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Sample records for brain purine metabolism

  1. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, N

    1982-09-01

    The pathways of purine biosynthesis and degradation have been elucidated during the last 30 years; the regulation of the mechanisms involved is not yet fully understood, particularly with respect to quantitative aspects. Research into inborn errors of purine metabolism has provided valuable insights into purine synthesis and salvage pathways. Nutrition experiments using purine-free formula diets and supplements with defined purine sources permit precise descriptions of the influence of various dietary purines on uric acid formation. Supplements of dietary purines produce dose-proportional increases in plasma uric acid concentrations, uric acid pool size and renal uric acid excretion. The magnitude of these increases depends on the type of purine compound administered, which may limit the value of food tables for human dietetics. Purine content of food must be related not only to weight but also to energy and to protein, particularly if new foodstuffs or a vegetarian diet are ingested. Dietary purines appear to influence the biosynthesis of pyrimidines. In contrast to dietary purines, pyrimidines in the diet, if administered as nucleosides or nucleotides, are utilized in animals for the synthesis of nucleic acids. Much further work is necessary for a better understanding of the inter-relationships of purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  2. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism in man V

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, W.L.; Thompson, L.F.; Watts, R.W.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book comprises the proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Human Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism. Its papers are organized under the following categories: adenosine receptors; purine receptors and the central nervous system; nucleoside and base transport; studies with antimetabolites; deoxynucleotide and nucleoside toxicity and metabolism; enzymes; purine and pyrimidine metabolism during lymphocyte differentiation; purine metabolism in skeletal muscle; purine nucleotide metabolism in the heart; purine and pyrimidine metabolism in primary cell cultures and in parasites; nucleoside kinases and drug activation; phosphoribosylpyrophosphate; S-adenosylmethionine metabolism; and the metabolic effects of interferon.

  3. Purine metabolism in Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, E.C.; Marr, J.J.; Berens, R.L.

    1989-06-25

    We have studied the incorporation and interconversion of purines into nucleotides by freshly isolated Toxoplasma gondii. They did not synthesize nucleotides from formate, glycine, or serine. The purine bases hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanine, and adenine were incorporated at 9.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 4.3 pmol/10(7) cells/h, respectively. The purine nucleosides adenosine, inosine, guanosine, and xanthosine were incorporated at 110, 9.0, 2.7, and 0.3 pmol/10(7) cells/h, respectively. Guanine, xanthine, and their respective nucleosides labeled only guanine nucleotides. Inosine, hypoxanthine, and adenine labeled both adenine and guanine nucleotide pools at nearly equal ratios. Adenosine kinase was greater than 10-fold more active than the next most active enzyme in vitro. This is consistent with the metabolic data in vivo. No other nucleoside kinase or phosphotransferase activities were found. Phosphorylase activities were detected for guanosine and inosine; no other cleavage activities were detected. Deaminases were found for adenine and guanine. Phosphoribosyltransferase activities were detected for all four purine nucleobases. Interconversion occurs only in the direction of adenine to guanine nucleotides.

  4. Integrating Genome-Wide Association Study and Brain Expression Data Highlights Cell Adhesion Molecules and Purine Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zimin; Xu, Meiling; Liao, Mingzhi; Jiang, Yongshuai; Jiang, Qinghua; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Ma, Guoda; Wang, Guangyu; Chen, Zugen; Zhao, Bin; Sun, Tiansheng; Li, Keshen; Liu, Guiyou

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used to investigate AD pathogenesis. However, a large proportion of AD heritability has yet to be explained. We previously identified the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) pathway as a consistent signal in two AD GWAS. However, it is unclear whether CAM is present in the Genetic and Environmental Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (GERAD) GWAS and brain expression GWAS. Meanwhile, we think integrating AD GWAS and AD brain expression datasets may provide complementary information to identify important pathways involved in AD. Here, we conducted a systems analysis using (1) KEGG pathways, (2) large-scale AD GWAS from GERAD (n = 11,789), (3) two brain expression GWAS datasets (n = 399) from the AD cerebellum and temporal cortex, and (4) previous results from pathway analysis of AD GWAS. Our results indicate that (1) CAM is a consistent signal in five AD GWAS; (2) CAM is the most significant signal in AD; (3) we confirmed previous AD risk pathways related to immune system and diseases, and cardiovascular disease, etc.; and (4) we highlighted the purine metabolism pathway in AD for the first time. We believe that our results may advance our understanding of AD mechanisms and will be very informative for future genetic studies in AD.

  5. Purines: forgotten mediators in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Edwin K; Boison, Detlev; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the topic of traumatic brain injury has gained attention in both the scientific community and lay press. Similarly, there have been exciting developments on multiple fronts in the area of neurochemistry specifically related to purine biology that are relevant to both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. At the 2105 meeting of the National Neurotrauma Society, a session sponsored by the International Society for Neurochemistry featured three experts in the field of purine biology who discussed new developments that are germane to both the pathomechanisms of secondary injury and development of therapies for traumatic brain injury. This included presentations by Drs. Edwin Jackson on the novel 2',3'-cAMP pathway in neuroprotection, Detlev Boison on adenosine in post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy, and Michael Schwarzschild on the potential of urate to treat central nervous system injury. This mini review summarizes the important findings in these three areas and outlines future directions for the development of new purine-related therapies for traumatic brain injury and other forms of central nervous system injury. In this review, novel therapies based on three emerging areas of adenosine-related pathobiology in traumatic brain injury (TBI) were proposed, namely, therapies targeting 1) the 2',3'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway, 2) adenosine deficiency after TBI, and 3) augmentation of urate after TBI. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Blood purine measurements as a rapid real-time indicator of reversible brain ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Faming; Bibi, Fakhra; Dale, Nicholas; Imray, Christopher H E

    2017-08-12

    To preserve the disequilibrium between ATP and ADP necessary to drive cellular metabolism, enzymatic pathways rapidly convert ADP to adenosine and the downstream purines inosine and hypoxanthine. During ischaemia, these same pathways result in the production of purines. We performed a prospective observational study to test whether purine levels in arterial blood might correlate with brain ischaemia. We made real-time perioperative measurements, via microelectrode biosensors, of the purine levels in untreated arterial blood from 18 patients undergoing regional anaesthetic carotid endarterectomy. Pre-operatively, the median purine level was 2.4 μM (95% CI 1.3-4.0 μM); during the cross-clamp phase, the purines rose to 6.7 μM (95% CI 4.7-11.5 μM) and fell back to 1.9 μM (95% CI 1.4-2.7 μM) in recovery. Three patients became unconscious during carotid clamping, necessitating insertion of a temporary carotid shunt to restore cerebral blood flow. In these, the pre-operative median purine level was 5.4 μM (range 4.7-6.1 μM), on clamping, 9.6 μM (range 9.4-16.1 μM); during shunting, purines fell to below the pre-operative level (1.4 μM, range 0.4-2.9 μM) and in recovery 1.8 μM (range 1.8-2.6 μM). Our results suggest that blood purines may be a sensitive real-time and rapidly produced indicator of brain ischaemia, even when there is no accompanying neurological obtundation.

  7. Advances in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Michio; Peters, Godefridus J

    2016-12-01

    In June, 2015, the Purine and Pyrimidine Society organized the 16th biennial symposium on Purine and Pyrimidine metabolism at the Faculty House of Columbia University, New York City. This exciting meeting focused on these important molecules, new developments in inborn errors of metabolism; therapeutic analogs. In addition, the biochemistry of mammalian and non-mammalian systems were discussed. Due to significant advances in molecular medicine, the boundaries between clinical and basic sciences have merged into exciting translational research, of which a small portion was highlighted in the presymposium.

  8. Potential chemotherapeutic targets in the purine metabolism of parasites.

    PubMed

    el Kouni, Mahmoud H

    2003-09-01

    Parasites are responsible for a wide variety of infectious diseases in human as well as in domestic and wild animals, causing an enormous health and economical blight. Current containment strategies are not entirely successful and parasitic infections are on the rise. In the absence of availability of antiparasitic vaccines, chemotherapy remains the mainstay for the treatment of most parasitic diseases. However, there is an urgent need for new drugs to prevent or combat some major parasitic infections because of lack of a single effective approach for controlling the parasites (e.g., trypanosomiasis) or because some serious parasitic infections developed resistance to presently available drugs (e.g., malaria). The rational design of a drug is usually based on biochemical and physiological differences between pathogens and host. Some of the most striking differences between parasites and their mammalian host are found in purine metabolism. Purine nucleotides can be synthesized by the de novo and/or the so-called "salvage" pathways. Unlike their mammalian host, most parasites studied lack the pathways for de novo purine biosynthesis and rely on the salvage pathways to meet their purine demands. Moreover, because of the great phylogenic separation between the host and the parasite, there are in some cases sufficient distinctions between corresponding enzymes of the purine salvage from the host and the parasite that can be exploited to design specific inhibitors or "subversive substrates" for the parasitic enzymes. Furthermore, the specificities of purine transport, the first step in purine salvage, diverge significantly between parasites and their mammalian host. This review highlights the unique transporters and enzymes responsible for the salvage of purines in parasites that could constitute excellent potential targets for the design of safe and effective antiparasitic drugs.

  9. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  10. Novel developments in metabolic disorders of purine and pyrimidine metabolism and therapeutic applications of their analogs.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosa J; Peters, Godefridus J; Puig, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    The biennial 15th symposium on Purine and Pyrimidine metabolism was held in Madrid, June 2013 (PP13). During the meeting, several novel developments on the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of several inborn errors of purine and pyrimidine metabolism were presented. These ranged from new drugs for gout to enzyme replacement therapies for mitochondrial diseases. A relatively novel aspect in this meeting was the interest in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in nonmammalian systems, such as parasites, mycoplasms, and bacteria. Development of novel analogs for parasite infections, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer were also discussed.

  11. Purine metabolism is dysregulated in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ali-Sisto, Toni; Tolmunen, Tommi; Toffol, Elena; Viinamäki, Heimo; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Valkonen-Korhonen, Minna; Honkalampi, Kirsi; Ruusunen, Anu; Velagapudi, Vidya; Lehto, Soili M

    2016-08-01

    The purine cycle and altered purinergic signaling have been suggested to play a role in major depressive disorder (MDD). Nevertheless, data on this topic are scarce. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that compared with non-depressed controls, MDD patients have distinct purine metabolite profiles. The samples comprised 99 MDD patients and 253 non-depressed controls, aged 20-71 years. Background data were collected with questionnaires. Fasting serum samples were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) to determine seven purine cycle metabolites belonging to the purine cycle. We investigated the levels of these metabolites in three settings: (1) MDD patients vs. non-depressed controls and (2) remitted vs. non-remitted MDD patients, and also (3) within-group changes in metabolite levels during the follow-up period. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking, alcohol use, physical exercise, glycosylated hemoglobin, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lower levels of inosine (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97) and guanosine (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17-0.59), and higher levels of xanthine (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.30-3.75) were associated with MDD vs. the non-depressed group. Levels of several metabolites changed significantly during the follow-up period in the MDD group, but there were no differences between remitted and non-remitted groups. We observed altered purine metabolism in MDD patients compared with non-depressed controls. Furthermore, our observations suggest that circulating xanthine may accumulate in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Purine nucleoside transport and metabolism in isolated rat jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Stow, R A; Bronk, J R

    1993-01-01

    1. The absorption and metabolism of purine nucleosides and their constituent bases has been investigated by perfusion through the lumen of isolated loops of rat jejunum. In control perfusions and those with luminal purines or purine nucleosides, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed uric acid as the only detectable purine in the mucosal epithelial layer and the serosal secretions unless the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol was present. 2. Adenosine (0.5 mM) was quantitatively deaminated to inosine in the lumen after perfusion for 30 min. 3. Luminal inosine and hypoxanthine (0.15-1.0 mM) increased the serosal uric acid concentration significantly (P < 0.001); at 0.5 and 1.0 mM the nucleoside gave a significantly greater (P < 0.01) rate of serosal uric acid appearance than the base. 4. Luminal guanosine (0.05-0.50 mM) and guanine (0.05-0.15 mM) increased the serosal uric acid concentration significantly (P < 0.001); with 0.15 mM nucleoside the serosal uric acid appeared significantly faster (P < 0.01) than it did from the base. 5. Luminal allopurinol (0.3 mM) inhibited xanthine oxidase by 80% and reduced serosal purine appearance significantly (P < 0.01) from luminal guanine, hypoxanthine and inosine. With allopurinol, guanosine (0.1 and 0.15 mM) and inosine (0.1-1.0 mM) gave significantly higher (P < 0.01) total serosal purine concentrations than their respective bases. 6. Inosine and guanosine were cleaved to their respective bases plus ribose phosphate by the action of a cytoplasmic nucleoside phosphorylase, which was found to have widely different Michaelis constants (Km; 318 +/- 45 and 41.4 +/- 3.6 microM for inosine and guanosine, respectively) and maximum velocities (Vmax; 79.3 +/- 4.0 and 20.5 +/- 0.05 mumol min-1 (mg protein)-1 for inosine and guanosine, respectively). 7. We conclude that hypoxanthine and guanine absorbed by rat small intestine are oxidized to uric acid which is released in the serosa. The corresponding nucleosides are

  13. Metabolic Reprogramming During Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jessica L.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-02-27

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over 3 months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6-48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms.

  14. Metabolic Reprogramming during Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over three months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6–48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms. PMID:24586154

  15. Characterizing substrate properties of purine-related compounds with purine metabolism enzymes for enzymatic peak-shift HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Fukuuchi, T; Morimura, A; Kawatani, M; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, N; Kaneko, K

    2014-01-01

    We have extended peak-shift method for measuring purine bases to make it suitable for other purine-related compounds. We optimized the reactions of the purine metabolism enzymes 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) (EC 2.4.2.1), xanthine oxidase (XO) (EC 1.17.3.2), urate hydroxylase (EC 1.7.3.3), adenosine deaminase (ADA) (EC 3.5.4.4), and guanine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.3) by determining their substrate specificity and reaction kinetics. These enzymes eliminate the five purine base peaks (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid) and four nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, inosine, and xanthosine). The bases and nucleosides can be identified and accurately quantified by comparing the chromatograms before and after treatment with the enzymes. Elimination of the individual purine compound peaks was complete in a few minutes. However, when there were multiple substrates, such as for XO, and when the metabolites were purine compounds, such as for PNP and ADA, it took longer to eliminate the peaks. The optimum reaction conditions for the peak-shift assay methods were an assay mixture containing the substrate (10 μL, 0.1 mg/mL), the combined enzyme solution (10 μL each, optimum concentration), and 50 mM sodium phosphate (up to 120 μL, pH 7.4). The mixture was incubated for 60 minutes at 37°C. This method should be suitable for determining the purine content of a variety of samples, without interference from impurities.

  16. The Effects of Azathioprine (Imuran) on Purine Synthesis in Clinical Disorders of Purine Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, William N.; Rosenbloom, Frederick M.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1967-01-01

    Azathioprine, a purine analogue, significantly suppressed the purine synthesis de novo of two gouty patients manifesting overproduction of uric acid, as well as three of four gouty patients who showed normal uric acid production. This suppression is taken as evidence that phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate amidotransferase, the rate-controlling step in purine synthesis de novo, has a normal sensitivity to feedback inhibitors in the patients who responded to the drug. Two children afflicted with the familial disorder of hyperuricemia, choreo-athetosis, and self-mutilation described by Lesch and Nyhan showed no reduction in the activity of the biosynthetic pathway in response to azathioprine. This inability to respond to azathioprine can be directly related to the absence in these patients of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase which is required for conversion of the drug or its metabolites to the biochemically active ribonucleotide form. PMID:16695929

  17. Absorption and intermediary metabolism of purines and pyrimidines in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Stentoft, Charlotte; Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Kristensen, Niels B; Vestergaard, Mogens; Larsen, Mogens

    2015-02-28

    About 20 % of ruminal microbial N in dairy cows derives from purines and pyrimidines; however, their intermediary metabolism and contribution to the overall N metabolism has sparsely been described. In the present study, the postprandial patterns of net portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic metabolism were assessed to evaluate purine and pyrimidine N in dairy cows. Blood was sampled simultaneously from four veins with eight hourly samples from four multi-catheterised Holstein cows. Quantification of twenty purines and pyrimidines was performed with HPLC-MS/MS, and net fluxes were estimated across the PDV, hepatic tissue and total splanchnic tissue (TSP). Concentration differences between veins of fifteen purine and pyrimidine nucleosides (NS), bases (BS) and degradation products (DP) were different from zero (P≤ 0·05), resulting in the net PDV releases of purine NS (0·33-1·3 mmol/h), purine BS (0·0023-0·018 mmol/h), purine DP (7·0-7·8 mmol/h), pyrimidine NS (0·30-2·8 mmol/h) and pyrimidine DP (0·047-0·77 mmol/h). The hepatic removal of purine and pyrimidine was almost equivalent to the net PDV release, resulting in no net TSP release. One exception was uric acid (7·9 mmol/h) from which a large net TSP release originated from the degradation of purine NS and BS. A small net TSP release of the pyrimidine DP β-alanine and β-aminoisobutyric acid (-0·032 to 0·37 mmol/h) demonstrated an outlet of N into the circulating N pool. No effect of time relative to feeding was observed (P>0·05). These data indicate that considerable amounts of N are lost in the dairy cow due to prominent intermediary degradation of purines, but that pyrimidine N is reusable to a larger extent.

  18. Autoimmune dysregulation and purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties.

  19. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  20. Plasticity in the purine-thiamine metabolic network of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Bazurto, Jannell V; Downs, Diana M

    2011-02-01

    In Salmonella enterica, 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) is the precursor of the 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) pyrophosphate moiety of thiamine and the last intermediate in the common HMP/purine biosynthetic pathway. AIR is synthesized de novo via five reactions catalyzed by the purF, -D, -T, -G, and -I gene products. In vivo genetic analysis demonstrated that in the absence of these gene products AIR can be generated if (i) methionine and lysine are in the growth medium, (ii) PurC is functional, and (iii) 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) has accumulated. This study provides evidence that the five steps of the common HMP/purine biosynthetic pathway can be bypassed in the synthesis of AIR and thus demonstrates that thiamine synthesis can be uncoupled from the early purine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria.

  1. Metabolism of purine alkaloids and xanthine in leaves of maté (Ilex paraguariensis).

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuling; Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation and metabolism of purine alkaloids in leaves of maté (Ilex paraguariensis) were investigated. In winter, leaves accumulated caffeine but not theobromine, indicating that caffeine is the end product of purine alkaloid synthesis in maté. To elucidate the purine alkaloid metabolism in maté leaves, the metabolic fate of [8-(14)C]theobromine, [8-(14)C]theophylline, [8-(14)C]caffeine and [8-(14)C] xanthine was investigated in the leaf disks of young and mature leaves. In young maté leaves, significant amounts of theobromine and theophylline were utilized for caffeine biosynthesis, but the conversion was not observed in mature leaves. A small amount of theophylline was converted to theobromine. Practically no caffeine catabolism was detected in maté leaves during a 24 h-incubation. Catabolism of theobromine and theophylline via 3-methylxanthine was observed mainly in mature leaves. Xanthine was catabolised extensively via ureides in both young and mature leaves, but limited amounts are also utilized for the synthesis of theobromine, theophylline and caffeine. Possible pathways for the metabolism of purine alkaloids in maté leaves are discussed.

  2. Metabolic Engineering of the Purine Pathway for Riboflavin Production in Ashbya gossypii†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A.; Pompejus, Markus; Revuelta, José L.

    2005-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are essential precursors for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and the biosynthesis of several amino acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. GTP is the immediate precursor for riboflavin biosynthesis, and its formation through the purine pathway is subject to several regulatory mechanisms in different steps. Extracellular purines repress the transcription of most genes required for de novo ATP and GTP synthesis. Additionally, three enzymes of the pathway, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and IMP dehydrogenase, are subject to feedback inhibition by their end products. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of the committed step in the purine pathway of the riboflavin overproducer Ashbya gossypii. We report that phosphoribosylamine biosynthesis in A. gossypii is negatively regulated at the transcriptional level by extracellular adenine. Furthermore, we show that ATP and GTP exert a strong inhibitory effect on the PRPP amidotransferase from A. gossypii. We constitutively overexpressed the AgADE4 gene encoding PRPP amidotransferase in A. gossypii, thereby abolishing the adenine-mediated transcriptional repression. In addition, we replaced the corresponding residues (aspartic acid310, lysine333, and alanine417) that have been described to be important for PRPP amidotransferase feedback inhibition in other organisms by site-directed mutagenesis. With these manipulations, we managed to enhance metabolic flow through the purine pathway and to increase the production of riboflavin in the triple mutant strain 10-fold (228 mg/liter). PMID:16204483

  3. [Metformin impact on purine metabolism in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shatova, O P; Butenko, Eu V; Khomutov, Eu V; Kaplun, D S; Sedakov, I Eu; Zinkovych, I I

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of metformin in oncology practice. However, the mechanisms of implementation of the anti-tumor effect of this drug there is still need understanding. In this study we have investigated the effect of metformin on the activity of adenosine deaminase and respectively adenosinergic immunosuppression in tumors and their microenvironment. The material of the study was taken during surgery of breast cacer patients receiveing metformin, and also patients which did not take this drug. The adenosine deaminase activity and substrate (adenosine) and products (inosine, hypoxanthine) concentrations were determined by HPLC. Results of this study suggest that metformin significantly alters catabolism of purine nucleotides in the node breast adenocarcinoma tisue. However, the metformin-induced increase in the adenosine deaminase activity is not sufficient to reduce the level of adenosine in cancer tissue. Thus, in metformin treated patients the adenosine concentration remained unchanged, and inosine and hypoxanthine concentration significantly increased.

  4. The purine metabolite allantoin enhances abiotic stress tolerance through synergistic activation of abscisic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Mayumi; Hakomori, Yuki; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2014-04-01

    Purine catabolism is regarded as a housekeeping function that remobilizes nitrogen for plant growth and development. However, emerging evidence suggests that certain purine metabolites might contribute to stress protection of plants. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, the intermediary metabolite allantoin plays a role in abiotic stress tolerance via activation of abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism. The aln loss-of-function of ALN, encoding allantoinase, results in increased allantoin accumulation, genome-wide up-regulation of stress-related genes and enhanced tolerance to drought-shock and osmotic stress in aln mutant seedlings. This phenotype is not caused by a general response to purine catabolism inhibition, but rather results from a specific effect of allantoin. Allantoin activates ABA production both through increased transcription of NCED3, encoding a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, and through post-translational activation via high-molecular-weight complex formation of BG1, a β-glucosidase hydrolysing glucose-conjugated ABA. Exogenous application of allantoin to wild-type plants also activates the two ABA-producing pathways that lead to ABA accumulation and stress-responsive gene expression, but this effect is abrogated in ABA-deficient and BG1-knockout mutants. We propose that purine catabolism functions not only in nitrogen metabolism, but also in stress tolerance by influencing ABA production, which is mediated by the possible regulatory action of allantoin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  6. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  7. Normalizing dysfunctional purine metabolism accelerates diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Andrew L; Lalezarzadeh, Frank D; Soares, Marc A; Saadeh, Pierre B; Ceradini, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic patients exhibit dysfunction of the normal wound healing process, leading to local ischemia by vascular occlusive disease as well as sustained increases in the proinflammatory cytokines and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Of the many sources of ROS, the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) has been linked to overproduction of ROS in diabetic environment, and studies have shown that treatment with XO inhibitors decreases XO overactivity and XO-generated ROS. This study evaluates the role of XO in the diabetic wound and the impact of specifically inhibiting its activity on wound healing. Treatment of diabetic wounds with siXDH (xanthine dehydrogenase siRNA) decreased XDH mRNA expression by 51.6%, XO activity by 35.9%, ROS levels by 78.1%, pathologic wound burden by 31.5%, and accelerated wound healing by 7 days (23.3%). Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that increased XO activity in wild-type wound may be due to XDH to XO conversion and/or XO phosphorylation, but not to gene transcription, whereas increased XO activity in diabetic wounds may also be from gene transcription. These results suggest that XO may be responsible for large proportion of elevated oxidative stress in the diabetic wound environment and that normalizing the metabolic activity of XO using targeted delivery of siXDH may decrease overproduction of ROS and accelerate wound healing in diabetic patients. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  8. [Fitness by cold stimulation of various intensity: effects on metabolism of purines and free radicals].

    PubMed

    Brenke, R; Siems, W; Maass, R

    1994-01-01

    Whole-body cold stimuli lead to a dosage-depended decrease of uric acid level in blood plasma. This could be observed in own studies on winter-swimming and cold shower application and in studies on patients treated by cold-chamber-therapy. This uric acid decrease is due to an accelerated oxygen radical formation during cold exposition rather than to an inhibition of purine metabolism. The acute oxidative loading due to cold exposure and the long-term antioxidative adaptation may be interpreted as a new molecular mechanism resulting in body hardening.

  9. An expanding role for purine uptake permease-like transporters in plant secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jelesko, John G.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP) transporter family was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs). The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely derived from a pre-existing nucleotide-sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways. PMID:22639664

  10. Structural Phylogenomics Reveals Gradual Evolutionary Replacement of Abiotic Chemistries by Protein Enzymes in Purine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Kelsey; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The origin of metabolism has been linked to abiotic chemistries that existed in our planet at the beginning of life. While plausible chemical pathways have been proposed, including the synthesis of nucleobases, ribose and ribonucleotides, the cooption of these reactions by modern enzymes remains shrouded in mystery. Here we study the emergence of purine metabolism. The ages of protein domains derived from a census of fold family structure in hundreds of genomes were mapped onto enzymes in metabolic diagrams. We find that the origin of the nucleotide interconversion pathway benefited most parsimoniously from the prebiotic formation of adenine nucleosides. In turn, pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, catabolism and salvage originated ∼300 million years later by concerted enzymatic recruitments and gradual replacement of abiotic chemistries. Remarkably, this process led to the emergence of the fully enzymatic biosynthetic pathway ∼3 billion years ago, concurrently with the appearance of a functional ribosome. The simultaneous appearance of purine biosynthesis and the ribosome probably fulfilled the expanding matter-energy and processing needs of genomic information. PMID:23516625

  11. Validation and steady-state analysis of a power-law model of purine metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Sorribas, A; Cascante, M

    1997-01-01

    The paper introduces a model of human purine metabolism in situ. Chosen from among several alternative system descriptions, the model is formulated as a Generalized Mass Action system within Biochemical Systems Theory and validated with analyses of steady-state and dynamic characteristics. Eigenvalue and sensitivity analyses indicate that the model has a stable and robust steady-state. The model quite accurately reproduces numerous biochemical and clinical observations in healthy subjects as well as in patients with disorders of purine metabolism. These results suggest that the model can be used to assess biochemical and clinical aspects of human purine metabolism. It provides a means of exploring effects of enzyme deficiencies and is a potential tool for identifying steps of the pathway that could be the target of therapeutical intervention. Numerous quantitative comparisons with data are given. The model can be used for biomathematical exploration of relationships between enzymic deficiencies and clinically manifested diseases. PMID:9210399

  12. An Ancient Riboswitch Class in Bacteria Regulates Purine Biosynthesis and One-carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter B.; Nelson, James W.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Over thirty years ago, ZTP (5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate), a modified purine biosynthetic intermediate, was proposed to signal 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10f-THF) deficiency in bacteria. However, the mechanisms by which this putative alarmone or its precursor ZMP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, also known as AICAR) brings about any metabolic changes remain unexplained. Herein we report the existence of a widespread riboswitch class that is most commonly associated with genes related to de novo purine biosynthesis and one carbon metabolism. Biochemical data confirms that members of this riboswitch class selectively bind ZMP and ZTP with nanomolar affinity, while strongly rejecting numerous natural analogs. Indeed, increases in the ZMP/ZTP pool, caused by folate stress in bacterial cells, trigger changes in the expression of a reporter gene fused to representative ZTP riboswitches in vivo. The wide distribution of this riboswitch class suggests that ZMP/ZTP signaling is important for species in numerous bacterial lineages. PMID:25616067

  13. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Rebecca; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus. PMID:27025643

  14. Comparison of human erythrocyte purine nucleotide metabolism and blood purine and pyrimidine degradation product concentrations before and after acute exercise in trained and sedentary subjects.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Wioleta; Suska, M; Lubkowska, A; Jakubowska, K; Olszewska, M; Safranow, K; Chlubek, D

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed at evaluating the concentration of erythrocyte purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP) in trained and sedentary subjects before and after maximal physical exercise together with measuring the activity of purine metabolism enzymes as well as the concentration of purine (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid) and pyrimidine (uridine) degradation products in blood. The study included 15 male elite rowers [mean age 24.3 ± 2.56 years; maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 52.8 ± 4.54 mL/kg/min; endurance and strength training 8.2 ± 0.33 h per week for 6.4 ± 2.52 years] and 15 sedentary control subjects (mean age 23.1 ± 3.41 years; VO2max 43.2 ± 5.20 mL/kg/min). Progressive incremental exercise testing until refusal to continue exercising was conducted on a bicycle ergometer. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP and the activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (PRPP-S) were determined in erythrocytes. The concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and uridine were determined in the whole blood before exercise, after exercise, and 30 min after exercise testing. The study demonstrated a significantly higher concentration of ATP in the erythrocytes of trained subjects which, in part, may be explained by higher metabolic activity on the purine re-synthesis pathway (significantly higher PRPP-S, APRT and HGPRT activities). The ATP concentration, just as the ATP/ADP ratio, as well as an exercise-induced increase in this ratio, correlates with the VO2max level in these subjects which allows them to be considered as the important factors characterising physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Maximal physical exercise in the group of trained subjects results not only in a lower post-exercise increase in the concentration of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid but also in that of uridine. This indicates the possibility of

  15. Metabolic drift in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Stauch, Kelly L.; Petrascheck, Michael; Benton, H. Paul; Epstein, Adrian A.; Fang, Mingliang; Gorantla, Santhi; Tran, Minerva; Hoang, Linh; Kurczy, Michael E.; Boska, Michael D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Fox, Howard S.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Brain function is highly dependent upon controlled energy metabolism whose loss heralds cognitive impairments. This is particularly notable in the aged individuals and in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, how metabolic homeostasis is disrupted in the aging brain is still poorly understood. Here we performed global, metabolomic and proteomic analyses across different anatomical regions of mouse brain at different stages of its adult lifespan. Interestingly, while severe proteomic imbalance was absent, global-untargeted metabolomics revealed an energy metabolic drift or significant imbalance in core metabolite levels in aged mouse brains. Metabolic imbalance was characterized by compromised cellular energy status (NAD decline, increased AMP/ATP, purine/pyrimidine accumulation) and significantly altered oxidative phosphorylation and nucleotide biosynthesis and degradation. The central energy metabolic drift suggests a failure of the cellular machinery to restore metabostasis (metabolite homeostasis) in the aged brain and therefore an inability to respond properly to external stimuli, likely driving the alterations in signaling activity and thus in neuronal function and communication. PMID:27182841

  16. The Purine-Utilizing Bacterium Clostridium acidurici 9a: A Genome-Guided Metabolic Reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Hartwich, Katrin; Poehlein, Anja; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium acidurici is an anaerobic, homoacetogenic bacterium, which is able to use purines such as uric acid as sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Together with the two other known purinolytic clostridia C. cylindrosporum and C. purinilyticum, C. acidurici serves as a model organism for investigation of purine fermentation. Here, we present the first complete sequence and analysis of a genome derived from a purinolytic Clostridium. The genome of C. acidurici 9a consists of one chromosome (3,105,335 bp) and one small circular plasmid (2,913 bp). The lack of candidate genes encoding glycine reductase indicates that C. acidurici 9a uses the energetically less favorable glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway for glycine degradation. In accordance with the specialized lifestyle and the corresponding narrow substrate spectrum of C. acidurici 9a, the number of genes involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism is significantly lower than in other clostridia such as C. acetobutylicum, C. saccharolyticum, and C. beijerinckii. The only amino acid that can be degraded by C. acidurici is glycine but growth on glycine only occurs in the presence of a fermentable purine. Nevertheless, the addition of glycine resulted in increased transcription levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in the glycine-serine-pyruvate pathway such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase and acetate kinase, whereas the transcription levels of formate dehydrogenase-encoding genes decreased. Sugars could not be utilized by C. acidurici but the full genetic repertoire for glycolysis was detected. In addition, genes encoding enzymes that mediate resistance against several antimicrobials and metals were identified. High resistance of C. acidurici towards bacitracin, acriflavine and azaleucine was experimentally confirmed. PMID:23240052

  17. Altered Mitochondria, Protein Synthesis Machinery, and Purine Metabolism Are Molecular Contributors to the Pathogenesis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Ansoleaga, Belén; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Hernández-Ortega, Karina; Carmona Tech, Margarita; Antonio Del Rio, José; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-06-12

    Neuron loss, synaptic decline, and spongiform change are the hallmarks of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), and may be related to deficiencies in mitochondria, energy metabolism, and protein synthesis. To investigate these relationships, we determined the expression levels of genes encoding subunits of the 5 protein complexes of the electron transport chain, proteins involved in energy metabolism, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins, and enzymes of purine metabolism in frontal cortex samples from 15 cases of sCJD MM1 and age-matched controls. We also assessed the protein expression levels of subunits of the respiratory chain, initiation and elongation translation factors of protein synthesis, and localization of selected mitochondrial components. We identified marked, generalized alterations of mRNA and protein expression of most subunits of all 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in sCJD cases. Expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and purine metabolism were also altered in sCJD. These findings point to altered mRNA and protein expression of components of mitochondria, protein synthesis machinery, and purine metabolism as components of the pathogenesis of CJD. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [THE DIAGNOSTICS OF HEREDITARY DISORDERS OF METABOLISM OF PURINES AND PYRIMIDINES IN CHILDREN USING HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF ELECTRO-SPRAY TANDEM MASS-SPECTROMETRY].

    PubMed

    Mamedov, I S; Zolkina, I V; Sukhorukov, V S

    2015-06-01

    The article presents data concerning new technique of diagnostic of diseases of metabolism of purines and pyrimidines using high performance liquid chromatography combined with electro-spray mass-spectrometry. The procedure of analysis is described in detail: from pre-analytical stage to interpretation of data of liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry, control of quality of data analysis, mass-spectrometry parameters and chromatographic conditions of analysis of purines, pyrimidines and their metabolites. The reference values are presented for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and bases in urine of healthy individuals. The chemical structure of purines, pyrimidines and their metabolites and examples of chromato-mass-spectrograms under various hereditary disorders of metabolism of purines and pyrimidines are presented as well. The article is targeted to pediatricians of all profiles, medical geneticists and physicians of laboratory diagnostic.

  19. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  20. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Susanne; Barduhn, Tobias; Zimmet, Sarah; Volmer, Dietrich A; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2012-10-24

    Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol g(CDW)⁻¹. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol g(CDW)⁻¹). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol g(CDW)⁻¹) derived from IMP degradation. The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization.

  1. Influence of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stathis, C G; Febbraio, M A; Carey, M F; Snow, R J

    1994-04-01

    To examine the effect of sprint training on human skeletal muscle purine nucleotide metabolism, eight active untrained subjects completed a maximal 30-s sprint bout on a cycle ergometer before and after 7 wk of sprint training. Resting muscle ATP and total adenine nucleotide content were reduced (P < 0.05) by 19 and 18%, respectively, after training. Training resulted in a 52% attenuation (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of ATP depletion after exercise and a similar reduction (P < 0.05) in the accumulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate and ammonia. During recovery, muscle inosine 5'-monophosphate (P < 0.05) and inosine (P < 0.01) content were reduced after training, as was the accumulation of inosine (P < 0.05). Plasma ammonia was higher (P < 0.05) after training early in recovery; in contrast, plasma hypoxanthine concentrations were reduced (P < 0.05) during the latter stages of recovery. The attenuated resting ATP and total adenine nucleotide contents after training probably result from the acute effects of prior training sessions. The reduction in the magnitude of ATP depletion during a 30-s sprint bout after training must reflect an improved balance between ATP hydrolysis and resynthesis. It is unclear which mechanism(s) is responsible for the reduction in the magnitude of ATP degradation after training.

  2. Analysis of abnormalities in purine metabolism leading to gout and to neurological dysfunctions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Cascante, M

    1998-01-01

    A modelling approach is used to analyse diseases associated with purine metabolism in man. The specific focus is on deficiencies in two enzymes, hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenylosuccinate lyase. These deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms, including neurological dysfunctions and mental retardation. Although the biochemical mechanisms of dysfunctions associated with adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency are not completely understood, there is at least general agreement in the literature about possible causes. Simulations with our model confirm that accumulation of the two substrates of the enzyme can lead to significant biochemical imbalance. In hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency the biochemical mechanisms associated with neurological dysfunctions are less clear. Model analyses support some old hypotheses but also suggest new indicators for possible causes of neurological dysfunctions associated with this deficiency. Hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is known to cause hyperuricaemia and gout. We compare the relative importance of this deficiency with other known causes of gout in humans. The analysis suggests that defects in the excretion of uric acid are more consequential than defects in uric acid synthesis such as hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:9445373

  3. Short-term effect of caffeine on purine, pyrimidine and pyridine metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei-Wei; Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    As part of our studies on the physiological and ecological function of caffeine, we investigated the effect of exogenously supplied caffeine on purine, pyrimidine and pyridine metabolism in rice seedlings. We examined the effect of 1 mM caffeine on the in situ metabolism of 14C-labelled adenine, guanine, inosine, uridine, uracil, nicotinamide and nicotinic acid. The segments of 4-day-old dark-grown seedlings were incubated with these labelled compounds for 6 h. For purines, the incorporation of radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine and [8-(14)C]guanine into nucleotides was enhanced by caffeine; in contrast, incorporation into CO2 were reduced. The radioactivity in ureides (allantoin and allantoic acid) from [8-(14)C]guanine and [8-(14)C]inosine was increased by caffeine. For pyrimidines, caffeine enhanced the incorporation of radioactivity from [2-(14)C]uridine into nucleotides, which was accompanied by a decrease in pyrimidine catabolism. Such difference was not found in the metabolism of [2-(14)C]uracil. Caffeine did not influence the pyridine metabolism of [carbonyl-14C]- nicotinamide and [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid. The possible control steps of caffeine on nucleotide metabolism in rice are discussed.

  4. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  6. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, John B.; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  7. Extracellular-purine metabolism in blood vessels (part I). Extracellular-purine level in blood of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lecka, Joanna; Molski, Stanislaw; Komoszynski, Michal

    2010-09-01

    Adenosine and adenosine derivatives are the main regulators of purinoceptors (P1 and P2) mediated hemostasis and blood pressure. Since impaired hemostasis and high blood pressure lead to atherosclerosis and to the development of aneurysm, in this study we tested and compared the concentration of extracellular purines (e-purines) in the blood in of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm with that from healthy volunteers. Whereas adenine nucleosides and nucleotides level in human blood plasma was analysed using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), cholesterol concentration was estimated by an enzymatic assay. We did not find any correlation between e-purines concentration and the age of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the sum level of e-purines (ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, and inosine) in the control group did not exceed 70 microM, while it was nearly two-fold higher in the blood of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm, (123 microM). In a special case of people with Leriche Syndrome, a disease characterized by deep atherosclerotic changes, the e-purines level had further increased. Additionally, we also report typical atherosclerotic changes in the aorta using histological assays as well as total cholesterol rise. The significant rise in cholesterol concentration in the blood of the patients with abdominal aortas aneurysm, compared with the control groups, was not unique since 23% of the healthy people also exceeded the normal level of cholesterol. Therefore, our results strongly indicate that the estimation of e-purines concentration in the blood may serve as another indicator of atherosclerosis and warrant further consideration as a futuristic diagnostic tool.

  8. Disturbance of Antioxidant Enzymes and Purine Metabolism in the Ejaculate of Men Living in Disadvantaged Areas of Kyzylorda Region.

    PubMed

    Kislitskaya, Valentihna N; Kenzhin, Zhandos D; Kultanov, Berikbay Zh; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S; Turmuhambetova, Anar A

    2015-09-15

    Objective of the study was to evaluate the state of the main indicators of antioxidant status and enzymes of purine metabolism in the germ cells of men living in the zone of ecological catastrophe Aral Sea region. The criterion for inclusion is the stay of an adult in the Aral Sea area is not less than 5 years, employment in occupations with no more than 2 hazard class. Determination of the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was conducted in semen by the method of Nemechek et al., 1993. Determination of the activity of catalase (CAT) was performed according by the method of Korolyuk et al., 1988. Results of the study indicate a change in the activity of catalase and adenosine deaminase, due to increased levels of oxidative stress and the development of the pathological process. According to the results of study, it was put the influence of negative factors of the Aral Sea region in men's sperm of reproductive age gives to disability free-radical processes, that proves changing of ferments of ant oxidative protection Catalase and adenosine deaminase (ADA). This disturbance in men's sperm of reproductive age leading to increased level of oxidative stress and impaired activity of antioxidant enzymes and purine metabolism, responsible for the abnormal transmembrane and intracellular processes, reflecting the degree of imbalance of enzymes.

  9. Disturbance of Antioxidant Enzymes and Purine Metabolism in the Ejaculate of Men Living in Disadvantaged Areas of Kyzylorda Region

    PubMed Central

    Kislitskaya, Valentihna N.; Kenzhin, Zhandos D.; Kultanov, Berikbay Zh.; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S.; Turmuhambetova, Anar A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Objective of the study was to evaluate the state of the main indicators of antioxidant status and enzymes of purine metabolism in the germ cells of men living in the zone of ecological catastrophe Aral Sea region. METHODS: The criterion for inclusion is the stay of an adult in the Aral Sea area is not less than 5 years, employment in occupations with no more than 2 hazard class. Determination of the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was conducted in semen by the method of Nemechek et al., 1993. Determination of the activity of catalase (CAT) was performed according by the method of Korolyuk et al., 1988. RESULTS: Results of the study indicate a change in the activity of catalase and adenosine deaminase, due to increased levels of oxidative stress and the development of the pathological process. CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of study, it was put the influence of negative factors of the Aral Sea region in men’s sperm of reproductive age gives to disability free-radical processes, that proves changing of ferments of ant oxidative protection Catalase and adenosine deaminase (ADA). This disturbance in men’s sperm of reproductive age leading to increased level of oxidative stress and impaired activity of antioxidant enzymes and purine metabolism, responsible for the abnormal transmembrane and intracellular processes, reflecting the degree of imbalance of enzymes. PMID:27275276

  10. Proline metabolism in N2-fixing root nodules: energy transfer and regulation of purine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, D H; Schubert, K R; Carter, M B; Hagedorn, C H; Shearer, G

    1988-01-01

    N2-fixing root nodules of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) convert atmospheric N2 to ammonia(um) in an energy-intensive enzymatic reaction. These nodules synthesize large quantities of purines because nitrogen fixed by bacteria contained within this tissue is transferred to the shoots in the form of ureides, which are degradation products of purines. In animal systems, it has been proposed that proline biosynthesis by pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) is used to generate the NADP+ required for the synthesis of the purine precursor ribose 5-phosphate. We have examined the levels, properties, and location of P5CR and proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) in soybean nodules. Nodule P5CR was found in the plant cytosol. Its activity was substantially higher than that reported for other animal and plant tissues and is 4-fold higher than in pea (Pisum sativum) nodules (which export amides). The Km for NADPH was lower by a factor of 25 than the Km for NADH, while the Vmax with NADPH was one-third of that with NADH. P5CR activity was diminished by NADP+ but not by proline. These characteristics are consistent with a role for P5CR in supporting nodule purine biosynthesis rather than in producing proline for incorporation into protein. ProDH activity was divided between the bacteroids and plant cytosol, but less than 2% was in the mitochondria-rich fractions. The specific activity of ProDH in soybean nodule bacteroids was comparable to that in rat liver mitochondria. In addition, we propose that some of the proline synthesized in the plant cytosol by P5CR is catabolized within the bacteroids by ProDH and that this represents a novel mechanism for transferring energy from the plant to its endosymbiont. PMID:3353366

  11. Interrogating Metabolism in Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Salzillo, Travis C; Hu, Jingzhe; Nguyen, Linda; Whiting, Nicholas; Lee, Jaehyuk; Weygand, Joseph; Dutta, Prasanta; Pudakalakatti, Shivanand; Millward, Niki Zacharias; Gammon, Seth T; Lang, Frederick F; Heimberger, Amy B; Bhattacharya, Pratip K

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews existing and emerging techniques of interrogating metabolism in brain cancer from well-established proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the promising hyperpolarized metabolic imaging and chemical exchange saturation transfer and emerging techniques of imaging inflammation. Some of these techniques are at an early stage of development and clinical trials are in progress in patients to establish the clinical efficacy. It is likely that in vivo metabolomics and metabolic imaging is the next frontier in brain cancer diagnosis and assessing therapeutic efficacy; with the combined knowledge of genomics and proteomics a complete understanding of tumorigenesis in brain might be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrative Analysis of Circadian Transcriptome and Metabolic Network Reveals the Role of De Novo Purine Synthesis in Circadian Control of Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms. PMID:25714999

  13. Integrative analysis of circadian transcriptome and metabolic network reveals the role of de novo purine synthesis in circadian control of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms.

  14. Contribution of serine, folate and glycine metabolism to the ATP, NADPH and purine requirements of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, P M; Markert, E K; Gounder, M; Lin, H; Dvorzhinski, D; Dolfi, S C; Chan, L L-Y; Qiu, J; DiPaola, R S; Hirshfield, K M; Boros, L G; Bertino, J R; Oltvai, Z N; Vazquez, A

    2013-10-24

    Recent observations on cancer cell metabolism indicate increased serine synthesis from glucose as a marker of poor prognosis. We have predicted that a fraction of the synthesized serine is routed to a pathway for ATP production. The pathway is composed by reactions from serine synthesis, one-carbon (folate) metabolism and the glycine cleavage system (SOG pathway). Here we show that the SOG pathway is upregulated at the level of gene expression in a subset of human tumors and that its level of expression correlates with gene signatures of cell proliferation and Myc target activation. We have also estimated the SOG pathway metabolic flux in the NCI60 tumor-derived cell lines, using previously reported exchange fluxes and a personalized model of cell metabolism. We find that the estimated rates of reactions in the SOG pathway are highly correlated with the proliferation rates of these cell lines. We also observe that the SOG pathway contributes significantly to the energy requirements of biosynthesis, to the NADPH requirement for fatty acid synthesis and to the synthesis of purines. Finally, when the PC-3 prostate cancer cell line is treated with the antifolate methotrexate, we observe a decrease in the ATP levels, AMP kinase activation and a decrease in ribonucleotides and fatty acids synthesized from [1,2-(13)C2]-D-glucose as the single tracer. Taken together our results indicate that the SOG pathway activity increases with the rate of cell proliferation and it contributes to the biosynthetic requirements of purines, ATP and NADPH of cancer cells.

  15. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. PMID:27402852

  16. Trophic effects of purines in neurons and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, M P; Middlemiss, P J; Gysbers, J W; Andrew, C; Herman, M A; Reed, J K; Ciccarelli, R; Di Iorio, P; Caciagli, F

    1999-12-01

    In addition to their well known roles within cells, purine nucleotides such as adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine 5' triphosphate (GTP), nucleosides such as adenosine and guanosine and bases, such as adenine and guanine and their metabolic products xanthine and hypoxanthine are released into the extracellular space where they act as intercellular signaling molecules. In the nervous system they mediate both immediate effects, such as neurotransmission, and trophic effects which induce changes in cell metabolism, structure and function and therefore have a longer time course. Some trophic effects of purines are mediated via purinergic cell surface receptors, whereas others require uptake of purines by the target cells. Purine nucleosides and nucleotides, especially guanosine, ATP and GTP stimulate incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of astrocytes and microglia and concomitant mitosis in vitro. High concentrations of adenosine also induce apoptosis, through both activation of cell-surface A3 receptors and through a mechanism requiring uptake into the cells. Extracellular purines also stimulate the synthesis and release of protein trophic factors by astrocytes, including bFGF (basic fibroblast growth factor), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3, ciliary neurotrophic factor and S-100beta protein. In vivo infusion into brain of adenosine analogs stimulates reactive gliosis. Purine nucleosides and nucleotides also stimulate the differentiation and process outgrowth from various neurons including primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and pheochromocytoma cells. A tonic release of ATP from neurons, its hydrolysis by ecto-nucleotidases and subsequent re-uptake by axons appears crucial for normal axonal growth. Guanosine and GTP, through apparently different mechanisms, are also potent stimulators of axonal growth in vitro. In vivo the extracellular concentration of purines depends on a balance between the release of purines from cells and their re

  17. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Aw, Wanping; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-11-04

    In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid) in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., 421C>A (major) and 376C>T (minor), in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  18. Metabolic management of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael A; Marsh, Jeremy; Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna

    2011-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults. Conventional therapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing long-term management. As primarily a metabolic disease, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy under reduced glucose, malignant brain tumors are strongly dependent on glycolysis for energy. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome and normal mitochondria can effectively transition from one energy state to another. Mutations restrict genomic and metabolic flexibility thus making tumor cells more vulnerable to energy stress than normal cells. We propose an alternative approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and metabolically challenged tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in mice and humans treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are presented for the metabolic management of brain cancer. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Kim, Min Seon

    2016-12-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance.

  20. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance. PMID:28029023

  1. Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency. Functional and metabolic abnormalities associated with disruption of the purine nucleotide cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sabina, R L; Swain, J L; Olanow, C W; Bradley, W G; Fishbein, W N; DiMauro, S; Holmes, E W

    1984-01-01

    To assess the role of the purine nucleotide cycle in human skeletal muscle function, we evaluated 10 patients with AMP deaminase deficiency (myoadenylate deaminase deficiency; MDD). 4 MDD and 19 non-MDD controls participated in an exercise protocol. The latter group was composed of a patient cohort (n = 8) exhibiting a constellation of symptoms similar to those of the MDD patients, i.e., postexertional aches, cramps, and pains; as well as a cohort of normal, unconditioned volunteers (n = 11). The individuals with MDD fatigued after performing only 28% as much work as their non-MDD counterparts. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the four MDD patients and the eight non-MDD patients at rest and following exercise to the point of fatigue. Creatine phosphate content fell to a comparable extent in the MDD (69%) and non-MDD (52%) patients at the onset of fatigue. Following exercise the 34% decrease in ATP content of muscle from the non-MDD subjects was significantly greater than the 6% decrease in ATP noted in muscle from the MDD patients (P = 0.048). Only one of four MDD patients had a measurable drop in ATP compared with seven of eight non-MDD patients. At end-exercise the muscle content of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), a product of AMP deaminase, was 13-fold greater in the non-MDD patients than that observed in the MDD group (P = 0.008). Adenosine content of muscle from the MDD patients increased 16-fold following exercise, while there was only a twofold increase in adenosine content of muscle from the non-MDD patients (P = 0.028). Those non-MDD patients in whom the decrease in ATP content following exercise was measurable exhibited a stoichiometric increase in IMP, and total purine content of the muscle did not change significantly. The one MDD patient in whom the decrease in ATP was measurable, did not exhibit a stoichiometric increase in IMP. Although the adenosine content increased 13-fold in this patient, only 48% of the ATP catabolized could be accounted for

  2. Transcriptional Signature of an Altered Purine Metabolism in the Skeletal Muscle of a Huntington's Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Michal; Smolenski, Ryszard T.; Isalan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (HTT). HD has a peripheral component to its pathology: skeletal muscles are severely affected, leading to atrophy, and malfunction in both pre-clinical and clinical settings. We previously used two symptomatic HD mouse models to demonstrate the impairment of the contractile characteristics of the hind limb muscles, which was accompanied by a significant loss of function of motor units. The mice displayed a significant reduction in muscle force, likely because of deteriorations in energy metabolism, decreased oxidation, and altered purine metabolism. There is growing evidence suggesting that HD-related skeletal muscle malfunction might be partially or completely independent of CNS degeneration. The pathology might arise from mutant HTT within muscle (loss or gain of function). Hence, it is vital to identify novel peripheral biomarkers that will reflect HD skeletal muscle atrophy. These will be important for upcoming clinical trials that may target HD peripherally. In order to identify potential biomarkers that might reflect muscle metabolic changes, we used qPCR to validate key gene transcripts in different skeletal muscle types. Consequently, we report a number of transcript alterations that are linked to HD muscle pathology. PMID:28303108

  3. Effect of ethanol on metabolism of purine bases (hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Moriwaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Sumio

    2005-06-01

    There are many factors that contribute to hyperuricemia, including obesity, insulin resistance, alcohol consumption, diuretic use, hypertension, renal insufficiency, genetic makeup, etc. Of these, alcohol (ethanol) is the most important. Ethanol enhances adenine nucleotide degradation and increases lactic acid level in blood, leading to hyperuricemia. In beer, purines also contribute to an increase in plasma uric acid. Although rare, dehydration and ketoacidosis (due to ethanol ingestion) are associated with the ethanol-induced increase in serum uric acid levels. Ethanol also increases the plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine via the acceleration of adenine nucleotide degradation and a possible weak inhibition of xanthine dehydrogenase activity. Since many factors such as the ALDH2*1 gene and ADH2*2 gene, daily drinking habits, exercise, and dehydration enhance the increase in plasma concentration of uric acid induced by ethanol, it is important to pay attention to these factors, as well as ingested ethanol volume, type of alcoholic beverage, and the administration of anti-hyperuricemic agents, to prevent and treat ethanol-induced hyperuricemia.

  4. Adenylosuccinate Is an Insulin Secretagogue Derived from Glucose-Induced Purine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Jessica R; Jensen, Mette V; Dai, Xiaoqing; Wenner, Brett R; Lu, Danhong; Arumugam, Ramamani; Ferdaoussi, Mourad; MacDonald, Patrick E; Newgard, Christopher B

    2015-10-06

    Pancreatic islet failure, involving loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from islet β cells, heralds the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). To search for mediators of GSIS, we performed metabolomics profiling of the insulinoma cell line 832/13 and uncovered significant glucose-induced changes in purine pathway intermediates, including a decrease in inosine monophosphate (IMP) and an increase in adenylosuccinate (S-AMP), suggesting a regulatory role for the enzyme that links the two metabolites, adenylosuccinate synthase (ADSS). Inhibition of ADSS or a more proximal enzyme in the S-AMP biosynthesis pathway, adenylosuccinate lyase, lowers S-AMP levels and impairs GSIS. Addition of S-AMP to the interior of patch-clamped human β cells amplifies exocytosis, an effect dependent upon expression of sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1). S-AMP also overcomes the defect in glucose-induced exocytosis in β cells from a human donor with T2D. S-AMP is, thus, an insulin secretagogue capable of reversing β cell dysfunction in T2D. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The comparative study digestion and metabolism of nitrogen and purine derivatives in male, Thai, Swamp buffalo and Thai, Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Jetana, Thongsuk; Tasripoo, Kringsak; Vongpipatana, Cheerapath; Kitsamraj, Suriya; Sophon, Sunpeth

    2009-04-01

    Studies on in vivo digestion, rates of passages, metabolism of nitrogen, urinary purine derivative excretion and blood metabolites were carried out in Thai Brahman cattle and Thai swamp buffaloes (16 months old). The animals were fed mixed diets based on pineapple (Ananas comusus) waste silage containing urea-N (NPN) and true protein from a concentrate (TP). The Brahman cattle (310 +/- 15 kg) were heavier than the swamp buffaloes (195 +/- 9.4 kg) and had higher dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) intakes when compared on the basis of their metabolic body weight (BW(0.75)), but these intakes did not differ significantly when the diets of each animal species were compared. The total tract, apparent digestibilities of dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) were not significantly different between the animal species when comparing the two types of diets. The NDF digestibility was significantly (P < 0.01) decreased in both animal species when fed the TP diet, but was significantly (P < 0.01) greater in cattle than in swamp buffaloes. The passage rate digesta k(1) (P < 0.01) and the passage rate digesta k(2) (through the caecum and proximal colon) (P < 0.03) were significantly slower, and the total mean retention time (TMRT) (P < 0.01) was significantly longer in swamp buffaloes when compared to Brahman cattle, but the transit time (TT) showed no difference (P = 0.07) between the animal species or the diets. The N intakes were not different in both animal species and diets, but urine-N was greater (P < 0.05) in Brahman cattle than that in swamp buffaloes. Urine N and digestibility of N were significantly (P < 0.04) higher in animals fed the NPN diet than those fed the TP diet. Urinary purine derivatives (PD) and the creatinine (Cr) excretion of swamp buffaloes were significantly (P < 0.01) lower than those in Brahman cattle. Plasma urea-N (BUN) concentration was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in swamp buffaloes than that in Brahman

  6. Monoamine metabolism in human brain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D S; Sourkes, T L; Nies, A; Harris, L S; Spector, S; Bartlett, D L; Kaye, I S

    1977-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) levels were measured in human brain tissue obtained at autopsy from a series of 39 patients dying of various medical and accidental causes. The nine following brain areas were studied: globus pallidus, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, floor of the fourth ventricle, orbital cortex, caudate nucleus, and mammillary bodies. Enzyme activity correlated positively with age in all brain areas for MAO (with both benzylamine and tryptamine substrates) but no consistent pattern of correlation was found for COMT and TH. Mean MAO activity was significantly higher in women than men. There is increased brain MAO activity during late childhood and adolescence. These data are consistent with previous evidence suggesting that age and sex are important determinants of amine metabolism in the human central nervous system.

  7. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive "tinnitus-causing" network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  8. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F.; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive “tinnitus-causing” network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  9. Deficiency of the purine metabolic gene HPRT dysregulates microRNA-17 family cluster and guanine-based cellular functions: a role for EPAC in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki; Pandori, William; Hrustanovic, Gorjan

    2013-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). A series of motor, cognitive and neurobehavioral anomalies characterize this disease phenotype, which is still poorly understood. The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are believed to be the consequences of deficiencies in neurodevelopmental pathways that lead to disordered brain function. We have used microRNA array and gene ontology analysis to evaluate the gene expression of differentiating HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines. We set out to identify dysregulated genes implicated in purine-based cellular functions. Our approach was based on the premise that HPRT deficiency affects preeminently the expression and the function of purine-based molecular complexes, such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and small GTPases. We found that several microRNAs from the miR-17 family cluster and genes encoding GEF are dysregulated in HPRT deficiency. Most notably, our data show that the expression of the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is blunted in HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines and fibroblast cells from LNS patients, and is altered in the cortex, striatum and midbrain of HPRT knockout mouse. We also show a marked impairment in the activation of small GTPase RAP1 in the HPRT-deficient cells, as well as differences in cytoskeleton dynamics that lead to increased motility for HPRT-deficient neuron-like cell lines relative to control. We propose that the alterations in EPAC/RAP1 signaling and cell migration in HPRT deficiency are crucial for neuro-developmental events that may contribute to the neurological dysfunctions in LNS. PMID:23804752

  10. Deficiency of the purine metabolic gene HPRT dysregulates microRNA-17 family cluster and guanine-based cellular functions: a role for EPAC in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki; Pandori, William; Hrustanovic, Gorjan

    2013-11-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). A series of motor, cognitive and neurobehavioral anomalies characterize this disease phenotype, which is still poorly understood. The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are believed to be the consequences of deficiencies in neurodevelopmental pathways that lead to disordered brain function. We have used microRNA array and gene ontology analysis to evaluate the gene expression of differentiating HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines. We set out to identify dysregulated genes implicated in purine-based cellular functions. Our approach was based on the premise that HPRT deficiency affects preeminently the expression and the function of purine-based molecular complexes, such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and small GTPases. We found that several microRNAs from the miR-17 family cluster and genes encoding GEF are dysregulated in HPRT deficiency. Most notably, our data show that the expression of the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is blunted in HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines and fibroblast cells from LNS patients, and is altered in the cortex, striatum and midbrain of HPRT knockout mouse. We also show a marked impairment in the activation of small GTPase RAP1 in the HPRT-deficient cells, as well as differences in cytoskeleton dynamics that lead to increased motility for HPRT-deficient neuron-like cell lines relative to control. We propose that the alterations in EPAC/RAP1 signaling and cell migration in HPRT deficiency are crucial for neuro-developmental events that may contribute to the neurological dysfunctions in LNS.

  11. Technical note: fatty acids and purine profile of cecum and colon bacteria as indicators of equine microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Santos, A S; Jerónimo, E; Ferreira, L M; Rodrigues, M A M; Bessa, R J B

    2013-04-01

    The potential use of odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFA) and purine bases (PB) as microbial markers in the equine hindgut was studied. For this purpose, feed particles adherent bacteria [solid associated bacteria (SAB)] and planktonic bacteria [liquid associated bacteria (PAB)] were isolated from total cecum and colon contents of 8 healthy, crossbred horses (9 ± 3 yr). Horses were fasted for 12 to 15 h before slaughter, and the cecum and colon were identified and clamped in their extremities to avoid mixing of digesta contents. The total cecum or colon contents was collected into thermal containers previously filled with CO2, immediately transported to the laboratory, and subjected to separation of solid and liquid phases to obtain bacterial PAB and SAB pellets from each horse. Overall differences observed were mainly between site of bacterial collection (cecum vs. colon) rather than between type of bacterial population (PAB vs. SAB). Cecal bacteria fraction had greater (P < 0.05) OM, PB, and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA):odd-chain fatty acids (OFA) ratio but less (P < 0.05) BCFA, OFA, BCFA:PB ratio, and adenine:guanine ratio than colon bacterial biomass. Results indicated that the composition of cecal and colon bacteria is very different from that of similar ecosystems (e.g., rumen). These differences can be a reflection of different growth stages or nutrition of particular populations as well as different bacterial metabolic activities. Results presented herein provide evidence that PB and fatty acids can be used as microbial markers in equine studies.

  12. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-05-17

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour.

  13. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  14. Ibogaine affects brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paskulin, Roman; Jamnik, Polona; Zivin, Marko; Raspor, Peter; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-12-15

    Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid present in the root of the plant Tabernanthe iboga. It is known to attenuate abstinence syndrome in animal models of drug addiction. Since the anti-addiction effect lasts longer than the presence of ibogaine in the body, some profound metabolic changes are expected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ibogaine on protein expression in rat brains. Rats were treated with ibogaine at 20 mg/kg body weight i.p. and subsequently examined at 24 and 72 h. Proteins were extracted from whole brain and separated by two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis. Individual proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Enzymes of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle namely glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase A, pyruvate kinase and malate dehydrogenase were induced. The results suggest that the remedial effect of ibogaine could be mediated by the change in energy availability. Since energy dissipating detoxification and reversion of tolerance to different drugs of abuse requires underlying functional and structural changes in the cell, higher metabolic turnover would be favourable. Understanding the pharmacodynamics of anti-addiction drugs highlights the subcellular aspects of addiction diseases, in addition to neurological and psychological perspectives.

  15. Purines regulate adult brain subventricular zone cell functions: contribution of reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Boccazzi, Marta; Rolando, Chiara; Abbracchio, Maria P; Buffo, Annalisa; Ceruti, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Brain injuries modulate activation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult brain. In pathological conditions, the concentrations of extracellular nucleotides (eNTs) raise several folds, contribute to reactive gliosis, and possibly directly affect subventricular zone (SVZ) cell functioning. Among eNTs and derived metabolites, the P2Y1 receptor agonist ADP strongly promotes astrogliosis and might also influence SVZ progenitor activity. Here, we tested the ability of the stable P2Y1 agonist adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPβS) to control adult NSC functions both in vitro and in vivo, with a focus on the possible effects exerted by reactive astrocytes. In the absence of growth factors, ADPβS promoted proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors. Moreover, ADPβS-activated astrocytes markedly changed the pattern of released cytokines and chemokines, and strongly modulated neurosphere-forming capacity of SVZ progenitors. Notably, a significant enhancement in proliferation was observed when SVZ cells, initially grown in the supernatant of astrocytes exposed to ADPβS, were shifted to normal medium. In vivo, ADPβS administration in the lateral ventricle of adult mice by osmotic minipumps caused diffused reactive astrogliosis, and a strong response of SVZ progenitors. Indeed, proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive NSCs increased and led to a significant expansion of SVZ transit-amplifying progenitors and neuroblasts. Lineage tracing experiments performed in the GLAST::CreERT2;Rosa-YFP transgenic mice further demonstrated that ADPβS promoted proliferation of glutamate/aspartate transporter-positive progenitors and sustained their progression toward the generation of rapidly dividing progenitors. Altogether, our results show that the purinergic system crucially affects SVZ progenitor activities both directly and through the involvement of reactive astrocytes.

  16. The Purine Salvage Pathway and the Restoration of Cerebral ATP: Implications for Brain Slice Physiology and Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2017-08-24

    Brain slices have been the workhorse for many neuroscience labs since the pioneering work of Henry McIlwain in the 1950s. Their utility is undisputed and their acceptance as appropriate models for the central nervous system is widespread, if not universal. However, the skeleton in the closet is that ATP levels in brain slices are lower than those found in vivo, which may have important implications for cellular physiology and plasticity. Far from this being a disadvantage, the ATP-impoverished slice can serve as a useful and experimentally-tractable surrogate for the injured brain, which experiences similar depletion of cellular ATP. We have shown that the restoration of cellular ATP in brain slices to in vivo values is possible with a simple combination of D-ribose and adenine (RibAde), two substrates for ATP synthesis. Restoration of ATP in slices to physiological levels has implications for synaptic transmission and plasticity, whilst in the injured brain in vivo RibAde shows encouraging positive results. Given that ribose, adenine, and a third compound, allopurinol, are all separately in use in man, their combined application after acute brain injury, in accelerating ATP synthesis and increasing the reservoir of the neuroprotective metabolite, adenosine, may help reduce the morbidity associated with stroke and traumatic brain injury.

  17. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and some cognitive deficits typical of the old age. The brain contains large amount of cholesterol, but the cholesterol metabolism and its complex homeostasis regulation are currently poorly understood. This review will seek to integrate current knowledge about the brain cholesterol metabolism with molecular mechanisms.

  18. Influence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Casali, Emerson A; Silveira, Stephanie S; Moritz, Cesar E J; Camillo, Giovana; Flores, Mariana M; Fighera, Rafael; Thomé, Gustavo R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rue, Mario De La; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice (BALB/c) experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii. In experiment I (n=24) the mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii, while in experiment II (n=36) they were infected with strain ME-49 of T. gondii. Our results showed that, for RH strain (acute phase), an increase in both periods in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine (only on day 6 PI) and uric acid (only on day 6 PI). By the other hand, the RH strain led, on days 4 and 6 PI, to a reduction in the concentration of inosine. ME-49, a cystogenic strain, showed some differences in acute and chronic phase, since on day 6 PI the levels of ATP and ADP were increased, while on day 30 these same nucleotides were reduced. On day 60 PI, ME-49 induced a reduction in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and xanthine, while uric acid was increased. A decrease of E-ADA activity was observed in brain on days 4 and 6 PI (RH), and 30 PI (ME-49); however on day 60 PI E-ADA activity was increased for infection by ME-49 strain. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that infection with T. gondii changes the purine levels and the activity of E-ADA in brain, which may be associated with neurological signs commonly observed in this disease.

  19. [Genetic control of metabolism of mutagenic purine base analogs 6-hydroxylaminopurine and 2-amino-6-hydroxylaminopurine in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Stepchenkova, E I; Koz'min, S G; Alenin, V V; Pavlov, Iu I

    2009-04-01

    The influence of inactivation of genes, which control biosynthesis of inosine monophosphate (IMP) de novo and the purine utilization and interconversion pathway, on sensitivity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to the mutagenic and toxic action of 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP) and 2-amino-6-hydroxylaminopurine (AHA) was studied. It was shown that the manifestation of HAP and AHA mutagenic properties involves the action of enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase encoded in yeast by APT1 gene. A blockade of each stage of IMP biosynthesis, with the exception of the block mediated by inactivation of genes ADE16 and ADE17 leading to the accumulation of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR), was shown to enhance yeast cell sensitivity to the HAP mutagenic effect; however, it does not affect the sensitivity to AHA. A blockade of conversion of IMP into adenosine monophosphate (AMP) causes hypersensitivity of yeast cells to the mutagenic action of HAP and to the toxic effect of HAP, AHA, and hypoxanthine. It is fully probable that this enhancement of sensitivity to HAP and AHA is conditioned by changes in the pool of purines. This indicates that genes ADE12, ADE13, AAH1, and HAM1 controlling processes of purine utilization and interconversion in yeast make the greatest contribution to the system of protection against the toxic and mutagenic action of the examined analogs. Possible mechanisms of HAP detoxication in bacteria, yeast, and humans are considered.

  20. Insulin action in brain regulates systemic metabolism and brain function.

    PubMed

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A; Cai, Weikang; Kahn, C Ronald

    2014-07-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2008-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the 'post-weaned/adult' brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain's capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation.

  2. Protection of midbrain dopaminergic neurons by the end-product of purine metabolism uric acid: potentiation by low-level depolarization.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Serge; Ponceau, Aurélie; Toulorge, Damien; Martin, Elodie; Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Hirsch, Etienne C; Michel, Patrick P

    2009-05-01

    High plasma levels of the end product of purine metabolism uric acid (UA) predict a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease suggesting that UA may operate as a protective factor for midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Consistent with this view, UA exerted partial but long-term protection in a culture model in which these neurons die spontaneously. The rescued neurons were functional as they accumulated dopamine, efficiently. The use of the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine-123 revealed that UA operated by an antioxidant mechanism. The iron chelating agent desferrioxamine, the H(2)O(2) scavenger enzyme catalase and the inhibitor of lipid peroxidation Trolox mimicked the effects of UA, suggesting that UA neutralized reactive oxygen species produced via a Fenton-type chemical reaction. UA was, however, not significantly accumulated into neurons, which indicates that the antioxidant effect occurred probably extracellularly. Structure - activity relationships among purine derivatives revealed that the antioxidant properties of UA resulted from the presence of a 8-one substituent in its chemical structure. Of interest, the stimulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels by high K(+)-induced depolarization and the ensuing activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 strongly improved the neuroprotective effect of UA whereas the depolarizing signal alone had no effect. In summary, our data indicate that UA may interfere directly with the disease's pathomechanism.

  3. Brain energy metabolism: focus on astrocyte-neuron metabolic cooperation.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Mireille; Allaman, Igor; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2011-12-07

    The energy requirements of the brain are very high, and tight regulatory mechanisms operate to ensure adequate spatial and temporal delivery of energy substrates in register with neuronal activity. Astrocytes-a type of glial cell-have emerged as active players in brain energy delivery, production, utilization, and storage. Our understanding of neuroenergetics is rapidly evolving from a "neurocentric" view to a more integrated picture involving an intense cooperativity between astrocytes and neurons. This review focuses on the cellular aspects of brain energy metabolism, with a particular emphasis on the metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Total purine and purine base content of common foodstuffs for facilitating nutritional therapy for gout and hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Inazawa, Katsunori; Yamaoka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Purines are natural substances found in all of the body's cells and in virtually all foods. In humans, purines are metabolized to uric acid, which serves as an antioxidant and helps to prevent damage caused by active oxygen species. A continuous supply of uric acid is important for protecting human blood vessels. However, frequent and high intake of purine-rich foods reportedly enhances serum uric acid levels, which results in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the daily intake of dietary purines is recommended to be less than 400 mg to prevent gout and hyperuricemia. We have established an HPLC method for purine analysis and determined purines in a total of 270 foodstuffs. A relatively small number of foods contained concentrated amounts of purines. For the most part, purine-rich foods are also energy-rich foods, and include animal meats, fish meats, organs such as the liver and fish milt, and yeast. When the ratio of the four purine bases (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) was compared, two groups of foods were identified: one that contained mainly adenine and guanine and one that contained mainly hypoxanthine. For patients with gout and hyperuricemia, the amount of total purines and the types of purines consumed, particularly hypoxanthine, are important considerations. In this context, the data from our analysis provide a purine content reference, and thereby clinicians and patients could utilize that reference in nutritional therapy for gout and hyperuricemia.

  5. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  6. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  7. Insulin Action in Brain Regulates Systemic Metabolism and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, André; Ferris, Heather A.; Cai, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptors, as well as IGF-1 receptors and their postreceptor signaling partners, are distributed throughout the brain. Insulin acts on these receptors to modulate peripheral metabolism, including regulation of appetite, reproductive function, body temperature, white fat mass, hepatic glucose output, and response to hypoglycemia. Insulin signaling also modulates neurotransmitter channel activity, brain cholesterol synthesis, and mitochondrial function. Disruption of insulin action in the brain leads to impairment of neuronal function and synaptogenesis. In addition, insulin signaling modulates phosphorylation of tau protein, an early component in the development of Alzheimer disease. Thus, alterations in insulin action in the brain can contribute to metabolic syndrome, and the development of mood disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24931034

  8. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  9. Metabolism and functions of copper in brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Mercer, Julian F B; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an important trace element that is required for essential enzymes. However, due to its redox activity, copper can also lead to the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cellular uptake, storage as well as export of copper have to be tightly regulated in order to guarantee sufficient copper supply for the synthesis of copper-containing enzymes but also to prevent copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, copper is of importance for normal development. In addition, both copper deficiency as well as excess of copper can seriously affect brain functions. Therefore, this organ possesses ample mechanisms to regulate its copper metabolism. In brain, astrocytes are considered as important regulators of copper homeostasis. Impairments of homeostatic mechanisms in brain copper metabolism have been associated with neurodegeneration in human disorders such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. This review article will summarize the biological functions of copper in the brain and will describe the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in copper transport, storage and export of brain cells. The role of copper in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis will also be discussed.

  10. Brain amino acid metabolism and ketosis.

    PubMed

    Yudkoff, M; Daikhin, Y; Nissim, I; Lazarow, A; Nissim, I

    2001-10-15

    The relationship between ketosis and brain amino acid metabolism was studied in mice that consumed a ketogenic diet (>90% of calories as lipid). After 3 days on the diet the blood concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 5 mmol/l (control = 0.06-0.1 mmol/l). In forebrain and cerebellum the concentration of 3-OH-butyrate was approximately 10-fold higher than control. Brain [citrate] and [lactate] were greater in the ketotic animals. The concentration of whole brain free coenzyme A was lower in ketotic mice. Brain [aspartate] was reduced in forebrain and cerebellum, but [glutamate] and [glutamine] were unchanged. When [(15)N]leucine was administered to follow N metabolism, this labeled amino acid accumulated to a greater extent in the blood and brain of ketotic mice. Total brain aspartate ((14)N + (15)N) was reduced in the ketotic group. The [(15)N]aspartate/[(15)N]glutamate ratio was lower in ketotic animals, consistent with a shift in the equilibrium of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction away from aspartate. Label in [(15)N]GABA and total [(15)N]GABA was increased in ketotic animals. When the ketotic animals were injected with glucose, there was a partial blunting of ketoacidemia within 40 min as well as an increase of brain [aspartate], which was similar to control. When [U-(13)C(6)]glucose was injected, the (13)C label appeared rapidly in brain lactate and in amino acids. Label in brain [U-(13)C(3)]lactate was greater in the ketotic group. The ratio of brain (13)C-amino acid/(13)C-lactate, which reflects the fraction of amino acid carbon that is derived from glucose, was much lower in ketosis, indicating that another carbon source, i.e., ketone bodies, were precursor to aspartate, glutamate, glutamine and GABA.

  11. Metabolic sensing in brain dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Ivan E; Ren, Xueying; Ferreira, Jozélia G

    2010-01-01

    The gustatory system allows the brain to monitor the presence of chemicals in the oral cavity and initiate appropriate responses of acceptance or rejection. Among such chemicals are the nutrients that must be rapidly recognized and ingested for immediate oxidation or storage. In the periphery, the gustatory system consists of a highly efficient sensing mechanism, where distinct cell types express receptors that bind specifically to chemicals associated with one particular taste quality. These specialized receptors connect to the brain via dedicated pathways, the stimulation of which triggers stereotypic behavioral responses as well as neurotransmitter release in brain reward dopamine systems. However, evidence also exists in favor of the concept that the critical regulators of long-term nutrient choice are physiological processes taking place after ingestion and independently of gustation. We will appraise the hypothesis that organisms can develop preferences for nutrients independently of oral taste stimulation. Of particular interest are recent findings indicating that disrupting nutrient utilization interferes with activity in brain dopamine pathways. These findings establish the metabolic fate of nutrients as previously unanticipated reward signals that regulate the reinforcing value of foods. In particular, it suggests a role for brain dopamine reward systems as metabolic sensors, allowing for signals generated by the metabolic utilization of nutrients to regulate neurotransmitter release and food reinforcement.

  12. A role for adenine nucleotides in the sensing mechanism to purine starvation in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Boitz, Jan M; Koop, Dennis R; Fulwiler, Audrey L; Cassera, Maria Belen; Ullman, Buddy; Carter, Nicola S

    2016-07-01

    Purine salvage by Leishmania is an obligatory nutritional process that impacts both cell viability and growth. Previously, we have demonstrated that the removal of purines in culture provokes significant metabolic changes that enable Leishmania to survive prolonged periods of purine starvation. In order to understand how Leishmania sense and respond to changes in their purine environment, we have exploited several purine pathway mutants, some in which adenine and guanine nucleotide metabolism is uncoupled. While wild type parasites grow in any one of a variety of naturally occurring purines, the proliferation of these purine pathway mutants requires specific types or combinations of exogenous purines. By culturing purine pathway mutants in high levels of extracellular purines that are either permissive or non-permissive for growth and monitoring for previously defined markers of the adaptive response to purine starvation, we determined that adaptation arises from a surveillance of intracellular purine nucleotide pools rather than from a direct sensing of the extracellular purine content of the environment. Specifically, our data suggest that perturbation of intracellular adenine-containing nucleotide pools provides a crucial signal for inducing the metabolic changes necessary for the long-term survival of Leishmania in a purine-scarce environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Metabolism of steroids by human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Weidenfeld, J; Schiller, H

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal steroids or their precursors can be metabolized in the CNS to products with altered hormonal activity. The importance of the intracerebral transformation of steroids has been demonstrated, particularly with regard to neuroendocrine regulation and sexual behavior. These studies were carried out on normal brain tissues, but the ability of neoplastic tissues of CNS origin to metabolize steroids is unknown. We investigated the in vitro metabolism of tritiated pregnenolone, testosterone, and estradiol-17 beta by homogenates of four brain tumors defined as astrocytomas. In three tumors of cortical origin, removed from adult patients, the only enzymic activity found was the conversion of estradiol to estrone. In one tumor of cerebellar origin removed from an 11-year-old boy, the following conversions were found: pregnenolone to progesterone, testosterone to either androstenedione or estradiol, and estradiol to estrone. These results demonstrate that human astrocytomas can transform steroids to compounds with modified hormonal activity. These compounds formed by the tumorous tissue can affect brain function, which may be of clinical significance. Furthermore, these results may add important parameters for biochemical characterization of neoplastic brain tissues.

  14. Brain metabolism and blood flow during aging.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, B

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of cerebral metabolism have suggested that although cerebral blood flow is reduced during rest in the healthy aged brain, there is little or no decline in resting glucose consumption. Intercorrelations between resting regional cerebral rates for glucose (rCMRglc), as determined by positron emission tomography using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose, were shown to provide a measure of the functional associativity of brain regions. Partial correlation coefficients, controlling for whole brain glucose metabolism, were used in the analysis. Dividing the brain into 59 regions, we found, for 40 healthy males (21-83 years in age) in a state of reduced sensory input, that the strongest correlations generally were between bilaterally symmetric brain regions, and that there were many statistically significant correlations (P less than 0.01) among frontal and parietal lobe regions and also among temporal and occipital lobe areas, but few significant correlations between these two domains. The correlation analysis then was applied to two groups (15 healthy males each) of young (20-32 years old) and elderly (64-83 years old) subjects in the same resting state. Compared with the young group, we found that the elderly subjects have fewer statistically significant (P less than 0.01) correlations, with the most noteworthy reductions being between parietal and frontal lobe regions, and among parietal lobe areas. These findings indicated that cerebral functional interactions were reduced in the healthy elderly. The same analysis, applied to 21 mainly mildly-to-moderately impaired presumed Alzheimer subjects (and 21 age-matched controls), revealed fewer significant correlations between homologous brain regions which correspond to metabolic asymmetries linked to neuropsychological deficiencies.

  15. Metabolic profiling of Alzheimer's disease brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Toyo'Oka, Toshimasa

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease and can be definitively diagnosed after death through an examination of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in several brain regions. It is to be expected that changes in the concentration and/or localization of low-molecular-weight molecules are linked to the pathological changes that occur in AD, and determining their identity would provide valuable information regarding AD processes. Here, we propose definitive brain metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. The acquired data were subjected to principal components analysis to differentiate the frontal and parietal lobes of the AD/Control groups. Significant differences in the levels of spermine and spermidine were identified using S-plot, mass spectra, databases and standards. Based on the investigation of the polyamine metabolite pathway, these data establish that the downstream metabolites of ornithine are increased, potentially implicating ornithine decarboxylase activity in AD pathology.

  16. [The influence of some trace elements on bioaccumulation in tissues and bioenergetic metabolism of the edible snail Helix aspersa maxima as determined by HPLC of purine derivatives].

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the bioaccumulation of fluoride and some metals (Cu, Zn, Pb) in tissues of snails under strictly controlled conditions expecting with this approach to verify the hypothesis that snails are suitable for the monitoring of environmental hazards. Additionally, the toxicity of fluorides administered orally on the energy balance of the snail's foot was investigated basing on concentrations of nucleosides, nucleotides and their products measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two parallel snail cultures were started. The effect of dose on tissue levels of fluoride and metals was studied in the first part of the experiment. The second part served to study the effects of fluoride on energy metabolism of foot muscle (Tab. 1). Quantitation of fluoride and metal levels was done in soft tissues (foot, hepatopancreas) and shells of snails. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of purine compounds was performed in slices of foot. Fluoride concentrations in pulverized shells were measured using an ion-selective electrode. Gas chromatography served to determine fluoride concentrations in soft tissues (hepatopancreas and foot). Concentrations of metals were determined spectrophotometrically. Fluoride and metal content was calculated basing on weight of the pulverized sample. Purines were measured in foot muscle slices with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Concentrations were adjusted for protein content of sample. Concentrations of the following nucleosides, nucleotides and their products were determined: ATP, ADP, AMP, Ado (adenosine), GTP, GDP, GMP, Guo (guanosine), Hyp (hypoxanthine), IMP, Ino (inosine), Xan (xanthine), Urd (uridine), UA (uric acid), NAD+, and NADP (Fig. 1.). Statistical analysis was done with non-parametric test of Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient. 1. Accumulation in the shell was significantly increased at the lowest concentration of fluoride

  17. Consequences of Impaired Purine Recycling on the Proteome in a Cellular Model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Duc M.; Hanfelt, John; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of specific pathways of purine metabolism for normal brain function is highlighted by several inherited disorders, such as Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND). In this disorder, deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), causes severe neurological and behavioral abnormalities. Despite many years of research, the mechanisms linking the defect in purine recycling to the neurobehavioral abnormalities remain unclear. In the current studies, an unbiased approach to the identification of potential mechanisms was undertaken by examining changes in protein expression in a model of HGprt deficiency based on the dopaminergic rat PC6-3 line, before and after differentiation with nerve growth factor (NGF). Protein expression profiles of 5 mutant sublines carrying different mutations affecting HGprt enzyme activity were compared to the HGprt-competent parent line using the method of stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of tryptic digests, and subsequent identification of affected biochemical pathways using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional annotation chart analysis. The results demonstrate that HGprt deficiency causes broad changes in protein expression that depend on whether the cells are differentiated or not. Several of the pathways identified reflect predictable consequences of defective purine recycling. Other pathways were not anticipated, disclosing previously unknown connections with purine metabolism and novel insights into the pathogenesis of LND. PMID:25769394

  18. Consequences of impaired purine recycling on the proteome in a cellular model of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    PubMed

    Dammer, Eric B; Göttle, Martin; Duong, Duc M; Hanfelt, John; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Jinnah, H A

    2015-04-01

    The importance of specific pathways of purine metabolism for normal brain function is highlighted by several inherited disorders, such as Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND). In this disorder, deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), causes severe neurological and behavioral abnormalities. Despite many years of research, the mechanisms linking the defect in purine recycling to the neurobehavioral abnormalities remain unclear. In the current studies, an unbiased approach to the identification of potential mechanisms was undertaken by examining changes in protein expression in a model of HGprt deficiency based on the dopaminergic rat PC6-3 line, before and after differentiation with nerve growth factor (NGF). Protein expression profiles of 5 mutant sublines carrying different mutations affecting HGprt enzyme activity were compared to the HGprt-competent parent line using the method of stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of tryptic digests, and subsequent identification of affected biochemical pathways using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional annotation chart analysis. The results demonstrate that HGprt deficiency causes broad changes in protein expression that depend on whether the cells are differentiated or not. Several of the pathways identified reflect predictable consequences of defective purine recycling. Other pathways were not anticipated, disclosing previously unknown connections with purine metabolism and novel insights into the pathogenesis of LND. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  20. Metabolic brain PET pattern underlying hyperkinetic seizures.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Eric; McGonigal, Aileen; Vaugier, Lisa; Mundler, Olivier; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to contribute to the identification of selective brain regions involved in hyperkinetic behaviors. We studied the whole-brain voxel-based interictal metabolic 18FDG-PET pattern of 23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures, in comparison with both 15 healthy subjects similar for age and gender, and 23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures. Patients were in particular similar for the localization of the epileptogenic zone, this having been defined using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) when clinically indicated (15/23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures and 13/23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures). Using conjunction voxel-based analysis, patients with hyperkinetic seizures exhibited significant hypometabolism within bilateral midbrain and the right caudate head, in comparison both to healthy subjects (p<0.05, FDR-corrected for the voxel) and to patients without hyperkinetic seizures (p<0.0167, uncorrected for the voxel). Findings were secondarily confirmed separately in each subgroup of patients with frontal, temporal or posterior epilepsy. These findings argue for a specific subcortical metabolic impairment in patients with hyperkinetic seizures, within brain structures supposed to be involved in the generation of primitive motor programs.

  1. Sirtuins: from metabolic regulation to brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenzhen

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by progressive loss of neurophysiological functions that is often accompanied by age-associated neurodegeneration. Calorie restriction has been linked to extension of lifespan and reduction of the risk of neurodegenerative diseases in experimental model systems. Several signaling pathways have been indicated to underlie the beneficial effects of calorie restriction, among which the sirtuin family has been suggested to play a central role. In mammals, it has been established that sirtuins regulate physiological responses to metabolism and stress, two key factors that affect the process of aging. Sirtuins represent a promising new class of conserved deacetylases that play an important role in regulating metabolism and aging. This review focuses on current understanding of the relation between metabolic pathways involving sirtuins and the brain aging process, with focus on SIRT1 and SIRT3. Identification of therapeutic agents capable of modulating the expression and/or activity of sirtuins is expected to provide promising strategies for ameliorating neurodegeneration. Future investigations regarding the concerted interplay of the different sirtuins will help us understand more about the aging process, and potentially lead to the development of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of age-related neurodegenerative diseases and promotion of successful aging. PMID:23888142

  2. Morphine metabolism, transport and brain disposition.

    PubMed

    De Gregori, Simona; De Gregori, Manuela; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia; Allegri, Massimo; Minella, Cristina; Regazzi, Mario

    2012-03-01

    The chemical structures of morphine and its metabolites are closely related to the clinical effects of drugs (analgesia and side-effects) and to their capability to cross the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). Morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and Morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) are both highly hydrophilic, but only M6G can penetrate the BBB; accordingly, M6G is considered a more attractive analgesic than the parent drug and the M3G. Several hypotheses have been made to explain these differences. In this review we will discuss recent advances in the field, considering brain disposition of M6G, UDP-glucoronosyltransferases (UGT) involved in morphine metabolism, UGT interindividual variability and transport proteins.

  3. Brain Iron Metabolism Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Wang, Jun; Rogers, Jack; Xie, Junxia

    2017-05-01

    Dysfunction of iron metabolism, which includes its uptake, storage, and release, plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Understanding how iron accumulates in the substantia nigra (SN) and why it specifically targets dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is particularly warranted for PD, as this knowledge may provide new therapeutic avenues for a more targeted neurotherapeutic strategy for this disease. In this review, we begin with a brief introduction describing brain iron metabolism and its regulation. We then provide a detailed description of how iron accumulates specifically in the SN and why DAergic neurons are especially vulnerable to iron in PD. Furthermore, we focus on the possible mechanisms involved in iron-induced cell death of DAergic neurons in the SN. Finally, we present evidence in support that iron chelation represents a plausable therapeutic strategy for PD.

  4. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  5. [Determination of purine compounds and purine bases in food].

    PubMed

    Colling, M; Wolfram, G

    1987-10-01

    The total purine content and the content of RNA, DNA, nucleotides, nucleosides and free purine bases has been determined in commercial raw food. After hydrolysing food samples with acid, the total purine content is enzymatically determined as uric acid. For the determination of the nucleic acid content, a method is chosen that allows for the analysis of the composition of nucleic acids. The amount of purine bound in nucleic acids and of purine bound in nucleotides, nucleosides and free bases is very different. The content of nucleic acids is especially high in the innards of veal, pork and beef. In these samples the quantity of purine bound in nucleotides, nucleosides and bases is very small. In trout and herring, however, more purine is bound in RNA and DNA. The same is true of roe, pork and beef muscle. Peas and beans have the lowest total purine content of all the samples examined.

  6. Striatal Neurodevelopment Is Dysregulated in Purine Metabolism Deficiency and Impacts DARPP-32, BDNF/TrkB Expression and Signaling: New Insights on the Molecular and Cellular Basis of Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Barron, Nikki; Pandori, William

    2014-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). This syndrome is characterized by an array of severe neurological impairments that in part originate from striatal dysfunctions. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions remain largely unidentified. In this report, we demonstrate that HPRT-deficiency causes dysregulated expression of key genes essential for striatal patterning, most notably the striatally-enriched transcription factor B-cell leukemia 11b (Bcl11b). The data also reveal that the down-regulated expression of Bcl11b in HPRT-deficient immortalized mouse striatal (STHdh) neural stem cells is accompanied by aberrant expression of some of its transcriptional partners and other striatally-enriched genes, including the gene encoding dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32, (DARPP-32). Furthermore, we demonstrate that components of the BDNF/TrkB signaling, a known activator of DARPP-32 striatal expression and effector of Bcl11b transcriptional activation are markedly increased in HPRT-deficient cells and in the striatum of HPRT knockout mouse. Consequently, the HPRT-deficient cells display superior protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell death upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that the purine metabolic defect caused by HPRT-deficiency, while it may provide neuroprotection to striatal neurons, affects key genes and signaling pathways that may underlie the neuropathogenesis of LNS. PMID:24804781

  7. Striatal neurodevelopment is dysregulated in purine metabolism deficiency and impacts DARPP-32, BDNF/TrkB expression and signaling: new insights on the molecular and cellular basis of Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Barron, Nikki; Pandori, William

    2014-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). This syndrome is characterized by an array of severe neurological impairments that in part originate from striatal dysfunctions. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions remain largely unidentified. In this report, we demonstrate that HPRT-deficiency causes dysregulated expression of key genes essential for striatal patterning, most notably the striatally-enriched transcription factor B-cell leukemia 11b (Bcl11b). The data also reveal that the down-regulated expression of Bcl11b in HPRT-deficient immortalized mouse striatal (STHdh) neural stem cells is accompanied by aberrant expression of some of its transcriptional partners and other striatally-enriched genes, including the gene encoding dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32, (DARPP-32). Furthermore, we demonstrate that components of the BDNF/TrkB signaling, a known activator of DARPP-32 striatal expression and effector of Bcl11b transcriptional activation are markedly increased in HPRT-deficient cells and in the striatum of HPRT knockout mouse. Consequently, the HPRT-deficient cells display superior protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell death upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that the purine metabolic defect caused by HPRT-deficiency, while it may provide neuroprotection to striatal neurons, affects key genes and signaling pathways that may underlie the neuropathogenesis of LNS.

  8. Purine Salvage in Two Halophilic Archaea: Characterization of Salvage Pathways and Isolation of Mutants Resistant to Purine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Nygaard, Per

    1998-01-01

    In exponentially growing cultures of the extreme halophile Halobacterium halobium and the moderate halophile Haloferax volcanii, growth characteristics including intracellular protein levels, RNA content, and nucleotide pool sizes were analyzed. This is the first report on pool sizes of nucleoside triphosphates, NAD, and PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate) in archaea. The presence of a number of salvage and interconversion enzymes was determined by enzymatic assays. The levels varied significantly between the two organisms. The most significant difference was the absence of GMP reductase activity in H. halobium. The metabolism of exogenous purines was investigated in growing cultures. Both purine bases and nucleosides were readily taken up and were incorporated into nucleic acids. Growth of both organisms was affected by a number of inhibitors of nucleotide synthesis. H. volcanii was more sensitive than H. halobium, and purine base analogs were more toxic than nucleoside analogs. Growth of H. volcanii was inhibited by trimethoprim and sulfathiazole, while these compounds had no effect on the growth of H. halobium. Spontaneous mutants resistant to purine analogs were isolated. The most frequent cause of resistance was a defect in purine phosphoribosyltransferase activity coupled with reduced purine uptake. A single phosphoribosyltransferase seemed to convert guanine as well as hypoxanthine to nucleoside monophosphates, and another phosphoribosyltransferase had specificity towards adenine. The differences in the metabolism of purine bases and nucleosides and the sensitivity to purine analogs between the two halobacteria were reflected in differences in purine enzyme levels. Based on our results, we conclude that purine salvage and interconversion pathways differ just as much between the two archaeal species as among archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. PMID:9457844

  9. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-02

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification.

  10. Extracellular purine metabolism in blood vessels (Part II): Activity of ecto-enzymes in blood vessels of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lecka, Joanna; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Molski, Stanislaw; Komoszynski, Michal

    2010-12-01

    Both platelet aggregation and high blood pressure are associated with development of atherosclerosis. Among other factors that modulate platelet aggregation and blood pressure, extracellular purines (e-purines) influence these processes via purinoceptors P1 and P2 for which they are natural ligands. We hypothesized that ecto-enzymes such as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases), adenylate kinase, 5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase that regulate the level of e-purines may be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. The enzymatic assays were performed either on the fragments of human abdominal aortas obtained after death or on abdominal aneurysm samples collected during surgery. The substrates and products such as adenine nucleosides and nucleotides were analyzed using reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Here, we estimated and demonstrated the activities of these ecto-enzymes in the patients with atherosclerosis or atherosclerosis-like diseases such as abdominal aneurysm, myocardial infarction, or Leriche syndrome (LS) with worse thrombosis of extremities. In particular, we noticed reduction in activity of NTPDase1(app), NTPDase2(app), ecto-adenylate kinase( app), and ecto-adenosine deaminase(app); however, ecto-5'-nucleotidase(app) that hydrolyzed e-adenosine monophosphate (e-AMP) into e-adenosine did not show any significant changes. This led us to suggest that alteration of the activity of examined ecto-enzymes is responsible for the development of atherosclerosis or atherosclerosis-like diseases.

  11. Hostility differentiates the brain metabolic effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fallon, James H; Keator, David B; Mbogori, James; Turner, Jessica; Potkin, Steven G

    2004-01-01

    The brain mechanisms underlying the cause of nicotine dependence are unknown, however, hostility traits are associated with increased susceptibility to nicotine dependence. We used FDG PET to measure brain metabolic response to nicotine administered by patch while the subject performed the Bushman aggression task in 86 high- and low-hostility subjects. Low-hostility trait subjects demonstrated no significant change in brain metabolic response to nicotine. In marked contrast, high-hostility non-smokers subjects demonstrated dramatic metabolic changes to low dose (3.5 mg patch) as did high-hostility smokers to high dose nicotine (21 mg patch) throughout the brain bilaterally (p<0.025). Correlational analyses demonstrated greater metabolic changes in response to nicotine in subjects with greatest hostility trait measures. The observed differences were not a consequence of plasma nicotine or cotinine levels. These metabolic changes were not observed when subjects performed a sustained attentional task (continuous performance task; CPT). Behaviorally, high-hostility subjects had higher ratings of anger, impatience, irritability and nervousness, and lower ratings of happiness, relaxation and curiosity than low-hostility subjects. Smokers had significantly greater scores on impatience and restlessness than non-smokers. This PET study demonstrates a conspicuous lack of the brain metabolic response to nicotine in low-hostility non-smokers in contrast to a dramatic brain response to nicotine in high hostility subjects. This biological difference in brain metabolic response to nicotine between high and low hostility trait subjects may explain differences in susceptibility to nicotine dependence.

  12. BRAIN FUEL METABOLISM, AGING AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Cunnane, SC; Nugent, S; Roy, M; Courchesne-Loyer, A; Croteau, E; Tremblay, S; Castellano, A; Pifferi, F; Bocti, C; Paquet, N; Begdouri, H; Bentourkia, M; Turcotte, E; Allard, M; Barberger-Gateau, P; Fulop, T; Rapoport, S

    2012-01-01

    Lower brain glucose metabolism is present before the onset of clinically-measurable cognitive decline in two groups of people at risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - carriers of apoE4, and in those with a maternal family history of AD. Supported by emerging evidence from in vitro and animal studies, these reports suggest that brain hypometabolism may precede and contribute to the neuropathological cascade leading cognitive decline in AD. The reason for brain hypometabolism is unclear but may include defects in glucose transport at the blood-brain barrier, glycolysis, and/or mitochondrial function. Methodological issues presently preclude knowing with certainty whether or not aging in the absence of cognitive impairment is necessarily associated with lower brain glucose metabolism. Nevertheless, aging appears to increase the risk of deteriorating systemic control of glucose utilization which, in turn, may increase the risk of declining brain glucose uptake, at least in some regions. A contributing role of deteriorating glucose availability to or metabolism by the brain in AD does not exclude the opposite effect, i.e. that neurodegenerative processes in AD further decrease brain glucose metabolism because of reduced synaptic functionality and, hence, reduced energy needs, thereby completing a vicious cycle. Strategies to reduce the risk of AD by breaking this cycle should aim to – (i) improve insulin sensitivity by improving systemic glucose utilization, or (ii) bypass deteriorating brain glucose metabolism using approaches that safely induce mild, sustainable ketonemia. PMID:21035308

  13. Purine molecules as hypnogenic factors role of adenosine, ATP, and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Muñoz, M; Salín-Pascual, R

    2010-12-01

    Purines are ubiquitous molecules with important roles in the regulation of metabolic networks and signal transduction events. In the central nervous system, adenosine and ATP modulate the sleep-wake cycle, acting as ligands of specific transmembrane receptors and as allosteric effectors of key intracellular enzymes for brain energy expenditure. Two types of adenosine receptors seem to be relevant to the sleep function, A1 and A2A. Caffeine, an antagonist of adenosine receptors, has been used as a tool in some of the studies reviewed in the present chapter. Possible changes in adenosine functioning due to the aging process have been observed in animal models and abnormalities in the adenosine system could also explain primary insomnia or the reduced amount of delta sleep and increased sensitivity to caffeine in some subjects with sleep deficits. Caffeine is a methylated-derivate of xanthine with profound effects on the onset and quality of sleep episodes. This purine acts principally as an antagonist of the A2A receptors. Adenosine and ATP in the nervous system are the bridge between metabolic activity, recovery function, and purinergic transmission that underlies the daily wake-sleep cycle in mammals. Modulators of purine actions have the potential to alleviate insomnia and other sleep disorders based on their physiopathological role during the sleep process.

  14. Metabolic Flux and Compartmentation Analysis in the Brain In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Bernard; Gruetter, Rolf; Duarte, João M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Through significant developments and progresses in the last two decades, in vivo localized nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) became a method of choice to probe brain metabolic pathways in a non-invasive way. Beside the measurement of the total concentration of more than 20 metabolites, 1H MRS can be used to quantify the dynamics of substrate transport across the blood-brain barrier by varying the plasma substrate level. On the other hand, 13C MRS with the infusion of 13C-enriched substrates enables the characterization of brain oxidative metabolism and neurotransmission by incorporation of 13C in the different carbon positions of amino acid neurotransmitters. The quantitative determination of the biochemical reactions involved in these processes requires the use of appropriate metabolic models, whose level of details is strongly related to the amount of data accessible with in vivo MRS. In the present work, we present the different steps involved in the elaboration of a mathematical model of a given brain metabolic process and its application to the experimental data in order to extract quantitative brain metabolic rates. We review the recent advances in the localized measurement of brain glucose transport and compartmentalized brain energy metabolism, and how these reveal mechanistic details on glial support to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. PMID:24194729

  15. Socially responsive effects of brain oxidative metabolism on aggression

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Rittschof, Clare C.; Massey, Jonathan H.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing high energetic demands, brains do not always use glucose and oxygen in a ratio that produces maximal ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. In some cases glucose consumption exceeds oxygen use despite adequate oxygen availability, a phenomenon known as aerobic glycolysis. Although metabolic plasticity seems essential for normal cognition, studying its functional significance has been challenging because few experimental systems link brain metabolic patterns to distinct behavioral states. Our recent transcriptomic analysis established a correlation between aggression and decreased whole-brain oxidative phosphorylation activity in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), suggesting that brain metabolic plasticity may modulate this naturally occurring behavior. Here we demonstrate that the relationship between brain metabolism and aggression is causal, conserved over evolutionary time, cell type-specific, and modulated by the social environment. Pharmacologically treating honey bees to inhibit complexes I or V in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway resulted in increased aggression. In addition, transgenic RNAi lines and genetic manipulation to knock down gene expression in complex I in fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) neurons resulted in increased aggression, but knockdown in glia had no effect. Finally, honey bee colony-level social manipulations that decrease individual aggression attenuated the effects of oxidative phosphorylation inhibition on aggression, demonstrating a specific effect of the social environment on brain function. Because decreased neuronal oxidative phosphorylation is usually associated with brain disease, these findings provide a powerful context for understanding brain metabolic plasticity and naturally occurring behavioral plasticity. PMID:25092297

  16. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development.

    PubMed

    Kuzawa, Christopher W; Chugani, Harry T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Sherwood, Chet C; Leonard, William R; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-09-09

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain's glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain-body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body's resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate.

  17. A cellular perspective on brain energy metabolism and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, Pierre J; Allaman, Igor

    2015-05-20

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body's energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and point at a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethanol, not metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via specific GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Caroline D.; Davidson, Joanne E.; Maher, Anthony D.; Rowlands, Benjamin D.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Nasrallah, Fatima A.; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we used an indirect approach, measuring the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-13C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and comparing the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-13C]ethanol. Ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) significantly reduced metabolic flux into all measured isotopomers and reduced all metabolic pool sizes. The metabolic profiles of these three concentrations of ethanol were similar and clustered with that of the α4β3δ positive allosteric modulator DS2 (4-Chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2a]-pyridin-3-yl]benzamide). Ethanol at a very low concentration (0.1 mM) produced a metabolic profile which clustered with those from inhibitors of GABA uptake, and ligands showing affinity for α5, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-13C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of 13C from [1,2-13C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabeled ethanol. The reduction in metabolism seen in the presence of ethanol is therefore likely to be due to its actions at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, and not because ethanol is substituting as a substrate or because of the effects of ethanol catabolites acetaldehyde or acetate. We suggest that the stimulatory effects of very low concentrations of ethanol are due to release of GABA via GAT1 and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5-containing, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. PMID:24313287

  19. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  20. Region-specific metabolic alterations in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, but its etiology is still not completely understood. The identification of underlying pathological mechanisms is becoming increasingly important for the discovery of biomarkers and therapies, for which metabolomics presents a great potential. In this work, we studied metabolic alterations in different brain regions of the APP/PS1 mice by using a high-throughput metabolomic approach based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistics showed that metabolomic perturbations are widespread, affecting mainly the hippocampus and the cortex, but are also present in regions not primarily associated with AD such as the striatum, cerebellum and olfactory bulbs. Multiple metabolic pathways could be linked to the development of AD-type disorders in this mouse model, including abnormal purine metabolism, bioenergetic failures, dyshomeostasis of amino acids and disturbances in membrane lipids, among others. Interestingly, region-specific alterations were observed for some of the potential markers identified, associated with abnormal fatty acid composition of phospholipids and sphingomyelins, or differential regulation of neurotransmitter amino acids (e.g. glutamate, glycine, serine, N-acetyl-aspartate), not previously described to our knowledge. Therefore, these findings could provide a new insight into brain pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Chugani, Harry T.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R.; Wildman, Derek E.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Leonard, William R.; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain’s glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain–body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate. PMID:25157149

  2. Metabolic connectomics targeting brain pathology in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Silvia P; Tettamanti, Marco; Sala, Arianna; Presotto, Luca; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cappa, Stefano F; Magnani, Giuseppe; Perani, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies is characterized by α-synuclein accumulation and degeneration of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways. To gain an overview of brain systems affected by neurodegeneration, we characterized the [18F]FDG-PET metabolic connectivity in 42 dementia with Lewy bodies patients, as compared to 42 healthy controls, using sparse inverse covariance estimation method and graph theory. We performed whole-brain and anatomically driven analyses, targeting cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways, and the α-synuclein spreading. The first revealed substantial alterations in connectivity indexes, brain modularity, and hubs configuration. Namely, decreases in local metabolic connectivity within occipital cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, and increases within frontal, temporal, parietal, and basal ganglia regions. There were also long-range disconnections among these brain regions, all supporting a disruption of the functional hierarchy characterizing the normal brain. The anatomically driven analysis revealed alterations within brain structures early affected by α-synuclein pathology, supporting Braak's early pathological staging in dementia with Lewy bodies. The dopaminergic striato-cortical pathway was severely affected, as well as the cholinergic networks, with an extensive decrease in connectivity in Ch1-Ch2, Ch5-Ch6 networks, and the lateral Ch4 capsular network significantly towards the occipital cortex. These altered patterns of metabolic connectivity unveil a new in vivo scenario for dementia with Lewy bodies underlying pathology in terms of changes in whole-brain metabolic connectivity, spreading of α-synuclein, and neurotransmission impairment.

  3. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Physiology and Metabolic Plasticity in Brain Angiogenesis and Blood-Brain Barrier Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Malinovskaya, Natalia A.; Komleva, Yulia K.; Salmin, Vladimir V.; Morgun, Andrey V.; Shuvaev, Anton N.; Panina, Yulia A.; Boitsova, Elizaveta B.; Salmina, Alla B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is a considerable interest to the assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB) development as a part of cerebral angiogenesis developmental program. Embryonic and adult angiogenesis in the brain is governed by the coordinated activity of endothelial progenitor cells, brain microvascular endothelial cells, and non-endothelial cells contributing to the establishment of the BBB (pericytes, astrocytes, neurons). Metabolic and functional plasticity of endothelial progenitor cells controls their timely recruitment, precise homing to the brain microvessels, and efficient support of brain angiogenesis. Deciphering endothelial progenitor cells physiology would provide novel engineering approaches to establish adequate microfluidically-supported BBB models and brain microphysiological systems for translational studies. PMID:27990124

  4. Effects of brain evolution on human nutrition and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Leonard, William R; Snodgrass, J Josh; Robertson, Marcia L

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of large human brain size has had important implications for the nutritional biology of our species. Large brains are energetically expensive, and humans expend a larger proportion of their energy budget on brain metabolism than other primates. The high costs of large human brains are supported, in part, by our energy- and nutrient-rich diets. Among primates, relative brain size is positively correlated with dietary quality, and humans fall at the positive end of this relationship. Consistent with an adaptation to a high-quality diet, humans have relatively small gastrointestinal tracts. In addition, humans are relatively "undermuscled" and "over fat" compared with other primates, features that help to offset the high energy demands of our brains. Paleontological evidence indicates that rapid brain evolution occurred with the emergence of Homo erectus 1.8 million years ago and was associated with important changes in diet, body size, and foraging behavior.

  5. Diet-Induced Metabolic Disturbances As Modulators of Brain Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Nguyen, AnhThao; Liu, Dr Ying; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    A number of metabolic disturbances occur in response to the consumption of a high fat Western diet. Such metabolic disturbances can include the progressive development of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulemia, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Cumulatively, diet-induced disturbance in metabolism are known to promote increased morbidity and negatively impact life expectancy through a variety of mechanisms. While the impact of metabolic disturbances on the hepatic, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems are well established there remains a noticeable void in understanding the basis by which the central nervous system (CNS) becomes altered in response to diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. In particular, it remains to be fully elucidated which established features of diet-induced pathogenesis (observed in non-CNS tissues) are recapitulated in the brain, and identification as to whether the observed changes in the brain are a direct or indirect effect of peripheral metabolic disturbances. This review will focus on each of these key issues and identify some critical experimental questions which remain to be elucidated experimentally, as well as provide an outline of our current understanding for how diet-induced alterations in metabolism may impact the brain during aging and age-related diseases of the nervous system. PMID:18926905

  6. Compact energy metabolism model: brain controlled energy supply.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Britta; Langemann, Dirk; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2010-06-21

    The regulation of the energy metabolism is crucial to ensure the functionality of the entire organism. Deregulations may lead to severe pathologies such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The decisive role of the brain as the active controller and heavy consumer in the complex whole body energy metabolism is the matter of recent research. Latest studies suggest that the brain's energy supply has the highest priority while all organs in the organism compete for the available energy resources. In our novel mathematical model, we address these new findings. We integrate energy fluxes and their control signals such as glucose fluxes, insulin signals as well as the ingestion momentum in our new dynamical system. As a novel characteristic, the hormone insulin is regarded as central feedback signal of the brain. Hereby, our model particularly contains the competition for energy between brain and body periphery. The analytical investigation of the presented dynamical system shows a stable long-term behavior of the entire energy metabolism while short time observations demonstrate the typical oscillating blood glucose variations as a consequence of food intake. Our simulation results demonstrate a realistic behavior even in situations like exercise or exhaustion, and key elements like the brain's preeminence are reflected. The presented dynamical system is a step towards a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus may shed light to defects causing diseases based on deregulations in the energy metabolism. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer: review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Mukherjee, Purna

    2005-10-21

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are often unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration, malignant brain cancer is potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. A radically different approach to brain cancer management is proposed that combines metabolic control analysis with the evolutionarily conserved capacity of normal cells to survive extreme shifts in physiological environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The bioenergetic transition from glucose to ketone bodies metabolically targets brain tumors through integrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. The approach focuses more on the genomic flexibility of normal cells than on the genomic defects of tumor cells and is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with dietary energy restriction and the ketogenic diet.

  8. Reproducibility of regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Overall, J. |

    1996-10-01

    Changes in regional brain glucose metabolism in response to benzodiazepine agonists have been used as indicators of benzodiazepine-GABA receptor function. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of these responses. Sixteen healthy right-handed men underwent scanning with PET and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) twice: before placebo and before lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg). The same double FDG procedure was repeated 6-8 wk later on the men to assess test-retest reproducibility. The regional absolute brain metabolic values obtained during the second evaluation were significantly lower than those obtained from the first evaluation regardless of condition (p {le} 0.001). Lorazepam significantly and consistently decreased both whole-brain metabolism and the magnitude. The regional pattern of the changes were comparable for both studies (12.3% {plus_minus} 6.9% and 13.7% {plus_minus} 7.4%). Lorazepam effects were the largest in the thalamus (22.2% {plus_minus} 8.6% and 22.4% {plus_minus} 6.9%) and occipital cortex (19% {plus_minus} 8.9% and 21.8% {plus_minus} 8.9%). Relative metabolic measures were highly reproducible both for pharmacolgic and replication condition. This study measured the test-retest reproducibility in regional brain metabolic responses, and although the global and regional metabolic values were significantly lower for the repeated evaluation, the response to lorazepam was highly reproducible. 1613 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Devastating metabolic brain disorders of newborns and young infants.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Yoo, So-Young; Eo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders of the brain that manifest in the neonatal or early infantile period are usually associated with acute and severe illness and are thus referred to as devastating metabolic disorders. Most of these disorders may be classified as organic acid disorders, amino acid metabolism disorders, primary lactic acidosis, or fatty acid oxidation disorders. Each disorder has distinctive clinical, biochemical, and radiologic features. Early diagnosis is important both for prompt treatment to prevent death or serious sequelae and for genetic counseling. However, diagnosis is often challenging because many findings overlap and may mimic those of more common neonatal conditions, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and infection. Ultrasonography (US) may be an initial screening method for the neonatal brain, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for evaluating metabolic brain disorders. Although nonspecific imaging findings are common in early-onset metabolic disorders, characteristic patterns of brain involvement have been described for several disorders. In addition, diffusion-weighted images may be used to characterize edema during an acute episode of encephalopathy, and MR spectroscopy depicts changes in metabolites that may help diagnose metabolic disorders and assess response to treatment. Imaging findings, including those of advanced MR imaging techniques, must be closely reviewed. If one of these rare disorders is suspected, the appropriate biochemical test or analysis of the specific gene should be performed to confirm the diagnosis.

  10. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  11. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  12. Facilitating Understanding of the Purine Nucleotide Cycle and the One-Carbon Pool: Part II--Metabolism of the One-Carbon Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

    2005-01-01

    Some metabolic processes such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and lipogenesis are readily understood because they are circumscribed in metabolic pathways that have clearly identifiable beginning points, end products, and other features. Other metabolic pathways that do not appear to be straightforward pose difficulties for students. In part I of…

  13. Facilitating Understanding of the Purine Nucleotide Cycle and the One-Carbon Pool: Part II--Metabolism of the One-Carbon Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arinze, Ifeanyi J.

    2005-01-01

    Some metabolic processes such as glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and lipogenesis are readily understood because they are circumscribed in metabolic pathways that have clearly identifiable beginning points, end products, and other features. Other metabolic pathways that do not appear to be straightforward pose difficulties for students. In part I of…

  14. Patterns of Brain Injury in Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gropman, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Many inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are associated with irreversible brain injury. For many, it is unclear how metabolite intoxication or substrate depletion accounts for the specific neurologic findings observed. IEM-associated brain injury patterns are characterized by whether the process involves gray matter, white matter, or both, and beyond that, whether subcortical or cortical gray matter nuclei are involved. Despite global insults, IEMs may result in selective injury to deep gray matter nuclei or white matter. This manuscript reviews the neuro-imaging patterns of neural injury in selected disorders of metabolism involving small molecule and macromolecular disorders (ie, Phenylketonuria, urea cycle disorders, and maple syrup urine disease) and discusses the contribution of diet and nutrition to the prevention or exacerbation of injury in selected inborn metabolic disorders. Where known, a review of the roles of individual differences in blood–brain permeability and transport mechanisms in the etiology of these disorders will be discussed. PMID:23245553

  15. Purine alkaloids in Paullinia.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Caroline S; Stutz, Michael A; Baumann, Thomas W

    2003-10-01

    Among the few purine alkaloid-containing genera consumed as stimulants, Paullinia is the least investigated with respect to both chemotaxonomy and within-the-plant allocation of caffeine and its allies. Since purine alkaloids (PuA) have been proved to be valuable marker compounds in chemotaxonomy, 34 species of Paullinia and related genera were screened for them, but only one, P. pachycarpa, was positive in addition to the already known P. cupana and P. yoco. The PuA allocation in P. pachycarpa was examined and found to be restricted to theobromine in the stem, leaves and flowers. Moreover, the theobromine concentration in the stem cortex increased significantly towards the base of the plant. Since the stem cortex of P. yoco is traditionally used by the natives of Colombia and Ecuador to prepare a caffeine-rich beverage, we suspected that within the genus Paullinia the PuA are preferentially allocated to the older parts of the stem and not to young shoots like e.g., in the coffee plant (Coffea spp.). Indeed, the axis (greenhouse) of P. cupana (guaraná), known for its caffeine-rich seeds, exhibited a basipetal PuA gradient (0.005-0.145%). Moreover, the analysis of young cortex samples (herbarium) and of one piece of old stem (museum collection) revealed the same for P. yoco, even though we found much less (0.5 vs 2.5%) caffeine in the old cortex as compared to the only two analyses in 1926 of similar material. However, this discrepancy may be explained by the high variability of the PuA pattern we detected among yoco, the diversity of which the Indians take advantage.

  16. Specific regions of the brain are capable of fructose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Sarah A; Zhang, Wanming; Tolan, Dean R

    2017-02-15

    High fructose consumption in the Western diet correlates with disease states such as obesity and metabolic syndrome complications, including type II diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and non-alcoholic fatty acid liver disease. Liver and kidneys are responsible for metabolism of 40-60% of ingested fructose, while the physiological fate of the remaining fructose remains poorly understood. The primary metabolic pathway for fructose includes the fructose-transporting solute-like carrier transport proteins 2a (SLC2a or GLUT), including GLUT5 and GLUT9, ketohexokinase (KHK), and aldolase. Bioinformatic analysis of gene expression encoding these proteins (glut5, glut9, khk, and aldoC, respectively) identifies other organs capable of this fructose metabolism. This analysis predicts brain, lymphoreticular tissue, placenta, and reproductive tissues as possible additional organs for fructose metabolism. While expression of these genes is highest in liver, the brain is predicted to have expression levels of these genes similar to kidney. RNA in situ hybridization of coronal slices of adult mouse brains validate the in silico expression of glut5, glut9, khk, and aldoC, and show expression across many regions of the brain, with the most notable expression in the cerebellum, hippocampus, cortex, and olfactory bulb. Dissected samples of these brain regions show KHK and aldolase enzyme activity 5-10 times the concentration of that in liver. Furthermore, rates of fructose oxidation in these brain regions are 15-150 times that of liver slices, confirming the bioinformatics prediction and in situ hybridization data. This suggests that previously unappreciated regions across the brain can use fructose, in addition to glucose, for energy production.

  17. A delicate balance: Iron metabolism and diseases of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Dominic; Ayton, Scott; Bush, Ashley; Lei, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal within the brain, and is vital for a number of cellular processes including neurotransmitter synthesis, myelination of neurons, and mitochondrial function. Redox cycling between ferrous and ferric iron is utilized in biology for various electron transfer reactions essential to life, yet this same chemistry mediates deleterious reactions with oxygen that induce oxidative stress. Consequently, there is a precise and tightly controlled mechanism to regulate iron in the brain. When iron is dysregulated, both conditions of iron overload and iron deficiencies are harmful to the brain. This review focuses on how iron metabolism is maintained in the brain, and how an alteration to iron and iron metabolism adversely affects neurological function. PMID:23874300

  18. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  19. Brain areas and pathways in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; Serlie, Mireille J; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is the most important source of fuel for the brain and its concentration must be kept within strict boundaries to ensure the organism's optimal fitness. To maintain glucose homeostasis, an optimal balance between glucose uptake and glucose output is required. Besides managing acute changes in plasma glucose concentrations, the brain controls a daily rhythm in glucose concentrations. The various nuclei within the hypothalamus that are involved in the control of both these processes are well known. However, novel studies indicate an additional role for brain areas that are originally appreciated in other processes than glucose metabolism. Therefore, besides the classic hypothalamic pathways, we will review cortico-limbic brain areas and their role in glucose metabolism.

  20. Brain lactate metabolism: the discoveries and the controversies.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-07-01

    Potential roles for lactate in the energetics of brain activation have changed radically during the past three decades, shifting from waste product to supplemental fuel and signaling molecule. Current models for lactate transport and metabolism involving cellular responses to excitatory neurotransmission are highly debated, owing, in part, to discordant results obtained in different experimental systems and conditions. Major conclusions drawn from tabular data summarizing results obtained in many laboratories are as follows: Glutamate-stimulated glycolysis is not an inherent property of all astrocyte cultures. Synaptosomes from the adult brain and many preparations of cultured neurons have high capacities to increase glucose transport, glycolysis, and glucose-supported respiration, and pathway rates are stimulated by glutamate and compounds that enhance metabolic demand. Lactate accumulation in activated tissue is a minor fraction of glucose metabolized and does not reflect pathway fluxes. Brain activation in subjects with low plasma lactate causes outward, brain-to-blood lactate gradients, and lactate is quickly released in substantial amounts. Lactate utilization by the adult brain increases during lactate infusions and strenuous exercise that markedly increase blood lactate levels. Lactate can be an 'opportunistic', glucose-sparing substrate when present in high amounts, but most evidence supports glucose as the major fuel for normal, activated brain.

  1. The metabolic comparison of HPD in normal brain tissue and s180 sarcoma in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Huiguo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: Search The Metabolic Comparision of HPD in Normal Brain Tissue and S180 sarcoma in brain. Methods: Xe laser photoradiation of normal brain tissue and S180 sarcoma in brain to excite fluorescence was performed at different time after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in normal rats and rats with S180 sarcoma of Brain. We analysed HPD fluorescence lifetime imaging (wavelength: 630 nm and 690 nm) of two rat team with OMA. Result: We concluded the peak intensity of HPD fluorescence fell obviously in normal brain three hours later after injection, while it still retained high HPD concentration in sarcoma of Brain. Conclusion: first-rank time the 4~5 hours after injection of HPD is first-rank time 0f PDT and photosensitive diagnose in sarcoma of Brain of rat

  2. Neurosteroid metabolism in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Stoffel-Wagner, B

    2001-12-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge of the biosynthesis of neurosteroids in the human brain, the enzymes mediating these reactions, their localization and the putative effects of neurosteroids. Molecular biological and biochemical studies have now firmly established the presence of the steroidogenic enzymes cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450SCC), aromatase, 5alpha-reductase, 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in human brain. The functions attributed to specific neurosteroids include modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), nicotinic, muscarinic, serotonin (5-HT3), kainate, glycine and sigma receptors, neuroprotection and induction of neurite outgrowth, dendritic spines and synaptogenesis. The first clinical investigations in humans produced evidence for an involvement of neuroactive steroids in conditions such as fatigue during pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome, post partum depression, catamenial epilepsy, depressive disorders and dementia disorders. Better knowledge of the biochemical pathways of neurosteroidogenesis and their actions on the brain seems to open new perspectives in the understanding of the physiology of the human brain as well as in the pharmacological treatment of its disturbances.

  3. Ethanol effects on rat brain phosphoinositide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in acidic phospholipids in brain plasma and synaptic plasma membranes upon chronic ethanol administration was observed. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in an increase in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into the acidic phospholipids in synaptosomes. Postdecapitative ischemic treatment resulted rapid degradation of poly-PI in rat brain. However, there was a rapid appearance of IP{sub 2} in ethanol group which indicated a more rapid turnover of IP{sub 3} in the ethanol-treated rats. Carbachol stimulated accumulation of labeled inositol phosphates in brain slices and synaptosomes. Carbachol-stimulated release of IP and IP{sub 2} was calcium dependent and was inhibited by EGTA and atropine. Adenosine triphosphates and 1 mM further enhanced carbachol-induced formation of IP and IP{sub 2}, but showed an increase and a decrease in IP{sub 3} at 1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Guanosine triphosphate at 0.1 mM did not change in labeled IP, but there was a significant increase in labeled IP{sub 2} and decrease in IP{sub 3}. Mn and CMP greatly enhanced incorporation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol into PI, but not into poly-PI labeling in brain synaptosomes. Incubation of brain synaptosomes resulted in a Ca{sup 2+}, time-dependent release of labeled IP. However, the pool of PI labeled through this pathway is not susceptible to carbachol stimulation. When saponin permeabilized synaptosomal preparations were incubated with ({sup 3}H)-inositol-PI or ({sup 14}C)-arachidonoyl-PI, ATP enhanced the formation of labeled IP and DG.

  4. Metabolism as a tool for understanding human brain evolution: lipid energy metabolism as an example.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Pei; Yang, Hao; Wu, Jiang Wei; Gauthier, Nicolas; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant A

    2014-12-01

    Genes and the environment both influence the metabolic processes that determine fitness. To illustrate the importance of metabolism for human brain evolution and health, we use the example of lipid energy metabolism, i.e. the use of fat (lipid) to produce energy and the advantages that this metabolic pathway provides for the brain during environmental energy shortage. We briefly describe some features of metabolism in ancestral organisms, which provided a molecular toolkit for later development. In modern humans, lipid energy metabolism is a regulated multi-organ pathway that links triglycerides in fat tissue to the mitochondria of many tissues including the brain. Three important control points are each suppressed by insulin. (1) Lipid reserves in adipose tissue are released by lipolysis during fasting and stress, producing fatty acids (FAs) which circulate in the blood and are taken up by cells. (2) FA oxidation. Mitochondrial entry is controlled by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1). Inside the mitochondria, FAs undergo beta oxidation and energy production in the Krebs cycle and respiratory chain. (3) In liver mitochondria, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) pathway produces ketone bodies for the brain and other organs. Unlike most tissues, the brain does not capture and metabolize circulating FAs for energy production. However, the brain can use ketone bodies for energy. We discuss two examples of genetic metabolic traits that may be advantageous under most conditions but deleterious in others. (1) A CPT1A variant prevalent in Inuit people may allow increased FA oxidation under nonfasting conditions but also predispose to hypoglycemic episodes. (2) The thrifty genotype theory, which holds that energy expenditure is efficient so as to maximize energy stores, predicts that these adaptations may enhance survival in periods of famine but predispose to obesity in modern dietary environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipids levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  6. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-04-07

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, but whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help in balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipid levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but also the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting that the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis.

  7. Effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on purine receptor expression in the brain and gliosis in rats tolerant to morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Listos, Joanna; Gutowska, Izabela; Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Maciej; Puchałowicz, Kamila; Prokopowicz, Adam; Talarek, Sylwia; Listos, Piotr; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-01-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on protein and mRNA expression of purine receptors: P2X4, P2X7, adenosine receptor A1; and astrocytes (GFAP mRNA expression) and on microglia activation (Iba1 mRNA expression) in several structures of the mesolimbic system (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex) in rats expressing tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Rat mothers were orally treated with 0.1% lead acetate from conception, through gestation, and postnatally, as well as to offspring up to day (PND) 28; subsequently molecular studies were conducted on adult (PND 60) male rats. Morphine tolerance developed more strongly in rats perinatally exposed to Pb. The analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of protein and mRNA P2X4 receptor expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex but not in the hippocampus; P2X7 protein and mRNA receptor expression in the striatum and hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex; A1 protein receptor expression in all investigated structures and A1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; Iba1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; and GFAP mRNA expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Immunohistochemical analysis has also revealed significant alterations. Strong expressions of P2X4, P2X7, A1 receptors, astrocytes and microglia activation were observed in the hippocampus in Pb and/or morphine treated rats. The higher expression of purine receptors and glial cell activation are important markers of neuroinflammatory processes. Therefore, we conclude that Pb-induced neuroinflammation may be responsible for the intensification of morphine tolerance in the Pb-treated rats. Additionally, the dysregulation of A1 adenosine receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, may also be involved in the intensification of morphine tolerance in Pb-treated rats. Our study demonstrates the significant participation of environmental factors in

  8. Fats for thoughts: An update on brain fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Romano, Adele; Koczwara, Justyna Barbara; Gallelli, Cristina Anna; Vergara, Daniele; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Gaetani, Silvana; Giudetti, Anna Maria

    2017-03-01

    Brain fatty acid (FA) metabolism deserves a close attention not only for its energetic aspects but also because FAs and their metabolites/derivatives are able to influence many neural functions, contributing to brain pathologies or representing potential targets for pharmacological and/or nutritional interventions. Glucose is the preferred energy substrate for the brain, whereas the role of FAs is more marginal. In conditions of decreased glucose supply, ketone bodies, mainly formed by FA oxidation, are the alternative main energy source. Ketogenic diets or medium-chain fatty acid supplementations were shown to produce therapeutic effects in several brain pathologies. Moreover, the positive effects exerted on brain functions by short-chain FAs and the consideration that they can be produced by intestinal flora metabolism contributed to the better understanding of the link between "gut-health" and "brain-health". Finally, attention was paid also to the regulatory role of essential polyunsaturated FAs and their derivatives on brain homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Day-night variations of adenosine and its metabolizing enzymes in the brain cortex of the rat--possible physiological significance for the energetic homeostasis and the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, V; Hernández Múñoz, R; Suárez, J; Vidrio, S; Yáñez, L; Díaz Múñoz, M

    1993-05-28

    The role of adenosine as a metabolic regulator of physiological processes in the brain was studied by measuring its concentrations and the activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes: 5'-nucleotidase, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase in the cerebral cortex of the rat. Other purine compounds, such as, inosine, hypoxanthine and adenine nucleotides were also studied. The purines' pattern was bimodal with high levels of adenosine, inosine and hypoxanthine during the light period reaching their peak at 12.00 h, 08.00 h and 16.00 h, respectively, and small increments during the night between 02.00 h and 04.00 h. The enzymatic activities showed, in general, an unimodal profile with low activity during the day and high activities at night. The adenine nucleotide profile showed a significant diminution between 12.00 h and 24.00 h. The high adenosine level during the day might be due to a diminution of adenine nucleotide and to the low activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes, suggesting an accumulation of the nucleoside. The night increase, although of less magnitude, is simultaneous to high activity of adenosine-metabolizing enzymes and could be due to an increased formation of the nucleoside. The present data and the findings from other authors strongly suggest that adenosine in the brain cortex of the rat can participate at least in two physiological processes: regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and replenishment of the adenine nucleotide pool.

  11. Expensive Brains: "Brainy" Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate.

    PubMed

    Sobrero, Raúl; May-Collado, Laura J; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernández, Cristián E

    2011-01-01

    Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur.

  12. Use of Analogues and the Substrate-Sensitivity of Mutants in Analysis of Purine Uptake and Breakdown in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, A. J.; Scazzocchio, C.

    1967-01-01

    Aspergillus mutants resistant to various purine analogues (purine, 8-azaguanine, 2-thioxanthine, and 2-thiouric acid) are defective in at least one step of purine uptake or breakdown. The properties of these mutants show that there are two uptake systems for purines, one which mediates the uptake of hypoxanthine, guanine, and adenine, and the other, xanthine and uric acid. Allantoinase-less strains are sensitive to the toxic effects of allantoin accumulation. They are severely inhibited when grown in the presence of naturally occurring purines. Mutant strains derived from these, resistant to naturally occurring purines, may be isolated. These are either wild-type revertants, or carry a second metabolic block in the uptake or breakdown of purines. The properties of these double mutants confirm the interpretation of the nature of the analogue-resistant mutants. PMID:6025432

  13. Brain glucose metabolism: Role of Wnt signaling in the metabolic impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Pedro; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2017-06-15

    The brain is an organ that has a high demand for glucose. In the brain, glucose is predominantly used in energy production, with almost 70% of the energy used by neurons. The importance of the energy requirement in neurons is clearly demonstrated by the fact that all neurodegenerative disorders exhibit a critical metabolic impairment that includes decreased glucose uptake/utilization and decreased mitochondrial activity, with a consequent diminution in ATP production. In fact, in Alzheimer's disease, the measurement of the general metabolic rate of the brain has been reported to be an accurate tool for diagnosis. Additionally, the administration of metabolic activators such as insulin/glucagon-like peptide 1 can improve memory/learning performance. Despite the importance of energy metabolism in the brain, little is known about the cellular pathways involved in the regulation of this process. Several reports postulate a role for Wnt signaling as a general metabolic regulator. Thus, in the present review, we discuss the antecedents that support the relationship between Wnt signaling and energy metabolism in the Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers.

  15. Kynurenine pathway metabolism and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, P J; Cryan, J F; Dinan, T G; Clarke, G

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the gut microbiota influences not only gastrointestinal physiology but also central nervous system (CNS) function by modulating signalling pathways of the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning the influence exerted by the gut microbiota on brain function and behaviour has become a key research priority. Microbial regulation of tryptophan metabolism has become a focal point in this regard, with dual emphasis on the regulation of serotonin synthesis and the control of kynurenine pathway metabolism. Here, we focus in detail on the latter pathway and begin by outlining the structural and functional dynamics of the gut microbiota and the signalling pathways of the brain-gut axis. We summarise preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrating that the gut microbiota influences CNS physiology, anxiety, depression, social behaviour, cognition and visceral pain. Pertinent studies are drawn from neurogastroenterology demonstrating the importance of tryptophan and its metabolites in CNS and gastrointestinal function. We outline how kynurenine pathway metabolism may be regulated by microbial control of neuroendocrine function and components of the immune system. Finally, preclinical evidence demonstrating direct and indirect mechanisms by which the gut microbiota can regulate tryptophan availability for kynurenine pathway metabolism, with downstream effects on CNS function, is reviewed. Targeting the gut microbiota represents a tractable target to modulate kynurenine pathway metabolism. Efforts to develop this approach will markedly increase our understanding of how the gut microbiota shapes brain and behaviour and provide new insights towards successful translation of microbiota-gut-brain axis research from bench to bedside. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'.

  16. Purines and neuronal excitability: links to the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Ruskin, D N; Geiger, J D; Boison, D

    2012-07-01

    ATP and adenosine are purines that play dual roles in cell metabolism and neuronal signaling. Acting at the A(1) receptor (A(1)R) subtype, adenosine acts directly on neurons to inhibit excitability and is a powerful endogenous neuroprotective and anticonvulsant molecule. Previous research showed an increase in ATP and other cell energy parameters when an animal is administered a ketogenic diet, an established metabolic therapy to reduce epileptic seizures, but the relationship among purines, neuronal excitability and the ketogenic diet was unclear. Recent work in vivo and in vitro tested the specific hypothesis that adenosine acting at A(1)Rs is a key mechanism underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy and yielded direct evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Specifically, an in vitro mimic of a ketogenic diet revealed an A(1)R-dependent metabolic autocrine hyperpolarization of hippocampal neurons. In parallel, applying the ketogenic diet in vivo to transgenic mouse models with spontaneous electrographic seizures revealed that intact A(1)Rs are necessary for the seizure-suppressing effects of the diet. This is the first direct in vivo evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Other predictions of the relationship between purines and the ketogenic diet are discussed. Taken together, recent research on the role of purines may offer new opportunities for metabolic therapy and insight into its underlying mechanisms.

  17. Purines and Neuronal Excitability: Links to the Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Masino, SA; Kawamura, M; Ruskin, DN; Geiger, JD; Boison, D

    2011-01-01

    ATP and adenosine are purines that play dual roles in cell metabolism and neuronal signaling. Acting at the A1 receptor (A1R) subtype, adenosine acts directly on neurons to inhibit excitability and is a powerful endogenous neuroprotective and anticonvulsant molecule. Previous research showed an increase in ATP and other cell energy parameters when an animal is administered a ketogenic diet, an established metabolic therapy to reduce epileptic seizures, but the relationship among purines, neuronal excitability and the ketogenic diet was unclear. Recent work in vivo and in vitro tested the specific hypothesis that adenosine acting at A1Rs is a key mechanism underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy and yielded direct evidence linking A1Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Specifically, an in vitro mimic of a ketogenic diet revealed an A1R-dependent metabolic autocrine hyperpolarization of hippocampal neurons. In parallel, applying the ketogenic diet in vivo to transgenic mouse models with spontaneous electrographic seizures revealed that intact A1Rs are necessary for the seizure-suppressing effects of the diet. This is the first direct in vivo evidence linking A1Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Other predictions of the relationship between purines and the ketogenic diet are discussed. Taken together, recent research on the role of purines may offer new opportunities for metabolic therapy and insight into its underlying mechanisms. PMID:21880467

  18. Focally perfused succinate potentiates brain metabolism in head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Howe, Duncan J; Shannon, Richard J; Grice, Peter; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Stovell, Matthew G; van der Heide, Susan; Murphy, Michael P; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri Lh

    2016-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, complex cerebral energy perturbations occur. Correlating with unfavourable outcome, high brain extracellular lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests hypoxic metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether focal administration of succinate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate interacting directly with the mitochondrial electron transport chain, could improve cerebral metabolism. Microdialysis perfused disodium 2,3-(13)C2 succinate (12 mmol/L) for 24 h into nine sedated traumatic brain injury patients' brains, with simultaneous microdialysate collection for ISCUS analysis of energy metabolism biomarkers (nine patients) and nuclear magnetic resonance of (13)C-labelled metabolites (six patients). Metabolites 2,3-(13)C2 malate and 2,3-(13)C2 glutamine indicated tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, and 2,3-(13)C2 lactate suggested tricarboxylic acid cycle spinout of pyruvate (by malic enzyme or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate kinase), then lactate dehydrogenase-mediated conversion to lactate. Versus baseline, succinate perfusion significantly decreased lactate/pyruvate ratio (p = 0.015), mean difference -12%, due to increased pyruvate concentration (+17%); lactate changed little (-3%); concentrations decreased for glutamate (-43%) (p = 0.018) and glucose (-15%) (p = 0.038). Lower lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests better redox status: cytosolic NADH recycled to NAD(+) by mitochondrial shuttles (malate-aspartate and/or glycerol 3-phosphate), diminishing lactate dehydrogenase-mediated pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, and lowering glutamate. Glucose decrease suggests improved utilisation. Direct tricarboxylic acid cycle supplementation with 2,3-(13)C2 succinate improved human traumatic brain injury brain chemistry, indicated by biomarkers and (13)C-labelling patterns in metabolites.

  19. Phosphatidylserine in the brain: metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X; Spector, Arthur A

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine, and this reaction is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear.

  20. Brain Hyperglycemia Induced by Heroin: Association with Metabolic Neural Activation.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Bola, R Aaron; Fasulo, Bradley J; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2017-02-15

    Glucose enters the brain extracellular space from arterial blood, and its proper delivery is essential for metabolic activity of brain cells. By using enzyme-based biosensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats, we previously showed that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) display high variability, increasing rapidly following exposure to various arousing stimuli. In this study, the same technology was used to assess NAc glucose fluctuations induced by intravenous heroin. Heroin passively injected at a low dose optimal for maintaining self-administration behavior (100 μg/kg) induces a rapid but moderate glucose rise (∼150-200 μM or ∼15-25% over resting baseline). When the heroin dose was doubled and tripled, the increase became progressively larger in magnitude and longer in duration. Heroin-induced glucose increases also occurred in other brain structures (medial thalamus, lateral striatum, hippocampus), suggesting that brain hyperglycemia is a whole-brain phenomenon but changes were notably distinct in each structure. While local vasodilation appears to be the possible mechanism underlying the rapid rise in extracellular glucose levels, the driving factor for this vasodilation (central vs peripheral) remains to be clarified. The heroin-induced NAc glucose increases positively correlated with increases in intracerebral heat production determined in separate experiments using multisite temperature recordings (NAc, temporal muscle and skin). However, glucose levels rise very rapidly, preceding much slower increases in brain heat production, a measure of metabolic activation associated with glucose consumption.

  1. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  2. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jeffrey K.; Dougherty, George G.; Reddy, Ravinder D.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a biochemically complex disorder characterized by widespread defects in multiple metabolic pathways whose dynamic interactions, until recently, have been difficult to examine. Rather, evidence for these alterations has been collected piecemeal, limiting the potential to inform our understanding of the interactions amongst relevant biochemical pathways. We herein review perturbations in purine and neurotransmitter metabolism observed in early SZ using a metabolomic approach. Purine catabolism is an underappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. We have observed a homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with SZ (FENNS). Precursor and product relationships within purine pathways are tightly correlated. Although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS suggesting that steady formation of the antioxidant uric acid (UA) via purine catabolism is altered early in the course of illness. As is the case for within-pathway correlations, there are also significant cross-pathway correlations between respective purine and tryptophan (TRP) pathway metabolites. By contrast, purine metabolites show significant cross-pathway correlation only with tyrosine, and not with its metabolites. Furthermore, several purine metabolites (UA, guanosine, or xanthine) are each significantly correlated with 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in healthy controls, but not in FENNS at baseline or 4-week after antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, the above findings suggest that purine catabolism strongly associates with the TRP pathways leading to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and kynurenine metabolites. The lack of a significant correlation between purine metabolites and 5-HIAA, suggests alterations in key 5-HT pathways that may both be modified by and contribute to oxidative stress via purine

  4. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Bola, R. Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  5. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Bola, R Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  6. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  7. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  8. Arthrobacter oxydans as a biocatalyst for purine deamination.

    PubMed

    Médici, Rosario; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2008-12-01

    Deaminases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of amino groups of nucleosides or their bases. Because these enzymes play important roles in nucleotide metabolism, they are relevant targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapies. Mammalian deaminases are commercially available but the use of bacterial whole cells, especially as biocatalysts, is continuously growing because of their economical benefits. Moreover, deaminases are useful for the preparative chemoenzymatic transformation of nucleoside and base analogues into a variety of derivatives. The purine deaminase activities of Arthrobacter oxydans, a gram-positive bacterium utilized widely in bioremediation, were studied. The presence of adenosine, adenine and guanine deaminases was demonstrated and some purine bases and nucleosides were analyzed as substrates. Using A. oxydans whole cells as the biocatalyst, different purine compounds such as the anti-HIV, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (73%, 2 h) were obtained.

  9. Longitudinal MR Spectroscopy Shows Altered Metabolism in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Maudsley, Andrew A; Govind, Varan; Saigal, Gaurav; Gold, Stuart G; Harris, Leo; Sheriff, Sulaiman

    2017-07-23

    Brain trauma is known to result in heterogeneous patterns of tissue damage and altered neuronal and glial metabolism that evolve over time following injury; however, little is known on the longitudinal evolution of these changes. In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was used to map the distributions of altered metabolism in a single subject at five time points over a period of 28 months following injury. Magnetic resonance imaging and volumetric MRSI data were acquired in a subject that had experienced a moderate traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 13) at five time points, from 7 weeks to 28 months after injury. Maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), total choline (Cho), and total creatine signal were generated and differences from normal control values identified using a z-score image analysis method. The z-score metabolite maps revealed areas of significantly reduced NAA and increased Cho, predominately located in frontal and parietal white matter, which evolved over the complete course of the study. A map of the ratio of Cho/NAA showed the greatest sensitivity to change, which indicated additional metabolic changes throughout white matter. The metabolic changes reduced over time following injury, though with abnormal values remaining in periventricular regions. The use of z-score image analysis for MRSI provides a method for visualizing diffuse changes of tissue metabolism in the brain. This image visualization method is of particularly effective for visualizing widespread and diffuse metabolic changes, such as that due to traumatic injury. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Unpredictable Chronic Stress Alters Adenosine Metabolism in Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, F F; Altenhofen, S; Kist, L W; Leite, C E; Bogo, M R; Cognato, G P; Bonan, C D

    2016-05-01

    Stress is considered a risk factor for several human disorders. Despite the broad knowledge of stress responses in mammals, data on the relationship between unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) and its effects on purinergic signaling are limited. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering that some stress models could affect signaling systems, the objective of this study was to investigate whether UCS alters ectonucleotidase and ADA pathway in zebrafish brain. Additionally, we analyzed ATP metabolism as well as ada1, ada2.1, ada2.2, adaL, and adaasi gene expression in zebrafish brain. Our results have demonstrated that UCS did not alter ectonucleotidase and soluble ADA activities. However, ecto-ADA activity was significantly decreased (26.8%) in brain membranes of animals exposed to UCS when compared to the control group. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis did not show significant changes on ADA gene expression after the UCS exposure. The brain ATP metabolism showed a marked increase in adenosine levels (ADO) in animals exposed to UCS. These data suggest an increase on extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. Since this nucleoside has neuromodulatory and anxiolytic effects, changes in adenosine levels could play a role in counteracting the stress, which could be related to a compensatory mechanism in order to restore the homeostasis.

  11. Regional brain metabolism in a murine systemic lupus erythematosus model.

    PubMed

    Vo, An; Volpe, Bruce T; Tang, Chris C; Schiffer, Wynne K; Kowal, Czeslawa; Huerta, Patricio T; Uluğ, Aziz M; Dewey, Stephen L; Eidelberg, David; Diamond, Betty

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by multiorgan inflammation, neuropsychiatric disorders (NPSLE), and anti-nuclear antibodies. We previously identified a subset of anti-DNA antibodies (DNRAb) cross-reactive with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, present in 30% to 40% of patients, able to enhance excitatory post-synaptic potentials and trigger neuronal apoptosis. DNRAb+ mice exhibit memory impairment or altered fear response, depending on whether the antibody penetrates the hippocampus or amygdala. Here, we used 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) microPET to plot changes in brain metabolism after regional blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach. In DNRAb+ mice, metabolism declined at the site of BBB breach in the first 2 weeks and increased over the next 2 weeks. In contrast, DNRAb- mice exhibited metabolic increases in these regions over the 4 weeks after the insult. Memory impairment was present in DNRAb+ animals with hippocampal BBB breach and altered fear conditioning in DNRAb+ mice with amygdala BBB breach. In DNRAb+ mice, we observed an inverse relationship between neuron number and regional metabolism, while a positive correlation was observed in DNRAb- mice. These findings suggest that local metabolic alterations in this model take place through different mechanisms with distinct time courses, with important implications for the interpretation of imaging data in SLE subjects.

  12. Regional brain metabolism in a murine systemic lupus erythematosus model

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An; Volpe, Bruce T; Tang, Chris C; Schiffer, Wynne K; Kowal, Czeslawa; Huerta, Patricio T; Uluğ, Aziz M; Dewey, Stephen L; Eidelberg, David; Diamond, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by multiorgan inflammation, neuropsychiatric disorders (NPSLE), and anti-nuclear antibodies. We previously identified a subset of anti-DNA antibodies (DNRAb) cross-reactive with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, present in 30% to 40% of patients, able to enhance excitatory post-synaptic potentials and trigger neuronal apoptosis. DNRAb+ mice exhibit memory impairment or altered fear response, depending on whether the antibody penetrates the hippocampus or amygdala. Here, we used 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) microPET to plot changes in brain metabolism after regional blood–brain barrier (BBB) breach. In DNRAb+ mice, metabolism declined at the site of BBB breach in the first 2 weeks and increased over the next 2 weeks. In contrast, DNRAb− mice exhibited metabolic increases in these regions over the 4 weeks after the insult. Memory impairment was present in DNRAb+ animals with hippocampal BBB breach and altered fear conditioning in DNRAb+ mice with amygdala BBB breach. In DNRAb+ mice, we observed an inverse relationship between neuron number and regional metabolism, while a positive correlation was observed in DNRAb− mice. These findings suggest that local metabolic alterations in this model take place through different mechanisms with distinct time courses, with important implications for the interpretation of imaging data in SLE subjects. PMID:24824914

  13. Regional brain glucose metabolism in patients with brain tumors before and after radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Lau, Y.H.

    1994-05-01

    This study was performed to measure regional glucose metabolism in nonaffected brain regions of patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. Seven female and four male patients (mean age 51.5{plus_minus}14.0 years old) were compared with eleven age and sex matched normal subjects. None of the patients had hydrocephalus and/or increased intracranial pressure. Brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET scan. Five of the patients were reevaluated one week after receiving radiation treatment (RT) to the brain. Patients were on Decadron and/or Dilantin at the time of both scan. PET images were analyzed with a template of 115 nonoverlapping regions of interest and then grouped into eight gray matter regions on each hemisphere. Brain regions with tumors and edema shown in MR imaging were excluded. Z scores were used to compare individual patients` regional values with those of normal subjects. The number of regional values with Z scores of less than - 3.0 were considered abnormal and were quantified. The mean global glucose metabolic rate (mean of all regions) in nonaffected brain regions of patients was significantly lower than that of normal controls (32.1{plus_minus}9.0 versus 44.8{plus_minus}6.3 {mu}mol/100g/min, p<0.001). Analyses of individual subjects revealed that none of the controls and 8 of the 11 patients had at least one abnormal region. In these 8 patients the regions which were abnormal were most frequently localized in right (n=5) and left occipital (n=6) and right orbital frontal cortex (n=7) whereas the basal ganglia was not affected. Five of the patients who had repeated scans following RT showed decrements in tumor metabolism (41{plus_minus}20.5%) and a significant increase in whole brain metabolism (8.6{plus_minus}5.3%, p<0.001). The improvement in whole brain metabolism after RT suggests that the brain metabolic decrements in the patients were related to the presence of tumoral tissue and not just a medication effect.

  14. The ketogenic diet: metabolic influences on brain excitability and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    A dietary therapy for pediatric epilepsy known as the ketogenic diet has seen a revival in its clinical use in the past decade. Though the diet’s underlying mechanism remains unknown, modern scientific approaches like genetic disruption of glucose metabolism are allowing for more detailed questions to be addressed. Recent work indicates that several mechanisms may exist for the ketogenic diet including disruption of glutamatergic synaptic transmission, inhibition of glycolysis, and activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Here we describe on-going work in these areas that is providing a better understanding of metabolic influences on brain excitability and epilepsy. PMID:23228828

  15. [Hyperuricemia and disorders in content of amino acids-purine precursors in patients with autoimmune diseases and gout].

    PubMed

    Nikolenko, Iu I; Siniachenko, O V; Anan'eva, M N; Nikolenko, V Iu; Dubiaga, V V; Shchukin, I N

    2005-06-01

    Patients with system lupus erythematosus, rheumatic arthritis, chronic active hepatitis and gout were found to have considerable hyperuricemia and be decreased in aminoacides content, which are the predecessors of purine. Hyperactivity of xanthineoxidase and POL content were also revealed. The close correlation relation of purine indices of such patients has been observed. The obtained data allow applying methods of correction of immunity system and purine metabolism to these patients by introducing in a complex therapy inhibitors of xanthineoxidase.

  16. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  17. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-02-03

    Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. We performed an open-label study using (31)P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed (31)P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including (31)P brain MRS scan. At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls-reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis-followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain’s response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine’s effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  19. Gut-Brain Cross-Talk in Metabolic Control.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Müller, Timo D; Woods, Stephen C; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Seeley, Randy J; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2017-02-23

    Because human energy metabolism evolved to favor adiposity over leanness, the availability of palatable, easily attainable, and calorically dense foods has led to unprecedented levels of obesity and its associated metabolic co-morbidities that appear resistant to traditional lifestyle interventions. However, recent progress identifying the molecular signaling pathways through which the brain and the gastrointestinal system communicate to govern energy homeostasis, combined with emerging insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying successful bariatric surgery, gives reason to be optimistic that novel precision medicines that mimic, enhance, and/or modulate gut-brain signaling can have unprecedented potential for stopping the obesity and type 2 diabetes pandemics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expensive Brains: “Brainy” Rodents have Higher Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Sobrero, Raúl; May-Collado, Laura J.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Hernández, Cristián E.

    2011-01-01

    Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution of traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass (BM) varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006). Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species BM is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of BM for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of BM) and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur. PMID:21811456

  1. Modulators of nucleoside metabolism in the therapy of brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoside receptors are known to be important targets for a variety of brain diseases. However, the therapeutic modulation of their endogenous agonists by inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism represents an alternative therapeutic strategy that has gained increasing attention in recent years. Deficiency in endogenous nucleosides, in particular of adenosine, may causally be linked to a variety of neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from epilepsy and chronic pain to schizophrenia. Consequently, augmentation of nucleoside function by inhibiting their metabolism appears to be a rational therapeutic strategy with distinct advantages: (i) in contrast to specific receptor modulation, the increase (or decrease) of the amount of a nucleoside will affect several signal transduction pathways simultaneously and therefore have the unique potential to modify complex neurochemical networks; (ii) by acting on the network level, inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism are highly suited to fine-tune, restore, or amplify physiological functions of nucleosides; (iii) therefore inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism have promise for the "soft and smart" therapy of neurological diseases with the added advantage of reduced systemic side effects. This review will first highlight the role of nucleoside function and dysfunction in physiological and pathophysiological situations with a particular emphasis on the anticonvulsant, neuroprotective, and antinociceptive roles of adenosine. The second part of this review will cover pharmacological approaches to use inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism, with a special emphasis on adenosine kinase, the key regulator of endogenous adenosine. Finally, novel gene-based therapeutic strategies to inhibit nucleoside metabolism and focal treatment approaches will be discussed.

  2. Modulators of Nucleoside Metabolism in the Therapy of Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Nucleoside receptors are known to be important targets for a variety of brain diseases. However, the therapeutic modulation of their endogenous agonists by inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism represents an alternative therapeutic strategy that has gained increasing attention in recent years. Deficiency in endogenous nucleosides, in particular of adenosine, may causally be linked to a variety of neurological diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from epilepsy and chronic pain to schizophrenia. Consequently, augmentation of nucleoside function by inhibiting their metabolism appears to be a rational therapeutic strategy with distinct advantages: (i) in contrast to specific receptor modulation, the increase (or decrease) of the amount of a nucleoside will affect several signal transduction pathways simultaneously and therefore have the unique potential to modify complex neurochemical networks; (ii) by acting on the network level, inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism are highly suited to fine-tune, restore, or amplify physiological functions of nucleosides; (iii) therefore inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism have promise for the “soft and smart” therapy of neurological diseases with the added advantage of reduced systemic side effects. This review will first highlight the role of nucleoside function and dysfunction in physiological and pathophysiological situations with a particular emphasis on the anticonvulsant, neuroprotective, and antinociceptive roles of adenosine. The second part of this review will cover pharmacological approaches to use inhibitors of nucleoside metabolism, with a special emphasis on adenosine kinase, the key regulator of endogenous adenosine. Finally, novel gene-based therapeutic strategies to inhibit nucleoside metabolism and focal treatment approaches will be discussed. PMID:21401494

  3. The Role of Metabolomics in Brain Metabolism Research.

    PubMed

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-09-01

    This special edition of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology focuses on the leading edge of metabolomics in brain metabolism research. The topics covered include a metabolomic field overview and the challenges in neuroscience metabolomics. The workflow and utility of different analytical platforms to profile complex biological matrices that include biofluids, brain tissue and cells, are shown in several case studies. These studies demonstrate how global and targeted metabolite profiling can be applied to distinguish disease stages and to understand the effects of drug action on the central nervous system (CNS). Finally, we discuss the importance of metabolomics to advance the understanding of brain function that includes ligand-receptor interactions and new insights into the mechanisms of CNS disorders.

  4. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic ‘brain-thyroid’ disorders. PMID:24665922

  5. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-07-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic 'brain-thyroid' disorders.

  6. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1-4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (<10 μM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target.

  7. Pathophysiological roles for purines: adenosine, caffeine and urate

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Micaela; Carta, Anna R; Kachroo, Anil; Schwarzschild, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are due primarily to the degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. However, several other brain areas and neurotransmitters other than dopamine such as noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine and acetylcholine are affected in the disease. Moreover, adenosine because of the extensive interaction of its receptors with the dopaminergic system has been implicated in the in the pathophysiology of the disease. Based on the involvement of these nondopaminergic neurotransmitters in PD and the sometimes severe adverse effects that limit the mainstay use of dopamine-based antiparkinsonian treatments, recent assessments have called for a broadening of therapeutic options beyond the traditional dopaminergic drug arsenal. In this review we describe the interactions between dopamine and adenosine receptors that underpin the preclinical and clinical rationale for pursuing adenosine A2A receptor antagonists as symptomatic and potentially neuroprotective treatment of PD. The review will pay particular attention to recent results regarding specific A2A receptor-receptor interactions and recent findings identifying urate, the end product of purine metabolism, as a novel prognostic biomarker and candidate neuroprotectant in PD. PMID:20696321

  8. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides are essential metabolites for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and biosynthesis of several amino acids and riboflavin. Owing to the pivotal roles of purines in cell physiology, the pool of intracellular purine nucleotides must be maintained under strict control, and hence the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated by transcription repression and inhibition mechanism. Deregulation of purine pathway is essential for this pathway engineering in Bacillus subtilis. Results Deregulation of purine pathway was attempted to improve purine nucleotides supply, based on a riboflavin producer B. subtilis strain with modification of its rib operon. To eliminate transcription repression, the pur operon repressor PurR and the 5’-UTR of pur operon containing a guanine-sensing riboswitch were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the relative transcription levels of purine genes were up-regulated about 380 times. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was successfully introduced into PRPP amidotransferase (encoded by purF) to remove feedback inhibition by homologous alignment and analysis. Overexpression of the novel mutant PurF (D293V, K316Q and S400W) significantly increased PRPP amidotransferase activity and triggered a strong refractory effect on purine nucleotides mediated inhibition. Intracellular metabolite target analysis indicated that the purine nucleotides supply in engineered strains was facilitated by a stepwise gene-targeted deregulation. With these genetic manipulations, we managed to enhance the metabolic flow through purine pathway and consequently increased riboflavin production 3-fold (826.52 mg/L) in the purF-VQW mutant strain. Conclusions A sequential optimization strategy was applied to deregulate the rib operon and purine pathway of B. subtilis to create genetic diversities and to improve riboflavin production

  9. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C F; Rosa, Daniela V; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B F; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies.

  10. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C. F.; Rosa, Daniela V.; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M.

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28293169

  11. Typical cerebral metabolic patterns in neurodegenerative brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Teune, Laura K; Bartels, Anna L; de Jong, Bauke M; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Eshuis, Silvia A; de Vries, Jeroen J; van Oostrom, Joost C H; Leenders, Klaus L

    2010-10-30

    The differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative brain diseases on clinical grounds is difficult, especially at an early disease stage. Several studies have found specific regional differences of brain metabolism applying [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), suggesting that this method can assist in early differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative brain diseases.We have studied patients who had an FDG-PET scan on clinical grounds at an early disease stage and included those with a retrospectively confirmed diagnosis according to strictly defined clinical research criteria. Ninety-six patients could be included of which 20 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 21 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 17 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 10 corticobasal degeneration (CBD), 6 dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 15 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 7 frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FDG PET images of each patient group were analyzed and compared to18 healthy controls using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5).Disease-specific patterns of relatively decreased metabolic activity were found in PD (contralateral parietooccipital and frontal regions), MSA (bilateral putamen and cerebellar hemispheres), PSP (prefrontal cortex and caudate nucleus, thalamus, and mesencephalon), CBD (contralateral cortical regions), DLB (occipital and parietotemporal regions), AD (parietotemporal regions), and FTD (frontotemporal regions).The integrated method addressing a spectrum of various neurodegenerative brain diseases provided means to discriminate patient groups also at early disease stages. Clinical follow-up enabled appropriate patient inclusion. This implies that an early diagnosis in individual patients can be made by comparing each subject's metabolic findings with a complete database of specific disease related patterns.

  12. Neurovascular coupling and energy metabolism in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Kozberg, M.; Hillman, E.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, increases in local neural activity are almost always accompanied by increases in local blood flow. However, many functional imaging studies of the newborn and developing human brain have observed patterns of hemodynamic responses that differ from adult responses. Among the proposed mechanisms for the observed variations is that neurovascular coupling itself is still developing in the perinatal brain. Many of the components thought to be involved in actuating and propagating this hemodynamic response are known to still be developing postnatally, including perivascular cells such as astrocytes and pericytes. Both neural and vascular networks expand and are then selectively pruned over the first year of human life. Additionally, the metabolic demands of the newborn brain are still evolving. These changes are highly likely to affect early postnatal neurovascular coupling, and thus may affect functional imaging signals in this age group. This chapter will discuss the literature relating to neurovascular development. Potential effects of normal and aberrant development of neurovascular coupling on the newborn brain will also be explored, as well as ways to effectively utilize imaging techniques that rely on hemodynamic modulation such as fMRI and NIRS in younger populations. PMID:27130418

  13. Neurovascular coupling and energy metabolism in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Kozberg, M; Hillman, E

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, increases in local neural activity are almost always accompanied by increases in local blood flow. However, many functional imaging studies of the newborn and developing human brain have observed patterns of hemodynamic responses that differ from adult responses. Among the proposed mechanisms for the observed variations is that neurovascular coupling itself is still developing in the perinatal brain. Many of the components thought to be involved in actuating and propagating this hemodynamic response are known to still be developing postnatally, including perivascular cells such as astrocytes and pericytes. Both neural and vascular networks expand and are then selectively pruned over the first year of human life. Additionally, the metabolic demands of the newborn brain are still evolving. These changes are highly likely to affect early postnatal neurovascular coupling, and thus may affect functional imaging signals in this age group. This chapter will discuss the literature relating to neurovascular development. Potential effects of normal and aberrant development of neurovascular coupling on the newborn brain will also be explored, as well as ways to effectively utilize imaging techniques that rely on hemodynamic modulation such as fMRI and NIRS in younger populations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Was adenine the first purine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Bakker, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Oligomerization of HCN (1 molar) in the presence of added formaldehyde (0.5 molar) produced an order of magnitude more 8-hydroxymethyladenine than adenine or any other biologically significant purine. This result suggests that on the prebiotic earth, nucleoside analogs may have been synthesized directly in more complex mixtures of HCN with other aldehydes.

  15. Was adenine the first purine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Bakker, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Oligomerization of HCN (1 molar) in the presence of added formaldehyde (0.5 molar) produced an order of magnitude more 8-hydroxymethyladenine than adenine or any other biologically significant purine. This result suggests that on the prebiotic earth, nucleoside analogs may have been synthesized directly in more complex mixtures of HCN with other aldehydes.

  16. Evidence for purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) release from rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Buccella, Silvana; Peña-Altamira, Luis Emiliano; Polazzi, Elisabetta; Virgili, Marco; Monti, Barbara; Poli, Alessandro; Rathbone, Michel P; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Ciccarelli, Renata; Caciagli, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Intracellular purine turnover is mainly oriented to preserving the level of triphosphate nucleotides, fundamental molecules in vital cell functions that, when released outside cells, act as receptor signals. Conversely, high levels of purine bases and uric acid are found in the extracellular milieu, even in resting conditions. These compounds could derive from nucleosides/bases that, having escaped to cell reuptake, are metabolized by extracellular enzymes similar to the cytosolic ones. Focusing on purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) that catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of purine (deoxy)-nucleosides/bases, we found that it is constitutively released from cultured rat C6 glioma cells into the medium, and has a molecular weight and enzyme activity similar to the cytosolic enzyme. Cell exposure to 10 μM ATP or guanosine triphosphate (GTP) increased the extracellular amount of all corresponding purines without modifying the levels/activity of released PNP, whereas selective activation of ATP P2Y1 or adenosine A2A metabotropic receptors increased PNP release and purine base formation. The reduction to 1% in oxygen supply (2 h) to cells decreased the levels of released PNP, leading to an increased presence of extracellular nucleosides and to a reduced formation of xanthine and uric acid. Conversely, 2 h cell re-oxygenation enhanced the extracellular amounts of both PNP and purine bases. Thus, hypoxia and re-oxygenation modulated in opposite manner the PNP release/activity and, thereby, the extracellular formation of purine metabolism end-products. In conclusion, extracellular PNP and likely other enzymes deputed to purine base metabolism are released from cells, contributing to the purinergic system homeostasis and exhibiting an important pathophysiological role. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Localisation of phencyclidine-induced changes in brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meibach, R C; Glicks, D; Cox, R; Maayani, S

    1979-12-06

    The abuse of phencyclidine [1(1-phencylohexyl)piperidine, PCP], commonly referred to as angel dust or hog, is rapidly reaching epidemic proportions. PCP users often appear violent and increases in PCP-implicated homicides and suicides have been reported. In animal studies PCP has been demonstrated in brain up to 48 h after administration, long after blood levels become undetectable. However, there is little further information on the distribution of PCP within the central nervous system with regard to the possible sites of action. Recently, Sokoloff and associates described a new technique which can be used to visualise possible sites of drug action. The technique is based on the premise that neuronal activity is closely related to energy metabolism. Therefore, by directly monitoring 2-deoxy-D-glucose consumption before and after a pharmacological stimulus, we can obtain autoradiographic evidence of changes in neuronal activity in discrete areas brain as a response to that stimulus. Using this procedure, we now report that PCP causes dramatic changes in glucose metabolism in very specific regions of the rat brain.

  18. Brain metabolism and spatial memory are affected by portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2012-06-01

    Portal hypertension is a major complication of cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder that affects cognition. The present study was undertaken in order to compare the performance of sham-operated rats (SHAM) and portal hypertension rats (PH) in reference memory tasks in the Morris water maze (MWM). Two groups of animals were used: SHAM group (n=12) was used as a control group and PH group (n=12) by the triple portal vein ligation method was used as an animal model of early evolutive phase of PH. The portal pressure was measured in the splenic parenchyma. Our work shows that spatial learning in the MWM is not impaired in PH group although this group showed a one-day delay in the task acquisition compared to the SHAM group. We assessed the brain metabolic activity of the animals by means of cytochrome c-oxidase (COx) histochemistry. Significant changes were found in the CA3, dentate gyrus, basolateral, medial, lateral and central amygdala, showing lower COx activity in the PH group as compared to the SHAM group in all cases. We found no changes in metabolic activity in prefrontal cortex and CA1 area between groups. In fact, different neural networks were shown according to the execution level of the subjects. The early PH evolution induced changes in brain metabolic activity without biggest alterations in spatial memory.

  19. A Targeted Metabolomics Assay to Measure Eight Purines in the Diet of Common Bottlenose Dolphins, Tursiops truncatus

    PubMed Central

    Ardente, AJ; Garrett, TJ; Wells, RS; Walsh, M; Smith, CR; Colee, J; Hill, RC

    2016-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins managed under human care, human beings and Dalmatian dogs are prone to forming urate uroliths. Limiting dietary purine intake limits urate urolith formation in people and dogs because purines are metabolized to uric acid, which is excreted in urine. Managed dolphins develop ammonium urate nephroliths, whereas free-ranging dolphins do not. Free-ranging dolphins consume live fish, whereas managed dolphins consume different species that have been stored frozen and thawed. Differences in the purine content of fish consumed by dolphins under human care versus in the wild may be responsible for the difference in urolith prevalence. Commercially available purine assays measure only four purines, but reported changes in purines during frozen storage suggest that a wider range of metabolites should be measured when comparing fresh and stored fish. A method using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed to quantify eight purine metabolites in whole fish and squid commonly consumed by dolphins. The coefficient of variation within and among days was sometimes high for purines present in small amounts but was acceptable (≤ 25%) for guanine, hypoxanthine, and inosine, which were present in high concentrations. This expanded assay identified a total purine content up to 2.5 times greater than the total that would be quantified if only four purines were measured. Assuming additional purines are absorbed, these results suggest that additional purine metabolites should be measured to better understand the associated risk when fish or other purine-rich foods are consumed by people or animals prone to developing uroliths. PMID:27904786

  20. A Targeted Metabolomics Assay to Measure Eight Purines in the Diet of Common Bottlenose Dolphins, Tursiops truncatus.

    PubMed

    Ardente, A J; Garrett, T J; Wells, R S; Walsh, M; Smith, C R; Colee, J; Hill, R C

    2016-10-01

    Bottlenose dolphins managed under human care, human beings and Dalmatian dogs are prone to forming urate uroliths. Limiting dietary purine intake limits urate urolith formation in people and dogs because purines are metabolized to uric acid, which is excreted in urine. Managed dolphins develop ammonium urate nephroliths, whereas free-ranging dolphins do not. Free-ranging dolphins consume live fish, whereas managed dolphins consume different species that have been stored frozen and thawed. Differences in the purine content of fish consumed by dolphins under human care versus in the wild may be responsible for the difference in urolith prevalence. Commercially available purine assays measure only four purines, but reported changes in purines during frozen storage suggest that a wider range of metabolites should be measured when comparing fresh and stored fish. A method using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed to quantify eight purine metabolites in whole fish and squid commonly consumed by dolphins. The coefficient of variation within and among days was sometimes high for purines present in small amounts but was acceptable (≤ 25%) for guanine, hypoxanthine, and inosine, which were present in high concentrations. This expanded assay identified a total purine content up to 2.5 times greater than the total that would be quantified if only four purines were measured. Assuming additional purines are absorbed, these results suggest that additional purine metabolites should be measured to better understand the associated risk when fish or other purine-rich foods are consumed by people or animals prone to developing uroliths.

  1. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  2. Metabolic imaging of rat brain during pharmacologically-induced tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Paul, A K; Lobarinas, E; Simmons, R; Wack, D; Luisi, John C; Spernyak, J; Mazurchuk, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Salvi, R

    2009-01-15

    Although much is known about the perceptual characteristics of tinnitus, its neural origins remain poorly understood. We investigated the pattern of neural activation in central auditory structures using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a rat model of salicylate-induced tinnitus. Awake rats were injected with the metabolic tracer, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), once in a quiet state (baseline) and once during salicylate-induced tinnitus. Tinnitus was verified using a behavioral technique. Brain imaging was performed using a high-resolution microPET scanner. Rats underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and reconstructed MRI and microPET images were fused to identify brain structures. FDG activity in brain regions of interest were quantified and compared. MicroPET imaging showed that FDG activity in the frontal pole was stable between baseline and tinnitus conditions, suggesting it was metabolically inert during tinnitus. Inferior colliculi (p=0.03) and temporal cortices (p=0.003) showed significantly increased FDG activity during tinnitus relative to baseline; activity in the colliculi and temporal cortices increased by 17%+/-21% and 29%+/-20%, respectively. FDG activity in the thalami also increased during tinnitus, but the increase did not reach statistical significance (p=0.07). Our results show increased metabolic activity consistent with neuronal activation in inferior colliculi and auditory cortices of rats during salicylate-induced tinnitus. These results are the first to show that microPET imaging can be used to identify central auditory structures involved in tinnitus and suggest that microPET imaging might be used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of drugs to treat tinnitus.

  3. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression.

  4. The interaction of aflatoxins with purines and purine nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Janet I.; Rees, K. R.

    1967-01-01

    From measurements of thermal hyperchromicity and the behaviour of an aflatoxin–DNA mixture on a Sephadex column it was concluded that aflatoxin B1 is capable of weak binding to single-stranded DNA. The interactions of the aflatoxins (B1, G1 and G2) with nucleosides result in difference spectra and suggest that the purine bases and the amino group play a role in the binding of all the aflatoxins to DNA. PMID:6032981

  5. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders.

  6. Mechanism of purine antimetabolites and purine nucleodise imbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Purine starvation is responsible for the cytotoxic effects of many purine antimetabolites. Guanine nucleotide depletion leads to a drastic DNA synthesis inhibition while adenine nucleotide depletion interferes with other vital functions before inhibiting DNA synthesis. To investigate the mechanism of these distinct effects, kinetics studies of adenine and guanine tracer incorporation into nucleotide pools and DNA were performed in S-49 cells. To address the question whether the cellular dGTP pool is compartmentalized, ({sup 14}C)Gua and ({sup 3}H)Guo tracer experiments were performed in a double mutant S-49 cell line, dGuo-L, with purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency and dGTP feedback resistant ribonucleotide reductase (RR). While RR inhibition by dGTP was proposed as the cytotoxic mechanism in PNP immunodeficiency, additional effects of dGuo were studied in S-49 cells and human peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBTL). RNA synthesis but not DNA synthesis was among the earliest targets of dGuo toxicity, and dGuo exerted cytotoxicity in resting PBTL before DNA synthesis. Three transformed T cells lines, PEER, HPB-ALL and HPB-MLT, were selected and characterized for cell surface markers and their sensitivities to dAdo and deoxycoformycin, an ADA inhibitor.

  7. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-03-11

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

  8. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  9. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Down's syndrome brains.

    PubMed

    Iulita, M Florencia; Do Carmo, Sonia; Ower, Alison K; Fortress, Ashley M; Flores Aguilar, Lisi; Hanna, Michael; Wisniewski, Thomas; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Buhusi, Mona; Busciglio, Jorge; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons play a key role in cognition. This neuronal system is highly dependent on NGF for its synaptic integrity and the phenotypic maintenance of its cell bodies. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons progressively degenerate in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, and their atrophy contributes to the manifestation of dementia. Paradoxically, in Alzheimer's disease brains, the synthesis of NGF is not affected and there is abundance of the NGF precursor, proNGF. We have shown that this phenomenon is the result of a deficit in NGF's extracellular metabolism that compromises proNGF maturation and exacerbates its subsequent degradation. We hypothesized that a similar imbalance should be present in Down's syndrome. Using a combination of quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and zymography, we investigated signs of NGF metabolic dysfunction in post-mortem brains from the temporal (n = 14), frontal (n = 34) and parietal (n = 20) cortex obtained from subjects with Down's syndrome and age-matched controls (age range 31-68 years). We further examined primary cultures of human foetal Down's syndrome cortex (17-21 gestational age weeks) and brains from Ts65Dn mice (12-22 months), a widely used animal model of Down's syndrome. We report a significant increase in proNGF levels in human and mouse Down's syndrome brains, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator messenger RNA as well as an increment in neuroserpin expression; enzymes that partake in proNGF maturation. Human Down's syndrome brains also exhibited elevated zymogenic activity of MMP9, the major NGF-degrading protease. Our results indicate a failure in NGF precursor maturation in Down's syndrome brains and a likely enhanced proteolytic degradation of NGF, changes which can compromise the trophic support of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. The alterations in pro

  10. Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0412 TITLE: Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER WX81XWH-15...15. SUBJECT TERMS Repetitive brain trauma, glial metabolism, glutamate, multinuclear spectroscopy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer’s

  11. The Effects of Conditions of Cerebral Anoxia, on Phospholipids, Metabolism, and Circulation of the Brain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Anoxia, *Phospholipids, Blood circulation, Pathology, Blood plasma , Erythrocytes, Patients, Metabolism, Blood chemistry, Brain, Experimental data, Dogs, Laboratory animals, Tables(Data), Blood diseases

  12. In vitro effect of antipsychotics on brain energy metabolism parameters in the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Rochi, Natália; Morais, Meline O S; Maggi, Débora D; De-Nês, Bruna T; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-02-01

    Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs have been shown to have different clinical, biochemical and behavioural profiles. It is well described that impairment of metabolism, especially in the mitochondria, leads to oxidative stress and neuronal death and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases in the brain. In this context, we investigated the in vitro effect of antipsychotic drugs on energy metabolism parameters in the brain of rats. Clozapine (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml), olanzapine (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) and aripiprazole (0.05, 0.15 and 0.3 mg/ml) were suspended in buffer and added to the reaction medium containing rat tissue homogenates and the respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase (CK) activities were evaluated. Our results showed that olanzapine and aripriprazole increased the activities of respiratory chain complexes. On the other hand, complex IV activity was inhibited by clozapine, olanzapine and aripriprazole. CK activity was increased by clozapine at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml in prefrontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus and posterior cortex of rats. Moreover, olanzapine and aripiprazole did not affect CK activity. In this context, if the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders is correct and these results also occur in vivo, we suggest that olanzapine may reverse a possible diminution of metabolism.

  13. Systemic glucose and brain energy metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Helbok, Raimund; Schmidt, J Michael; Kurtz, Pedro; Hanafy, Khalid A; Fernandez, Luis; Stuart, R Morgan; Presciutti, Mary; Ostapkovich, Noeleen D; Connolly, E Sander; Lee, Kiwon; Badjatia, Neeraj; Mayer, Stephan A; Claassen, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Brain energy metabolic crisis (MC) and lactate-pyruvate ratio (LPR) elevations have been linked to poor outcome in comatose patients. We sought to determine if MC and LPR elevations after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are associated with acute reductions in serum glucose. Twenty-eight consecutive comatose SAH patients that underwent multimodality monitoring with intracranial pressure and microdialysis were studied. MC was defined as lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR) > or = 40 and brain glucose < 0.7 mmol/l. Time-series data were analyzed using a multivariable general linear model with a logistic link function for dichotomized outcomes. Multimodality monitoring included 3,178 h of observation (mean 114 +/- 65 h per patient). In exploratory analysis, serum glucose significantly decreased from 8.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/l (148 mg/dl) 2 h before to 6.9 +/- 1.9 mmol/l (124 mg/dl) at the onset of MC (P < 0.001). Reductions in serum glucose of 25% or more were significantly associated with new onset MC (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-6.0). Acute reductions in serum glucose of 25% or more were also significantly associated with an LPR rise of 25% or more (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4). All analyses were adjusted for significant covariates including Glasgow Coma Scale and cerebral perfusion pressure. Acute reductions in serum glucose, even to levels within the normal range, may be associated with brain energy metabolic crisis and LPR elevation in poor-grade SAH patients.

  14. Exchange transamination and the metabolism of glutamate in brain

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, R.; Haslam, R. J.

    1965-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to throw light on why the incorporation of 14C from labelled carbohydrate precursors into glutamate has been found to be more marked in brain than in other tissues. 2. Rapid isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled α-oxoglutarate was demonstrated in brain and liver mitochondrial preparations. In the presence but not in the absence of α-oxoglutarate the yield of 14CO2 from [1-14C]glutamate exceeded the net glutamate removal, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated that complete isotopic equilibration had occurred. Also, when in a brain preparation net glutamate removal was inhibited by malonate, isotope exchange between [1-14C]glutamate and α-oxoglutarate and the formation of 14CO2 were unaffected. 3. The time-course of isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled α-oxoglutarate was followed in uncoupled brain and liver mitochondrial fractions, and the rate of exchange calculated by a computer was found to be 3–8 times more rapid than the maximal rate of utilization of the two substrates. 4. The physiological situation was imitated by the continuous infusion of small amounts of α-oxo[1-14C]glutarate into brain homogenate containing added glutamate. The fraction of 14C infused that was retained in the glutamate pool depended on the size of the latter, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated almost complete isotope exchange. Isotopic equilibration also occurred when α-oxoglutarate was generated from pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in a brain mitochondrial preparation containing [1-14C]glutamate. 5. The differences in the incorporation of 14C from labelled glucose into the glutamate of brain and liver are discussed in terms of the rates of isotope exchange, the glutamate pool sizes and the rates of formation of labelled α-oxoglutarate in the two tissues. It is concluded that the differences between tissues in the

  15. EXCHANGE TRANSAMINATION AND THE METABOLISM OF GLUTAMATE IN BRAIN.

    PubMed

    BALAZS, R; HASLAM, J

    1965-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to throw light on why the incorporation of (14)C from labelled carbohydrate precursors into glutamate has been found to be more marked in brain than in other tissues. 2. Rapid isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled alpha-oxoglutarate was demonstrated in brain and liver mitochondrial preparations. In the presence but not in the absence of alpha-oxoglutarate the yield of (14)CO(2) from [1-(14)C]glutamate exceeded the net glutamate removal, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated that complete isotopic equilibration had occurred. Also, when in a brain preparation net glutamate removal was inhibited by malonate, isotope exchange between [1-(14)C]glutamate and alpha-oxoglutarate and the formation of (14)CO(2) were unaffected. 3. The time-course of isotope exchange between labelled glutamate and unlabelled alpha-oxoglutarate was followed in uncoupled brain and liver mitochondrial fractions, and the rate of exchange calculated by a computer was found to be 3-8 times more rapid than the maximal rate of utilization of the two substrates. 4. The physiological situation was imitated by the continuous infusion of small amounts of alpha-oxo[1-(14)C]glutarate into brain homogenate containing added glutamate. The fraction of (14)C infused that was retained in the glutamate pool depended on the size of the latter, and the final relative specific activities of the two substrates indicated almost complete isotope exchange. Isotopic equilibration also occurred when alpha-oxoglutarate was generated from pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in a brain mitochondrial preparation containing [1-(14)C]glutamate. 5. The differences in the incorporation of (14)C from labelled glucose into the glutamate of brain and liver are discussed in terms of the rates of isotope exchange, the glutamate pool sizes and the rates of formation of labelled alpha-oxoglutarate in the two tissues. It is concluded that

  16. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the 18F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. 18F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  17. Glycogen metabolism in brain and neurons - astrocytes metabolic cooperation can be altered by pre- and neonatal lead (Pb) exposure.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Maciej; Chibowska, Karina; Goschorska, Marta; Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2017-09-12

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental neurotoxin which particularly affects the developing brain but the molecular mechanism of its neurotoxicity still needs clarification. The aim of this paper was to examine whether pre- and neonatal exposure to Pb (concentration of Pb in rat offspring blood below the "threshold level") may affect the brain's energy metabolism in neurons and astrocytes via the amount of available glycogen. We investigated the glycogen concentration in the brain, as well as the expression of the key enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism in brain: glycogen synthase 1 (Gys1), glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM, an isoform active in astrocytes; and PYGB, an isoform active in neurons) and phosphorylase kinase β (PHKB). Moreover, the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) was evaluated to analyze whether Pb poisoning during the early phase of life may affect the neuron-astrocytes' metabolic cooperation. This work shows for the first time that exposure to Pb in early life can impair brain energy metabolism by reducing the amount of glycogen and decreasing the rate of its metabolism. This reduction in brain glycogen level was accompanied by a decrease in Gys1 expression. We noted a reduction in the immunoreactivity and the gene expression of both PYGB and PYGM isoform, as well as an increase in the expression of PHKB in Pb-treated rats. Moreover, exposure to Pb induced decrease in connexin 43 immunoexpression in all the brain structures analyzed, both in astrocytes as well as in neurons. Our data suggests that exposure to Pb in the pre- and neonatal periods results in a decrease in the level of brain glycogen and a reduction in the rate of its metabolism, thereby reducing glucose availability, which as a further consequence may lead to the impairment of brain energy metabolism and the metabolic cooperation between neurons and astrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain Tissue Oxygenation and Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Focal and Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Purins, Karlis; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Howells, Tim; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neurointensive care of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is currently based on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) targeted protocols. There are reasons to believe that knowledge of brain tissue oxygenation (BtipO2) would add information with the potential of improving patient outcome. The aim of this study was to examine BtipO2 and cerebral metabolism using the Neurovent-PTO probe and cerebral microdialysis (MD) in TBI patients. Methods: Twenty-three severe TBI patients with monitoring of physiological parameters, ICP, CPP, BtipO2, and MD for biomarkers of energy metabolism (glucose, lactate, and pyruvate) and cellular distress (glutamate, glycerol) were included. Patients were grouped according to injury type (focal/diffuse) and placement of the Neurovent-PTO probe and MD catheter (injured/non-injured hemisphere). Results: We observed different patterns in BtipO2 and MD biomarkers in diffuse and focal injury where placement of the probe also influenced the results (ipsilateral/contralateral). In all groups, despite fairly normal levels of ICP and CPP, increased MD levels of glutamate, glycerol, or the L/P ratio were observed at BtipO2 <5 mmHg, indicating increased vulnerability of the brain at this level. Conclusion: Monitoring of BtipO2 adds important information in addition to traditional ICP and CPP surveillance. Because of the different metabolic responses to very low BtipO2 in the individual patient groups we submit that brain tissue oximetry is a complementary tool rather than an alternative to MD monitoring. PMID:24817863

  19. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  20. [Purine metabolism in ankylosing spondylitis: clinical study].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Balderas, F J; Robles, E J; Juan, L; Badui, E; Arellano, H; Espinosa Said, L; Mintz Spiro, G

    1989-01-01

    We undertook a prospective study of 23 male patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) (New York Criteria), 18 HLA-B27 positive and 5 HLA-B27 negative, five of them had hyperuricemia. The following data of evolution were taken into consideration: age at onset of disease, time course of the disease, presence of urolithiasis, heart disease, flares of uveitis. Clinical activity and degree of disability were evaluated every one to 3 months; on each visit, every patient had determinations of serum and urinary uric acid levels, serum and phosphorus, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum protein electrophoresis, as well as X-ray films of the vertebral spine and pelvis. Three groups of patients were detected, all of them with equal age at onset, duration of disease, frequency of B27, peripheral arthritis, and leukocytosis. One group had hyperuricemia (5 of 23 patients, 80% of them HLA-B27 positive) and a lesser degree of clinical activity of the disease (p less than .001, a higher frequency of uveitis (40%, lower levels of serum gammaglobulins (p less than 0.05) and ESR (p less than 0.05), a lesser degree of ankylosis of the spine, and a better functional prognosis than the other groups. Another group (8 of 23 patients, 75% of them were HLA-B27 positive) had normouricemia and hyperuricosuria, and showed a higher frequency of fever (50%), an abnormal urinalysis, and urolithiasis (25%).

  1. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  2. Ethanol, not detectably metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via action at specific GABA(A) receptors and has measureable metabolic effects at very low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline D; Davidson, Joanne E; Maher, Anthony D; Rowlands, Benjamin D; Kashem, Mohammed A; Nasrallah, Fatima A; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2014-04-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we measured the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-¹³C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and compared the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol. Analyses of metabolic profile clusters suggest that the significant reductions in metabolism induced by ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) are via action at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, whereas very low concentrations of ethanol may produce metabolic responses owing to release of GABA via GABA transporter 1 (GAT1) and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5- or α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-¹³C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of ¹³C from [1,2-¹³C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabelled ethanol.

  3. Analysis of Intra- and Extracellular Levels of Purine Bases, Nucleosides, and Nucleotides in HepG2 Cells by High-performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Noriko; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate cellular uptake and purine transport, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography method for intra- and extracellular purine quantification. Our aim was to develop an effective method for simultaneously quantifying the substrate and metabolites with high sensitivity. C18 columns from different manufacturers were tested for simultaneous quantification of 22 different purine bases, nucleosides, and nucleotides. We used a YMC-Triart C18 column. The analysis conditions, including extraction solutions for the cells and cell culture medium, were optimized to achieve good quantification. Linearity, accuracy, determination limits, and recovery were assessed and showed good performance. The developed HPLC method was successfully applied to the qualitative analysis of 22 different intra- and extracellular purines, demonstrating that it is useful for studying the overall pattern of purine metabolism. This method could also be useful for evaluating metabolic dynamics of purines under a variety of stimulatory conditions of culture cells.

  4. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Strobel, Henry W; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-06-11

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  5. Drug Metabolism in Human Brain: High Levels of Cytochrome P4503A43 in Brain and Metabolism of Anti-Anxiety Drug Alprazolam to Its Active Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Varsha; Kommaddi, Reddy P.; Valli, Khader; Ryder, Daniel; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Strobel, Henry W.; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP) in brain and liver, relatively more α-hydroxy alprazolam (α-OHALP) is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both α-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP) while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of α-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of α-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action. PMID:18545703

  6. Comparison of nitrogen-15 and purines as microbial markers in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Calsamiglia, S; Stern, M D; Firkins, J L

    1996-06-01

    Eight dual-flow continuous-culture fermenters were used in four replicated periods to compare the effects of diet and microbial marker on estimates of N metabolism in continuous culture of ruminal microorganisms. A basal diet was supplemented with urea and tryptone, soybean meal (SBM), lignosulfonate-treated SBM, corn gluten meal, blood meal (BM), hydrolyzed feather meal, fish meal (FM), or meat and bone meal (MBM). Microbial protein flow and protein degradation in fermenters were estimated using purines, purine N, and 15N in bacteria obtained from fermenter flasks or from the effluent. The ratio of purine N to total N in bacteria averaged .083 and was not affected (P > .05) by treatment. Dietary purine content (percentage of DM) ranged from .033 in BM to .084 in FM. Escape of feed purine N (percentage of total purine N flow) averaged 1.7% (SE = 2.9) and was not different (P > .05) among treatments. Bacterial N flows obtained using purines were more variable than estimates obtained using 15N. Bacterial N flows calculated using 15N in bacteria isolated from fermenters were more variable than those obtained using bacteria isolated from the effluent. The use of purines as a microbial marker resulted in lower estimates of protein degradation and smaller differences among treatments compared with use of 15N. Data suggest that escape of feed purine N seems to be a minor factor affecting calculation of bacterial N flow and that the use of 15N in effluent bacteria may be a more accurate procedure when using continuous-culture fermenters.

  7. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Marta; Fidalgo, Camino; Aller, María Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx). We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral) were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups. PMID:23573412

  9. 24S-hydroxycholesterol: a marker of brain cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lütjohann, D; von Bergmann, K

    2003-09-01

    The enzymatic conversion of CNS cholesterol to 24S-hydroxycholesterol, which readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, is the major pathway for brain cholesterol elimination and brain cholesterol homeostasis maintenance. The enzyme mediating this conversion has been characterized at the molecular level (CYP46) and is mainly located in neurons. Like other oxysterols, 24S-hydroxycholesterol is efficiently converted into normal bile acids or excreted in bile in its sulfated and glucuronidated form. Levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in the circulation decrease with age in infants and children. In adults, however, the levels appear to be stable. There is accumulating evidence pointing toward a potentially important link between cholesterol, beta-amyloid, and Alzheimer's disease. Concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are significantly higher in Alzheimer's disease and vascular demented patients at early stages of the disease compared to healthy subjects. Variations in genetic background, time of disease onset, and severity of dementia are potential sources of variance. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, also termed statins, seem to have a reductive influence on the generation of the amyloid precursor protein, the neuronal secretion of beta-amyloid, and on de novo cholesterol synthesis. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that the prevalence of diagnosed AD and vascular dementia is reduced among people taking statins for a longer period of time. High-dose simvastatin treatment (80 mg/day) in patients with hypercholesterolemia leads to a significant decrease in brain-specific serum 24S-hydroxycholesterol concentrations and indicates a diminished cholesterol metabolism in the brain. CSF levels of cholesterol and lathosterol, a cholesterol precursor considered to be an indicator for cholesterol neogenesis, were significantly decreased in statin-treated subjects compared to non-treated normo- and hypercholesterolemic subjects

  10. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders B; Jónsdottir, Kristjana Y; Møller, Arne; Ashkanian, Mahmoud; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Iversen, Peter; Johannsen, Peter; Gjedde, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO2 during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors find decreases of both CBF and CMRO2 but increased OEF, while others find no change, and yet other find divergent changes. In this reanalysis of previously published results from positron emission tomography of healthy volunteers, we determined CMRO2 and CBF in 66 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 81 years. The magnitudes of CMRO2 and CBF declined in large parts of the cerebral cortex, including association areas, but the primary motor and sensory areas were relatively spared. We found significant increases of OEF in frontal and parietal cortices, excluding primary motor and somatosensory regions, and in the temporal cortex. Because of the inverse relation between OEF and capillary oxygen tension, increased OEF can compromise oxygen delivery to neurons, with possible perturbation of energy turnover. The results establish a possible mechanism of progression from healthy to unhealthy brain aging, as the regions most affected by age are the areas that are most vulnerable to neurodegeneration. PMID:22373642

  11. Aging elevates metabolic gene expression in brain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Karen A; Kent, Caroline; Personett, David; Lai, Weil R; Park, Peter J; Coleman, Paul; McKinney, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system is selectively vulnerable in human brain diseases, while the cholinergic groups in the upper pons of the brainstem (BS) resist neurodegeneration. Cholinergic neurons (200 per region per animal) were laser-microdissected from five young (8 months) and five aged (24 months) F344 rats from the BF and the BS pontine lateral dorsal tegmental/pedunculopontine nuclei (LDTN/PPN) and their expression profiles were obtained. The bioinformatics program SigPathway was used to identify gene groups and pathways that were selectively affected by aging. In the BF cholinergic system, aging most significantly altered genes involved with a variety of metabolic functions. In contrast, BS cholinergic neuronal age effects included gene groupings related to neuronal plasticity and a broad range of normal cellular functions. Transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPalpha), which controls expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, was more strongly upregulated in the BF cholinergic neurons (+107%) than in the BS cholinergic population (+40%). The results suggest that aging elicits elevates metabolic activity in cholinergic populations and that this occurs to a much greater degree in the BF group than in the BS group.

  12. Brain natriuretic peptide administered to man: actions and metabolism.

    PubMed

    McGregor, A; Richards, M; Espiner, E; Yandle, T; Ikram, H

    1990-04-01

    To investigate the effects and metabolism of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in man, eight normal subjects received 3-h infusions of synthetic porcine BNP (2 pmol/kg.min) in a placebo-controlled study. The MCR and plasma half-life of BNP were 2.69 L/min and 3.1 min, respectively. BNP clearly suppressed PRA to less than 50% of placebo values (P less than 0.001). Plasma aldosterone concentrations were also significantly reduced by 30% (P less than 0.05). Urinary sodium excretion tended to rise (P = 0.054), and urinary cGMP excretion was clearly enhanced (P less than 0.01). Systemic and renal hemodynamics, hematocrit, plasma protein concentrations, plasma ACTH, arginine vasopressin, PRL, and catecholamines were unchanged. Porcine BNP has a similar range of effects and is similarly metabolized in man as human ANP. Further elucidation of the possible role of BNP as a circulating hormone in man awaits measurement of tissue and plasma concentrations of human BNP in health and disease and provision of fuller dose-response data for human as well as porcine BNP.

  13. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  14. Altered lipid metabolism in brain injury and disorders.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, J F

    2008-01-01

    Deregulated lipid metabolism may be of particular importance for CNS injuries and disorders, as this organ has the highest lipid concentration next to adipose tissue. Atherosclerosis (a risk factor for ischemic stroke) results from accumulation of LDL-derived lipids in the arterial wall. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1), secretory phospholipase A2 IIA and lipoprotein-PLA2 are implicated in vascular inflammation. These inflammatory responses promote atherosclerotic plaques, formation and release of the blood clot that can induce ischemic stroke. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alter lipid metabolism and stimulate production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and reactive oxygen species that potentiate CNS injuries and certain neurological disorders. Cholesterol is an important regulator of lipid organization and the precursor for neurosteroid biosynthesis. Low levels of neurosteroids were related to poor outcome in many brain pathologies. Apolipoprotein E is the principal cholesterol carrier protein in the brain, and the gene encoding the variant Apolipoprotein E4 is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Parkinson's disease is to some degree caused by lipid peroxidation due to phospholipases activation. Niemann-Pick diseases A and B are due to acidic sphingomyelinase deficiency, resulting in sphingomyelin accumulation, while Niemann-Pick disease C is due to mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 genes, resulting in defective cholesterol transport and cholesterol accumulation. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating condition of the CNS. Inhibiting phospholipase A2 attenuated the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The endocannabinoid system is hypoactive in Huntington's disease. Ethyl-eicosapetaenoate showed promise in clinical trials. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis causes loss of motorneurons. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduced spinal neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mice

  15. [Total purine content in selected foods].

    PubMed

    Wolfram, G; Colling, M

    1987-12-01

    For the dietary treatment of hyperuricemia and gout, it is necessary to know the total purine content of food. A new method determining the purine content enzymatically, as uric acid, allows routine analysis. Many foods of animal and plant origin were brought in usual or alternative stores and analysed.

  16. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  17. Genetic and proteomic analyses of a Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris purC mutant deficient in purine biosynthesis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Sun, Shutao; Wu, Yao; Qian, Wei

    2013-09-20

    Bacterial proliferation in hosts requires activation of a number of housekeeping pathways, including purine de novo biosynthesis. Although inactivation of purine biosynthesis genes can attenuate virulence, it is unclear which biochemical or virulence factors are associated with the purine biosynthesis pathway in vivo. We report that inactivation of purC, a gene encoding phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide synthase, caused complete loss of virulence in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous plants. The purC mutant was a purine auxotroph; it could not grow on minimal medium, whereas addition of purine derivatives, such as hypoxanthine or adenine plus guanine, restored growth of the mutant. The purC mutation also significantly enhanced the production of an unknown purine synthesis associated pigment and extracellular polysaccharides by the bacterium. In addition, comparative proteomic analyses of bacteria grown on rich and minimal media revealed that the purC mutation affected the expression levels of diverse proteins involved in purine and pyrimidine synthesis, carbon and energy metabolisms, iron uptake, proteolysis, protein secretion, and signal transduction. These results provided clues to understanding the contributions of purine synthesis to bacterial virulence and interactions with host immune systems.

  18. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  19. Brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of mammalian brain size is directly linked with the evolution of the brain's unique structure and performance. Both maternal life history investment traits and basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlate with relative brain size, but current hypotheses regarding the details of these relationships are based largely on placental mammals. Using encephalization quotients, partial correlation analyses, and bivariate regressions relating brain size to maternal investment times and BMR, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of brain size evolution in marsupials and placentals, whose reproduction and metabolism differ extensively. Our results show that the misconception that marsupials are systematically smaller-brained than placentals is driven by the inclusion of one large-brained placental clade, Primates. Marsupial and placental brain size partial correlations differ in that marsupials lack a partial correlation of BMR with brain size. This contradicts hypotheses stating that the maintenance of relatively larger brains requires higher BMRs. We suggest that a positive BMR–brain size correlation is a placental trait related to the intimate physiological contact between mother and offspring during gestation. Marsupials instead achieve brain sizes comparable to placentals through extended lactation. Comparison with avian brain evolution suggests that placental brain size should be constrained due to placentals’ relative precociality, as has been hypothesized for precocial bird hatchlings. We propose that placentals circumvent this constraint because of their focus on gestation, as opposed to the marsupial emphasis on lactation. Marsupials represent a less constrained condition, demonstrating that hypotheses regarding placental brain size evolution cannot be generalized to all mammals. PMID:20823252

  20. Brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2010-09-14

    The evolution of mammalian brain size is directly linked with the evolution of the brain's unique structure and performance. Both maternal life history investment traits and basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlate with relative brain size, but current hypotheses regarding the details of these relationships are based largely on placental mammals. Using encephalization quotients, partial correlation analyses, and bivariate regressions relating brain size to maternal investment times and BMR, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of brain size evolution in marsupials and placentals, whose reproduction and metabolism differ extensively. Our results show that the misconception that marsupials are systematically smaller-brained than placentals is driven by the inclusion of one large-brained placental clade, Primates. Marsupial and placental brain size partial correlations differ in that marsupials lack a partial correlation of BMR with brain size. This contradicts hypotheses stating that the maintenance of relatively larger brains requires higher BMRs. We suggest that a positive BMR-brain size correlation is a placental trait related to the intimate physiological contact between mother and offspring during gestation. Marsupials instead achieve brain sizes comparable to placentals through extended lactation. Comparison with avian brain evolution suggests that placental brain size should be constrained due to placentals' relative precociality, as has been hypothesized for precocial bird hatchlings. We propose that placentals circumvent this constraint because of their focus on gestation, as opposed to the marsupial emphasis on lactation. Marsupials represent a less constrained condition, demonstrating that hypotheses regarding placental brain size evolution cannot be generalized to all mammals.

  1. Childhood brain tumors, residential insecticide exposure, and pesticide metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Searles Nielsen, Susan; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Farin, Federico M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Preston-Martin, Susan; Mueller, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    Insecticides that target the nervous system may play a role in the development of childhood brain tumors (CBTs). Constitutive genetic variation affects metabolism of these chemicals. We analyzed population-based case-control data to examine whether CBT is associated with the functional genetic polymorphisms PON1C-108T, PON1Q192R, PON1L55M, BCHEA539T, FMO1C-9536A, FMO3E158K, ALDH3A1S134A, and GSTT1 (null). DNA was obtained from newborn screening archives for 201 cases and 285 controls, metabolic polymorphisms with CBT risk. However, we observed strong interactions between genotype and insecticide exposure during childhood. Among exposed children, CBT risk increased per PON1-108T allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-3.0] and FMO1-9536A (*6) allele (OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-5.9), whereas among children never exposed, CBT risk was not increased (PON1: OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5-1.0, interaction p = 0.005; FMO1: OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.6, interaction p = 0.009). We observed a similar but statistically nonsignificant interaction between childhood exposure and BCHEA539T (interaction p = 0.08). These interactions were present among both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children. Based on known effects of these variants, these results suggest that exposure in childhood to organophosphorus and perhaps to carbamate insecticides in combination with a reduced ability to detoxify them may be associated with CBT. Confirmation in other studies is required.

  2. Agmatine : metabolic pathway and spectrum of activity in brain.

    PubMed

    Halaris, Angelos; Plietz, John

    2007-01-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous neuromodulator that, based on animal studies, has the potential for new drug development. As an endogenous aminoguanidine compound (1-amino-4-guanidinobutane), it is structurally unique compared with other monoamines. Agmatine was long thought to be synthesised only in lower life forms, until its biosynthetic pathway (decarboxylation of arginine) was described in the mammalian brain in 1994. Human arginine decarboxylase has been cloned and shown to have 48% identity to ornithine decarboxylase. In neurons of the brain and spinal cord, agmatine is packaged into synaptic vesicles and released upon neuronal depolarisation. Other evidence of a neuromodulation role for agmatine is the presence of a specific cellular uptake mechanism and a specific metabolic enzyme (agmatinase; which forms putrescine).Initially, agmatine was conceptualised as an endogenous clonidine-displacing substance of imidazoline receptors; however, it has now been established to have affinity for several transmembrane receptors, such as alpha(2)-adrenergic, imidazoline I(1) and glutamatergic NMDA receptors. In addition to activity at these receptors, agmatine irreversibly inhibits neuronal nitric oxide synthase and downregulates inducible nitric oxide synthase. Endogenous agmatine is induced in response to stress and/or inflammation. Stressful conditions that induce agmatine include hypoxic-ischaemia and cold-restraint stress of ulcerogenic proportion. Induction of agmatine in the brain seems to occur in astrocytes, although neurons also synthesise agmatine. The effects of injected agmatine in animals include anticonvulsant-, antineurotoxic- and antidepressant-like actions. Intraperitoneal or intracerebroventricular injections of agmatine rapidly elicit antidepressant-like behavioural changes in the rodent forced swim test and tail suspension test. Intraperitoneal injections of agmatine into rats and mice also elicit acute anxiolytic-like behavioural changes in the elevated

  3. De novo purine biosynthesis by two pathways in Burkitt lymphoma cells and in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Reem, G H

    1972-05-01

    This study was designed to answer the question whether human lymphocytes and spleen cells were capable of de novo purine biosynthesis. Experiments were carried out in cell-free extracts prepared from human spleen, and from a cell line established from Burkitt lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma cells and human spleen cells could synthesize the first and second intermediates of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Cell-free extracts of all cell lines studied contained the enzyme systems which catalyze the synthesis of phosphoribosyl-1-amine, the first intermediate unique to the purine biosynthetic pathway and of phosphoribosyl glycinamide, the second intermediate of this pathway. Phosphoribosyl-1-amine could be synthesized in cell-free extracts from alpha-5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and glutamine, from PRPP and ammonia, and by an alternative pathway, directly from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia. These findings suggest that extrahepatic tissues may be an important source for the de novo synthesis of purine ribonucleotide in man. They also indicate that ammonia may play an important role in purine biosynthesis. The alternative pathway for the synthesis of phosphoribosyl-1-amine from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia was found to be subject to inhibition by the end products of the purine synthetic pathway, particularly by adenylic acid and to a lesser degree by guanylic acid. The alternative pathway for phosphoribosyl-1-amine synthesis from ribose-5-phosphate and ammonia may contribute significantly towards the regulation of the rate of de novo purine biosynthesis in the normal state, in metabolic disorders in which purines are excessively produced and in myeloproliferative diseases.

  4. Systematic analysis of transcription-level effects of neurodegenerative diseases on human brain metabolism by a newly reconstructed brain-specific metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Sertbaş, Mustafa; Ulgen, Kutlu; Cakır, Tunahan

    2014-01-01

    Network-oriented analysis is essential to identify those parts of a cell affected by a given perturbation. The effect of neurodegenerative perturbations in the form of diseases of brain metabolism was investigated by using a newly reconstructed brain-specific metabolic network. The developed stoichiometric model correctly represents healthy brain metabolism, and includes 630 metabolic reactions in and between astrocytes and neurons, which are controlled by 570 genes. The integration of transcriptome data of six neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia) with the model was performed to identify reporter features specific and common for these diseases, which revealed metabolites and pathways around which the most significant changes occur. The identified metabolites are potential biomarkers for the pathology of the related diseases. Our model indicated perturbations in oxidative stress, energy metabolism including TCA cycle and lipid metabolism as well as several amino acid related pathways, in agreement with the role of these pathways in the studied diseases. The computational prediction of transcription factors that commonly regulate the reporter metabolites was achieved through binding-site analysis. Literature support for the identified transcription factors such as USF1, SP1 and those from FOX families are known from the literature to have regulatory roles in the identified reporter metabolic pathways as well as in the neurodegenerative diseases. In essence, the reconstructed brain model enables the elucidation of effects of a perturbation on brain metabolism and the illumination of possible machineries in which a specific metabolite or pathway acts as a regulatory spot for cellular reorganization.

  5. [Purine in common plant food in China].

    PubMed

    Rong, Shengzhong; Zou, Lina; Wang, Zhaoxu; Pan, Hongzhi; Yang, Yuexin

    2012-01-01

    To determine the content of purine in plant food in China with HPLC. HPLC analysis was applied on Waters Atlantis T3 column (4.6mm x 250mm x 5 microm), using 10.0 mmol/L NH4COOH (pH 3.6) and CH3OH (99%/1%) as mobile phase and running at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The column temperature was 30 degrees C, and the detection wavelength was at 254nm. The content of purine varied significantly in different kinds of plant food. The content of purine in dried fungi and dried legumes and legume products was higher than that in other food, the content of purine in vegetables and vegetable products and fruits and fruit products was low. As a whole, the content of purine was: dried fungi and algae > dried legumes and legume products > nuts and fresh > seeds fungi and algae > cereal and cereals products > vegetables and vegetable products > fruit and fruit products > tubers, starches and products. The content of purine of dried fungi and algae and dried legumes and legume products in plant food was high. The content of purine was varied significantly in different kinds of plant food.

  6. Regional cerebral brain metabolism correlates of neuroticism and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Miller, Karen K; Klibanski, Anne; Fischman, Alan; Dougherty, Darin D; Blais, Mark A; Herzog, David B; Rauch, Scott L

    2006-01-01

    Factor-analytic approaches to human personality have consistently identified several core personality traits, such as Extraversion/Introversion, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, Consciousness, and Openness. There is an increasing recognition that certain personality traits may render individuals vulnerable to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorders and depression. Our purpose in this study was to explore correlates between the personality dimensions neuroticism and extraversion as assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and resting regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglu) in healthy control subjects. Based on the anxiety and depression literatures, we predicted correlations with a network of brain structures, including ventral and medial prefrontal cortex (encompassing anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex), insular cortex, anterior temporal pole, ventral striatum, and the amygdala. Twenty healthy women completed an (18F)FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography (PET) scan at rest and the NEO-FFI inventory. We investigated correlations between scores on NEO-FFI Neuroticism and Extraversion and rCMRglu using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). Within a priori search territories, we found significant negative correlations between Neuroticism and rCMRglu in the insular cortex and positive correlations between Extraversion and rCMRglu in the orbitofrontal cortex. No significant correlations were found involving anterior cingulate, amygdala, or ventral striatum. Neuroticism and Extraversion are associated with activity in insular cortex and orbitofrontal cortex, respectively.

  7. Brain Metabolism during Hallucination-Like Auditory Stimulation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horga, Guillermo; Fernández-Egea, Emilio; Mané, Anna; Font, Mireia; Schatz, Kelly C.; Falcon, Carles; Lomeña, Francisco; Bernardo, Miguel; Parellada, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia are typically characterized by rich emotional content. Despite the prominent role of emotion in regulating normal perception, the neural interface between emotion-processing regions such as the amygdala and auditory regions involved in perception remains relatively unexplored in AVH. Here, we studied brain metabolism using FDG-PET in 9 remitted patients with schizophrenia that previously reported severe AVH during an acute psychotic episode and 8 matched healthy controls. Participants were scanned twice: (1) at rest and (2) during the perception of aversive auditory stimuli mimicking the content of AVH. Compared to controls, remitted patients showed an exaggerated response to the AVH-like stimuli in limbic and paralimbic regions, including the left amygdala. Furthermore, patients displayed abnormally strong connections between the amygdala and auditory regions of the cortex and thalamus, along with abnormally weak connections between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that abnormal modulation of the auditory cortex by limbic-thalamic structures might be involved in the pathophysiology of AVH and may potentially account for the emotional features that characterize hallucinatory percepts in schizophrenia. PMID:24416328

  8. Brain metabolism during hallucination-like auditory stimulation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Horga, Guillermo; Fernández-Egea, Emilio; Mané, Anna; Font, Mireia; Schatz, Kelly C; Falcon, Carles; Lomeña, Francisco; Bernardo, Miguel; Parellada, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia are typically characterized by rich emotional content. Despite the prominent role of emotion in regulating normal perception, the neural interface between emotion-processing regions such as the amygdala and auditory regions involved in perception remains relatively unexplored in AVH. Here, we studied brain metabolism using FDG-PET in 9 remitted patients with schizophrenia that previously reported severe AVH during an acute psychotic episode and 8 matched healthy controls. Participants were scanned twice: (1) at rest and (2) during the perception of aversive auditory stimuli mimicking the content of AVH. Compared to controls, remitted patients showed an exaggerated response to the AVH-like stimuli in limbic and paralimbic regions, including the left amygdala. Furthermore, patients displayed abnormally strong connections between the amygdala and auditory regions of the cortex and thalamus, along with abnormally weak connections between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that abnormal modulation of the auditory cortex by limbic-thalamic structures might be involved in the pathophysiology of AVH and may potentially account for the emotional features that characterize hallucinatory percepts in schizophrenia.

  9. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  10. Graded perturbations of metabolism in multiple regions of human brain in Alzheimer's disease: Snapshot of a pervasive metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingshu; Begley, Paul; Church, Stephanie J.; Patassini, Stefano; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Jüllig, Mia; Curtis, Maurice A.; Waldvogel, Henry J.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Unwin, Richard D.; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that displays pathological characteristics including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Metabolic defects are also present in AD-brain: for example, signs of deficient cerebral glucose uptake may occur decades before onset of cognitive dysfunction and tissue damage. There have been few systematic studies of the metabolite content of AD human brain, possibly due to scarcity of high-quality brain tissue and/or lack of reliable experimental methodologies. Here we sought to: 1) elucidate the molecular basis of metabolic defects in human AD-brain; and 2) identify endogenous metabolites that might guide new approaches for therapeutic intervention, diagnosis or monitoring of AD. Brains were obtained from nine cases with confirmed clinical/neuropathological AD and nine controls matched for age, sex and post-mortem delay. Metabolite levels were measured in post-mortem tissue from seven regions: three that undergo severe neuronal damage (hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and middle-temporal gyrus); three less severely affected (cingulate gyrus, sensory cortex and motor cortex); and one (cerebellum) that is relatively spared. We report a total of 55 metabolites that were altered in at least one AD-brain region, with different regions showing alterations in between 16 and 33 metabolites. Overall, we detected prominent global alterations in metabolites from several pathways involved in glucose clearance/utilization, the urea cycle, and amino-acid metabolism. The finding that potentially toxigenic molecular perturbations are widespread throughout all brain regions including the cerebellum is consistent with a global brain disease process rather than a localized effect of AD on regional brain metabolism. PMID:26957286

  11. Kinetics of luminol sonochemiluminescence quenched by purines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lai, Yongquan; Chen, Meili; Jiang, Zhou; Chen, Guonan

    2013-01-01

    A homogeneous chemiluminescence (CL) reaction was initiated by ultrasound irradiation. Luminol sonochemiluminescence (SCL) reaction kinetics were determined under pseudo-first-order conditions, and the reaction followed the model for simple rise-fall kinetics. In addition, SCL quenching reactions induced by purines were also investigated in which the interactions between luminol and purines were analysed using the Stern-Volmer (S-V) mechanism. The results implied that the high rate constant of luminol CL quenched by purines may be attributed to ground state interactions originating from hydrogen bonding. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  13. Estrogen use and brain metabolic change in older adults. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Rasgon, N L; Small, G W; Siddarth, P; Miller, K; Ercoli, L M; Bookheimer, S Y; Lavretsky, H; Huang, S C; Barrio, J R; Phelps, M E

    2001-07-01

    Because estrogen may influence brain blood flow and metabolism in older adults, we used positron emission tomography to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolic change in post-menopausal women and men. Women estrogen users (n=4), women non-users (n=8) and men (n=10) were scanned at baseline and two years later. Analyses focused on glucose metabolism in lateral temporal, inferior parietal and posterior cingulate brain regions, previously reported to decline in non-demented older persons. No metabolic differences in cerebral regions of interest were found among groups at baseline. At follow-up, women estrogen users showed significantly increased glucose metabolism in the lateral temporal region, whereas women non-users and men exhibited no significant metabolic change in this region. These findings suggest that estrogen use may protect against regional cerebral metabolic decline in postmenopausal women.

  14. Gut Microbiota and the Gut-Brain Axis: New Insights in the Pathophysiology of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Clercq, Nicolien C; Frissen, Myrthe N; Groen, Albert K; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2017-10-01

    Emerging preclinical evidence has shown that the bidirectional signaling between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the brain, the so-called gut-brain axis, plays an important role in both host metabolism and behavior. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms of the brain-gut axis in relation to the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. A selective literature review was conducted to evaluate GI and brain interactions. Evidence suggests reduced microbial diversity in obesity and metabolic dysregulation. However, findings of microbiota composition in obese individuals are inconsistent, and the investigation of causality between gut microbiota and energy homeostasis is complex because multiple variables contribute to the gut microbiota composition. The microbial metabolites short chain fatty acids are found to exert numerous physiologic effects, including energy homeostasis through the regulation of GI hormones such as cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine, and leptin. Preclinical studies show that modifying rodents' microbiota through fecal transplantation results in alterations of these GI hormones and subsequently an altered metabolism and behavior. However, whether and to what extent preclinical findings translate to human metabolism is unclear. One of the major limitations and challenges in this field of research is interindividual variability of the microbiome. Future research needs to combine recent insights gained into tracking the dynamics of the microbiome as well as the metabolic responses. Furthermore, advanced mapping of the human microbiome is required to investigate the metabolic implications of the gut-brain axis to develop targeted interventions for obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Reassessing the relationship between brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2014-09-01

    A vigorous discussion surrounds the question as to what enables some mammals--including primates and cetaceans--to evolve large brains. We recently published a study suggesting that the radiation of marsupial mammals is highly relevant to this question because of the unique reproductive and metabolic traits within this clade. In particular, we controversially suggested that marsupial brain sizes are not systematically smaller than those of placentals, and that elevated basal metabolic rates (BMR) are not linked to larger marsupial brains. As our dataset was found to contain some erroneous body size data, derived from a published source, we here use an updated and corrected dataset and employ standard as well as phylogenetically corrected analyses to re-assess and elaborate on our original conclusions. Our proposal that marsupials are not systematically smaller-brained than placentals remains supported, particularly when the unusually large-brained placental clade, Primates, is excluded. Use of the new dataset not only confirms that high metabolic rates are not associated with larger brain size in marsupials, but we additionally find some support for a striking negative correlation between BMR and brain size. The best supported correlates of large brain size remain the reproductive traits of weaning age and litter size. These results support our suggestion that mammalian brain sizes (including, by inference, those of monotremes) are predominantly constrained by the ability of females to fuel the growth of their offspring's large brains, rather than by the maintenance requirements of the adult brain.

  16. Acute Alcohol Intoxication Decreases Glucose Metabolism but Increases Acetate Uptake in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wong, Christopher; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication results in marked reductions in brain glucose metabolism, which we hypothesized reflect not just its GABAergic enhancing effects but also metabolism of acetate as an alternative brain energy source. To test this hypothesis we separately assessed the effects of alcohol intoxication on brain glucose and acetate metabolism using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We found that alcohol intoxication significantly decreased whole brain glucose metabolism (measured with FDG) with the largest decrements in cerebellum and occipital cortex and the smallest in thalamus. In contrast, alcohol intoxication caused a significant increase in [1-11C]acetate brain uptake (measured as standard uptake value, SUV), with the largest increases occurring in cerebellum and the smallest in thalamus. In heavy alcohol drinkers [1-11C]acetate brain uptake during alcohol challenge trended to be higher than in occasional drinkers (p <0.06) and the increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake in cerebellum with alcohol were positively associated with the reported amount of alcohol consumed (r=0.66, p<0.01). Our findings corroborate a reduction of brain glucose metabolism during intoxication and document an increase in brain acetate uptake. The opposite changes observed between regional brain metabolic decrements and regional increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake support the hypothesis that during alcohol intoxication the brain may rely on acetate as an alternative brain energy source and provides preliminary evidence that heavy alcohol exposures may facilitate the use of acetate as an energy substrate. These findings raise the question of the potential therapeutic benefits that increasing plasma acetate concentration (ie ketogenic diets) may have in alcoholics undergoing alcohol detoxification. PMID:22947541

  17. Upregulated expression of brain enzymatic markers of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In animal models, the metabolic syndrome elicits a cerebral response characterized by altered phospholipid and unesterified fatty acid concentrations and increases in pro-apoptotic inflammatory mediators that may cause synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. We hypothesized that these changes are associated with phospholipase (PLA2) enzymes that regulate arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-6) acid metabolism, major polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain. Male Wistar rats were fed a control or high-sucrose diet for 8 weeks. Brains were assayed for markers of AA metabolism (calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 IVA and cyclooxygenases), DHA metabolism (calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA and lipoxygenases), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and synaptic integrity (drebrin and synaptophysin). Lipid concentrations were measured in brains subjected to high-energy microwave fixation. Results The high-sucrose compared with control diet induced insulin resistance, and increased phosphorylated-cPLA2 protein, cPLA2 and iPLA2 activity and 12-lipoxygenase mRNA, but decreased BDNF mRNA and protein, and drebrin mRNA. The concentration of several n-6 fatty acids in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and lysophosphatidylcholine was increased, as was unesterified AA concentration. Eicosanoid concentrations (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4) did not change. Conclusion These findings show upregulated brain AA and DHA metabolism and reduced BDNF and drebrin, but no changes in eicosanoids, in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome. These changes might contribute to altered synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment in rats and humans with the metabolic syndrome. PMID:23110484

  18. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  19. Childhood Brain Tumors, Residential Insecticide Exposure, and Pesticide Metabolism Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Susan Searles; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Farin, Federico M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Preston-Martin, Susan; Mueller, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticides that target the nervous system may play a role in the development of childhood brain tumors (CBTs). Constitutive genetic variation affects metabolism of these chemicals. Methods We analyzed population-based case–control data to examine whether CBT is associated with the functional genetic polymorphisms PON1C–108T, PON1Q192R, PON1L55M, BCHEA539T, FMO1C–9536A, FMO3E158K, ALDH3A1S134A, and GSTT1 (null). DNA was obtained from newborn screening archives for 201 cases and 285 controls, ≤ 10 years of age, and born in California or Washington State between 1978 and 1990. Conception-to-diagnosis home insecticide treatment history was ascertained by interview. Results We observed no biologically plausible main effects for any of the metabolic polymorphisms with CBT risk. However, we observed strong interactions between genotype and insecticide exposure during childhood. Among exposed children, CBT risk increased per PON1–108T allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–3.0] and FMO1–9536A (*6) allele (OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2–5.9), whereas among children never exposed, CBT risk was not increased (PON1: OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5–1.0, interaction p = 0.005; FMO1: OR = 1.0; 95% CI, 0.6–1.6, interaction p = 0.009). We observed a similar but statistically nonsignificant interaction between childhood exposure and BCHEA539T (interaction p = 0.08). These interactions were present among both Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children. Conclusion Based on known effects of these variants, these results suggest that exposure in childhood to organophosphorus and perhaps to carbamate insecticides in combination with a reduced ability to detoxify them may be associated with CBT. Confirmation in other studies is required. PMID:20056567

  20. PET Radiotracers: crossing the blood-brain barrier and surviving metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotracers for imaging protein targets in living human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly useful in clinical research and in drug development. Such radiotracers must fulfill many criteria, among which an ability to enter brain adequately and reversibly without contamination by troublesome radiometabolites is desirable for accurate measurement of the density of a target protein (e.g., neuroreceptor, transporter, enzyme or plaque). Candidate radiotracers may fail as a result of poor passive brain entry, rejection from brain by efflux transporters or undesirable metabolism. These issues are reviewed. Emerging PET radiotracers for measuring efflux transporter function, and new strategies for ameliorating radiotracer metabolism are discussed. A growing understanding of the molecular features affecting the brain penetration, metabolism and efflux transporter sensitivity of prospective radiotracers should ultimately lead to their more rational and efficient design, and also to their greater efficacy. PMID:19616318

  1. Extracellular Nucleotides in Exercise: Possible Effect on Brain Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A review of experiments which demonstrate the release of ATP from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and active brain tissue. Effects of exogenously applied ATP to brain tissue are discussed in relation to whole body exercise. (Author/SA)

  2. Extracellular Nucleotides in Exercise: Possible Effect on Brain Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A review of experiments which demonstrate the release of ATP from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and active brain tissue. Effects of exogenously applied ATP to brain tissue are discussed in relation to whole body exercise. (Author/SA)

  3. Brain glycogen—new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Linea F.; Müller, Margit S.; Walls, Anne B.; Sickmann, Helle M.; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies—it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology. PMID:22403540

  4. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients with purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency. Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids. 2004 Oct;23(8-9):1411-5. Erratum in: Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids. 2005;24(4):303. Citation on PubMed Nyhan ...

  6. Mathematical modeling of the human energy metabolism based on the Selfish Brain Theory.

    PubMed

    Chung, Matthias; Göbel, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Deregulations in the human energy metabolism may cause diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The origins of these pathologies are fairly unknown. The key role of the brain is the regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism. The Selfish Brain Theory identifies the priority of brain energy supply in the competition for available energy resources within the organism. Here, we review mathematical models of the human energy metabolism supporting central aspects of the Selfish Brain Theory. First, we present a dynamical system modeling the whole body energy metabolism. This model takes into account the two central control mechanisms of the brain, i.e., allocation and appetite. Moreover, we present mathematical models of regulatory subsystems. We examine a neuronal model which specifies potential elements of the brain to sense and regulate cerebral energy content. We investigate a model of the HPA system regulating the allocation of energy within the organism. Finally, we present a robust modeling approach of appetite regulation. All models account for a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus do shed light onto defects causing metabolic diseases.

  7. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases.

  8. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-01-01

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases. PMID:27374823

  9. Test-retest reproducibility for regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Overall, J. |||

    1996-05-01

    Changes in regional brain glucose metabolism as assessed with PET and FDG in response to acute administration of benzodiazepine agonists have been used as indicators of benzodiazepine-GABA receptor function. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of these responses. Sixteen healthy right-handed men were scanned with positron emission tomography (PET) and [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) twice: prior to placebo and prior to lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg). The same double FDG procedure was repeated 6-8 weeks later to assess test-retest reproducibility. The regional absolute brain metabolic values obtained during the second evaluation were significantly lower than those obtained for the first evaluation regardless of condition (p {le} 0.001). Lorazepam significantly and consistently decreased whole brain metabolism and the magnitude as well as the regional pattern of the changes was comparable for both studies (12.3 {plus_minus} 6.9% and 13.7 {plus_minus} 7.4%). Lorazepam effects were largest in thalamus (22.2 {plus_minus} 8.9%). Relative metabolic measures ROI/global were highly reproducible both for drug as well as replication condition. This is the first study to measure test-retest reproducibility in regional brain metabolic response to a pharmacological challenge. While the global and regional absolute metabolic values were significantly lower for the repeated evaluation, the regional brain metabolic response to lorazepam was highly reproducible.

  10. Dietary purines in vegetarian meat analogues.

    PubMed

    Havlik, Jaroslav; Plachy, Vladimir; Fernandez, Javier; Rada, Vojtech

    2010-11-01

    The meat alternatives market offers a wide range of products resembling meat in taste, flavour or texture but based on vegetable protein sources. These high protein-low purine foods may find application in a low purine or purine-free diet, which is sometimes suggested for subjects with increased serum urate levels, i.e. hyperuricaemia. We determined purine content (uric acid, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine) in 39 commercially available meat substitutes and evaluated them in relation to their protein content. Some of the products contained a comparable sum of adenine and hypoxanthine per protein as meat. Analysis of variance showed an influence of protein source used. Mycoprotein-based products had significantly higher contents (2264 mg kg(-1)) of adenine and hypoxanthine per kg of 100% protein than soybean-based products (1648 mg kg(-1)) or mixtures consisting of soybean protein and wheat protein (1239 mg kg(-1)). Protein-rich vegetable-based meat substitutes might be generally accepted as meat alternatives for individuals on special diets. The type of protein used to manufacture these products determines the total content of purines, which is relatively higher in the case of mycoprotein or soybean protein, while appearing lower in wheat protein and egg white-based products. These are therefore more suitable for dietary considerations in a low-purine diet for hyperuricaemic subjects. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry

  11. Gestation length, metabolic rate, and body and brain weights in primates: epigenetic effects.

    PubMed

    Little, B B

    1989-10-01

    The relationship of brain and body weights can be expressed in log-log regression: log (brain weight) = log (A) + B log (body weight). To investigate further the weights' similarity, gestation length and brain and body weights were determined from the literature for 46 primate genera. The results of allometric and path regression analyses suggest that the relationship between brain and body weights may not be mainly pleiotropic in the order Primates. The correlation between brain and body weights appears to be due to epigenetic factors in hyperplastic growth related to time constraint by gestation length and to energy utilization limitations imposed by metabolic rate.

  12. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no exposure, 50-minute

  13. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Vaska, Paul; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Alexoff, Dave; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Context The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. Objective To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes (“on” condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated (“off” condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm3) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Main Outcome Measure Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism (µmol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Results Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 µmol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67–4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001

  14. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  15. Brain glucose sensing, glucokinase and neural control of metabolism and islet function.

    PubMed

    Ogunnowo-Bada, E O; Heeley, N; Brochard, L; Evans, M L

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly apparent that the brain plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis, including the maintenance of blood glucose. This is achieved by various efferent pathways from the brain to periphery, which help control hepatic glucose flux and perhaps insulin-stimulated insulin secretion. Also, critically important for the brain given its dependence on a constant supply of glucose as a fuel--emergency counter-regulatory responses are triggered by the brain if blood glucose starts to fall. To exert these control functions, the brain needs to detect rapidly and accurately changes in blood glucose. In this review, we summarize some of the mechanisms postulated to play a role in this and examine the potential role of the low-affinity hexokinase, glucokinase, in the brain as a key part of some of this sensing. We also discuss how these processes may become altered in diabetes and related metabolic diseases.

  16. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  17. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  18. Intersubject variability of brain glucose metabolic measurements in young normal males

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1994-09-01

    This study evaluates intersubject variability on regional glucose metabolic values in a group of 50 healthy right-handed males between 20 and 40 yr of age. Brain glucose metabolism was measured using PET and 2-deoxy-2({sup 18}F)fluoro-D-glucose under resting conditions and was separately assessed for subjects in their twenties (n = 34) and those in their thirties (n = 16). Regional brain metabolic values showed signficant intersubject variability with coefficients of variation (CV) that ranged between 11.1% to 15.2% (twenties) and 7.2% to 12.6% (thirties). Relative measures (regional/global) were less variable than absolute measures and the CV ranged between 4.1% to 8.3% (twenties) and 3.9% to 10% (thirties). Whereas global brain metabolic rate for subjects in their twenties was not significantly different from that of subjects in their thirties, the metabolic rate in left frontal regions was significantly lower in the older subjects. The correlations between age and absolute and relative metabolism in the left frontal region were r = 0.438, p < 0.0002 and r = 0.447, p < 0.001, respectively. This study shows signficant intersubject variability for regional brain metabolic values in normal controls and documents age-related decreases in frontal metabolism that occur even in relatively young adults. 116 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Description and prediction of resting metabolic rate after stroke and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, David C; Ashcraft, Christine M

    2012-09-01

    To compare the effect of stroke on the metabolic rate compared with the effect of traumatic brain injury and to determine whether the metabolic rate is predictable in both types of brain injury. Indirect calorimetry was conducted prospectively in mechanically ventilated patients within the first 6 d of admission to a critical care unit owing to ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, isolated traumatic brain injury, or traumatic brain injury with collateral injuries. Clinical data were collected simultaneously and a predicted value of the resting metabolic rate was calculated using the Penn State equation (using body size, body temperature, and minute ventilation). One hundred thirty patients were measured. Ischemic stroke showed a lower incidence of fever, a lower body temperature, and a lower resting metabolic rate than the other groups; whereas in hemorrhagic stroke, these variables were similar to the trauma groups. Sedation decreased the resting metabolic rate, but this effect seemed particular to the trauma patients. The Penn State equation predicted the resting metabolic rate accurately 72% of the time, and when its component variables of body temperature and minute ventilation were controlled in an analysis of variance, all the differences among the brain injury and sedation groups were eliminated. Stroke is a hypermetabolic event most of the time. Body size, temperature, and minute ventilation explain most of the variation in the resting metabolic rate after traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries. The Penn State equation therefore predicts the resting metabolic rate in brain-injured patients no matter the mechanism of injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of cocaine on regional brain glucose metabolism is attenuated in dopamine transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Michaelides, Michael; Benveniste, Helene; Wang, Gene Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2008-05-01

    Cocaine's ability to block the dopamine transporter (DAT) is crucial for its reinforcing effects. However the brain functional consequences of DAT blockade by cocaine are less clear since they are confounded by its concomitant blockade of norepinephrineand serotonin transporters. To separate the dopaminergic from the non-dopaminergic effects of cocaine on brain function we compared the regional brain metabolic responses to cocaine between dopamine transporter deficient (DAT(-/-)) mice with that of their DAT(+/+) littermates. We measured regional brain metabolism (marker of brain function) with 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and microPET (muPET) before and after acute cocaine administration (i.p. 10 mg/kg). Scans were conducted 2 weeks apart. At baseline DAT(-/-) mice had significantly greater metabolism in thalamus and cerebellum than DAT(+/+). Acute cocaine decreased whole brain metabolismand this effect was greater in DAT(+/+) (15%) than in DAT(-/-) mice (5%). DAT(+/+) mice showed regional decreases in the olfactory bulb, motor cortex, striatum, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum whereas DAT(-/-) mice showed decreases only in thalamus. The differential pattern of regional responses to cocaine in DAT(-/-) and DAT(+/+) suggests that most of the brain metabolic changes from acute cocaine are due to DAT blockade. Cocaine-induced decreases in metabolism in thalamus (region with dense noradrenergic innervation) in DAT(-/-) suggest that these were mediated by cocaine's blockade of norepinephrine transporters. The greater baseline metabolism in DAT(-/-) than DAT(+/+) mice in cerebellum (brain region mostly devoid of DAT) suggests that dopamine indirectly regulates activity of these brain regions.

  1. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  2. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  3. Brain and Adrenal Metabolic Responses to Stress (The Role of Brain Catecholamines in Regulation of Response to Stress).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    Effects of Cold Water Stress and Hallucinogenics on Brain Amines The effects of cold water stress were compared to LSO, psilocybin , mescaline, and...A-AIS 552 STANFORD WNil CA -NANCY PRITZKER LAB OF BEHAVIORAL N-ETC F/6 6/19 BRAIN AND ADRENAL METABOLIC RESPONSES TO STRESS ( THE ROLE OF BR-fETC(U)1...STANDARDS- 1963-A 4 - FINAL REPORT ’-4 to the dOFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH for Contract N00014-75-C-0132 November 1974 - June 1980 SUBJECT: Brain and

  4. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  6. Preliminary study of brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ling; Fu, Chang; Xuan, Ang; Shi, Da-Peng; Gao, Yong-Ju; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Jun-Ling

    2015-02-05

    Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors. This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types. One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer, who visited People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013, were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology, which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases), squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases), and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases). The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of these cases was retrospectively studied. The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM) software, with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison. The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction. The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal, bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus. Besides, the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group. The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255) was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217) and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292). The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  7. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Endo, T; Uratani, B; Freese, E

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic chart of the purine salvage pathway of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6408059

  8. Systemic investigation of a brain-centered model of the human energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Britta; Langemann, Dirk

    2011-03-01

    The regulation of the human energy metabolism is crucial to ensure the functionality of the entire organism. Deregulations may lead to severe pathologies such as diabetes mellitus and obesity. The decisive role of the brain as active controller and heavy consumer in the complex whole-body energy metabolism is the object of recent research. Latest studies suggest the priority of the brain energy supply in the competition between brain and body periphery for the available energy resources. In this paper, a systemic investigation of the human energy metabolism is presented which consists of a compartment model including periphery, blood, and brain as well as signaling paths via insulin, appetite, and ingestion. The presented dynamical system particularly contains the competition for energy between brain and body periphery. Characteristically, the hormone insulin is regarded as central feedback signal of the brain. The model realistically reproduces the qualitative behavior of the energy metabolism. Short-time observations demonstrate the physiological periodic food intake generating the typical oscillating blood glucose variations. Integration over the daily cycle yields a long-term model which shows a stable behavior in accordance with the homeostatic regulation of the energy metabolism on a long-time scale. Two types of abstract constitutive equations describing the interaction between compartments and signals are taken into consideration. These are nonlinear and linear representatives from the class of feasible relations. The robustness of the model against the choice of the representative relation is linked to evolutionary stability of existing organisms.

  9. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  10. Tools for studying drug transport and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Meagan R; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Development of xenobiotics that cross the blood-brain barrier in therapeutically-relevant quantities is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking. However, central nervous system diseases are an under-addressed cause of high mortality and morbidity, and drug development in this field is a worthwhile venture. We aim to familiarize the reader with available methodologies for studying drug transport into the brain. Current understanding of the blood-brain barrier structure has been well-described in other manuscripts, and first we briefly review the path that xenobiotics take through the brain - from bloodstream, to endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, to interstitial space, to brain parenchymal cells, and then to an exit point from the central nervous system. The second half of the review discusses research tools available to determine if xenobiotics are making the journey through the brain successfully and offers commentary on the translational utility of each methodology. Theoretically, non-human mammalian and human blood-brain barriers are similar in composition; however, some findings demonstrate important differences across species. Translational methodologies may provide more reliable information about how a drug may act across species. The recent finding of lymphatic vessels within the central nervous system may provide new tools and strategies for drug delivery to the brain.

  11. Brain PET metabolic abnormalities in a case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Benjamin; Guedj, Eric; Daumas, Aurélie; Leveque, Pierre; Villani, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The role of brain 18F-FDG PET in the diagnostic evaluation of encephalitis has been recently suggested, especially in limbic encephalitis, but descriptions are mainly limited to small case reports. However, the evaluation of cerebral metabolism by 18F-FDG PET has never been described for varicella-zoster virus encephalitis. We report the first case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis in which 18F-FDG PET revealed brain metabolic abnormalities. Brain metabolic PET imaging was analyzed by comparing the patient's brain 18F-FDG PET scans to that of 12 healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism were found and evolved over time with treatment.

  12. Probing astrocyte metabolism in vivo: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the injured and aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Janna L.; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a brain injury, the mobilization of reactive astrocytes is part of a complex neuroinflammatory response that may have both harmful and beneficial effects. There is also evidence that astrocytes progressively accumulate in the normal aging brain, increasing in both number and size. These astrocyte changes in normal brain aging may, in the event of an injury, contribute to the exacerbated injury response and poorer outcomes observed in older traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors. Here we present our view that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), a neuroimaging approach that probes brain metabolism within a defined region of interest, is a promising technique that may provide insight into astrocyte metabolic changes in the injured and aging brain in vivo. Although 1H-MRS does not specifically differentiate between cell types, it quantifies certain metabolites that are highly enriched in astrocytes (e.g., Myo-inositol, mlns), or that are involved in metabolic shuttling between astrocytes and neurons (e.g., glutamate and glutamine). Here we focus on metabolites detectable by 1H-MRS that may serve as markers of astrocyte metabolic status. We review the physiological roles of these metabolites, discuss recent 1H-MRS findings in the injured and aging brain, and describe how an astrocyte metabolite profile approach might be useful in clinical medicine and clinical trials. PMID:26578948

  13. Dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation downregulates arachidonate but upregulates docosahexaenoate metabolizing enzymes in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rao, Jagadeesh S; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Igarashi, Miki

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deprivation increases expression of arachidonic acid (AA 20:4n-6)-selective cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) IVA and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in rat brain, while decreasing expression of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA 22:6n-3)-selective calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA. Assuming that these enzyme changes represented brain homeostatic responses to deprivation, we hypothesized that dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation would produce changes in the opposite directions. Methods Brain expression of PUFA-metabolizing enzymes and their transcription factors was quantified in male rats fed an n-6 PUFA adequate or deficient diet for 15 weeks post-weaning. Results The deficient compared with adequate diet increased brain mRNA, protein and activity of iPLA2 VIA and 15-lipoxygenase (LOX), but decreased cPLA2 IVA and COX-2 expression. The brain protein level of the iPLA2 transcription factor SREBP-1 was elevated, while protein levels were decreased for AP-2α and NF-κB p65, cPLA2 and COX-2 transcription factors, respectively. Conclusions With dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation, rat brain PUFA metabolizing enzymes and some of their transcription factors change in a way that would homeostatically dampen reductions in brain n-6 PUFA concentrations and metabolism, while n-3 PUFA metabolizing enzyme expression is increased. The changes correspond to reported in vitro enzyme selectivities for AA compared with DHA. (198 words) PMID:21070866

  14. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  15. [Carbohydrate metabolism in the brain in comatose states].

    PubMed

    Khapiĭ, Kh Kh; Gruzman, A B

    1990-01-01

    The article confirms an earlier discovered phenomenon that during comas and in post-coma periods the brain releases glucose and consumes lactate. It is suggested that the phenomenon is based on glucogenesis taking place in the brain from non-carbohydrate glucose precursors, which is phylogenetically predetermined and biologically expedient.

  16. Coordinate developmental regulation of purine catabolic enzyme expression in gastrointestinal and postimplantation reproductive tracts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Using histochemical detection, we have visualized in situ the complete metabolic pathway for the degradation of purine nucleotides. From the tongue to the ileum, diverse epithelial cell types lining the lumen of the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract strongly coexpress each of the five key purine catabolic enzymes. Dramatic increases in the expression of each enzyme occurred during postnatal maturation of the GI tract. Using in situ hybridization, an intense accumulation of adenosine deaminase (ADA) mRNA was detected only within GI epithelial cells undergoing postmitotic differentiation. In a similar manner, at the developing maternal-fetal interface, high level expression of the purine catabolic pathway also occurred in a unique subset of maternal decidual cells previously known to express high levels of alkaline phosphatase and ADA. This induction occurred almost immediately after implantation in the periembryonic maternal decidual cells, shortly thereafter in antimesometrial decidual cells, and later in cells of the placental decidua basalis: all of which contain cell types thought to be undergoing programmed cell death. The expression of the pathway at the site of embryo implantation appears to be critical because its pharmacologic inhibition during pregnancy has been found to be embryolethal or teratogenic. Purine destruction at these nutritional interfaces (placenta and gastrointestinal tract) seem to override any potential economy of purine salvage, and may represent biochemical adaptation to nucleic acid breakdown occurring in the context of dietary digestion or extensive programmed cell death. PMID:1918135

  17. Identification of a chemoreceptor that specifically mediates chemotaxis toward metabolizable purine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is an essential mechanism that enables bacteria to move toward favorable ecological niches. Escherichia coli, the historical model organism for studying chemotaxis, has five well-studied chemoreceptors. However, many bacteria with different lifestyle have more chemoreceptors, most of unknown function. Using a high throughput screening approach, we identified a chemoreceptor from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, named McpH, which specifically recognizes purine and its derivatives, adenine, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid. The latter five compounds form part of the purine degradation pathway, permitting their use as sole nitrogen sources. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that these six compounds bind McpH-Ligand Binding Domain (LBD) with very similar affinity. In contrast, non-metabolizable purine derivatives (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine), nucleotides, nucleosides or pyrimidines are unable to bind McpH-LBD. Mutation of mcpH abolished chemotaxis toward the McpH ligands identified - a phenotype that is restored by complementation. This is the first report on bacterial chemotaxis to purine derivatives and McpH the first chemoreceptor described that responds exclusively to intermediates of a catabolic pathway, illustrating a clear link between metabolism and chemotaxis. The evolution of McpH may reflect a saprophytic lifestyle, which would have exposed the studied bacterium to high concentrations of purines produced by nucleic acid degradation.

  18. Metabolic actions of Rho-kinase in periphery and brain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hu; Lee, Dae-Ho; Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has increased at an alarming rate in recent years and is now a worldwide public health problem. Elucidating the mechanisms behind the metabolic dysfunctions associated with obesity is of high priority. The metabolic function of Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been the subject of a great deal of investigation in metabolic-related diseases. It appears that inhibition of ROCK activity is beneficial for the treatment of a wide range of cardiovascular-related diseases. However, recent studies with genetic models of ROCK demonstrate that ROCK plays a positive role in insulin and leptin signaling. Here we discuss the newly identified functions of ROCK in regulating glucose and energy metabolism, with particularly emphasis on metabolic actions of insulin and leptin. PMID:23938132

  19. Large-scale in silico modeling of metabolic interactions between cell types in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nathan E; Schramm, Gunnar; Bordbar, Aarash; Schellenberger, Jan; Andersen, Michael P; Cheng, Jeffrey K; Patel, Nilam; Yee, Alex; Lewis, Randall A; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic interactions between multiple cell types are difficult to model using existing approaches. Here we present a workflow that integrates gene expression data, proteomics data and literature-based manual curation to model human metabolism within and between different types of cells. Transport reactions are used to account for the transfer of metabolites between models of different cell types via the interstitial fluid. We apply the method to create models of brain energy metabolism that recapitulate metabolic interactions between astrocytes and various neuron types relevant to Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of the models identifies genes and pathways that may explain observed experimental phenomena, including the differential effects of the disease on cell types and regions of the brain. Constraint-based modeling can thus contribute to the study and analysis of multicellular metabolic processes in the human tissue microenvironment and provide detailed mechanistic insight into high-throughput data analysis.

  20. Formation of A Novel Purine Metabolite through CYP3A4 Bioactivation and Glutathione Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Apuy, Julius L.; Xiang, Cathie; Franc, Sarah; Hegde, Sayee G.; Hubbard, Robert; Zhao, Jingjing; Moghaddam, Mehran F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study of novel sites of metabolism is important in understanding new mechanisms of biotransformation of a particular moiety by metabolic enzymes. This information is valuable in designing metabolically-stable compounds with drug-like properties. It may also provide insights into the existence of active and reactive metabolites. Methods: We utilized small scale incubations to generate adequate amounts of the metabolite of interest. After purification, LC-MS/MS and Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) were utilized to unequivocally assign the novel site of glutathione conjugation on the purine ring system. Results: A proposed novel site of glutathione conjugation was investigated on a diaminopurine-containing molecule. It was demonstrated that the formation of the glutathione conjugate at the C-6 position of the purine ring system was due to the bioactivation of the compound to a di-imine intermediate by CYP3A4, followed by the nucleophilic addition of glutathione. Conclusion: S-glutathionylation at C-6 position of a purine was proven unequivocally. This previously unreported mechanism constitutes a novel biotransformation for purines. PMID:27165340

  1. A metabolic-transcriptional network links sleep and cellular energetics in the brain.

    PubMed

    Wisor, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    This review proposes a mechanistic link between cellular metabolic status, transcriptional regulatory changes and sleep. Sleep loss is associated with changes in cellular metabolic status in the brain. Metabolic sensors responsive to cellular metabolic status regulate the circadian clock transcriptional network. Modifications of the transcriptional activity of circadian clock genes affect sleep/wake state changes. Changes in sleep state reverse sleep loss-induced changes in cellular metabolic status. It is thus proposed that the regulation of circadian clock genes by cellular metabolic sensors is a critical intermediate step in the link between cellular metabolic status and sleep. Studies of this regulatory relationship may offer insights into the function of sleep at the cellular level.

  2. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Basile, B; Lazcano, A; Oró, J

    1984-01-01

    The work done in many laboratories during the last two decades has confirmed that hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene are the two major precursors for the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, respectively. Although several different pathways for the synthesis of purines have been described, they are all variations of the initial mechanism proposed by Oró and Kimball, where hydrogen cyanide leads first to the formation of a 4,5-di-substituted imidazole derivative, and then to the closing of the purine ring with a C1 compound. A number of experiments have shown that purines and pyrimidines can also be obtained from methane, ammonia (nitrogen), and water mixtures, provided an activating source of energy (radiation, electric discharges, etc.) is available. However, in this case the yields are lower by about two orders of magnitude because of the intermediate formation of hydrogen cyanide and cyanoacetylene. The latter two compounds have been found in interstellar space, Titan and other bodies of the solar system. They were probably present in the primordial parent bodies from the solar nebula in concentrations of 10(-2) to 10(-3) M as inferred from recent calculations by Miller and coworkers obtained for the Murchison meteorite. These concentrations should have been sufficient to generate relatively large amounts of purine and pyrimidine bases on the primitive Earth.

  3. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food.

    PubMed

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  4. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  5. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P < 0.001), anterior vermis (40%, P < 0.001) and fusiform gyrus (20%, P < 0.001) compared with controls or siblings, and lower metabolism in hippocampus (12%, P = 0.05) compared with controls, and showed significant intersubject variability (decreases in vermis ranged from 18% to 60%). Participants with ataxia-telangiectasia also had higher metabolism in globus pallidus (16%, P = 0.05), which correlated negatively with motor performance. Asymptomatic relatives had lower metabolism in anterior vermis (12%; P = 0.01) and hippocampus (19%; P = 0.002) than controls. Our results indicate that, in addition to the expected decrease in cerebellar metabolism, participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had widespread changes in metabolic

  6. Effect of alternate energy substrates on mammalian brain metabolism during ischemic events.

    PubMed

    Koppaka, S S; Puchowicz; LaManna, J C; Gatica, J E

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of brain metabolism and cerebral blood flow involves complex control systems with several interacting variables at both cellular and organ levels. Quantitative understanding of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous brain control mechanisms during internal and external stimuli requires the development and validation of a computational (mathematical) model of metabolic processes in brain. This paper describes a computational model of cellular metabolism in blood-perfused brain tissue, which considers the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis. The model structure consists of neurons, astrocytes, extra-cellular space, and a surrounding capillary network. Each cell is further compartmentalized into cytosol and mitochondria. Inter-compartment interaction is accounted in the form of passive and carrier-mediated transport. Our model was validated against experimental data reported by Crumrine and LaManna, who studied the effect of ischemia and its recovery on various intra-cellular tissue substrates under standard diet conditions. The effect of ketone bodies on brain metabolism was also examined under ischemic conditions following cardiac resuscitation through our model simulations. The influence of ketone bodies on lactate dynamics on mammalian brain following ischemia is studied incorporating experimental data.

  7. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, B Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Marsh, Jeremy; Mukherjee, Purna

    2009-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect), malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  8. Metabolism of [U-13C]glucose in Human Brain Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Elizabeth A.; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bachoo, Robert M.; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Raisanen, Jack; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Jindal, Ashish; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Choi, Changho; Madden, Christopher; Mathews, Dana; Pascual, Juan M.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) and brain metastases demonstrate avid uptake of 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and display perturbations of intracellular metabolite pools by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These observations suggest that metabolic reprogramming contributes to brain tumor growth in vivo. The Warburg effect, excess metabolism of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen, is a hallmark of cancer cells in culture. FDG-positive tumors are assumed to metabolize glucose in a similar manner, with high rates of lactate formation compared to mitochondrial glucose oxidation, but few studies have specifically examined the metabolic fates of glucose in vivo. In particular, the capacity of human brain malignancies to oxidize glucose in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is unknown. Here we studied the metabolism of human brain tumors in situ. [U-13C]glucose was infused during surgical resection, and tumor samples were subsequently subjected to 13C NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of tumor metabolites revealed lactate production, as expected. We also determined that pyruvate dehydrogenase, turnover of the TCA cycle, anaplerosis and de novo glutamine and glycine synthesis contributed significantly to the ultimate disposition of glucose carbon. Surprisingly, less than 50% of the acetyl-CoA pool was derived from blood-borne glucose, suggesting that additional substrates contribute to tumor bioenergetics. This study illustrates a convenient approach that capitalizes on the high information content of 13C NMR spectroscopy and enables the analysis of intermediary metabolism in diverse malignancies growing in their native microenvironment. PMID:22419606

  9. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  10. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2014-12-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.; Matsumoto, Joyce H.

    2014-01-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. PMID:24721741

  12. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basile, B.; Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyramidines are surveyed. Topics examined include the synthesis of purines from HCN via 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivatives in aqueous solutions or liquid NH3, simultaneous formation of amino acids and purines by electron irradiation of CH4-NH3-H2O mixtures, synthesis of pyrimadines from cynoacetylene, energetics, formation of bases under anhydrous or concentrated conditions, formation of bases under dilute conditions, Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, and the role of activated intermediates. It is pointed out that the precursor compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, on Titan, and in other solar-system bodies, and that solar-nebula HCN concentrations of the order of 1-10 mM have been estimated on the basis of meteorite measurements.

  13. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basile, B.; Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyramidines are surveyed. Topics examined include the synthesis of purines from HCN via 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivatives in aqueous solutions or liquid NH3, simultaneous formation of amino acids and purines by electron irradiation of CH4-NH3-H2O mixtures, synthesis of pyrimadines from cynoacetylene, energetics, formation of bases under anhydrous or concentrated conditions, formation of bases under dilute conditions, Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, and the role of activated intermediates. It is pointed out that the precursor compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, on Titan, and in other solar-system bodies, and that solar-nebula HCN concentrations of the order of 1-10 mM have been estimated on the basis of meteorite measurements.

  14. Brain-regulated metabolic suppression during hibernation: a neuroprotective mechanism for perinatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2008-05-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the perinatal period is a major cause of chronic disability and acute mortality in newborns. Despite numerous therapeutic strategies that reduce hypoxia-ischemia-induced damage in different experimental animal models, most of them have failed to translate to clinical therapies. This challenge calls for an urgent need to explore novel approaches to develop effective therapies for the clinical management of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury. This review focuses on studies that investigate neuroprotective related events during mammalian hibernation, characterized by dramatic reductions in several parameters including body temperature, oxygen consumption and heart rate, such that it is difficult to tell if the hibernating animal is dead or alive. The first part of this article reviews the mechanisms of metabolic suppression related events during hibernation. In the second part, hypoxic-ischemic events in the perinatal brain are discussed, and in turn, contrasted with brains experiencing metabolic suppression during mammalian hibernation. In the last part of this article, the diverse neuroprotective adaptations of hibernators and the mechanisms that might be involved in mammalian hibernation, and how they could in turn, contribute to neurprotection during perinatal hypoxia-ischemia related injuries are discussed. This article appraises the novel idea that knowledge of the central mechanisms involved in the regulatory metabolic suppression, during which; hibernators switch themselves off without dissolving their brains could represent brain neuroprotective strategy for the clinical management of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injuries in newborns.

  15. Human brain metabolic response to caffeine and the effects of tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dager, S R; Layton, M E; Strauss, W; Richards, T L; Heide, A; Friedman, S D; Artru, A A; Hayes, C E; Posse, S

    1999-02-01

    Since there is limited information concerning caffeine's metabolic effects on the human brain, the authors applied a rapid proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging technique to dynamically measure regional brain metabolic responses to caffeine ingestion. They specifically measured changes in brain lactate due to the combined effects of caffeine's stimulation of glycolysis and reduction of cerebral blood flow. Nine heavy caffeine users and nine caffeine-intolerant individuals, who had previously discontinued or substantially curtailed use of caffeinated products because of associated anxiety and discomforting physiological arousal, were studied at baseline and then during 1 hour following ingestion of caffeine citrate (10 mg/kg). To assess state-trait contributions and the effects of caffeine tolerance, five of the caffeine users were restudied after a 1- to 2-month caffeine holiday. The caffeine-intolerant individuals, but not the regular caffeine users, experienced substantial psychological and physiological distress in response to caffeine ingestion. Significant increases in global and regionally specific brain lactate were observed only among the caffeine-intolerant subjects. Reexposure of the regular caffeine users to caffeine after a caffeine holiday resulted in little or no adverse clinical reaction but significant rises in brain lactate which were of a magnitude similar to that observed for the caffeine-intolerant group. These results provide direct evidence for the loss of caffeine tolerance in the human brain subsequent to caffeine discontinuation and suggest mechanisms for the phenomenon of caffeine intolerance other than its metabolic effects on elevating brain lactate.

  16. Imaging and spectroscopic approaches to probe brain energy metabolism dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bonvento, Gilles; Valette, Julien; Flament, Julien; Mochel, Fanny; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Changes in energy metabolism are generally considered to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Whether these changes are causal or simply a part of self-defense mechanisms is a matter of debate. Furthermore, energy defects have often been discussed solely in the context of their probable neuronal origin without considering the cellular heterogeneity of the brain. Recent data point towards the existence of a tri-cellular compartmentation of brain energy metabolism between neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, each cell type having a distinctive metabolic profile. Still, the number of methods to follow energy metabolism in patients is extremely limited and existing clinical techniques are blind to most cellular processes. There is a need to better understand how brain energy metabolism is regulated in health and disease through experiments conducted at different scales in animal models to implement new methods in the clinical setting. The purpose of this review is to offer a brief overview of the broad spectrum of methodological approaches that have emerged in recent years to probe energy metabolism in more detail. We conclude that multi-modal neuroimaging is needed to follow non-cell autonomous energy metabolism dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Higher brain extracellular potassium is associated with brain metabolic distress and poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Elevated brain potassium levels ([K+]) are associated with neuronal damage in experimental models. The role of brain extracellular [K+] in patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its association with hemorrhage load, metabolic dysfunction and outcome has not been studied so far. Methods Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) samples from 28 poor grade aSAH patients were analyzed for CMD [K+] for 12 consecutive days after ictus, and time-matched to brain metabolic and hemodynamic parameters as well as corresponding plasma [K+]. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized estimating equation with an autoregressive function to handle repeated observations of an individual patient. Results CMD [K+] did not correlate with plasma [K+] (Spearman’s ρ = 0.114, P = 0.109). Higher CMD [K+] was associated with the presence of intracerebral hematoma on admission head computed tomography, CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio >40 and CMD lactate >4 mmol/L (P < 0.05). In vitro retrodialysis data suggest that high CMD [K+] was of brain cellular origin. Higher CMD [K+] was significantly associated with poor 3-month outcome, even after adjusting for age and disease severity (P < 0.01). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that brain extracellular [K+] may serve as a biomarker for brain tissue injury in poor-grade aSAH patients. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of brain interstitial K+ levels in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury after aSAH. PMID:24920041

  18. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P < 0.001), anterior vermis (40%, P < 0.001) and fusiform gyrus (20%, P < 0.001) compared with controls or siblings, and lower metabolism in hippocampus (12%, P = 0.05) compared with controls, and showed significant intersubject variability (decreases in vermis ranged from 18% to 60%). Participants with ataxia-telangiectasia also had higher metabolism in globus pallidus (16%, P = 0.05), which correlated negatively with motor performance. Asymptomatic relatives had lower metabolism in anterior vermis (12%; P = 0.01) and hippocampus (19%; P = 0.002) than controls. Our results indicate that, in addition to the expected decrease in cerebellar metabolism, participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had widespread changes in metabolic

  19. Microwave effects on energy metabolism of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, A.P.; Schaefer, D.J.; Joines, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    Rat brain was exposed to 591-MHz, continuous-wave (CW) microwaves at 13.8 or 5.0 mW/cm2 to determine the effect on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced (NADH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and creatine phosphate (CP) levels. On initiation of the in vivo microwave exposures, fluorimetrically determined NADH rapidly increased to a maximum of 4.0%-12.5% above pre-exposure control levels at one-half minute, than decreased slowly to 2% above control at three minutes, finally increasing slowly to 5% above control level at five minutes. ATP and CP assays were performed on sham- and microwave-exposed brain at each exposure time. At 13.8 mW/cm2, brain CP level was decreased an average of 39.4%, 41.1%, 18.2%, 13.1%, and 36.4% of control at exposure points one-half, one, two three, and five minutes, respectively, and brain ATP concentration was decreased an average of 25.2%, 15.2%, 17.8%, 7.4%, and 11.2% of control at the corresponding exposure periods. ATP and CP levels of rat brain exposed to 591-MHz cw microwaves at 5mW/cm2 for one-half and one minute were decreased significantly below control levels at these exposure times, but were not significantly different from the 13.8 mW/cm2 exposures. For all exposures, rectal temperature remained constant. Heat loss through the skull aperture caused brain temperature to decrease during the five-minute exposures. This decrease was the same in magnitude for experimental and control subjects. Changes in NADH, ATP, and CP levels during microwave exposure cannot be attributed to general tissue hyperthermia. The data support the hypothesis that microwave exposure inhibits mitochondrial electron transport chain function, which results in decreased ATP and CP levels in brain.

  20. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    García-Suástegui, W A; Ramos-Chávez, L A; Rubio-Osornio, M; Calvillo-Velasco, M; Atzin-Méndez, J A; Guevara, J; Silva-Adaya, D

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism.

  1. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    García-Suástegui, W. A.; Ramos-Chávez, L. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M.; Calvillo-Velasco, M.; Atzin-Méndez, J. A.; Guevara, J.

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism. PMID:28163821

  2. CYP-mediated drug metabolism in the brain impacts drug response.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Douglas M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-10-09

    The functional role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the brain is an exciting and evolving field of research. CYPs are present and active in the brain, with heterogeneous patterns of expression, activity, and sensitivity to modulation across cell types, regions, and species. Despite total brain CYP expression being a fraction of hepatic CYP expression, the expanding literature of in vitro and in vivo experiments have provided evidence that brain CYPs can impact acute and chronic drug response, susceptibility to damage by neurotoxins, and are associated with altered personality, behaviour, and risk of neurological disease. They may also play a role in endogenous neurotransmitter and neurosteroid homeostasis. This review goes through the characterization of brain CYPs across species, the patterns of susceptibility of brain CYPs to exogenous induction, and recent preclinical evidence of the potential role of brain CYPs in vivo (e.g. CYP2D), along with the development of experiment paradigms that allow modulation of brain CYP activity without affecting CYP activity in the liver. Understanding brain CYP function, and changes therein, may provide unique strategies for the development of CNS-acting therapeutics metabolized locally in the brain, as well as therapeutics to target brain CYPs directly. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in male schizophrenic patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin-Chuen; Hung, Yi-Yung; Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome was found in patients with schizophrenia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was involved in energy metabolism and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but differently in males and females. We aimed to investigate the serum BDNF levels in patients with schizophrenia with and without metabolic syndrome. Patients with schizophrenia were recruited. Their demographic data were collected. Metabolic profiles and serum BDNF levels were measured. Clinical symptoms were evaluated with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Metabolic syndrome was determined with the criteria provided by Ministry of Health and Welfare of Taiwan. Framingham Risk Score (FRS) for estimate of 10-year risk for coronary heart disease was provided by National Institutes of Health. Of the 81 participants, 40.7% had metabolic syndrome. Those with metabolic syndrome had higher FRS. Using analysis of covariance adjusted for age and body mass index, male patients with schizophrenia with metabolic syndrome had higher serum BDNF levels than those without (4.6 ± 4.7 vs 3.3 ± 3.8 ng/mL, P = .022). No statistical difference was found between female patients with and without metabolic syndrome. Significant differences of serum BDNF levels were found between male patients with schizophrenia with and without metabolic syndrome, but not in females. This finding suggested the gender difference behind the mechanism of BDNF in metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia. PMID:28562580

  4. [Effect of cooking on the purine content of foods].

    PubMed

    Colling, M; Wolfram, G

    1987-12-01

    The total purine content and the content of purines bound in RNA and DNA was determined in selected food (veal meat, pork meat, pork liver, pork spleen, soja meat). Raw and boiled food samples were analysed. During preparation of food the total purine content is changed by losses of water or of purines into cooking water. Simultaneously, a great part of nucleic acids is hydrolysed.

  5. DIETARY N-6 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID DEPRIVATION INCREASES DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID METABOLISM IN RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deprivation in rodents reduces brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) concentration and 20:4n-6-preferring cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2-IVA) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, while increasing brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) concentration and DHA-selective Ca2+-independent iPLA2-VIA expression. We hypothesized that these changes are accompanied by upregulated brain DHA metabolic rates. Using a fatty acid model, brain DHA concentrations and kinetics were measured in unanesthetized male rats fed, for 15 weeks post-weaning, an n-6 PUFA “adequate” (31.4 wt% linoleic acid) or “deficient” (2.7 wt% linoleic acid) diet, each lacking 20:4n-6 and DHA. [1-14C]DHA was infused intravenously, arterial blood was sampled, and the brain was microwaved at 5 min and analyzed. Rats fed the n-6 PUFA deficient compared with adequate diet had significantly reduced n-6 PUFA concentrations in brain phospholipids but increased eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosapentaenoic acidn-3 (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3) and DHA (by 9.4%) concentrations, particularly in ethanolamine glycerophospholipid. Incorporation rates of unesterified DHA from plasma, which represent DHA metabolic loss from brain, were increased 45% in brain phospholipids, as was DHA turnover. Increased DHA metabolism following dietary n-6 PUFA deprivation may increase brain concentrations of antiinflammatory DHA metabolites, which with a reduced brain n-6 PUFA content, likely promote neuroprotection. (199 words) PMID:22117540

  6. Brain mitochondrial cytochromes P450: xenobiotic metabolism, presence of multiple forms and their selective inducibility.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, S V; Boyd, M R; Ravindranath, V

    1995-06-20

    The capability of rat brain mitochondria to metabolize a variety of xenobiotics was examined. The presence of cytochrome P450 (P450) and associated monooxygenase activities were estimated in isolated rat brain mitochondria and compared with the corresponding activities in microsomes. Total P450 content in brain mitochondria from naive rats was twice that of the corresponding microsomal level. The ability of brain mitochondria to metabolize the potent carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine was more than twofold that of the corresponding microsomal activity, while the 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activity was significantly lower in mitochondria. Immunoblot experiments using antisera to purified rat liver microsomal P450s, namely P450 (2B1/2B2), P4501A1, and P4502E1, and purified phenobarbital-inducible rat brain P450, revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands in isolated brain mitochondria. These various antibodies to P450 inhibited the brain mitochondrial monooxygenase activities to significant, though varying extent. The addition of antiserum to microsomal NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase did not affect the mitochondrial P450 associated monooxygenase activities, although it completely inhibited the corresponding microsomal activities. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in twofold induction of total P450 content and the monooxygenase activities known to be mediated by P4502E1, such as N-nitrosodimethylamine-N-demethylase and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase in brain mitochondria. Pretreatment of animals with phenobarbital resulted in the induction of aminopyrine N-demethylase activity in brain mitochondria. The study demonstrates the presence of multiple forms of P450 in the rat brain mitochondria, their inducibility, and their capability to metabolize xenobiotics.

  7. Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism During Resection of Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Merkel, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Sommer, Björn; Buchfelder, Michael; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Rössler, Karl

    2017-04-01

    Tissue oxygen tension is an important parameter for brain tissue viability and its noninvasive intraoperative monitoring in the whole brain is of highly clinical relevance. The purpose of this study was the introduction of a multiparametric quantitative blood oxygenation dependent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism during the resection of brain lesions. Sixteen patients suffering from brain lesions were examined intraoperatively twice (before craniotomy and after gross-total resection) via the quantitative blood oxygenation dependent technique and a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner, which is installed in an operating room. The MRI protocol included T2*- and T2 mapping and dynamic susceptibility weighted perfusion. Data analysis was performed with a custom-made, in-house MatLab software for calculation of maps of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) as well as of cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow. Perilesional edema showed a significant increase in both perfusion (cerebral blood volume +21%, cerebral blood flow +13%) and oxygen metabolism (OEF +32%, CMRO2 +16%) after resection of the lesions. In perilesional nonedematous tissue only, however, oxygen metabolism (OEF +19%, CMRO2 +11%) was significantly increased, but not perfusion. No changes were found in normal brain. Fortunately, no neurovascular adverse events were observed. This approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism in the whole brain is a new application of intraoperative MRI additionally to resection control (residual tumor detection) and updating of neuronavigation (brain shift detection). It may help to detect neurovascular adverse events early during surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Low-Field Magnetic Stimulation on Brain Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Wang, Ruiliang; Alexoff, Dave; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher; Pradhan, Kith; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Ma, Yeming; Jayne, Millard

    2010-01-01

    Echo Planar imaging (EPI), the gold standard technique for functional MRI (fMRI), is based on fast magnetic field gradient switching. These time-varying magnetic fields induce electric (E) fields in the brain that could influence neuronal activity; but this has not been tested. Here we assessed the effects of EPI on brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function) using PET and 18F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Fifteen healthy subjects were in a 4 T magnet during the 18FDG uptake period twice: with (ON) and without (OFF) EPI gradients pulses along the z-axis (Gz: 23 mT/m; 250 microsecond rise-time; 920 Hz). The E-field from these EPI pulses is non-homogeneous, increasing linearly from the gradient’s isocenter (radial and z directions), which allowed us to assess the correlation between local strength of the E-field and the regional metabolic differences between ON and OFF sessions. Metabolic images were normalized to metabolic activity in the plane positioned at the gradient’s isocenter where E=0 for both ON and OFF conditions. Statistical parametric analyses used to identify regions that differed between ON versus OFF (p<0.05, corrected) showed that the relative metabolism was lower in areas at the poles of the brain (inferior occipital and frontal and superior parietal cortices) for ON than for OFF, which was also documented with individual region of interest analysis. Moreover the magnitude of the metabolic decrements was significantly correlated with the estimated strength of E (r=0.68, p<0.0001); the stronger the E-field the larger the decreases. However, we did not detect differences between ON versus OFF conditions on mood ratings nor on absolute whole brain metabolism. This data provides preliminary evidence that EPI sequences may affect neuronal activity and merits further investigation. PMID:20156571

  9. IMMUNOSUPPRESSANT NEUROTOXICITY IN RAT BRAIN MODELS: OXIDATIVE STRESS AND CELLULAR METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Klawitter, Jelena; Gottschalk, Sven; Hainz, Carsten; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2010-01-01

    Co-administration of the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine (CsA) and the mTOR inhibitors sirolimus (SRL) or everolimus (RAD) increases efficacy of immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Neurotoxicity of CsA is a major clinical problem. Our goal was to assess the effects of CsA, SRL and RAD on the brain cell metabolism. The studies included the comparison of immunosuppressant-mediated effects on glucose metabolism, energy production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in perfused rat brain slices, primary rat astrocytes and C6-glioma cells. In brain slices and astrocytes, CsA inhibited Krebs cycle metabolism, while activating anaerobic glycolysis most likely to compensate for the inhibition of mitochondrial energy production. SRL and RAD inhibited cytosolic glycolysis, but did not cause changes in mitochondrial energy production. CsA+SRL inhibited Krebs cycle and glycolysis, thus reducing the ability of the cell to compensate for the negative effects of CsA on mitochondrial nucleoside triphosphate synthesis. In contrast to SRL at the concentrations tested, RAD reduced the CsA-induced ROS formation and antagonized CsA-induced effects on glucose and energy metabolism. Surprisingly, in C6 cells, SRL and RAD exposure resulted in high ROS concentrations without significant impairment of cell metabolism. Our results suggested that SRL enhances CsA-induced ROS formation and negative metabolic effects in brain cells, while RAD seems to antagonize the CsA effects. However, the three models showed different metabolic responses when challenged with the study drugs. In contrast to SRL, RAD enhances ROS formation in C6 glioma cells, but has only minor effects on normal rat brain tissue. PMID:20148532

  10. Single-cell imaging tools for brain energy metabolism: a review

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Alejandro; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Ceballo, Sebastian; Valdebenito, Rocío; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Romero-Gómez, Ignacio; Barros, L. Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Neurophotonics comes to light at a time in which advances in microscopy and improved calcium reporters are paving the way toward high-resolution functional mapping of the brain. This review relates to a parallel revolution in metabolism. We argue that metabolism needs to be approached both in vitro and in vivo, and that it does not just exist as a low-level platform but is also a relevant player in information processing. In recent years, genetically encoded fluorescent nanosensors have been introduced to measure glucose, glutamate, ATP, NADH, lactate, and pyruvate in mammalian cells. Reporting relative metabolite levels, absolute concentrations, and metabolic fluxes, these sensors are instrumental for the discovery of new molecular mechanisms. Sensors continue to be developed, which together with a continued improvement in protein expression strategies and new imaging technologies, herald an exciting era of high-resolution characterization of metabolism in the brain and other organs. PMID:26157964

  11. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  12. Rapid estrogen regulation of DHEA metabolism in the male and female songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Devaleena S.; Yu, Yan; Soma, Kiran K.

    2010-01-01

    In the songbird brain, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is metabolized to the active and aromatizable androgen androstenedione (AE) by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (3β-HSD). Thus, brain 3β-HSD plays a key role in regulating the steroidal milieu of the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that stress rapidly regulates brain 3β-HSD activity in a sex-specific manner. To elucidate endocrine regulation of brain 3β-HSD, we asked whether 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates DHEA metabolism in adult zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and whether there are sex-specific effects. Brain tissue was homogenized and centrifuged to obtain supernatant lacking whole cells and cell nuclei. Supernatant was incubated with [3H]DHEA and radioinert E2 in vitro. Within only 10 min, E2 significantly reduced 3β-HSD activity in both male and female brain. Interestingly, the rapid effects of E2 were more pronounced in females than males. These are the first data to show a rapid effect of estrogens on the songbird brain and suggest that rapid estrogen effects differ between male and female brains. PMID:17949414

  13. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of 15NH4+ into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of 15NH4+ into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of 15NH4+ into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of 15N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia. PMID:24346692

  14. Crosstalk of Signaling and Metabolism Mediated by the NAD(+)/NADH Redox State in Brain Cells.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ulrike; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The energy metabolism of the brain has to be precisely adjusted to activity to cope with the organ's energy demand, implying that signaling regulates metabolism and metabolic states feedback to signaling. The NAD(+)/NADH redox state constitutes a metabolic node well suited for integration of metabolic and signaling events. It is affected by flux through metabolic pathways within a cell, but also by the metabolic state of neighboring cells, for example by lactate transferred between cells. Furthermore, signaling events both in neurons and astrocytes have been reported to change the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. Vice versa, a number of signaling events like astroglial Ca(2+) signals, neuronal NMDA-receptors as well as the activity of transcription factors are modulated by the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. In this short review, this bidirectional interdependence of signaling and metabolism involving the NAD(+)/NADH redox state as well as its potential relevance for the physiology of the brain and the whole organism in respect to blood glucose regulation and body weight control are discussed.

  15. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H; Raichlen, David A; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W; Ross, Stephen R

    2016-05-19

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day(-1)) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day(-1), respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day(-1)), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history.

  16. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history

    PubMed Central

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H.; Raichlen, David A.; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E.; Lambert, Estelle V.; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W.; Ross, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity1. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day−1) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day−1, respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day−1), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history. PMID:27144364

  17. A New HPLC Purine Assay for Quantifying Microbial Flow

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A HPLC method was developed to quantify the purines adenine and guanine and their metabolites xanthine and hypoxanthine in hydrolysates of isolated bacteria and omasal digesta and to assess the effect of using either purines only, or purines plus metabolites, as microbial markers for estimating micr...

  18. Age Drives Distortion of Brain Metabolic, Vascular and Cognitive Functions, and the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jared D; Parikh, Ishita; Green, Stefan J; Chlipala, George; Mohney, Robert P; Keaton, Mignon; Bauer, Bjoern; Hartz, Anika M S; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Advancing age is the top risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the contribution of aging processes to AD etiology remains unclear. Emerging evidence shows that reduced brain metabolic and vascular functions occur decades before the onset of cognitive impairments, and these reductions are highly associated with low-grade, chronic inflammation developed in the brain over time. Interestingly, recent findings suggest that the gut microbiota may also play a critical role in modulating immune responses in the brain via the brain-gut axis. In this study, our goal was to identify associations between deleterious changes in brain metabolism, cerebral blood flow (CBF), gut microbiome and cognition in aging, and potential implications for AD development. We conducted our study with a group of young mice (5-6 months of age) and compared those to old mice (18-20 months of age) by utilizing metabolic profiling, neuroimaging, gut microbiome analysis, behavioral assessments and biochemical assays. We found that compared to young mice, old mice had significantly increased levels of numerous amino acids and fatty acids that are highly associated with inflammation and AD biomarkers. In the gut microbiome analyses, we found that old mice had increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and alpha diversity. We also found impaired blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and reduced CBF as well as compromised learning and memory and increased anxiety, clinical symptoms often seen in AD patients, in old mice. Our study suggests that the aging process involves deleterious changes in brain metabolic, vascular and cognitive functions, and gut microbiome structure and diversity, all which may lead to inflammation and thus increase the risk for AD. Future studies conducting comprehensive and integrative characterization of brain aging, including crosstalk with peripheral systems and factors, will be necessary to define the

  19. Mitochondrial Damage: A Diagnostic and Metabolic Approach in Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-29

    performed in 50-100 ul blood ( depend on the severity of mitochondrial damage). The data of dipstick test in blood for complex I and PDH is shown in... mitochondrial dysfunction are induced by chronic stress in rat brain. Neuropsychopharmacology 2001;24:420-9. 13. Manoli I, Alesci S, Blackman MR, Su YA, Rennert...REPORT Mitochondrial Damage: A Diagnostic and Metabolic Approach in Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Disorder 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY

  20. Developmental changes in metabolism and transport properties of capillaries isolated from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Betz, A L; Goldstein, G W

    1981-01-01

    1. Capillaries were isolated from the brains of 1- to 45-day-old rats in order to study the development of metabolic and transport aspects of the blood-brain barrier. 2. The hydroxyproline content of capillary hydrolysates increased nearly threefold between 5 and 45 days of age. This finding is consistent with histological studies showing thickening of capillary basement membrane during development. 3. The activities of L-DOPA decarboxylase and monoamine oxidase were greatest in capillaries from 10-day-old rat brain. Thus, the metabolic blood-brain barrier for amine precursors is present during early development. 4. Capillaries from all ages were able to metabolize glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate. The rate of glucose oxidation more than doubled between 21 and 30 days of age but subsequently decreased. In contrast, beta-hydroxybutyrate and palmitate oxidation increased throughout development. These data suggest a sparing effect by alternate fuels on glucose metabolism. 5. Capillary glucose uptake was similar at 10 and 30 days of age and activity of the ouabain-sensitive K+ pump (measured using 86Rb+) was relatively constant at all ages. In contrast, Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transport was not present until after 21 days of age. Since this transport system may be responsible for the active efflux of neutral amino acids from brain to blood, it is likely that this process does not occur at the immature blood-brain barrier. 6. We conclude that various aspects of brain capillary functions show distinct developmental patterns which may be related to changes in blood-brain barrier permeability during development. PMID:7264999

  1. Effect of aging on brain respiration and carbohydrate metabolism of Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Fox, J H; Parmacek, M S; Patel-Mandlik, K

    1975-01-01

    Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of aging on brain slice respiration and metabolism. Young animals (average age 8 months) and old animals (average age 18 months) were incubated under standard conditions with the following parameters being measured: oxygen uptake, 14CO2 production, glucose utilization, lactate and pyruvate formation. No differences were found in the two groups. It is still very likely that subtle differences exist but can only be documented under conditions of metabolic stress.

  2. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation. PMID:26528968

  3. Energy Metabolism of the Brain, Including the Cooperation between Astrocytes and Neurons, Especially in the Context of Glycogen Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Goschorska, Marta; Nowacki, Przemysław; Chlubek, Dariusz; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena

    2015-10-29

    Glycogen metabolism has important implications for the functioning of the brain, especially the cooperation between astrocytes and neurons. According to various research data, in a glycogen deficiency (for example during hypoglycemia) glycogen supplies are used to generate lactate, which is then transported to neighboring neurons. Likewise, during periods of intense activity of the nervous system, when the energy demand exceeds supply, astrocyte glycogen is immediately converted to lactate, some of which is transported to the neurons. Thus, glycogen from astrocytes functions as a kind of protection against hypoglycemia, ensuring preservation of neuronal function. The neuroprotective effect of lactate during hypoglycemia or cerebral ischemia has been reported in literature. This review goes on to emphasize that while neurons and astrocytes differ in metabolic profile, they interact to form a common metabolic cooperation.

  4. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia.

  5. Metabolic correlatives of brain activity in a FOS epilepsy patient.

    PubMed

    Peca, Stefano; Carnì, Marco; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Aprile, Teresa; Hagberg, Gisela E; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Manfredi, Mario; Mangia, Silvia; Garreffa, Girolamo; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2010-02-01

    The correlation and the interactions between neuronal activity and underlying metabolic dynamics are still a matter of debate, especially in pathological conditions. This study reports findings obtained on a subject suffering from fixation-off sensitivity (FOS) epilepsy, exploited as a model system of triggerable anomalous electrical activity. Functional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy was used to investigate the metabolic response to visual spike-inducing stimuli in a single voxel placed in the temporo-occipital lobe of a FOS epilepsy patient. MRS measurements were additionally performed on a control group of five healthy volunteers. The FOS patient also underwent an EEG session with the same stimulus paradigm. Uniquely in the FOS patient, glutamate and glutamine concentration increased during the first 10 min of stimulation and then returned to baseline. On the other hand, FOS-induced epileptic activity (spiking) endured throughout all the stimulation epoch. The observed metabolic dynamics may be likely linked to a complex interplay between alterations of the metabolic pathways of glutamate and modulation of the neuronal activity. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Impact of lead toxicity on brain metabolisms of nucleic acid and catecholamine in protein malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Chatterjee, A K; Gupta, M

    1992-10-01

    The brain biochemistry in terms of certain key substances of brain were studied in 18% protein and 6% protein-fed rats following lead ingestion at a level of 1% in the diet. Lead ingestion diminished the protein and increased the RNA content of brain, and, consequently reduced the protein/RNA ratio. The RNA/DNA ratio in brain was elevated in lead toxicity, while the protein/DNA ratio remained unaltered. The RNase and DNase activities of brain were decreased. Lead treatment diminished the glutathione (GSH) level of blood but the GSH level of brain was not altered significantly by the lead treatment. The plasma protein level was also diminished after lead treatment. The effects of lead on some of these parameters were found to be more pronounced in rats receiving the 6% protein diet. The serotonin (5-HT) level of brain was reduced, while the norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) levels of brain were elevated following lead treatment. The monoamine oxidase (MAO) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activities and 5-hydroxy-indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) content of brain were elevated in lead-ingested rats. The effects of lead on these parameters were found to be potentiated when the rats were fed on a 6% protein diet. These studies suggest that lead at the present dose affects brain biochemistry in terms of both nucleic acids and amine metabolism, and protein deficiency potentiates some of these lead-induced changes.

  7. Determinants of brain metabolism changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chassoux, Francine; Artiges, Eric; Semah, Franck; Desarnaud, Serge; Laurent, Agathe; Landre, Elisabeth; Gervais, Philippe; Devaux, Bertrand; Helal, Ourkia Badia

    2016-06-01

    To determine the main factors influencing metabolic changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We prospectively studied 114 patients with MTLE (62 female; 60 left HS; 15- to 56-year-olds) with (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and correlated the results with the side of HS, structural atrophy, electroclinical features, gender, age at onset, epilepsy duration, and seizure frequency. Imaging processing was performed using statistical parametric mapping. Ipsilateral hypometabolism involved temporal (mesial structures, pole, and lateral cortex) and extratemporal areas including the insula, frontal lobe, perisylvian regions, and thalamus, more extensively in right HS (RHS). A relative increase of metabolism (hypermetabolism) was found in the nonepileptic temporal lobe and in posterior areas bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry detected unilateral hippocampus atrophy and gray matter concentration decrease in both frontal lobes, more extensively in left HS (LHS). Regardless of the structural alterations, the topography of hypometabolism correlated strongly with the extent of epileptic networks (mesial, anterior-mesiolateral, widespread mesiolateral, and bitemporal according to the ictal spread), which were larger in RHS. Notably, widespread perisylvian and bitemporal hypometabolism was found only in RHS. Mirror hypermetabolism was grossly proportional to the hypometabolic areas, coinciding partly with the default mode network. Gender-related effect was significant mainly in the contralateral frontal lobe, in which metabolism was higher in female patients. Epilepsy duration correlated with the contralateral temporal metabolism, positively in LHS and negatively in RHS. Opposite results were found with age at onset. High seizure frequency correlated negatively with the contralateral metabolism in LHS. Epileptic networks, as assessed by electroclinical correlations, appear to be the main determinant of

  8. Isolation of fast purine nucleotide synthase ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Matthew W L; Cadieux, Kelly E C; Unrau, Peter J

    2004-12-08

    Here we report the in vitro selection of fast ribozymes capable of promoting the synthesis of a purine nucleotide (6-thioguanosine monophosphate) from tethered 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and 6-thioguanine ((6S)Gua). The two most proficient purine synthases have apparent efficiencies of 284 and 230 M(-1) min(-1) and are both significantly more efficient than pyrimidine nucleotide synthase ribozymes selected previously by a similar approach. Interestingly, while both ribozymes showed good substrate discrimination, one ribozyme had no detectable affinity for 6-thioguanine while the second had a K(m) of approximately 80 muM, indicating that these ribozymes use considerably different modes of substrate recognition. The purine synthases were isolated after 10 rounds of selection from two high-diversity RNA pools. The first pool contained a long random sequence region. The second pool contained random sequence elements interspersed with the mutagenized helical elements of a previously characterized 4-thiouridine synthase ribozyme. While nearly all of the ribozymes isolated from this biased pool population appeared to have benefited from utilizing one of the progenitor's helical elements, little evidence for more complicated secondary structure preservation was evident. The discovery of purine synthases, in addition to pyrimidine synthases, demonstrates the potential for nucleotide synthesis in an 'RNA World' and provides a context from which to study small molecule RNA catalysis.

  9. Sex Differences in Regional Brain Glucose Metabolism Following Opioid Withdrawal and Replacement.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giovanni C; Carrion, Joseph; Patel, Krishna; Vilchez, Crystal; Veith, Jennifer; Brodie, Jonathan D; Dewey, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are currently the most common pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence. Interestingly, the clinical response to these drugs appears to be sex specific. That is, females exhibit superior therapeutic efficacy, defined as extended periods of abstinence and longer time to relapse, compared with males. However, the underlying metabolic effects of opioid withdrawal and replacement have not been examined. Therefore, using (18)FDG and microPET, we measured differences in regional brain glucose metabolism in males and females following morphine withdrawal and subsequent methadone or buprenorphine replacement. In both males and females, spontaneous opioid withdrawal altered glucose metabolism in regions associated with reward and drug dependence. Specifically, metabolic increases in the thalamus, as well as metabolic decreases in insular cortex and the periaqueductal gray, were noted. However, compared with males, females exhibited increased metabolism in the preoptic area, primary motor cortex, and the amygdala, and decreased metabolism in the caudate/putamen and medial geniculate nucleus. Methadone and buprenorphine initially abolished these changes uniformly, but subsequently produced their own regional metabolic alterations that varied by treatment and sex. Compared with sex-matched control animals undergoing spontaneous opioid withdrawal, male animals treated with methadone exhibited increased caudate/putamen metabolism, whereas buprenorphine produced increased ventral striatum and motor cortex metabolism in females, and increased ventral striatum and somatosensory cortex metabolism in males. Notably, when treatment effects were compared between sexes, methadone-treated females showed increased cingulate cortex metabolism, whereas buprenorphine-treated females showed decreased metabolism in cingulate cortex and increased metabolism in the globus pallidus. Perhaps the initial similarities in males and females underlie early therapeutic

  10. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of whole-brain irradiation on the specific brain regions in a rat model: Metabolic and histopathological changes.

    PubMed

    Bálentová, Soňa; Hnilicová, Petra; Kalenská, Dagmar; Murín, Peter; Hajtmanová, Eva; Lehotský, Ján; Adamkov, Marian

    2017-03-19

    Effect of ionizing radiation on the brain affects neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell population and lead to significant morphological, metabolic, and functional deficits. In the present study we investigated a dose- and time-dependent correlation between radiation-induced metabolic and histopathological changes. Adult male Wistar rats received a total dose of 35Gy delivered in 7 fractions (dose 5Gy per fraction) once per week in the same weekday during 7 consecutive weeks. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to determine whether radiation-induced alteration of the brain metabolites correlates with appropriate histopathological changes of neurogenesis and glial cell response in 2 neurogenic regions: the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb axis (SVZ-OB axis). Evaluation of the brain metabolites 18-19 weeks after irradiation performed by (1)H MRS revealed a significant decrease in the total N-acetylaspartate to total creatine (tNAA/tCr) ratio in the striatum and OB. A significant decline of gamma-aminobutyric acid to tCr (GABA/tCr) ratio was seen in the OB and hippocampus. MR revealed absence of gross inflammatory or necrotic lesions in these regions. Image analysis of the brain sections 18-21 weeks after the exposure showed a radiation-induced increase of neurodegeneration, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong resemblance to the reactive astrogliosis. Results showed that fractionated whole-brain irradiation led to the changes in neurotransmission and to the loss of neuronal viability in vivo. Metabolic changes were closely associated with histopathological findings, i.e. initiation of neuronal cell death, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong response of astrocytes indicated development of late radiation-induced changes.

  12. Effect of domoic acid on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Arias, B; Arufe, M; Alfonso, M; Duran, R

    1995-04-01

    Domoic acid (Dom) is a neurotoxic secondary amino acid that interacts with the glutamate receptors, producing neurological problems. In the present work, we study the effects of Dom on the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in discrete rat brain regions. The effects of Dom on the brain metabolism of serotonin are also discussed in this paper. Dom stimulates the rat brain serotoninergic system, increasing differentially the synthesis and the catabolism of 5-HT and the elimination of 5-HIAA.

  13. Brain Morphometric Correlates of Metabolic Variables in HIV: The CHARTER Study

    PubMed Central

    ARCHIBALD, S.L.; MCCUTCHAN, J.A.; SANDERS, C.; WOLFSON, T.; JERNIGAN, T.L.; ELLIS, R.J.; ANCES, B.M.; COLLIER, A.C.; MCARTHUR, J.C.; MORGELLO, S.; SIMPSON, D.M.; MARRA, C.; GELMAN, B.B.; CLIFFORD, D.B.; GRANT, I.; FENNEMA-NOTESTINE, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Obesity and other metabolic variables are associated with abnormal brain structural volumes and cognitive dysfunction in HIV-uninfected populations. Since individuals with HIV infection on combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) often have systemic metabolic abnormalities and changes in brain morphology and function, we examined associations among brain volumes and metabolic factors in the multi-site CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort. Design: Cross-sectional study of 222 HIV-infected individuals. Methods: Metabolic variables included body mass index (BMI), total blood cholesterol (C), low- and high-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C and HDL-C), blood pressure, random blood glucose, and diabetes. MRI measured volumes of cerebral white matter, abnormal white matter, cortical and subcortical gray matter, and ventricular and sulcal CSF. Multiple linear regression models allowed us to examine metabolic variables separately and in combination to predict each regional volume. Results: Greater body mass index (BMI) was associated with smaller cortical gray and larger white matter volumes. Higher total cholesterol (C) levels were associated with smaller cortex volumes; higher LDL-C was associated with larger cerebral white matter volumes, while higher HDL-C levels were associated with larger sulci. Higher blood glucose levels and diabetes were associated with more abnormal white matter. Conclusions: Multiple atherogenic metabolic factors contribute to regional brain volumes in HIV-infected, CART-treated patients, reflecting associations similar to those found in HIV-uninfected individuals. These risk factors may accelerate cerebral atherosclerosis and consequent brain alterations and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25227933

  14. Metabolism of acetyl-L-carnitine for energy and neurotransmitter synthesis in the immature rat brain.

    PubMed

    Scafidi, Susanna; Fiskum, Gary; Lindauer, Steven L; Bamford, Penelope; Shi, Da; Hopkins, Irene; McKenna, Mary C

    2010-08-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is an endogenous metabolic intermediate that facilitates the influx and efflux of acetyl groups across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Exogenously administered ALCAR has been used as a nutritional supplement and also as an experimental drug with reported neuroprotective properties and effects on brain metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine oxidative metabolism of ALCAR in the immature rat forebrain. Metabolism was studied in 21-22 day-old rat brain at 15, 60 and 120 min after an intraperitoneal injection of [2-(13)C]acetyl-L-carnitine. The amount, pattern, and fractional enrichment of (13)C-labeled metabolites were determined by ex vivo(13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolism of the acetyl moiety from [2-(13)C]ALCAR via the tricarboxylic acid cycle led to incorporation of label into the C4, C3 and C2 positions of glutamate (GLU), glutamine (GLN) and GABA. Labeling patterns indicated that [2-(13)C]ALCAR was metabolized by both neurons and glia; however, the percent enrichment was higher in GLN and GABA than in GLU, demonstrating high metabolism in astrocytes and GABAergic neurons. Incorporation of label into the C3 position of alanine, both C3 and C2 positions of lactate, and the C1 and C5 positions of glutamate and glutamine demonstrated that [2-(13)C]ALCAR was actively metabolized via the pyruvate recycling pathway. The enrichment of metabolites with (13)C from metabolism of ALCAR was highest in alanine C3 (11%) and lactate C3 (10%), with considerable enrichment in GABA C4 (8%), GLN C3 (approximately 4%) and GLN C5 (5%). Overall, our (13)C-NMR studies reveal that the acetyl moiety of ALCAR is metabolized for energy in both astrocytes and neurons and the label incorporated into the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Cycling ratios showed prolonged cycling of carbon from the acetyl moiety of ALCAR in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Labeling of compounds formed from metabolism of [2-(13)C]ALCAR via the pyruvate recycling pathway

  15. Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Regulates Escherichia coli Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Longkun; Maruvada, Ravi; Sapirstein, Adam; Malik, Kafait U.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 meningitis occurs following penetration of the blood-brain barrier, but the underlying mechanisms involved in E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that host cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) contributes to E. coli invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. cPLA2α selectively liberates arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that host 5-lipoxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid, cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs), contribute to E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC and penetration into the brain, and their contributions involve protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). These findings demonstrate that arachidonic acid metabolism regulates E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, and studies are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms involved with metabolic products of arachidonic acid for their contribution to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:20696828

  16. Selfish brain and selfish immune system interplay: A theoretical framework for metabolic comorbidities of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Ana Sayuri; Mansur, Rodrigo Barbachan; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Rosenstock, Tatiana; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    According to the "selfish brain" theory, the brain regulates its own energy supply influencing the peripheral metabolism and food intake according to its needs. The immune system has been likewise "selfish" due to independent energy consumption; and it may compete with the brain (another high energy-consumer) for glucose. In mood disorders, stress in mood episodes or physiological stress activate homeostasis mechanisms from the brain and the immune system to solve the imbalance. The interaction between the selfish brain and the selfish immune system may explain various conditions of medical impairment in mood disorders, such as Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and immune dysregulation. The objective of this study is to comprehensively review the literature regarding the competition between the brain and the immune system for energy substrate. Targeting the energetic regulation of the brain and the immune system and their cross-talk open alternative treatments and a different approach in the study of general medical comorbidities in mood disorders, although more investigation is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  18. Imaging brain signal transduction and metabolism via arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2012-02-10

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M(1,3,5), serotonergic 5-HT(2A/2C), dopaminergic D(2)-like (D(2), D(3), D(4)) or glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  20. Evidence for a relationship between body mass and energy metabolism in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schmoller, André; Hass, Torben; Strugovshchikova, Olga; Melchert, Uwe H; Scholand-Engler, Harald G; Peters, Achim; Schweiger, Ulrich; Hohagen, Fritz; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2010-07-01

    Cerebral energy metabolism has been suggested to have an important function in body weight regulation. We therefore examined whether there is a relationship between body mass and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism in the human brain. On the basis of our earlier findings indicating a neuroprotective preferential energy supply of the brain, as compared with peripheral muscle on experimentally induced hypoglycemia, we examined whether this physiological response is preserved also in low-weight and obese participants. We included 45 healthy male subjects with a body mass index (BMI) ranging from 17 to 44 kg/m(2). Each participant underwent a hypoglycemic glucose-clamp intervention, and the ATP metabolism, that is, the content of high-energy phosphates phosphocreatine (PCr) and ATP, was measured repeatedly by (31)phosphor magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) in the cerebral cortex and skeletal muscle. Results show an inverse correlation between BMI and high-energy phosphate content in the brain (P<0.01), whereas there was no such relationship found between skeletal muscle and BMI. The hypoglycemic clamp intervention did not affect the ATP metabolism in both tissues. Our data show an inverse correlation between BMI and cerebral high-energy phosphate content in healthy humans, suggesting a close relationship between energetic supply of the brain and body weight regulation.

  1. Glucose and oxygen metabolism after penetrating ballistic-like brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Kentaro, Shimoda; Diaz, Julio; Yokobori, Shoji; Spurlock, Markus; Diaz, Daniel; Jackson, Clayton; Wick, Alexandra; Zhao, Weizhao; Leung, Lai Y; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank; Bullock, M Ross

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in all age groups. Among TBI, penetrating traumatic brain injuries (PTBI) have the worst prognosis and represent the leading cause of TBI-related morbidity and death. However, there are no specific drugs/interventions due to unclear pathophysiology. To gain insights we looked at cerebral metabolism in a PTBI rat model: penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Early after injury, regional cerebral oxygen tension and consumption significantly decreased in the ipsilateral cortex in the PBBI group compared with the control group. At the same time point, glucose uptake was significantly reduced globally in the PBBI group compared with the control group. Examination of Fluorojade B-stained brain sections at 24 hours after PBBI revealed an incomplete overlap of metabolic impairment and neurodegeneration. As expected, the injury core had the most severe metabolic impairment and highest neurodegeneration. However, in the peri-lesional area, despite similar metabolic impairment, there was lesser neurodegeneration. Given our findings, the data suggest the presence of two distinct zones of primary injury, of which only one recovers. We anticipate the peri-lesional area encompassing the PBBI ischemic penumbra, could be salvaged by acute therapies. PMID:25669903

  2. Alterations in brain metabolism during the first year of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Kim, Hyun; Soulas, Caroline; Lee, Vallent; Venna, Nagagopal; Halpern, Elkan F.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Williams, Kenneth; González, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Migration of both uninfected and infected monocytes into the brain during acute HIV infection likely initiates metabolic changes that can be observed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Herein, we measured changes in brain metabolism during the first year of HIV infection and examined the relationship of these metabolite levels to CD16+ monocyte populations measured in the blood. MRS was performed on nine HIV+ subjects identified during acute HIV infection and nine seronegative control subjects. HIV+ subjects were examined within 90 days of an indeterminate Western blot, then again 2 and 6 months later, during early infection. Blood samples were collected for plasma viral RNA and monocyte subset quantification. HIV+ subjects were identified with acute viral ailment and did not display severe cognitive deficits such as dementia or minor cognitive motor disorder. Changes in lipid membrane metabolism (choline levels) in the frontal cortex and white matter were observed during the initial year of HIV infection. Greater numbers of CD16+ monocytes were associated with lower N-acetylaspartate levels and higher choline levels in the brain. These results suggest that HIV infection induces metabolic changes in the brain early during infection and that these changes may be related to monocyte dynamics in the periphery. PMID:21494901

  3. The MAO A genotype does not modulate resting brain metabolism in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Kriplani, Aarti; Pradhan, Kith; Ma, Jim Yeming; Logan, Jean; Williams, Benjamin; Craig, Ian W.; Telang, Frank; Tomasi, Dardo; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the monoamine-oxidase-A gene has been associated with volumetric changes in corticolimbic regions with differences in their response to relevant emotional tasks. Here we show no changes in baseline regional brain metabolism as a function of genotype indicating that, unchallenged, corticolimbic activity is not modulated by the MAOA genotype. PMID:18706791

  4. Influence of oxygen therapy on glucose-lactate metabolism after diffuse brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Michael; Schaller, Benoit; Widmer, Hans Rudolf; Seiler, Rolf; Bullock, Ross

    2004-08-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes a huge metabolic load on brain tissue, which can be summarized initially as a state of hypermetabolism and hyperglycolysis. In experiments O2 consumption has been shown to increase early after trauma, especially in the presence of high lactate levels and forced O2 availability. In recent clinical studies the effect of increasing O2 availability on brain metabolism has been analyzed. By their nature, however, clinical trauma models suffer from a heterogeneous injury distribution. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a standardized diffuse brain injury model, the effect of increasing the fraction of inspired O2 on brain glucose and lactate levels, and to compare this effect with the metabolism of the noninjured sham-operated brain. A diffuse severe TBI model developed by Foda and Maramarou, et al., in which a 420-g weight is dropped from a height of 2 m was used in this study. Forty-one male Wistar rats each weighing approximately 300 g were included. Anesthesized rats were monitored by placing a femoral arterial line for blood pressure and blood was drawn for a blood gas analysis. Two time periods were defined: Period A was defined as preinjury and Period B as postinjury. During Period B two levels of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) were studied: air (FiO2 0.21) and oxygen (FiO2 1). Four groups were studied including sham-operated animals: air-air-sham (AAS); air-O2-sham (AOS); air-air-trauma (AAT); and air-O2-trauma (AOT). In six rats the effect of increasing the FiO2 on serum glucose and lactate was analyzed. During Period B lactate values in the brain determined using microdialysis were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the AOT group than in the AAT group and glucose values in the brain determined using microdialysis were significantly higher (p < 0.04). No differences were demonstrated in the other groups. Increasing the FiO2 had no significant effect on the serum levels of glucose and lactate. Increasing the Fi

  5. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  6. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P; Ploner, Markus; Friston, Karl J; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-12

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using "eyes open" versus "eyes closed" conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders.

  7. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using “eyes open” versus “eyes closed” conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders. PMID:26712010

  8. Deletion of TRAAK Potassium Channel Affects Brain Metabolism and Protects against Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Laigle, Christophe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Viola, Angèle

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral stroke is a worldwide leading cause of disability. The two-pore domain K+ channels identified as background channels are involved in many functions in brain under physiological and pathological conditions. We addressed the hypothesis that TRAAK, a mechano-gated and lipid-sensitive two-pore domain K+ channel, is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia. We studied the effects of TRAAK deletion on brain morphology and metabolism under physiological conditions, and during temporary focal cerebral ischemia in Traak−/− mice using a combination of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We provide the first in vivo evidence establishing a link between TRAAK and neurometabolism. Under physiological conditions, Traak−/− mice showed a particular metabolic phenotype characterized by higher levels of taurine and myo-inositol than Traak+/+ mice. Upon ischemia, Traak−/− mice had a smaller infarcted volume, with lower contribution of cellular edema than Traak+/+ mice. Moreover, brain microcirculation was less damaged, and brain metabolism and pH were preserved. Our results show that expression of TRAAK strongly influences tissue levels of organic osmolytes. Traak−/− mice resilience to cellular edema under ischemia appears related to their physiologically high levels of myo-inositol and of taurine, an aminoacid involved in the modulation of mitochondrial activity and cell death. The beneficial effects of TRAAK deletion designate this channel as a promising pharmacological target for the treatment against stroke. PMID:23285272

  9. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets.

    PubMed

    Dehghani M, Masoumeh; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João M N; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of (13)C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized (13)C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of (13)C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from (13)C-(13)C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters.The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of (13)C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in (13)C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of (13)C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Regional development of carbachol-, glutamate-, norepinephrine-, and serotonin-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; Candura, S M; Costa, L G

    1991-09-19

    Phosphoinositide metabolism stimulated by activation of cholinergic muscarinic, glutamatergic, alpha-adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors was measured in brain regions of the developing rats. Accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates ([3H]InsPs) in [3H]inositol-prelabeled slices from cerebral cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Large age-, neurotransmitter receptor-, and brain region-dependent differences were found. Carbachol-stimulated [3H]InsPs accumulation peaked on postnatal day 7 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus while in cerebellum and brainstem the effect of muscarinic stimulation was maximal at birth and then declined to adulthood. The effect of glutamate also showed a peak on day 7 in hippocampus and brainstem and a developmentally related decrease in cerebral cortex. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the response to glutamate remained sustained through adulthood. Stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by norepinephrine increased with age in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but decreased in the cerebellum, while the effect of serotonin did not change significantly with age except in cerebellum. These changes in receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism do not parallel, for the most part, the ontogeny of receptor recognition sites. Activation of the phosphoinositide metabolism pathway leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and to stimulation of protein kinase C, which are believed to play significant roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Thus, the differential ability of neurotransmitters to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis might play a role in the development of brain regions.

  11. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  12. [Brain metabolism alterations in patients with anorexia nervosa observed in 1H-MRS].

    PubMed

    Grzelak, Piotr; Gajewicz, Witold; Wyszogrodzka-Kucharska, Anna; Rotkiewicz, Arkadiusz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Góraj, Bozena; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2005-01-01

    The causes of metabolic brain changes in patients with anorexia nervosa are still not fully explained. The purpose of this study was to use the 1H-MRS method in investigating metabolic changes in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa. We studied 10 patients for visible alternations in brain metabolism and compared the results to healthy controls. 1H-MRS was acquired by the method of single voxels in white and grey matter. Proton MRS was performed after image guided localization using stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence with a short echo time of 20 ms. For data evaluation we used standard Siemens software and the additional PC. Choosing of the MRS sequences was related with particular interest in metabolites of short time echo: myoinositol and lipids. Besides this we evaluated peaks of: N-acetylaspartate (NAN), creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho). The results show significant differences in the levels of metabolites connected with fatty metabolism. In white matter we observed the reduction of lip-peak. The data was evaluated approximately and presented as lip:Cr. We did not observe any differences in other metabolites. As far as we know similar results had been reported and our study confirmed significant disorders in metabolism of these chemicals in patients with anorexia nervosa.

  13. GPCRs regulate the assembly of a multienzyme complex for purine biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Florence; An, Songon; Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Kyoung, Minjoung; Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit exogenous signals to the nucleus, promoting a myriad of biological responses via multiple signaling pathways in both normal and cancer cells. However, little is known about the response in cytosolic metabolic pathways to GPCR-mediated signaling. Here, we applied fluorescent live-cell imaging and label-free dynamic mass redistribution assays to study whether purine metabolism is associated with GPCR signaling. By screening a library of GPCR ligands in conjunction with live-cell imaging of a metabolic multienzyme complex for de novo purine biosynthesis, the purinosome, we demonstrated that the activation of endogenous Gαi-coupled receptors correlates with purinosome assembly/disassembly in native HeLa cells. Given the implications of GPCRs in mitogenic signaling as well as the purinosome in controlling metabolic flux via de novo purine biosynthesis, we hypothesize that regulation of purinosome assembly/disassembly may represent one of downstream events of mitogenic GPCR signaling in human cancer cells. PMID:22020552

  14. GPCRs regulate the assembly of a multienzyme complex for purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Florence; An, Songon; Ferrie, Ann M; Sun, Haiyan; Kyoung, Minjoung; Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2011-10-23

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit exogenous signals to the nucleus, promoting a myriad of biological responses via multiple signaling pathways in both healthy and cancerous cells. However, little is known about the response of cytosolic metabolic pathways to GPCR-mediated signaling. Here we applied fluorescent live-cell imaging and label-free dynamic mass redistribution assays to study whether purine metabolism is associated with GPCR signaling. Through a library screen of GPCR ligands in conjunction with live-cell imaging of a metabolic multienzyme complex for de novo purine biosynthesis, the purinosome, we demonstrated that the activation of endogenous Gα(i)-coupled receptors correlates with purinosome assembly and disassembly in native HeLa cells. Given the implications of GPCRs in mitogenic signaling and of the purinosome in controlling metabolic flux via de novo purine biosynthesis, we hypothesize that regulation of purinosome assembly and disassembly may be one of the downstream events of mitogenic GPCR signaling in human cancer cells.

  15. Metabolic Rate Regulation by the Renin-Angiotensin System: Brain vs. Body

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Justin L.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Liu, Xuebo; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports a role for the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the regulation of metabolic function, but an apparent paradox exists where genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the RAS occasionally have similar physiological effects as chronic angiotensin infusion. Similarly, while RAS targeting in animal models has robust metabolic consequences, effects in humans are more subtle. Here we review the data supporting a role for the RAS in metabolic rate regulation and propose a model where the local brain RAS works in opposition to the peripheral RAS, thus helping to explain the paradoxically similar effects of RAS supplementation and inhibition. Selectively modulating the peripheral RAS or brain RAS may thus provide a more effective treatment paradigm for obesity and obesity-related disorders. PMID:22491893

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates local brain metabolism, brain edema and inflammatory response in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongming; Yang, Yanyan; Tang, Hong; Sun, Wenjiang; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Smerin, Daniel; Liu, Jiachuan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can provide some clinically curative effects on blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The specific mechanism by which this occurs still remains unknown, and no standardized time or course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment is currently used. In this study, bTBI was produced by paper detonators equivalent to 600 mg of TNT exploding at 6.5 cm vertical to the rabbit's head. HBO (100% O2 at 2.0 absolute atmospheres) was used once, 12 h after injury. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to investigate the impact of HBOT on the metabolism of local injured nerves in brain tissue. We also examined blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain water content, apoptotic factors, and some inflammatory mediators. Our results demonstrate that hyperbaric oxygen could confer neuroprotection and improve prognosis after explosive injury by promoting the metabolism of local neurons, inhibiting brain edema, protecting BBB integrity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and inhibiting the inflammatory response. Furthermore, timely intervention within 1 week after injury might be more conducive to improving the prognosis of patients with bTBI.

  17. First demonstration that brain CYP2D-mediated opiate metabolic activation alters analgesia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaidi; Khokhar, Jibran Y.; Zhao, Bin; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2013-01-01

    The response to centrally-acting drugs is highly variable between individuals and does not always correlate with plasma drug levels. Drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes in the brain may contribute to this variability by affecting local drug and metabolite concentrations. CYP2D metabolizes codeine to the active morphine metabolite. We investigate the effect of inhibiting brain, and not liver, CYP2D activity on codeine-induced analgesia. Rats received intracerebroventricular injections of CYP2D inhibitors (20 μg propranolol or 40 μg propafenone) or vehicle controls. Compared to vehicle-pretreated rats, inhibitor-pretreated rats had: a) lower analgesia in the tail-flick test (p<0.05) and lower areas under the analgesia-time curve (p<0.02) within the first hour after 30 mg/kg subcutaneous codeine, b) lower morphine concentrations and morphine to codeine ratios in the brain (p<0.02 and p<0.05, respectively), but not in plasma (p>0.6 and p>0.7, respectively), tested at 30 min after 30 mg/kg subcutaneous codeine, and c) lower morphine formation from codeine ex vivo by brain membranes (p<0.04), but not by liver microsomes (p>0.9). Analgesia trended toward a correlation with brain morphine concentrations (p=0.07) and correlated with brain morphine to codeine ratios (p<0.005), but not with plasma morphine concentrations (p>0.8) or plasma morphine to codeine ratios (p>0.8). Our findings suggest that brain CYP2D affects brain morphine levels after peripheral codeine administration, and may thereby alter codeine's therapeutic efficacy, side-effect profile and abuse liability. Brain CYPs are highly variable due to genetics, environmental factors and age, and may therefore contribute to interindividual variation in the response to centrally-acting drugs. PMID:23623752

  18. Non-invasive Quantification of Whole-brain Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Oxygen by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Ge, Yulin; Lu, Hanzhang

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an important marker for brain function and brain health. Existing techniques for quantification of CMRO2 with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or MRI involve special equipment and/or exogenous agent, and may not be suitable for routine clinical studies. In the present study, a non-invasive method is developed to estimate whole-brain CMRO2 in humans. This method applies phase-contrast MRI for quantitative blood flow measurement and T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging (TRUST) MRI for venous oxygenation estimation, and uses the Fick principle of arteriovenous difference for the calculation of CMRO2. Whole-brain averaged CMRO2 values in young, healthy subjects were 132.1±20.0 μmol/100g/min, in good agreement with literature reports using PET. Various acquisition strategies for phase-contrast and TRUST MRI were compared, and it was found that non-gated phase-contrast and sagittal sinus TRUST MRI were able to provide the most efficient and accurate estimation of CMRO2. In addition, blood flow and venous oxygenation were found to be positively correlated across subjects. Owing to the non-invasive nature of this method, it may be a convenient and useful approach for assessment of brain metabolism in brain disorders as well as under various physiologic conditions. PMID:19353674

  19. Cerebral energy metabolism and the brain's functional network architecture: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Louis-David; Expert, Paul; Huckins, Jeremy F; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2013-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have emphasized the contributions of synchronized activity in distributed brain networks to cognitive processes in both health and disease. The brain's ‘functional connectivity' is typically estimated from correlations in the activity time series of anatomically remote areas, and postulated to reflect information flow between neuronal populations. Although the topological properties of functional brain networks have been studied extensively, considerably less is known regarding the neurophysiological and biochemical factors underlying the temporal coordination of large neuronal ensembles. In this review, we highlight the critical contributions of high-frequency electrical oscillations in the γ-band (30 to 100 Hz) to the emergence of functional brain networks. After describing the neurobiological substrates of γ-band dynamics, we specifically discuss the elevated energy requirements of high-frequency neural oscillations, which represent a mechanistic link between the functional connectivity of brain regions and their respective metabolic demands. Experimental evidence is presented for the high oxygen and glucose consumption, and strong mitochondrial performance required to support rhythmic cortical activity in the γ-band. Finally, the implications of mitochondrial impairments and deficits in glucose metabolism for cognition and behavior are discussed in the context of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative syndromes characterized by large-scale changes in the organization of functional brain networks. PMID:23756687

  20. De novo purine nucleotide synthesis in the rat small and large intestine: effect of dietary protein and purines.

    PubMed

    LeLeiko, N S; Bronstein, A D; Baliga, B S; Munro, H N

    1983-05-01

    This study assessed the pathway for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis in rat small intestinal and colonic mucosal cells, and determined the effects of dietary purines and protein on de novo purine nucleotide synthetic activity in the small intestine in vitro. Incubation of small intestinal mucosal scrapings with [14C]glycine failed to show an active pathway of de novo synthesis; in contrast, the colon showed incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA. Rats fed a diet deficient in purines demonstrated increased incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA-adrenine in small intestinal mucosal cells. Measurement of glutamine-amidophosphoribosyltransferase demonstrated that, regardless of the purine content of the diet, enzyme activity in the small intestine is significantly lower than in the colon or liver. The results indicate that, in the small intestine of the rat, there is an inactive de novo pathway of purine nucleotide biosynthesis that can be stimulated when purines are omitted from the diet.

  1. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  2. Unbiased Metabolomic Investigation of Alzheimer's Disease Brain Points to Dysregulation of Mitochondrial Aspartate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; Stocchero, Matteo; Cacciatore, Stefano; Lai, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Keller, Markus; Ralser, Markus; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2016-02-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of adult dementia. Yet the complete set of molecular changes accompanying this inexorable, neurodegenerative disease remains elusive. Here we adopted an unbiased lipidomics and metabolomics approach to surveying frozen frontal cortex samples from clinically characterized AD patients (n = 21) and age-matched controls (n = 19), revealing marked molecular differences between them. Then, by means of metabolomic pathway analysis, we incorporated the novel molecular information into the known biochemical pathways and compared it with the results of a metabolomics meta-analysis of previously published AD research. We found six metabolic pathways of the central metabolism as well as glycerophospholipid metabolism predominantly altered in AD brains. Using targeted metabolomics approaches and MS imaging, we confirmed a marked dysregulation of mitochondrial aspartate metabolism. The altered metabolic pathways were further integrated with clinical data, showing various degrees of correlation with parameters of dementia and AD pathology. Our study highlights specific, altered biochemical pathways in the brains of individuals with AD compared with those of control subjects, emphasizing dysregulation of mitochondrial aspartate metabolism and supporting future venues of investigation.

  3. Metabolic constraint imposes tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-11-06

    Despite a general trend for larger mammals to have larger brains, humans are the primates with the largest brain and number of neurons, but not the largest body mass. Why are great apes, the largest primates, not also those endowed with the largest brains? Recently, we showed that the energetic cost of the brain is a linear function of its numbers of neurons. Here we show that metabolic limitations that result from the number of hours available for feeding and the low caloric yield of raw foods impose a tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons, which explains the small brain size of great apes compared with their large body size. This limitation was probably overcome in Homo erectus with the shift to a cooked diet. Absent the requirement to spend most available hours of the day feeding, the combination of newly freed time and a large number of brain neurons affordable on a cooked diet may thus have been a major positive driving force to the rapid increased in brain size in human evolution.

  4. Metabolic constraint imposes tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Despite a general trend for larger mammals to have larger brains, humans are the primates with the largest brain and number of neurons, but not the largest body mass. Why are great apes, the largest primates, not also those endowed with the largest brains? Recently, we showed that the energetic cost of the brain is a linear function of its numbers of neurons. Here we show that metabolic limitations that result from the number of hours available for feeding and the low caloric yield of raw foods impose a tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons, which explains the small brain size of great apes compared with their large body size. This limitation was probably overcome in Homo erectus with the shift to a cooked diet. Absent the requirement to spend most available hours of the day feeding, the combination of newly freed time and a large number of brain neurons affordable on a cooked diet may thus have been a major positive driving force to the rapid increased in brain size in human evolution. PMID:23090991

  5. Purine Pathway Implicated in Mechanism of Resistance to Aspirin Therapy: Pharmacometabolomics-Informed-Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Ellero-Simatos, Sandrine; Georgiades, Anastasia; Zhu, Hongjie; Lewis, Joshua; Horenstein, Richard B.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Dane, Adrie; Reijmers, Theo; Hankemeier, Thomas; Fiehn, Oliver; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Though aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed upon exposure to aspirin and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Further, purines were associated with aspirin response and poor responders had higher post-aspirin adenosine and inosine than good responders (N=76;p<4×10-3 both). Using our established “pharmacometabolomics-informs-pharmacogenomics” approach we identified genetic variants in adenosine kinase (ADK) associated with aspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response - an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  6. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  7. Astrocyte Oxidative Metabolism and Metabolite Trafficking after Fluid Percussion Brain Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Hovda, David A.; Sutton, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite various lines of evidence pointing to the compartmentation of metabolism within the brain, few studies have reported the effect of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal and astrocyte compartments and/or metabolic trafficking between these cells. In this study we used ex vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy following an infusion of [1-13C] glucose and [1,2-13C2] acetate to study oxidative metabolism in neurons and astrocytes of sham-operated and fluid percussion brain injured (FPI) rats at 1, 5, and 14 days post-surgery. FPI resulted in a decrease in the 13C glucose enrichment of glutamate in neurons in the injured hemisphere at day 1. In contrast, enrichment of glutamine in astrocytes from acetate was not significantly decreased at day 1. At day 5 the 13C enrichment of glutamate and glutamine from glucose in the injured hemisphere of FPI rats did not differ from sham levels, but glutamine derived from acetate metabolism in astrocytes was significantly increased. The 13C glucose enrichment of the C3 position of glutamate (C3) in neurons was significantly decreased ipsilateral to FPI at day 14, whereas the enrichment of glutamine in astrocytes had returned to sham levels at this time point. These findings indicate that the oxidative metabolism of glucose is reduced to a greater extent in neurons compared to astrocytes following a FPI. The increased utilization of acetate to synthesize glutamine, and the acetate enrichment of glutamate via the glutamate-glutamine cycle, suggests an integral protective role for astrocytes in maintaining metabolic function following TBI-induced impairments in glucose metabolism. PMID:20939699

  8. Age-Related Sex-Specific Changes in Brain Metabolism and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Ito, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2016-02-01

    With a large database, we aimed to evaluate sex-specific distinctive changes in brain glucose metabolism and morphology during normal aging using MRI and (18)F-FDG PET. A total of 963 cognitively healthy adults were included in this study. All subjects completed a medical questionnaire, took the mini-mental state examination, and underwent brain MRI and whole-body (18)F-FDG PET. The MR and PET images were statistically analyzed using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection. All images were corrected for whole-brain pixel value to identify the brain regions with significant changes, and regions of interest were set up with reference to Brodmann areas. We evaluated morphologic and glucose metabolic changes by cross-sectional analysis. The baseline database consisted of subjects from 30 to 40 y old, and the age-step for comparison was 5-y ranges. We also compared sex-specific differences in MR and PET images in each age group. Regarding age-related changes, in both sexes brain atrophy was observed in the lateral frontal and parietal regions and glucose hypometabolism in the medial frontal regions. There were significant differences in these parameters between the sexes; parallel changes in volume and metabolism were manifested in the medial frontal cortex in men and in the lateral and medial temporal cortex in women. By contrast, metabolism-dominant reductions were manifested in the lateral and medial parietal cortex in men and in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, including the Broca area, in women. These differences became insignificant in individuals 66 y or older. Our brain mapping study with a large number of reference human brain data demonstrated age-related parallel changes between morphology and metabolism in the medial frontal regions and sex-specific hypometabolism in the parietal (male) and ventrolateral prefrontal (female) cortices. These findings may suggest an aging vulnerability in sex-specific brain regions: the parietal cortex for

  9. Metabolic analysis of mouse brains that have compromised iron storage.

    PubMed

    Ill, Amanda M; Mitchell, Todd R; Neely, Elizabeth B; Connor, James R

    2006-09-01

    Iron is a critical component of the CNS that must be tightly regulated; too little iron can result in energy insufficiency and too much iron can result in oxidative stress. The intracellular iron storage protein ferritin is central to the regulation of iron. In this study, we determined the neurochemical profile of brains of animals deficient in heavy-chain ferritin (H-ferritin) using high-resolution magic angle spin proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS (1)H MRS). Spectra of 2 mm-thick coronal tissue punches ( approximately 4 mg) were obtained using a CPMG pulse sequence on Bruker Avance 500 and quantified (nmol/mg tissue) using customized LCModel software (16 metabolites). In H-ferritin deficient mice, we found significant increases in striatal glutamate, hippocampal choline, and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in both the cortex and the hippocampus (t-test, p < 0.05). Neurochemical profiling with principal component analysis (PCA) revealed increased glutamate in the hippocampus, striatum, and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in H-ferritin deficient animals as compared to wild-type. While lactate was increased in the VTA of deficient animals, it was decreased in the striatum. Also, GABA was increased in both cortical and striatal regions of deficient mice. These changes reveal the importance of proper iron management for maintaining neurochemical balance and provide new evidence for region specific differences in neurochemical profiles as a result of compromised ability of neurons to store iron while overall iron status is normal. Because H-ferritin is predominantly expressed in neurons, the neurochemical profile is suggestive of neuronal iron deficiency and may have relevance to the functional consequences associated with brain iron deficiency.

  10. Brain testosterone metabolism in thyroidectomized and thyroxine-treated chickens.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Lucini, V; Harvey, S

    1984-10-01

    The metabolism of testosterone to reduced derivatives was studied in the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the hyperstriatum dorsale of thyroidectomized, sham-operated, and thyroxine (T4)-injected immature cockerels. The levels of plasma thyroid hormones were markedly reduced (P less than 0.001) in thyroidectomized cockerels whereas thyroidectomized or sham-operated birds injected daily with 100 micrograms/kg thyroxine had significantly elevated (P less than 0.001) levels in comparison with sham-operated control birds. Each tissue was found to produce significant amounts of 5 beta-androstane-17 beta-ol-3-one (5 beta-DHT), 5 beta-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol (5 beta-3 alpha-diol), and androstenedione. Irrespective of thyroid state 5 beta-DHT and 5 beta-3 alpha-diol were produced to the greatest extent by the hyperstriatum dorsale whereas androstenedione was maximally produced in the pituitary gland. In comparison with the hyperstriatum dorsale and the hypothalamus only small quantities of 5 beta-DHT were produced in the pituitary gland. In the hyperstriatum dorsale of thyroidectomized birds both 5 beta-DHT (P less than 0.05) and 5 beta-3 alpha-diol (P less than 0.1) were formed to a greater extent than in sham-operated birds. This effect was reversed by administration of T4 to the operated birds which reduced the levels to those measured in the sham-operated controls. Similarly, injection of T4 into sham-operated birds decreased (P less than 0.05) the production of 5 beta-DHT in the hypothalamus while in the pituitary gland injection of T4 into thyroidectomized birds reduced the production of androstenedione (P less than 0.05). It was concluded that in the cockerel thyroid hormone is likely to play a role in the metabolism of testosterone. The physiological significance of 5 beta-reductase activity in the neuroendocrine tissues is discussed.

  11. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R; Selmer, Christian; Vogelsang, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2004-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O2/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O2, glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AVO2 from 3.2 ± 0.1 at rest to 3.5 ± 0.2 mm (mean ± s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AVglc from 0.6 ± 0.0 to 0.9 ± 0.1 mm (P < 0.01). Notably, the AVlac increased from 0.0 ± 0.0 to 1.3 ± 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 ± 0.3 to 2.8 ± 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 ± 0.1 mm; n = 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 ± 0.1 mm; n = 6). Also, the 1H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of ∼1.5 mm. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized. PMID:14608005

  12. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-03

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway.

  13. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  14. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  15. Gender difference in relationship between anxiety-related personality traits and cerebral brain glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hakamata, Yuko; Iwase, Mikio; Iwata, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Nishio, Masami; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Inada, Toshiya

    2009-09-30

    Recent functional neuroimaging studies have suggested that specific brain regions might be associated with the formation of anxiety-related personality traits, which are well known to be influenced by gender. Such anxiety-related personality traits are one of the representative predisposing factors for mood and anxiety disorders, whose incidence is also known to be much influenced by gender. However, little is known about the gender differences in brain function related to anxiety-related personality traits. The aim of the present study was to examine gender-related differences in the pattern of the relationships between an anxiety-related personality trait and cerebral brain glucose metabolism. Regional brain glucose metabolism was measured using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in 102 healthy subjects (65 males and 37 females). An anxiety-related trait was assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory dimension Harm Avoidance (HA). HA was negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the anterior portion of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in females but not in males. The anterior vmPFC may be a possible neural target for the prevention or therapy of emotional disorders, especially in females.

  16. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Jeremias, Isabela C; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Freitas, Karolina V; Antonini, Rafaela; Scaini, Giselli; Rezin, Gislaine T; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-09-01

    Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  17. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions.

  18. Evoked Potentials and Neuropsychological Tests Validate Positron Emission Topography (PET) Brain Metabolism in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Damle, Uma J.; Kerner, Mallory; Dushaj, Kristina; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Topography (PET) brain hypometabolism (HM) correlates with diminished cognitive capacity and risk of developing dementia. However, because clinical utility of PET is limited by cost, we sought to determine whether a less costly electrophysiological measure, the P300 evoked potential, in combination with neuropsychological test performance, would validate PET HM in neuropsychiatric patients. We found that patients with amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive impairment and HM (n = 43) evidenced significantly reduced P300 amplitudes, delayed latencies, and neuropsychological deficits, compared to patients with normal brain metabolism (NM; n = 187). Data from patients with missing cognitive test scores (n = 57) were removed from the final sample, and logistic regression modeling was performed on the modified sample (n = 173, p = .000004). The logistic regression modeling, based on P300 and neuropsychological measures, was used to validate membership in the HM vs. NM groups. It showed classification validation in 13/25 HM subjects (52.0%) and in 125/148 NM subjects (84.5%), correlating with total classification accuracy of 79.8%. In this paper, abnormal P300 evoked potentials coupled with cognitive test impairment validates brain metabolism and mild/moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). To this end, we cautiously propose incorporating electrophysiological and neuropsychological assessments as cost-effective brain metabolism and MCI indicators in primary care. Final interpretation of these results must await required additional studies confirming these interesting results. PMID:23526928

  19. Control of metabolism by nutrient-regulated nuclear receptors acting in the brain.

    PubMed

    Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Prawitt, Janne; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Today, we are witnessing a rising incidence of obesity worldwide. This increase is due to a sedentary life style, an increased caloric intake and a decrease in physical activity. Obesity contributes to the appearance of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular complications due to atherosclerosis, and nephropathy. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies may become a necessity. Given the metabolism controlling properties of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs (such as liver, adipose tissues, pancreas) and their implication in various processes underlying metabolic diseases, they constitute interesting therapeutic targets for obesity, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The recent identification of the central nervous system as a player in the control of peripheral metabolism opens new avenues to our understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes and potential novel ways to treat these diseases. While the metabolic functions of nuclear receptors in peripheral organs have been extensively investigated, little is known about their functions in the brain, in particular with respect to brain control of energy homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the relationships between nuclear receptors in the brain, mainly at the hypothalamic level, and the central regulation of energy homeostasis. In this context, we will particularly focus on the role of PPARα, PPARγ, LXR and Rev-erbα. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Apomorphine pump in advanced Parkinson's disease: Effects on motor and nonmotor symptoms with brain metabolism correlations.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Manon; Le Jeune, Florence; Maurus, Anne; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Robert, Gabriel Hadrien; Sauleau, Paul; Vérin, Marc

    2017-01-15

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and contraindications for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) could particularly benefit from subcutaneous infusion therapy with apomorphine. This original study was designed to evaluate the general efficacy of add-on apomorphine in motor and nonmotor symptoms in advanced PD, while characterizing the changes induced in brain glucose metabolism. The aim was to look at the underlying anatomical-functional pathways. 12 patients with advanced PD were assessed before and after 6months of add-on apomorphine, using resting-state (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and exhaustive clinical assessments. After 6months of therapy, oral treatment was significantly reduced. Both motor and nonmotor scores improved, with a beneficial effect on executive functions, quality of life and apathy. Significant metabolic changes were observed, with overall increases in the right fusiform gyrus and hippocampus, alongside a decrease in the left middle frontal gyrus. Consistent correlations between significant changes in clinical scores and metabolism were established. Well tolerated, add-on apomorphine appears to be an interesting option for patients with fluctuations and contra-indications for DBS. Changes in brain metabolism, with beneficial effects on motor and nonmotor symptoms were observed after 6months. These preliminary results have to be confirmed by further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain metabolic stress and neuroinflammation at the basis of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Fernanda G.; Lourenco, Mychael V.

    2015-01-01

    Brain metabolic dysfunction is known to influence brain activity in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In fact, deregulation of neuronal metabolism has been postulated to play a key role leading to the clinical outcomes observed in AD. Besides deficits in glucose utilization in AD patients, recent evidence has implicated neuroinflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as components of a novel form of brain metabolic stress that develop in AD and other neurological disorders. Here we review findings supporting this novel paradigm and further discuss how these mechanisms seem to participate in synapse and cognitive impairments that are germane to AD. These deleterious processes resemble pathways that act in peripheral tissues leading to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, in an intriguing molecular connection linking AD to diabetes. The discovery of detailed mechanisms leading to neuronal metabolic stress may be a key step that will allow the understanding how cognitive impairment develops in AD, thereby offering new avenues for effective disease prevention and therapeutic targeting. PMID:26042036

  2. Early brain temperature elevation and anaerobic metabolism in human acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Karaszewski, Bartosz; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Marshall, Ian; Cvoro, Vera; Wartolowska, Karolina; Haga, Kristin; Armitage, Paul A; Bastin, Mark E; Dennis, Martin S

    2009-04-01

    Early after acute ischaemic stroke, elevation of brain temperature might augment tissue metabolic rate and conversion of ischaemic but viable tissue to infarction. This might explain the observed link between pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. We tested this hypothesis by measuring brain temperature and lactate concentration with multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging across the acute ischaemic stroke lesion and normal brain as determined on diffusion imaging. We compared patterns of lactate concentration (reported in 'institutional units') and temperature elevation in diffusion lesion core, potential penumbra, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brain and with stroke severity. Amongst 40 patients with moderate to severe acute stroke imaged up to 26 h after onset, lactate concentration was highest in the ischaemic lesion core (42 versus 26 units in potential penumbra, P < 0.05), whereas temperature was highest in the potential penumbra (37.7 versus 37.3 degrees C in lesion core, P < 0.05). Neither sub-regional temperature nor lactate concentration correlated with stroke severity. With increasing time after stroke, ipsilateral brain temperature did not change, but contralateral hemisphere temperature was higher in patients scanned at later times; lactate remained elevated in the lesion core, but declined in potential penumbral and ipsilateral normal tissue at later times. We conclude that early brain temperature elevation after stroke is not directly related to lactate concentration, therefore augmented metabolism is unlikely to explain the relationship between early pyrexia, severe stroke and poor outcome. Early brain temperature elevation may result from different mechanisms to those which raise body temperature after stroke. Further studies are required to determine why early brain temperature elevation is highest in potential penumbral tissue.

  3. Structural Biology of the Purine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Morar, Mariya; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis requires ten enzymatic transformations to generate inosine monophosphate. PurF, PurD, PurL, PurM, PurC, and PurB are common to all pathways, while PurN or PurT, PurK/PurE-I or PurE-II, PurH or PurP, and PurJ or PurO catalyze the same steps in different organisms. X-ray crystal structures are available for all 15 purine biosynthetic enzymes, including seven ATP-dependent enzymes, two amidotransferases and two tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes. Here we summarize the structures of the purine biosynthetic enzymes, discuss similarities and differences, and present arguments for pathway evolution. Four of the ATP-dependent enzymes belong to the ATP-grasp superfamily and two to the PurM superfamily. The amidotransferases are unrelated with one utilizing an NTN-glutaminase and the other utilizing a triad glutaminase. Likewise the tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes are unrelated. Ancestral proteins may have included a broad specificity enzyme instead of PurD, PurT, PurK, PurC, and PurP, and a separate enzyme instead of PurM and PurL. PMID:18712276

  4. Brain and muscle energy metabolism studied in vivo by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in NARP syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, R; Montagna, P; Iotti, S; Zaniol, P; Barboni, P; Puddu, P; Barbiroli, B

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) was used to study in vivo the energy metabolism of brain and skeletal muscle in two members of an Italian pedigree with NARP syndrome due to a point mutation at bp 8993 of mtDNA. In the youngest patient, a 13 year old girl with retinitis pigmentosa, ataxia, and psychomotor retardation, there was an alteration of brain energy metabolism shown by a decreased phosphocreatine content, increased [ADP] and decreased phosphorylation potential. The energy metabolism of her skeletal muscle was also abnormal, as shown by resting higher inorganic phosphate and lower phosphocreatine concentrations than in normal subjects. Her mother, a 41 year old woman with minimal clinical involvement, showed a milder derangement of brain energy metabolism and normal skeletal muscle. Findings with MRS showed that this point mutation of mtDNA is responsible for a derangement of energy metabolism in skeletal muscle and even more so in the brain. PMID:7798979

  5. Metabolic syndrome--psycho neuropathogenesis and human brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Madhusoothanan Bhagavathi

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Heightened hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is associated with pathogenesis of MS. Life style, food habits and physical activity also play critical role in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the precise neurophysiology behind chronic stress leading on to such effects is unknown. Review of recent animal and human studies have shown the subtle differences in morphological changes associated with chronic stress between medial prefrontal cortex and amygdaloid complex. The loss of dendritic spines in pyramidal neurons of medial prefrontal cortex, dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala and dendritic loss in central nucleus of amygdala causes increased basal output from amygdaloid complex to HPA axis and other targets whose networks are evolutionarily well conserved. The increased HPA axis activity, elevated blood pressure and appetite for high calorie diet leads to MS. The evolution of isocortex in primates and associated regression in size of limbic structures predisposed to increased synaptic noise in amygdaloid complex which in turn cause heighetened output from amygdala during chronic stress. Copyright © 2010 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity of ventilation and brain metabolism to ammonia exposure in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Nawata, C Michele; Wood, Chris M

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia has been documented as a respiratory gas that stimulates ventilation, and is sensed by peripheral neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in the gills in ammoniotelic rainbow trout. However, the hyperventilatory response is abolished in trout chronically exposed (1+ months) to high environmental ammonia [HEA; 250 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4]. This study investigates whether the brain is involved in the acute sensitivity of ventilation to ammonia, and whether changes in brain metabolism are related to the loss of hyperventilatory responses in trout chronically exposed to HEA ('HEA trout'). Hyperventilation (via increased ventilatory amplitude rather than rate) and increased total ammonia concentration ([TAmm]) in brain tissue were induced in parallel by acute HEA exposure in control trout in a concentration-series experiment [500, 750 and 1000 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4], but these inductions were abolished in HEA trout. Ventilation was correlated more closely to [TAmm] in brain rather than to [TAmm] in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid. The close correlation of hyperventilation and increased brain [TAmm] also occurred in control trout acutely exposed to HEA in a time-series analysis [500 μmol l(-1) (NH4)2SO4; 15, 30, 45 and 60 min], as well as in a methionine sulfoxamine (MSOX) pre-injection experiment [to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GSase)]. These correlations consistently suggest that brain [TAmm] is involved in the hyperventilatory responses to ammonia in trout. The MSOX treatments, together with measurements of GSase activity, TAmm, glutamine and glutamate concentrations in brain tissue, were conducted in both the control and HEA trout. These experiments revealed that GSase plays an important role in transferring ammonia to glutamate to make glutamine in trout brain, thereby attenuating the elevation of brain [TAmm] following HEA exposure, and that glutamate concentration is reduced in HEA trout. The mRNAs for the ammonia channel proteins Rhbg, Rhcg1 and Rhcg2 were expressed

  7. Noninvasive imaging of brain oxygen metabolism in children with primary nocturnal enuresis during natural sleep.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Huang, Mingzhu; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Hongwei; Peng, Miao; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-02-14

    A series of studies have revealed that nocturnal enuresis is closely related to hypoxia in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE). However, brain oxygen metabolism of PNE children has not been investigated before. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 ), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in children suffering from PNE. We used the newly developed T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) magnetic resonance imaging technique. Neurological evaluation, structural imaging, phase-contrast, and the TRUST imaging method were applied in children with PNE (n = 37) and healthy age- and sex-matched control volunteers (n = 39) during natural sleep to assess whole-brain CMRO2 , CBF, OEF, and arousal from sleep scores. Results showed that whole-brain CMRO2 and OEF values of PNE children were higher in controls, while there was no significant difference in CBF. Consequently, OEF levels of PNE children were increased to maintain oxygen supply. The elevation of OEF was positively correlated with the difficulty of arousal. Our results provide the first evidence that high oxygen consumption and high OEF values could make PNE children more susceptible to hypoxia, which may induce cumulative arousal deficits and make them more prone to nocturnal enuresis. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuronal and astrocytic interactions modulate brain endothelial properties during metabolic stresses of in vitro cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular and gliovascular interactions significantly affect endothelial phenotype. Physiologically, brain endothelium attains several of its properties by its intimate association with neurons and astrocytes. However, during cerebrovascular pathologies such as cerebral ischemia, the uncoupling of neurovascular and gliovascular units can result in several phenotypical changes in brain endothelium. The role of neurovascular and gliovascular uncoupling in modulating brain endothelial properties during cerebral ischemia is not clear. Specifically, the roles of metabolic stresses involved in cerebral ischemia, including aglycemia, hypoxia and combined aglycemia and hypoxia (oxygen glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation, OGDR) in modulating neurovascular and gliovascular interactions are not known. The complex intimate interactions in neurovascular and gliovascular units are highly difficult to recapitulate in vitro. However, in the present study, we used a 3D co-culture model of brain endothelium with neurons and astrocytes in vitro reflecting an intimate neurovascular and gliovascular interactions in vivo. While the cellular signaling interactions in neurovascular and gliovascular units in vivo are much more complex than the 3D co-culture models in vitro, we were still able to observe several important phenotypical changes in brain endothelial properties by metabolically stressed neurons and astrocytes including changes in barrier, lymphocyte adhesive properties, endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and in vitro angiogenic potential. PMID:24438487

  9. Molecular pathophysiology of impaired glucose metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative DNA damage in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Nona; Leon, Julio; Sheng, Zijing; Oka, Sugako; Hamasaki, Hideomi; Iwaki, Toru; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2017-01-01

    In normal brain, neurons in the cortex and hippocampus produce insulin, which modulates glucose metabolism and cognitive functions. It has been shown that insulin resistance impairs glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function, thus increasing production of reactive oxygen species. Recent progress in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research revealed that insulin production and signaling are severely impaired in AD brain, thereby resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. Among possible oxidative DNA lesions, 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is highly accumulated in the brain of AD patients. Previously we have shown that incorporating 8-oxoG in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA promotes MUTYH (adenine DNA glycosylase) dependent neurodegeneration. Moreover, cortical neurons prepared from MTH1 (8-oxo-dGTPase)/OGG1 (8-oxoG DNA glycosylase)-double deficient adult mouse brains is shown to exhibit significantly poor neuritogenesis in vitro with increased 8-oxoG accumulation in mitochondrial DNA in the absence of antioxidants. Therefore, 8-oxoG can be considered involved in the neurodegenerative process in AD brain. In mild cognitive impairment, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage may induce synaptic dysfunction due to energy failures in neurons thus resulting in impaired cognitive function. If such abnormality lasts long, it can lead to vicious cycles of oxidative damage, which may then trigger the neurodegenerative process seen in Alzheimer type dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical and experimental features of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of brain glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Francisca; Gruetter, Rolf; Lei, Hongxia

    2016-12-26

    In the brain, glycogen is a source of glucose not only in emergency situations but also during normal brain activity. Altered brain glycogen metabolism is associated with energetic dysregulation in pathological conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy. Both in humans and animals, brain glycogen levels have been assessed non-invasively by Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) in vivo. With this approach, glycogen synthesis and degradation may be followed in real time, thereby providing valuable insights into brain glycogen dynamics. However, compared to the liver and muscle, where glycogen is abundant, the sensitivity for detection of brain glycogen by (13)C-MRS is inherently low. In this review we focus on strategies used to optimize the sensitivity for (13)C-MRS detection of glycogen. Namely, we explore several technical perspectives, such as magnetic field strength, field homogeneity, coil design, decoupling, and localization methods. Furthermore, we also address basic principles underlying the use of (13)C-labeled precursors to enhance the detectable glycogen signal, emphasizing specific experimental aspects relevant for obtaining kinetic information on brain glycogen.

  11. Metabolism and disposition of 3,6-dibutanoylmorphine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tasker, R A; Nakatsu, K

    1986-09-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory it was found that dibutanoylmorphine (DBM) was more potent than morphine as an analgesic in rats and that it was less active than acetyl esters of morphine on behaviour. As DBM is a morphine prodrug, the aim of this work was to determine if rat brain homogenates were capable of deacylating DBM and monobutanoylmorphine (MBM) and to determine relative proportions of parent drug to metabolites in the brain in vivo. In 10% (w/v) brain homogenates, DBM was eliminated with a half-life of about 70 min (corrected for dilution), while MBM was eliminated 10 times as quickly. DBM and its metabolites were found in both blood and brain as early as 1 min after i.v. administration of DBM. After 5 min, the predominant form in blood was MBM and in brain it was DBM. Thus, rat brain possesses the capacity to metabolize DBM by deesterification and the parent drug, MBM, and morphine were found in blood and brain in vivo.

  12. Liver and brain tryptophan metabolism following hydrocortisone administration to rats and gerbils.

    PubMed

    Green, A R; Sourkes, T L; Young, S N

    1975-02-01

    1 Liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity is low in the mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) and is not induced by hydrocortisone (5 mg/kg). In contrast, there is measurable activity in the rat liver and this is induced by hydrocortisone. In vivo measurements confirmed the absence of induction in gerbils but suggested that they were able to metabolize tryptophan. However no detectable pyrrolase activity was found in any other tissues either before or after hydrocortisone. 2 In agreement with previous observations hydrocortisone decreased rat brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) 6 h after administration. Brain tryptophan concentrations were also decreased at this time. In contrast, hydrocortisone did not alter gerbil brain 5-HT, 5-HIAA or trytophan. alpha-Methyltryptophan activated hepatic tryptophan pyrrolase and decreased brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA in both animals. 3 Results suggest that the decrease in rat brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA following hydrocortisone may be associated with the rise in liver tryptophan pyrrolase and that the brain amine changes are mediated through the decrease in brain tryptophan concentration.

  13. Mitochondria: A crossroads for lipid metabolism defect in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation diseases.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of brain iron deposition syndromes that lead to mixed extrapyramidal features and progressive dementia. Exact pathologic mechanism of iron deposition in NBIA remains unknown. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are hallmarked by metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid profile. Among the identified disease genes, four encode for proteins localized in mitochondria, which are directly or indirectly implicated in lipid metabolism: PANK2, CoASY, PLA2G6 and C19orf12. Mutations in PANK2 and CoASY, both implicated in CoA biosynthesis that acts as a fatty acyl carrier, lead, respectively, to PKAN and CoPAN forms of NBIA. Mutations in PLA2G6, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis and remodeling of membrane phospholipids including cardiolipin, lead to PLAN. Mutations in C19orf12 lead to MPAN, a syndrome similar to that caused by mutations in PANK2 and PLA2G6. Although the function of C19orf12 is largely unknown, experimental data suggest its implication in mitochondrial homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Altogether, the identified mutated proteins localized in mitochondria and associated with different NBIA forms support the concept that dysfunctions in mitochondria and lipid metabolism play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  14. Brain Responses to Smoking Cues Differ Based on Nicotine Metabolism Rate.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Mary; Cao, Wen; Bernardo, Leah; Tyndale, Rachel F; Loughead, James; Lerman, Caryn

    2016-08-01

    Inherited differences in the rate of metabolism of nicotine, the addictive chemical in tobacco, affect smoking behavior and quitting success. The nicotine metabolite ratio (3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine) is a reliable measure of nicotine clearance and a well-validated predictive biomarker of response to pharmacotherapy. To clarify the mechanisms underlying these associations, we investigated the neural responses to smoking cues in normal and slow nicotine metabolizers. Treatment-seeking smokers (N = 69; 30 slow metabolizers and 39 normal metabolizers) completed a visual cue reactivity task during functional magnetic resonance imaging on two separate occasions: once during smoking satiety and once after 24 hours of smoking abstinence. In whole-brain analysis, normal (compared with slow) metabolizers exhibited heightened abstinence-induced neural responses to smoking cues in the left caudate, left inferior frontal gyrus, and left frontal pole. These effects were more pronounced when extreme groups of slow and normal metabolizers were examined. Greater activation in the left caudate and left frontal pole was associated with abstinence-induced subjective cravings to smoke. Inherited differences in rate of nicotine elimination may drive neural responses to smoking cues during early abstinence, providing a plausible mechanism to explain differences in smoking behaviors and response to cessation treatment. Normal metabolizers may benefit from adjunctive behavioral smoking cessation treatments, such as cue exposure therapy. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹⁸FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared to placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.

  16. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; ...

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET-¹⁸FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared tomore » placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.« less

  17. Alcohol Decreases Baseline Brain Glucose Metabolism More in Heavy Drinkers Than Controls But Has No Effect on Stimulation-Induced Metabolic Increases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S.; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-18FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. PMID:25698759

  18. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-(18)FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal.

  19. Dual roles of brain serine hydrolase KIAA1363 in ether lipid metabolism and organophosphate detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Daniel K.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Issa, Roger S.; Ward, Anna M.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Casida, John E.

    2008-04-01

    Serine hydrolase KIAA1363 is an acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE) hydrolase involved in tumor cell invasiveness. It is also an organophosphate (OP) insecticide-detoxifying enzyme. The key to understanding these dual properties was the use of KIAA1363 +/+ (wildtype) and -/- (gene deficient) mice to define the role of this enzyme in brain and other tissues and its effectiveness in vivo in reducing OP toxicity. KIAA1363 was the primary AcMAGE hydrolase in brain, lung, heart and kidney and was highly sensitive to inactivation by chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) (IC{sub 50} 2 nM) [the bioactivated metabolite of the major insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF)]. Although there was no difference in hydrolysis product monoalkylglycerol ether (MAGE) levels in +/+ and -/- mouse brains in vivo, isopropyl dodecylfluorophosphonate (30 mg/kg) and CPF (100 mg/kg) resulted in 23-51% decrease in brain MAGE levels consistent with inhibition of AcMAGE hydrolase activity. On incubating +/+ and -/- brain membranes with AcMAGE and cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine, the absence of KIAA1363 activity dramatically increased de novo formation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF, signifying that metabolically-stabilized AcMAGE can be converted to this bioactive lipid in brain. On considering detoxification, KIAA1363 -/- mice were significantly more sensitive than +/+ mice to ip-administered CPF (100 mg/kg) and parathion (10 mg/kg) with increased tremoring and mortality that correlated for CPF with greater brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Docking AcMAGE and CPO in a KIAA1363 active site model showed similar positioning of their acetyl and trichloropyridinyl moieties, respectively. This study establishes the relevance of KIAA1363 in ether lipid metabolism and OP detoxification.

  20. Brain networks predict metabolism, diagnosis and prognosis at the bedside in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Chennu, Srivas; Annen, Jitka; Wannez, Sarah; Thibaut, Aurore; Chatelle, Camille; Cassol, Helena; Martens, Géraldine; Schnakers, Caroline; Gosseries, Olivia; Menon, David; Laureys, Steven

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have demonstrated novel potential for informing diagnosis and prognosis in the unresponsive wakeful syndrome and minimally conscious states. However, these technologies come with considerable expense and difficulty, limiting the possibility of wider clinical application in patients. Here, we show that high density electroencephalography, collected from 104 patients measured at rest, can provide valuable information about brain connectivity that correlates with behaviour and functional neuroimaging. Using graph theory, we visualize and quantify spectral connectivity estimated from electroencephalography as a dense brain network. Our findings demonstrate that key quantitative metrics of these networks correlate with the continuum of behavioural recovery in patients, ranging from those diagnosed as unresponsive, through those who have emerged from minimally conscious, to the fully conscious locked-in syndrome. In particular, a network metric indexing the presence of densely interconnected central hubs of connectivity discriminated behavioural consciousness with accuracy comparable to that achieved by expert assessment with positron emission tomography. We also show that this metric correlates strongly with brain metabolism. Further, with classification analysis, we predict the behavioural diagnosis, brain metabolism and 1-year clinical outcome of individual patients. Finally, we demonstrate that assessments of brain networks show robust connectivity in patients diagnosed as unresponsive by clinical consensus, but later rediagnosed as minimally conscious with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. Classification analysis of their brain network identified each of these misdiagnosed patients as minimally conscious, corroborating their behavioural diagnoses. If deployed at the bedside in the clinical context, such network measurements could complement systematic behavioural assessment and help reduce the high misdiagnosis rate reported

  1. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Horstmann, Annette; Busse, Franziska; Lepsien, Jöran; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training twice a week over a period of 3 months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI), reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing. PMID:26190989

  2. Comparison of clinical types of Wilson's disease and glucose metabolism in extrapyramidal motor brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hermann, W; Barthel, H; Hesse, S; Grahmann, F; Kühn, H-J; Wagner, A; Villmann, T

    2002-07-01

    In Wilson's disease a disturbed glucose metabolism especially in striatal and cerebellar areas has been reported. This is correlated with the severity of extrapyramidal motor symptoms (EPS). These findings are only based on a small number of patients. Up to now it is unknown whether EPS are caused by various patterns of disturbed basal ganglia glucose metabolism. We investigated 37 patients and 9 normal volunteers to characterize the disturbed glucose metabolism in Wilson's disease more precisely. The glucose metabolism was determined in 5 cerebellar and cerebral areas (putamen, caput nuclei caudati, cerebellum, midbrain and thalamic area) by using (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose-Positron-Emission-Tomography ( [(18)F]FDG-PET). The database was evaluated by a cluster analysis. Additionally, the severity extrapyramidal motor symptoms were judged by a clinical score system. Three characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism in basal ganglia were obtained. Two of them may be assigned to patients with neurological symptoms whereas the third cluster corresponds to most patients without EPS or normal volunteers. The clusters can be identified by characteristic consumption rates in this 5 brain areas. The severity of EPS can not clearly be assigned to one of the clusters with disturbed glucose metabolism. However, the most severe cases are characterized by the lowest consumption in the striatal area. When there is marked improvement of EPS impaired glucose consumption reveals a persistent brain lesion. Finally, the neurological symptoms in Wilson's disease are caused by (at least) two different patterns of disturbed glucose metabolism in basal ganglia and cerebellum. The severity of EPS seems to be determined by a disturbed consumption in the striatal area.

  3. Limbic Metabolic Abnormalities in Remote Traumatic Brain Injury and Correlation With Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Capizzano, Arístides A.; Jorge, Ricardo E.; Robinson, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate limbic metabolic abnormalities in remote traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their psychiatric correlates. Twenty patients and 13 age-matched comparison subjects received complete psychiatric evaluation and brain MRI and MR spectroscopy at 3 Tesla. Patients had reduced NAA to creatine ratio in the left hippocampus relative to comparison subjects (mean=1.3 [SD=0.21] compared with mean=1.55 [SD=0.21]; F=10.73, df=1, 30, p=0.003), which correlated with the Social Functioning Examination scores (rs=−0.502, p=0.034). Furthermore, patients with mood disorders had reduced NAA to creatine ratio in the left cingulate relative to patients without mood disorders (1.47 compared with 1.68; F=3.393, df=3, 19, p=0.044). Remote TBI displays limbic metabolic abnormalities, which correlate to social outcome and psychiatric status. PMID:21037120

  4. Effects of hyperammonemia on brain energy metabolism: controversial findings in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse K

    2014-12-01

    The literature related to the effects of elevated plasma ammonia levels on brain energy metabolism is abundant, but heterogeneous in terms of the conclusions. Thus, some studies claim that ammonia has a direct, inhibitory effect on energy metabolism whereas others find no such correlation. In this review, we discuss both recent and older literature related to this controversial topic. We find that it has been consistently reported that hepatic encephalopathy and concomitant hyperammonemia lead to reduced cerebral oxygen consumption. However, this may not be directly linked to an effect of ammonia but related to the fact that hepatic encephalopathy is always associated with reduced brain activity, a condition clearly characterized by a decreased CMRO2. Whether this may be related to changes in GABAergic function remains to be elucidated.

  5. Folate-Dependent Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Humans1

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Joseph E; Tamura, Tsunenobu

    2015-01-01

    Purine nucleotide biosynthesis de novo (PNB) requires 2 folate-dependent transformylases—5′-phosphoribosyl-glycinamide (GAR) and 5′-phosphoribosyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) transformylases—to introduce carbon 8 (C8) and carbon 2 (C2) into the purine ring. Both transformylases utilize 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-formyl-H4folate), where the formyl-carbon sources include ring-2-C of histidine, 3-C of serine, 2-C of glycine, and formate. Our findings in human studies indicate that glycine provides the carbon for GAR transformylase (exclusively C8), whereas histidine and formate are the predominant carbon sources for AICAR transformylase (C2). Contrary to the previous notion, these carbon sources may not supply a general 10-formyl-H4folate pool, which was believed to equally provide carbons to C8 and C2. To explain these phenomena, we postulate that GAR transformylase is in a complex with the trifunctional folate-metabolizing enzyme (TFM) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase to channel carbons of glycine and serine to C8. There is no evidence for channeling carbons of histidine and formate to AICAR transformylase (C2). GAR transformylase may require the TFM to furnish 10-formyl-H4folate immediately after its production from serine to protect its oxidation to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-formyl-H2folate), whereas AICAR transformylase can utilize both 10-formyl-H2folate and 10-formyl-H4folate. Human liver may supply AICAR to AICAR transformylase in erythrocytes/erythroblasts. Incorporation of ring-2-C of histidine and formate into C2 of urinary uric acid presented a circadian rhythm with a peak in the morning, which corresponds to the maximum DNA synthesis in the bone marrow, and it may be useful in the timing of the administration of drugs that block PNB for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. PMID:26374178

  6. The glucose ketone index calculator: a simple tool to monitor therapeutic efficacy for metabolic management of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Meidenbauer, Joshua J; Mukherjee, Purna; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic therapy using ketogenic diets (KD) is emerging as an alternative or complementary approach to the current standard of care for brain cancer management. This therapeutic strategy targets the aerobic fermentation of glucose (Warburg effect), which is the common metabolic malady of most cancers including brain tumors. The KD targets tumor energy metabolism by lowering blood glucose and elevating blood ketones (β-hydroxybutyrate). Brain tumor cells, unlike normal brain cells, cannot use ketone bodies effectively for energy when glucose becomes limiting. Although plasma levels of glucose and ketone bodies have been used separately to predict the therapeutic success of metabolic therapy, daily glucose levels can fluctuate widely in brain cancer patients. This can create difficulty in linking changes in blood glucose and ketones to efficacy of metabolic therapy. A program was developed (Glucose Ketone Index Calculator, GKIC) that tracks the ratio of blood glucose to ketones as a single value. We have termed this ratio the Glucose Ketone Index (GKI). The GKIC was used to compute the GKI for data published on blood glucose and ketone levels in humans and mice with brain tumors. The results showed a clear relationship between the GKI and therapeutic efficacy using ketogenic diets and calorie restriction. The GKIC is a simple tool that can help monitor the efficacy of metabolic therapy in preclinical animal models and in clinical trials for malignant brain cancer and possibly other cancers that express aerobic fermentation.

  7. NMR-based metabolomics reveals brain region-specific metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Lin, Qiuting; Wang, Dan; Xu, Pengtao; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in cognitive dysfunction, but its potential metabolic mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the metabolite profiling in eight different brain regions of the normal rats and the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats accompanied by cognitive dysfunction using a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach. A mixed linear model analysis was performed to assess the effects of DM, brain region and their interaction on metabolic changes. We found that different brain regions in rats displayed significant metabolic differences. In addition, the hippocampus was more susceptible to DM compared with other brain regions in rats. More interestingly, significant interaction effects of DM and brain region were observed on alanine, creatine/creatine-phosphate, lactate, succinate, aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glycine, choline, N-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol and taurine. Based on metabolic pathway analysis, we speculate that cognitive dysfunction in the STZ-induced diabetic rats may be associated with brain region-specific metabolic alterations involving energy metabolism, neurotransmitters, membrane metabolism and osmoregulation.

  8. The Brain Metabolic Enhancer Methylene Blue Improves Discrimination Learning in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wrubel, Kathryn M.; Riha, Penny D.; Maldonado, Monica A.; McCollum, David; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2007-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a metabolic enhancer that has been demonstrated to improve memory retention when given post-training in low doses in a variety of tasks in rats, including inhibitory avoidance, spatial memory (in both normal and metabolically-impaired subjects), object recognition, and habituation to a familiar environment. MB has been also shown to improve memory retention of extinction of fear conditioning in the rat. No experiments have been conducted to determine the effects of MB on more complex learning such as in discrimination tasks that require repeated days of training. This study examined the effects of daily MB on spatial discrimination memory in a baited holeboard maze. Following three days of discrimination training, subjects treated daily with post-training MB (1 mg/kg) reliably discriminated between rewarded (baited) and non-rewarded (unbaited) trials as indicated by a greater number of correct responses on rewarded trials than non-rewarded trials during the last three days of discrimination training. No such discrimination effects were observed in the saline-treated control group during the same training period. To determine whether the memory-enhancing effects of MB are associated with an increase in metabolic energy capacity in the brain, cytochrome c oxidation was measured in brains from rats treated with 1 mg/kg MB or saline for three days. The number of daily injections was chosen based on the behavioral data which revealed group differences three days after the beginning of MB treatment. Brain cytochrome oxidase activity in the MB-treated group was approximately 70% higher than in saline-treated rats. The findings suggest that repeated post-training MB may improve memory consolidation between days of learning by an induction in the enzyme cytochrome oxidase, leading to increased metabolic capacity in brain regions requiring more energy during discrimination learning. PMID:17428524<