effect of amoxicillin exposure on brain, gill, liver, and kidney of common carp (Cyprinus carpio): The role of amoxicilloic acid.

    PubMed

    Elizalde-Velázquez, Armando; Martínez-Rodríguez, Héctor; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Dublán-García, Octavio; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Rodríguez-Flores, Juana; Castañeda-Peñalvo, Gregorio; Lizcano-Sanz, Isabel; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics around the world due to its broad-spectrum activity against different bacterial strains as well as its use as a growth promoter in animal husbandry. Although residues of this antibacterial agent have been found in water bodies in diverse countries, there is not enough information on its potential toxicity to aquatic organisms such as the common carp Cyprinus carpio. This study aimed to evaluate AMX-induced oxidative stress in brain, gill, liver and kidney of C. carpio. Carp were exposed to three different concentrations of AMX (10 ng/L, 10 μg/L, 10 mg/L) for 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation (LPX), hydroperoxide content (HPC), protein carbonyl content (PCC) and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Amoxicillin and its main degradation product amoxicilloic acid (AMA) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and UV detection (HPLC-EC-UV). Significant increases in LPX, HPC, and PCC (P < 0.05) were found in all study organs, particularly kidney, as well as significant changes in antioxidant enzymes activity. Amoxicilloic acid in water is concluded to induce oxidative stress in C. carpio, this damage being highest in kidney. The biomarkers used are effective for the assessment of the environmental impact of this agent on aquatic species. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1102-1120, 2017.

  14. In vivo formation of natural HgSe nanoparticles in the liver and brain of pilot whales

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Lawan, Mohammed M.; Urgast, Dagmar S.; Raab, Andrea; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Kopittke, Peter M.; Loeschner, Katrin; Larsen, Erik H.; Woods, Glenn; Brownlow, Andrew; Read, Fiona L.; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the biochemistry of methylmercury (MeHg) that leads to the formation of mercury-selenium (Hg-Se) clusters is a long outstanding challenge that promises to deepen our knowledge of MeHg detoxification and the role Se plays in this process. Here, we show that mercury selenide (HgSe) nanoparticles in the liver and brain of long-finned pilot whales are attached to Se-rich structures and possibly act as a nucleation point for the formation of large Se-Hg clusters, which can grow with age to over 5 μm in size. The detoxification mechanism is fully developed from the early age of the animals, with particulate Hg found already in juvenile tissues. As a consequence of MeHg detoxification, Se-methionine, the selenium pool in the system is depleted in the efforts to maintain essential levels of Se-cysteine. This study provides evidence of so far unreported depletion of the bioavailable Se pool, a plausible driving mechanism of demonstrated neurotoxic effects of MeHg in the organism affected by its high dietary intake. PMID:27678068

  15. In vivo formation of natural HgSe nanoparticles in the liver and brain of pilot whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Lawan, Mohammed M.; Urgast, Dagmar S.; Raab, Andrea; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Kopittke, Peter M.; Loeschner, Katrin; Larsen, Erik H.; Woods, Glenn; Brownlow, Andrew; Read, Fiona L.; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M.

    2016-09-01

    To understand the biochemistry of methylmercury (MeHg) that leads to the formation of mercury-selenium (Hg-Se) clusters is a long outstanding challenge that promises to deepen our knowledge of MeHg detoxification and the role Se plays in this process. Here, we show that mercury selenide (HgSe) nanoparticles in the liver and brain of long-finned pilot whales are attached to Se-rich structures and possibly act as a nucleation point for the formation of large Se-Hg clusters, which can grow with age to over 5 μm in size. The detoxification mechanism is fully developed from the early age of the animals, with particulate Hg found already in juvenile tissues. As a consequence of MeHg detoxification, Se-methionine, the selenium pool in the system is depleted in the efforts to maintain essential levels of Se-cysteine. This study provides evidence of so far unreported depletion of the bioavailable Se pool, a plausible driving mechanism of demonstrated neurotoxic effects of MeHg in the organism affected by its high dietary intake.

  16. Accumulation of mercury, selenium and PCBs in domestic duck brain, liver and egg from a contaminated area with an investigation of their redox responses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Wenhua

    2013-05-01

    PCBs and methylmercury (MeHg) are two of the most ubiquitous contaminants in the Qingzhen (QZ) area of Guizhou province. The estimated tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) of total mercury (T-Hg), MeHg, PCBs and Se from contaminated rice, eggs and fish by Chinese people in QZ showed that both MeHg and PCBs exceeded the corresponding safety limits. Pearson's correlation analyses of mercury and Se in all duck tissues showed that there were high correlations with T-Hg or MeHg and Se in QZ samples. However, the molar ratio between T-Hg and Se in brain tissues was close to 1, suggesting that Se is antagonistic to mercury toxicity only in brain tissues. Biochemical analyses showed that both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase increased in the brain, whereas in the liver and egg these enzymes decreased. However, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 generation in liver and egg tissues showed contrary responses, where significant increases in these tissues were seen relative to controls. Mercury and PCBs co-accumulation in liver and egg tissues gave rise to large numbers of free radicals as well as aggravated alkyl free radicals, superoxide radical and nitric oxide, thereby resulting in oxidative stress in these tissues. It can be concluded that an adaptive response of the redox defense system is present in brain tissues, as opposed to a general break down of the redox defense system in liver and egg. The results obtained in this study will provide basic information on exposure and risk assessment in local residents.

  17. [Effects of catalase activators and inhibitors on ethanol pharmacokinetic characteristics and ethanol and aldehyde-metabolizing enzyme activities in the rat liver and brain].

    PubMed

    Bardina, L R; Pron'ko, P S; Satanovskaia, V I; Alieva, E V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of catalase regulators (aminotriazole, lead acetate, taurine, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate) on the preference for ethanol, its pharmacokinetics, and activities of rat liver and brain ethanol and acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzymes were studied. Lead acetate (100 mg/kg, i.p., 7 days), aminotriazole (1 g/kg, i.p., 7 days), and taurine (650 mg/kg, i.g., 14 days) decreased ethanol consumption under conditions of free choice (10% ethanol water), whereas di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (300 mg/kg, i.g., 7 days) did not exert any effect on this parameter. Taurine, lead acetate and di-2-ethylhexylphthalate significantly activated liver ADH, MEOS and catalase peroxidase activity. Aminotriazole also activated ADH and MEOS, but inhibited liver catalase. The activities of liver and brain A1DH as well as catalase were insignificantly changed by this treatment. The 7-day administration of lead acetate, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate and aminotriazole administrations significantly influenced the ethanol (2 g/kg., i.p.) pharmacokinetic parameters: the area under the pharmacokinetic curve and the elimination half-life time were significantly reduced, whereas the elimination constant and clearance were increased. This unequivocally indicates accelerated ethanol elimination. The 14-day ingestion of taurine insignificantly changed the parameters of ethanol pharmacokinetics in rats.

  18. Effect of exposure and withdrawal of 900-MHz-electromagnetic waves on brain, kidney and liver oxidative stress and some biochemical parameters in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ragy, Merhan Mamdouh

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of mobile phones in daily life with increasing adverse effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR), emitted from mobile on some physiological processes, cause many concerns about their effects on human health. Therefore, this work was designed to study the effects of exposure to mobile phone emits 900-MHz EMR on the brain, liver and kidney of male albino rats. Thirty male adult rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 each) as follows: control group (rats without exposure to EMR), exposure group (exposed to 900-MHz EMR for 1 h/d for 60 d) and withdrawal group (exposed to 900-MHz electromagnetic wave for 1 h/d for 60 d then left for 30 d without exposure). EMR emitted from mobile phone led to a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and significant decrease total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels in brain, liver and kidneys tissues. The sera activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), urea, creatinine and corticosterone were significantly increased (p < 0.05), while serum catecholamines were insignificantly higher in the exposed rats. These alterations were corrected by withdrawal. In conclusion, electromagnetic field emitting from mobile phone might produce impairments in some biochemicals changes and oxidative stress in brain, liver and renal tissue of albino rats. These alterations were corrected by withdrawal.

  19. Superoxide and respiratory coupling in mitochondria of insulin-deficient diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Herlein, Judith A; Fink, Brian D; O'Malley, Yunxia; Sivitz, William I

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species have been implicated in both diabetic complications and the progression of the underlying diabetic state. However, it is not clear whether mitochondria of diabetic origin are intrinsically altered to generate excess reactive oxygen species independent of the surrounding diabetic milieu. Mitochondria were isolated from gastrocnemius, heart, and liver of 2-wk and 2-month streptozotocin diabetic rats and controls. We rigidly quantified mitochondrial superoxide, respiration and ATP production, respiratory coupling, the expression of several proteins with antioxidant properties, and the redox state of glutathione. Both fluorescent assessment and electron paramagnetic spectroscopy revealed that superoxide production was unchanged or reduced in the 2-month diabetic mitochondria compared with controls. Kinetic analysis of the proton leak showed that diabetic heart and muscle mitochondria were actually more coupled compared with control despite an approximate 2- to 4-fold increase in uncoupling protein-3 content. Adenine nucleotide translocator type 1 expression was reduced by approximately 50% in diabetic muscle mitochondria. Catalase was significantly up-regulated in muscle and heart tissue and in heart mitochondria, whereas glutathione peroxidase expression was increased in liver mitochondria of diabetic rats. We conclude that gastrocnemius, heart, and liver mitochondria of streptozotocin diabetic rats are not irrevocably altered toward excess superoxide production either by complex I or complex III. Moreover, gastrocnemius and heart mitochondria demonstrate increased, not decreased, respiratory coupling. Mitochondria of insulin-deficient diabetic rats do show signs of adaptation to antecedent oxidative stress manifested as tissue-specific enzyme and uncoupling protein expression but remain remarkably robust with respect to superoxide production.

  20. Molecular Integrity of Mitochondria Alters by Potassium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2015-01-01

    Potassium chloride (KCl) has been commonly used in homogenization buffer and procedures of protein extraction. It is known to facilitate release of membrane-associated molecules but the higher concentration of KCl may affect the integrity of mitochondria by breaching the electrostatic force between the lipids and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to explore the effect of KCl on mitochondrial proteome. The mitochondria were isolated from the mice liver and sub-fractionated into mitochondrial matrix and outer mitochondrial membrane fraction. The fractions were analysed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and 2D-PAGE. The analysis of ultrastructure and protein profiles by MALDI-MS and data-mining reveals KCl-associated alterations in the integrity of mitochondria and its proteome. The mitochondrial membrane, cristae, and the matrix proteins appear altered under the influence of KCl.

  1. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  2. Protective effect of Allium sativum (garlic) aqueous extract against lead-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain, liver, and kidney.

    PubMed

    Manoj Kumar, V; Henley, A K; Nelson, C J; Indumati, O; Prabhakara Rao, Y; Rajanna, S; Rajanna, B

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the ameliorative activity of Allium sativum against lead-induced oxidative stress in the brain, liver, and kidney of male rats. Four groups of male Wistar strain rats (100-120 g) were taken: group 1 received 1000 mg/L sodium acetate and group 2 was given 1000 mg/L lead acetate through drinking water for 2 weeks. Group 3 and 4 were treated with 250 mg/kg body weight/day of A. sativum and 500 mg/kg body weight/day of A. sativum, respectively, by oral intubation for a period of 2 weeks along with lead acetate. The rats were sacrificed after treatment and the brain, liver, and kidney were isolated on ice. In the brain, four important regions namely the hippocampus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and brain stem were separated and used for the present investigation. Blood was also drawn by cardiac puncture and preserved in heparinized vials at 4 °C for estimation of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity. The results showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products (LPP), total protein carbonyl content (TPCC), and lead in the selected brain regions, liver, and kidney of lead-exposed group compared with their respective controls. Blood delta-ALAD activity showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the lead-exposed rats. However, the concomitant administration of A. sativum resulted in tissue-specific recovery of oxidative stress parameters namely ROS, LPP, and TPCC. A. sativum treatment also restored the blood delta-ALAD activity back to control. Overall, our results indicate that A. sativum administration could be an effective antioxidant treatment strategy for lead-induced oxidative insult.

  3. Quantitative proteomics of synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria: insights for synaptic mitochondrial vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-05-02

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage.

  4. Lipids of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Targeting Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.; Almeida, Ana S.; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria present two key roles on cellular functioning: (i) cell metabolism, being the main cellular source of energy and (ii) modulation of cell death, by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gaseoustransmitter, which presents several biological functions and is involved in maintaining cell homeostasis and cytoprotection. Herein, mitochondrion is approached as the main cellular target of carbon monoxide (CO). In this paper, two main perspectives concerning CO modulation of mitochondrial functioning are evaluated. First, the role of CO on cellular metabolism, in particular oxidative phosphorylation, is discussed, namely, on: cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial respiration, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial biogenesis, and general cellular energetic status. Second, the mitochondrial pathways involved in cell death inhibition by CO are assessed, in particular the control of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. PMID:22536507

  6. Over-dose insulin and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Attenuated gastric ulcers, seizures, brain lesions, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, breakdown of liver glycogen, profound hypoglycemia and calcification in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, S; Brcic, I; Mester, M; Filipovic, M; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Barisic, I; Radic, B; Zoricic, Z; Bilic, V; Berkopic, L; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Romic, Z; Pazanin, L; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    We focused on over-dose insulin (250 IU/kg i.p.) induced gastric ulcers and then on other disturbances that were concomitantly induced in rats, seizures (eventually fatal), severely damaged neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, increased AST, ALT and amylase serum values, breakdown of liver glycogen with profound hypoglycemia and calcification development. Calcium deposits were present in the blood vessel walls, hepatocytes surrounding blood vessels and sometimes even in parenchyma of the liver mainly as linear and only occasionally as granular accumulation. As an antidote after insulin, we applied the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg/kg) given (i) intraperitoneally or (ii) intragastrically immediately after insulin. Controls received simultaneously an equivolume of saline (5 ml/kg). Those rats that survived till the 180 minutes after over-dose application were further assessed. Interestingly, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, as an antiulcer peptide, may besides stomach ulcer consistently counteract all insulin disturbances and fatal outcome. BPC 157 rats showed no fatal outcome, they were mostly without hypoglycemic seizures with apparently higher blood glucose levels (glycogen was still present in hepatocytes), less liver pathology (i.e., normal liver weight, less fatty liver), decreased ALT, AST and amylase serum values, markedly less damaged neurons in brain and they only occasionally had small gastric lesions. BPC 157 rats exhibited mostly only dot-like calcium presentation. In conclusion, the success of BPC 157 therapy may indicate a likely role of BPC 157 in insulin controlling and BPC 157 may influence one or more causative process(es) after excessive insulin application.

  7. Brain energy metabolism spurns fatty acids as fuel due to their inherent mitotoxicity and potential capacity to unleash neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2017-03-30

    The brain uses long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) to a negligible extent as fuel for the mitochondrial energy generation, in contrast to other tissues that also demand high energy. Besides this generally accepted view, some studies using cultured neural cells or whole brain indicate a moderately active mitochondrial β-oxidation. Here, we corroborate the conclusion that brain mitochondria are unable to oxidize fatty acids. In contrast, the combustion of liver-derived ketone bodies by neural cells is long-known. Furthermore, new insights indicate the use of odd-numbered medium-chain fatty acids as valuable source for maintaining the level of intermediates of the citric acid cycle in brain mitochondria. Non-esterified LCFAs or their activated forms exert a large variety of harmful side-effects on mitochondria, such as enhancing the mitochondrial ROS generation in distinct steps of the β-oxidation and therefore potentially increasing oxidative stress. Hence, the question arises: Why do in brain energy metabolism mitochondria selectively spurn LCFAs as energy source? The most likely answer are the relatively higher content of peroxidation-sensitive polyunsaturated fatty acids and, the low antioxidative defense in brain tissue. There are two remarkable peroxisomal defects, one relating to α-oxidation of phytanic acid and the other to uptake of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) which lead to pathologically high tissue levels of such fatty acids. Both, the accumulation of phytanic acid and that of VLCFAs give an enlightening insight into harmful activities of fatty acids on neural cells, which possibly explain why evolution has prevented brain mitochondria from the equipment of with significant β-oxidation enzymatic capacity.

  8. Deletion of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 2 (GAT2 and SLC6A13) gene in mice leads to changes in liver and brain taurine contents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Holmseth, Silvia; Guo, Caiying; Hassel, Bjørnar; Höfner, Georg; Huitfeldt, Henrik S; Wanner, Klaus T; Danbolt, Niels C

    2012-10-12

    The GABA transporters (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and BGT1) have mostly been discussed in relation to their potential roles in controlling the action of transmitter GABA in the nervous system. We have generated the first mice lacking the GAT2 (slc6a13) gene. Deletion of GAT2 (both mRNA and protein) neither affected growth, fertility, nor life span under nonchallenging rearing conditions. Immunocytochemistry showed that the GAT2 protein was predominantly expressed in the plasma membranes of periportal hepatocytes and in the basolateral membranes of proximal tubules in the renal cortex. This was validated by processing tissue from wild-type and knockout mice in parallel. Deletion of GAT2 reduced liver taurine levels by 50%, without affecting the expression of the taurine transporter TAUT. These results suggest an important role for GAT2 in taurine uptake from portal blood into liver. In support of this notion, GAT2-transfected HEK293 cells transported [(3)H]taurine. Furthermore, most of the uptake of [(3)H]GABA by cultured rat hepatocytes was due to GAT2, and this uptake was inhibited by taurine. GAT2 was not