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  1. Modulation of Memory Consolidation by the Basolateral Amygdala or Nucleus Accumbens Shell Requires Concurrent Dopamine Receptor Activation in Both Brain Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Nawar, Erene M.; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) interact in influencing memory consolidation. The current study investigated whether this interaction requires concurrent dopamine (DA) receptor activation in both brain regions. Unilateral, right-side cannulae were implanted into the BLA and the…

  2. Hot receptors in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, Hendrik W; Ko, Shanelle W; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhuo, Min

    2006-01-01

    Two major approaches have been employed for the development of novel drugs to treat chronic pain. The most traditional approach identifies molecules involved in pain as potential therapeutic targets and has focused mainly on the periphery and spinal cord. A more recent approach identifies molecules that are involved in long-term plasticity. Drugs developed through the latter approach are predicted to treat chronic, but not physiological or acute, pain. The TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid-1) receptor is involved in nociceptive processing, and is a candidate therapeutic target for pain. While most research on TRPV1 receptors has been conducted at the level of the spinal cord and peripheral structures, considerably less research has focused on supraspinal structures. This short paper summarizes progress made on TRPV1 receptors, and reviews research on the expression and function of TRPV1 receptors in supraspinal structures. We suggest that the TRPV1 receptor may be involved in pain processing in higher brain structures, such as the anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, some regions of the brain utilize the TRPV1 receptor for functions apparently unrelated to pain. PMID:17092351

  3. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  4. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  5. Receptor occupancy and brain free fraction.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeanette; Wright, Sara; Lucas, Adam; Clarke, Kirsten L; Viggers, Jean; Cheetham, Sharon; Jeffrey, Phil; Porter, Rod; Read, Kevin D

    2009-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether brain unbound concentration (C(u,brain)) is a better predictor of dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy than total brain concentration, cerebrospinal fluid concentration (C(CSF)), or blood unbound concentration (C(u,blood)). The ex vivo D(2) receptor occupancy and concentration-time profiles in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and brain of six marketed antipsychotic drugs were determined after oral administration in rats at a range of dose levels. The C(u,brain) was estimated from the product of total brain concentration and unbound fraction, which was determined using a brain homogenate method. In conclusion, the C(u,brain) of selected antipsychotic agents is a good predictor of D(2) receptor occupancy in rats. Furthermore, C(u,brain) seems to provide a better prediction of D(2) receptor occupancy than C(CSF) or C(u,blood) for those compounds whose mechanism of entry into brain tissue is influenced by factors other than simple passive diffusion. PMID:19158315

  6. Receptor occupancy and brain free fraction.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeanette; Wright, Sara; Lucas, Adam; Clarke, Kirsten L; Viggers, Jean; Cheetham, Sharon; Jeffrey, Phil; Porter, Rod; Read, Kevin D

    2009-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether brain unbound concentration (C(u,brain)) is a better predictor of dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy than total brain concentration, cerebrospinal fluid concentration (C(CSF)), or blood unbound concentration (C(u,blood)). The ex vivo D(2) receptor occupancy and concentration-time profiles in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and brain of six marketed antipsychotic drugs were determined after oral administration in rats at a range of dose levels. The C(u,brain) was estimated from the product of total brain concentration and unbound fraction, which was determined using a brain homogenate method. In conclusion, the C(u,brain) of selected antipsychotic agents is a good predictor of D(2) receptor occupancy in rats. Furthermore, C(u,brain) seems to provide a better prediction of D(2) receptor occupancy than C(CSF) or C(u,blood) for those compounds whose mechanism of entry into brain tissue is influenced by factors other than simple passive diffusion.

  7. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  8. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Brain Delivery of Therapeutic Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) requires both specific and nonspecific interactions between macromolecules and proteins/receptors expressed on the luminal and/or the abluminal surfaces of the brain capillary endothelial cells. Endocytosis and transcytosis play important roles in the distribution of macromolecules. Due to the tight junction of BBB, brain delivery of traditional therapeutic proteins with large molecular weight is generally not possible. There are multiple pathways through which macromolecules can be taken up into cells through both specific and nonspecific interactions with proteins/receptors on the cell surface. This review is focused on the current knowledge of receptor-mediated endocytosis/transcytosis and brain delivery using the Angiopep-2-conjugated system and the molecular Trojan horses. In addition, the role of neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in regulating the efflux of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from brain to blood, and approaches to improve the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic biologics by generating Fc fusion proteins, and increasing the pH dependent binding affinity between Fc and FcRn, are discussed. PMID:23840214

  9. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  10. Progesterone Receptors: Form and Function in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.; Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Wang, JunMing; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.; Nilsen, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood, inflammation, mitochondrial function, neurogenesis and regeneration, myelination and recovery from traumatic brain injury. Progesterone-regulated neural responses are mediated by an array of progesterone receptors (PR) that include the classic nuclear PRA and PRB receptors and splice variants of each, the seven transmembrane domain 7TMPRβ and the membrane-associated 25-Dx PR (PGRMC1). These PRs induce classic regulation of gene expression while also transducing signaling cascades that originate at the cell membrane and ultimately activate transcription factors. Remarkably, PRs are broadly expressed throughout the brain and can be detected in every neural cell type. The distribution of PRs beyond hypothalamic borders, suggests a much broader role of progesterone in regulating neural function. Despite the large body of evidence regarding progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects of progesterone metabolite neurosteroids, much remains to be discovered regarding the functional outcomes resulting from activation of the complex array of PRs in brain by gonadally and / or glial derived progesterone. Moreover, the impact of clinically used progestogens and developing selective PR modulators for targeted outcomes in brain is a critical avenue of investigation as the non-reproductive functions of PRs have far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging. PMID:18374402

  11. Human polyomavirus receptor distribution in brain parenchyma contrasts with receptor distribution in kidney and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Haley, Sheila A; O'Hara, Bethany A; Nelson, Christian D S; Brittingham, Frances L P; Henriksen, Kammi J; Stopa, Edward G; Atwood, Walter J

    2015-08-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6-linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent. PMID:26056932

  12. Human Polyomavirus Receptor Distribution in Brain Parenchyma Contrasts with Receptor Distribution in Kidney and Choroid Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Sheila A.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Brittingham, Frances L.P.; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Stopa, Edward G.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human polyomavirus, JCPyV, is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, a rare demyelinating disease that occurs in the setting of prolonged immunosuppression. After initial asymptomatic infection, the virus establishes lifelong persistence in the kidney and possibly other extraneural sites. In rare instances, the virus traffics to the central nervous system, where oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and glial precursors are susceptible to lytic infection, resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The mechanisms by which the virus traffics to the central nervous system from peripheral sites remain unknown. Lactoseries tetrasaccharide c (LSTc), a pentasaccharide containing a terminal α2,6–linked sialic acid, is the major attachment receptor for polyomavirus. In addition to LSTc, type 2 serotonin receptors are required for facilitating virus entry into susceptible cells. We studied the distribution of virus receptors in kidney and brain using lectins, antibodies, and labeled virus. The distribution of LSTc, serotonin receptors, and virus binding sites overlapped in kidney and in the choroid plexus. In brain parenchyma, serotonin receptors were expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but these cells were negative for LSTc and did not bind virus. LSTc was instead found on microglia and vascular endothelium, to which virus bound abundantly. Receptor distribution was not changed in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Virus infection of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during disease progression is LSTc independent. PMID:26056932

  13. The brain mineralocorticoid receptor and stress resilience.

    PubMed

    ter Heegde, Freija; De Rijk, Roel H; Vinkers, Christiaan H

    2015-02-01

    Stress exposure activates the HPA-axis and results in the release of corticosteroids which bind to two receptor types in the brain: the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While the role of the GR in stress reactivity has been extensively studied, the MR has received less attention. Nevertheless, pioneering in-depth studies over the past two decades have shown the importance of the brain MR in the processing of stressful information. Moreover, a membrane-bound MR mediating the rapid effects of cortisol was recently discovered. This review summarizes how the MR may play a role in stress resilience. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the MR is an important stress modulator and influences basal as well as stress-induced HPA-axis activity, stress appraisal, and fear-related memories. These MR effects are mediated by both genomic and non-genomic MRs and appear to be at least partially sex-dependent. Moreover, the majority of studies indicate that high MR functionality or expression may confer resilience to traumatic stress. This has direct clinical implications. First, increasing activity or expression of brain MRs may prevent or reverse symptoms of stress-related depression. Second, individuals with a relatively low MR functionality may possess an increased stress susceptibility for depression. Nevertheless, the number of clinical MR studies is currently limited. In conclusion, the recent emergence of the MR as a putative stress resilience factor is important and may open up new avenues for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  14. Donepezil, an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, and ABT-239, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, require the integrity of brain histamine system to exert biochemical and procognitive effects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Provensi, Gustavo; Costa, Alessia; Passani, M Beatrice; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-10-01

    Histaminergic H3 receptors (H3R) antagonists enhance cognition in preclinical models and modulate neurotransmission, in particular acetylcholine (ACh) release in the cortex and hippocampus, two brain areas involved in memory processing. The cognitive deficits seen in aging and Alzheimer's disease have been associated with brain cholinergic deficits. Donepezil is one of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor approved for use across the full spectrum of these cognitive disorders. We addressed the question if H3R antagonists and donepezil require an intact histamine neuronal system to exert their procognitive effects. The effect of the H3R antagonist ABT-239 and donepezil were evaluated in the object recognition test (ORT), and on the level of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) phosphorylation in normal and histamine-depleted mice. Systemic administration of ABT-239 or donepezil ameliorated the cognitive performance in the ORT. However, these compounds were ineffective in either genetically (histidine decarboxylase knock-out, HDC-KO) or pharmacologically, by means of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the HDC irreversible inhibitor a-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), histamine-deficient mice. Western blot analysis revealed that ABT-239 or donepezil systemic treatments increased GSK-3β phosphorylation in cortical and hippocampal homogenates of normal, but not of histamine-depleted mice. Furthermore, administration of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 that blocks GSK-3β phosphorylation, prevented the procognitive effects of both drugs in normal mice. Our results indicate that both donepezil and ABT-239 require the integrity of the brain histaminergic system to exert their procognitive effects and strongly suggest that impairments of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β intracellular pathway activation is responsible for the inefficacy of both drugs in histamine-deficient animals. PMID:27291828

  15. Pregnancy reduces brain sigma receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Richard; de Montigny, Claude; Debonnel, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors have recently been cloned, though their endogenous ligand(s) remain unidentified. However, some neuroactive steroids, such as progesterone, have a high affinity for these receptors. Some σ ligands, such as DTG, (+)-pentazocine and DHEA, act as σ ‘agonists' by potentiating the neuronal response to NMDA. Others, such as haloperidol, NE-100 and progesterone, act as σ ‘antagonists' by reversing the potentiations induced by σ ‘agonists'.We compared the effects of σ ‘agonists' in four series of female rats: in controls, at day 18 of pregnancy, at day 5 post-partum, and in ovariectomized rats following a 3-week treatment with a high dose of progesterone.In pregnant rats and following a 3-week treatment with progesterone, 10 fold higher doses of DTG, (+)-pentazocine and DHEA were required to elicit a selective potentiation of the NMDA response comparable to that obtained in control females. Conversely, at day 5 post-partum and following the 3-week treatment with a progesterone and after a 5-day washout, the potentiation of the NMDA response induced by the σ ‘agonist' DTG was greater than in control females.The present data suggest that endogenous progesterone acts as an ‘antagonist' at σ receptors. The resulting changes in the function of σ receptors during pregnancy and post-partum may be implicated in emotional phenomena occurring during these periods. PMID:10482906

  16. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  17. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field.

  18. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  19. Prolactin transport into mouse brain is independent of prolactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rosemary S E; Wyatt, Amanda K; Herbison, Ryan E; Knowles, Penelope J; Ladyman, Sharon R; Binart, Nadine; Banks, William A; Grattan, David R

    2016-02-01

    The anterior pituitary hormone prolactin exerts important physiologic actions in the brain. However, the mechanism by which prolactin crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain is not completely understood. On the basis of high expression of the prolactin receptor in the choroid plexus, it has been hypothesized that the receptor may bind to prolactin in the blood and translocate it into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This study aimed to test this hypothesis by investigating transport of (125)I-labeled prolactin ((125)I-prolactin) into the brain of female mice in the presence and absence of the prolactin receptor (PRLR(-/-)). Peripherally administered prolactin rapidly activates brain neurons, as evidenced by prolactin-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (pSTAT5) in neurons within 30 min of administration. The transport of prolactin into the brain was saturable, with transport effectively blocked only by a very high dose of unlabeled ovine prolactin. Transport was regulated, as in lactating mice with chronically elevated levels of prolactin, the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain was significantly increased compared to nonlactating controls. There was no change in the rate of (125)I-prolactin transport into the brain in PRLR(-/-) mice lacking functional prolactin receptors compared to control mice, indicating transport is independent of the prolactin receptor. These data suggest that prolactin transport into the brain involves another as yet unidentified transporter molecule. Because CSF levels of (125)I-prolactin were very low, even up to 90 min after administration, the data suggest that CSF is not the major route by which blood prolactin gains access to neurons in the brain.

  20. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  1. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators differentially potentiate brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R W; Yao, J; To, J; Hamilton, R T; Cadenas, E; Brinton, R D

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. The present study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ERα (propylpyrazoletriol; PPT) and ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ERα and, to a greater extent, ERβ localisation. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ERβ agonist, significantly increased ERβ association with mitochondria. In the hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COX I expression, whereas PPT was ineffective, indicating that mechanistically ERβ, and not ERα, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV, suggesting that activation of ERβ or ERα is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defence proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurones and mixed glia. The results of analyses conducted in vitro were consistent with data obtained in vivo. Furthermore, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E(2) , PPT and DPN. These findings suggest that the activation of both ERα and ERβ is differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails

  2. Calcium Channels and Associated Receptors in Malignant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Fernanda B; Gehring, Marina P; Nicoletti, Natália F

    2016-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are highly lethal and aggressive. Despite recent advances in the current therapies, which include the combination of surgery and radio/chemotherapy, the average survival rate remains poor. Altered regulation of ion channels is part of the neoplastic transformation, which suggests that ion channels are involved in cancer. Distinct classes of calcium-permeable channels are abnormally expressed in cancer and are likely involved in the alterations underlying malignant growth. Specifically, cytosolic Ca(2+) activity plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, and Ca(2+) signaling is altered in proliferating tumor cells. A series of previous studies emphasized the importance of the T-type low-voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in different cancer types, including gliomas, and remarkably, pharmacologic inhibition of T-type VGCC caused antiproliferative effects and triggered apoptosis of human glioma cells. Other calcium permeable channels, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, contribute to changes in Ca(2+) by modulating the driving force for Ca(2+) entry, and some TRP channels are required for proliferation and migration in gliomas. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. Likewise, the purinergic P2X7 receptor acts as a direct conduit for Ca(2+)-influx and an indirect activator of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel. Evidence also shows that P2X7 receptor activation is linked to elevated expression of inflammation promoting factors, tumor cell migration, an increase in intracellular mobilization of Ca(2+), and membrane depolarization in gliomas. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent findings on calcium channels and associated receptors as potential targets to treat malignant gliomas. PMID:27418672

  3. Somatostatin receptors: identification and characterization in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-06-01

    We have identified and characterized specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (SRIF; somatotropin release-inhibiting factor) in rat brain using [125I]Tyr11]SRIF as the radioligand. These receptors are present in membranes obtained from a subfraction of synaptosomes. Membranes derived from cerebral cortex bind SRIF with high affinity (Ka = 1.25 X 10(10) M-1) and have a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.155 X 10(-12) mol/mg. Neither opiates nor other neuropeptides appear to influence the binding of SRIF to brain membranes. Synthetic analogs with greater biological potency than SRIF--[D-Trp8]SRIF, [D-Cys14]SRIF, and [D-Trp8, D-Cys14]SRIF--bind to the receptors with greater avidity than SRIF, whereas inactive analogs [(2H)Ala3]SRIF and [Ala6]SRIF exhibit low binding. The ratio of receptor density to endogenous somatostatin is high in the cortex, thalamus, and striatum, low in the hypothalamus, and extremely low in the brain stem and cerebellum. Thus, SRIF receptors in the brain appear to be a distinct, new class of receptors with a regional distribution different from that of endogenous somatostatin.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  5. Brain mineralocorticoid receptors in cognition and cardiovascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) mediate diverse functions supporting osmotic and hemodynamic homeostasis, response to injury and inflammation, and neuronal changes required for learning and memory. Inappropriate MR activation in kidneys, heart, vessels, and brain hemodynamic control centers results in cardiovascular and renal pathology and hypertension. MR binds aldosterone, cortisol and corticosterone with similar affinity, while the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has less affinity for cortisol and corticosterone. As glucocorticoids are more abundant than aldosterone, aldosterone activates MR in cells co-expressing enzymes with 11β-hydroxydehydrogenase activity to inactivate them. MR and GR co-expressed in the same cell interact at the molecular and functional level and these functions may be complementary or opposing depending on the cell type. Thus the balance between MR and GR expression and activation is crucial for normal function. Where 11β-hydroxydehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD2) that inactivates cortisol and corticosterone in aldosterone target cells of the kidney and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is not expressed, as in most neurons, MR are activated at basal glucocorticoid concentrations, GR at stress concentrations. An exception may be pre-autonomic neurons of the PVN which express MR and 11β-HSD1 in the absence of hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase required to generate the requisite cofactor for reductase activity, thus acts as a dehydrogenase. MR antagonists, valuable adjuncts to the treatment of cardiovascular disease, also inhibit MR in the brain that are crucial for memory formation and exacerbate detrimental effects of excessive GR activation on cognition and mood. 11β-HSD1 inhibitors combat metabolic and cognitive diseases related to glucocorticoid excess, but may exacerbate MR action where 11β-HSD1 acts as a dehydrogenase, while non-selective 11β-HSD1&2 inhibitors cause injurious disruption of MR hemodynamic control. MR functions in the brain

  6. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  7. ERK phosphorylation in intact, adult brain by alpha(2)-adrenergic transactivation of EGF receptors.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting; Li, Baoman; Liu, Shufang; Zang, Peizhuo; Prevot, Vincent; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Our previous work demonstrated dexmedetomidine-activated phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK(1/2)) in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes and showed that it is evoked by alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors, a known response to activation of G(i/o)- or G(q)-coupled receptors [Li, B., Du, T., Li, H., Gu, L., Zhang, H., Huang, J., Hertz, L., Peng, L., 2008a. Signaling pathways for transactivation by dexmedetomidine of epidermal growth factor receptors in astrocytes and its paracrine effect on neurons. Br. J. Pharmacol. 154, 191-203]. Like most studies of transactivation, that study used cultured cells, raising the question whether a similar effect can be demonstrated in intact brain tissue and the brain in vivo. In the present study we have shown that (i) dexmedetomidine-mediated ERK(1/2) phosphorylation occurs in mouse brain slices with a similar concentration dependence as in cultured astrocytes (near-maximum effect at 50nM); (ii) intraperitoneal injection of dexmedetomidine (3microg/kg) in adult mice causes rapid phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (at Y845 and Y992) and of ERK(1/2) in the brain; (iii) both EGF receptor and ERK(1/2) phosphorylation are inhibited by intraventricular administration of (a) AG 1478, a specific inhibitor of the receptor-tyrosine kinase of the EGF receptor; (b) GM 6001, an inhibitor of metalloproteinase(s) required for release of EGF receptor agonists from membrane-bound precursors; or (c) heparin, neutralizing heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF). Thus, in intact brain HB-EGF, known to be expressed in brain, may be the major EGF agonist released in response to stimulation of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, the released agonist(s) activate(s) EGF receptors, and ERK(1/2) is phosphorylated as a conventional response to EGF receptor activation. Our previous paper (see above) showed that dexmedetomidine evokes no ERK(1/2) phosphorylation in cultured neurons, but neurons

  8. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Expression in Brain and Physical Associations with Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yore, Mackensie A.; Im, DaEun; Webb, Lena K.; Zhao, Yingxin; Chadwick, Joseph G.; Molenda-Figueira, Heather A.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; Denner, Larry; Tetel, Marc J.

    2010-01-01

    Estradiol and progesterone bind to their respective receptors in the hypothalamus and hippocampus to influence a variety of behavioral and physiological functions, including reproduction and cognition. Work from our lab and others has shown that the nuclear receptor coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and SRC-2, are essential for efficient estrogen receptor (ER) and progestin receptor (PR) transcriptional activity in brain and for hormone-dependent behaviors. While the expression of SRC-1 in brain has been studied extensively, little is known about the expression of SRC-2 in brain. In the present studies, we found that SRC-2 was highly expressed throughout the hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus, including the medial preoptic area (MPOA), ventral medial nucleus (VMN), arcuate nucleus (ARC), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, supraoptic nucleus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. In order for coactivators to function with steroid receptors, they must be expressed in the same cells. Indeed, SRC-2 and ERα were coexpressed in many cells in the MPOA, VMN and ARC, all brain regions known to be involved in female reproductive behavior and physiology. While in vitro studies indicate that SRC-2 physically associates with ER and PR, very little is known about receptor-coactivator interactions in brain. Therefore, we used pull-down assays to test the hypotheses that SRC-2 from hypothalamic and hippocampal tissue physically associate with ER and PR subtypes in a ligand-dependent manner. SRC-2 from both brain regions interacted with ERα bound to agonist, but not in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the selective ER modulator, tamoxifen. Analysis by mass spectrometry confirmed these ligand-dependent interactions between ERα and SRC-2 from brain. In dramatic contrast, SRC-2 from brain showed little to no interaction with ERβ. Interestingly, SRC-2 from both brain regions interacted with PR-B, but not PR-A, in a ligand-dependent manner. Taken together

  9. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  10. Brain angiotensin AT1 receptors as specific regulators of cardiovascular reactivity to acute psychoemotional stress.

    PubMed

    Mayorov, Dmitry N

    2011-02-01

    1. Cardiovascular reactivity, an abrupt rise in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate in response to psychoemotional stress, is a risk factor for heart disease. Pharmacological and molecular genetic studies suggest that brain angiotensin (Ang) II and AT(1) receptors are required for the normal expression of sympathetic cardiovascular responses to various psychological stressors. Moreover, overactivity of the brain AngII system may contribute to enhanced cardiovascular reactivity in hypertension. 2. Conversely, brain AT(1) receptors appear to be less important for the regulation of sympathetic cardiovascular responses to a range of stressors involving an immediate physiological threat (physical stressors) in animal models. 3. Apart from threatening events, appetitive stimuli can induce a distinct, central nervous system-mediated rise in BP. However, evidence indicates that brain AT(1) receptors are not essential for the regulation of cardiovascular arousal associated with positively motivated behaviour, such as anticipation and the consumption of palatable food. The role of central AT(1) receptors in regulating cardiovascular activation elicited by other types of appetitive stimuli remains to be determined. 4. Emerging evidence also indicates that brain AT(1) receptors play a limited role in the regulation of cardiovascular responses to non-emotional natural daily activities, sleep and exercise. 5. Collectively, these findings suggest that, with respect to cardiovascular arousal, central AT(1) receptors may be involved primarily in the regulation of the defence response. Therefore, these receptors could be a potential therapeutic target for selective attenuation of BP hyperreactivity to aversive stressors, without altering physiologically important cardiovascular adjustments to normal daily activities, sleep and exercise.

  11. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  12. kappa-Opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function.

    PubMed

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W

    2009-12-11

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. kappa-Opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system.

  13. Solubilization and purification of melatonin receptors from lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Conron, R.W. Jr.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Melatonin receptors in lizard brain were identified and characterized using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin (({sup 125}I)MEL) after solubilization with the detergent digitonin. Saturation studies of solubilized material revealed a high affinity binding site, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 181 +/- 45 pM. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs, but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of solubilized material with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, guanosine 5'-(3-O-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S), significantly reduced receptor affinity. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized melatonin receptors revealed a high affinity, large (Mr 400,000) peak of specific binding. Pretreatment with GTP-gamma-S before solubilization resulted in elution of a lower affinity, smaller (Mr 150,000) peak of specific binding. To purify solubilized receptors, a novel affinity chromatography resin was developed by coupling 6-hydroxymelatonin with Epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B. Using this resin, melatonin receptors were purified approximately 10,000-fold. Purified material retained the pharmacologic specificity of melatonin receptors. These results show that melatonin receptors that bind ligand after detergent treatment can be solubilized and substantially purified by affinity chromatography.

  14. Upregulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor at the blood-brain barrier: intercommunications between brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the endothelial cells in large vessels where LDL receptors are downregulated, brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo express an LDL receptor. Using a cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier consisting of a coculture of brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes, we observed that the capacity of endothelial cells to bind LDL is enhanced threefold when cocultured with astrocytes. We next investigated the ability of astrocytes to modulate endothelial cell LDL receptor expression. We have shown that the lipid requirement of astrocytes increases the expression of endothelial cell LDL receptors. Experiments with dialysis membranes of different pore size showed that this effect is mediated by a soluble factor(s) with relative molecular mass somewhere between 3,500 and 14,000. Substituting astrocytes with smooth muscle cells or brain endothelium with endothelium from the aorta or the adrenal cortex did not enhance the luminal LDL receptor expression on endothelial cells, demonstrating the specificity of the interactions. This factor(s) is exclusively secreted by astrocytes cocultured with brain capillary endothelial cells, but it also upregulates the LDL receptor on other cell types. This study confirms the notion that the final fine tuning of cell differentiation is under local control. PMID:8034745

  15. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  16. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  17. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  18. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  19. Chapter 3. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Nilufer; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Brain abscesses arise from a localized parenchymal infection, typically elicited by pyogenic bacteria such as S. aureus. Despite improvements in detection and treatment strategies, brain abscesses continue to occur, with an increased prevalence in developing countries and immune compromised patients. Adding to the seriousness of these infections is the recent emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, which are becoming more commonly associated with brain abscesses. Recent studies using a mouse experimental brain abscess model have revealed a complex role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in disease pathogenesis. Interestingly, TLR2 has limited impact on the innate immune response during the acute stage of brain abscess formation induced by S. aureus but influences adaptive immunity. In contrast, mice deficient in MyD88, a central adaptor molecule for the majority of TLRs in addition to the IL-1R and IL-18R, demonstrate severe defects in innate immunity coupled with exaggerated tissue destruction. It is envisioned that understanding the roles for TLRs in both resident CNS glia as well as infiltrating immune cells will provide insights as to how the immune response to bacterial infection can be tailored to achieve effective pathogen destruction without inducing excessive bystander damage of surrounding non-infected brain parenchyma. A discussion of recent findings in this field is presented along with outstanding questions and the concept of a pathogen-necrosis-autoantigen triad for the amplification for TLR signaling is introduced. PMID:19688327

  20. Modulation of brain opioid receptors by zinc and histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanissian, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of zinc and several trace elements was studied on the binding of the opioid receptor antagonist ({sup 3}H)-naloxone and the agonists ({sup 3}H)-DAGO, ({sup 3}H)-DSTLE, and ({sup 3}H)-EKC, specific for the mu, delta and kappa receptors, respectively, in several areas of the rat brain. Physiological concentrations of zinc were inhibitory to the binding of naloxone, DAGO, and EKC, whereas delta receptors were insensitive to this inhibition. Copper, cadmium, and mercury also inhibited the binding of all the ligands studied to their receptors. Histidine was most effective in preventing the inhibitory effects of zinc and copper, whereas it was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibit was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibition caused by mercury. Its metabolites histamine and imidazoleacetic acid, and also citrate were ineffective. Magnesium and manganese were stimulatory to opioid receptor binding, whereas cobalt and nickel had dual effects. Concentrations of zinc less that its IC{sub 50} totally prevented the stimulatory effects of magnesium and manganese on the mu and delta receptors on which zinc alone had no effects. The reducing reagents dithiothreitol and B-mercaptoethanol partially protected against zinc inhibition, and the oxidizing reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid even potentiated the inhibitory effects of zinc on DSTLE and DAGO binding, although to different extents.

  1. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  2. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of oxytocin receptors in human brain.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M L; Petrusz, P; Suzuki, K; Marson, L; Pedersen, C A

    2013-12-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) regulates rodent, primate and human social behaviors and stress responses. OT binding studies employing (125)I-d(CH2)5-[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4,Tyr-NH2(9)] ornithine vasotocin ((125)I-OTA), has been used to locate and quantify OT receptors (OTRs) in numerous areas of the rat brain. This ligand has also been applied to locating OTRs in the human brain. The results of the latter studies, however, have been brought into question because of subsequent evidence that (125)I-OTA is much less selective for OTR vs. vasopressin receptors in the primate brain. Previously we used a monoclonal antibody directed toward a region of the human OTR to demonstrate selective immunostaining of cell bodies and fibers in the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area and ventral septum of a cynomolgus monkey (Boccia et al., 2001). The present study employed the same monoclonal antibody to study the location of OTRs in tissue blocks containing cortical, limbic and brainstem areas dissected from fixed adult, human female brains. OTRs were visualized in discrete cell bodies and/or fibers in the central and basolateral regions of the amygdala, medial preoptic area (MPOA), anterior and ventromedial hypothalamus, olfactory nucleus, vertical limb of the diagonal band, ventrolateral septum, anterior cingulate and hypoglossal and solitary nuclei. OTR staining was not observed in the hippocampus (including CA2 and CA3), parietal cortex, raphe nucleus, nucleus ambiguus or pons. These results suggest that there are some similarities, but also important differences, in the locations of OTRs in human and rodent brains. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) utilizing a monoclonal antibody provides specific localization of OTRs in the human brain and thereby provides opportunity to further study OTR in human development and psychiatric conditions.

  4. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain.

  5. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Catana, Ciprian; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats; Borsook, David; Peterson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis) were selected out of a larger (n = 120) randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis). These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA), was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP) / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment. PMID:27658244

  6. Purification and reconstitution of serotonin receptors from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, T.K.; Wang, H.H. )

    1988-04-01

    An affinity-chromatography column was used to isolate and purify 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptors from bovine brain frontal cortex. The affinity ligand lysergic acid ethylamidoethylbromide was synthesized and coupled to an agarose matrix via a thioether bond. Receptors in the crude cortical membrane fragments were solubilized using 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) affinity purified, and reconstituted into lipid vesicles. ({sup 3}H)5-HT binding analysis indicates a single class of high-affinity binding site that was reconstituted. 5-Methoxytryptamine, a competitor for high-affinity serotonin sites, inhibited this binding and showed a K{sub i} of 27.4 nM. Ketanserin, a high-affinity ligand for 5-HT{sub 2} type receptors, was ineffective in displacing ({sup 3}H)5-HT binding at concentrations up to 4 {mu}M indicating a 5-HT{sub 1} receptor as the primary receptor type isolated. The average specific activity of 359 pmol/mg in the reconstituted fractions is an enrichment of 1,062-fold over crude membrane fragments. Sodium dodecylsulfate electrophoresis showed the presence of four proteins in the reconstituted vesicles with approximate relative M{sub r} values of 63,000, 70,000, 81,000, and 94,000.

  7. Aromatase, estrogen receptors and brain development in fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Adrio, Fátima; Diotel, Nicolas; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Nasri, Ahmed; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Estrogens affect brain development of vertebrates, not only by impacting activity and morphology of existing circuits, but also by modulating embryonic and adult neurogenesis. The issue is complex as estrogens can not only originate from peripheral tissues, but also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of androgens. In this respect, teleost fishes are quite unique because aromatase is expressed exclusively in radial glial cells, which represent pluripotent cells in the brain of all vertebrates. Expression of aromatase in the brain of fish is also strongly stimulated by estrogens and some androgens. This creates a very intriguing positive auto-regulatory loop leading to dramatic aromatase expression in sexually mature fish with elevated levels of circulating steroids. Looking at the effects of estrogens or anti-estrogens in the brain of adult zebrafish showed that estrogens inhibit rather than stimulate cell proliferation and newborn cell migration. The functional meaning of these observations is still unclear, but these data suggest that the brain of fish is experiencing constant remodeling under the influence of circulating steroids and brain-derived neurosteroids, possibly permitting a diversification of sexual strategies, notably hermaphroditism. Recent data in frogs indicate that aromatase expression is limited to neurons and do not concern radial glial cells. Thus, until now, there is no other example of vertebrates in which radial progenitors express aromatase. This raises the question of when and why these new features were gained and what are their adaptive benefits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  8. Aromatase, estrogen receptors and brain development in fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Adrio, Fátima; Diotel, Nicolas; Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Nasri, Ahmed; Vaillant, Colette; Kah, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Estrogens affect brain development of vertebrates, not only by impacting activity and morphology of existing circuits, but also by modulating embryonic and adult neurogenesis. The issue is complex as estrogens can not only originate from peripheral tissues, but also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of androgens. In this respect, teleost fishes are quite unique because aromatase is expressed exclusively in radial glial cells, which represent pluripotent cells in the brain of all vertebrates. Expression of aromatase in the brain of fish is also strongly stimulated by estrogens and some androgens. This creates a very intriguing positive auto-regulatory loop leading to dramatic aromatase expression in sexually mature fish with elevated levels of circulating steroids. Looking at the effects of estrogens or anti-estrogens in the brain of adult zebrafish showed that estrogens inhibit rather than stimulate cell proliferation and newborn cell migration. The functional meaning of these observations is still unclear, but these data suggest that the brain of fish is experiencing constant remodeling under the influence of circulating steroids and brain-derived neurosteroids, possibly permitting a diversification of sexual strategies, notably hermaphroditism. Recent data in frogs indicate that aromatase expression is limited to neurons and do not concern radial glial cells. Thus, until now, there is no other example of vertebrates in which radial progenitors express aromatase. This raises the question of when and why these new features were gained and what are their adaptive benefits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development. PMID:25038582

  9. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  10. Oxytocin and Estrogen Receptor β in the Brain: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Mani, Shaila K.; Handa, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide synthesized primarily by neurons of the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus. These neurons have axons that project into the posterior pituitary and release OT into the bloodstream to promote labor and lactation; however, OT neurons also project to other brain areas where it plays a role in numerous brain functions. OT binds to the widely expressed OT receptor (OTR), and, in doing so, it regulates homeostatic processes, social recognition, and fear conditioning. In addition to these functions, OT decreases neuroendocrine stress signaling and anxiety-related and depression-like behaviors. Steroid hormones differentially modulate stress responses and alter OTR expression. In particular, estrogen receptor β activation has been found to both reduce anxiety-related behaviors and increase OT peptide transcription, suggesting a role for OT in this estrogen receptor β-mediated anxiolytic effect. Further research is needed to identify modulators of OT signaling and the pathways utilized and to elucidate molecular mechanisms controlling OT expression to allow better therapeutic manipulations of this system in patient populations. PMID:26528239

  11. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor exhibits sexually dimorphic expression in the medaka brain.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yukiko; Hosono, Kohei; Yamashita, Junpei; Kawabata, Yukika; Okubo, Kataaki

    2015-11-01

    The differential impact of stress on brain functions of males and females has been widely observed in vertebrates. Recent evidence suggests that stress-induced glucocorticoid signaling affects sexual differentiation and sex changes in teleost fish. These facts led us to postulate that there were sex differences in glucocorticoid signaling in the teleost brain that underlie some sex differences in their physiological and behavioral traits. Here we found sexually dimorphic expression of a glucocorticoid receptor gene (gr1) in the brain of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), with females having greater expression in several preoptic and thalamic nuclei. Further, gr1 exhibits female-biased expression in neurons of the anterior parvocellular preoptic nucleus that produce the neuropeptides vasotocin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (these neuropeptides have been implicated in the regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioral functions). These findings suggest that glucocorticoids have a greater influence on physiology and behavior mediated by these neuropeptides in females than in males, which may contribute to sex differences in the brain's response to stress. PMID:26433060

  13. Apolipoprotein E receptors: linking brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herz, J; Beffert, U

    2000-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts an increasing part of our ageing population. An isoform of apolipoprotein E, a protein that mediates the transport of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system, predisposes carriers of this allele to the common late-onset form of the disease. How this protein is related to a neurodegenerative disorder is an enigma. Mounting evidence indicates that apolipoprotein E receptors, which are abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system, also fulfill critical functions during brain development and may profoundly influence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Sex, the brain and hypertension: brain oestrogen receptors and high blood pressure risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hay, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to worldwide morbidity and mortality rates related to cardiovascular disease. There are important sex differences in the onset and rate of hypertension in humans. Compared with age-matched men, premenopausal women are less likely to develop hypertension. However, after age 60, the incidence of hypertension increases in women and even surpasses that seen in older men. It is thought that changes in levels of circulating ovarian hormones as women age may be involved in the increase in hypertension in older women. One of the key mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension in both men and women is an increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Brain regions important for the regulation of SNA, such as the subfornical organ, the paraventricular nucleus and the rostral ventral lateral medulla, also express specific subtypes of oestrogen receptors. Each of these brain regions has also been implicated in mechanisms underlying risk factors for hypertension such as obesity, stress and inflammation. The present review brings together evidence that links actions of oestrogen at these receptors to modulate some of the common brain mechanisms involved in the ability of hypertensive risk factors to increase SNA and blood pressure. Understanding the mechanisms by which oestrogen acts at key sites in the brain for the regulation of SNA is important for the development of novel, sex-specific therapies for treating hypertension.

  15. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  16. Insulin receptors internalize by a rapid, saturable pathway requiring receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The effect of receptor occupancy on insulin receptor endocytosis was examined in CHO cells expressing normal human insulin receptors (CHO/IR), autophosphorylation- and internalization-deficient receptors (CHO/IRA1018), and receptors which undergo autophosphorylation but lack a sequence required for internalization (CHO/IR delta 960). The rate of [125I]insulin internalization in CHO/IR cells at 37 degrees C was rapid at physiological concentrations, but decreased markedly in the presence of increasing unlabeled insulin (ED50 = 1-3 nM insulin, or 75,000 occupied receptors/cell). In contrast, [125I]insulin internalization by CHO/IRA1018 and CHO/IR delta 960 cells was slow and was not inhibited by unlabeled insulin. At saturating insulin concentrations, the rate of internalization by wild-type and mutant receptors was similar. Moreover, depletion of intracellular potassium, which has been shown to disrupt coated pit formation, inhibited the rapid internalization of [125I]insulin at physiological insulin concentrations by CHO/IR cells, but had little or no effect on [125I]insulin uptake by CHO/IR delta 960 and CHO/IRA1018 cells or wild-type cells at high insulin concentrations. These data suggest that the insulin-stimulated entry of the insulin receptor into a rapid, coated pit-mediated internalization pathway is saturable and requires receptor autophosphorylation and an intact juxtamembrane region. Furthermore, CHO cells also contain a constitutive nonsaturable pathway which does not require receptor autophosphorylation or an intact juxtamembrane region; this second pathway is unaffected by depletion of intracellular potassium, and therefore may be independent of coated pits. Our data suggest that the ligand-stimulated internalization of the insulin receptor may require specific saturable interactions between the receptor and components of the endocytic system. PMID:1757462

  17. PGF(2alpha) FP receptor contributes to brain damage following transient focal brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sofiyan; Ahmad, Abdullah Shafique; Maruyama, Takayuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Although some of the COX-2 metabolites and prostaglandins have been implicated in stroke and excitotoxicity, the role of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and its FP receptor have not been elucidated in the pathogenesis of ischemic-reperfusion (I/R) brain injury. Here we investigated the FP receptor's contribution in a unilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model of focal cerebral ischemia in mice. The MCA in wild type (WT) and FP knockout (FP(-/-)) C57BL/6 male mice was transiently occluded with a monofilament for 90 min. After 96 h of reperfusion, the FP(-/-) mice had 25.3% less neurological deficit (P < 0.05) and 34.4% smaller infarct volumes (P < 0.05) than those of the WT mice. In a separate cohort, physiological parameters were monitored before, during, and after ischemia, and the results revealed no differences between the groups. Because excitotoxicity is an acute mediator of stroke outcome, the effect of acute NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was also tested. Forty-eight hours after unilateral intrastriatal NMDA injection, excitotoxic brain damage was 20.8% less extensive in the FP(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) than in the WT counterparts, further supporting the toxic contribution of the FP receptor in I/R injury. Additionally, we investigated the effect of post-treatment with the FP agonist latanoprost in mice subjected to MCA occlusion; such treatment resulted in an increase in neurological deficit and infarct size in WT mice (P < 0.05), though no effects were observed in the latanoprost-treated FP(-/-) mice. Together, the results suggest that the PGF(2alpha) FP receptor significantly enhances cerebral ischemic and excitotoxic brain injury and that these results are of importance when planning for potential development of therapeutic drugs to treat stroke and its acute and/or long term consequences.

  18. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  19. Gustatory receptors required for sensing umbelliferone in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Seeta; Kim, Yunjung; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Youngseok

    2015-11-01

    Studies of taste modality using the animal model Drosophila melanogaster have elucidated a number of uncharacterized mechanisms of sensory responses. Gustatory receptors expressed in taste organs are not only responsible for the acceptance and rejection of different foods, but are also involved in the process of selecting an oviposition site. This contact-chemosensation is essential for animals to discriminate between nutritious and contaminated foods. In this study, we characterized the function of gustatory receptors that play a dual role in feeding and oviposition using the plant metabolite umbelliferone. The combined electrophysiological and behavioral evidence demonstrated that two broadly tuned gustatory receptors, GR33a and GR66a, and one narrowly tuned gustatory receptor, GR93a, are all required to generate a functional umbelliferone receptor. PMID:26524963

  20. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 3, 1 May 85-30 Apr 86

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1986-05-01

    We have compared the characteristics of the recognition sites for 3(H)acetylcholine and 3H(-)nicotine in rat brain and found that the pharmacology, distribution, disulfide bond requirement, and regulation by chronic administration of nicotine and soman are identical. From these studies we conclude that 3Hacetylcholine and 3H(-)nicotine recognize the same recognition site which has the characteristics expected of a nicotinic cholinergic receptor. We have also determined that 3Hacetylcholine of high specific radioactivity (80 Ci/mmol) is an excellent ligand with which to study muscarinic receptors that have high affinity for agonists. These receptors may represent a subtype of muscarinic receptors found in brain, heart, glands, an some smooth muscle. (JS)

  1. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  2. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  3. Melanocortin 4 Receptor and Dopamine D2 Receptor Expression in Brain Areas Involved in Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ye Ran

    2015-01-01

    Background The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is involved in the regulation of homeostatic energy balance by the hypothalamus. Recent reports showed that MC4R can also control the motivation for food in association with a brain reward system, such as dopamine. We investigated the expression levels of MC4R and the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), which is known to be related to food rewards, in both the hypothalamus and brain regions involved in food rewards. Methods We examined the expression levels of D2R and MC4R by dual immunofluorescence histochemistry in hypothalamic regions and in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), the central amygdala, and the ventral tegmental area of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of the D2R gene. Results In the hypothalamic area, significant coexpression of MC4R and D2R was observed in the arcuate nucleus. We observed a significant coexpression of D2R and MC4R in the BNST, which has been suggested to be an important site for food reward. Conclusion We suggest that MC4R and D2R function in the hypothalamus for control of energy homeostasis and that within the brain regions related with rewards, such as the BNST, the melanocortin system works synergistically with dopamine for the integration of food motivation in the control of feeding behaviors. PMID:26790386

  4. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1: Expression and action in brain.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Husø; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Andersson, Krister; Gjedde, Albert; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a "volume transmitter" in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the cerebral neocortex and the hippocampus, where it can be stimulated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the HCAR1 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP levels. Cerebral HCAR1 is concentrated on the postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses and also is enriched at the blood-brain barrier. In synaptic spines and in adipocytes, HCAR1 immunoreactivity is also located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Through activation of HCAR1, lactate can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress, and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells. PMID:25881750

  5. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1: Expression and action in brain.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Husø; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Andersson, Krister; Gjedde, Albert; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a "volume transmitter" in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the cerebral neocortex and the hippocampus, where it can be stimulated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the HCAR1 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP levels. Cerebral HCAR1 is concentrated on the postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses and also is enriched at the blood-brain barrier. In synaptic spines and in adipocytes, HCAR1 immunoreactivity is also located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Through activation of HCAR1, lactate can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress, and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells.

  6. The role of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors for secondary brain damage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Trabold, Raimund; Erös, Christian; Zweckberger, Klaus; Relton, Jane; Beck, Heike; Nussberger, Juerg; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Bader, Michael; Whalley, Eric; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms are known to contribute to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since bradykinin is one of the first mediators activated during inflammation, we investigated the role of bradykinin and its receptors in posttraumatic secondary brain damage. We subjected wild-type (WT), B1-, and B2-receptor-knockout mice to controlled cortical impact (CCI) and analyzed tissue bradykinin as well as kinin receptor mRNA and protein expression up to 48 h thereafter. Brain edema, contusion volume, and functional outcome were assessed 24 h and 7 days after CCI. Tissue bradykinin was maximally increased 2 h after trauma (P<0.01 versus sham). Kinin B1 receptor mRNA was upregulated up to four-fold 24 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry showed that B1 and B2 receptors were expressed in the brain and were significantly upregulated in the traumatic penumbra 1 to 24 h after CCI. B2R−/− mice had significantly less brain edema (−51% versus WT, 24 h; P<0.001), smaller contusion volumes (∼50% versus WT 24 h and 7 d after CCI; P<0.05), and better functional outcome 7 days after TBI as compared with WT mice (P<0.05). The present results show that bradykinin and its B2 receptors play a causal role for brain edema formation and cell death after TBI. PMID:19773800

  7. Prospective Design of Anti‐Transferrin Receptor Bispecific Antibodies for Optimal Delivery into the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kanodia, JS; Gadkar, K; Bumbaca, D; Zhang, Y; Tong, RK; Luk, W; Hoyte, K; Lu, Y; Wildsmith, KR; Couch, JA; Watts, RJ; Dennis, MS; Ernst, JA; Scearce‐Levie, K; Atwal, JK; Joseph, S

    2016-01-01

    Anti‐transferrin receptor (TfR)‐based bispecific antibodies have shown promise for boosting antibody uptake in the brain. Nevertheless, there are limited data on the molecular properties, including affinity required for successful development of TfR‐based therapeutics. A complex nonmonotonic relationship exists between affinity of the anti‐TfR arm and brain uptake at therapeutically relevant doses. However, the quantitative nature of this relationship and its translatability to humans is heretofore unexplored. Therefore, we developed a mechanistic pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic (PK‐PD) model for bispecific anti‐TfR/BACE1 antibodies that accounts for antibody‐TfR interactions at the blood‐brain barrier (BBB) as well as the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect of anti‐BACE1 arm. The calibrated model correctly predicted the optimal anti‐TfR affinity required to maximize brain exposure of therapeutic antibodies in the cynomolgus monkey and was scaled to predict the optimal affinity of anti‐TfR bispecifics in humans. Thus, this model provides a framework for testing critical translational predictions for anti‐TfR bispecific antibodies, including choice of candidate molecule for clinical development. PMID:27299941

  8. Prospective Design of Anti-Transferrin Receptor Bispecific Antibodies for Optimal Delivery into the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, J S; Gadkar, K; Bumbaca, D; Zhang, Y; Tong, R K; Luk, W; Hoyte, K; Lu, Y; Wildsmith, K R; Couch, J A; Watts, R J; Dennis, M S; Ernst, J A; Scearce-Levie, K; Atwal, J K; Ramanujan, S; Joseph, S

    2016-05-01

    Anti-transferrin receptor (TfR)-based bispecific antibodies have shown promise for boosting antibody uptake in the brain. Nevertheless, there are limited data on the molecular properties, including affinity required for successful development of TfR-based therapeutics. A complex nonmonotonic relationship exists between affinity of the anti-TfR arm and brain uptake at therapeutically relevant doses. However, the quantitative nature of this relationship and its translatability to humans is heretofore unexplored. Therefore, we developed a mechanistic pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for bispecific anti-TfR/BACE1 antibodies that accounts for antibody-TfR interactions at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as well as the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect of anti-BACE1 arm. The calibrated model correctly predicted the optimal anti-TfR affinity required to maximize brain exposure of therapeutic antibodies in the cynomolgus monkey and was scaled to predict the optimal affinity of anti-TfR bispecifics in humans. Thus, this model provides a framework for testing critical translational predictions for anti-TfR bispecific antibodies, including choice of candidate molecule for clinical development. PMID:27299941

  9. The P2X4 receptor is required for neuroprotection via ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Rieko; Sasai, Miwa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), a procedure consisting of transient ischemia and subsequent reperfusion, provides ischemic tolerance against prolonged ischemia in the brain. Although the blood flow changes mediated by IPC are primarily perceived by vascular endothelial cells, the role of these cells in ischemic tolerance has not been fully clarified. In this study, we found that the P2X4 receptor, which is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, is required for ischemic tolerance following middle artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. Mechanistically, the P2X4 receptor was stimulated by fluid shear stress, which mimics reperfusion, thus promoting the increased expression of osteopontin, a neuroprotective molecule. Furthermore, we found that the intracerebroventricular administration of osteopontin was sufficient to exert a neuroprotective effect mediated by preconditioning-stimulated P2X4 receptor activation. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby vascular endothelial cells are involved in ischemic tolerance. PMID:27173846

  10. A Factor-Image Framework to Quantification of Brain Receptor Dynamic PET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. Jane; Szabo, Zsolt; Lei, Peng; Varga, József; Liu, K. J. Ray

    2007-01-01

    The positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique enables the measurement of receptor distribution or neurotransmitter release in the living brain and the changes of the distribution with time and thus allows quantification of binding sites as well as the affinity of a radioligand. However, quantification of receptor binding studies obtained with PET is complicated by tissue heterogeneity in the sampling image elements (i.e., voxels, pixels). This effect is caused by a limited spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Spatial heterogeneity is often essential in understanding the underlying receptor binding process. Tracer kinetic modeling also often requires an intrusive collection of arterial blood samples. In this paper, we propose a likelihood-based framework in the voxel domain for quantitative imaging with or without the blood sampling of the input function. Radioligand kinetic parameters are estimated together with the input function. The parameters are initialized by a subspace-based algorithm and further refined by an iterative likelihood-based estimation procedure. The performance of the proposed scheme is examined by simulations. The results show that the proposed scheme provides reliable estimation of factor time-activity curves (TACs) and the underlying parametric images. A good match is noted between the result of the proposed approach and that of the Logan plot. Real brain PET data are also examined, and good performance is observed in determining the TACs and the underlying factor images. PMID:18769527

  11. Estrogen receptor beta in the brain: from form to function.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Michael J; Foradori, Chad D; Handa, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    Estrogens have numerous effects on the brain, both in adulthood and during development. These actions of estrogen are mediated by two distinct estrogen receptor (ER) systems, ER alpha (ERalpha) and ER beta (ERbeta). In brain, ERalpha plays a critical role in regulating reproductive neuroendocrine function and behavior, however, a definitive role for ERbeta in any neurobiological function has been slow in forthcoming. Clues to the function of ERbeta in the central nervous system can be gleaned from the neuroanatomical distribution of ERbeta and the phenotypes of neurons that express ERbeta. ERbeta immunoreactivity has been found in populations of GnRH, CRH, vasopressin, oxytocin and prolactin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. Utilizing subtype-selective estrogen receptor agonists can help determine the roles for ERbeta in non-reproductive behaviors in rat models. ERbeta-selective agonists exert potent anxiolytic activity when animals were tested in a number of behavioral paradigms. Consistent with this, ERbeta-selective agonists also inhibited the ACTH and corticosterone response to stress. In contrast, ERalpha selective agonists were found to be anxiogenic and correspondingly increased the hormonal stress response. Taken together, our studies implicate ERbeta as an important modulator of some non-reproductive neurobiological systems. The molecular and neuroanatomical targets of estrogen that are mediated by ERbeta remain to be determined. A number of splice variants of ERbeta mRNA have been reported in brain tissue. Imaging of eGFP labeled chimeric receptor proteins transfected into cell lines shows that ERbeta splice variation can alter trafficking patterns and function. The originally described ERbeta (herein termed ERbeta1) is characterized by possessing a high affinity for estradiol. Similar to ERalpha, it is localized in the nucleus and is trafficked to nuclear sites termed "hyperspeckles" following ligand binding. In contrast, ERbeta2 contains an 18

  12. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation.

  13. Cannabinoid control of brain bioenergetics: Exploring the subcellular localization of the CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Reguero, Leire; Puente, Nagore; Lutz, Beat; Chaouloff, Francis; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Benard, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Brain mitochondrial activity is centrally involved in the central control of energy balance. When studying mitochondrial functions in the brain, however, discrepant results might be obtained, depending on the experimental approaches. For instance, immunostaining experiments and biochemical isolation of organelles expose investigators to risks of false positive and/or false negative results. As an example, the functional presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on brain mitochondrial membranes (mtCB1) was recently reported and rapidly challenged, claiming that the original observation was likely due to artifact results. Here, we addressed this issue by directly comparing the procedures used in the two studies. Our results show that the use of appropriate controls and quantifications allows detecting mtCB1 receptor with CB1 receptor antibodies, and that, if mitochondrial fractions are enriched and purified, CB1 receptor agonists reliably decrease respiration in brain mitochondria. These data further underline the importance of adapted experimental procedures to study brain mitochondrial functions.

  14. Transferrin receptors in rat brain: neuropeptide-like pattern and relationship to iron distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J M; Ruff, M R; Weber, R J; Pert, C B

    1985-01-01

    We have characterized and visualized the binding of 125I-labeled transferrin to sections of rat brain. This saturable, reversible, high-affinity (Kd = 1 X 10(-9) M) binding site appears indistinguishable from transferrin receptors previously characterized in other tissues. Moreover, a monoclonal antibody raised to rat lymphocyte transferrin receptors could immunoprecipitate recovered intact transferrin solubilized from labeled brain slices, indicating that labeling was to the same molecular entity previously characterized as the transferrin receptor. The pattern of transferrin receptor distribution visualized in brain with both 125I-labeled transferrin and an anti-transferrin receptor monoclonal antibody are almost indistinguishable but differ from the pattern of iron distribution. Iron-rich brain areas generally receive neuronal projections from areas with abundant transferrin receptors, suggesting that iron may be transported neuronally. However, many brain areas with a high density of transferrin receptors appear unrelated to iron uptake and neuronal transport and form a receptor distribution pattern similar to that of other known neuropeptides. This "neuropeptide-like" distribution pattern suggests that transferrin may have neuromodulatory, perhaps behavioral, function in brain. Images PMID:2989832

  15. Somatostatin receptors in the rat adrenal cortex: characterization and comparison with brain and pituitary receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-05-01

    Specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (S-14) in rat adrenal cortical membranes were quantitated by direct binding studies using [125I-Tyr11]S-14. Competitive inhibition of this radioligand by S-14 showed that these receptors constitute a single class of high affinity binding sites [dissociation constant (Kd) = 1.08 nM and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) = 0.35 pmol/mg membrane protein]. Structural analogs of S-14 with halogenated Trp8 moiety exhibited 4- to 46-fold greater binding affinity than S-14, [D-F5-Trp8]S-14 being the most potent. [Tyr11]S-14 and [des-Ala1]S-14 bound to these receptors with reduced affinity whereas [Phe4]S-14 exhibited 1.5-fold greater affinity than S-14. Somatostatin-28 (S-28) and S-14 were equipotent, whereas the N-terminal fragments of S-28 [S-28(1-14) and S-28(1-12)] were inactive. High affinity binding sites were also quantitated using a radioligand prepared from the tyrosinated S-28 analog, [Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25]S-28 (Kd = 1.2 nM; Bmax = 0.21 pmol/mg membrane protein). Both S-14 and S-28 exhibited comparable relative potencies for inhibiting the specific binding of this radioligand and [125I-Tyr11]S-14. Extracts of whole adrenal or the adrenal medulla and cortex contained very low levels of S-14-like immunoreactivity (2.4 pg/mg protein). These studies confirm the presence of specific receptors for S-14 in the adrenal cortex and suggest that 1) with respect to S-14 biological activity, Trp8-modified S-14 analogs should be more potent than S-14, S-28 equipotent with S-14, and N-terminal fragments of S-28 inactive in this tissue. 2) Direct binding studies using radioiodinated [Tyr11]S-14 and [Leu8,D-Trp22, Tyr25]S-28 appear to quantitate the same receptor sites in adrenocortical tissue. 3) The ligand specificity of the adrenocortical S-14 receptor differs from that previously reported for the pituitary and brain providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of the S-14 receptor. 4) In view of the very low concentrations

  16. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  17. Neurokinin-3 Receptor Binding in Guinea Pig, Monkey, and Human Brain: In Vitro and in Vivo Imaging Using the Novel Radioligand, [18F]Lu AF10628

    PubMed Central

    Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Stepanov, Vladimir; Takano, Akihiro; Tóth, Miklós; Svedberg, Marie; Møller Nielsen, Søren; Khanzhin, Nikolay A.; Juhl, Karsten; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous autoradiography studies have suggested a marked interspecies variation in the neuroanatomical localization and expression levels of the neurokinin 3 receptor, with high density in the brain of rat, gerbil, and guinea pig, but at the time offered no conclusive evidence for its presence in the human brain. Hitherto available radioligands have displayed low affinity for the human neurokinin 3 receptor relative to the rodent homologue and may thus not be optimal for cross-species analyses of the expression of this protein. Methods: A novel neurokinin 3 receptor radioligand, [18F]Lu AF10628 ((S)-N-(cyclobutyl(3-fluorophenyl)methyl)-8-fluoro-2-((3-[18F]-fluoropropyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-4-carboxamide), was synthesized and used for autoradiography studies in cryosections from guinea pig, monkey, and human brain as well as for positron emission tomography studies in guinea pig and monkey. Results: The results confirmed previous observations of interspecies variation in the neurokinin 3 receptor brain localization with more extensive distribution in guinea pig than in primate brain. In the human brain, specific binding to the neurokinin 3 receptor was highest in the amygdala and in the hypothalamus and very low in other regions examined. Positron emission tomography imaging showed a pattern consistent with that observed using autoradiography. The radioactivity was, however, found to accumulate in skull bone, which limits the use of this radioligand for in vivo quantification of neurokinin 3 receptor binding. Conclusion: Species differences in the brain distribution of neurokinin 3 receptors should be considered when using animal models for predicting human neurokinin 3 receptor pharmacology. For positron emission tomography imaging of brain neurokinin 3 receptors, additional work is required to develop a radioligand with more favorable in vivo properties. PMID:26993630

  18. Gustatory receptors required for avoiding the insecticide L-canavanine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok; Kang, Min Jung; Shim, Jaewon; Cheong, Chae Uk; Moon, Seok Jun; Montell, Craig

    2012-01-25

    Insect survival depends on contact chemosensation to sense and avoid consuming plant-derived insecticides, such as L-canavanine. Members of a family of ∼60 gustatory receptors (GRs) comprise the main peripheral receptors responsible for taste sensation in Drosophila. However, the roles of most Drosophila GRs are unknown. In addition to GRs, a G protein-coupled receptor, DmXR, has been reported to be required for detecting L-canavanine. Here, we showed that GRs are essential for responding to L-canavanine and that flies missing DmXR displayed normal L-canavanine avoidance and L-canavanine-evoked action potentials. Mutations disrupting either Gr8a or Gr66a resulted in an inability to detect L-canavanine. We found that L-canavanine stimulated action potentials in S-type sensilla, which were where Gr8a and Gr66a were both expressed, but not in Gr66a-expressing sensilla that did not express Gr8a. L-canavanine-induced action potentials were also abolished in the Gr8a and Gr66a mutant animals. Gr8a was narrowly required for responding to L-canavanine, in contrast to Gr66a, which was broadly required for responding to other noxious tastants. Our data suggest that GR8a and GR66a are subunits of an L-canavanine receptor and that GR8a contributes to the specificity for L-canavanine. PMID:22279227

  19. High affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands. 1. Regional rat brain distribution of iodinated benzamides

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Ansari, M.S.; de Paulis, T.; Schmidt, D.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Smith, H.E.; Manning, R.G.; Gillespie, D.; Ebert, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Five 125I-labeled substituted benzamides, which are close structural analogues of (S)-sulpiride, eticlopride, and isoremoxipride, were evaluated for their selective in vivo uptake into dopamine D2 receptor rich tissue of the rat brain. Iodopride (KD 0.88 nM), an iodine substituted benzamide structurally related to sulpiride, displayed a maximal striatum: cerebellar uptake ratio of 7.6. Demonstration of saturation of the receptor with (125I)iodopride in striatum required uptake in frontal cortex to be used, rather than cerebellar uptake, to define nonspecific binding. Two other ligands structurally related to eticlopride, iclopride (KD 0.23 nM) and itopride (KD 0.16 nM), displayed maximal striatal: cerebellar uptake ratios of 9.8 and 3.3, respectively. The most potent ligands, epidepride (KD 0.057 nM) and ioxipride (KD 0.070 nM) showed striatal:cerebellar uptake ratios of 234 and 65, respectively. The observed uptake ratios correlated poorly with the affinity constants for the dopamine D2 receptor alone, but were highly correlated (r = 0.92) with the product of the receptor dissociation constant (KD) and the apparent lipophilicity (kw), as determined by reverse-phase HPLC at pH 7.5. Total striatal uptake also appeared dependent on lipophilicity, with maximal uptake occurring for ligands having log kw 2.4-2.8.

  20. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  1. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron–glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  2. Enterovirus D68 receptor requirements unveiled by haploid genetics.

    PubMed

    Baggen, Jim; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Staring, Jacqueline; Jae, Lucas T; Liu, Yue; Guo, Hongbo; Slager, Jasper J; de Bruin, Jost W; van Vliet, Arno L W; Blomen, Vincent A; Overduin, Pieter; Sheng, Ju; de Haan, Cornelis A M; de Haan Xander, Cornelis A M; de Vries, Erik; Meijer, Adam; Rossmann, Michael G; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-02-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe respiratory disease and is associated with cases of paralysis, especially among children. Heretofore, information on host factor requirements for EV-D68 infection is scarce. Haploid genetic screening is a powerful tool to reveal factors involved in the entry of pathogens. We performed a genome-wide haploid screen with the EV-D68 prototype Fermon strain to obtain a comprehensive overview of cellular factors supporting EV-D68 infection. We identified and confirmed several genes involved in sialic acid (Sia) biosynthesis, transport, and conjugation to be essential for infection. Moreover, by using knockout cell lines and gene reconstitution, we showed that both α2,6- and α2,3-linked Sia can be used as functional cellular EV-D68 receptors. Importantly, the screen did not reveal a specific protein receptor, suggesting that EV-D68 can use multiple redundant sialylated receptors. Upon testing recent clinical strains, we identified strains that showed a similar Sia dependency, whereas others could infect cells lacking surface Sia, indicating they can use an alternative, nonsialylated receptor. Nevertheless, these Sia-independent strains were still able to bind Sia on human erythrocytes, raising the possibility that these viruses can use multiple receptors. Sequence comparison of Sia-dependent and Sia-independent EV-D68 strains showed that many changes occurred near the canyon that might allow alternative receptor binding. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the identity of the EV-D68 receptor and suggest the possible existence of Sia-independent viruses, which are essential for understanding tropism and disease. PMID:26787879

  3. Enterovirus D68 receptor requirements unveiled by haploid genetics.

    PubMed

    Baggen, Jim; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Staring, Jacqueline; Jae, Lucas T; Liu, Yue; Guo, Hongbo; Slager, Jasper J; de Bruin, Jost W; van Vliet, Arno L W; Blomen, Vincent A; Overduin, Pieter; Sheng, Ju; de Haan, Cornelis A M; de Haan Xander, Cornelis A M; de Vries, Erik; Meijer, Adam; Rossmann, Michael G; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-02-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe respiratory disease and is associated with cases of paralysis, especially among children. Heretofore, information on host factor requirements for EV-D68 infection is scarce. Haploid genetic screening is a powerful tool to reveal factors involved in the entry of pathogens. We performed a genome-wide haploid screen with the EV-D68 prototype Fermon strain to obtain a comprehensive overview of cellular factors supporting EV-D68 infection. We identified and confirmed several genes involved in sialic acid (Sia) biosynthesis, transport, and conjugation to be essential for infection. Moreover, by using knockout cell lines and gene reconstitution, we showed that both α2,6- and α2,3-linked Sia can be used as functional cellular EV-D68 receptors. Importantly, the screen did not reveal a specific protein receptor, suggesting that EV-D68 can use multiple redundant sialylated receptors. Upon testing recent clinical strains, we identified strains that showed a similar Sia dependency, whereas others could infect cells lacking surface Sia, indicating they can use an alternative, nonsialylated receptor. Nevertheless, these Sia-independent strains were still able to bind Sia on human erythrocytes, raising the possibility that these viruses can use multiple receptors. Sequence comparison of Sia-dependent and Sia-independent EV-D68 strains showed that many changes occurred near the canyon that might allow alternative receptor binding. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the identity of the EV-D68 receptor and suggest the possible existence of Sia-independent viruses, which are essential for understanding tropism and disease.

  4. Enterovirus D68 receptor requirements unveiled by haploid genetics

    PubMed Central

    Baggen, Jim; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Staring, Jacqueline; Jae, Lucas T.; Liu, Yue; Guo, Hongbo; Slager, Jasper J.; de Bruin, Jost W.; van Vliet, Arno L. W.; Blomen, Vincent A.; Overduin, Pieter; Sheng, Ju; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; de Vries, Erik; Meijer, Adam; Rossmann, Michael G.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe respiratory disease and is associated with cases of paralysis, especially among children. Heretofore, information on host factor requirements for EV-D68 infection is scarce. Haploid genetic screening is a powerful tool to reveal factors involved in the entry of pathogens. We performed a genome-wide haploid screen with the EV-D68 prototype Fermon strain to obtain a comprehensive overview of cellular factors supporting EV-D68 infection. We identified and confirmed several genes involved in sialic acid (Sia) biosynthesis, transport, and conjugation to be essential for infection. Moreover, by using knockout cell lines and gene reconstitution, we showed that both α2,6- and α2,3-linked Sia can be used as functional cellular EV-D68 receptors. Importantly, the screen did not reveal a specific protein receptor, suggesting that EV-D68 can use multiple redundant sialylated receptors. Upon testing recent clinical strains, we identified strains that showed a similar Sia dependency, whereas others could infect cells lacking surface Sia, indicating they can use an alternative, nonsialylated receptor. Nevertheless, these Sia-independent strains were still able to bind Sia on human erythrocytes, raising the possibility that these viruses can use multiple receptors. Sequence comparison of Sia-dependent and Sia-independent EV-D68 strains showed that many changes occurred near the canyon that might allow alternative receptor binding. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the identity of the EV-D68 receptor and suggest the possible existence of Sia-independent viruses, which are essential for understanding tropism and disease. PMID:26787879

  5. A Drosophila Gustatory Receptor Required for Strychnine Sensation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok; Moon, Seok Jun; Wang, Yijin; Montell, Craig

    2015-09-01

    Strychnine is a potent, naturally occurring neurotoxin that effectively protects plants from animal pests by deterring feeding behavior. In insects, such as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, bitter-tasting aversive compounds are detected primarily through a family of gustatory receptors (GRs), which are expressed in gustatory receptor neurons. We previously described multiple GRs that eliminate the behavioral avoidance to all bitter compounds tested, with the exception of strychnine. Here, we report the identity of a strychnine receptor, referred to as GR47a. We generated a mutation in Gr47a and found that it eliminated strychnine repulsion and strychnine-induced action potentials. GR47a was narrowly tuned, as the responses to other avoidance compounds were unaffected in the mutant animals. This analysis supports an emerging model that Drosophila GRs fall broadly into two specificity classes-one class is comprised of core receptors that are broadly required, whereas the other class, which includes GR47a, consists of narrowly tuned receptors that define chemical specificity. PMID:26187906

  6. A Drosophila Gustatory Receptor Required for Strychnine Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngseok; Moon, Seok Jun; Wang, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Strychnine is a potent, naturally occurring neurotoxin that effectively protects plants from animal pests by deterring feeding behavior. In insects, such as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, bitter-tasting aversive compounds are detected primarily through a family of gustatory receptors (GRs), which are expressed in gustatory receptor neurons. We previously described multiple GRs that eliminate the behavioral avoidance to all bitter compounds tested, with the exception of strychnine. Here, we report the identity of a strychnine receptor, referred to as GR47a. We generated a mutation in Gr47a and found that it eliminated strychnine repulsion and strychnine-induced action potentials. GR47a was narrowly tuned, as the responses to other avoidance compounds were unaffected in the mutant animals. This analysis supports an emerging model that Drosophila GRs fall broadly into two specificity classes—one class is comprised of core receptors that are broadly required, whereas the other class, which includes GR47a, consists of narrowly tuned receptors that define chemical specificity. PMID:26187906

  7. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads /sup 60/Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 /sup 60/Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia.

  8. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  9. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  10. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  11. From The Cover: Microtransplantation of functional receptors and channels from the Alzheimer's brain to frog oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, R.; Dueñas, Z.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Kawas, C. H.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-02-01

    About a decade ago, cell membranes from the electric organ of Torpedo and from the rat brain were transplanted to frog oocytes, which thus acquired functional Torpedo and rat neurotransmitter receptors. Nevertheless, the great potential that this method has for studying human diseases has remained virtually untapped. Here, we show that cell membranes from the postmortem brains of humans that suffered Alzheimer's disease can be microtransplanted to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. We show also that these postmortem membranes carry neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-operated channels that are still functional, even after they have been kept frozen for many years. This method provides a new and powerful approach to study directly the functional characteristics and structure of receptors, channels, and other membrane proteins of the Alzheimer's brain. This knowledge may help in understanding the basis of Alzheimer's disease and also help in developing new treatments. -aminobutyric acid receptors | sodium channels | calcium channels | postmortem brain

  12. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  13. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models. PMID:26971573

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aa, Nathalie; Goffin, Karolien; Koole, Michel; Porke, Kathleen; Van De Velde, Marc; Rooms, Liesbeth; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Laere, Koen; Kooy, R. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET) and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:26222316

  15. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  16. Reduced cortical neurotransmitter receptor complex levels in fetal Down syndrome brain.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Dierssen, Mara; Ghafari, Maryam; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2016-01-01

    In this study, cortical receptor complex levels were determined in fetal Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) brain. Frontal cortices were obtained from individuals with DS (19th-22nd week of gestation) and controls. Membrane proteins were extracted, assayed on blue native gels and immunoblotted with brain receptor antibodies. Levels of a D1R-containing complex were markedly decreased in male and female cortices of DS individuals. Females with DS had significant reductions of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors α4 and α7, NMDA receptor GluN1 and AMPA receptor GluA1- and GluA3-containing receptor complexes. Levels of other brain receptor complexes (5-hydroxytryptamine 1A, GluA2 and GluR4 receptor-containing complexes) were comparable between the groups of females. Levels of GluA2- and GluA3-containing complexes were significantly increased in males. Decreased levels of D1R complexes in both sexes, along with the significant reduction of α4, α7-containing receptor complexes observed in females, may explain the brain deficits and impaired cognition observed in DS.

  17. The Nuclear Receptor TLX Is Required for Gliomagenesis within the Adult Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhua; Niu, Wenze; Qin, Song; Downes, Michael; Burns, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) continually generate functional neurons in the adult brain. Due to their ability to proliferate, deregulated NSCs or their progenitors have been proposed as the cells of origin for a number of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including infiltrating gliomas. The orphan nuclear receptor TLX is required for proliferation of adult NSCs, and its upregulation promotes brain tumor formation. However, it is unknown whether TLX is required for gliomagenesis. We examined the genetic interactions between TLX and several tumor suppressors, as well as the role of TLX-dependent NSCs during gliomagenesis, using mouse models. Here, we show that TLX is essential for the proliferation of adult NSCs with a single deletion of p21, p53, or Pten or combined deletion of Pten and p53. While brain tumors still form in Tlx mutant mice, these tumors are less infiltrative and rarely associate with the adult neurogenic niches, suggesting a non-stem-cell origin. Taken together, these results indicate a critical role for TLX in NSC-dependent gliomagenesis and implicate TLX as a therapeutic target to inhibit the development of NSC-derived brain tumors. PMID:23028043

  18. Functional Synergy between Cholecystokinin Receptors CCKAR and CCKBR in Mammalian Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Sayoko; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Ishigame, Keiko; Sestan, Nenad; Günel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and one of the most abundant neuropeptides in vertebrate brain, mediates its actions via two G-protein coupled receptors, CCKAR and CCKBR, respectively active in peripheral organs and the central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that the CCK receptors have a dynamic and largely reciprocal expression in embryonic and postnatal brain. Using compound homozygous mutant mice lacking the activity of both CCK receptors, we uncover their additive, functionally synergistic effects in brain development and demonstrate that CCK receptor loss leads to abnormalities of cortical development, including defects in the formation of the midline and corpus callosum, and cortical interneuron migration. Using comparative transcriptome analysis of embryonic neocortex, we define the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects. Thus we demonstrate a developmental, hitherto unappreciated, role of the two CCK receptors in mammalian neocortical development. PMID:25875176

  19. GLP-1 receptor activation modulates appetite- and reward-related brain areas in humans.

    PubMed

    van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; IJzerman, Richard G; Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Barkhof, Frederik; Konrad, Robert J; Drent, Madeleine L; Veltman, Dick J; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-12-01

    Gut-derived hormones, such as GLP-1, have been proposed to relay information to the brain to regulate appetite. GLP-1 receptor agonists, currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), improve glycemic control and stimulate satiety, leading to decreases in food intake and body weight. We hypothesized that food intake reduction after GLP-1 receptor activation is mediated through appetite- and reward-related brain areas. Obese T2DM patients and normoglycemic obese and lean individuals (n = 48) were studied in a randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial. Using functional MRI, we determined the acute effects of intravenous administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide, with or without prior GLP-1 receptor blockade using exendin 9-39, on brain responses to food pictures during a somatostatin pancreatic-pituitary clamp. Obese T2DM patients and normoglycemic obese versus lean subjects showed increased brain responses to food pictures in appetite- and reward-related brain regions (insula and amygdala). Exenatide versus placebo decreased food intake and food-related brain responses in T2DM patients and obese subjects (in insula, amygdala, putamen, and orbitofrontal cortex). These effects were largely blocked by prior GLP-1 receptor blockade using exendin 9-39. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which GLP-1 regulates food intake and how GLP-1 receptor agonists cause weight loss. PMID:25071023

  20. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  1. The yeast nuclear import receptor is required for mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, J D; Schlenstedt, G; Pellman, D; Kornitzer, D; Silver, P A; Fink, G R

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear import system is highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here we report the effects of a conditional mutation in SRP1, which encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of the vertebrate nuclear import receptor importin. Importin was isolated as a factor required for the initial targeting step of a nuclear import substrate to the nuclear envelope in a mammalian in vitro assay. We show that yeast Srp1 is similarly required for protein import. In addition, Srp1 is also required for the execution of mitosis: we demonstrate that cells containing a conditional mutation of SRP1 arrest with a G2/M phenotype in a manner analogous to classic cdc mutants. This defect may be due to the failure of the mutant to degrade the mitotic cyclin Clb2 and other proteins required for mitosis. The requirement of a nuclear import receptor for cell cycle-regulated proteolysis implies that import of cell cycle regulators into the nucleus is critical for cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7644471

  2. Distribution of kappa opioid receptors in the brain of young and old male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, R.; Limonta, P.; Dondi, D.; Martini, L.; Piva, F. )

    1989-01-01

    The experiments to be described have been designed in order to: (a) provide new information on the concentrations of opioid kappa receptors in different regions of the brain of the male rats; and (b) to analyze whether the density of brain kappa receptors might be modified by the process of aging. The concentration of kappa receptors was investigated in the hypothalamus, amygdala, mesencephalon, corpus striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, frontal poles, anterior and posterior cortex collected from male rats of 2 and 19 months of age. {sup 3}H-bremazocine (BRZ) was used as the ligand of kappa receptors, after protection of mu and delta receptors respectively with dihydromorphine and d-ala-d-leu-enkephalin. The results obtained show that: (1) in young male rats, the number of kappa opioid receptors is different in the various brain areas examined. (2) Aging exerts little influence on the number of kappa receptors in the majority of the brain structures considered. However in the amygdala and in the thalamus the number of kappa receptors was increased in old animals.

  3. Vocal area-related expression of the androgen receptor in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2008-05-01

    The androgen receptor is a steroid hormone receptor widely expressed in the vocal control nuclei in songbirds. Here, we analysed androgen receptor expression in the brains of juvenile and adult budgerigars. With a species-specific probe for budgerigar androgen receptor mRNA, we found that the androgen receptor was expressed in the vocal areas, such as the central nucleus of the lateral nidopallium, the anterior arcopallium, the oval nucleus of the mesopallium, the oval nucleus of the anterior nidopallium and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus. With the present data, together with previous reports, it turned out that the androgen receptor expression in telencephalic vocal control areas is similar amongst three groups of vocal learners--songbirds, hummingbirds and parrots, suggesting the possibility that the androgen receptor might play a role in vocal development and that the molecular mechanism regulating the androgen receptor expression in the vocal areas might be important in the evolution of vocal learning.

  4. Assessment of dopamine receptor densities in the human brain with carbon-11-labeled N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstroem, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon-11-labeled 3-N-methylspiperone, a ligand that preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and, for the first time, in a human. The method has now been used in 58 humans for noninvasive assessment of the state of brain dopamine receptors under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    SAAVEDRA, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT1 receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood–brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT1 receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT1 receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  6. GABAA receptor regulation of voluntary ethanol drinking requires PKCepsilon.

    PubMed

    Besheer, Joyce; Lepoutre, Veronique; Mole, Beth; Hodge, Clyde W

    2006-11-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) regulates a variety of neural functions, including ion channel activity, neurotransmitter release, receptor desensitization and differentiation. We have shown previously that mice lacking the epsilon-isoform of PKC (PKCepsilon) self-administer 75% less ethanol and exhibit supersensitivity to acute ethanol and allosteric positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors when compared with wild-type controls. The purpose of the present study was to examine involvement of PKCepsilon in GABA(A) receptor regulation of voluntary ethanol drinking. To address this question, PKCepsilon null-mutant and wild-type control mice were allowed to drink ethanol (10% v/v) vs. water on a two-bottle continuous access protocol. The effects of diazepam (nonselective GABA(A) BZ positive modulator), zolpidem (GABA(A) alpha1 agonist), L-655,708 (BZ-sensitive GABA(A) alpha5 inverse agonist), and flumazenil (BZ antagonist) were then tested on ethanol drinking. Ethanol intake (grams/kg/day) by wild-type mice decreased significantly after diazepam or zolpidem but increased after L-655,708 administration. Flumazenil antagonized diazepam-induced reductions in ethanol drinking in wild-type mice. However, ethanol intake by PKCepsilon null mice was not altered by any of the GABAergic compounds even though effects were seen on water drinking in these mice. Increased acute sensitivity to ethanol and diazepam, which was previously reported, was confirmed in PKCepsilon null mice. Thus, results of the present study show that PKCepsilon null mice do not respond to doses of GABA(A) BZ receptor ligands that regulate ethanol drinking by wild-type control mice. This suggests that PKCepsilon may be required for GABA(A) receptor regulation of chronic ethanol drinking.

  7. Asymmetric Receptor Contact is Required for Tyrosine Autophosphorylation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.; Boggon, T; Tomé, F; Mandiyan, V; Lax, I; Schlessinge, J

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in regulation of kinase activity and in recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Autophosphorylation is mediated by a sequential and precisely ordered intermolecular (trans) reaction. In this report we present structural and biochemical experiments demonstrating that formation of an asymmetric dimer between activated FGFR1 kinase domains is required for transphosphorylation of FGFR1 in FGF-stimulated cells. Transphosphorylation is mediated by specific asymmetric contacts between the N-lobe of one kinase molecule, which serves as an active enzyme, and specific docking sites on the C-lobe of a second kinase molecule, which serves a substrate. Pathological loss-of-function mutations or oncogenic activating mutations in this interface may hinder or facilitate asymmetric dimer formation and transphosphorylation, respectively. The experiments presented in this report provide the molecular basis underlying the control of transphosphorylation of FGF receptors and other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  8. Antidepressant Drugs Transactivate TrkB Neurotrophin Receptors in the Adult Rodent Brain Independently of BDNF and Monoamine Transporter Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Rantamäki, Tomi; Di Lieto, Antonio; Tammela, Päivi; Schmitt, Angelika; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Rios, Maribel; Castrén, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Background Antidepressant drugs (ADs) have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. Methodology In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. Principal Findings Using a chemical-genetic TrkBF616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf−/− knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01), indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT) deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. Conclusions The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the ability of ADs to

  9. Mapping of the full length and the truncated interleukin-18 receptor alpha in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Alboni, Silvia; Cervia, Davide; Ross, Brendon; Montanari, Claudia; Gonzalez, Alejandro Sanchez; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; De Vries, David; Sugama, Shuei; Brunello, Nicoletta; Blom, Joan; Tascedda, Fabio; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The cytokine IL-18 acts on the CNS both in physiological and pathological conditions. Its action occurs through the heterodimeric receptor IL-18Rα\\β. To better understand IL-18 central effects, we investigated in the mouse brain the distribution of two IL-18Rα transcripts, a full length and an isoform lacking the intracellular domain hypothesized to be a decoy receptor. Both isoforms were expressed in neurons throughout the brain primarily with overlapping distribution but also with some unique pattern. These data suggest that IL-18 may modulate neuronal functions and that its action may be regulated through expression of a decoy receptor. PMID:19640592

  10. Effects of weightlessness on neurotransmitter receptors in selected brain areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. D.; Murakami, D. M.; Mcmillen, B. A.; Mcconnaughey, M. M.; Williams, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The central nervous system receptor dynamics of rats exposed to 7 days of microgravity are studied. The receptor affinity and receptor number at the hippocampus, lateral frontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, corpus striatum, cerebellum and pons-medulla, and the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity are examined. The data reveal that there is no significant change in the receptor affinity and receptor number for the lateral frontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla; however, there is an increase from 81 + or - 11 to 120 + or 5 fmole/mg protein in the receptor number for hippocampal binding, and a decrease in receptor number for the striatum from 172 + or - 14 to 143 + or - 10 fmoles/mg protein. A 9 percent decrease in Mg-dependent Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity is observed. It is detected that the terminal mechanism may be affected by exposure to microgravity.

  11. The Minimal Energetic Requirement of Sustained Awareness after Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stender, Johan; Mortensen, Kristian Nygaard; Thibaut, Aurore; Darkner, Sune; Laureys, Steven; Gjedde, Albert; Kupers, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Differentiation of the minimally conscious state (MCS) and the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) is a persistent clinical challenge [1]. Based on positron emission tomography (PET) studies with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during sleep and anesthesia, the global cerebral metabolic rate of glucose has been proposed as an indicator of consciousness [2, 3]. Likewise, FDG-PET may contribute to the clinical diagnosis of disorders of consciousness (DOCs) [4, 5]. However, current methods are non-quantitative and have important drawbacks deriving from visually guided assessment of relative changes in brain metabolism [4]. We here used FDG-PET to measure resting state brain glucose metabolism in 131 DOC patients to identify objective quantitative metabolic indicators and predictors of awareness. Quantitation of images was performed by normalizing to extracerebral tissue. We show that 42% of normal cortical activity represents the minimal energetic requirement for the presence of conscious awareness. Overall, the cerebral metabolic rate accounted for the current level, or imminent return, of awareness in 94% of the patient population, suggesting a global energetic threshold effect, associated with the reemergence of consciousness after brain injury. Our data further revealed that regional variations relative to the global resting metabolic level reflect preservation of specific cognitive or sensory modules, such as vision and language comprehension. These findings provide a simple and objective metabolic marker of consciousness, which can readily be implemented clinically. The direct correlation between brain metabolism and behavior further suggests that DOCs can fundamentally be understood as pathological neuroenergetic conditions and provide a unifying physiological basis for these syndromes. PMID:27238279

  12. The Minimal Energetic Requirement of Sustained Awareness after Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stender, Johan; Mortensen, Kristian Nygaard; Thibaut, Aurore; Darkner, Sune; Laureys, Steven; Gjedde, Albert; Kupers, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Differentiation of the minimally conscious state (MCS) and the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) is a persistent clinical challenge [1]. Based on positron emission tomography (PET) studies with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during sleep and anesthesia, the global cerebral metabolic rate of glucose has been proposed as an indicator of consciousness [2, 3]. Likewise, FDG-PET may contribute to the clinical diagnosis of disorders of consciousness (DOCs) [4, 5]. However, current methods are non-quantitative and have important drawbacks deriving from visually guided assessment of relative changes in brain metabolism [4]. We here used FDG-PET to measure resting state brain glucose metabolism in 131 DOC patients to identify objective quantitative metabolic indicators and predictors of awareness. Quantitation of images was performed by normalizing to extracerebral tissue. We show that 42% of normal cortical activity represents the minimal energetic requirement for the presence of conscious awareness. Overall, the cerebral metabolic rate accounted for the current level, or imminent return, of awareness in 94% of the patient population, suggesting a global energetic threshold effect, associated with the reemergence of consciousness after brain injury. Our data further revealed that regional variations relative to the global resting metabolic level reflect preservation of specific cognitive or sensory modules, such as vision and language comprehension. These findings provide a simple and objective metabolic marker of consciousness, which can readily be implemented clinically. The direct correlation between brain metabolism and behavior further suggests that DOCs can fundamentally be understood as pathological neuroenergetic conditions and provide a unifying physiological basis for these syndromes.

  13. Identification of a histamine H(3)-like receptor in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain.

    PubMed

    Peitsaro, N; Anichtchik, O V; Panula, P

    2000-08-01

    The distribution of histaminergic fibers in the zebrafish brain was recently shown to resemble that in mammals. Expression of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was shown only in the area corresponding to that expressing HDC in mammals. This indicates that the zebrafish could be a useful model for studies on the function of the brain histaminergic system. In this study an H(3)-like receptor is identified in zebrafish brain. With binding studies using N-alpha-[(3)H]methylhistamine on zebrafish brain sections, signals were observed in several regions. Highest densities were detected in optic tectum and hypothalamus. The autoradiographic signal was abolished completely by the H(3)-specific antagonist clobenpropit and significantly reduced by another H(3) antagonist, thioperamide. Histamine and immepip induced an increase of guanosine 5'-(gamma-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding in several areas of the zebrafish brain. The activation was blocked with clobenpropit but not with cimetidine or mepyramine. These results indicate that the zebrafish has a histamine H(3)-like receptor that functionally interacts with the inhibitory, G(i)/G(o), class of G proteins. No previous evidence for a histamine receptor in zebrafish exists. The receptor described here is apparently similar to the mammalian H(3) receptor, making this the first description of a histamine H(3)-like receptor in a lower vertebrate.

  14. Evidence for thymopoietin and thymopoietin/. alpha. -bungarotoxin/nicotinic receptors within the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, M. ); Babu, U.; Audhya, T.; Goldstein, G. )

    1991-03-15

    Thymopoietin, a polypeptide hormone of the thymus that has pleiotropic actions on the immune, endocrine, and nervous systems, potently interacts with the neuromuscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thymopoietin binds to the nicotinic {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BGT) receptor in muscle and, like {alpha}BGT, inhibits cholinergic transmission at this site. Evidence is given that radiolabeled thymopoietin similarly binds to a nicotinic {alpha}-BGT-binding site within the brain and does so with the characteristics of a specific receptor ligand. Thus specific binding to neuronal membranes was saturable, of high affinity linear with increased tissue concentration, and readily reversible; half-time was {approximately}5 min for association and 10 min for dissociation. Binding of {sup 125}I-labeled thymopoietin was displaced not only by unlabeled thymopoietin but also by {alpha}-BGT and the nicotinic receptor ligands d-tubocurarine and nicotine; various other receptor ligands (muscarinic, adrenergic, and dopaminergic) did not affect binding of {sup 125}I-labeled thymopoietin. Thymopoietin was shown by ELISA to be present in brain extracts, displacement curves of thymus and brain extracts being parallel to the standard thymopoietin curve, and Western (immuno) blot identified in brain and thymus extracts a thymopoietin-immunoreactive polypeptide of the same molecular mass as purified thymopoietin polypeptide. The authors conclude that thymopoietin and thymopoietin-binding sites are present within the brain and that the receptor for thymopoietin is the previously identified nicotinic {alpha}-BGT-binding site of neuronal tissue.

  15. Somatostatin analogs. Dissociation of brain receptor binding affinities and pituitary actions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for somatostatin (SRIF) in rat brain synaptosomal membranes which appear to mediate its action. Using this system as a radioreceptor assay, we have examined the ability of a wide range of SRIF analogs to interact with these receptors. Although structural modifications in the Trp8 moiety of SRIF resulted in significant enhancement of affinity for binding to the brain SRIF receptors, the different relative specificities of des AA1,2,4,5,12,13 D-Trp8 SRIF (oligo D-Trp8 SRIF), D-Trp8 SRIF and D-5-Br-Trp8 SRIF in the pituitary and the central nervous system (CNS) suggest that basic differences exist between SRIF receptors present in the brain and the pituitary.

  16. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  17. Cysteamine-induced depletion of brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cerebrocortical somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1984-09-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) administered as a single sc injection to rats produced rapid depletion of cerebrocortical Somatostatin-14 like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) with a significant 48% reduction occurring within 5 min and maximum (72%) decrease at 4 h. The depletion of S-14 LI was associated with a 1.7 fold increase in Bmax of the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors 5 min after CSH administration and a concomitant but slower increase in the affinity of these receptors [dissociation constant (Kd) being 1.8- and 1.6-fold lower than the control at 30 and 60 min, respectively, post CSH]. Incubation of intact synaptosomes with 1 mM CSH at 37 C in vitro for 60 min also caused a rapid depletion of S-14 LI, but in contrast to the in vivo data, there was no change in the Bmax or Kd of the S-14 receptors for up to 30 min beyond which time a 2.8-fold decrease in the affinity of S-14 receptors was observed. Higher concentrations of CSH (greater than or equal to 10 mM) added during the incubation of synaptosomes in vitro completely abolished the specific binding of these receptors. The pituitary S-14 receptors were studied 30 min after CSH administration and unlike the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors at this time did not exhibit any change in Bmax or affinity. When added at the time of the binding assay CSH (1 mM) was without a direct effect on cerebrocortical as well as pituitary membrane S-14 receptors. Furthermore, addition of CSH at the time of binding assay did not destroy the integrity of [125I-Tyr11]S-14. It is concluded that administration of CSH to rats in vivo depletes brain S-14 LI and up-regulates synaptosomal S-14 receptors. Exposure of synaptosomes to CSH in vitro for 30 min also depletes S-14 LI but has no effect on S-14 receptors suggesting that S-14 receptor regulation by S-14 is an in vivo phenomenon or requires the intact cell. CSH has a direct inhibitory effect on S-14 receptor binding after prolonged in vitro incubation. Pituitary S-14 receptors unlike those in the

  18. A peripherally administered, centrally acting angiotensin II AT2 antagonist selectively increases brain AT1 receptors and decreases brain tyrosine hydroxylase transcription, pituitary vasopressin and ACTH.

    PubMed

    Macova, Miroslava; Pavel, Jaroslav; Saavedra, Juan M

    2009-01-23

    The physiological actions of brain Angiotensin II AT(2) receptors and their relationship to Angiotensin II AT(1) receptors remain controversial. To further clarify their role, we determined to what extent systemic administration of an AT(2) receptor antagonist affected AT(2) receptor binding within the brain and the expression of AT(1) receptors. For this purpose, we subcutaneously administered the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg/day) to adult male rats for two weeks via osmotic minipumps. We also studied the content of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone and vasopressin, representative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, and the tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in the locus coeruleus as a measure of central norepinephrine function. We found significant decreases in AT(2) receptor binding in brain areas inside the blood brain barrier, the inferior olive and the locus coeruleus. AT(2) receptor blockade increased AT(1) receptor binding and mRNA expression not only in the subfornical organ and the median eminence, situated outside the blood brain barrier, but also in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, located inside the blood brain barrier. These changes paralleled decreased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the locus coeruleus and decreased pituitary adrenocorticotropic and vasopressin content. Our results demonstrate that sustained peripheral administration of an AT(2) antagonist decreases binding to brain AT(2) receptors, indicating that this drug is a useful tool for the study of their central role. AT(2) receptor activity inhibition up-regulates AT(1) receptor expression in specific brain areas. Blockade of brain AT(2) receptors is compatible with enhanced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and decreased central sympathetic system activity.

  19. TrkB receptors are required for follicular growth and oocyte survival in the mammalian ovary

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Alfonso; Romero, Carmen; Dissen, Gregory A.; DeChiara, Tom M.; Reichardt, Louis; Cornea, Anda; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Xu, Baoji

    2009-01-01

    Although it is well established that both follicular assembly and the initiation of follicle growth in the mammalian ovary occur independently of pituitary hormone support, the factors controlling these processes remain poorly understood. We now report that neurotrophins (NTs) signaling via TrkB receptors are required for the growth of newly formed follicles. Both neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the preferred TrkB ligands, are expressed in the infantile mouse ovary. Initially, they are present in oocytes, but this site of expression switches to granulosa cells after the newly assembled primordial follicles develop into growing primary follicles. Full-length kinase domain-containing TrkB receptors are expressed at low and seemingly unchanging levels in the oocytes and granulosa cells of both primordial and growing follicles. In contrast, a truncated TrkB isoform lacking the intracellular domain of the receptor is selectively expressed in oocytes, where it is targeted to the cell membrane as primary follicles initiate growth. Using gene-targeted mice lacking all TrkB isoforms, we show that the ovaries of these mice or those lacking both NT-4 and BDNF suffer a stage-selective deficiency in early follicular development that compromises the ability of follicles to grow beyond the primary stage. Proliferation of granulosa cells— required for this transition—and expression of FSH receptors (FSHR), which reflects the degree of biochemical differentiation of growing follicles, are reduced in trkB-null mice. Ovaries from these animals grafted under the kidney capsule of wild-type mice fail to sustain follicular growth and show a striking loss of follicular organization, preceded by massive oocyte death. These results indicate that TrkB receptors are required for the early growth of ovarian follicles and that they exert this function by primarily supporting oocyte development as well as providing granulosa cells with a proliferative

  20. Ethanol, not metabolized in brain, significantly reduces brain metabolism, probably via specific GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Caroline D.; Davidson, Joanne E.; Maher, Anthony D.; Rowlands, Benjamin D.; Kashem, Mohammed A.; Nasrallah, Fatima A.; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Cook, James M; Balcar, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is a known neuromodulatory agent with reported actions at a range of neurotransmitter receptors. Here, we used an indirect approach, measuring the effect of alcohol on metabolism of [3-13C]pyruvate in the adult Guinea pig brain cortical tissue slice and comparing the outcomes to those from a library of ligands active in the GABAergic system as well as studying the metabolic fate of [1,2-13C]ethanol. Ethanol (10, 30 and 60 mM) significantly reduced metabolic flux into all measured isotopomers and reduced all metabolic pool sizes. The metabolic profiles of these three concentrations of ethanol were similar and clustered with that of the α4β3δ positive allosteric modulator DS2 (4-Chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2a]-pyridin-3-yl]benzamide). Ethanol at a very low concentration (0.1 mM) produced a metabolic profile which clustered with those from inhibitors of GABA uptake, and ligands showing affinity for α5, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. There was no measureable metabolism of [1,2-13C]ethanol with no significant incorporation of 13C from [1,2-13C]ethanol into any measured metabolite above natural abundance, although there were measurable effects on total metabolite sizes similar to those seen with unlabeled ethanol. The reduction in metabolism seen in the presence of ethanol is therefore likely to be due to its actions at neurotransmitter receptors, particularly α4β3δ receptors, and not because ethanol is substituting as a substrate or because of the effects of ethanol catabolites acetaldehyde or acetate. We suggest that the stimulatory effects of very low concentrations of ethanol are due to release of GABA via GAT1 and the subsequent interaction of this GABA with local α5-containing, and to a lesser extent, α1-containing GABA(A)R. PMID:24313287

  1. Role of the prostaglandin E2 EP1 receptor in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, Alexander V; Fazal, Jawad A; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries promote upregulation of so-called proinflammatory prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leading to overactivation of a class of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors, including EP1, which is considered a promising target for treatment of ischemic stroke. However, the role of the EP1 receptor is complex and depends on the type of brain injury. This study is focused on the investigation of the role of the EP1 receptor in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The therapeutic effects of post-treatments with a widely studied EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, were examined in wildtype and EP1 receptor knockout C57BL/6 mice. Neurological deficit scores (NDS) were assessed 24 and 48 h following CCI or sham surgery, and brain immunohistochemical pathology was assessed 48 h after surgery. In wildtype mice, CCI resulted in an obvious cortical lesion and localized hippocampal edema with an associated significant increase in NDS compared to sham-operated animals. Post-treatments with the selective EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 or genetic knockout of EP1 receptor had no significant effects on cortical lesions and hippocampal swelling or on the NDS 24 and 48 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed CCI-induced gliosis and microglial activation in selected ipsilateral brain regions that were not affected by SC-51089 or in the EP1 receptor-deleted mice. This study provides further clarification on the respective contribution of the EP1 receptor in TBI and suggests that, under this experimental paradigm, the EP1 receptor would have limited effects in modulating acute neurological and anatomical pathologies following contusive brain trauma. Findings from this protocol, in combination with previous studies demonstrating differential roles of EP1 receptor in ischemic, neurotoxic, and hemorrhagic conditions, provide scientific background and further clarification of potential therapeutic

  2. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  3. Requirements for heterodimerization between the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 and retinoid X receptors.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Paola; Dwornik, Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-09-20

    The nuclear receptor nurr1 is a transcription factor involved in the development and maintenance of neurons synthesizing the neurotransmitter dopamine. Although the lack of nurr1 expression has dramatic consequences for these cells either in terms of differentiation or survival, the mechanisms by which nurr1 controls gene transcription still remain unclear. In the intent to understand better the modalities of action of this nuclear receptor, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of the transcriptional effects and DNA binding properties of nurr1 as a monomer or when forming dimers with the different isotypes of the retinoic X receptor (RXR). Here, we show that nurr1 acts as a gene activator independently of RXR and through an AF2-independent mechanism. In addition, heterodimerization with RXR is isotype-specific, involves multiple domains in the C-terminal region of nurr1, and requires RXR binding to DNA. RXR(alpha)-nurr1 and RXRgamma-nurr1 heterodimers bind direct repeat response elements and display no specific requirements with respect to half-site spacing. However, the retinoid responsiveness of DNA-bound heterodimers requires the reiteration of at least three nurr1 binding sites, thereby limiting retinoid-induced nurr1 transcriptional activity to specific direct response elements.

  4. Receptors for advanced glycosylation endproducts in human brain: role in brain homeostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. J.; Dickson, D.; Hof, P. R.; Vlassara, H.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the reactive derivatives of nonenzymatic glucose-macromolecule condensation products. Aging human tissues accumulate AGEs in an age-dependent manner and contribute to age-related functional changes in vital organs. We have shown previously that AGE scavenger receptors are present on monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes, and other cells. However, it remains unclear whether the human brain can efficiently eliminate AGE-modified proteins and whether excessive AGEs can contribute to inflammatory changes leading to brain injury in aging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To explore the expression and characteristics of AGE-binding proteins on CNS glia components and their putative function, such as degradation of AGE-modified proteins, primary human astrocytes and human monocytes (as a microglial cell surrogate) and murine microglia (N9) cells and cell membrane extracts were used. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of AGE-binding proteins in the human hippocampus; RT-PCR techniques were used to examine the biologic effects of AGEs and a model AGE compound, FFI, on AGE-binding protein modulation and cytokine responses of human astrocytes and monocytes. RESULTS: Our results showed that AGE-binding proteins AGE-R1, -R2, and -R3 are present in glial cells. Western blot analyses and radiolabeled ligand binding studies show that AGE-R1 and -R3 from human astrocytes bind AGE-modified proteins; binding could be blocked by anti-AGE-R1 and anti-AGE-R3 antibodies, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed that AGE-R1 and -R2 are expressed mainly in neurons; only some glial cells express these AGE-binding proteins. In contrast, AGE-R3 was found only on those astrocytes whose positively stained foot processes extend and surround the sheath of microcapillaries. RT-PCR results showed that mRNAs of the three AGE-binding proteins are expressed constitutively in human astrocytes and monocytes, and receptor transcripts are

  5. Characterization and visualization of rat and guinea pig brain. kappa. opioid receptors: Evidence for. kappa. sub 1 and. kappa. sub 2 opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zukin, R.S.; Eghbali, M.; Olive, D.; Unterwald, E.M.; Tempel, A. )

    1988-06-01

    {kappa} opioid receptors ({kappa} receptors) have been characterized in homogenates of guinea pig and rat brain under in vitro binding conditions. {kappa} receptors were labeled by using the tritiated prototypic {kappa} opioid ethylketocyclazocine under conditions in which {mu} and {delta} opioid binding was suppressed. In the case of guinea pig brain membranes, a single population of high-affinity {kappa} opioid receptor sites was observed. In contrast, in the case of rat brain, two populations of {kappa} sites were observed. To test the hypothesis that the high- and low-affinity {kappa} sites represent two distinct {kappa} receptor subtypes, a series of opioids were tested for their abilities to compete for binding to the two sites. U-69,593 and Cambridge 20 selectively displaced the high-affinity {kappa} site in both guinea pig and rat tissue, but were inactive at the rat-brain low-affinity site. Other {kappa} opioid drugs competed for binding to both sites, but with different rank orders of potency. Quantitative light microscopy in vitro autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical pattern of {kappa} receptors in rat and guinea pig brain. The distribution patterns of the two {kappa} receptor subtypes of rat brain were clearly different. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence for the presence of two {kappa} receptor subtypes; the U-69,593-sensitive, high-affinity {kappa}{sub 1} site predominates in guinea pig brain, and the U-69,593-insensitive, low-affinity {kappa}{sub 2} site predominates in rat brain.

  6. Effect of meta-chlorobenzhydryl urea (m-ClBHU) on benzodiazepine receptor system in rat brain during experimental alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Shushpanova, T V; Solonskii, A V; Novozheeva, T P; Udut, V V

    2014-04-01

    Chronic alcohol intake induces neuroadaptive changes in benzodiazepine receptors modulating GABAA receptors that promote alcohol addiction. Analysis of benzodiazepine receptors in the brain of Wistar rats differing by alcohol preference has demonstrated that affinity of [(3)H]flunitrazepam and [(3)H]Ro5-4864 binding with membrane fraction was reduced, while the density of specific binding sites in the brain cortex of heavy drinking and low drinking rats was increased in comparison with rats nonpreferring alcohol. Administration of anticonvulsant meta-chlorobenzhydryl urea increased affinity of benzodiazepine receptors in the brain cortex of heavy drinking rats, which improved GABA neurotransmission in the brain of these animals and reduced alcohol consumption.

  7. Is there a gender difference of somatostatin-receptor density in the human brain?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Maschek, Wilhelmine; Crespillo, Carmen; Esteva, Isabel; Soriguer, Federico

    2002-01-01

    Animal experiments and observations in human brains have convincingly shown that sexual differentiation not only concerns the genitalia but also the brain. This has been investigated also in the light of a possible explanation of a presumed biological aetiology of transsexuality. The volume of the central subdivision of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, a brain area that is essential for sexual behaviour, has been reported to be larger in men than in women. Additionally, the number of somatostatin expressing neurons in this region was shown to be higher in men than in women. As neuronal production of somatostatin is involved the idea is striking whether somatostatin-receptor density in the cortex of cerebral hemispheres might be related to gender identity. We investigated in vivo the density of somatostatin-receptors in selected regions of the human brain in both sexes by means of receptor scintigraphy. Basal ganglia tracer uptake of 111-In-Pentreotide was equally low in both genders at 0,80% +/ 0,26 (related to tracer uptake of the whole brain layer). Temporal cortex accumulated at 2,9% +/ 1,1 in men and at 2,3% +/ 0,76 in women. Frontal brain region had an uptake of 3,0% +/ 1,4 in male and of 2,5% +/ 1,3 in female. This shows a tendency in males for relatively augmented uptake indicating higher somatostatin receptor density in temporal and frontal cerebral cortex.

  8. Targeting the sigma-1 receptor chaperone in the treatment of perinatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is an important factor in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain injury. The sigma-1 receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been known to affect the function of the NMDA receptor. 4-Phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl)piperidine (PPBP) has been investigated as a sigma-1 receptor agonist for several decades. An article using PPBP in a model of preterm brain injury was published in Experimental Neurology. The authors reported that PPBP protected against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the systemic administration of PPBP significantly reduced microglial activation and lesion size in cortical gray and white matter after the excitotoxic insult in neonatal mice. This study suggests that sigma-1 receptor agonists could be potential preventive and therapeutic drugs for perinatal brain injury, although a pharmacological experiment using a sigma-1 receptor antagonist was not performed. This commentary aims to highlights the key findings of this article in a broader context, emphasizing the future potential therapeutic applications in patients with perinatal brain injury.

  9. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  10. Cathepsins are required for Toll-like receptor 9 responses

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Saitoh, Shin-ichiroh; Fukui, Ryutaroh; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Tanimura, Natsuko; Konno, Kazunori; Kusumoto, Yutaka; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke

    2008-03-14

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize a variety of microbial products and activate defense responses. Pathogen sensing by TLR2/4 requires accessory molecules, whereas little is known about a molecule required for DNA recognition by TLR9. After endocytosis of microbes, microbial DNA is exposed and recognized by TLR9 in lysosomes. We here show that cathepsins, lysosomal cysteine proteases, are required for TLR9 responses. A cell line Ba/F3 was found to be defective in TLR9 responses despite enforced TLR9 expression. Functional cloning with Ba/F3 identified cathepsin B/L as a molecule required for TLR9 responses. The protease activity was essential for the complementing effect. TLR9 responses were also conferred by cathepsin S or F, but not by cathepsin H. TLR9-dependent B cell proliferation and CD86 upregulation were apparently downregulated by cathepsin B/L inhibitors. Cathepsin B inhibitor downregulated interaction of CpG-B with TLR9 in 293T cells. These results suggest roles for cathepsins in DNA recognition by TLR9.

  11. Chronic ethanol treatment changes the number of beta-receptors in rat brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchi, L.; Cazzaniga, A.; Picotti, G.B.; Covelli, V.; Magnoni, M.S.; Borriero, L.; Spano, P.F.; Trabucchi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the binding (125I)-iodohydroxybenzylpindolol to beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain microvessels has been studied. The results show that chronic ethanol treatment increases the number of beta-receptors present in brain microvessels without changing the binding affinity of the binding site for the beta-adrenoceptor ligand. This effect is apparently not associated with changes in peripheral adrenergic tone, since no differences in platelet epinephrine or norepinephrine concentrations were found between ethanol-treated and control animals. An increase in beta-receptor density in brain microvessels might contribute to the alterations of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption reported during chronic ethanol intoxication.

  12. Multiple microvascular and astroglial 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes in human brain: molecular and pharmacologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bouchelet, I; Olivier, A; Villemure, J G; Ball, R; Stanimirovic, D B; Hamel, E

    1999-08-01

    Physiologic and anatomic evidence suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurons regulate local cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier permeability. To evaluate the possibility that some of these effects occur directly on the blood vessels, molecular and/or pharmacologic approaches were used to assess the presence of 5-HT receptors in human brain microvascular fractions, endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures, as well as in astroglial cells which intimately associate with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Isolated microvessels and capillaries consistently expressed messages for the h5-HT1B, h5-HT1D, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A but not 5-HT7 receptors. When their distribution within the vessel wall was studied in more detail, it was found that capillary endothelial cells exhibited mRNA for the h5-HT1D and for the 5-HT7 receptors whereas microvascular smooth muscle cells, in addition to h5-HT1D and 5-HT7, also showed polymerase chain reaction products for h5-HT1B receptors. Expression of 5-HT1F and 5-HT2A receptor mRNAs was never detected in any of the microvascular cell cultures. In contrast, messages for all 5-HT receptors tested were detected in human brain astrocytes with a predominance of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 subtypes. In all cultures, sumatriptan inhibited (35-58%, P < .05) the forskolin-stimulated production of cyclic AMP, an effect blocked by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonists GR127935 and GR55562. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine induced strong increases (> or = 400%, P < .005) in basal cyclic AMP levels that were abolished by mesulergine, a nonselective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. Only astroglial cells showed a ketanserin-sensitive increase (177%, P < .05) in IP3 formation when exposed to 5-HT. These results show that specific populations of functional 5-HT receptors are differentially distributed within the various cellular compartments of the human cortical microvascular bed, and that human brain astroglial cells are endowed with multiple 5-HT receptors

  13. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α Induces Lysosomal Biogenesis in Brain Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Sims, Katherine B.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role. PMID:25750174

  14. Expression of groups I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat brain during aging.

    PubMed

    Simonyi, Agnes; Ngomba, Richard T; Storto, Marianna; Catania, Maria V; Miller, Laura A; Youngs, Brian; DiGiorgi-Gerevini, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sun, Grace Y

    2005-05-10

    Age-dependent changes in the expression of group I and II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were studied by in situ hybridization, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Male Fisher 344 rats of three ages (3, 12 and 25 months) were tested. Age-related increases in mGlu1 receptor mRNA levels were found in several areas (thalamic nuclei, hippocampal CA3) with parallel increases in mGlu1a receptor protein expression. However, a slight decrease in mGlu1a receptor mRNA expression in individual Purkinje neurons and a decline in cerebellar mGlu1a receptor protein levels were detected in aged animals. In contrast, mGlu1b receptor mRNA levels increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer. Although mGlu5 receptor mRNA expression decreased in many regions, its protein expression remained unchanged during aging. Compared to the small changes in mGlu2 receptor mRNA levels, mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels showed substantial age differences. An increased mGlu2/3 receptor protein expression was found in the frontal cortex, thalamus, hippocampus and corpus callosum in aged animals. These results demonstrate region- and subtype-specific, including splice variant specific changes in the expression of mGlu receptors in the brain with increasing age. PMID:15862522

  15. Differential brain angiotensin-II type I receptor expression in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A

    2011-09-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin-II (Ang-II) has profound effects in the brain. We tested the hypothesis that Ang-II-dependent hypertension involves differential Ang-II type I (AT(1)) receptors expression in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Male Wistar rats were implanted with 14-day osmotic minipump filled with Ang-II (150 ng/kg/min) or saline. AT(1) receptor mRNA levels were detected in the SFO and RVLM by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ang-II caused hypertension (134 ± 10 mmHg vs. 98 ± 9 mmHg, n = 9, p < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed that Ang-II infusion induced increased AT(1) receptor mRNA levels in RVLM and decreased in SFO. Our data suggest that Ang-II-induced hypertension involves differential expression of brain AT(1) receptors. PMID:21897104

  16. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  17. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  18. Early brain development disruption from NMDA receptor hypofunction: relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    du Bois, Teresa Marie; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2007-02-01

    Disruption to brain development at an early stage can potentially alter chemically coded neural networks and can affect behavior in later life. During early brain development antagonism of glutamate NMDA receptors, which play an important role in neuronal outgrowth and survival, leads to neuronal damage in several brain regions and causes behavioral alterations in rodents that mimic schizophrenia symptoms and endophenotypes. There are several lines of evidence implicating involvement of a dysfunctional glutamate system in schizophrenia. In normal subjects, NMDA receptor antagonists produce behavioral and neurochemical changes that mimic schizophrenia symptoms better than any other psychotomimetic drug. Moreover, these drugs worsen symptoms in schizophrenia patients and can trigger a recrudescence of the acute psychotic state in patients with stable chronic schizophrenia. In addition, genes consistently reported as being altered in schizophrenia play roles in development, neuroplasticity and glutamate/GABAergic neurotransmission. Perinatal NMDA receptor antagonist treatment is a useful model for studying the neurodevelopmental and NMDA receptor hypofunction hypotheses of schizophrenia because neurochemical and behavioral changes, reminiscent of those seen in schizophrenia, are present long after cessation of drug administration, which suggests that a permanent change in brain structure and organization has occurred during brain development.

  19. Differences in colocalization of corticosteroid-binding globulin and glucocorticoid receptor immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sivukhina, Elena; Schäfer, Hans H; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2013-05-01

    Endocrine regulation of central and systemic stress response as well as learning and memory are in part controlled by systemic glucocorticoid levels. So far steroids have been thought to act on the brain predominantly through nuclear receptors. However, some brain systems known to respond to glucocorticoids seem to be devoid of the respective receptor proteins (GR). It is likely that known central actions of adrenal steroids may also be mediated by non-genomic actions involving intrinsic binding globulins. In recent studies we described the intrinsic expression of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) in rat, mouse and human brains. Here we report an immunohistochemical mapping study on the colocalization of CBG and of GR in the rat brain. In the nucleus accumbens, septum, hippocampus, globus pallidus, medial and basolateral amygdale nuclei, magnocellular preoptic nuclei, diagonal band of Broca high intensity of CBG immunoreactivity was accompanied by weak or moderate GR staining, and vice versa. In the caudate putamen, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, septohypothalamic nucleus and parvocellular subdivision of the paraventricular nucleus strong GR immunoreactivity was observed, but CBG was almost undetectable. In contrast, throughout the supraoptic nucleus and magnocellular subdivision of the paraventricular nucleus numerous strongly CBG-positive cells were observed, devoid of specific GR immunoreactivity. It is most likely that CBG in the brain may be involved in the response to changing systemic glucocorticoid levels in addition to known nuclear and membrane corticosteroid receptors, or in glucocorticoid responsive regions devoid of these receptors.

  20. High abundance androgen receptor in goldfish brain: characteristics and seasonal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasmanik, M.; Callard, G.V.

    1988-08-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts its actions in brain directly via androgen receptors or, after aromatization to estradiol, via estrogen receptors. Brain aromatase activity in teleost fish is 100-1000 times greater than in mammals and would be expected to significantly reduce the quantity of androgen available for receptor binding. Experiments were carried out on the goldfish Carassius auratus to determine if androgen receptors are present in teleost brain and whether their physicochemical properties reflect elevated aromatase. Cytosolic and nuclear extracts were assayed with the use of (/sup 3/H)T and charcoal, Sephadex LH-20, or DNA-cellulose chromatography to separate bound and free steroids. Binding activity was saturable and had an equally high affinity for T and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Although mibolerone was a relatively weak competitor, the putative teleost androgen 11-ketotestosterone, methyltrienolone (R1881), estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were poor ligands. Characteristics that distinguish this receptor from a steroid-binding protein in goldfish serum are the presence of binding activity in both nuclear and cytosolic extracts, a low rate of ligand-receptor dissociation, electrophoretic mobility, sedimentation properties in low vs. high salt, and tissue distribution. DNA cellulose-adhering and nonadhering forms were detected, but these did not differ in other variables measured. Although goldfish androgen receptors resembled those of mammals in all important physicochemical characteristics, they were unusually abundant compared to levels in rat brain, but comparable to levels in prostate and other male sex hormone target organs. Moreover, there were seasonal variations in total receptors, with a peak at spawning (April) 4- to 5-fold higher than values in reproductively inactive fish.

  1. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-05-10

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos-positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies.

  2. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  3. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  4. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  5. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  6. Hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor activation enhances voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances: relevance to brain aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, D S; Campbell, L W; Thibault, O; Landfield, P W

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) activate several biochemical/molecular processes in the hippocampus through two receptor types. In addition, GCs influence cognitive behaviors and hippocampal neural activity and can also increase the rate of aging-dependent cell loss in the hippocampus. However, the ionic mechanisms through which GCs modulate hippocampal neuronal function are not well understood. We report here direct evidence that activation of cytosolic steroid receptors, specifically of the type II GC receptor, can enhance voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances in brain neurons. Ca2+ current was assessed by current-clamp measures of Ca2+ action potentials and by sharp electrode voltage-clamp analyses of voltage-sensitive currents in cesium-, tetrodotoxin-, and tetraethylammonium-treated CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices. Both Ca2+ action potentials and voltage-activated Ca2+ currents (N- and L-like) were increased by 2-hr exposure to the synthetic GC receptor agonist, RU 28362. This effect of RU 28362 was blocked by coincubation with cycloheximide, indicating that the GC receptor-Ca2+ channel interaction depends on de novo protein synthesis. Dysregulated calcium homeostasis is also viewed as a candidate mechanism in brain aging. Thus, present results are consistent with the hypothesis that excessive GC-receptor activation and resultant increased Ca2+ influx may be two sequential phases of a brain-aging process that results initially in impairment of function and eventually in neuronal loss. PMID:1528857

  7. Luteolin inhibits GABAA receptors in HEK cells and brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chen-Hung; Chen, Rita Yu-Tzu; Zhou, Ning; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of the A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) is one of the major drug targets for neurological and psychological diseases. The natural flavonoid compound luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)- 5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone) has been reported to have antidepressant, antinociceptive, and anxiolytic-like effects, which possibly involve the mechanisms of modulating GABA signaling. However, as yet detailed studies of the pharmacological effects of luteolin are still lacking, we investigated the effects of luteolin on recombinant and endogenous GABAAR-mediated current responses by electrophysiological approaches. Our results showed that luteolin inhibited GABA-mediated currents and slowed the activation kinetics of recombinant α1β2, α1β2γ2, α5β2, and α5β2γ2 receptors with different degrees of potency and efficacy. The modulatory effect of luteolin was likely dependent on the subunit composition of the receptor complex: the αβ receptors were more sensitive than the αβγ receptors. In hippocampal pyramidal neurons, luteolin significantly reduced the amplitude and slowed the rise time of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). However, GABAAR-mediated tonic currents were not significantly influenced by luteolin. These data suggested that luteolin has negative modulatory effects on both recombinant and endogenous GABAARs and inhibits phasic rather than tonic inhibition in hippocampus. PMID:27292079

  8. Icotinib combined whole brain radiotherapy for patients with brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain is a metastatic organ that is most prone to lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, the prognosis of patients with brain metastasis remains very poor. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of icotinib plus whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for treating patients with brain metastasis from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated LAC. Methods All patients received standard WBRT administered to the whole brain in 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. Each patient was also instructed to take 125 mg icotinib thrice per day beginning from the first day of the WBRT. After completing the WBRT, maintenance icotinib was administered until the disease progressed or intolerable adverse effects were observed. Cranial progression-free survival (CPFS) and overall survival (OS) times were the primary endpoints. Results A total of 43 patients were enrolled in this study. Two patients (4.7%) presented a complete response (CR), whereas 20 patients (46.5%) presented a partial response (PR). The median CPFS and OS times were 11.0 and 15.0 months, respectively. The one-year CPFS rate was 40.0% for the patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion and 16.7% for the patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R (P=0.027). Conclusions The concurrent administration of icotinib and WBRT exhibited favorable effects on the patients with brain metastasis. EGFR exon 19 deletion was predictive of a long CPFS following icotinib plus WBRT. PMID:27499937

  9. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  10. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  11. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  12. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, A.V.; Iversen, L.L.; Rossor, M.; Spokes, E.; Bird, E.; Arregui, A.; Creese, I.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients.

  13. Region-selective effects of neuroinflammation and antioxidant treatment on peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and NMDA receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Alvarado, M.; Budinger, T.F.; Grossman, R.; Hensley, K.; West, M.S.; Kotake, Y.; Ono, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    2001-12-10

    Following induction of acute neuroinflammation by intracisternal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) in rats, quantitative autoradiography was used to assess the regional level of microglial activation and glutamate (NMDA) receptor binding. The possible protective action of the antioxidant phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone in this model was tested by administering the drug in the drinking water for 6 days starting 24 hours after endotoxin injection. Animals were killed 7 days post-injection and consecutive cryostat brain sections labeled with [3H]PK11195 as a marker of activated microglia and [125I]iodoMK801 as a marker of the open-channel, activated state of NMDA receptors. Lipopolysaccharide increased [3H]PK11195 binding in the brain, with the largest increases (2-3 fold) in temporal and entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. A significant (>50 percent) decrease in [125I]iodoMK801 binding was found in the same brain regions. Phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone treatment resulted in a partial inhibition ({approx}25 percent decrease) of the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in [3H]PK11195 binding but completely reversed the lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in [125I]iodoMK80 binding in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and substantia innominata. Loss of NMDA receptor function in cortical and hippocampal regions may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in diseases with a neuroinflammatory component, such as meningitis or Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  15. Regional dependence of morphine-induced mu-opiate receptor down-regulation in perinatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hammer, R P; Seatriz, J V; Ricalde, A R

    1991-12-17

    The effect of perinatal morphine administration was examined in various brain regions using in vitro receptor autoradiography. Morphine was administered by continuous s.c. infusion of 10 mg/kg per day; brains of offspring were examined at five days of age. Morphine exposure reduced mu-receptor binding density in the preoptic area of hypothalamus, but not in the primary somatosensory cortex. mu-Receptor density was greater in the medial preoptic area of females than males, and in superficial layers of cortex in males than females. The results suggest that morphine has selective regional effects on mu-receptor ontogeny in rat brain. PMID:1665797

  16. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  17. Melanocortin 4 receptor signaling in dopamine 1 receptor neurons is required for procedural memory learning

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Mason, Brittany L.; Lee, Charlotte; Nishi, Akinori; Elmquist, Joel K; Lutter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that exposure to palatable foods engages reward circuits that promote over-eating and facilitate the development of obesity. While the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) has previously been shown to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, little is known about its role in food reward. We demonstrate that MC4R is co-expressed with the dopamine 1 receptor (D1R) in the ventral striatum. While MC4R-null mice are hyperphagic and obese, they exhibit impairments in acquisition of operant responding for a high fat reinforcement. Restoration of MC4R signaling in D1R neurons normalizes procedural learning without affecting motivation to obtain high fat diet. MC4R signaling in D1R neurons is also required for learning in a non-food-reinforced version of the cued water maze. Finally, MC4R signaling in neostriatal slices increases phosphorylation of the Thr34 residue of DARPP-32, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor that regulates synaptic plasticity. These data identify a novel requirement for MC4R signaling in procedural memory learning. PMID:22342812

  18. Notch receptor expression in human brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hill-Felberg, Sandra; Wu, Hope Hueizhi; Toms, Steven A; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-08-01

    The roles of the Notch pathway proteins in normal adult vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of brain arteriovenous malformations are not well-understood. Notch 1 and 4 have been detected in human and mutant mice vascular malformations respectively. Although mutations in the human Notch 3 gene caused a genetic form of vascular stroke and dementia, its role in arteriovenous malformations development has been unknown. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry screening on tissue microarrays containing eight surgically resected human brain arteriovenous malformations and 10 control surgical epilepsy samples. The tissue microarrays were evaluated for Notch 1-4 expression. We have found that compared to normal brain vascular tissue Notch-3 was dramatically increased in brain arteriovenous malformations. Similarly, Notch 4 labelling was also increased in vascular malformations and was confirmed by western blot analysis. Notch 2 was not detectable in any of the human vessels analysed. Using both immunohistochemistry on microarrays and western blot analysis, we have found that Notch-1 expression was detectable in control vessels, and discovered a significant decrease of Notch 1 expression in vascular malformations. We have demonstrated that Notch 3 and 4, and not Notch 1, were highly increased in human arteriovenous malformations. Our findings suggested that Notch 4, and more importantly, Notch 3, may play a role in the development and pathobiology of human arteriovenous malformations.

  19. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  20. Limited heterogeneity of rearranged T-cell receptor Vα transcripts in brains of multiple sclerosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Stuart, Simon; Begovich, Ann B.; Bell, Robert B.; Erlich, Henry A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Bernard, Claude C. A.

    1990-05-01

    THE identification of activated ? cells in the brain of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) indicates that these cells are critical in the pathogenesis of this disease. In an attempt to elucidate the nature of the lymphocytic infiltration, we used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) Vα sequences from transcripts derived from MS brain lesions. In each of three MS brains, only two to four rearranged TCR Vα transcripts were detected. No Vα transcripts could be found in control brains. Sequence analysis of transcripts encoded by the Vα 12.1 region showed rearrangements to a limited number of Jα region segments. These results imply that TCR Vα gene expression in MS brain lesions is restricted.

  1. Astrocyte inositol triphosphate receptor type 2 and cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha regulate arteriole responses in mouse neocortical brain slices.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Functional hyperemia of the cerebral vascular system matches regional blood flow to the metabolic demands of the brain. One current model of neurovascular control holds that glutamate released by neurons activates group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) on astrocytes, resulting in the production of diffusible messengers that act to regulate smooth muscle cells surrounding cerebral arterioles. The acute mouse brain slice is an experimental system in which changes in arteriole diameter can precisely measured with light microscopy. Stimulation of the brain slice triggers specific cellular responses that can be correlated to changes in arteriole diameter. Here we used inositol trisphosphate receptor type 2 (IP(3)R2) and cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)α) deficient mice to determine if astrocyte mGluR activation coupled to IP(3)R2-mediated Ca(2+) release and subsequent cPLA(2)α activation is required for arteriole regulation. We measured changes in astrocyte cytosolic free Ca(2+) and arteriole diameters in response to mGluR agonist or electrical field stimulation in acute neocortical mouse brain slices maintained in 95% or 20% O(2). Astrocyte Ca(2+) and arteriole responses to mGluR activation were absent in IP(3)R2(-/-) slices. Astrocyte Ca(2+) responses to mGluR activation were unchanged by deletion of cPLA(2)α but arteriole responses to either mGluR agonist or electrical stimulation were ablated. The valence of changes in arteriole diameter (dilation/constriction) was dependent upon both stimulus and O(2) concentration. Neuron-derived NO and activation of the group I mGluRs are required for responses to electrical stimulation. These findings indicate that an mGluR/IP(3)R2/cPLA(2)α signaling cascade in astrocytes is required to transduce neuronal glutamate release into arteriole responses.

  2. Expression of a Novel D4 Dopamine Receptor in the Lamprey Brain. Evolutionary Considerations about Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Megías, Manuel; Pombal, Manuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous data reported in lampreys, which belong to the phylogenetically oldest branch of vertebrates, show that the dopaminergic system was already well developed at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. The expression of dopamine in the lamprey brain is well conserved when compared to other vertebrates, and this is also true for the D2 receptor. Additionally, the key role of dopamine in the striatum, modulating the excitability in the direct and indirect pathways through the D1 and D2 receptors, has also been recently reported in these animals. The moment of divergence regarding the two whole genome duplications occurred in vertebrates suggests that additional receptors, apart from the D1 and D2 previously reported, could be present in lampreys. We used in situ hybridization to characterize the expression of a novel dopamine receptor, which we have identified as a D4 receptor according to the phylogenetic analysis. The D4 receptor shows in the sea lamprey a more restricted expression pattern than the D2 subtype, as reported in mammals. Its main expression areas are the striatum, lateral and ventral pallial sectors, several hypothalamic regions, habenula, and mesencephalic and rhombencephalic motoneurons. Some expression areas are well conserved through vertebrate evolution, as is the case of the striatum or the habenula, but the controversies regarding the D4 receptor expression in other vertebrates hampers for a complete comparison, especially in rhombencephalic regions. Our results further support that the dopaminergic system in vertebrates is well conserved and suggest that at least some functions of the D4 receptor were already present before the divergence of lampreys. PMID:26778974

  3. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed Central

    Friden, P M; Walus, L R; Musso, G F; Taylor, M A; Malfroy, B; Starzyk, R M

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. We have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration (Jefferies, W. A., Brandon, M. R., Hunt, S. V., Williams, A. F., Gatter, K. C. & Mason, D. Y. (1984) Nature (London) 312, 162-163), labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate approximately 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26. Images PMID:2052557

  4. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate {approximately} 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26.

  5. Estrogen alters the diurnal rhythm of alpha 1-adrenergic receptor densities in selected brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.G.; Wise, P.M.

    1987-11-01

    Norepinephrine regulates the proestrous and estradiol-induced LH surge by binding to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The density of alpha 1-receptors may be regulated by estradiol, photoperiod, and noradrenergic neuronal activity. We wished to determine whether alpha 1-receptors exhibit a diurnal rhythm in ovariectomized and/or estradiol-treated female rats, whether estradiol regulates alpha 1-receptors in those areas of brain involved with LH secretion and/or sexual behavior, and whether the concentrations of alpha-receptors vary inversely relative to previously reported norepinephrine turnover patterns. Young female rats, maintained on a 14:10 light-dark cycle were ovariectomized. One week later, half of them were outfitted sc with Silastic capsules containing estradiol. Groups of animals were decapitated 2 days later at 0300, 1000, 1300, 1500, 1800, and 2300 h. Brains were removed, frozen, and sectioned at 20 micron. Sections were incubated with (/sup 3/H)prazosin in Tris-HCl buffer, washed, dried, and exposed to LKB Ultrofilm. The densities of alpha 1-receptors were quantitated using a computerized image analysis system. In ovariectomized rats, the density of alpha 1-receptors exhibited a diurnal rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and pineal gland. In SCN and MPN, receptor concentrations were lowest during the middle of the day and rose to peak levels at 1800 h. In the pineal gland, the density of alpha 1-receptors was lowest at middark phase, rose to peak levels before lights on, and remained elevated during the day. Estradiol suppressed the density of alpha 1 binding sites in the SCN, MPN, median eminence, ventromedial nucleus, and the pineal gland but had no effect on the lateral septum. Estrogen treatment altered the rhythm of receptor densities in MPN, median eminence, and the pineal gland.

  6. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  7. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-(3H)nicotine or alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin; (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by (3H)nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment.

  8. ( sup 3 H)cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic {sup 3}H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of ({sup 3}H)cytisine in rat brain homogenates. ({sup 3}H)Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of ({sup 3}H)cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  10. Effect of prenatal stress on density of NMDA receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Elham; Saboory, Ehsan; Teshfam, Masood; Rasmi, Yusef; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Ilkhanizadeh, Behrooz; Hesari, Ali Kalantari

    2013-12-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are important excitatory receptors which contribute to many brain functions. Altered NMDA receptor levels cause maldevelopment of corticostriatal and corticolimbic pathways, which is a neurobiological predisposing factor for development of epilepsy, schizophrenia and other idiopathic psychotic disorders. It was hypothesized that prenatal stress could play a role in pathophysiology of these disorders by affecting expression of the receptors through releasing corticosterone. Sixty-eight virgin female Wistar rats were selected and mated with male rats with the same genotype. Then, the pregnant rats were subjected to restraint or predator stress on 15th, 16th and 17th gestation days. Prenatal stress consisted of restraint or predator stresses of the dams under normal room conditions. After parturition, the pups were studied in terms of density of NMDA receptors in brain at different time points. Meanwhile, blood sample was obtained and corticosterone blood level (CBL) was measured. The pups were then compared with the pups born to unstressed dams. Stress induced significant rise in CBL and NMDA receptors in brain of the offspring. CBL was significantly higher among the stressed rats compared to the control ones; there was significant difference between the two stresses and between the two sexes. The male pups were affected more severely. Stressful events during gestation had important effects on NMDA receptors of the offspring. It can be concluded that stress-induced elevation of NMDA receptors and corticosterone might mediate altered susceptibility to epilepsy and decrease ability of learning and memory and other stress-induced neurologic disorders. PMID:24120877

  11. Roles of the endogenous VEGF receptors flt-1 and flk-1 in astroglial and vascular remodeling after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Krum, Janette M.; Mani, Nina; Rosenstein, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    Following trauma to the brain significant changes occur in both the astroglial and vascular components of the neuropil. Angiogenesis is required to re-establish metabolic support and astrocyte activation encompasses several functions including scar formation and the production of growth factors. VEGF has seminal involvement in the process of brain repair and is upregulated during many pathological events. VEGF signaling is regulated mainly through its two primary receptors: flk-1 (KDR/VEGF-R2) is expressed on vascular endothelium and some neurons and flt-1 (VEGF-R1) in the CNS, is expressed predominantly by activated astrocytes. Using an injury model of chronic minipump infusion of neutralizing antibodies (NA) to block VEGF receptor signaling, this study takes advantage of these differences in VEGF receptor distribution in order to understand the role the cytokine plays after brain injury. Infusion of NA to flk-1 caused a significant decrease in vascular proliferation and increased endothelial cell degeneration compared to control IgG infusions but had no effect on astrogliosis. By contrast infusion of NA to flt-1 significantly decreased astroglial mitogenicity and scar formation and caused some increase in endothelial degeneration. Neutralization of the flt-1 receptor function, but not flk-1, caused significant reduction in the astroglial expression of the growth factors, CNTF and FGF by seven days. These data suggest that after CNS injury, endogenous VEGF upregulation (by astrocytes) induces angiogenesis and, by autocrine signaling, increases both astrocyte proliferation and facilitates expression of growth factors. It is likely that VEGF plays an important role in aspects of astroglial scar formation. PMID:18482723

  12. The TAM receptor Mertk protects against neuroinvasive viral infection by maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Daniels, Brian P; Shrestha, Bimmi; Proenca-Modena, Jose L; Lew, Erin D; Lazear, Helen M; Gorman, Matthew J; Lemke, Greg; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The TAM receptors Tyro3, Axl and Mertk are receptor tyrosine kinases that dampen host innate immune responses following engagement with their ligands Gas6 and Protein S, which recognize phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells. In a form of apoptotic mimicry, many enveloped viruses display phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of their membranes, enabling TAM receptor activation and downregulation of antiviral responses. Accordingly, we hypothesized that a deficiency of TAM receptors would enhance antiviral responses and protect against viral infection. Unexpectedly, mice lacking Mertk and/or Axl, but not Tyro3, exhibited greater vulnerability to infection with neuroinvasive West Nile and La Crosse encephalitis viruses. This phenotype was associated with increased blood-brain barrier permeability, which enhanced virus entry into and infection of the brain. Activation of Mertk synergized with interferon-β to tighten cell junctions and prevent virus transit across brain microvascular endothelial cells. Because TAM receptors restrict pathogenesis of neuroinvasive viruses, these findings have implications for TAM antagonists that are currently in clinical development. PMID:26523970

  13. The TAM receptor Mertk protects against neuroinvasive viral infection by maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Daniels, Brian P; Shrestha, Bimmi; Proenca-Modena, Jose L; Lew, Erin D; Lazear, Helen M; Gorman, Matthew J; Lemke, Greg; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The TAM receptors Tyro3, Axl and Mertk are receptor tyrosine kinases that dampen host innate immune responses following engagement with their ligands Gas6 and Protein S, which recognize phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells. In a form of apoptotic mimicry, many enveloped viruses display phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of their membranes, enabling TAM receptor activation and downregulation of antiviral responses. Accordingly, we hypothesized that a deficiency of TAM receptors would enhance antiviral responses and protect against viral infection. Unexpectedly, mice lacking Mertk and/or Axl, but not Tyro3, exhibited greater vulnerability to infection with neuroinvasive West Nile and La Crosse encephalitis viruses. This phenotype was associated with increased blood-brain barrier permeability, which enhanced virus entry into and infection of the brain. Activation of Mertk synergized with interferon-β to tighten cell junctions and prevent virus transit across brain microvascular endothelial cells. Because TAM receptors restrict pathogenesis of neuroinvasive viruses, these findings have implications for TAM antagonists that are currently in clinical development.

  14. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-10-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to -aminobutyric acid, -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders.

  15. ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES SRC-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING REQUIRES Src-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 (Y845)
    Weidong Wu1, Lee M. Graves2, Gordon N. Gill3 and James M. Samet4 1Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology; 2Department of Pharmacology, University o...

  16. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  17. In vivo labeling of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain with [3H]cytisine.

    PubMed

    Flesher, J E; Scheffel, U; London, E D; Frost, J J

    1994-01-01

    [3H]Cytisine was evaluated as an in vivo ligand for the nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAchR) in mouse brain. The tracer was injected intravenously, and radioactivity in brain regions was analyzed. Radioactivity peaked in the brain at 30 minutes. It was highest in the thalamus, intermediate in the superior colliculi, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and low in the cerebellum. Pretreatment with unlabeled cytisine inhibited binding in the thalamus, but not in the cerebellum. Binding was displaced by l-nicotine, but not by d-nicotine or dexetimide. The results suggest that cytisine, appropriately labeled with a positron emitting radionuclide, may be useful for study of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in humans by emission computed tomography. PMID:8196506

  18. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  19. Dynamics of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists on brain histamine metabolism: do all histamine H(3) receptor antagonists act at a single site?

    PubMed

    Barnes, W; Boyd, D; Hough, L

    2001-11-16

    Thioperamide, the prototypical histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, acts at the brain histamine H(3) autoreceptor to promote the release and metabolism of neuronal histamine, resulting in higher brain levels of the metabolite tele-methylhistamine. However, unlike thioperamide, several new histamine H(3) receptor antagonists enter the central nervous system (CNS), block brain histamine H(3) receptors and increase histamine release without increasing brain tele-methylhistamine levels. Experiments were performed presently in an attempt to understand these results. Consistent with previous findings, thioperamide significantly increased the content and synthesis rate of tele-methylhistamine in mouse and rat brain. In contrast, the histamine H(3) receptor antagonists GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and clobenpropit did not affect tele-methylhistamine synthesis rate in mouse whole brain. The histamine H(3) receptor ligand GT-2016 (5-cyclohexyl-1-(4-imidazol-4-ylpiperidyl)pentan-1-one) had no effect on tele-methylhistamine levels in any rat brain region and decreased tele-methylhistamine synthesis rates in the mouse whole brain. To examine the possibility that these histamine H(3) receptor antagonists might prevent the methylation of newly released histamine, they were co-administered with thioperamide to determine their effects on the thioperamide-induced stimulation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis. GT-2016 significantly reduced the thioperamide-induced activation of tele-methylhistamine synthesis in mouse whole brain and in several regions of rat brain. Although further clarification is needed, these results suggest that some histamine H(3) receptor antagonists may promote the release of neuronal histamine, but also act to reduce histamine methylation in vivo by an unknown mechanism.

  20. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  1. Distribution of angiotensin type-1 receptor messenger RNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, Z; Palkovits, M; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1998-02-01

    Angiotensin II and angiotensin III in the brain exert their various effects by acting on two pharmacologically well-defined receptors, the type-1 (AT1) and the type-2 (AT2) receptors. Receptor binding autoradiography has revealed the dominant presence of AT1 in brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular, body fluid and neuroendocrine control. The cloning of the AT1 complementary DNA has revealed the existence of two receptor subtypes in rodents, AT1A and AT1B. Using specific riboprobes for in situ hybridization, we have previously shown that the AT1A messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in the rat forebrain; in contrast the AT1B subtype predominates in the anterior pituitary. Using a similar technical approach, the aim of the present study was to establish the precise anatomical localization of cells synthetising the AT1A receptor in the adult rat brain. High AT1A messenger RNA expression was found in the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, the subfornical organ, the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus, the parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the area postrema, in agreement with previous autoradiographic studies, describing a high density of AT1 binding sites in these nuclei. In addition, AT1A messenger RNA expression was detected in several brain areas, where no AT1 binding was reported previously. Thus, we identify strong expression of AT1A messenger RNA expression in scattered cells of the lateral parts of the preoptic region, the lateral hypothalamus and several brainstem nuclei. In none of these structures was the AT1B messenger RNA detectable at the microscopic level. In conclusion, it is suggested that angiotensins may exert their central effects on body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis mainly via the AT1A receptor subtype. PMID:9483539

  2. AMPA receptor potentiation by acetylcholinesterase is age-dependently upregulated at synaptogenesis sites of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Silvia; Henley, Jeremy M.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have used radioligand binding to synaptic membranes from distinct rat brain regions and quantitative autoradiography to investigate the postnatal evolution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-evoked up-regulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in CNS areas undergoing synaptogenesis. Incubation of synaptosomal membranes or brain sections with purified AChE caused a developmentally modulated enhancement in the binding of [3H]-(S)–AMPA and the specific AMPA receptor ligand [3H]-(S)-5–fluorowillardiine, but did not modify binding to kainate neither N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In all postnatal ages investigated (4, 7, 14, 20, 27, 40 days-old and adult rats), AChE effect on binding was concentration-dependent and blocked by propidium, BW 284c51, diisopropylfluorophosphonate and eserine, therefore requiring indemnity of both peripheral and active sites of the enzyme. AChE-mediated enhancement of [3H]-fluorowillardiine binding was measurable in all major CNS areas, but displayed remarkable anatomical selectivity and developmental regulation. Autoradiograph densitometry exhibited distinct temporal profiles and peaks of treated/control binding ratios for different cortices, cortical layers, and nuclei. Within the parietal, occipital and temporal neocortices, hippocampal CA1 field and cerebellum, AChE-potentiated binding ratios peaked in chronological correspondence with synaptogenesis periods of the respective AMPA-receptor containing targets. This modulation of AMPA receptors by AChE is a molecular mechanism able to transduce localized neural activity into durable modifications of synaptic molecular structure and function. It might also contribute to AChE-mediated neurotoxicity, as postulated in Alzheimer’s disease and other CNS disorders. PMID:12565696

  3. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. PMID:27511839

  4. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  5. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  6. Foxc1 is required by pericytes during fetal brain angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Siegenthaler, Julie A.; Choe, Youngshik; Patterson, Katelin P.; Hsieh, Ivy; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Daneman, Richard; Kume, Tsutomu; Huang, Eric J.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Brain pericytes play a critical role in blood vessel stability and blood–brain barrier maturation. Despite this, how brain pericytes function in these different capacities is only beginning to be understood. Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor Foxc1 is expressed by brain pericytes during development and is critical for pericyte regulation of vascular development in the fetal brain. Conditional deletion of Foxc1 from pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells leads to late-gestation cerebral micro-hemorrhages as well as pericyte and endothelial cell hyperplasia due to increased proliferation of both cell types. Conditional Foxc1 mutants do not have widespread defects in BBB maturation, though focal breakdown of BBB integrity is observed in large, dysplastic vessels. qPCR profiling of brain microvessels isolated from conditional mutants showed alterations in pericyte-expressed proteoglycans while other genes previously implicated in pericyte–endothelial cell interactions were unchanged. Collectively these data point towards an important role for Foxc1 in certain brain pericyte functions (e.g. vessel morphogenesis) but not others (e.g. barriergenesis). PMID:23862012

  7. BDNF modulates GABAA receptors microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Torchia, G.; Limatola, C.; Trettel, F.; Arcella, A.; Cantore, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Manfredi, M.; Esposito, V.; Quarato, P. P.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Cell membranes isolated from brain tissues, obtained surgically from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and from one nonepileptic patient afflicted with a cerebral oligodendroglioma, were injected into frog oocytes. By using this approach, the oocytes acquire human GABAA receptors, and we have shown previously that the “epileptic receptors” (receptors transplanted from epileptic brains) display a marked run-down during repetitive applications of GABA. It was found that exposure to the neurotrophin BDNF increased the amplitude of the “GABA currents” (currents elicited by GABA) generated by the epileptic receptors and decreased their run-down; both events being blocked by K252A, a neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor B inhibitor. These effects of BDNF were not mimicked by nerve growth factor. In contrast, the GABAA receptors transplanted from the nonepileptic human hippocampal uncus (obtained during surgical resection as part of the nontumoral tissue from the oligodendroglioma margins) or receptors expressed by injecting rat recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor subunit cDNAs generated GABA currents whose time-course and run-down were not altered by BDNF. Loading the oocytes with the Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetate-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), or treating them with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent PKA, did not alter the GABA currents. However, staurosporine (a broad spectrum PK inhibitor), bisindolylmaleimide I (a PKC inhibitor), and U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor) blocked the BDNF-induced effects on the epileptic GABA currents. Our results indicate that BDNF potentiates the epileptic GABAA currents and antagonizes their use-dependent run-down, thus strengthening GABAergic inhibition, probably by means of activation of tyrosine kinase receptor B receptors and of both PLC and PKC. PMID:15665077

  8. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  9. Chronic stress alters glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) brain.

    PubMed

    Dickens, M; Romero, L M; Cyr, N E; Dunn, I C; Meddle, S L

    2009-10-01

    Although the glucocorticoid response to acute short-term stress is an adaptive physiological mechanism that aids in the response to and survival of noxious stimuli, chronic stress is associated with a negative impact on health. In wild-caught European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), chronic stress alters the responsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by the acute corticosterone response. In the present study, we investigated potential underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms by comparing glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in the brains of chronically and nonchronically-stressed starlings. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, but not hippocampal, glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in chronically-stressed birds was significantly lower compared to controls, suggesting changes in the efficacy of corticosterone negative feedback. In addition, chronically-stressed birds showed a significant decrease in hippocampal MR mRNA expression. Together, these results suggest that chronic stress changes the brain physiology of wild birds and provides important information for the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in dysregulation of the HPA axis in wild animals by chronic stress. PMID:19686439

  10. Muscarinic receptor occupancy by biperiden in living human brain.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Y; Suhara, T; Suzuki, K; Okubo, Y; Yoshikawa, K; Uchida, S; Sassa, T; Okauchi, T; Sasaki, Y; Matsushita, M

    1999-01-01

    Anticholinergic drug is often used to treat extrapyramidal symptoms. We measured muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAchR) occupancy by the oral administration of biperiden in eight healthy subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate (NMPB). After the baseline scan each subject underwent one or two post-dose PET scans. mAchR occupancy was 10-45% in the frontal cortex three hours after the oral administration of 4 mg of biperiden. The occupancy correlated with the plasma concentration of biperiden in a curvilinear manner.

  11. Blocking the ghrelin receptor type 1a in the rat brain impairs memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Siamak; Shahrokhi, Shahrzad

    2015-08-01

    Studies have shown that intracerebral administration of ghrelin hormone affects learning and memory in different experimental models of learning. However, the effect of antagonism of ghrelin receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) on different stages of learning has not been investigated. In this study the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injection of a GHS-R1a selective antagonist (d-Lys-3-GHRP-6) was examined on acquisition and consolidation of learning in the passive avoidance task. In total, 72 male Wistar rats weighing 230-280g were randomly distributed into 9 groups of 8 each. Animals underwent stereotaxic surgery and cannulated in their right ventricle. One week after surgery, the rats received different doses of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 (0.2, 2, 20 and 80nM/5μl; i.c.v) 10min before, or (2, 20 and 80nM/5μl; i.c.v) immediately after training. The control groups received solvent of the drug. Twenty four hours later in the test day, memory retrieval was assessed. Pre-training injection of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 decreased step-through latency (STL) and increased number of step-throughs into the dark compartment (NST) in a dose-dependent manner, but failed to be statistically significant. It also increased time spent in the dark compartment (TDC), significantly and in a dose-dependent manner. Post-training injection of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 decreased step-through latency and increased time spent in the dark compartment and number of step-throughs into the dark compartment, significantly and in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that antagonism of the GHS-R1a in the rat brain impairs memory encoding on both acquisition and consolidation stages. Further studies are required to elucidate the main brain regions affected by the antagonist.

  12. [3H]LY341495 binding to group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wright, R A; Arnold, M B; Wheeler, W J; Ornstein, P L; Schoepp, D D

    2001-08-01

    [3H]LY341495 is a highly potent and selective antagonist for group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3), which has been used to label these receptors in cells expressing recombinant receptor subtypes. In this study, we characterized the kinetics, pharmacology, and distribution of [3H]LY341495 binding to mGlu receptors in rat brain tissue. Equilibrium experiments in the rat forebrain demonstrated binding to a single site that was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity (Bmax, 3.9 +/- 0.65 pmol/mg of protein, Kd, 0.84 +/- 0.11 nM). The relative order of potencies for displacement of [3H]LY341495 by mGlu receptor ligands was LY341495 > L-glutamic acid > LY354740 > (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine > 4-(2R,4R)-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate > (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid > (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine > (R,S)3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine > L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid. [3H]LY341495 was not displaced by the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists N-methyl-D-aspartic acid, (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, or kainate at concentrations up to 1 mM. Comparison of [3H]LY341495 binding in rat brain with recombinant mGlu receptor subtypes demonstrated a very high correlation with mGlu3 receptor binding (r2 = 0.957), a significant, but lower, correlation with mGlu2 receptor binding (r2 = 0.869), but no significant correlation to mGlu8 receptor binding (r2 = 0.284). Regional studies using autoradiography showed a similar distribution of [3H]LY341495 binding to that for group II mGlu receptors previously reported by others using immunocytochemical techniques. These studies indicate that [3H]LY341495 selectively labels group II (mGlu2/3) receptors, but under the conditions used, [3H]LY341495 may bind predominately to mGlu3 receptor populations in the rat forebrain. PMID:11454905

  13. Single nanoparticle tracking of [Formula: see text]-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in cultured and intact brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Varela, Juan A; Ferreira, Joana S; Dupuis, Julien P; Durand, Pauline; Bouchet, Delphine; Groc, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Recent developments in single-molecule imaging have revealed many biological mechanisms, providing high spatial and temporal resolution maps of molecular events. In neurobiology, these techniques unveiled that plasma membrane neurotransmitter receptors and transporters laterally diffuse at the surface of cultured brain cells. The photostability of bright nanoprobes, such as quantum dots (QDs), has given access to neurotransmitter receptor tracking over long periods of time with a high spatial resolution. However, our knowledge has been restricted to cultured systems, i.e., neurons and organotypic slices, therefore lacking several aspects of the intact brain rheology and connectivity. Here, we used QDs to track single glutamatergic [Formula: see text]-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in acute brain slices. By delivering functionalized nanoparticles in vivo through intraventricular injections to rats expressing genetically engineered-tagged NMDAR, we successfully tracked the receptors in native brain tissue. Comparing NMDAR tracking to different classical brain preparations (acute brain slices, cultured organotypic brain slices, and cultured neurons) revealed that the surface diffusion properties shared several features and are also influenced by the nature of the extracellular environment. Together, we describe the experimental procedures to track plasma membrane NMDAR in dissociated and native brain tissue, paving the way for investigations aiming at characterizing receptor diffusion biophysics in intact tissue and exploring the physiopathological roles of receptor surface dynamics.

  14. Targeting receptor-mediated transport for delivery of biologics across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Biologics are an emerging class of medicines with substantial promise to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a formidable obstacle that appreciably limits brain uptake and hence, therapeutic potential, of biologics following intravenous administration. One promising strategy for overcoming the BBB to deliver biologics is the targeting of endogenous receptor-mediated transport (RMT) systems that employ vesicular trafficking to transport ligands across the BBB endothelium. If a biologic is modified with an appropriate targeting ligand, it can gain improved access to the brain via RMT. Various RMT targeting strategies have been developed over the past 20 years, and this review will explore exciting recent advances, with a particular emphasis on those studies showing brain targeting in vivo. PMID:25340933

  15. Localization of insulin receptor mRNA in rat brain by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.L.; Porte, D. Jr.; Stahl, W.L.; Baskin, D.G. )

    1990-12-01

    Insulin receptor mRNA was demonstrated in rat brain slices by in situ hybridization with three {sup 35}S-oligonucleotide probes and contact film autoradiography. Specificity was confirmed by showing that (a) excess unlabeled probe abolished the signal, (b) an oligonucleotide probe for rat neuropeptide Y mRNA showed a different distribution of hybridization signal, and (c) the distribution of insulin receptor binding was consistent with the distribution of insulin receptor mRNA. Insulin receptor mRNA was most abundant in the granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, cerebellum and dentate gyrus, in the pyramidal cell body layers of the pyriform cortex and hippocampus, in the choroid plexus and in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

  16. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  17. The Nuclear Receptor PPARγ as a Therapeutic Target for Cerebrovascular and Brain Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Hamel, Edith

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that regulate peripheral lipid and glucose metabolism. Three subtypes make up the PPAR family (α, γ, β/δ), and synthetic ligands for PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (Thiazolidinediones, TZDs) are currently prescribed for the respective management of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. In contrast to the well characterized action of PPARs in the periphery, little was known about the presence or function of these receptors in the brain and cerebral vasculature until fairly recently. Indeed, research in the last decade has uncovered these receptors in most brain cell types, and has shown that their activation, particularly that of PPARγ, is implicated in normal brain and cerebrovascular physiology, and confers protection under pathological conditions. Notably, accumulating evidence has highlighted the therapeutic potential of PPARγ ligands in the treatment of brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), leading to the testing of the TZDs pioglitazone and rosiglitazone in AD clinical trials. This review will focus on the benefits of PPARγ agonists for vascular, neuronal and glial networks, and assess the value of these compounds as future AD therapeutics in light of evidence from transgenic mouse models and recent clinical trials. PMID:20725514

  18. Sexually dimorphic development and binding characteristics of NMDA receptors in the brain of the platyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Yablonsky-Alter, E.; Banerjee, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated age- and gender-specific variations in properties of the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in a freshwater teleost, the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus). Prior localization of the immunoreactive (ir)-R1 subunit of the NMDAR protein (R1) in cells of the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a primary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus in the platyfish, suggests that NMDAR, as in mammals, is involved in modulation of the platyfish brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. The current study shows that the number of cells in the NOR displaying ir-R1 is significantly increased in pubescent and mature female platyfish when compared to immature and senescent animals. In males, there is no significant change in ir-R1 expression in the NOR at any time in their lifespan. The affinity of the noncompetitive antagonist ((3)H)MK-801 for the NMDAR is significantly increased in pubescent females while maximum binding of ((3)H)MK-801 to the receptor reaches a significant maximum in mature females. In males, both MK-801 affinity and maximum binding remain unchanged throughout development. This is the first report of gender differences in the association of NMDA receptors with neuroendocrine brain areas during development. It is also the first report to suggest NMDA receptor involvement in the development of the BPG axis in a nonmammalian vertebrate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin ({sup 125}I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. {sup 125}I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K{sub d} of 2.3 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M and 2.06 {plus minus} 0.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of {sup 125}I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP({gamma}S) treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of {sup 125}I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M{sub r} > 400,000 and M{sub r} ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP({gamma}S) before solubilization; only the M{sub r} 110,000 peak was present in GTP({gamma}S)-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that {sup 125}I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000.

  20. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies.

  1. Lysergic acid diethylamide-induced Fos expression in rat brain: role of serotonin-2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Gresch, P J; Strickland, L V; Sanders-Bush, E

    2002-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) produces altered mood and hallucinations in humans and binds with high affinity to serotonin-2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors. Although LSD interacts with other receptors, the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors is thought to mediate the hallucinogenic properties of LSD. The goal of this study was to identify the brain sites activated by LSD and to determine the influence of 5-HT(2A) receptors in this activation. Rats were pretreated with the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist MDL 100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min prior to LSD (500 microg/kg, i.p.) administration and killed 3 h later. Brain tissue was examined for Fos protein expression by immunohistochemistry. LSD administration produced a five- to eight-fold increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and central nucleus of amygdala. However, in dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens no increase in Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed. Pretreatment with MDL 100907 completely blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, but only partially blocked LSD-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in amygdala. Double-labeled immunohistochemistry revealed that LSD did not induce Fos-like immunoreactivity in cortical cells expressing 5-HT(2A) receptors, suggesting an indirect activation of cortical neurons. These results indicate that the LSD activation of medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex is mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors, whereas in amygdala 5-HT(2A) receptor activation is a component of the response. These findings support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and perhaps the amygdala, are important regions involved in the production of hallucinations.

  2. Isolation and characterisation of two cDNAs encoding the neuromedin U receptor from goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Kaiya, H; Miyazato, M; Konno, N; Wakasugi, T; Uchiyama, M; Shioda, S; Murakami, N; Matsuda, K

    2011-03-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neuromedin U (NMU) exerts an anorexigenic effect in a goldfish model. However, little is known about the NMU receptor and its signalling system in fish. In the present study, we isolated and cloned two cDNAs encoding different proteins comprising 429 and 388 amino acid residues from the goldfish brain based on the nucleotide sequences of human NMU receptor 1 (NMU-R1) and receptor 2 (NMU-R2). Hydropathy and phylogenetic analyses suggested that these two proteins were orthologues of NMU-R1 and -R2 of goldfish. We established two human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines stably expressing putative NMU-R1 and -R2, respectively, and showed that NMU induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in these cells. We examined the presence of NMU-R1 and -R2 in the goldfish brain by western blotting analysis using affinity-purified antisera raised against peptide fragments derived from these receptors. NMU-R1-specific and NMU-R2-specific antisera detected a 49-kDa and 45-kDa immunopositive bands, respectively, in the brain extract. The mass of each band corresponded to that of the deduced respective primary structures. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NMU-R1 and -R2 transcripts were detected in several tissues. In particular, both mRNAs were strongly expressed in the goldfish brain. By contrast, NMU-R2 mRNA was also expressed in the gut. These results indicate for the first time that NMU-R orthologues exist in goldfish, and suggest physiological roles of NMU and its receptor system in fish.

  3. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  4. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Annual report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.

    1985-05-13

    We have conducted experiments to determine if 3H acetylcholine (3Hach) nicotinic recognition sites are located presynaptically on catecholamine and/or serotonin axons. Lesions of these axons by intraventricular injections of neurotoxins resulted in marked decreases in 3Hach binding sites in the striatum and hypothalamus, but not in the cortex or thalamus. These results indicate that 3Hach nicotinic binding sites are located on catecholamine and serotonin axons in specific areas of the brain. In other experiments, we determined that repeated administration of nicotine results in enhanced behavioral responses to a subsequent injection of nicotine, and that there appears to be a correlation between the enhanced response to nicotine and increased 3Hach binding sites in cerebral cortex.

  5. GABAA receptors expression pattern in rat brain following low pressure distension of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, M; Molinari, C; Grossini, E; Piffanelli, V; Mary, D A S G; Vacca, G; Cannas, M

    2008-03-18

    It is known that gastric mechanoreceptor stimuli are widely integrated into neuronal circuits that involve visceral nuclei of hindbrain as well as several central brain areas. GABAergic neurons are widely represented in hindbrain nuclei controlling gastric motor functions, but limited information is available specifically about GABA(A)-responding neurons in brain visceral areas. The present investigation was designed to determine the central sensory neuronal pathways and their GABA(A)-alpha1 and -alpha3 receptor presenting neurons that respond to gastric mechanoreceptor stimulation within the entire rat brain. Low pressure gastric distension was used to deliver physiological mechanical stimuli in anesthetized rats, and different protocols of gastric distension were performed to mimic different stimulation patterns with and without sectioning vagal and/or splanchnic afferent nerves. Mapping of activated neurons was investigated using double colorimetric immunohistochemistry for GABA(A)-alpha1 or -alpha3 subunits and c-Fos. Following stomach distension, neurons expressing GABA(A) receptors with alpha1 or alpha3 subunits were detected. Low frequency gastric distension induced c-Fos expression in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) only, whereas in the high frequency gastric distension c-Fos positive nuclei were found in lateral reticular nucleus and in NTS in addition to some forebrain areas. In contrast, during the tonic-rapid gastric distension the neuronal activation was found in hindbrain, midbrain and forebrain areas. Moreover different protocols of gastric stimulation activated diverse patterns of neurons presenting GABA(A)-alpha1 or -alpha3 receptors within responding brain nuclei, which may indicate a probable functional significance of differential expression of GABA(A)-responding neurons. The same protocol of gastric distension performed in vagotomized rats has confirmed the primary role of the vagus in the response of activation of gastric brain areas, whereas

  6. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  7. Brain Changes Associated with Thromboxane Receptor Antagonist, SQ 29,548, Treatment in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Rebel, Andrew A.; Urquhart, Siri A.; Puig, Kendra L.; Ghatak, Atreyi; Brose, Stephen A.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Combs, Colin K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize behavioral and physiological effects of a selective thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist, SQ 29,548, in the C57BL/6 mouse model. At six months of age, male mice were given either sham or drug intraperitoneal injections for three days at a dose of 2mg/kg each day. On the day after the final injection mice were subjected to behavioral testing paradigms before brain collection. Left hemisphere hippocampi were collected from all mice for protein analysis via western blot. Right brain hemispheres were fixed and imbedded in gelatin, and serially sectioned. The sections were immunostained using anti-c-Fos antibodies. Prostaglandin analysis was performed from remaining homogenized brain samples, minus the hippocampi. Injection of SQ 29,548 decreased selective brain prostaglandin levels compared to sham controls. This correlated with robust increases in limbic region c-Fos immunoreactivity in the SQ 29,548 injected mice. However, drug treated mice demonstrated no significant changes in relevant hippocampal protein levels compared to sham treatments, as determined by western blots. Surprisingly, injection of SQ 29,548 caused mixed changes in parameters of depression and anxiety-like behavior in the mice. In conclusion, the results indicate that administration of peripheral TP receptor antagonists alters brain levels of prostanoids and influences neuronal activity with only minimal alterations of behavior. Whether the drug affects neurons directly or through a secondary pathway involving endothelium or other tissues remains unclear. PMID:25703023

  8. Photoperiod and testosterone regulate androgen receptor immunostaining in the Siberian hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Bittman, Eric L; Ehrlich, David A; Ogdahl, Justyne L; Jetton, Amy E

    2003-09-01

    Day length regulates the effects of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin secretion and behavior in seasonal breeders. To determine whether this influence of photoperiod results from changes in androgen receptor expression in Siberian hamster brain regions that regulate neuroendocrine function, androgen receptor immunostaining was examined in castrated animals given either no androgen replacement or one of three doses of testosterone (T) resulting in physiological serum concentrations. Half of the animals were housed under inhibitory photoperiod conditions, and immunostaining was quantified 11 days later. Measurement of serum gonadotropin and prolactin concentrations confirmed that androgen exerted graded effects on pituitary function but that the animals were killed before photoperiodic influences had fully developed. T significantly increased the numbers of androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells in every brain region examined. Photoperiod exerted no significant influence on androgen receptor-immunoreactive cell number in the arcuate nucleus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), medial preoptic nucleus, or in medial amygdala. An interaction between T and photoperiod was observed in the BNST and in the rostral and middle portions of the arcuate nucleus. Although increasing concentrations of T resulted in more intense cellular immunostaining in the BNST and arcuate, this effect was not influenced by day length. These results indicate that relatively short-duration (11 days) exposure to inhibitory photoperiod triggers localized and regionally specific changes in androgen receptor expression.

  9. Characterization and in vivo regulation of V sub 1 -type vasopressin receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shewey, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Specific, high affinity binding sites for ({sup 3}H)-arginine{sup 8}-vasopressin (AVP) have been characterized in Long-Evans rat septal membranes. Binding displacement studies with peptide analogs of AVP indicate that this binding site is similar to the V{sub 1} (pressor)-type receptor for AVP. When added to rat brain septal slices that had been pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)-myoinositol, AVP stimulated the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1-phosphate (IP{sub 1}) in the presence of lithium in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulation was completely inhibited by the specific V{sub 1} antagonists, d(CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP, indicating that AVP stimulates hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids in rat brain septum through an interaction with V{sub 1}-type AVP receptors. Binding studies of AVP receptors in the septum of heterozygous (HE) and homozygous, Brattleboro (BB) rats revealed an increased number of receptors with a lower affinity for AVP in the HO-BB rat when compared to the HE-BB rat. AVP-stimulated accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} was significantly greater in the septum of the HO-BB rat than in the HE-BB rat. AVP receptor binding capacity correlated with release of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} for all three groups studied.

  10. Stimulation of endocannabinoid formation in brain slice cultures through activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Mangieri, Regina; Stapleton, Christopher; Kim, Janet; Fegley, Darren; Wallace, Matthew; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2005-11-01

    Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors drives the endocannabinoid system to cause both short- and long-term changes of synaptic strength in the striatum, hippocampus, and other brain areas. Although there is strong electrophysiological evidence for a role of endocannabinoid release in mGlu receptor-dependent plasticity, the identity of the endocannabinoid transmitter mediating this phenomenon remains undefined. In this study, we show that activation of group I mGlu receptors triggers the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but not anandamide, in primary cultures of corticostriatal and hippocampal slices prepared from early postnatal rat brain. Pharmacological studies suggest that 2-AG biosynthesis is initiated by activation of mGlu5 receptors, is catalyzed by phospholipase C (PLC) and 1,2-diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) activities, and is dependent on intracellular Ca2+ ions. Realtime polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining analyses indicate that DGL-beta is the predominant DGL isoform expressed in corticostriatal and hippocampal slices and that this enzyme is highly expressed in striatal neurons, where it is colocalized with PLC-beta1. The results suggest that 2-AG is a primary endocannabinoid mediator of mGlu receptor-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  11. Oxytocin receptor mRNA expression in rat brain: implications for behavioral integration and reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, N L

    1998-11-01

    The nonapeptide, oxytocin (OT), has been implicated in a wide range of physiological, behavioral and pharmacological effects related to learning and memory, parturition and lactation, maternal and sexual behavior, and the formation of social attachments. Specific G-protein linked membrane bound OT receptors mediate OTs effects. The unavailability of highly selective pharmacological ligands that discriminate the OT receptor from the highly homologous vasopressin receptors (V1a, V1b and V2 subtypes) has made it difficult to confirm specific effects of oxytocin, particularly in brain regions where OT and multiple AVP receptor subtypes may be coexpressed. Here, data on the oxytocin receptor (OTR) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) localization in brain are presented in the context of a model that proposes a reproductive state-dependent role for steroid-hormone restructuring of neural circuits, and a role for oxytocin in the integration of neural transmission in pathways subserving: (1) steroid-sensitive reproductive behaviors; (2) learning; and (3) reinforcement. It is hypothesized that social attachments emerge as a consequence of a conditioned association between OT-related activity in these pathways and the eliciting stimulus. PMID:9924748

  12. Influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic brain receptors.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, M; Fixmann, A; Holschbach, M; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1998-11-01

    The distribution of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain in vivo has been successfully characterized using radiolabeled tracers and emission tomography. The effect of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft on receptor binding of these tracers has not yet been investigated. The present study examined the influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic cholinergic receptors of porcine brain synaptosomes in vitro. 4-Iododexetimide is a subtype-unspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist with high affinity. Acetylcholine competed with 4-[125I]iododexetimide in a dose-dependent manner. A concentration of 500 microM acetylcholine inhibited 50% of total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding to synaptosomes when both substances were given simultaneously. An 800 microM acetylcholine solution reduced total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding by about 35%, when acetylcholine was given 60 min after incubation of synaptosomes with 4-[125I]iododexetimide. Variations in the synaptic acetylcholine concentration might influence muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging in vivo using 4-[123I]iododexetimide. Conversely, 4-[123I]iododexetimide might be an appropriate molecule to investigate alterations of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft in vivo using single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:9863566

  13. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  14. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  15. Substance P receptor desensitization requires receptor activation but not phospholipase C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiya, Hiroshi; Putney, J.W. Jr. )

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of parotid acinar cells to substance P at 37{degree}C results in activation of phospholipase C, formation of ({sup 3}H)inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), and persistent desensitization of the substance P response. In cells treated with antimycin in medium containing glucose, ATP was decreased to {approximately}20% of control values, IP{sub 3} formation was completely inhibited, but desensitization was unaffected. When cells were treated with antimycin in the absence of glucose, cellular ATP was decreased to {approximately}5% of control values, and both IP{sub 3} formation and desensitization were blocked. A series of substance P-related peptides increased the formation of ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} and induced desensitization of the substance P response with a similar rank order of potencies. The substance P antagonist, (D-Pro{sup 2}, D-Try{sup 7,9})-substance P, inhibited substance P-induced IP{sub 3} formation and desensitization but did not induce desensitization. These results suggest that the desensitization of substance P-induced IP{sub 3} formation requires agonist activation of a P-type substance P receptor, and that one or more cellular ATP-dependent processes are required for this reaction. However, activation of phospholipase C and the generation of inositol phosphates does not seem to be a prerequisite for desensitization.

  16. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family. PMID:21476267

  17. Changes in sensitivity of brain dopamine and serotonin receptors during long-term treatment with carbidine

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Allikmets, L.K.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the state of the dopamine and serotonin receptors of the brain during chronic administration of carbidine to animals. Parts of the brain from two rats were pooled and binding of tritium-spiperone and tritium-LSD was determined. Statistical analysis of the data for apomorphine sterotypy was carried out and the Student's test was used for analysis of the remaining data. It is shown that after discontinuation of carbidine binding of tritium-spiperone and tritium-LSD in the cortex was reduced.

  18. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism by cocaine, norcocaine and cocaethylene in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tan, X X; Costa, L G

    1994-05-13

    The interaction of cocaine, its metabolites norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene, which is formed following a combined cocaine and ethanol exposure, with muscarinic receptor binding and phosphoinositide metabolism was investigated in brain from immature rats. Cocaine and norcocaine inhibited binding of [3H]telenzepine and carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in cerebral cortex, while benzoylecgonine was devoid of any inhibitory activity. Cocaethylene was the most potent inhibitor of both binding and phosphoinositide metabolism. The effect of cocaine was more pronounced at the muscarinic receptors, but a small inhibition of histamine--and serotonin--stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism was also observed.

  19. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  20. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is required for immunity mediated by pattern recognition receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Malick; Bourdais, Gildas; Gervasi, Fabio; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Spallek, Thomas; Bartels, Sebastian; Boller, Thomas; Ueda, Takashi; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-09-27

    Sensing of potential pathogenic bacteria is of critical importance for immunity. In plants, this involves plasma membrane-resident pattern recognition receptors, one of which is the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) receptor kinase. Ligand-activated FLS2 receptors are internalized into endosomes. However, the extent to which these spatiotemporal dynamics are generally present among pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and their regulation remain elusive. Using live-cell imaging, we show that at least three other receptor kinases associated with plant immunity, PEP RECEPTOR 1/2 (PEPR1/2) and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), internalize in a ligand-specific manner. In all cases, endocytosis requires the coreceptor BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1), and thus depends on receptor activation status. We also show the internalization of liganded FLS2, suggesting the transport of signaling competent receptors. Trafficking of activated PRRs requires clathrin and converges onto the same endosomal vesicles that are also shared with the hormone receptor BRASSINOSTERIOD INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1). Importantly, clathrin-dependent endocytosis participates in plant defense against bacterial infection involving FLS2-mediated stomatal closure and callose deposition, but is uncoupled from activation of the flagellin-induced oxidative burst and MAP kinase signaling. In conclusion, immunity mediated by pattern recognition receptors depends on clathrin, a critical component for the endocytosis of signaling competent receptors into a common endosomal pathway. PMID:27651493

  1. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  2. Ephrin/Eph receptor expression in brain of adult nonhuman primates: implications for neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danqing; Miller, Gregory M; Jassen, Amy; Westmoreland, Susan V; Pauley, Douglas; Madras, Bertha K

    2006-01-01

    In developing brain, Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands (Ephs/ephrins) are implicated in facilitating topographic guidance of a number of pathways, including the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathways. In adult rodent brain, these molecules are implicated in neuronal plasticity associated with learning and memory. Cocaine significantly alters the expression of select members of this family of axonal guidance molecules, implicating Ephs, ephrins in drug-induced neuroadaptation. The potential contribution of Ephs, ephrins to cocaine-induced reorganization of striatal circuitry brain in primates [Saka, E., Goodrich, C., Harlan, P., Madras, B.K., Graybiel, A.M., 2004. Repetitive behaviors in monkeys are linked to specific striatal activation patterns. J. Neurosci. 24, 7557-7565] is unknown because there are no documented reports of Eph/ephrin expression or function in adult primate brain. We now report that brains of adult old and new world monkeys express mRNA encoding EphA4 receptor and ephrin-B2 ligand, implicated in topographic guidance of dopamine and striatal neurons during development. Their encoded proteins distributed highly selectively in regions of adult monkey brain. EphA4 mRNA levels were prominent in the DA-rich caudate/putamen, nucleus accumbens and globus pallidus, as well as the medial and orbitofrontal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and cerebellum. Immunocytochemical localization of EphA4 protein revealed discrete expression in caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, cerebellar Purkinje cells, pyramidal cells of frontal cortices (layers II, III and V) and the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. Evidence for EphA4 expression in dopamine neurons emerged from colocalization with tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive terminals in striatum and substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area cell bodies. The association of axonal guidance molecules with drug-induced reorganization of adult primate brain circuitry warrants

  3. Brain aromatase (Cyp19A2) and estrogen receptors, in larvae and adult pejerrey fish Odontesthes bonariensis: Neuroanatomical and functional relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobl-Mazzulla, P. H.; Lethimonier, C.; Gueguen, M.M.; Karube, M.; Fernandino, J.I.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Strussmann, C.A.; Kah, O.; Somoza, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although estrogens exert many functions on vertebrate brains, there is little information on the relationship between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of two estrogen receptors, ?? and ??, in pejerrey. Both receptors' mRNAs largely overlap and were predominantly expressed in the brain, pituitary, liver, and gonads. Also brain aromatase and estrogen receptors were up-regulated in the brain of estradiol-treated males. In situ hybridization was performed to study in more detail, the distribution of the two receptors in comparison with brain aromatase mRNA in the brain of adult pejerrey. The estrogen receptors' mRNAs exhibited distinct but partially overlapping patterns of expression in the preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus, as well as in the pituitary gland. Moreover, the estrogen receptor ??, but not ??, were found to be expressed in cells lining the preoptic recess, similarly as observed for brain aromatase. Finally, it was shown that the onset expression of brain aromatase and both estrogen receptors in the head of larvae preceded the morphological differentiation of the gonads. Because pejerrey sex differentiation is strongly influenced by temperature, brain aromatase expression was measured during the temperature-sensitive window and was found to be significantly higher at male-promoting temperature. Taken together these results suggest close neuroanatomical and functional relationships between brain aromatase and estrogen receptors, probably involved in the sexual differentiation of the brain and raising interesting questions on the origin (central or peripheral) of the brain aromatase substrate. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  5. Lysophospholipid receptors LPA1–3 are not required for the inhibitory effects of LPA on mouse retinal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Birgbauer, Eric; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    One of the major requirements in the development of the visual system is axonal guidance of retinal ganglion cells toward correct targets in the brain. A novel class of extracellular lipid signaling molecules, lysophospholipids, may serve as potential axon guidance cues. They signal through cognate G protein-coupled receptors, at least some of which are expressed in the visual system. Here we show that in the mouse visual system, a lysophospholipid known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is inhibitory to retinal neurites in vitro when delivered extracellularly, causing growth cone collapse and neurite retraction. This inhibitory effect of LPA is both active in the nanomolar range and specific compared to the related lysophospholipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Knockout mice lacking three of the five known LPA receptors, LPA1–3, continue to display retinal growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in response to LPA, demonstrating that these three receptors are not required for these inhibitory effects and indicating the existence of one or more functional LPA receptors expressed on mouse retinal neurites that can mediate neurite retraction. PMID:26966392

  6. Steroid modulation of the chloride ionophore in rat brain: structure-activity requirements, regional dependence and mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, K.W.; Bolger, M.B.; Brinton, R.E.; Coirini, H.; McEwen, B.S.

    1988-08-01

    Further in vitro studies of steroids active at the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor regulated Cl- channel labeled by (35S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((35S)TBPS) reveal additional structural requirements necessary for activity. Evaluation of selected steroids for activity against TBPS-induced convulsions show similar requirements for activity. Interestingly, steroids (e.g., 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha, 20 alpha-diol) were identified that have high potency but limited efficacy as modulators of (35S)TBPS binding. These characteristics are reminiscent of the clinically useful benzodiazepines (BZs) such as clonazepam. However, interactions between the prototypical anesthetic-barbiturate, sodium pentobarbital, and steroids active at the Cl- channel suggest that they do not share a common site of action as allosteric modulators of (35S)TBPS and BZ receptor binding. The most potent steroid evaluated, 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one, modulates (35S)TBPS binding at low concentrations (IC50 approximately 17 nM) in a regionally dependent manner. All (35S)TBPS binding sites appear to be functionally coupled to a steroid modulatory site. Because several of the active steroids are metabolites of progesterone, their ability to inhibit the binding of (3H)promegestrone to the cytosolic progestin receptor in rat uterus was evaluated. Those steroids showing potent activity at the GABAA receptor-Cl- ionophore were inactive at the intracellular progestin receptor. Such specificity coupled with their high potency provide additional support for the hypothesis that some of these steroids may be involved in the homeostatic regulation of brain excitability via the GABAA-BZ receptor complex.

  7. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  8. Effect of nicotine and cocaine on neurofilaments and receptors in whole brain tissue and synaptoneurosome preparations.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, K; Lajtha, A; Sershen, H

    2010-04-29

    The present study examined the effect of repeated nicotine and cocaine administration on the expression of neurofilament proteins (NF-L, -M, and -H), actin, and on alpha-7 nicotinic, dopamine D1 and NMDA NR1 receptors in brain. Whole tissue homogenate and synaptoneurosomal preparations from hippocampus, striatum and cortex were assayed. C57BL/6By mice were treated for 2 weeks with a daily injection of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) or cocaine (25mg/kg). The mice were killed 60 min after the last injection and tissue prepared for Western blot analysis of expression of NFs and receptor expression. Actin protein was affected by cocaine and nicotine treatment, decreasing in homogenate fraction (striatum and cortex) and showing an increase in the synaptoneurosome preparation (hippocampus and cortex). NF expression was affected; with regional and response differences dependent on tissue preparation. NF-M increased in all three brain regions; NF-L increased in the cortex and NF-H increased in the striatum in the synaptoneurosomal preparations. Change in nicotinic and dopamine receptor expression was dependent on region and tissue preparation. NMDA NR1 expression increased in the three brain regions in the synaptoneurosomal preparation. The results suggest that specific brain protein levels are affected by repeated drug administration. Drug effects on cytoskeletal elements are selective, regionally heterogeneous, and change with time after drug administration. Changes in cytoskeletal proteins maybe part of the mechanism in drug-induced neurotransmitter changes. We have found previously that drug-induced changes in neurotransmitters are regionally heterogeneous and are drug specific. We now found similar regional heterogeneity and drug specificity in drug-induced changes in cytoskeletal and receptor proteins.

  9. Localization of receptors for bombesin-like peptides in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, T.W.; Getz, R.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Rosenstein, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    BN-like peptides and receptors are present in discrete areas of the mammalian brain. By radioimmunoassay, endogenous BN/GRP, neuromedin B, and ranatensin-like peptides are present in the rat brain. High-to-moderate concentrations of BN/GRP are present in the rat hypothalamus and thalamus, whereas moderate-to-high densities of neuromedin B and ranatensin-like peptides are present in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, as well as in the hypothalamus and thalamus. While the distribution of neuromedin B and ranatensin-like peptides appears similar, it is distinct from that of BN/GRP. When released from CNS neurons, these peptides may interact with receptors for BN-like peptides. BN, GRP, ranatensin, and neuromedin B inhibit specific (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)BN binding with high affinity. By use of in vitro autoradiographic techniques to detect binding of (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)BN to receptors for BN-like peptides, high grain densities were found in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, the nucleus accumbens, the suprachiasmatic and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the central medial and paraventricular thalamic nuclei, the hippocampus, the dentate gyrus, and the amygdala of the rat brain. Some of these receptors may be biologically active and mediate the biological effects of BN-like peptides. For example, when BN is directly injected into the nucleus accumbens, pronounced grooming results and the effects caused by BN are reversed by spantide and (D-Phe12)BN. Thus, the putative BN receptor antagonists may serve as useful agents to investigate the biological significance of BN-like peptides in the CNS.

  10. Estradiol decreases cortical reactive astrogliosis after brain injury by a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, Ana Belén; Mateos Vicente, Beatriz; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Noé; Bellini, María José; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Viveros, María-Paz

    2011-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid estradiol reduces reactive astroglia after brain injury by mechanisms similar to those involved in the regulation of reactive gliosis by endocannabinoids. In this study, we have explored whether cannabinoid receptors are involved in the effects of estradiol on reactive astroglia. To test this hypothesis, the effects of estradiol, the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251, and the cannabinoid CB2 antagonist/inverse agonist AM630 were assessed in the cerebral cortex of male rats after a stab wound brain injury. Estradiol reduced the number of vimentin immunoreactive astrocytes and the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive astrocytes in the proximity of the wound. The effect of estradiol was significantly inhibited by the administration of either CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists. The effect of estradiol may be in part mediated by alterations in endocannabinoid signaling because the hormone increased in the injured cerebral cortex the messenger RNA levels of CB2 receptors and of some of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids. These findings suggest that estradiol may decrease reactive astroglia in the injured brain by regulating the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  11. Parkin expression profile in dopamine d3 receptor knock-out mice brains.

    PubMed

    D'Agata, Velia; Tiralongo, Adriana; Castorina, Alessandro; Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Drago, Filippo

    2009-02-01

    Patients affected by autosomic recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) exhibit parkin gene mutations with brain decrease in dopamine D2/D3 binding sites. To date, there are no data indicating whether the reduction in dopamine D3 receptors (DRD3) may be associated with the expression of specific parkin variants. In the present study we investigated parkin expression profile in DRD3 knock-out mice brains. RT-PCR analysis was performed to assess qualitative changes in parkin isoforms' distribution pattern and in exons' expression both in wild type controls and dopamine D3 receptor's knock-out mice. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify single exons mRNA. Results demonstrated that exons 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, were more expressed in wild type compared to dopamine D3 receptor KO mice brains while some other (3, 9, 10) were lower expressed. The expression levels of exons 5, 11 and 12 did not change in both animal groups. Our analysis was confirmed by western blot, which showed that parkin protein levels were influenced by the absence of DRD3.

  12. Phosphatase inhibitors remove the run-down of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the human epileptic brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Ragozzino, D. A.; Di Angelantonio, S.; Spinelli, G.; Trettel, F.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Torchia, G.; Arcella, A.; Di Gennaro, G.; Quarato, P. P.; Esposito, V.; Cantore, G.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAA receptors) microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes were compared with those recorded directly from neurons, or glial cells, in human brains slices. Cell membranes isolated from brain specimens, surgically obtained from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were injected into frog oocytes. Within a few hours, these oocytes acquired GABAA receptors that generated GABA currents with an unusual run-down, which was inhibited by orthovanadate and okadaic acid. In contrast, receptors derived from membranes of a nonepileptic hippocampal uncus, membranes from mouse brain, or recombinant rat α1β2γ2-GABA receptors exhibited a much less pronounced GABA-current run-down. Moreover, the GABAA receptors of pyramidal neurons in temporal neocortex slices from the same six epileptic patients exhibited a stronger run-down than the receptors of rat pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the GABAA receptors of neighboring glial cells remained substantially stable after repetitive activation. Therefore, the excessive GABA-current run-down observed in the membrane-injected oocytes recapitulates essentially what occurs in neurons, rather than in glial cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses from the same TLE neocortex specimens revealed that GABAA-receptor β1, β2, β3, and γ2 subunit mRNAs were significantly overexpressed (8- to 33-fold) compared with control autopsy tissues. Our results suggest that an abnormal GABA-receptor subunit transcription in the TLE brain leads to the expression of run-down-enhanced GABAA receptors. Blockage of phosphatases stabilizes the TLE GABAA receptors and strengthens GABAergic inhibition. It may be that this process can be targeted to develop new treatments for intractable epilepsy. PMID:15218107

  13. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  14. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  15. LP-211 is a brain penetrant selective agonist for the serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Peter B; Leopoldo, Marcello; Caccia, Silvio; Sarkisyan, Gor; Fracasso, Claudia; Martelli, Giuliana; Lacivita, Enza; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto

    2010-08-30

    We have determined the pharmacological profile of the new serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor agonist N-(4-cyanophenylmethyl)-4-(2-diphenyl)-1-piperazinehexanamide (LP-211). Radioligand binding assays were performed on a panel of 5-HT receptor subtypes. The compound was also evaluated in vivo by examining its effect on body temperature regulation in mice lacking the 5-HT(7) receptor (5-HT(7)(-/-)) and their 5-HT(7)(+/+) sibling controls. Disposition studies were performed in mice of both genotypes. It was found that LP-211 was brain penetrant and underwent metabolic degradation to 1-(2-diphenyl)piperazine (RA-7). In vitro binding assays revealed that RA-7 possessed higher 5-HT(7) receptor affinity than LP-211 and a better selectivity profile over a panel of 5-HT receptor subtypes. In vivo it was demonstrated that LP-211, and to a lesser degree RA-7, induced hypothermia in 5-HT(7)(+/+) but not in 5-HT(7)(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that LP-211 can be used as a 5-HT(7) receptor agonist in vivo. PMID:20600619

  16. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, Jason P.; Cuff, Simone M.; Yong, Audrey A.; Wang, Eddie C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members’ roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined. PMID:21861782

  17. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  18. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  19. Heteromeric α7β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Pei; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Shen, Jianxin; Whiteaker, Paul; Yakel, Jerrel L.

    2016-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is highly expressed in the brain, where it maintains various neuronal functions including (but not limited to) learning and memory. In addition, the protein expression levels of α7 nAChRs are altered in various brain disorders. The classic rule governing α7 nAChR assembly in the mammalian brain was that it was assembled from five α7 subunits to form a homomeric receptor pentamer. However, emerging evidence demonstrates the presence of heteromeric α7 nAChRs in heterologously expressed systems and naturally in brain neurons, where α7 subunits are co-assembled with β2 subunits to form a novel type of α7β2 nAChR. Interestingly, the α7β2 nAChR exhibits distinctive function and pharmacology from traditional homomeric α7 nAChRs. We review recent advances in probing the distribution, function, pharmacology, pathophysiology, and stoichiometry of the heteromeric α7β2 nAChR, which have provided new insights into the understanding of a novel target of cholinergic signaling. PMID:27179601

  20. Expression of β-adrenergic receptors in pediatric malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    SARDI, IACOPO; GIUNTI, LAURA; BRESCI, CECILIA; BUCCOLIERO, ANNA MARIA; DEGL’INNOCENTI, DUCCIO; CARDELLICCHIO, STEFANIA; BARONI, GIANNA; CASTIGLIONE, FRANCESCA; ROS, MARTINA DA; FIORINI, PATRIZIO; GIGLIO, SABRINA; GENITORI, LORENZO; ARICÒ, MAURIZIO; FILIPPI, LUCA

    2013-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors that activate signal transduction pathways involved in angiogenesis, resulting in enhanced tumor vascularization and more aggressive growth. In this study, we evaluated the expression of β-ARs in a population of 12 children affected by malignant primary brain tumors. We found a significant expression of β1- and β2-ARs in all 12 samples as well as the 3 cell lines tested (U87MG, T98G and DAOY). The mean absolute β1-AR mRNA level standardized to GAPDH was 5.81 (range, -7.91 to 11.29) for brain tumors and 8.59 (range, 6.046 to 12.59) for cell lines (U87MG, DAOY and T98G), respectively. The mean absolute β2-AR mRNA level was 4.74 (range, −9.30 to 8.45) for tumor specimens and 7.64 (range, 5.85 to 8.88) for cell lines. These real-time quantitative (qRT)-PCR expression data were confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Our study evaluated the presence of β1- and β2-ARs in malignant pediatric brain tumors and brain tumor cell lines. PMID:23255924

  1. (Development of gamma emitting, receptor-binding, radiotracers for imaging the brain and pancreas)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to Feb. 28, 1988. In studies to better understand the nature of the m-AChR receptor subtypes, we have generated a manuscript which has been submitted for publication in Life sciences entitled: The effect of chronic atropine and diisopropylfluorophosphate on rat brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype concentrations. We have also developed a more direct synthesis of 3-quinuclidinyl 4-iodobenzilate and its analogues. During this contract period, we have been involved with the synthesis of analogues 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). We have determined the affinity constants of various compounds synthesized this year for the muscarinic receptor from rat corpus striatum. We have continued our investigation of the m-AChR in pancreas. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. CGP 36216 is a selective antagonist at GABA(B) presynaptic receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Bexis, S; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I; Froestl, W

    2001-03-01

    In rat neocortical preparations maintained in Mg(2+)-free Krebs medium, baclofen depressed the frequency of spontaneous discharges in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) = 6 microM), sensitive to (3-aminopropyl)ethylphosphinic acid (CGP 36216) (100, 300 and 500 microM) (pA(2) = 3.9 +/- 0.1). By contrast, CGP 36216, up to 1 mM, was ineffective in antagonising baclofen-induced hyperpolarisations, mediated through gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) postsynaptic receptors. In electrically stimulated brain slices preloaded with [3H]GABA, CGP 36216 increased [3H]GABA release (IC(50) = 43 microM), which was reversed by baclofen (20 microM). While CGP 36216 is ineffective at GABA(B) postsynaptic receptors, it is appreciably more active at presynaptic receptors.

  3. Multiple opioid receptor binding in dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; James, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Dissociated intact guinea pig brain cells were prepared by the method of Rogers and El-Fakahany. Over 95% of these cells are viable as demonstrated by their exclusion of the dye trypan blue. Opioid receptor binding assays were performed in a modified Kreb-Ringers physiological buffer. The following radiolabeled ligands and conditions were used to selectively labeled multiple opioid receptors: mu binding, 1 nM (/sup 3/H)naloxone + 20 nM DADLE + 300 nM U50,488H; kappa binding, 4 nM (-)-(/sup 3/H)-EKC + 100 nM DAGO + 500 nM DADLE; delta binding, 2 nM (/sup 3/H)-DADLE + 100 nM DAGO + 300 nM U50,488H; sigma binding, 4 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. The intact brain cells in physiological buffer demonstrated specific binding for mu, kappa, delta, and sigma receptors. The relative binding potency of naloxone for each of the receptor types is arbitrarily set at 1.

  4. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  5. Discrete mapping of brain Mu and delta opioid receptors using selective peptides: Quantitative autoradiography, species differences and comparison with kappa receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, N.A.; Hughes, J. )

    1989-05-01

    The opioid peptides, (3H)DAGO and (3H)DPDPE, bound to rat and guinea pig brain homogenates with a high, nanomolar affinity and to a high density of mu and delta receptors, respectively. (3H)DAGO binding to mu receptors was competitively inhibited by unlabelled opioids with the following rank order of potency: DAGO greater than morphine greater than DADLE greater than naloxone greater than etorphine much greater than U50488 much greater than DPDPE. In contrast, (3H)DPDPE binding to delta receptors was inhibited by compounds with the following rank order of potency: DPDPE greater than DADLE greater than etorphine greater than dynorphin(1-8) greater than naloxone much greater than U50488 much greater than DAGO. These profiles were consistent with specific labelling of the mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively. In vitro autoradiographic techniques coupled with computer-assisted image analyses revealed a discrete but differential anatomical localization of mu and delta receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain. In general, mu and delta receptor density in the rat exceeded that in the guinea pig brain and differed markedly from that of kappa receptors in these species. However, while mu receptors were distributed throughout the brain with hotspots in the fore-, mid- and hindbrain of the two rodents, the delta sites were relatively diffusely distributed, and were mainly concentrated in the forebrain with particularly high levels within the olfactory bulb (OB), n. accumbens and striatum. Notable regions of high density of mu receptors in the rat and guinea pig brain were the accessory olfactory bulb, striatal patches and streaks, amygdaloid nuclei, ventral hippocampal subiculum and dentate gyrus, numerous thalamic nuclei, geniculate bodies, central grey, superior and inferior colliculi, solitary and pontine nuclei and s. nigra.

  6. In vivo occupancy of female rat brain estrogen receptors by 17beta-estradiol and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Pareto, D; Alvarado, M; Hanrahan, S M; Biegon, A

    2004-11-01

    Estrogens or antiestrogens are currently used by millions of women, but the interaction of these hormonal agents with brain estrogen receptors (ER) in vivo has not been characterized to date. Our goal was to assess, in vivo, the extent and regional distribution of brain ER occupancy in rats chronically exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen (TAM). For that purpose, female ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with subcutaneous pellets containing either placebo (OVX), E(2), or TAM for 3 weeks. ER occupancy in grossly dissected regions was quantified with 16alpha-[(18)F]fluoroestradiol ([(18)F]FES). Both E(2) and TAM produced significant decreases in radioligand uptake in the brain although the effect of E(2) was larger and more widespread than the effect of TAM. Detailed regional analysis of the interaction was then undertaken using a radioiodinated ligand, 11beta-methoxy-16alpha-[(125)I]iodo-estradiol ([(125)I]MIE(2)), and quantitative ex vivo autoradiography. E(2) treatment resulted in near-complete (86.6 +/- 17.5%) inhibition of radioligand accumulation throughout the brain, while ER occupancy in the TAM group showed a marked regional distribution such that percentage inhibition ranged from 40.5 +/- 15.6 in the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus to 84.6 +/- 4.5 in the cortical amygdala. These results show that exposure to pharmacologically relevant levels of TAM produces a variable, region-specific pattern of brain ER occupancy, which may be influenced by the regional proportion of ER receptor subtypes. These findings may partially explain the highly variable and region-specific effects observed in neurochemical, metabolic, and functional studies of the effects of TAM in the brain of experimental animals as well as human subjects.

  7. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration.

  8. STATISTICAL APPROACH TO BRAIN MORPHOMETRY DATA REQUIRED IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY (DNT) TESTING GUIDELINES: PROFILE ANALYSIS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain morphometry measurements are required in test guidelines proposed by the USEPA to screen chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. Because the DNT is a screening battery, the analysis of this data should be sensitive to dose-related changes in the pattern of brain growt...

  9. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 Contributes to the Astrocyte Swelling and Brain Edema in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.R.; Valdes, V.; Tong, X.Y.; Shamaladevi, N.; Gonzalez, W.; Norenberg, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte swelling (cytotoxic brain edema) is the major neurological complication of acute liver failure (ALF), a condition in which ammonia has been strongly implicated in its etiology. Ion channels and transporters are known to be involved in cell volume regulation and a disturbance in these systems may result in cell swelling. One ion channel known to contribute to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in other neurological disorders is the ATP-dependent, non-selective cation channel (NCCa-ATP channel). We therefore examined its potential role in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema associated with ALF. Cultured astrocytes treated with 5 mM ammonia showed a 3-fold increase in the sulfonylurea receptor type 1 (SUR1) protein expression, a marker of NCCa-ATP channel activity. Blocking SUR1 with glibenclamide significantly reduced the ammonia-induced cell swelling in cultured astrocytes. Additionally, overexpression of SUR1 in ammonia-treated cultured astrocytes was significantly reduced by co-treatment of cells with BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB, indicating the involvement of an NF-κB-mediated SUR1 upregulation in the mechanism of ammonia-induced astrocyte swelling. Brain SUR1 mRNA level was also found to be increased in the thioacetamide (TAA) rat model of ALF. Additionally, we found a significant increase in SUR1 protein expression in rat brain cortical astrocytes in TAA-treated rats. Treatment with glibenclamide significantly reduced the brain edema in this model of ALF. These findings strongly suggest the involvement of NCCa-ATP channel in the astrocyte swelling/brain edema in ALF, and that targeting this channel may represent a useful approach for the treatment of the brain edema associated with ALF. PMID:24443056

  10. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  11. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions.

  12. Localization of tachykinin receptors and Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by substance P in guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Yip, J; Chahl, L A

    2000-11-01

    1. In the present study, a comparison was made between the distribution of tachykinin NK1 and NK3 receptor immunoreactivity and the distribution of Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by the tachykinin agonist substance P (SP) in the guinea-pig brain. 2. In agreement with results from previous studies in rat brain, NK1 receptor-immunoreactive neurons were found to be widely distributed throughout the brain in the striatum and in diencephalic and mesencephalic structures, while NK3 receptor-immunoreactive neurons were mainly in telencephalic structures. Considerable overlap was observed between NK1 and NK3 receptor distributions. 3. Substance P induced Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) in extensive areas of the guinea-pig brain. The induction of Fos-LI was markedly inhibited in many areas by pretreatment with the NK1 receptor antagonist SR 140333. The NK3 receptor antagonist SR 142801 reduced Fos-LI staining in fewer areas, although a reduction was observed in the cortex, striatum and hypothalamus. 4. In general, tachykinin receptors were located at sites corresponding to areas of functional activation by SP, as shown by Fos-LI. These results extend previous studies by adding a functional dimension to tachykinin receptor localization studies.

  13. The localization and physiological effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the brain stem auditory system of the chick

    PubMed Central

    Stincic, Todd L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Fast, temporally-precise, and consistent synaptic transmission is required to encode features of acoustic stimuli. Neurons of nucleus magnocellularis (NM) in the auditory brain stem of the chick possess numerous adaptations to optimize the coding of temporal information. One potential problem for the system is the depression of synaptic transmission during a prolonged stimulus. The present studies tested the hypothesis that cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) signaling may limit synaptic depression at the auditory nerve-NM synapse. In situ hybridization was used to confirm that CB1 mRNA is expressed in the cochlear ganglion; immunohistochemistry was used to confirm the presence of CB1 protein in NM. These findings are consistent with the common presynaptic locus of CB1 in the brain. Rate-dependent synaptic depression was then examined in a brain slice preparation before and after administration of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), a potent CB1 agonist. WIN decreased the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents and also reduced depression across a train of stimuli. The effect was most obvious late in the pulse train and during high rates of stimulation. This CB1-mediated influence could allow for lower, but more consistent activation of NM neurons, which could be of importance for optimizing the coding of prolonged, temporally-locked acoustic stimuli. PMID:21703331

  14. Ontogenic increase in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha receptor density in brain microvessels of pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D. Y.; Varma, D. R.; Chemtob, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the relative vasoconstrictor ineffectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2 alpha on cerebral vessels of newborn pigs might be due to fewer receptors for these prostanoids was tested by comparing receptors for PGE2 (EP) and PGF2 alpha (FP) in cerebral microvessels from newborn and adult pigs. 2. Specific binding of [3H]-PGE2 and [3H]-PGF2 alpha to membranes prepared from brain microvessels showed that EP and FP receptor density (Bmax) in tissues from newborn animals was less than 50% of that determined in tissues from adults. By contrast, estimates of affinity (KD) were unchanged. 3. Specifically bound [3H]-PGE2 to brain microvessels from both the newborn and adult was displaced by AH 6809 (EP1-selective antagonist) by 80-90%, and only by approximately 30-35% by both 11-deoxy PGE1 (EP2/EP3 agonist) and M&B 28,767 (EP3 agonist); butaprost (EP2 agonist) was completely ineffective. 4. PGE2, 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 (EP1 agonist), PGF2 alpha and fenprostalene (PGF2 alpha analogue) caused significantly less increase in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in brain microvessels from the newborn than in those from adult pigs. The stimulation of IP3 by PGE2 and 17-phenyl trinor PGE2 was almost completely inhibited by the EP1 antagonist, AH 6809. 5. PGE2, 11-deoxy PGE1 and M&B 28,767 produced small reduction of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in adult vessels but no effect in newborn tissues. 6. The lower density of EP and FP receptors in microvessels of newborn pigs compared to adults may explain the reduced ability of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha to stimulate production of IP3 in tissues from newborn animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032662

  15. Methamphetamine neurotoxicity increases brain expression and alters behavioral functions of CB₁ cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Marco; Frau, Roberto; Bini, Valentina; Luesu, William; Loriga, Roberta; Collu, Maria; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Ennas, M Grazia; Castelli, M Paola

    2010-10-01

    Cannabis is the most common secondary illicit substance in methamphetamine (METH) users, yet the outcomes of the concurrent consumption of both substances remain elusive. Capitalizing on recent findings on the implication of CB₁ cannabinoid receptors in the behavioral effects of METH, we hypothesized that METH-induced neurotoxicity may alter the brain expression of CB₁, thereby affecting its role in behavioral functions. To test this possibility, we subjected rats to a well-characterized model of METH neurotoxicity (4 mg/kg, subcutaneous × 4 injections, 2 h apart), and analyzed their CB₁ receptor brain expression three weeks later. METH exposure resulted in significant enhancements of CB₁ receptor expression across several brain regions, including prefrontal cortex, caudate-putamen, basolateral amygdala, CA1 hippocampal region and perirhinal cortex. In parallel, a different group of METH-exposed rats was used to explore the responsiveness to the potent cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) (0.5-1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), within several paradigms for the assessment of emotional and cognitive functions, such as open field, object exploration and recognition, and startle reflex. WIN induced anxiolytic-like effects in METH-exposed rats and anxiogenic-like effects in saline-treated controls. Furthermore, METH-exposed animals exhibited a significantly lower impact of WIN on the attenuation of exploratory behaviors and short-term (90 min) recognition memory. Conversely, METH neurotoxicity did not significantly affect WIN-induced reductions in locomotor activity, exploration time and acoustic startle. These results suggest that METH neurotoxicity may alter the vulnerability to select behavioral effects of cannabis, by inducing distinct regional variations in the expression of CB₁ receptors.

  16. Neurotrophin Receptor Activation and Expression in Human Postmortem Brain: Effect of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Zhang, Hui; Mondal, Amal C.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Conley, Robert R.; Pandey, Ghanshyam N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The physiological functions of neurotrophins occur through binding to two different receptors: pan75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and a family of tropomysin receptor kinases (Trks A, B, and C). Recently, we reported that expression of neurotrophins and TrkB were reduced in brains of suicide subjects. Present study examines whether expression and activation of Trk receptors and expression of p75NTR are altered in brain of these subjects. Methods Expression levels of TrkA, B, C, and of p75NTR were measured by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of suicide and normal control subjects. The activation of Trks was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting using phosphotyrosine antibody. Results In hippocampus, lower mRNA levels of TrkA and TrkC were observed in suicide subjects. In the PFC, the mRNA level of TrkA was decreased, without any change in TrkC. On the other hand, the mRNA level of p75NTR was increased in both PFC and hippocampus. Immunolabeling studies showed similar results as observed for the mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of all Trks was decreased in hippocampus, but in PFC, decreased phosphorylation was noted only for TrkA and B. Increased expression ratios of p75NTR to Trks were also observed in PFC and hippocampus of suicide subjects. Conclusions Our results suggest not only reduced functioning of Trks in brains of suicide subjects but that increased ratios of p75NTR to Trks indicate possible activation of pathways that are apoptotic in nature. These findings may be crucial in the pathophysiology of suicide. PMID:18930453

  17. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  18. GLP-1 receptor signaling is not required for reduced body weight after RYGB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianping; Hao, Zheng; Mumphrey, Michael B; Townsend, R Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M; Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher D; Drucker, Daniel J; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Exaggerated GLP-1 and PYY secretion is thought to be a major mechanism in the reduced food intake and body weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Here, we use complementary pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function approaches to test the role of increased signaling by these gut hormones in high-fat diet-induced obese rodents. Chronic brain infusion of a supramaximal dose of the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-9-39 into the lateral cerebral ventricle significantly increased food intake and body weight in both RYGB and sham-operated rats, suggesting that, while contributing to the physiological control of food intake and body weight, central GLP-1 receptor signaling tone is not the critical mechanism uniquely responsible for the body weight-lowering effects of RYGB. Central infusion of the selective Y2R-antagonist BIIE0246 had no effect in either group, suggesting that it is not critical for the effects of RYGB on body weight under the conditions tested. In a recently established mouse model of RYGB that closely mimics surgery and weight loss dynamics in humans, obese GLP-1R-deficient mice lost the same amount of body weight and fat mass and maintained similarly lower body weight compared with wild-type mice. Together, the results surprisingly provide no support for important individual roles of either gut hormone in the specific mechanisms by which RYGB rats settle at a lower body weight. It is likely that the beneficial effects of bariatric surgeries are expressed through complex mechanisms that require combination approaches for their identification.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Is Required for Opioid-Induced Microglia Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Junying; Jiang, Yulin; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Zuoxiang; Hanley, Gregory; Li, Yi; Zhang, Xiumei; LeSage, Gene; Peng, Ying; Yin, Deling

    2011-01-01

    Opioids have been widely applied in clinics as one of the most potent pain relievers for centuries, but their abuse has deleterious physiological effects beyond addiction. However, the underlying mechanism by which microglia in response to opioids remains largely unknown. Here we show that morphine induces the expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), a key mediator of innate immunity and inflammation. Interestingly, TLR9 deficiency significantly inhibited morphine-induced apoptosis in microglia. Similar results were obtained when endogenous TLR9 expression was suppressed by the TLR9 inhibitor CpGODN. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by its specific inhibitor SB203580 attenuated morphine-induced microglia apoptosis in wild type microglia. Morphine caused a dramatic decrease in Bcl-2 level but increase in Bax level in wild type microglia, but not in TLR9 deficient microglia. In addition, morphine treatment failed to induce an increased levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and MAP kinase kinase 3/6 (MKK3/6), the upstream MAPK kinase of p38 MAPK, in either TLR9 deficient or µ-opioid receptor (µOR) deficient primary microglia, suggesting an involvement of MAPK and µOR in morphine-mediated TLR9 signaling. Moreover, morphine-induced TLR9 expression and microglia apoptosis appears to require μOR. Collectively, these results reveal that opioids prime microglia to undergo apoptosis through TLR9 and µOR as well. Taken together, our data suggest that inhibition of TLR9 and/or blockage of µOR is capable of preventing opioid-induced brain damage. PMID:21559519

  20. Augmenting NMDA receptor signaling boosts experience-dependent neuroplasticity in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Jennifer K.; Bachman, Peter; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Roach, Brian J.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity is a fundamental property of the brain. It is critical for everyday function, is impaired in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and frequently depends on long-term potentiation (LTP). Preclinical studies suggest that augmenting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling may promote experience-dependent plasticity; however, a lack of noninvasive methods has limited our ability to test this idea in humans until recently. We examined the effects of enhancing NMDAR signaling using d-cycloserine (DCS) on a recently developed LTP EEG paradigm that uses high-frequency visual stimulation (HFvS) to induce neural potentiation in visual cortex neurons, as well as on three cognitive tasks: a weather prediction task (WPT), an information integration task (IIT), and a n-back task. The WPT and IIT are learning tasks that require practice with feedback to reach optimal performance. The n-back assesses working memory. Healthy adults were randomized to receive DCS (100 mg; n = 32) or placebo (n = 33); groups were similar in IQ and demographic characteristics. Participants who received DCS showed enhanced potentiation of neural responses following repetitive HFvS, as well as enhanced performance on the WPT and IIT. Groups did not differ on the n-back. Augmenting NMDAR signaling using DCS therefore enhanced activity-dependent plasticity in human adults, as demonstrated by lasting enhancement of neural potentiation following repetitive HFvS and accelerated acquisition of two learning tasks. Results highlight the utility of considering cellular mechanisms underlying distinct cognitive functions when investigating potential cognitive enhancers. PMID:26621715

  1. Brain stem adenosine receptors modulate centrally mediated hypotensive responses in conscious rats: A review.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Noha N; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine is implicated in the modulation of cardiovascular responses either at the peripheral or at central level in experimental animals. However, there are no dedicated reviews on the involvement of adenosine in mediating the hypotensive response of centrally administered clonidine in general and specifically in aortically barodenervated rats (ABD). The conscious ABD rat model exhibits surgically induced baroreflex dysfunction and exaggerated hypotensive response, compared with conscious sham-operated (SO) rats. The current review focuses on, the role of adenosine receptors in blood pressure (BP) regulation and their possible crosstalk with other receptors e.g. imidazoline (I1) and alpha (α2A) adrenergic receptor (AR). The former receptor is a molecular target for clonidine, whose hypotensive effect is enhanced approx. 3-fold in conscious ABD rats. We also discussed how the balance between the brain stem adenosine A1 and A2A receptors is regulated by baroreceptors and how such balance influences the centrally mediated hypotensive responses. The use of the ABD rat model yielded insight into the downstream signaling cascades following clonidine-evoked hypotension in a surgical model of baroreflex dysfunction. PMID:26257930

  2. Position 4 substituted somatostatin analogs: increased binding to somatostatin receptors in pituitary and brain.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Coy, D H; Patel, Y C

    1983-07-11

    Somatostatin (S-14) analogs with Phe4 substitutions bound to pituitary and cerebrocortical S-14 receptors more avidly than did S-14. The 2-4 fold greater affinities of the Phe4 S-14 as well as analogs with structural modification of the Phe4 residue for binding to pituitary S-14 receptors showed good correlation with their reported potencies for in vivo Gh inhibition. In the cerebral cortex, [Phe4] S-14, [Phe4, D-Trp8] S-14 and [F5-Phe4] S14 were 2-3 times more potent while [p-NH2-Phe4] S-14 was 6 times more potent compared to S-14 in binding to S-14 receptors. The increased binding affinities of the Phe4 analogs in these two tissues does not appear to be due to differential stability of the analogs compared to S-14 under the experimental conditions used. [Thr4] S-14 exhibited very low binding in both these tissues. Thus structural modification of the position 4 moiety of the S-14 molecule does not result in dissociated affinities for binding to S-14 receptors in the brain and the pituitary. The increased receptor binding affinities of the Phe4 analogs in the cerebral cortex suggest that they may be more potent than S-14 in the CNS.

  3. Astroglial CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate leptin signaling in mouse brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bosier, Barbara; Bellocchio, Luigi; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Matias, Isabelle; Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Cannich, Astrid; Maitre, Marlène; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Cardinal, Pierre; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Canduela, Miren Josune; Reguero, Leire; Hermans, Emmanuel; Grandes, Pedro; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) and leptin (ObR) receptors regulate metabolic and astroglial functions, but the potential links between the two systems in astrocytes were not investigated so far. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of CB1 receptor expression and activity in cultured cortical and hypothalamic astrocytes demonstrated that cannabinoid signaling controls the levels of ObR expression. Lack of CB1 receptors also markedly impaired leptin-mediated activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 and 5 (STAT3 and STAT5) in astrocytes. In particular, CB1 deletion determined a basal overactivation of STAT5, thereby leading to the downregulation of ObR expression, and leptin failed to regulate STAT5-dependent glycogen storage in the absence of CB1 receptors. These results show that CB1 receptors directly interfere with leptin signaling and its ability to regulate glycogen storage, thereby representing a novel mechanism linking endocannabinoid and leptin signaling in the regulation of brain energy storage and neuronal functions.

  4. Reduced expression of the TrkB receptor in Huntington's disease mouse models and in human brain.

    PubMed

    Ginés, Silvia; Bosch, Miquel; Marco, Sonia; Gavaldà, Núria; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Lucas, José J; Canals, Josep M; Alberch, Jordi

    2006-02-01

    Deficits of neurotrophic support caused by reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in the selective vulnerability of striatal neurones in Huntington's disease (HD). Therapeutic strategies based on BDNF administration have been proposed to slow or prevent the disease progression. However, the effectiveness of BDNF may depend on the proper expression of its receptor TrkB. In this study, we analysed the expression of TrkB in several HD models and in postmortem HD brains. We found a specific reduction of TrkB receptors in transgenic exon-1 and full-length knock-in HD mouse models and also in the motor cortex and caudate nucleus of HD brains. Our findings also demonstrated that continuous expression of mutant huntingtin is required to down-regulate TrkB levels. This was shown by findings in an inducible HD mouse model showing rescue of TrkB by turning off mutant huntingtin expression. Interestingly, the length of the polyglutamine tract in huntingtin appears to modulate the reduction of TrkB. Finally, to analyse the effect of BDNF in TrkB we compared TrkB expression in mutant huntingtin R6/1 and double mutant (R6/1 : BDNF+/-) mice. Similar TrkB expression was found in both transgenic mice suggesting that reduced TrkB is not a direct consequence of decreased BDNF. Therefore, taken together our findings identify TrkB as an additional component that potentially might contribute to the altered neurotrophic support in HD.

  5. Photoperiodic regulation of androgen receptor and steroid receptor coactivator-1 in Siberian hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Tetel, Marc J; Ungar, Todd C; Hassan, Brett; Bittman, Eric L

    2004-11-24

    Seasonal changes in the neuroendocrine actions of gonadal steroid hormones are triggered by fluctuations in daylength. The mechanisms responsible for photoperiodic influences upon the feedback and behavioral effects of testosterone in Siberian hamsters are poorly understood. We hypothesized that daylength regulates the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and/or steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) in specific forebrain regions. Hamsters were castrated and implanted with either oil-filled capsules or low doses of testosterone; half of the animals remained in 16L/8D and the rest were kept in 10L/14D for the ensuing 70 days. The number of AR-immunoreactive (AR-ir) cells was regulated by testosterone in medial amygdala and caudal arcuate, and by photoperiod in the medial preoptic nucleus and the posterodorsal medial amygdala. A significant interaction between photoperiod and androgen treatment was found in medial preoptic nucleus and posterodorsal medial amygdala. The molecular weight and distribution of SRC-1 were similar to reports in other rodent species, and short days reduced the number of SRC-1-ir cells in posteromedial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and posterodorsal medial amygdala. A significant interaction between androgen treatment and daylength in regulation of SRC-1-ir was found in anterior medial amygdala. The present results indicate that daylength-induced fluctuations in SRC-1 and AR expression may contribute to seasonally changing effects of testosterone.

  6. Continuous blockade of brain glucocorticoid receptors facilitates spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Oitzl, M S; Fluttert, M; Sutanto, W; de Kloet, E R

    1998-12-01

    Previously, a corticosterone surge associated with a learning task was shown to facilitate cognitive processes through brain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) while chronic overexposure to this stress hormone impaired cognition. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that opposing effects on learning and memory might also occur after either phasic or continuous blockade of brain GR by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the GR antagonist RU38486 (aGR). We used a Morris water maze procedure to assess spatial learning and memory abilities in male Wistar rats. The effect of phasic brain GR blockade was studied following daily pretraining administration of 10 and 100 ng/microL aGR i.c.v. on 3 consecutive days. This repetitive aGR treatment impaired spatial learning and memory dose-dependently in comparison with vehicle controls. For continuous brain GR blockade, animals received an i.c.v., infusion of aGR (10 and 100 ng/0.5 microL per h or vehicle) over 10 days. Infusion of 100 ng aGR per hour resulted in a long-lasting facilitation of spatial performance. The 10 ng aGR infusion also caused initially a facilitating effect, which was, however, transient and performance became impaired during retest. Possible anxiolytic properties of the drugs were excluded in view of the animals' behaviour in the elevated plus maze. Both doses of aGR infusion reduced the number of mineralocorticoid receptors in the hippocampus, but only the high dose of aGR resulted in a significant reduction of available GR sites. In conclusion, continuous administration of GR antagonist improves cognitive function, while phasic blockade of brain GR function causes a cognitive deficit.

  7. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R(-/-)) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction size evaluated. Flow cytometry was performed on brain-infiltrating cells, and semi-automated analysis of flow cytometric data was applied. A1R(-/-) mice displayed larger infarctions (+33%, p < 0.05) and performed worse in beam walking tests (44% more mistakes, p < 0.05) than wild-type (WT) mice. Myeloid cell activation after injury was enhanced in A1R(-/-) versus WT brains. Activated B lymphocytes expressing IL-10 infiltrated the brain after HI in WT, but were less activated and did not increase in relative frequency in A1R(-/-). Also, A1R(-/-) B lymphocytes expressed less IL-10 than their WT counterparts, the A1R antagonist DPCPX decreased IL-10 expression whereas the A1R agonist CPA increased it. CD4(+) T lymphocytes including FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells, were unaffected by genotype, whereas CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses were smaller in A1R(-/-) mice. Using PCA to characterize the immune profile, we could discriminate the A1R(-/-) and WT genotypes as well as sham operated from HI-subjected animals. We conclude that A1R signaling modulates IL-10 expression by immune cells, influences the activation of these cells in vivo, and affects outcome after HI. PMID:26608888

  8. Selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate reactive microglia after penetrating brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, George E.; Santos-Galindo, Maria; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Following brain injury, microglia assume a reactive-like state and secrete pro-inflammatory molecules that can potentiate damage. A therapeutic strategy that may limit microgliosis is of potential interest. In this context, selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are known to reduce microglia activation induced by neuroinflammatory stimuli in young animals. In the present study, we have assessed whether raloxifene and tamoxifen are able to affect microglia activation after brain injury in young and aged animals in time points relevant to clinics, which is hours after brain trauma. Volume fraction of MHC-II+ microglia was estimated according to the point-counting method of Weibel within a distance of 350 μm from the lateral border of the wound, and cellular morphology was measured by fractal analysis. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) young rats, ovariectomized at 2 months of age; and (2) aged rats, ovariectomized at 18 months of age. Fifteen days after ovariectomy animals received a stab wound brain injury and the treatment with estrogenic compounds. Our findings indicate that raloxifene and tamoxifen reduced microglia activation in both young and aged animals. Although the volume fraction of reactive microglia was found lower in aged animals, this was accompanied by important changes in cell morphology, where aged microglia assume a bushier and hyperplasic aspect when compared to young microglia. These data suggest that early regulation of microglia activation provides a mechanism by which selective estrogen receptors modulators (SERMs) may exert a neuroprotective effect in the setting of a brain trauma. PMID:24999330

  9. REGULATION OF NETRIN-1 RECEPTORS BY AMPHETAMINE IN THE ADULT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    YETNIKOFF, L.; LABELLE-DUMAIS, C.; FLORES, C.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 is a guidance cue molecule fundamental to the organization of neuronal connectivity during development. Netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and UNC-5 homologues (UNC-5), continue to be expressed in the adult brain, although neither their function nor the kinds of events that activate their expression are known. Two lines of evidence suggest a role for netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced dopamine plasticity in the adult. First, DCC is highly expressed by adult dopamine neurons. Second, adult mice with reduced DCC levels do not develop amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization. To explore the role of netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced plasticity, we examined the effects of sensitizing treatment regimens of amphetamine on DCC and/or UNC-5 protein expression in the adult rat. These treatments produced striking and enduring increases in DCC and UNC-5 expression in the cell body, but not terminal regions, of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Notably, neuroadaptations in the cell body region of mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons underlie the development of sensitization to the effects of amphetamine. Furthermore, these localized amphetamine-induced changes were prevented by co-treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, a treatment known to block the development of amphetamine-induced sensitization of behavioral activation, dopamine release and motivated behavior. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that both DCC and UNC-5 receptors are highly expressed by adult mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons. These results provide the first evidence that repeated exposure to a stimulant drug such as amphetamine affects netrin-1 receptor expression in the adult brain. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in netrin-1 receptor expression may play a role in the lasting effects of exposure to amphetamine and other stimulant drugs. PMID:17996376

  10. Fourteen. beta. -(bromoacetamido)morphine irreversibly labels. mu. opioid receptors in rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bidlack, J.M.; Frey, D.K.; Seyed-Mozaffari, A.; Archer, S. )

    1989-05-16

    The binding properties of 14{beta}-(bromoacetamido)morphine (BAM) and the ability of BAM to irreversibly inhibit opioid binding to rat brain membranes were examined to characterize the affinity and selectivity of BAM as an irreversible affinity ligand for opioid receptors. BAM had the same receptor selectivity as morphine, with a 3-5-fold decrease in affinity for the different types of opioid receptors. When brain membranes were incubated with BAM, followed by extensive washing, opioid binding was restored to control levels. However, when membranes were incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT), followed by BAM, and subsequently washed, 90% of the 0.25 nM ({sup 3}H)(D-Ala{sup 2},(Me)Phe{sup 4},Gly(ol){sup 5})enkephalin (DAGO) binding was irreversibly inhibited as a result of the specific alkylation of a sulfhydryl group at the {mu} binding site. This inhibition was dependent on the concentrations of both DTT and BAM. The {mu} receptor specificity of BAM alkylation was demonstrated by the ability of BAM alkylated membranes to still bind the {delta}-selective peptide ({sup 3}H)(D-penicillamine{sup 2},D-penicillamine{sup 5})enkephalin (DPDPE) and (-)-({sup 3}H)bremazocine in the presence of {mu} and {delta} blockers, selective for {kappa} binding sites. Morphine and naloxone partially protected the binding site from alkylation with BAM, while ligands that did not bind to the {mu}s site did not afford protection. These studies have demonstrated that when a disulfide bond at or near {mu} opioid binding sites was reduced, BAM could then alkylate this site, resulting in the specific irreversible labeling of {mu} opioid receptors.

  11. Shedding of soluble platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β from human brain pericytes.

    PubMed

    Sagare, Abhay P; Sweeney, Melanie D; Makshanoff, Jacob; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-10-21

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ) is expressed in the brain by vascular mural cells-brain capillary pericytes and arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Recent evidence shows that blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and increased permeability, especially in the hippocampus, positively correlates with elevated levels of soluble PDGFRβ (sPDGFRβ) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with mild dementia. To determine which vascular cell type(s) contributes to increased sPDGFRβ in CSF, we compared PDGFRβ expression and sPDGFRβ shedding in response to injury in early passage primary cultures of human brain pericytes, brain arterial VSMCs, and brain endothelial cells. PDGFRβ protein was undetectable in endothelial cells, but was found both in pericytes and VSMCs. PDGFRβ relative protein abundance was by 4.2-fold (p<0.05) higher in pericytes compared to VSMCs. Hypoxia (1% O2) or amyloid-β peptide (25 μM) compared to normoxia (21% O2) both increased over 48 h shedding of sPDGFRβ and its levels in the culture medium from pericytes cultures, but not from VSMCs cultures, by 4.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively, compared to the basal sPDGFRβ levels in the medium (1.43±0.15 ng/ml). This was associated with the corresponding loss of cell-associated PDGFRβ from pericytes and no change in cellular levels of PDGFRβ in VSMCs. Thus, sPDGFRβ is a biomarker of pericyte injury, and elevated sPDGFRβ levels in biofluids in patients with dementia and/or other neurodegenerative disorders likely reflects pericyte injury, which supports the potential for sPDGFRβ to be developed and validated as a biomarker of brain pericyte injury and BBB dysfunction.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptors in Bergmann glia cells.

    PubMed

    Poblete-Naredo, Irais; Guillem, Alain M; Juárez, Claudia; Zepeda, Rossana C; Ramírez, Leticia; Caba, Mario; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Aguilera, José; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is an abundant and widely distributed neurotrophin expressed in the Central Nervous System. It is critically involved in neuronal differentiation and survival. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and that of its catalytic active cognate receptor (TrkB) has been extensively studied in neuronal cells but their expression and function in glial cells is still controversial. Despite of this fact, brain-derived neurotrophic factor is released from astrocytes upon glutamate stimulation. A suitable model to study glia/neuronal interactions, in the context of glutamatergic synapses, is the well-characterized culture of chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells. Using, this system, we show here that BDNF and its functional receptor are present in Bergmann glia and that BDNF stimulation is linked to the activation of the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase/protein kinase C/mitogen-activated protein kinase/Activator Protein-1 signaling pathway. Accordingly, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments predicted the expression of full-length and truncated TrkB isoforms. Our results suggest that Bergmann glia cells are able to express and respond to BDNF stimulation favoring the notion of their pivotal role in neuroprotection.

  13. Characterization and localization of arginine vasotocin receptors in the brain and kidney of an amphibian

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Because arginine vasotocin (AVT) activates male sexual behaviors in the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa), quantitative autoradiography with radiolabeled arginine vasopressin (/sup 3/H-AVP) was used to localize and characterize putative AVT receptors in the brain of this amphibian. Binding of /sup 3/H-AVP to sites within the medial pallium was saturable, specific, reversible, of high affinity and low capacity. These binding sites appear to represent authentic central nervous system receptors for AVT. Furthermore, ligand specificity for the binding sites in this amphibian differs from that reported for AVP binding sites in rat brains. Dense concentrations of specific binding sites were located in the olfactory nerve as it entered the olfactory bulb within the medial pallium, dorsal pallium, and amygdala pars lateralis of the telencephalon, and in the tegmental region of the medulla. Concentrations of binding sites differed significantly among various brain regions. A comparison of male and female newts collected during the breeding season revealed no sexual dimorphism. These areas may represent site(s) of action where AVT elicits sexual behaviors in male T. granulosa.

  14. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.T.; Adkins-Regan, E.; Whiting, P.; Lindstrom, J.M.; Podleski, T.R.

    1988-08-08

    We have localized nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the zebra finch brain by using three 125I-labelled ligands: alpha bungarotoxin and two monoclonal antibodies to neuronal nicotinic receptors. Unfixed brains from intact adult male and female zebra finches were prepared for in vitro autoradiography. Low-resolution film autoradiograms and high-resolution emulsion autoradiograms were prepared for each of the three ligands. The major brain structures that bind all three of the ligands are hippocampus; hyperstriatum dorsalis; hyperstriatum ventralis; nucleus lentiformis mesencephali; nucleus pretectalis, some layers of the optic tectum; nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis; pars dorsalis; locus ceruleus; and all cranial motor nuclei except nucleus nervi hypoglossi. The major structures labelled only by (125I)-alpha bungarotoxin binding included hyperstriatum accessorium and the nuclei: preopticus medialis, medialis hypothalami posterioris, semilunaris, olivarius inferior, and the periventricular organ. Of the song control nuclei, nucleus magnocellularis of the anterior neostriatum; hyperstriatum ventralis, pars caudalis; nucleus intercollicularis; and nucleus hypoglossus were labelled. The binding patterns of the two antibodies were similar to one another but not identical. Both labelled nucleus spiriformis lateralis and nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis especially heavily and also labelled the nucleus habenula medialis; nucleus subpretectalis; nucleus isthmi, pars magnocellularis; nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis; nucleus reticularis lateralis; nucleus tractus solitarii; nucleus vestibularis dorsolateralis; nucleus vestibularis lateralis; nucleus descendens nervi trigemini; and the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  15. Lactate receptor sites link neurotransmission, neurovascular coupling, and brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Morland, Cecilie; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Hagelin, Else Marie; Lauritzen, Fredrik; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Gjedde, Albert; Bergersen, Linda H

    2014-10-01

    The G-protein-coupled lactate receptor, GPR81 (HCA1), is known to promote lipid storage in adipocytes by downregulating cAMP levels. Here, we show that GPR81 is also present in the mammalian brain, including regions of the cerebral neocortex and hippocampus, where it can be activated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the specific GPR81 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP. Cerebral GPR81 is concentrated on the synaptic membranes of excitatory synapses, with a postsynaptic predominance. GPR81 is also enriched at the blood-brain-barrier: the GPR81 densities at endothelial cell membranes are about twice the GPR81 density at membranes of perivascular astrocytic processes, but about one-seventh of that on synaptic membranes. There is only a slight signal in perisynaptic processes of astrocytes. In synaptic spines, as well as in adipocytes, GPR81 immunoreactivity is located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking of the protein to and from the plasma membrane. The results indicate roles of lactate in brain signaling, including a neuronal glucose and glycogen saving response to the supply of lactate. We propose that lactate, through activation of GPR81 receptors, can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral energy metabolism and energy substrate availability.

  16. Neonatal Administration of Thimerosal Causes Persistent Changes in Mu Opioid Receptors in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Thimerosal added to some pediatric vaccines is suspected in pathogenesis of several neurodevelopmental disorders. Our previous study showed that thimerosal administered to suckling rats causes persistent, endogenous opioid-mediated hypoalgesia. Here we examined, using immunohistochemical staining technique, the density of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the brains of rats, which in the second postnatal week received four i.m. injections of thimerosal at doses 12, 240, 1,440 or 3,000 μg Hg/kg. The periaqueductal gray, caudate putamen and hippocampus were examined. Thimerosal administration caused dose-dependent statistically significant increase in MOR densities in the periaqueductal gray and caudate putamen, but decrease in the dentate gyrus, where it was accompanied by the presence of degenerating neurons and loss of synaptic vesicle marker (synaptophysin). These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development. PMID:20803069

  17. Pharmacological characterization and autoradiographic localization of substance P receptors in guinea pig brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, T.V.; Quirion, R.

    1986-09-01

    (/sup 3/H)Substance P ((/sup 3/H)SP) was used to characterize substance P (SP) receptor binding sites in guinea pig brain using membrane preparations and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Curvilinear Scatchard analysis shows that (/sup 3/H)SP binds to a high affinity site (Kd = 0.5 nM) with a Bmax of 16.4 fmol/mg protein and a low affinity site (Kd = 29.6 nM) with a Bmax of 189.1 fmol/mg protein. Monovalent cations generally inhibit (/sup 3/H)SP binding while divalent cations substantially increased it. The ligand selectivity pattern is generally similar to the one observed in rat brain membrane preparation with SP being more potent than SP fragments and other tachykinins. However, the potency of various nucleotides is different with GMP-PNP greater than GDP greater than GTP. The autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)SP binding sites shows that high amounts of sites are present in the hippocampus, striatum, olfactory bulb, central nucleus of the amygdala, certain thalamic nuclei and superior colliculus. The cortex is moderately enriched in (/sup 3/H)SP binding sites while the substantia nigra contains only very low amounts of sites. Thus, the autoradiographic distribution of SP binding sites is fairly similar in both rat and guinea pig brain.

  18. Intact brain cells: a novel model system for studying opioid receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, N.F.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-07-29

    The use of a novel tissue preparation to study opioid receptor binding in viable, intact cells derived from whole brains of adult rats is presented. Mechanically dissociated and sieved cells, which were not homogenized at any stage of the experimental protocol, and iso-osmotic physiological buffer were used in these experiments. This system was adapted in order to avoid mechanical and chemical disruption of cell membranes, cytoskeletal ultrastructure or receptor topography by homogenization or by the use of nonphysiological buffers, and to mimic in vivo binding conditions as much as possible. Using (/sup 3/H)naloxone as the radioligand, the studies showed saturable and stereospecific high-affinity binding of this opioid antagonist in intact cells, which in turn showed consistently high viability. (/sup 3/H)Naloxone binding was also linear over a wide range of tissue concentrations. This technique provides a very promising model for future studies of the binding of opioids and of many other classes of drugs to brain tissue receptors in a more physiologically relevant system than those commonly used to date.

  19. Changes of several brain receptor complexes in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer disease: probable new potential pharmaceutical targets.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Roßner, Steffen; Ghafari, Maryam; Groessl, Michael; Morawski, Markus; Gerner, Christopher; Lubec, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Although Alzheimer disease (AD) has been linked to defects in major brain receptors, studies thus far have been limited to the determination of receptor subunits or specific ligand binding studies. However, the availability of current technology enables the determination and quantification of brain receptor complexes. Thus, we examined levels of native receptor complexes in the brains of patients with AD. Cortical tissue was obtained from control subjects (n = 12 females and 12 males) and patients with AD (n = 12 females and 12 males) within a 3-h postmortem time period. The tissues were kept frozen until further biochemical analyses. Membrane proteins were extracted and subsequently enriched by ultracentrifugation using a sucrose gradient. Membrane proteins were then electrophoresed onto native gels and immunoblotted using antibodies against individual brain receptors. We found that the levels were comparable for complexes containing GluR2, GluR3 and GluR4 as well as 5-HT1A. Moreover, the levels of complexes containing muscarinic AChR M1, NR1 and GluR1 were significantly increased in male patients with AD. Nicotinic AChRs 4 and 7 as well as dopaminergic receptors D1 and D2 were also increased in males and females with AD. These findings reveal a pattern of altered receptor complex levels that may contribute to the deterioration of the concerted activity of these receptors and thus result in cognitive deficits observed in patients with AD. It should be emphasised that receptor complexes function as working units rather than individual subunits. Thus, the receptor deficits identified may be relevant for the design of experimental therapies. Therefore, specific pharmacological modulation of these receptors is within the pharmaceutical repertoire.

  20. Induction of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptors following Focal Ischemia in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. TGF-βs bind to type I (TGF-βRI) and II receptors (TGF-βRII), which are transmembrane kinase receptors, and an accessory type III receptor (TGF-βRIII). TGF-β may utilize another type I receptor, activin-like kinase receptor (Alk1). TGF-β is neuroprotective in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of stroke. Recently, we reported the expression pattern of TGF-β1-3 after MCAO. To establish how TGF-βs exert their actions following MCAO, the present study describes the induction of TGF-βRI, RII, RIII and Alk1 at 24 h, 72 h and 1 mo after transient 1 h MCAO as well as following 24 h permanent MCAO using in situ hybridization histochemistry. In intact brain, only TGF-βRI had significant expression: neurons in cortical layer IV contained TGF-βRI. At 24 h after the occlusion, no TGF-β receptors showed induction. At 72 h following MCAO, all four types of TGF-β receptors were induced in the infarct area, while TGF-βRI and RII also appeared in the penumbra. Most cells with elevated TGF-βRI mRNA levels were microglia. TGF-βRII co-localized with both microglial and endothelial markers while TGF-βRIII and Alk1 were present predominantly in endothels. All four TGF-β receptors were induced within the lesion 1 mo after the occlusion. In particular, TGF-βRIII was further induced as compared to 72 h after MCAO. At this time point, TGF-βRIII signal was predominantly not associated with blood vessels suggesting its microglial location. These data suggest that TGF-β receptors are induced after MCAO in a timely and spatially regulated fashion. TGF-β receptor expression is preceded by increased TGF-β expression. TGF-βRI and RII are likely to be co-expressed in microglial cells while Alk1, TGF-βRII, and RIII in endothels within the infarct where TGF-β1 may be their ligand. At later time points, TGF-βRIII may also appear in glial cells to potentially

  1. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  2. Distribution of Tuberoinfundibular Peptide of 39 Residues and Its Receptor, Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor, in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    FABER, CATHERINE A.; DOBOLYI, ARPÁD; SLEEMAN, MARK; USDIN, TED B.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) was identified as a potent parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) agonist. Existing anatomical data also support the suggestion that TIP39 is the PTH2R’s endogenous ligand, but a comprehensive comparison of TIP39 and PTH2R distributions has not been performed. In the present study, we compared the distributions of TIP39 and PTH2R on adjacent mouse brain sections. In addition, we determined the locations of PTH2R-expressing cell bodies by in situ hybridization histochemistry and by labeling β-galactosidase driven by the PTH2R promoter in knockin mice. An excellent correlation was found between the distributions of TIP39-containing fibers and PTH2R-containing cell bodies and fibers throughout the brain. TIP39 and the PTH2R are abundant in medial prefrontal, insular, and ectorhinal cortices, the lateral septal nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the fundus striati, the amygdala, the ventral subiculum, the hypothalamus, midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei, the medial geniculate body, the periaqueductal gray, the ventral tegmental area, the superior and inferior colliculi, the parabrachial nuclei, the locus coeruleus, subcoeruleus and periolivary areas, and the nucleus of the solitary tract. Furthermore, even the subregional distribution of TIP39- and PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers in these regions showed remarkable similarities, providing anatomical evidence that TIP39 may act on the PTH2R. Based on these observations and on previous pharmacological data, we propose that TIP39 is an endogenous ligand of the PTH2R and that they form a neuromodulator system, which is optimally positioned to regulate limbic, endocrine, and auditory brain functions. PMID:17394159

  3. Distribution of tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues and its receptor, parathyroid hormone 2 receptor, in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catherine A; Dobolyi, Arpád; Sleeman, Mark; Usdin, Ted B

    2007-06-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) was identified as a potent parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) agonist. Existing anatomical data also support the suggestion that TIP39 is the PTH2R's endogenous ligand, but a comprehensive comparison of TIP39 and PTH2R distributions has not been performed. In the present study, we compared the distributions of TIP39 and PTH2R on adjacent mouse brain sections. In addition, we determined the locations of PTH2R-expressing cell bodies by in situ hybridization histochemistry and by labeling beta-galactosidase driven by the PTH2R promoter in knockin mice. An excellent correlation was found between the distributions of TIP39-containing fibers and PTH2R-containing cell bodies and fibers throughout the brain. TIP39 and the PTH2R are abundant in medial prefrontal, insular, and ectorhinal cortices, the lateral septal nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the fundus striati, the amygdala, the ventral subiculum, the hypothalamus, midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei, the medial geniculate body, the periaqueductal gray, the ventral tegmental area, the superior and inferior colliculi, the parabrachial nuclei, the locus coeruleus, subcoeruleus and periolivary areas, and the nucleus of the solitary tract. Furthermore, even the subregional distribution of TIP39- and PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers in these regions showed remarkable similarities, providing anatomical evidence that TIP39 may act on the PTH2R. Based on these observations and on previous pharmacological data, we propose that TIP39 is an endogenous ligand of the PTH2R and that they form a neuromodulator system, which is optimally positioned to regulate limbic, endocrine, and auditory brain functions. Published 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Distribution and function of TrkB receptors in the developing brain of the opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Bartkowska, Katarzyna; Aniszewska, Agata; Turlejski, Kris; Djavadian, Ruzanna L

    2014-07-01

    The expression, development pattern, spatiotemporal distribution, and function of TrkB receptors were investigated during the postnatal brain development of the opossum. Full-length TrkB receptor expression was detectable in the newborn opossum, whereas three different short forms that are expressed in the adult brain were almost undetectable in the newborn opossum brain. The highest level of full-length TrkB receptor expression was observed at P35, which corresponds to the time of eye opening. We found that in different brain structures, TrkB receptors were localized in various compartments of cells. The hypothalamus was distinguished by the presence of TrkB receptors not only in cell bodies but also in the neuropil. Double immunofluroscent staining for TrkB and a marker for the identification of the cell phenotype in several brain regions such as the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum showed that unlike in eutherians, in the opossum, TrkB receptors were predominantly expressed in neurons. A lack of TrkB receptors in glial cells, particularly astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, provides evidence that TrkB receptors can play a functionally different role in marsupials than in eutherians. The effects of TrkB signaling on the development of cortical progenitor cells were examined in vitro using shRNAs. Blockade of the endogenous TrkB receptor expression induced a decrease in the number of progenitor cells proliferation, whereas the number of apoptotic progenitor cells increased. These changes were statistically significant but relatively small. In contrast, TrkB signaling was strongly involved in regulation of the cortical progenitor cell differentiation process.

  5. Brain-Penetrant Tetrahydronaphthalene Thromboxane A2-Prostanoid (TP) Receptor Antagonists as Prototype Therapeutics for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark pathological feature of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain is the presence of senile plaques, which comprise amyloid β (Aβ) peptides that are derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The plaque-containing AD brain is thought to be under oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased lipid oxidation products that include isoprostane-F2αIII (iPF2αIII). IPF2αIII can bind to and activate the thromboxane A2-prostanoid (TP) receptor, and TP receptor activation causes increased Aβ production through enhancement of APP mRNA stability. Moreover, TP receptor antagonists have been shown to block iPF2αIII-induced increases of Aβ secretion. Thus, the TP receptor may be a potential drug target for AD therapy. However, here we show that existing TP receptor antagonists have poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, likely due to the presence of a carboxylic acid moiety that is believed to be important for receptor interaction, but which may hamper passive diffusion across the BBB. We now report selected analogues of a known tetrahydronaphthalene TP receptor antagonist, wherein the carboxylic acid moiety has been replaced by heterocyclic bioisosteres. These heterocyclic analogues retained relatively high affinity for the mouse and human TP receptors, and, unlike the parent carboxylic acid compound, several examples freely diffused across the BBB into the brain upon administration to mice. These results reveal that brain-penetrant tetrahydronaphthalene TP receptor antagonists can be developed by substituting the carboxylic acid moiety with a suitable nonacidic bioisostere. Compounds of this type hold promise as potential lead structures to develop drug candidates for the treatment of AD. PMID:23173073

  6. Imaging muscarinic cholinergic receptors in human brain in vivo with Spect, [123I]4-iododexetimide, and [123I]4-iodolevetimide.

    PubMed

    Müller-Gärtner, H W; Wilson, A A; Dannals, R F; Wagner, H N; Frost, J J

    1992-07-01

    A method to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (muscarinic receptors) noninvasively in human brain in vivo was developed using [123I]4-iododexetimide ([123I]IDex), [123I]4-iodolevetimide ([123I]ILev), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [123I]IDex is a high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist. [123I]ILev is its pharmacologically inactive enantiomer and measures nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vitro. Regional brain activity after tracer injection was measured in four young normal volunteers for 24 h. Regional [123I]IDex and [123I]ILev activities were correlated early after injection, but not after 1.5 h. [123I]IDex activity increased over 7-12 h in neocortex, neostriatum, and thalamus, but decreased immediately after the injection peak in cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity was highest in neostriatum, followed in rank order by neocortex, thalamus, and cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity correlated with muscarinic receptor concentrations in matching brain regions. In contrast, [123I]ILev activity decreased immediately after the injection peak in all brain regions and did not correspond to muscarinic receptor concentrations. [123I]IDex activity in neocortex and neostriatum during equilibrium was six to seven times higher than [123I]ILev activity. The data demonstrate that [123I]IDex binds specifically to muscarinic receptors in vivo, whereas [123I]ILev represents the nonspecific part of [123I]IDex binding. Subtraction of [123I]ILev from [123I]IDex images on a pixel-by-pixel basis therefore reflects specific [123I]IDex binding to muscarinic receptors. Owing to its high specific binding, [123I]IDex has the potential to measure small changes in muscarinic receptor characteristics in vivo with SPECT. The use of stereoisomerism directly to measure nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vivo may reduce complexity in modeling approaches to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human brain. PMID:1618935

  7. (/sup 3/H)Ethylketocyclazocine binding to mouse brain membranes: evidence for a kappa opioid receptor type

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, J.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Lee, N.M.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of the putative kappa agonist ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) to synaptosomal membranes of mouse brain was studied. This benzomorphan was able to bind to different opioid receptors. A portion of this binding was not inhibited by the agonist naloxone, even at high concentrations (10 microM). This population of receptors, to which opioate alkaloids and opiod peptides display very low affinity, is probably the sigma receptor. Another class of binding sites was identified by the simultaneous addition of the selective agonists Sandoz FK-33824 and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin, which blocked the access of EKC to mu and delta opioid receptors, respectively, leaving a portion of naloxone-displaceable benzomorphan binding still detectable. Analysis of this remaining binding revealed a small population of receptors of high affinity, the kappa receptor. Therefore, EKC binds to the mu, delta, kappa and sigma receptors in the mouse brain, with similar affinities for the mu and kappa (0.22 and 0.15 nM). These results confirm the existence of a kappa opioid receptor type in the mouse brain.

  8. Characterization and Expression of the Nuclear Progestin Receptor in Zebrafish Gonads and Brain1

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Richard N.; Daly, Sean C.J.; Pang, Yefei; Anglade, Isabelle; Kah, Olivier; Thomas, Peter; Zhu, Yong

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish nuclear progestin receptor (nPR; official symbol PGR) was identified and characterized to better understand its role in regulating reproduction in this well-established teleost model. A full-length cDNA was identified that encoded a 617-amino acid residue protein with high homology to PGRs in other vertebrates, and contained five domains characteristic of nuclear steroid receptors. In contrast to the multiplicity of steroid receptors often found in euteleosts and attributed to probable genome duplication, only a single locus encoding the full-length zebrafish pgr was identified. Cytosolic proteins from pgr-transfected cells showed a high affinity (Kd = 2 nM), saturable, single-binding site specific for a native progestin in euteleosts, 4-pregnen-17,20beta-diol-3-one (17,20beta-DHP). Both 17,20beta-DHP and progesterone were potent inducers of transcriptional activity in cells transiently transfected with pgr in a dual luciferase reporter assay, whereas androgens and estrogens had little potency. The pgr transcript and protein were abundant in the ovaries, testis, and brain and were scarce or undetectable in the intestine, muscle, and gills. Further analyses indicate that Pgr was expressed robustly in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus in the brain; proliferating spermatogonia and early spermatocytes in the testis; and in follicular cells and early-stage oocytes (stages I and II), with very low levels within maturationally competent late-stage oocytes (IV) in the ovary. The localization of Pgr suggests that it mediates progestin regulation of reproductive signaling in the brain, early germ cell proliferation in testis, and ovarian follicular functions, but not final oocyte or sperm maturation. PMID:19741205

  9. Potent cyclic enkephalin analogues for delta opioid receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, G.; Kao, J.; Hruby, V.; Morelli, M.; Gulya, K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1986-03-01

    (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/,D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPDPE) and (/sup 3/H) (D-Pen/sup 2/, L-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin ((/sup 3/H)DPLPE) characterization studies showed high affinity binding of these radioligands to rat brain membranes with dissociation constants of 1.8 and 1.0 nM, respectively, while a similar number of receptor density was found with both radiolabeled ligands (77 fmoles/mg protein). Unlabeled DPDPE inhibited both radioligands with high affinity (IC50 = 7 nM0 while morphine (IC50 = 80 nM), DAGO (IC50 = 250 nM) and PLO17 (no inhibition at 1000 nM) were less effective in inhibiting the binding, thus, illustrating the selective action of these radiolabeled ligands at the delta opioid receptor. A series of conformationally restricted D-penicillamine containing cyclic enkephalin analogues were synthesized using standard solid phase methods and their ability to inhibit (/sup 3/H)DPDPE and (/sup 3/H)DPLPE were examined in rat brain radioreceptor assays. Substitutions in the DPDPE molecule were made in phe/sup 4/. These substitutions were pNO/sub 2/-phe/sup 4/, beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sub 4/, pNO/sub 2/-beta-methyl-phe/sup 4/ (three isomeric forms: A,B,D). The IC50 values for the above enkephalin analogues were 3.7, 16, 7, 7, 200 nM, respectively. Thus, these potent analogues of DPDPE should be useful in determining the structure activity relationships of the delta opioid receptor in rat brain.

  10. Contribution of regional brain melanocortin receptor subtypes to elevated activity energy expenditure in lean, active rats.

    PubMed

    Shukla, C; Koch, L G; Britton, S L; Cai, M; Hruby, V J; Bednarek, M; Novak, C M

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) are crucial factors accounting for individual differences in body weight, interacting with genetic predisposition. In the brain, a number of neuroendocrine intermediates regulate food intake and energy expenditure (EE); this includes the brain melanocortin (MC) system, consisting of MC peptides as well as their receptors (MCR). MC3R and MC4R have emerged as critical modulators of EE and food intake. To determine how variance in MC signaling may underlie individual differences in physical activity levels, we examined behavioral response to MC receptor agonists and antagonists in rats that show high and low levels of physical activity and NEAT, that is, high- and low-capacity runners (HCR, LCR), developed by artificial selection for differential intrinsic aerobic running capacity. Focusing on the hypothalamus, we identified brain region-specific elevations in expression of MCR 3, 4, and also MC5R, in the highly active, lean HCR relative to the less active and obesity-prone LCR. Further, the differences in activity and associated EE as a result of MCR activation or suppression using specific agonists and antagonists were similarly region-specific and directly corresponded to the differential MCR expression patterns. The agonists and antagonists investigated here did not significantly impact food intake at the doses used, suggesting that the differential pattern of receptor expression may by more meaningful to physical activity than to other aspects of energy balance regulation. Thus, MCR-mediated physical activity may be a key neural mechanism in distinguishing the lean phenotype and a target for enhancing physical activity and NEAT.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  12. Chronic nicotine treatment attenuates alpha 7 nicotinic receptor deficits following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Verbois, S L; Scheff, S W; Pauly, J R

    2003-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often causes a persistent and debilitating impairment of cognitive function. Although the neurochemical basis for TBI-induced cognitive dysfunction is not well characterized, some studies suggest prominent involvement of the CNS cholinergic system. Previous studies from our laboratories have shown that alpha 7* nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChrs) are especially vulnerable to the pathophysiological effects of TBI. Hippocampal and cortical alpha-[(125)I]-bungarotoxin (BTX) expression of alpha 7* nAChrs is significantly decreased in many brain regions following TBI and this reduction persists for at least 3 weeks following injury. In the present study we evaluated whether chronic nicotine infusion could attenuate TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were sham-operated, or subjected to mild or moderate unilateral cortical contusion injury. Immediately following brain injury, osmotic mini-pumps that delivered chronic saline or nicotine (0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg/h) were implanted. The animals were euthanatized and the brains prepared for nAChr quantitative autoradiography, 7 days following surgery. Brain injury caused significant decreases in BTX binding in several regions of the hippocampus. TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr density were reversed in four of the six hippocampal brain regions evaluated following chronic nicotine administration. If TBI-induced deficits in alpha 7* nAChr expression play a role in post-injury cognitive impairment, pharmacological treatments which restore nAChr binding to control levels may be therapeutically useful.

  13. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  14. Oxytocin receptor gene and racial ingroup bias in empathy-related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siyang; Li, Bingfeng; Ma, Yina; Zhang, Wenxia; Rao, Yi; Han, Shihui

    2015-04-15

    The human brain responds more strongly to racial ingroup than outgroup individuals' pain. This racial ingroup bias varies across individuals and has been attributed to social experiences. What remains unknown is whether the racial ingroup bias in brain activity is associated with a genetic polymorphism. We investigated genetic associations of racial ingroup bias in the brain activity to racial ingroup and outgroup faces that received painful or non-painful stimulations by scanning A/A and G/G homozygous of the oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (OXTR rs53576) using functional MRI. We found that G/G compared to A/A individuals showed stronger activity in the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor area (ACC/SMA) in response to racial ingroup members' pain, whereas A/A relative to G/G individuals exhibited greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in response to racial outgroup members' pain. Moreover, the racial ingroup bias in ACC/SMA activity positively predicted participants' racial ingroup bias in implicit attitudes and NAcc activity to racial outgroup individuals' pain negatively predicted participants' motivations to reduce racial outgroup members' pain. Our results suggest that the two variants of OXTR rs53576 are associated with racial ingroup bias in brain activities that are linked to implicit attitude and altruistic motivation, respectively. PMID:25637390

  15. Oxytocin receptor gene and racial ingroup bias in empathy-related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siyang; Li, Bingfeng; Ma, Yina; Zhang, Wenxia; Rao, Yi; Han, Shihui

    2015-04-15

    The human brain responds more strongly to racial ingroup than outgroup individuals' pain. This racial ingroup bias varies across individuals and has been attributed to social experiences. What remains unknown is whether the racial ingroup bias in brain activity is associated with a genetic polymorphism. We investigated genetic associations of racial ingroup bias in the brain activity to racial ingroup and outgroup faces that received painful or non-painful stimulations by scanning A/A and G/G homozygous of the oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (OXTR rs53576) using functional MRI. We found that G/G compared to A/A individuals showed stronger activity in the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor area (ACC/SMA) in response to racial ingroup members' pain, whereas A/A relative to G/G individuals exhibited greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in response to racial outgroup members' pain. Moreover, the racial ingroup bias in ACC/SMA activity positively predicted participants' racial ingroup bias in implicit attitudes and NAcc activity to racial outgroup individuals' pain negatively predicted participants' motivations to reduce racial outgroup members' pain. Our results suggest that the two variants of OXTR rs53576 are associated with racial ingroup bias in brain activities that are linked to implicit attitude and altruistic motivation, respectively.

  16. Insulin Receptor Expression and Activity in the Brains of Nondiabetic Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Lap; Yemul, Shrishailam; Knable, Lindsay; Katsel, Pavel; Zhao, Rudy; Haroutunian, Vahram; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the contents of the insulin receptor-beta subunit (IRβ) and [Tyr1162/1163]-phosphorylated IRβ as surrogate indices of total IR content and IR activation in postmortem hippocampal formation brain specimens from nondiabetic sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases. We found no significant changes in the brain contents of total IRβ or [Tyr1162/1163]-phosphorylated IRβ, suggesting normal IR content and activation in the brains of nondiabetic sporadic AD cases. Moreover, total IRβ and [Tyr1162/1163]-phosphorylated IRβ levels in the hippocampal formation are not correlated with the severity of amyloid or tau-neuropathology. Exploring the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) α/β, key IR-signaling components, we observed significantly lower levels of total GSK3 α/β in brain specimens from nondiabetic AD cases, suggesting that impaired IR signaling mechanisms might contribute to the onset and/or progression of AD dementia. Outcomes from our study support the development of insulin-sensitizing therapeutic strategies to stimulate downstream IR signaling in nondiabetic AD cases. PMID:22666619

  17. Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on beta-adrenergic receptors in different rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hadjiivanova, Ch I; Petkov, V V

    2002-08-01

    The effect of oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract at a dose of 90 mg/kg for 7 consecutive days on rat brain beta-adrenergic receptors in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and hypothalamus was studied. Ginkgo biloba treatment induced a significant decrease in the density (B(max)) of beta-adrenoreceptors in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. It has been suggested that modulation of the beta-adrenergic system is implicated in the favourable effects of Ginkgo biloba extracts on learning and memory.

  18. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  19. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  20. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  1. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine upregulates p75 neurotrophin receptor protein expression in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaomin; Peng, Zugui; Kuang, Weihong; Zheng, Hanyu; Long, Jiang; Wang, Xue

    2012-04-25

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, facilitates apoptosis during development and following central nervous system injury. Previous studies have shown that programmed cell death is likely involved in the neurotoxic effects of 3, 4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA), because MDMA induces apoptosis of immortalized neurons through regulation of proteins belonging to the Bcl-2 family. In the present study, intraperitoneal injection of different doses of MDMA (20, 50, and 100 mg/kg) induced significant behavioral changes, such as increased excitability, increased activity, and irritability in rats. Moreover, changes exhibited dose-dependent adaptation. Following MDMA injection in rat brain tissue, the number of apoptotic cells dose-dependently increased and p75 neurotrophin receptor expression significantly increased in the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus. These findings confirmed that MDMA induced neuronal apoptosis, and results suggested that this effect was related by upregulated protein expression of the p75 neurotrophin receptor. PMID:25722682

  2. Increased potency and binding of mazindol to putative brain anorectic receptors in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, B E; Brown, K L; Vincent, G

    1994-12-30

    A class of sodium-sensitive, low affinity binding sites in the brain recognizes [3H]mazindol (MAZ). Competition for [3H]MAZ binding at these sites correlates with the anorectic potency of various phenethylamine drugs suggesting that these might be anorectic binding sites. Here [3H]MAZ binding, in the absence of sodium, was assessed by quantitative receptor autoradiography in rat brain. Binding was saturable, widespread and heterogenous with Kd = 3-229 microM and Bmax = 0.64-21.9 nmol/mg protein in various brain areas. By saturation studies, highest binding was in the somatosensory cortex, central amygdalar nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Hypothalamic subnuclei had intermediate and the piriform cortex had low binding. Rats were identified as prone to develop (DIO-prone) or resist (DR-prone) diet-induced obesity by their low vs. high 24 h urine norepinephrine excretion, respectively. While similar in body weight and basal 30 min intake of 4% sucrose, DIO-prone rats had 28% greater inhibition of sucrose intake by 3 mg/kg MAZ, i.p. (86 +/- 5%) than DR-prone rats (67 +/- 6%; P = 0.05). DIO-prone rats also had 23-55% higher levels of 10 nM [3H]MAZ binding in various hypothalamic and amygdalar nuclei, the somatosensory, piriform and gustatory cortices and thalamus. Given their greater sensitivity the highest dose of MAZ used and their higher binding of MAZ to putative brain anorectic receptors, DIO-prone rats might have a deficiency of an endogenous satiety factor which could predispose them to develop obesity when challenged with high energy, high sucrose diets.

  3. Eph Receptor and Ephrin Signaling in Developing and Adult Brain of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Vidovic, Maria; Nighorn, Alan; Koblar, Simon; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Roles for Eph receptor tyrosine kinase and ephrin signaling in vertebrate brain development are well established. Their involvement in the modulation of mammalian synaptic structure and physiology is also emerging. However, less is known of their effects on brain development and their function in adult invertebrate nervous systems. Here, we report on the characterization of Eph receptor and ephrin orthologs in the honeybee, Apis mellifera (Am), and their role in learning and memory. In situ hybridization for mRNA expression showed a uniform distribution of expression of both genes across the developing pupal and adult brain. However, in situ labeling with Fc fusion proteins indicated that the AmEphR and Amephrin proteins were differentially localized to cell body regions in the mushroom bodies and the developing neuropiles of the antennal and optic lobes. In adults, AmEphR protein was localized to regions of synaptic contacts in optic lobes, in the glomeruli of antennal lobes, and in the medial lobe of the mushroom body. The latter two regions are involved in olfactory learning and memory in the honeybee. Injections of EphR-Fc and ephrin-Fc proteins into the brains of adult bees, 1 h before olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex, sig-nificantly reduced memory 24 h later. Experimental amnesia in the group injected with ephrin-Fc was apparent 1 h post-training. Experimental amnesia was also induced by post-training injections with ephrin-Fc suggesting a role in recall. This is the first demonstration that Eph molecules function to regulate the formation of memory in insects. PMID:17443785

  4. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents.

  5. Molecular size of benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain in situ: evidence for a functional dimer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, A.; Iversen, L. L.

    1982-02-01

    Benzodiazepine tranquillizers such as diazepam and chlordiazepoxide interact with high-affinity binding sites in nervous tissue1,2. The correlation between the affinities of various benzodiazepines for these sites with their clinical potencies and activity in behavioural and electrophysiological tests in animals suggests that the sites represent the functional `receptor' whereby benzodiazepines exert their effects3. The intimate involvement of benzodiazepines with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and chloride channels raised the possibility that the benzodiazepine binding site (BDZ-R) may be a protein in the GABA receptor-effector complex4,5. GABA agonists enhance the affinity of BDZ-R for benzodiazepines6, although BDZ-R is distinct from the GABA receptor itself3. However, electrophysiological evidence suggests that the action of benzodiazepines is chloride channel, rather than receptor, directed7-10. Several attempts have been made to measure the molecular weight (Mr) of BDZ-R after solubilization from brain membranes: treatment with 1% Triton X-100 followed by assay of binding activity in solute fractions separated according to molecular weight suggested11 a value of ~200,000, photoaffinity labelling of BDZ-R with 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FNZ) followed by more rigorous solubilization and gel chromatography indicated12,13 an apparent Mr of ~55,000 and a third approach14 a value of ~100,000. The measured molecular weight seems to depend critically on the solubilization procedure used. Chang et al.15 recently described the use of radiation inactivation to determine the size of BDZ-R in situ in calf brain membranes, and estimated a Mr, of 216,000. We have also used this approach; the results reported here indicate a Mr of between 90,000 and 100,000, but this is reduced to 60,000-63,000 in membranes pretreated with GABA, suggesting the disaggregation of a normally dimeric form.

  6. Physiology and gene regulation of the brain NPY Y1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Eva, Carola; Serra, Mariangela; Mele, Paolo; Panzica, GianCarlo; Oberto, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most prominent and abundant neuropeptides in the mammalian brain where it interacts with a family of G-protein coupled receptors, including the Y(1) receptor subtype (Y(1)R). NPY-Y(1)R signalling plays a prominent role in the regulation of several behavioural and physiological functions including feeding behaviour and energy balance, sexual hormone secretion, stress response, emotional behaviour, neuronal excitability and ethanol drinking. Y(1)R expression is regulated by neuronal activity and peripheral hormones. The Y(1)R gene has been isolated from rodents and humans and it contains multiple regulatory elements that may participate in the regulation of its expression. Y(1)R expression in the hypothalamus is modulated by changes in energetic balance induced by a wide variety of conditions (fasting, pregnancy, hyperglycaemic challenge, hypophagia, diet induced obesity). Estrogens up-regulate responsiveness to NPY to stimulate preovulatory GnRH and gonadotropin surges by increasing Y(1)R gene expression both in the hypothalamus and the pituitary. Y(1)R expression is modulated by different kinds of brain insults, such as stress and seizure activity, and alteration in its expression may contribute to antidepressant action. Chronic modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by benzodiazepines or neuroactive steroids also affects Y(1)R expression in the amygdala, suggesting that a functional interaction between the GABA(A) receptor and Y(1)R mediated signalling may contribute to the regulation of emotional behaviour. In this paper, we review the state of the art concerning Y(1)R function and gene expression, including our personal contribution to many of the subjects mentioned above.

  7. Apparent target size of rat brain benzodiazepine receptor, acetylcholinesterase, and pyruvate kinase is highly influenced by experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1988-08-25

    Radiation inactivation is a method to determine the apparent target size of molecules. In this report we examined whether radiation inactivation of various enzymes and brain receptors is influenced by the preparation of samples preceding irradiation. The apparent target sizes of endogenous acetylcholinesterase and pyruvate kinase from rat brain and from rabbit muscle and benzodiazepine receptor from rat brain were investigated in some detail. In addition the target sizes of alcohol dehydrogenase (from yeast and horse liver), beta-galactosidase (from Escherichia coli), lactate dehydrogenase (endogenous from rat brain), and 5-HT2 receptors, acetylcholine muscarine receptors, and (/sup 35/S) butyl bicyclophosphorothionate tertiary binding sites from rat brain were determined. The results show that apparent target sizes are highly influenced by the procedure applied for sample preparation before irradiation. The data indicate that irradiation of frozen whole tissue as opposed to lyophilized tissue or frozen tissue homogenates will estimate the smallest and most relevant functional target size of a receptor or an enzyme.

  8. Intracellular distribution of the vitamin D receptor in the brain: comparison with classic target tissues and redistribution with development.

    PubMed

    Eyles, D W; Liu, P Y; Josh, P; Cui, X

    2014-05-30

    Apart from its role in regulating calcium there is growing evidence that vitamin D is a neuroactive steroid capable of regulating multiple pathways important for both brain development and mature brain function. Vitamin D induces its genomic effects through its nuclear receptor the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Although there is abundant evidence for this receptor's presence in the mammalian brain from studies employing immunohistochemistry, Western blot or quantitative RNA studies there remains some dispute regarding the validity of these studies. In this study we provide unambiguous confirmation for the VDR in adult rodent brain using proteomic techniques. However Western blot experiments show that compared to more classic target organs such as the gut and kidney, VDR expression is quantitatively lower in the brain. In addition we have examined VDR subcellular distribution in the gut, kidney and brain from both embryonic and adult tissues. We show that in all embryonic tissues VDR distribution is mostly nuclear, however by adulthood it appears that at least in the gut and kidney, VDR presence in the plasma membrane is more prominent perhaps reflecting some change in VDR function with the maturation of these tissues. Finally the subcellular distribution of VDR in the embryo did not appear to be altered by vitamin D deficiency indicating that perhaps there are other mechanisms at play in vivo to stabilize this receptor in the absence of its ligand. PMID:24607320

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nociception

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Emiliano; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Husson, Steven J.; Steuer-Costa, Wagner; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R.; Treinin, Millet

    2014-01-01

    Polymodal nociceptors sense and integrate information on injurious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Chemical signals either activate nociceptors or modulate their responses to other stimuli. One chemical known to activate or modulate responses of nociceptors is acetylcholine (ACh). Across evolution nociceptors express subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family, a family of ACh-gated ion channels. The roles of ACh and nAChRs in nociceptor function are, however, poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans polymodal nociceptors, PVD, express nAChR subunits on their sensory arbor. Here we show that mutations reducing ACh synthesis and mutations in nAChR subunits lead to defects in PVD function and morphology. A likely cause for these defects is a reduction in cytosolic calcium measured in ACh and nAChR mutants. Indeed, overexpression of a calcium pump in PVD mimics defects in PVD function and morphology found in nAChR mutants. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a central role for nAChRs and ACh in nociceptor function and suggest that calcium permeating via nAChRs facilitates activity of several signaling pathways within this neuron. PMID:24518198

  10. Characterization of Aromatase Expression in the Adult Male and Female Mouse Brain. I. Coexistence with Oestrogen Receptors α and β, and Androgen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stanić, Davor; Dubois, Sydney; Chua, Hui Kheng; Tonge, Bruce; Rinehart, Nicole; Horne, Malcolm K.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR), although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα−, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females. PMID:24646567

  11. Coincident activation of NMDA and dopamine D1 receptors within the nucleus accumbens core is required for appetitive instrumental learning.

    PubMed

    Smith-Roe, S L; Kelley, A E

    2000-10-15

    The nucleus accumbens, a brain structure ideally situated to act as an interface between corticolimbic information-processing regions and motor output systems, is well known to subserve behaviors governed by natural reinforcers. In the accumbens core, glutamatergic input from its corticolimbic afferents and dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area converge onto common dendrites of the medium spiny neurons that populate the accumbens. We have previously found that blockade of NMDA receptors in the core with the antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5; 5 nmol) abolishes acquisition but not performance of an appetitive instrumental learning task (Kelley et al., 1997). Because it is currently hypothesized that concurrent dopamine D(1) and glutamate receptor activation is required for long-term changes associated with plasticity, we wished to examine whether the dopamine system in the accumbens core modulates learning via NMDA receptors. Co-infusion of low doses of the D(1) receptor antagonist SCH-23390 (0.3 nmol) and AP-5 (0.5 nmol) into the accumbens core strongly impaired acquisition of instrumental learning (lever pressing for food), whereas when infused separately, these low doses had no effect. Infusion of the combined low doses had no effect on indices of feeding and motor activity, suggesting a specific effect on learning. We hypothesize that co-activation of NMDA and D(1) receptors in the nucleus accumbens core is a key process for acquisition of appetitive instrumental learning. Such an interaction is likely to promote intracellular events and gene regulation necessary for synaptic plasticity and is supported by a number of cellular models.

  12. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 in Humans with Post-Traumatic Brain Contusions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Vidal-Jorge, Marian; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Castro, Lidia; Arikan, Fuat; Cordero, Esteban; Rădoi, Andreea; Poca, Maria-Antonia; Simard, J Marc; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2015-10-01

    Post-traumatic brain contusions (PTBCs) are traditionally considered primary injuries and can increase in size, generate perilesional edema, cause mass effect, induce neurological deterioration, and cause death. Most patients experience a progressive increase in pericontusional edema, and nearly half, an increase in the hemorrhagic component itself. The underlying molecular pathophysiology of contusion-induced brain edema and hemorrhagic progression remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate sulfonylurea 1/transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (SUR1-TRPM4) ion channel SUR1 expression in various cell types (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils) of human brain contusions and whether SUR1 up-regulation was related to time postinjury. Double immunolabeling of SUR1 and cell-type- specific proteins was performed in 26 specimens from traumatic brain injury patients whose lesions were surgically evacuated. Three samples from limited brain resections performed for accessing extra-axial skull-base tumors or intraventricular lesions were controls. We found SUR1 was significantly overexpresed in all cell types and was especially prominent in neurons and endothelial cells (ECs). The temporal pattern depended on cell type: 1) In neurons, SUR1 increased within 48 h of injury and stabilized thereafter; 2) in ECs, there was no trend; 3) in glial cells and microglia/macrophages, a moderate increase was observed over time; and 4) in neutrophils, it decreased with time. Our results suggest that up-regulation of SUR1 in humans point to this channel as one of the important molecular players in the pathophysiology of PTBCs. Our findings reveal opportunities to act therapeutically on the mechanisms of growth of traumatic contusions and therefore reduce the number of patients with neurological deterioration and poor neurological outcomes. PMID:26398596

  13. Affinity of neuroleptics for D1 receptor of human brain striatum.

    PubMed Central

    Kanba, S; Suzuki, E; Nomura, S; Nakaki, T; Yagi, G; Asai, M; Richelson, E

    1994-01-01

    We determined the inhibition-dissociation constant (Ki) of a number of neuroleptics for D1 receptors of normal human brain tissue using [3H]SCH23390 [R-(+)-8-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3[benzazepine-7- ol]. SCH23390 had the highest affinity with a Ki of 0.76 nM. Among clinically used drugs, propericiazine showed the highest affinity with a Ki of 10 nM. When neuroleptics were classified according to chemical structures, the Ki values were as follows. Phenothiazines ranged from 10 nM to 250 nM. Butyrophenones ranged from 45 nM to 250 nM. Thioxanthenes ranged from 12 nM to 340 nM. Orthopramines were more than 10,000 nM. The Ki values for the binding site of this study were significantly correlated with those reported in studies using animal brain. The possible relationship between D1 receptors and negative symptoms is discussed. PMID:7918347

  14. Specific factors are required for kinase-dependent endocytosis of insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J B; Worthylake, R; Wiley, H S; Gill, G N

    1994-01-01

    Mouse B82 cells that support high affinity saturable endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) exhibited only low rates of nonsaturable internalization of insulin receptors (InsR). To investigate the defect in endocytosis of InsR in B82 cells, we examined the role of sequence motifs and tyrosine kinase, the two receptor components shown to be required for efficient saturable endocytosis of InsR in Rat 1 cells. Placement of residues encoded by exon 16 of the InsR onto an EGFR truncated to residue 958 restored EGF-induced internalization of this mutant receptor indicating that the sequence codes in exon 16 are recognized by B82 cells. To determine whether the kinase function could be provided in trans, a B82 cell expressing both receptors was established. EGF-activated EGFR kinase was not able to restore insulin-dependent rapid endocytosis to InsR. However, fusion of untransfected Rat1 cells with InsR-expressing B82 cells enabled rapid endocytosis of InsR, indicating that the internalization defect can be complemented. These results indicate that, although internalization codes can function in the context of other receptors, activation of tyrosine kinase receptors requires an additional specific component. Images PMID:7919536

  15. Plasminogen Kringle 5 Induces Apoptosis of Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Sensitization by Radiation and Requirement for GRP78 and LRP1

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Braden C.; Stewart, Jerry; Hamza, Amal; Nordal, Robert; Davidson, Donald J.; Henkin, Jack; Gladson, Candece L.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant plasminogen kringle 5 (rK5) has been shown to induce apoptosis of dermal microvessel endothelial cells (MvEC) in a manner that requires glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). As we are interested in anti-angiogenic therapy for glioblastoma tumors, and the effectiveness of anti-angiogenic therapy can be enhanced when combined with radiation, we investigated the pro-apoptotic effects of rK5 combined with radiation on brain MvEC. We found that rK5 treatment of brain MvEC induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and that prior irradiation significantly sensitized (500-fold) the cells to rK5-induced apoptosis. The rK5-induced apoptosis of both unirradiated and irradiated MvEC required expression of GRP78 and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), a scavenger receptor, based on downregulation studies with small interfering RNA, and blocking studies with either a GRP78 antibody or a competitive inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP1. Furthermore, p38 MAP kinase was found to be a necessary downstream effector for rK5-induced apoptosis. These data suggest that irradiation sensitizes brain MvEC to the rK5-induced apoptosis and that this signal requires LRP1 internalization of GRP78 and the activation of p38 MAP kinase. Our findings suggest that prior irradiation would have a dose-sparing effect on rK5 anti-angiogenic therapy for brain tumors and further suggest that the effects of rK5 would be tumor-specific as the expression of GRP78 protein is upregulated on the brain MvEC in glioblastoma tumor biopsies as compared to the normal brain. PMID:19549899

  16. Intraperitoneal injection of saline modulates hippocampal brain receptor complex levels but does not impair performance in the Morris Water Maze.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Khan, Deeba; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2012-08-01

    The involvement of the hippocampus in pain has been demonstrated but key players, i.e. the major brain receptors have not been shown to be modulated by pain. It was therefore the aim of the study to show the concerted action and pattern of brain receptor complex levels in a non-invasive model of moderate pain. C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups of 14 animals each: trained injected, trained non-injected, yoked injected and yoked non-injected. Animals were tested in the open field and the elevated plus maze for behavioural evaluation and cognitive functions were tested using the Morris Water Maze. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following sacrification. Membrane proteins were prepared by ultracentrifugation and run on blue native gels to keep the native state, blotted to membranes and western blotting was carried out using the primary antibodies against serotonin receptor 5HT1A, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 (mAChR-M1), nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 (nAChR-alpha7), glutamate (AMPA) receptor (GluR1) and neurokinin receptor 1 (NK-1). There was no difference between performance in behaviour or in the MWM between groups. Brain receptor level changes involved all receptors given above. Pain affected mAChR-M1, GluR1 and NK-1 complex levels when yoked-injected were compared with yoked non-injected animals. Memory mechanisms affected mAChR-M1 complex levels when trained non-injected animals were compared with yoked non-injected controls. Taken together, the neurochemical basis for testing receptor agonists/antagonists on the role of pain and the hippocampus was generated that may be useful for interpretations of the role of this complex area in moderate pain.

  17. Targeting brain α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Alzheimer's disease: rationale and current status.

    PubMed

    Vallés, Ana Sofía; Borroni, María Virginia; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older persons. Pathognomonic hallmarks of the disease include the development of amyloid senile plaques and deposits of neurofibrillary tangles. These changes occur in the brain long before the clinical manifestations of AD (cognitive impairment in particular) become apparent. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), particularly the α7 subtype, are highly expressed in brain regions relevant to cognitive and memory functions and involved in the processing of sensory information. There is strong evidence that implicates the participation of AChRs in AD. This review briefly introduces current strategies addressing the pathophysiologic findings (amyloid-β-peptide plaques, neurofibrillary tangles) and then focuses on more recent efforts of pharmacologic intervention in AD, specifically targeted to the α7 AChR. Whereas cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil, galantamine, or rivastigmine, together with the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine are at the forefront of present-day clinical intervention for AD, new insights into AChR molecular pharmacology are bringing other drugs, directed at AChRs, to center stage. Among these are the positive allosteric modulators that selectively target α7 AChRs and are aimed at unleashing the factors that hinder agonist-mediated, α7 AChR channel activation. This calls for more detailed knowledge of the distribution, functional properties, and involvement of AChRs in various signaling cascades-together with the corresponding abnormalities in all these properties-to be able to engineer strategies in drug design and evaluate the therapeutic possibilities of new compounds targeting this class of neurotransmitter receptors. PMID:25248971

  18. Clozapine effects on adenylyl cyclase activity and serotonin type 1A receptors in human brain post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Castagna, Maura; Naccarato, Antonio G; Luccachini, Antonio; Catena-Dell'Osso, Mario; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-04-01

    Although the pharmacological profile of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine has been extensively studied in animal models, little information is available on its effects in the human brain. In particular, much interest is focused on the understanding of clozapine activity on serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission, particularly on 5-HT receptor of type 1A (5-HT(1A)) that seems to play a pivotal role in the control of the 5-HT system. The present work, therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of clozapine and its major metabolite, norclozapine, on the modulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) velocity via 5-HT(1A) receptors in human post-mortem brain regions, in particular the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and raphe nuclei. Concomitantly, the ability of the two compounds to displace the specific binding of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist [³H]-8-hydroxy-(2-di-N-propylamino) tetralin ([³H]-8-OH-DPAT) was evaluated in the same brain areas. The results showed that both clozapine and norclozapine, although with a 20-fold lower affinity, displaced [³H]8-OH-DPAT binding in all of the brain regions analysed, suggesting their interaction with 5-HT(1A) receptors. At the same time, clozapine and, to a lesser extent, norclozapine were found to inhibit the forskolin (FK)-stimulated AC system, while decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations in the hippocampus only. The receptor characterisation of the clozapine effect on AC observed in the hippocampus by the use of antagonists showed a mixed profile, involving not only the 5-HT(1A) receptor but also a muscarinic (M) receptor subtype, most likely the M₄ one. These findings, while considering all the limitations due to the use of post-mortem tissues, are strongly suggestive of a region-dependent pharmacological action of clozapine in the human brain that may explain its peculiar clinical effects and open up research towards novel targets for future antipsychotic drugs.

  19. Local application of drugs to study nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function in mouse brain slices.

    PubMed

    Engle, Staci E; Broderick, Hilary J; Drenan, Ryan M

    2012-10-29

    Tobacco use leads to numerous health problems, including cancer, heart disease, emphysema, and stroke. Addiction to cigarette smoking is a prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that stems from the biophysical and cellular actions of nicotine on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) throughout the central nervous system. Understanding the various nAChR subtypes that exist in brain areas relevant to nicotine addiction is a major priority. Experiments that employ electrophysiology techniques such as whole-cell patch clamp or two-electrode voltage clamp recordings are useful for pharmacological characterization of nAChRs of interest. Cells expressing nAChRs, such as mammalian tissue culture cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes, are physically isolated and are therefore easily studied using the tools of modern pharmacology. Much progress has been made using these techniques, particularly when the target receptor was already known and ectopic expression was easily achieved. Often, however, it is necessary to study nAChRs in their native environment: in neurons within brain slices acutely harvested from laboratory mice or rats. For example, mice expressing "hypersensitive" nAChR subunits such as α4 L9'A mice (1) and α6 L9'S mice (2), allow for unambiguous identification of neurons based on their functional expression of a specific nAChR subunit. Although whole-cell patch clamp recordings from neurons in brain slices is routinely done by the skilled electrophysiologist, it is challenging to locally apply drugs such as acetylcholine or nicotine to the recorded cell within a brain slice. Dilution of drugs into the superfusate (bath application) is not rapidly reversible, and U-tube systems are not easily adapted to work with brain slices. In this paper, we describe a method for rapidly applying nAChR-activating drugs to neurons recorded in adult mouse brain slices. Standard whole-cell recordings are made from neurons in slices, and a second micropipette filled with a drug of

  20. Circulating angiotensin II deteriorates left ventricular function with sympathoexcitation via brain angiotensin II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Keisuke; Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Sympathoexcitation contributes to the progression of heart failure. Activation of brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) causes central sympathoexcitation. Thus, we assessed the hypothesis that the increase in circulating angiotensin II comparable to that reported in heart failure model affects cardiac function through the central sympathoexcitation via activating AT1R in the brain. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II for 14 days increased the circulating angiotensin II level comparable to that reported in heart failure model rats after myocardial infarction. In comparison with the control, angiotensin II infusion increased 24 hours urinary norepinephrine excretion, and systolic blood pressure. Angiotensin II infusion hypertrophied left ventricular (LV) without changing chamber dimensions while increased end-diastolic pressure. The LV pressure–volume relationship indicated that angiotensin II did not impact on the end-systolic elastance, whereas significantly increased end-diastolic elastance. Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of AT1R blocker, losartan, attenuated these angiotensin II-induced changes. In conclusion, circulating angiotensin II in heart failure is capable of inducing sympathoexcitation via in part AT1R in the brain, subsequently leading to LV diastolic dysfunction. PMID:26290529

  1. Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Zhang, Yanan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Wiethe, Robert; Amato, George; Maitra, Rangan

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation in some patients, which led to withdrawal of the pyrazole inverse agonist rimonabant (SR141716A) from European markets. Efforts are underway to produce peripherally selective CB1 antagonists to circumvent CNS-associated adverse effects. In this study, novel analogs of rimonabant (1) were explored in which the 1-aminopiperidine group was switched to a 4-aminopiperidine, attached at the 4-amino position (5). The piperidine nitrogen was functionalized with carbamates, amides, and sulfonamides, providing compounds that are potent inverse agonists of hCB1 with good selectivity for hCB1 over hCB2. Select compounds were further studied using in vitro models of brain penetration, oral absorption and metabolic stability. Several compounds were identified with predicted minimal brain penetration and good metabolic stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic testing revealed that inverse agonist 8c is orally bioavailable and has vastly reduced brain penetration compared to rimonabant.

  2. A2A adenosine receptor regulates the human blood brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) symbolically represents the gateway to the central nervous system. It is a single layer of specialized endothelial cells that coats the central nervous system (CNS) vasculature and physically separates the brain environment from the blood constituents, to maintain the homeostasis of the CNS. However, this protective measure is a hindrance to the delivery of therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. Here, we show that activation of A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved agonist potently permeabilizes an in vitro primary human brain endothelial barrier (hBBB) to the passage of chemotherapeutic drugs and T cells. T cell migration under AR signaling occurs primarily by paracellular transendothelial route. Permeabilization of the hBBB is rapid, time-dependent and reversible and is mediated by morphological changes in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization induced by RhoA signaling and a potent down-regulation of Claudin-5 and VE-Cadherin. Moreover, the kinetics of BBB permeability in mice closely overlaps with the permeability kinetics of the hBBB. These data suggest that activation of A2A AR is an endogenous mechanism that may be used for CNS drug delivery in human. PMID:25262373

  3. Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Zhang, Yanan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Wiethe, Robert; Amato, George; Maitra, Rangan

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation in some patients, which led to withdrawal of the pyrazole inverse agonist rimonabant (SR141716A) from European markets. Efforts are underway to produce peripherally selective CB1 antagonists to circumvent CNS-associated adverse effects. In this study, novel analogs of rimonabant (1) were explored in which the 1-aminopiperidine group was switched to a 4-aminopiperidine, attached at the 4-amino position (5). The piperidine nitrogen was functionalized with carbamates, amides, and sulfonamides, providing compounds that are potent inverse agonists of hCB1 with good selectivity for hCB1 over hCB2. Select compounds were further studied using in vitro models of brain penetration, oral absorption and metabolic stability. Several compounds were identified with predicted minimal brain penetration and good metabolic stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic testing revealed that inverse agonist 8c is orally bioavailable and has vastly reduced brain penetration compared to rimonabant. PMID:26827137

  4. SB 242084, a selective and brain penetrant 5-HT2C receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Wood, M D; Bright, F; Trail, B; Riley, G; Holland, V; Avenell, K Y; Stean, T; Upton, N; Bromidge, S; Forbes, I T; Brown, A M; Middlemiss, D N; Blackburn, T P

    1997-01-01

    SB 242084 has a high affinity (pKi 9.0) for the cloned human 5-HT2C receptor and 100- and 158-fold selectivity over the closely related cloned human 5-HT2B and 5-HT2A subtypes respectively. SB 242084 had over 100-fold selectivity over a range of other 5-HT, dopamine and adrenergic receptors. In studies of 5-HT-stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing the cloned human 5-HT2C receptor, SB 242084 acted as an antagonist with a pKb of 9.3, which closely resembled its corresponding receptor binding affinity. SB 242084 potently inhibited m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP, 7 mgkg i.p. 20 min pre-test)-induced hypolocomotion in rats, a model of in vivo central 5-HT2C receptor function, with an ID50 of 0.11 mg/kg i.p., and 2.0 mg/kg p.o. SB 242084 (0.1-1 mg/kg i.p.) exhibited an anxiolytic-like profile in the rat social interaction test, increasing time spent in social interaction, but having no effect on locomotion. SB 242084 (0.1-1 mg/kg i.p.) also markedly increased punished responding in a rat Geller-Seifter conflict test of anxiety, but had no consistent effect on unpunished responding. A large acute dose of SB 242084 (30 mg/kg p.o.) had no effect on seizure susceptibility in the rat maximal electroshock seizure threshold test. Also, while SB 242084 (2 and 6 mg/kg p.o. 1 hr pre-test) antagonized the hypophagic response to mCPP, neither acute nor subchronic administration of the drug, for 5 days at 2 or 6 mg/kg p.o. twice daily, affected food intake or weight gain. The results suggest that SB 242084 is the first reported selective potent and brain penetrant 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and has anxiolytic-like activity, but does not possess either proconvulsant or hyperphagic properties which are characteristic of mutant mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. PMID:9225286

  5. Preparation of brain membranes containing a single type of opioid receptor highly selective for dynorphin.

    PubMed Central

    James, I F; Chavkin, C; Goldstein, A

    1982-01-01

    Opioid receptors on guinea pig brain membranes were alkylated by the naltrexone analogue beta-chlornaltrexamine. Binding of the prototypical mu and kappa ligands, [3H]dihydromorphine and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, was more readily affected by the reagent than was binding of the delta ligand, 3H-labeled [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin. Treatment of membranes with beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of dynorphin resulted in significant protection of [3H]ethylketocyclazocine binding sites, without protection of [3H]dihydromorphine or 3H-labeled [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin sites. Similarly, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and sufentanil selectively protected binding sites for 3H-labeled [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]dihydromorphine, respectively. Scatchard analysis of [3H]ethylketocyclazocine binding to untreated membranes suggested two types of binding site with 40-fold difference in affinities. Membranes treated with beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of dynorphin retained about 40% of the high-affinity sites and lost the low-affinity sites. Selective protection of sites with high affinity for dynorphin and ethylketocyclazocine was confirmed in competition binding assays. These results strongly suggest that the three types of opioid receptor are not interconvertible and provide further evidence that the endogenous peptide dynorphin is a highly selective ligand of the kappa opioid receptor. PMID:6130527

  6. Homodimerization of adenosine A₁ receptors in brain cortex explains the biphasic effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Eduard; Moreno, Estefania; Cortés, Antoni; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; McCormick, Peter J; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent

    2013-08-01

    Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and proximity ligation assays, we obtained the first direct evidence that adenosine A₁ receptors (A₁Rs) form homomers not only in cell cultures but also in brain cortex. By radioligand binding experiments in the absence or in the presence of the A₁Rs allosteric modulator, adenosine deaminase, and by using the two-state dimer receptor model to fit binding data, we demonstrated that the protomer-protomer interactions in the A₁R homomers account for some of the pharmacological characteristics of agonist and antagonist binding to A₁Rs. These pharmacological properties include the appearance of cooperativity in agonist binding, the change from a biphasic saturation curve to a monophasic curve in self-competition experiments and the molecular cross-talk detected when two different specific molecules bind to the receptor. In this last case, we discovered that caffeine binding to one protomer increases the agonist affinity for the other protomer in the A₁R homomer, a pharmacological characteristic that correlates with the low caffeine concentrations-induced activation of agonist-promoted A₁R signaling. This pharmacological property can explain the biphasic effects reported at low and high concentration of caffeine on locomotor activity.

  7. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  8. EphrinB3 blocks EphB3 dependence receptor functions to prevent cell death following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Theus, M H; Ricard, J; Glass, S J; Travieso, L G; Liebl, D J

    2014-05-08

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, have a variety of roles in the developing and adult central nervous system that require direct cell-cell interactions; including regulating axon path finding, cell proliferation, migration and synaptic plasticity. Recently, we identified a novel pro-survival role for ephrins in the adult subventricular zone, where ephrinB3 blocks Eph-mediated cell death during adult neurogenesis. Here, we examined whether EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult forebrain following traumatic brain injury and whether ephrinB3 infusion could limit this effect. We show that EphB3 co-labels with microtubule-associated protein 2-positive neurons in the adult cortex and is closely associated with ephrinB3 ligand, which is reduced following controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In the complete absence of EphB3 (EphB3(-/-)), we observed reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and functional improvements in motor deficits after CCI injury as compared with wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice. We also demonstrated that EphB3 exhibits dependence receptor characteristics as it is cleaved by caspases and induces cell death, which is not observed in the presence of ephrinB3. Following trauma, infusion of pre-clustered ephrinB3-Fc molecules (eB3-Fc) into the contralateral ventricle reduced cortical infarct volume and TUNEL staining in the cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampus of wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice, but not EphB3(-/-) mice. Similarly, application of eB3-Fc improved motor functions after CCI injury. We conclude that EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult cortex through a novel dependence receptor-mediated cell death mechanism in the injured adult cortex and is attenuated following ephrinB3 stimulation.

  9. Mitochondrial morphogenesis, dendrite development, and synapse formation in cerebellum require both Bcl-w and the glutamate receptor delta2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong A; Shio, Helen

    2008-06-13

    Bcl-w belongs to the prosurvival group of the Bcl-2 family, while the glutamate receptor delta2 (Grid2) is an excitatory receptor that is specifically expressed in Purkinje cells, and required for Purkinje cell synapse formation. A recently published result as well as our own findings have shown that Bcl-w can physically interact with an autophagy protein, Beclin1, which in turn has been shown previously to form a protein complex with the intracellular domain of Grid2 and an adaptor protein, nPIST. This suggests that Bcl-w and Grid2 might interact genetically to regulate mitochondria, autophagy, and neuronal function. In this study, we investigated this genetic interaction of Bcl-w and Grid2 through analysis of single and double mutant mice of these two proteins using a combination of histological and behavior tests. It was found that Bcl-w does not control the cell number in mouse brain, but promotes what is likely to be the mitochondrial fission in Purkinje cell dendrites, and is required for synapse formation and motor learning in cerebellum, and that Grid2 has similar phenotypes. Mice carrying the double mutations of these two genes had synergistic effects including extremely long mitochondria in Purkinje cell dendrites, and strongly aberrant Purkinje cell dendrites, spines, and synapses, and severely ataxic behavior. Bcl-w and Grid2 mutations were not found to influence the basal autophagy that is required for Purkinje cell survival, thus resulting in these phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that Bcl-w and Grid2 are two critical proteins acting in distinct pathways to regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis and control Purkinje cell dendrite development and synapse formation. We propose that the mitochondrial fission occurring during neuronal growth might be critically important for dendrite development and synapse formation, and that it can be regulated coordinately by multiple pathways including Bcl-2 and glutamate receptor family members.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic receptor binding in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)methylcarbamylcholine, a novel radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Gehlert, D.R.; Hawkins, K.N.; Nakayama, K.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-12-28

    Light microscopic autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical distribution of nicotinic receptors in rat brain using a novel radioligand, (/sup 3/H)methylcarbamylcholine (MCC). Specific (/sup 3/H)MCC binding to slide-mounted tissue sections of rat brain was saturable, reversible and of high affinity. Data analysis revealed a single population of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding sites with a K/sub d/ value or 1.8 nM and B/sub max/ of 20.1 fmol/mg protein. Nicotinic agonists and antagonists competed for (/sup 3/H)MCC binding sites in slide-mounted brain sections with much greater potency than muscarinic drugs. The rat brain areas containing the highest densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were in thalamic regions, the medial habenular nucleus and the superior colliculus. Moderate densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were seen over the anterior cingulate cortex, the nucleus accumbens, the zona compacta of substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Low densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were found in most other brain regions. These data suggest that (/sup 3/H)MCC selectively labels central nicotinic receptors and that these receptors are concentrated in the thalamus, the medial habenular nucleus and the superior colliculus of the rat brain. 29 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Functional genomics reveals dysregulation of cortical olfactory receptors in Parkinson disease: novel putative chemoreceptors in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Schlüter, Agatha; Carmona, Margarita; Moreno, Jesús; Ansoleaga, Belen; Torrejón-Escribano, Benjamín; Gustincich, Stefano; Pujol, Aurora; Ferrer, Isidre

    2013-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is no longer considered a complex motor disorder but rather a systemic disease with variable nonmotor deficits that may include impaired olfaction, depression, mood and sleep disorders, and altered cortical function. Increasing evidence indicates that multiple metabolic defects occur in regions outside the substantia nigra, including the cerebral cortex, even at premotor stages of the disease. We investigated changes in gene expression in the frontal cortex in PD patient brains using a transcriptomics approach. Functional genomics analysis indicated that cortical olfactory receptors (ORs) and taste receptors (TASRs) are altered in PD patients. Olfactory receptors OR2L13, OR1E1, OR2J3, OR52L1, and OR11H1 and taste receptors TAS2R5 and TAS2R50 were downregulated, but TAS2R10 and TAS2R13 were upregulated at premotor and parkinsonian stages in the frontal cortex area 8 in PD patient brains. Furthermore, we present novel evidence that, in addition to the ORs, obligate downstream components of OR function adenylyl cyclase 3 and olfactory G protein (Gαolf), OR transporters, receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 and receptor expression enhancing protein 1, and OR xenobiotic removing UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A6 are widely expressed in neurons of the cerebral cortex and other regions of the adult human brain. Together, these findings support the concept that ORs and TASRs in the cerebral cortex may have novel physiologic functions that are affected in PD patients.

  12. Selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor biased agonists elicitdistinct brain activation patterns: a pharmacoMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, G.; Bolbos, R.; Costes, N.; Redouté, J.; Newman-Tancredi, A.; Zimmer, L.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptors are involved in several physiological and pathological processes and constitute therefore an important therapeutic target. The recent pharmacological concept of biased agonism asserts that highly selective agonists can preferentially direct receptor signaling to specific intracellular responses, opening the possibility of drugs targeting a receptor subtype in specific brain regions. The present study brings additional support to this concept thanks to functional magnetic resonance imaging (7 Tesla-fMRI) in anaesthetized rats. Three 5-HT1A receptor agonists (8-OH-DPAT, F13714 and F15599) and one 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (MPPF) were compared in terms of influence on the brain blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Our study revealed for the first time contrasting BOLD signal patterns of biased agonists in comparison to a classical agonist and a silent antagonist. By providing functional information on the influence of pharmacological activation of 5-HT1A receptors in specific brain regions, this neuroimaging approach, translatable to the clinic, promises to be useful in exploring the new concept of biased agonism in neuropsychopharmacology. PMID:27211078

  13. Antibody response to a T-dependent antigen requires B cell expression of complement receptors

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody responses to T- dependent antigens require complement receptors expressed on either B lymphocytes or follicular dendritic cells. We have used RAG-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to create mice specifically lacking B cell complement receptors. Despite normal expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1[CD35]) and CR2 (CD21) on follicular dendritic cells, these mice have a profound defect in their capacity to mount a T-dependent antibody response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This suggests that CD21 and/or CD35 on B lymphocytes may be required for cellular activation, adsorptive endocytosis of antigen, recruitment to germinal centers, and/or protection from apoptosis during the humoral response to T-dependent antigens. PMID:8666942

  14. BDNF-induced synaptic delivery of AMPAR subunits is differentially dependent on NMDA receptors and requires ERK.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Keifer, Joyce

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies using an in vitro model of eyeblink classical conditioning in turtles suggest that increased numbers of synaptic AMPARs supports the acquisition and expression of conditioned responses (CRs). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its associated receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, is also required for acquisition of CRs. Bath application of BDNF alone induces synaptic delivery of GluR1- and GluR4-containing AMPARs that is blocked by coapplication of the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a. The molecular mechanisms involved in BDNF-induced AMPAR trafficking remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether BDNF-induced synaptic AMPAR incorporation utilizes similar cellular mechanisms as AMPAR trafficking that occurs during in vitro classical conditioning. Using pharmacological blockade and confocal imaging, the results show that synaptic delivery of GluR1 subunits during conditioning or BDNF application does not require activity of NMDARs but is mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In contrast, synaptic delivery of GluR4-containing AMPARs during both conditioning and BDNF application is NMDAR- as well as ERK-dependent. These findings indicate that BDNF application mimics AMPAR trafficking observed during conditioning by activation of some of the same intracellular signaling pathways and suggest that BDNF is a key signal transduction element in postsynaptic events that mediate conditioning.

  15. Hormonal regulation of type II glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, A; Lapointe, B; Barden, N

    1991-10-01

    Differences in the regulation of type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels in female rat brain regions involved in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis were studied by Northern blot analysis after chronic administration of corticosterone or dexamethasone to adrenalectomized (ADX), ovariectomized (OVX), and ADX/OVX animals. The effect of chronic estradiol or progesterone treatment of intact animals was also studied. Our results show that type II GR mRNA levels of ADX animals were significantly increased above control values in amygdala (140%) and hippocampus (196%), but not in hypothalamus. These increased transcript levels were down-regulated by corticosterone or dexamethasone, with the exception of those in the amygdala, where corticosterone had no effect. Ovariectomy significantly increased hypothalamic GR mRNA content (174%) over control values, and this increase was sensitive to dexamethasone. The combined effect of adrenalectomy/ovariectomy on GR mRNA levels was greater than that of adrenalectomy only in amygdala. Corticosterone increased amygdala transcript levels in OVX and ADX/OVX animals. Estradiol administration to intact animals raised the GR mRNA content of amygdala, while progesterone treatment had no effect on any of the brain regions studied. We conclude that there exists heterogeneity with respect to type II GR mRNA regulation by corticosterone and dexamethasone in brain regions of ADX female rats, and that certain limbic structures show greater sensitivity to these hormonal manipulations, suggesting a more prominent role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Our results also suggest that circulating estrogens can influence the sensitivity of brain structures (i.e. hypothalamus and amygdala) to glucocorticoids by altering GR mRNA levels. These regions may represent integration sites at which gonadal steroids are able to alter stress hormone secretion.

  16. Elevated Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Availability in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Neumeister, Alexander; Normandin, Marc D.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Piomelli, Daniele; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Gujarro-Anton, Ana; Potenza, Marc N.; Bailey, Christopher R.; Lin, Shu-fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Henry, Shannan; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and their attending cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) have been implicated in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, their specific role has not been studied in people with PTSD. Herein, we present an in vivo imaging study using positron emission tomography (PET) and the CB1-selective radioligand [11C]OMAR in individuals with PTSD, and healthy controls with lifetime histories of trauma (trauma controls [TC]) and those without such histories (healthy controls [HC]). Untreated individuals with PTSD (N=25) with non-combat trauma histories, and TC (N=12) and HC (N=23) participated in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scan and a resting PET scan with the CB1 receptor antagonist radiotracer [11C]OMAR, which measures volume of distribution (VT) linearly related to CB1 receptor availability. Peripheral levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and cortisol were also assessed. In the PTSD group, relative to the HC and TC groups, we found elevated brain-wide [11C]OMAR VT values (F(2,53)=7.96, p=.001; 19.5% and 14.5% higher, respectively) which were most pronounced in women (F(1,53)=5.52, p=.023). Anandamide concentrations were reduced in the PTSD relative to the TC (53.1% lower) and HC (58.2% lower) groups. Cortisol levels were lower in the PTSD and TC groups relative to the HC group. Three biomarkers examined collectively—OMAR VT, anandamide, and cortisol—correctly classified nearly 85% of PTSD cases. These results suggest that abnormal CB1 receptor-mediated anandamide signaling is implicated in the etiology of PTSD, and provide a promising neurobiological model to develop novel, evidence-based pharmacotherapies for this disorder. PMID:23670490

  17. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) administration selectively downregulates serotonin2 receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Buckholtz, N S; Zhou, D F; Freedman, D X; Potter, W Z

    1990-04-01

    A dosage regimen of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) that reliably produces behavioral tolerance in rats was evaluated for effects on neurotransmitter receptor binding in rat brain using a variety of radioligands selective for amine receptor subtypes. Daily administration of LSD [130 micrograms/kg (0.27 mumol/kg) intraperitoneally (IP)] for 5 days produced a decrease in serotonin2 (5-hydroxytryptamine2, 5-HT2) binding in cortex (measured 24 hours after the last drug administration) but did not affect binding to other receptor systems (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, beta-adrenergic, alpha 1- or alpha 2-adrenergic, D2-dopaminergic) or to a recognition site for 5-HT uptake. The decrease was evident within 3 days of LSD administration but was not demonstrable after the first LSD dose. Following 5 days of LSD administration the decrease was still present 48 hours, but not 96 hours, after the last administration. The indole hallucinogen psilocybin [1.0 mg/kg (3.5 mumol/kg) for 8 days] also produced a significant decrease in 5HT2 binding, but neither the nonhallucinogenic analog bromo-LSD [1.3 mg/kg (2.4 mumol/kg) for 5 days] nor mescaline [10 mg/kg (40.3 mumol/kg) for 5 or 10 days] affected 5-HT2 binding. These observations suggest that LSD and other indole hallucinogens may act as 5-HT2 agonists at postsynaptic 5-HT2 receptors. Decreased 5-HT2 binding strikingly parallels the development and loss of behavioral tolerance seen with repeated LSD administration, but the decreased binding per se cannot explain the gamut of behavioral tolerance and cross-tolerance phenomena among the indole and phenylethylamine hallucinogens.

  18. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  19. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  20. Gender differences in brain peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expression and seizures produced by heptachlor during development.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Eric F; Woolley, Dorothy E

    2008-01-01

    Heptachlor has been widely used as an insecticide. It is a GABA-A antagonist and causes seizures. It also increases peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in brain. PBRs are found on the outer mitochondrial membrane in glia, rather than in neurons, and are necessary for steroidogenesis in brain. We compared the effects of acute oral administration of heptachlor (60 mg/ml oil/kg body wt) at 10 ages from postnatal day (PND) 0 to 60 on brain PBR expression and seizure severity in both male and female rats at 1 and 2 hr after administration. From PND 10 through 60, brain PBR expression was increased about 175-225% of controls at both 1 and 2 hr after heptachlor in females. In males however, PBRs were only increased at 30-60 days at 1 hr but not at any age at 2 hr. At 2 hr after heptachlor at 30-60 days in males, PBRs were significantly lower than at 1 hr and even tended to be lower than control levels. By contrast, seizure intensity was greater in males than in females from 10 through 20 days of age at 1 hr and was even greater at 2 hr from 16 through 30 days of age, reflecting the lower PBR levels at 2 hr than at 1 hr in males. Thus, the gender difference in PBR expression was the opposite of the gender difference in seizure intensity. PBRs in brain synthesize several neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, which is a potent anticonvulsant agent. We hypothesize that the gender differences in seizure intensity after heptachlor were due to the action of heptachlor in greatly increasing PBR expression in females but not in males. Thus the greater expression of PBRs in females would result in more synthesis of allopregnanolone than in males. Therefore, because of allopregnanolone's anticonvulsant effects, seizure intensity was less in females than in males. By comparison, maximal electroshock (MES) caused seizures and increased PBRs in brain in both male and female developing rats with no gender differences at 10-20 days of age.

  1. Neuroprotection by gonadal steroid hormones in acute brain damage requires cooperation with astroglia and microglia.

    PubMed

    Johann, Sonja; Beyer, Cordian

    2013-09-01

    The neuroactive steroids 17β-estradiol and progesterone control a broad spectrum of neural functions. Besides their roles in the regulation of classical neuroendocrine loops, they strongly influence motor and cognitive systems, behavior, and modulate brain performance at almost every level. Such a statement is underpinned by the widespread and lifelong expression pattern of all types of classical and non-classical estrogen and progesterone receptors in the CNS. The life-sustaining power of neurosteroids for tattered or seriously damaged neurons aroused interest in the scientific community in the past years to study their ability for therapeutic use under neuropathological challenges. Documented by excellent studies either performed in vitro or in adequate animal models mimicking acute toxic or chronic neurodegenerative brain disorders, both hormones revealed a high potency to protect neurons from damage and saved neural systems from collapse. Unfortunately, neurons, astroglia, microglia, and oligodendrocytes are comparably target cells for both steroid hormones. This hampers the precise assignment and understanding of neuroprotective cellular mechanisms activated by both steroids. In this article, we strive for a better comprehension of the mutual reaction between these steroid hormones and the two major glial cell types involved in the maintenance of brain homeostasis, astroglia and microglia, during acute traumatic brain injuries such as stroke and hypoxia. In particular, we attempt to summarize steroid-activated cellular signaling pathways and molecular responses in these cells and their contribution to dampening neuroinflammation and neural destruction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'. PMID:23196064

  2. Minimum number of lipids are required to support the functional properties of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.T.; Eubanks, J.H.; Earnest, J.P.; McNamee, M.G.

    1988-05-17

    The detergent sodium cholate was used to both solubilize and partially delipidate the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Using both native membranes and reconstituted membranes, it is shown that the detergent to lipid molar ratio is the most important parameter in determining the effect of the detergent on the functional properties of the receptor. Receptor-lipid complexes were quantitatively separated from detergent and excess lipids by centrifugation through detergent-free sucrose gradients. The lipid to protein molar ratio of the complexes could be precisely controlled by adjusting the cholate and lipid concentrations of the starting membranes. Analyses of both ion influx activity and ligand binding revealed that a minimum of 45 lipids per receptor was required for stabilization of the receptor in a fully functional state. Progressive irreversible inactivation occurred as the lipid to protein mole ratio was decreased below 45, and complete inactivation occurred below a ratio of 20. The results are consistent with a functional requirement for a single shell of lipids around the perimeter of the receptor.

  3. Burst firing in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones does not require ionotrophic GABA or glutamate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Liu, X; Herbison, A E

    2012-12-01

    Burst firing is a feature of many neuroendocrine cell types, including the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones that control fertility. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic influences in generating GnRH neurone burst firing is presently unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of fast amino acid transmission in burst firing by examining the effects of receptor antagonists on bursting displayed by green fluorescent protein GnRH neurones in sagittal brain slices prepared from adult male mice. Blockade of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors with a cocktail of CNQX and AP5 was found to have no effects on burst firing in GnRH neurones. The frequency of bursts, dynamics of individual bursts, or percentage of firing clustered in bursts was not altered. Similarly, GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin had no effects upon burst firing in GnRH neurones. To examine the importance of both glutamate and GABA ionotrophic signalling, a cocktail including picrotoxin, CNQX and AP5 was used but, again, this was found to have no effects on GnRH neurone burst firing. To further question the impact of endogenous amino acid release on burst firing, electrical activation of anteroventral periventricular nuclei GABA/glutamate inputs to GnRH neurones was undertaken and found to have no impact on burst firing. Taken together, these observations indicate that bursting in GnRH neurones is not dependent upon acute ionotrophic GABA and glutamate signalling and suggest that extrinsic inputs to GnRH neurones acting through AMPA, NMDA and GABA(A) receptors are unlikely to be required for burst initiation in these cells.

  4. N-Acetylserotonin: Circadian Activation of the BDNF Receptor and Neuroprotection in the Retina and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Iuvone, P. Michael; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Tosini, Gianluca; Ye, Keqiang

    2014-01-01

    TrkB is the cognate receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family involved in neuronal survival, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. BDNF has been shown to protect photoreceptors from light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) and to improve ganglion cell survival following optic nerve damage. However, the utility of BDNF as a retinal neuroprotectant is limited by its short half-life, inability to cross the blood-brain and blood-retinal barriers, and activation of the proapoptotic p75 neurotrophin receptor. N-Acetylserotonin (NAS) is a naturally occurring chemical intermediate in the melatonin biosynthetic pathway in the pineal gland and retina. Its synthesis occurs in a circadian fashion with high levels at night and is suppressed by light exposure. Until recently, NAS was thought to function primarily as a melatonin precursor with little or no biological function of its own. We have now shown that TrkB activation in the retina and hippocampus is circadian in C3H/f+/+ mice, which synthesize NAS, but not in C57BL/6 mice, which have a mutation in the gene encoding the enzyme that converts serotonin to NAS. In addition, treatment of mice exogenous NAS, but not with serotonin or melatonin, activates TrkB during the daytime in a BDNF-independent manner. NAS appears to have neuroprotective properties and its administration reduces caspase 3 activation in the brain in response to kainic acid, a neurotoxic glutamate analog. We have developed structural analogs of NAS that activate TrkB. One of these derivatives, N-[2- (5-hydroxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]-2-oxopiperideine- 3-carboximide (HIOC), selectively activates TrkB with greater potency than NAS and has a significantly longer biological half-life than NAS after systemic administration. HIOC administration results in long-lasting activation of TrkB and downstream signaling kinases. The compound can pass the blood-brain and blood-retinal barriers when administered systemically

  5. Localization of CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor mRNA in the Brain of the Chick (Gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Stincic, Todd L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) is prevalent in the brains of many species. Receptor binding, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical surveys have described the distribution of this receptor in a limited number of species. The current study used in situ hybridization to examine the expression of CB1 mRNA in the chick brain, a non-mammalian vertebrate. The results were compared to the observed patterns of expression for CB1 mRNA, protein, and agonist binding that have been reported for other avian species and mammals. Importantly, since CB1 receptors are typically located on neuronal terminals, comparison of the somatic mRNA expression with previously reported descriptions of the location of functional receptors, allows speculation about the circuits that make use of these receptors. The expression pattern for CB1 mRNA appears to be highly conserved across species in key areas such as the cerebellum and portions of the forebrain. For example, high levels of expression were observed in the avian amygdala and hippocampus, areas which express high levels of CB1 in mammals. The avian substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, however, showed specific labeling. This finding is in stark contrast to the high levels of receptor binding or CB1 protein, but not CB1 mRNA in these areas of the mammalian brain. Moderate labeling was also seen throughout the hyperpallium and mesopallium. Throughout the brain, a number of regions that are known to be involved in visual processing displayed high levels of expression. For example, the tectum also had strong mRNA expression within layers 9-11 of the stratum griseum et fibrosum superficale and stratum album centrale. PMID:18835551

  6. The putative signal peptide of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is not required for receptor synthesis but promotes receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yunjun; Yang, Dehua; Dai, Antao; Zhou, Caihong; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    GLP-1R (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor) mediates the ‘incretin effect’ and many other anti-diabetic actions of its cognate ligand, GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). It belongs to the class B family of GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors) and possesses an N-terminal putative SP (signal peptide). It has been reported that this sequence is required for the synthesis of GLP-1R and is cleaved after receptor synthesis. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth exploration towards the role of the putative SP in GLP-1R synthesis. A mutant GLP-1R without this sequence was expressed in HEK293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) and displayed normal functionality with respect to ligand binding and activation of adenylate cyclase. Thus the putative SP does not seem to be required for receptor synthesis. Immunoblotting analysis shows that the amount of GLP-1R synthesized in HEK293 cells is low when the putative SP is absent. This indicates that the role of the sequence is to promote the expression of GLP-1R. Furthermore, epitopes tagged at the N-terminal of GLP-1R are detectable by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in our experiments. In conclusion, the present study points to different roles of SP in GLP-1R expression which broadens our understanding of the functionality of this putative SP of GLP-1R and possibly other Class B GPCRs. PMID:25330813

  7. The brain as immunoprecipitator of serum autoantibodies against N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Gomez, Esther; Kästner, Anne; Steiner, Johann; Schneider, Anja; Hettling, Bilke; Poggi, Giulia; Ostehr, Kristin; Uhr, Manfred; Asif, Abdul R; Matzke, Mike; Schmidt, Ulrike; Pfander, Viktoria; Hammer, Christian; Schulz, Thomas F; Binder, Lutz; Stöcker, Winfried; Weber, Frank; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies (AB) against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 (NMDAR1) are highly seroprevalent in health and disease. Symptomatic relevance may arise upon compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, it remained unknown whether circulating NMDAR1 AB appear in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Of n = 271 subjects with CSF-serum pairs, 26 were NMDAR1 AB seropositive, but only 1 was CSF positive. Contrariwise, tetanus AB (non-brain-binding) were present in serum and CSF of all subjects, with CSF levels higher upon BBB dysfunction. Translational mouse experiments proved the hypothesis that the brain acts as an 'immunoprecipitator'; simultaneous injection of NMDAR1 AB and the non-brain-binding green fluorescent protein AB resulted in high detectability of the former in brain and the latter in CSF. PMID:26505629

  8. Potent, stereoselective, and brain region selective modulation of second messengers in the rat brain by (+)LY354740, a novel group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, D D; Johnson, B G; Wright, R A; Salhoff, C R; Monn, J A

    1998-08-01

    LY354740 is a highly potent and selective agonist for recombinant Group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2 and mGlu3), which has anxiolytic and drug withdrawal alleviating properties when administered systemically in rats and mice. The modulation of second messengers by LY354740 in rat brain tissues was investigated to understand the cellular basis for the pharmacological and potential therapeutic actions of LY354740. LY354740 potently decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation in slices of the adult rat hippocampus (EC50=22+/-3 nM) in a stereoselective manner. LY354740 (at 1 microM) greatly (>90%) suppressed forskolin-stimulated cAMP in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, while producing only partial suppression (about 50%) in midbrain regions and olfactory bulb, and no significant cAMP alterations in the cerebellum and brainstem regions. Inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was antagonized by (+)-alpha(-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine [(+)MCPG], a competitive mGlu receptor antagonist. LY354740 did not alter phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the rat hippocampus per se, but potentiated stimulation of phophoinositide hydrolysis by the Group I mGlu receptor selective agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or stimulation of cAMP formation by the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamideoadenosine (NECA). These data indicate that LY354740 is a highly potent, efficacious, and selective Group II mGlu receptor (mGlu 2/3) agonist in the rat brain. The potent, stereoselective, and brain region selective actions of LY354740 on mGlu receptor linked second messenger systems likely underlie the in vivo potency and stereoselectivity of this compound in animal models. PMID:9750002

  9. Vasopressin receptors in the brain, liver and kidney of rats following osmotic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Szot, P; Dorsa, D M

    1991-03-29

    The binding site concentration (Bmax) and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for [3H]-arginine vasopressin (AVP) binding sites were measured in limbic brain areas (septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala) and liver and kidney of control and osmotically stimulated male Wistar rats. Membrane binding was performed in these five areas 30, 60 and 180 min following intraperitoneal injection of hypertonic saline. This paradigm resulted in no significant change in binding characteristics in the septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala and liver from control treated rats. In contrast, the kidney Bmax was significantly reduced 60 min following osmotic stimulation, with no effect on affinity. These results also suggest that AVP receptors in the CNS are relatively resistant to regulatory effects of an acute AVP exposure. PMID:1828184

  10. Effect of chronic psychogenic stress on characteristics of some rat brain synaptic membrane receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikuradze, V.O.; Kozlovskaya, M.M.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies characteristics of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptors, and imipramine and bensodiazepine receptors in brain synaptic membranes of rats after exposure to combined stress for 15 days by a modified Hecht's method. Before the experiment the suspension was thawed and centrifuged. Specific binding of tritium-WB-4101 (30 Ci/mmole), tritium-dihydroalprenolol, tritium-flunitrazepam, and tritium-imipramine was carried out by known methods with certain modifications. The results suggest that pathology of behavior in rats observed in the model may be classed as a depressive-like state rather than a neurosis-like state, and the model itself may be more appropriate for the study of the mechanisms of action of compounds with marked tranquilizing activity.

  11. Characterization of opioid receptor types modulating acetylcholine release in septal regions of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gazyakan, E; Hennegriff, M; Haaf, A; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Feuerstein, T J; Jackisch, R

    2000-07-01

    antibody-linked enzymatic staining procedure, whereas mRNAs for mu- or delta-opioid receptors were detected with radioactive probes. These experiments revealed that in the septal region mainly mu-opioid receptors were expressed by neurons positive for ChAT mRNA, whereas in the rat striatum the expression of delta-opioid receptors prevailed in those neurons. We conclude that in the septal area of the rat brain, in contrast to the rat striatum and hippocampus, both presynaptic mu- and delta-opioid receptors modulate the evoked release of ACh. Whether presynaptic mu- and delta-opioid receptors occur on the same or on different septal cells or axon terminals remains to be clarified. PMID:10935530

  12. A2A adenosine receptor modulates drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from toxic substances within the peripheral circulation. It maintains brain homeostasis and is a hurdle for drug delivery to the CNS to treat neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and brain tumors. The drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is highly expressed on brain endothelial cells and blocks the entry of most drugs delivered to the brain. Here, we show that activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved A2A AR agonist (Lexiscan) rapidly and potently decreased P-gp expression and function in a time-dependent and reversible manner. We demonstrate that downmodulation of P-gp expression and function coincided with chemotherapeutic drug accumulation in brains of WT mice and in primary mouse and human brain endothelial cells, which serve as in vitro BBB models. Lexiscan also potently downregulated the expression of BCRP1, an efflux transporter that is highly expressed in the CNS vasculature and other tissues. Finally, we determined that multiple pathways, including MMP9 cleavage and ubiquitinylation, mediated P-gp downmodulation. Based on these data, we propose that A2A AR activation on BBB endothelial cells offers a therapeutic window that can be fine-tuned for drug delivery to the brain and has potential as a CNS drug-delivery technology. PMID:27043281

  13. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhu, Pei; Li, Jianzhen; Sham, Kathy W.Y.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Christopher H.K.; Lin, Haoran

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons.

  14. Regulation of σ-1 Receptors and Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones in the Brain of Methamphetamine Self-Administering Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Teruo; Justinova, Zuzana; Hayashi, Eri; Cormaci, Gianfrancesco; Mori, Tomohisa; Tsai, Shang-Yi; Barnes, Chanel; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    σ-1 Receptors are endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones that are implicated in the neuroplasticity associated with psychostimulant abuse. We immunocytochemically examined the distribution of σ-1 receptors in the brain of drug-naive rats and then examined the dynamics of σ-1 receptors and other ER chaperones in specific brain subregions of rats that self-administered methamphetamine, received methamphetamine passively, or received only saline injections. σ-1 Receptors were found to be expressed in moderate to high levels in the olfactory bulb, striatum, nucleus accumbens shell, olfactory tubercle, amygdala, hippocampus, red nucleus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, and locus ceruleus. Methamphetamine, whether self-administered or passively received, significantly elevated ER chaperones including the σ-1 receptor, BiP, and calreticulin in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. In the olfactory bulb, however, only the σ-1 receptor chaperone was increased, and this increase occurred only in rats that actively self-administered methamphetamine. Consistent with an increase in σ-1 receptors, extracellular signal-regulated kinase was found to be activated and protein kinase A attenuated in the olfactory bulb of methamphetamine self-administering rats. σ-1 Receptors in the olfactory bulb were found to be colocalized with dopamine D1 receptors. These results indicate that methamphetamine induces ER stress in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra in rats whether the drug is received actively or passively. However, the changes seen only in rats that actively self-administered methamphetamine suggest that D1 and σ-1 receptors in the olfactory bulb might play an important role in the motivational conditioning/learning aspects of methamphetamine self-administration in the rat. PMID:19940104

  15. Alteration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rabies viral-infected dog brains.

    PubMed

    Dumrongphol, H; Srikiatkhachorn, A; Hemachudha, T; Kotchabhakdi, N; Govitrapong, P

    1996-04-01

    Functions of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) were studied in rabid dog brains using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) as a radioligand. Of various brain regions, hippocampus and brainstem were the areas mostly affected in terms of impaired specific binding to [3H]QNB, as compared to other regions, as well as to those of controls. Saturation studies of the hippocampus revealed significantly elevated dissociation equilibrium constant (K(d)) values in both furious (n = 5) (9.80 + or - 2.77 nM) and dumb (n = 6) (6.01 + or - 1.08 nM) types of rabies as compared to 11 controls (2.15 + or - 0.31 nM), whereas the maximum number of receptor sites (B (max)) values were comparable among all subgroups of normal (1.38 + or - 0.10 pmol/mg protein), dumb (1.43 + or - 0.17 pmol/mg protein) and furious (1.28 + or - 0.12 pmol/mg protein) rabies types. Hippocampal K(d) values were comparable between high (fluorescent antibody test-FAT and polymerase chain reaction-PCR positive; n = 4) (7.47 + or - 3.27 nM), and low (FAT-negative and PCR-positive; n = 4) virus amount (8.34 + or - 3.93 nM) but these were significantly higher than controls (n = 4) (1.58 + or - 0.17 nM). Our data suggest a functional derangement of mAChR at specific sites of hippocampus and brainstem which is not dependent on the amount of virus.

  16. PCSK9 is not involved in the degradation of LDL receptors and BACE1 in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mali; Wu, Guoxin; Baysarowich, Jennifer; Kavana, Michael; Addona, George H.; Bierilo, Kathleen K.; Mudgett, John S.; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Sitlani, Ayesha; Renger, John J.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Zerbinatti, Celina V.

    2010-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a secreted protein that regulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels in humans. PCSK9 has also been shown to regulate the levels of additional membrane-bound proteins in vitro, including the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), which are all highly expressed in the CNS and have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To better understand the role of PCSK9 in regulating these additional target proteins in vivo, their steady-state levels were measured in the brain of wild-type, PCSK9-deficient, and human PCSK9 overexpressing transgenic mice. We found that while PCSK9 directly bound to recombinant LDLR, VLDLR, and apoER2 protein in vitro, changes in PCSK9 expression did not alter the level of these receptors in the mouse brain. In addition, we found no evidence that PCSK9 regulates BACE1 levels or APP processing in the mouse brain. In conclusion, our results suggest that while PCSK9 plays an important role in regulating circulating LDL cholesterol levels by reducing the number of hepatic LDLRs, it does not appear to modulate the levels of LDLR and other membrane-bound proteins in the adult mouse brain. PMID:20453200

  17. Discovery and characterization of ACT-335827, an orally available, brain penetrant orexin receptor type 1 selective antagonist.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Gatfield, John; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Dietrich, Hendrik; Treiber, Alexander; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Stress relief: Orexin neuropeptides regulate arousal and stress processing through orexin receptor type 1 (OXR-1) and 2 (OXR-2) signaling. A selective OXR-1 antagonist, represented by a phenylglycine-amide substituted tetrahydropapaverine derivative (ACT-335827), is described that is orally available, penetrates the brain, and decreases fear, compulsive behaviors and autonomic stress reactions in rats.

  18. mRNA for low density lipoprotein receptor in brain and spinal cord of immature and mature rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Russell, D.W.; Goldstein, J.L.; Brown, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Hybridization studies with (/sup 32/P)cDNA probes revealed detectable amounts of mRNA for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the central nervous system (CNS) of rabbits. mRNA levels were highest in the medulla/pons and spinal cord, which were the most heavily myelinated regions that were studied. Lower, but detectable levels were present in cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, and cerebellum. In the medulla/pons and spinal cord, the levels of receptor mRNA were in a range comparable to that detected in the liver. The levels of receptor mRNA in whole brain were constant from 3 days of age to adulthood and, thus, did not vary in proportion to the rate of myelin synthesis. LDL receptor mRNA in the CNS was produced by the same gene that produced the liver and adrenal mRNA as revealed by the demonstration of a deletion in the neural mRNA of Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits identical to the deletion in the LDL receptor gene of these mutant animals. Using antibodies directed against the bovine LDL receptor, the authors showed that LDL receptor protein is present in the medulla/pons of adult cows. The cell types that express LDL receptors in the CNS and the functions of these receptors are unknown.

  19. Hypothyroidism Stimulates D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing in Response to Acute Hypoxia and alters D2 Receptors Levels in Carotid Bodies & Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism can depress breathing and alter dopamine D2 receptor expression and function. We hypothesized that relative to euthyroid hamsters (EH), hypothyroid hamsters (HH) contain increased D2 receptors in brain regions associated with breathing and carotid bodies (CB), and that stimulation of D2 receptors would decease ventilation more in the HH compared to the EH. Hamsters were treated with vehicle, carmoxirile (peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist), or bromocriptine (central and peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist) and breathing was evaluated during exposure to air, hypoxia, and then air. HH exhibited increased D2 receptor protein levels in the striatum and CB’s, but decreased levels in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Relative to vehicle, carmoxirole and bromocriptine stimulated ventilation in the HH during and following exposure to hypoxia. Only bromocriptine depressed ventilation in the EH during and after exposure to hypoxia. Thus,, hypothyroidism impacts the expression of D2 receptors in the carotid body, PVN and striatum, and D2 stimulation affects ventilation remarkably differently than in EH. PMID:22051191

  20. Distribution and Abundance of Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Receptors throughout the Brain of the Great Tit (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Senft, Rebecca A; Meddle, Simone L; Baugh, Alexander T

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid stress response, regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, enables individuals to cope with stressors through transcriptional effects in cells expressing the appropriate receptors. The two receptors that bind glucocorticoids-the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-are present in a variety of vertebrate tissues, but their expression in the brain is especially important. Neural receptor patterns have the potential to integrate multiple behavioral and physiological traits simultaneously, including self-regulation of glucocorticoid secretion through negative feedback processes. In the present work, we quantified the expression of GR and MR mRNA throughout the brain of a female great tit (Parus major), creating a distribution map encompassing 48 regions. This map, the first of its kind for P. major, demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution of both receptor types. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the hippocampus (HP)-the two brain regions that we sampled from a total of 25 birds, we found high GR mRNA expression in the former and, unexpectedly, low MR mRNA in the latter. We examined the covariation of MR and GR levels in these two regions and found a strong, positive relationship between MR in the PVN and MR in the HP and a similar trend for GR across these two regions. This correlation supports the idea that hormone pleiotropy may constrain an individual's behavioral and physiological phenotype. In the female song system, we found moderate GR in hyperstriatum ventrale, pars caudalis (HVC), and moderate MR in robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). Understanding intra- and interspecific patterns of glucocorticoid receptor expression can inform us about the behavioral processes (e.g. song learning) that may be sensitive to stress and stimulate future hypotheses concerning the relationships between receptor expression, circulating hormone concentrations and

  1. Distribution and Abundance of Glucocorticoid and Mineralocorticoid Receptors throughout the Brain of the Great Tit (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Senft, Rebecca A; Meddle, Simone L; Baugh, Alexander T

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid stress response, regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, enables individuals to cope with stressors through transcriptional effects in cells expressing the appropriate receptors. The two receptors that bind glucocorticoids-the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-are present in a variety of vertebrate tissues, but their expression in the brain is especially important. Neural receptor patterns have the potential to integrate multiple behavioral and physiological traits simultaneously, including self-regulation of glucocorticoid secretion through negative feedback processes. In the present work, we quantified the expression of GR and MR mRNA throughout the brain of a female great tit (Parus major), creating a distribution map encompassing 48 regions. This map, the first of its kind for P. major, demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution of both receptor types. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the hippocampus (HP)-the two brain regions that we sampled from a total of 25 birds, we found high GR mRNA expression in the former and, unexpectedly, low MR mRNA in the latter. We examined the covariation of MR and GR levels in these two regions and found a strong, positive relationship between MR in the PVN and MR in the HP and a similar trend for GR across these two regions. This correlation supports the idea that hormone pleiotropy may constrain an individual's behavioral and physiological phenotype. In the female song system, we found moderate GR in hyperstriatum ventrale, pars caudalis (HVC), and moderate MR in robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). Understanding intra- and interspecific patterns of glucocorticoid receptor expression can inform us about the behavioral processes (e.g. song learning) that may be sensitive to stress and stimulate future hypotheses concerning the relationships between receptor expression, circulating hormone concentrations and

  2. Chronic aspartame affects T-maze performance, brain cholinergic receptors and Na+,K+-ATPase in rats.

    PubMed

    Christian, Brandon; McConnaughey, Kenneth; Bethea, Elena; Brantley, Scott; Coffey, Amy; Hammond, Leigha; Harrell, Shelly; Metcalf, Kasee; Muehlenbein, Danielle; Spruill, Willie; Brinson, Leslie; McConnaughey, Mona

    2004-05-01

    This study demonstrated that chronic aspartame consumption in rats can lead to altered T-maze performance and increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor densities in certain brain regions. Control and treated rats were trained in a T-maze to a particular side and then periodically tested to see how well they retained the learned response. Rats that had received aspartame (250 mg/kg/day) in the drinking water for 3 or 4 months showed a significant increase in time to reach the reward in the T-maze, suggesting a possible effect on memory due to the artificial sweetener. Using [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) (1 nM) to label muscarinic cholinergic receptors and atropine (10(-6) M) to determine nonspecific binding in whole-brain preparations, aspartame-treated rats showed a 31% increase in receptor numbers when compared to controls. In aspartame-treated rats, there was a significant increase in muscarinic receptor densities in the frontal cortex, midcortex, posterior cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum of 80%, 60%, 61%, 65%, 66% and 60%, respectively. The midbrain was the only area where preparations from aspartame-treated rats showed a significant increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. It can be concluded from these data that long-term consumption of aspartame can affect T-maze performance in rats and alter receptor densities or enzymes in brain.

  3. Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, M; García-Sevilla, J A

    2013-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction. This study evaluated the status of cannabinoid (CB) CB1 and CB2 receptors, the endocytic cycle of CB1 receptors, G protein-coupled receptor regulatory kinases (GRK), and associated signaling (mammalian target of rapamicin (mTOR) and 70kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K)) in brain cortices of drug abusers and cocaine- and cannabinoid-treated rodents. The main results indicate that in cocaine adddicts, but not in mixed cocaine/opiate or opiate abusers, CB1 receptor protein in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was reduced (-44%, total homogenate) with a concomitant receptor redistribution and/or internalization (decreases in membranes and increases in cytosol). In cocaine addicts, the reductions of CB1 receptors and GRK2/3/5 (-26% to -30%) indicated receptor desensitization. CB2 receptor protein was not significantly altered in the PFC of cocacine addicts. Chronic cocaine in mice and rats also reduced CB1 receptor protein (-41% and -80%) in the cerebral cortex inducing receptor redistribution and/or internalization. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 caused receptor downregulation (decreases in membranes and cytosol) and the antagonists rimonabant and AM281 induced opposite effects (receptor upregulation in membranes and cytosol). Rimonabant and AM281 also behaved as inverse agonists on the activation of mTOR and its target p70S6K. Chronic cocaine in mice was associated with tolerance to the acute activation of mTOR and p70S6K. In long-term cocaine addicts, mTOR and p70S6K activations were not altered when compared with controls, indicating that CB1 receptor signaling was dampened. The dysregulation of CB1 receptor, GRK2/3/5, and mTOR/p70S6K signaling by cocaine may contribute to alterations of neuroplasticity and/or neurotoxicity in brains of cocaine addicts.

  4. Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, M; García-Sevilla, J A

    2013-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction. This study evaluated the status of cannabinoid (CB) CB1 and CB2 receptors, the endocytic cycle of CB1 receptors, G protein-coupled receptor regulatory kinases (GRK), and associated signaling (mammalian target of rapamicin (mTOR) and 70kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K)) in brain cortices of drug abusers and cocaine- and cannabinoid-treated rodents. The main results indicate that in cocaine adddicts, but not in mixed cocaine/opiate or opiate abusers, CB1 receptor protein in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was reduced (-44%, total homogenate) with a concomitant receptor redistribution and/or internalization (decreases in membranes and increases in cytosol). In cocaine addicts, the reductions of CB1 receptors and GRK2/3/5 (-26% to -30%) indicated receptor desensitization. CB2 receptor protein was not significantly altered in the PFC of cocacine addicts. Chronic cocaine in mice and rats also reduced CB1 receptor protein (-41% and -80%) in the cerebral cortex inducing receptor redistribution and/or internalization. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 caused receptor downregulation (decreases in membranes and cytosol) and the antagonists rimonabant and AM281 induced opposite effects (receptor upregulation in membranes and cytosol). Rimonabant and AM281 also behaved as inverse agonists on the activation of mTOR and its target p70S6K. Chronic cocaine in mice was associated with tolerance to the acute activation of mTOR and p70S6K. In long-term cocaine addicts, mTOR and p70S6K activations were not altered when compared with controls, indicating that CB1 receptor signaling was dampened. The dysregulation of CB1 receptor, GRK2/3/5, and mTOR/p70S6K signaling by cocaine may contribute to alterations of neuroplasticity and/or neurotoxicity in brains of cocaine addicts. PMID:23727505

  5. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    The effect of histamine and related drugs on the tritium overflow evoked electrically (0.3 Hz) or by introduction of Ca2+ ions into Ca2+-free K+-rich (25 mmol/l) medium containing tetrodotoxin was studied in superfused guinea-pig brain cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus or hypothalamus slices and in mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine; the H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit reversed the effect of histamine to a slight facilitation. The facilitatory effect of histamine (obtained in the presence of clobenpropit) was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine but abolished by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine. In the absence of clobenpropit, ranitidine augmented the inhibitory effect of histamine. In slices superfused in the presence of ranitidine, the evoked overflow was inhibited by histamine and, more potently, by the H3 receptor agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine in a concentration-dependent manner (maximum inhibitory effect obtained for both agonists 30-35%). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide. R-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically evoked tritium overflow also in guinea-pig cerebellar, hippocampal and hypothalamic slices. In cortex slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, the H2 receptor agonists impromidine and, less potently, R-sopromidine facilitated the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. S-Sopromidine only tended to increase the evoked overflow. The effect of impromidine was counteracted by the H2 receptor antagonists ranitidine and cimetidine. The extent of the maximum facilitatory effect of impromidine (by 15-20%) was about the same when (i) the Ca2+ concentration in the medium was reduced from 1.3 to 0.98 mmol/l, (ii) the time of exposure to impromidine was reduced from 28 to 8 min or (iii) cerebellar

  6. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  7. H3 Receptors and Pain Modulation: Peripheral, Spinal, and Brain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs), distributed within the brain, the spinal cord, and on specific types of primary sensory neurons, can modulate pain transmission by several mechanisms. In the skin, H3Rs are found on certain Aβ fibers, and on keratinocytes and Merkel cells, as well as on deep dermal, peptidergic Aδ fibers terminating on deep dermal blood vessels. Activation of H3Rs on the latter in the skin, heart, lung, and dura mater reduces calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P release, leading to anti-inflammatory (but not antinociceptive) actions. However, activation of H3Rs on the spinal terminals of these sensory fibers reduces nociceptive responding to low-intensity mechanical stimuli and inflammatory stimuli such as formalin. These findings suggest that H3R agonists might be useful analgesics, but these drugs have not been tested in clinically relevant pain models. Paradoxically, H3 antagonists/inverse agonists have also been reported to attenuate several types of pain responses, including phase II responses to formalin. In the periaqueductal gray (an important pain regulatory center), the H3 inverse agonist thioperamide releases neuronal histamine and mimics histamine's biphasic modulatory effects in thermal nociceptive tests. Newer H3 inverse agonists with potent, selective, and brain-penetrating properties show efficacy in several neuropathic and arthritis pain models, but the sites and mechanisms for these actions remain poorly understood. PMID:20864501

  8. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding to mu opioid receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, K.N.; Knapp, R.J.; Gehlert, D.R.; Lui, G.K.; Yamamura, M.S.; Roeske, L.C.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 ((/sup 3/H)CTOP), a potent and highly selective mu opioid antagonist, was used to localize the mu receptors in rat brain by light microscopic autoradiography. Radioligand binding studies with (/sup 3/H)CTOP using slide-mounted tissue sections of rat brain produced a Kd value of 1.1 nM with a Bmax value of 79.1 fmol/mg protein. Mu opioid agonists and antagonists inhibited (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding with high affinity (IC50 values of 0.2-2.4nM), while the delta agonist DPDPE, delta antagonist ICI 174,864, and kappa agonist U 69,593 were very weak inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding. Light microscopic autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding sites revealed regions of high density and regions of moderate labeling. The cerebral cortex showed a low density of (/sup 3/H)CTOP binding.

  9. Human brain n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phorbol ester receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S; Kozma, R; Monfries, C; Hall, C; Lim, H H; Smith, P; Lim, L

    1990-01-01

    A human brain-specific cDNA encoding n-chimaerin, a protein of predicted molecular mass 34 kDa, has sequence identity with two different proteins: protein kinase C (PKC) at the N-terminus and BCR protein [product of the breakpoint-cluster-region (BCR) gene, involved in Philadelphia chromosome translocation] at the C-terminus [Hall, Monfries, Smith, Lim, Kozma, Ahmed, Vannaisungham, Leung & Lim (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 211, 11-16]. The sequence identity of n-chimaerin with PKC includes the cysteine-rich motif CX2CX13CX2CX7CX7C, and amino acids upstream of the first cysteine residue, but not the kinase domain. This region of PKC has been implicated in the binding of diacylglycerol and phorbol esters in a phospholipid-dependent fashion. Part of this cysteine-rich motif (CX2CX13CX2C) has the potential of forming a 'Zn-finger' structure. Phorbol esters cause a variety of physiological changes and are among the most potent tumour promoters that have been described. PKC is the only known protein target for these compounds. We now report that n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester receptor, with the cysteine-rich region being responsible for this activity. This finding has wide implications for previous studies equating phorbol ester binding with the presence of PKC in the brain. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2268301

  10. Expression of high affinity folate receptor in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Bhargava, Rohit; Theisen, Brian K; Hamilton, Ronald L; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-10-01

    High affinity folate receptor (HFR) can be overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis, however the expression in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of HFR expression in BCBM and its role in the prognosis of this high-risk cohort. We analyzed 19 brain metastasis (BM) and 13 primary tumors (PT) from a total of 25 patients. HFR status was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). HFR was positive in 4/19 BM (21.1%) and in 1/13 PT (7.7%). Positive samples had low H-scores (range 1-50). 56% of patients had apocrine differentiation. OS was similar between patients with positive HFR (median OS 48 months) and negative HFR (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.25); and between patients with apocrine differentiation (median OS 63 months) and those without apocrine differentiation (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.49). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of HFR expression in BCBM. While previous studies associated the presence of HFR with worse prognosis; in our cohort HFR was positive in only 21.1% of BM with low levels of positivity. Neither HFR nor apocrine features had impact in OS.

  11. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  12. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  13. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al{sup 3+}) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe{sup 3}) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation.

  14. In vivo molecular imaging of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in the aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Rojas, Santiago; Herance, Raúl; Pareto, Deborah; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Figueiras, Francisca P; Popota, Foteini; Ruiz, Alba; Flotats, Núria; Fernández, Francisco J; Rocha, Milagros; Rovira, Mariana; Víctor, Víctor M; Gispert, Juan D

    2012-07-01

    The GABA-ergic system, known to regulate neural tissue genesis during cortical development, has been postulated to play a role in cerebral aging processes. Using in vivo molecular imaging and voxel-wise quantification, we aimed to assess the effects of aging on the benzodiazepine (BDZ) recognition site of the GABA(A) receptor. To visualize BDZ site availability, [(11)C]-flumazenil microPET acquisitions were conducted in young and old rats. The data were analyzed and region of interest analyses were applied to validate the voxel-wise approach. We observed decreased [(11)C]-flumazenil binding in the aged rat brains in comparison with the young control group. More specifically, clusters of reduced radioligand uptake were detected in the bilateral hippocampus, cerebellum, midbrain, and bilateral frontal and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results support the pertinence of voxel-wise quantification in the analysis of microPET data. Moreover, these findings indicate that the aging process involves declines in neural BDZ recognition site availability, proposed to reflect alterations in GABA(A) receptor subunit polypeptide expression.

  15. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaoxiang; Ni, Jie; Mao, Lei; Yan, Ming; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2015-11-19

    As the receptor of myelin associated inhibitory factors Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS) injury and regeneration. It is found that NgR1 complex acts in neurons to transduce the signals intracelluarly including induction of growth cone collapse, inhibition of axonal regeneration and regulation of nerve inflammation. In recent studies, NgR1 has also been found to be expressed in the microglia. However, NgR1 expressed in microglia in the developing nervous systems and following CNS injury have not been widely investigated. In this study, we detected the expression and cellular localization of NgR1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. The results showed that NgR1 was mainly expressed in microglia during embryonic and postnatal periods. The expression levels peaked at P4 and decreased thereafter into adulthood, while increased significantly with aging representatively at 17 mo. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of double positive NgR1(+)Iba1(+) cells between normal and TBI group. In summary, we first detected the expression of NgR1 in microglia during development and found that NgR1 protein expression increased significantly in microglia with aging. These findings will contribute to make a foundation for subsequent study about the role of NgR1 expressed in microglia on the CNS disorders.

  16. Sleep deprivation increases A1 adenosine receptor density in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Elmenhorst, David; Basheer, Radhika; McCarley, Robert W.; Bauer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine, increasing after sleep deprivation and acting via the A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR), is likely a key factor in the homeostatic control of sleep. This study examines the impact of sleep deprivation on A1AR density in different parts of the rat brain with [3H]CPFPX autoradiography. Binding of [3H]CPFPX was significantly increased in parietal cortex (PAR) (7%), thalamus (11%) and caudate-putamen (9%) after 24 h of sleep deprivation compared to a control group with an undisturbed circadian sleep-wake rhythm. Sleep deprivation of 12 h changed receptor density regionally between −5% and +9% (motor cortex (M1), statistically significant) compared to the circadian control group. These results suggest cerebral A1ARs are involved in effects of sleep deprivation and the regulation of sleep. The increase of A1AR density could serve the purpose of not only maintaining the responsiveness to increased adenosine levels but also amplifying the effect of sleep deprivation and is in line with a sleep-induced homoeostatic reorganization at the synaptic level. PMID:19146833

  17. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  18. Adropin acts in brain to inhibit water drinking: potential interaction with the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lauren M; Yosten, Gina L C; Samson, Willis K

    2016-03-15

    Adropin, a recently described peptide hormone produced in the brain and liver, has been reported to have physiologically relevant actions on glucose homeostasis and lipogenesis, and to exert significant effect on endothelial function. We describe a central nervous system action of adropin to inhibit water drinking and identify a potential adropin receptor, the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR19. Reduction in GPR19 mRNA levels in medial basal hypothalamus of male rats resulted in the loss of the inhibitory effect of adropin on water deprivation-induced thirst. The identification of a novel brain action of adropin and a candidate receptor for the peptide should extend and accelerate the study of the potential therapeutic value of adropin or its mimetics for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:26739651

  19. Characterization of the Distance Relationship Between Localized Serotonin Receptors and Glia Cells on Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schaller, Susanne; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan M

    2015-08-01

    We here present two new methods for the characterization of fluorescent localization microscopy images obtained from immunostained brain tissue sections. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of 5-HT1A serotonin receptors and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in healthy cryopreserved brain tissues are analyzed. In detail, we here present two image processing methods for characterizing differences in receptor distribution on glial cells and their distribution on neural cells: One variant relies on skeleton extraction and adaptive thresholding, the other on k-means based discrete layer segmentation. Experimental results show that both methods can be applied for distinguishing classes of images with respect to serotonin receptor distribution. Quantification of nanoscopic changes in relative protein expression on particular cell types can be used to analyze degeneration in tissues caused by diseases or medical treatment. PMID:26173412

  20. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  1. Dynamic changes in oxytocin receptor expression and activation at parturition in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Meddle, Simone L; Bishop, Valerie R; Gkoumassi, Effimia; van Leeuwen, Fred W; Douglas, Alison J

    2007-10-01

    Oxytocin plays a pivotal role in rat parturition, acting within the brain to facilitate its own release in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus, and to stimulate maternal behavior. We investigated oxytocin receptor (OTR) expression and activation perinatally. Using a (35)S-labeled riboprobe complementary to OTR mRNA, OTR expression was quantified in proestrus virgin, 21- and 22-day pregnant, parturient (90 min. from pup 1 birth), and postpartum (4-12 h from parturition) rats. Peak OTR mRNA expression was observed at parturition in the SON, brainstem regions, medial preoptic area (mPOA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BnST), and olfactory bulbs, but there was no change in the paraventricular nucleus and lateral septum. OTR mRNA expression was increased on the day of expected parturition in the SON and brainstem, suggesting that oxytocin controls the pathway mediating input from uterine signals. Likewise, OTR mRNA expression was increased in the mPOA and BnST during labor/birth. In the olfactory bulbs and medial amygdala, parturition induced increased OTR mRNA expression compared with pre-parturition, reflecting their immediate response to new stimuli at birth. Postpartum OTR expression in all brain regions returned to levels observed in virgin rats. Parturition significantly increased the number of double-immunolabeled cells for Fos and OTR within the SON, brainstem, BnST, and mPOA regions compared with virgin rats. Thus, there are dynamic region-dependent changes in OTR-expressing cells at parturition. This altered OTR distribution pattern in the brain perinatally reflects the crucial role oxytocin plays in orchestrating both birth and maternal behavior.

  2. Regulation of brain androgen receptor immunoreactivity by androgen in prepubertal male ferrets.

    PubMed

    Kashon, M L; Hayes, M J; Shek, P P; Sisk, C L

    1995-05-01

    During pubertal maturation, there is an increase in the number of androgen receptor-immunoreactive (AR-IR) cells in the preoptic area (POA), arcuate nucleus (ARC), medial amygdala (mAMY), and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) of the male ferret brain. In contrast, the number of AR-IR cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) or lateral septum (ISEP) does not change with pubertal development. This experiment tested the hypothesis that the pubertal increase in AR-IR cells in certain brain regions is the result of the pubertal increase in circulating androgens. Prepubertal male ferrets were left intact or were castrated and treated daily (10 days) with s.c. injections of either oil, testosterone (T; 5 mg/kg), dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 5 mg/kg), or estradiol (E; 10 micrograms/kg). Brains were processed for AR immunocytochemistry, and the number of immunopositive cells was quantified in POA, ARC, mAMY, VMH, BNST, and ISEP. Overall, castration reduced the number of AR-IR cells below that seen in intact animals, and E administration did not restore AR-IR cell number. Treatment of castrates with androgens restored numbers of AR-IR cells to those of intact animals in the BNST, ISEP, and VMH. However, AR-IR cell numbers were significantly greater in androgen-treated castrates than in intact animals in POA, mAMY, and ARC. These data show that AR-IR cells in prepubertal male ferrets are sensitive to circulating levels of androgens, supporting the hypothesis that the pubertal rise in T is responsible for the pubertal increase in the number of AR-IR cells in the POA, mAMY, and ARC. PMID:7626721

  3. EP4 Receptor-Associated Protein in Microglia Promotes Inflammation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Risako; Higuchi, Sei; Nakatsuji, Masato; Yasui, Mika; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Yokode, Masayuki; Minami, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    Microglial cells play a key role in neuronal damage in neurodegenerative disorders. Overactivated microglia induce detrimental neurotoxic effects through the excess production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms of microglial activation are poorly understood. We focused on prostaglandin E2 type 4 receptor-associated protein (EPRAP), which suppresses macrophage activation. We demonstrated that EPRAP exists in microglia in the brain. Furthermore, EPRAP-deficient mice displayed less microglial accumulation, and intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA in the brains of EPRAP-deficient mice. Consistently, EPRAP-deficient microglia showed a marked decrease in the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 induced by LPS treatment compared with wild-type controls. In addition, EPRAP deficiency decreased microglial activation and neuronal cell death induced by intraventricular injection of kainic acid. EPRAP deficiency impaired the LPS-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in microglia. The phosphorylation levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-which phosphorylates c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-were also decreased in EPRAP-deficient microglia after LPS stimulation. Although EPRAP in macrophages plays a role in the attenuation of inflammation, EPRAP promotes proinflammatory activation of microglia through mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-mediated signaling and may be key to the deteriorating neuronal damage brought on by brain inflammation. PMID:27315781

  4. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs.

    PubMed

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea; Smieško, Martin; Culot, Maxime; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Brodin, Birger; Wimmer, Laurin; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2016-06-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We here evaluated piperine and five selected analogs (SCT-66, SCT-64, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399) regarding their BBB permeability. Data were obtained in three in vitro BBB models, namely a recently established human model with immortalized hBMEC cells, a human brain-like endothelial cells (BLEC) model, and a primary animal (bovine endothelial/rat astrocytes co-culture) model. For each compound, quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS methods in the range of 5.00-500ng/mL in the corresponding matrix were developed, and permeability coefficients in the three BBB models were determined. In vitro predictions from the two human BBB models were in good agreement, while permeability data from the animal model differed to some extent, possibly due to protein binding of the screened compounds. In all three BBB models, piperine and SCT-64 displayed the highest BBB permeation potential. This was corroborated by data from in silico prediction. For the other piperine analogs (SCT-66, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399), BBB permeability was low to moderate in the two human BBB models, and moderate to high in the animal BBB model. Efflux ratios (ER) calculated from bidirectional permeability experiments indicated that the compounds were likely not substrates of active efflux transporters. PMID:27018328

  5. Pharmacological Stimulation of the Brain Serotonin Receptor 7 as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2–308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  6. Pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 as a novel therapeutic approach for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  7. Reductions in Brain 5-HT1B Receptor Availability in Primarily Cocaine-Dependent Humans

    PubMed Central

    Matuskey, David; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Planeta, Beata; Pittman, Brian; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Chen, Jason; Wanyiri, Jane; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Geha, Paul; Huang, Yiyun; Potenza, Marc N.; Neumeister, Alexander; Carson, Richard E.; Malison, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preclinical evidence implicates the 5-HT1B receptor in cocaine’s effects. This study explores 5-HT1B in humans by examining receptor availability in vivo with primary cocaine-dependent (CD) subjects using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods Fourteen medically healthy CD subjects (mean age=41±6 yrs) were compared to 14 age-matched healthy control subjects (41±8 yrs) with no past or current history of cocaine or other illicit substance abuse. Participants received an MRI and then a PET scan with the highly selective 5HT1B tracer, [11C]P943, for purposes of quantifying regional binding potential (BPND). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and gray matter masking (GMM) were also employed to control for potential partial volume effects. Results [11C]P943 PET imaging data in nine candidate regions (amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, caudate, frontal cortex, hypothalamus, pallidum, putamen, thalamus and ventral striatum) showed significant or nearly significant reductions of BPND in CD subjects in three regions, including the anterior cingulate (−16%; P<0.01), hypothalamus (−16%, P=0.03) and frontal cortex (−7%, P=0.08). VBM showed significant gray matter reductions in the frontal cortex of CD subjects. After GMM, statistically significant reductions in [11C]P943 BPND were either retained (anterior cingulate, −14%, p=0.01; hypothalamus, −20%, P<0.01) or achieved (frontal cortex, −14%, p<0.01). Whole brain voxel-wise parameter estimation confirmed these results. Secondary analyses were also significant in some regions for years of cocaine and daily tobacco use. Conclusions The reductions found in this study suggest that 5-HT1B receptors may contribute to the etiology and/or expression of cocaine dependence and potentially represent a target for medication development. PMID:24433854

  8. Inflammatory cytokine receptor blockade in a rodent model of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Perez-Polo, J R; Rea, H C; Johnson, K M; Parsley, M A; Unabia, G C; Xu, G-Y; Prough, D; DeWitt, D S; Paulucci-Holthauzen, A A; Werrbach-Perez, K; Hulsebosch, C E

    2016-01-01

    In rodent models of traumatic brain injury (TBI), both Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) levels increase early after injury to return later to basal levels. We have developed and characterized a rat mild fluid percussion model of TBI (mLFP injury) that results in righting reflex response times (RRRTs) that are less than those characteristic of moderate to severe LFP injury and yet increase IL-1α/β and TNFα levels. Here we report that blockade of IL-1α/β and TNFα binding to IL-1R and TNFR1, respectively, reduced neuropathology in parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus and improved outcome. IL-1β binding to the type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1) can be blocked by a recombinant form of the endogenous IL-1R antagonist IL-1Ra (Kineret). TNFα binding to the TNF receptor (TNFR) can be blocked by the recombinant fusion protein etanercept, made up of a TNFR2 peptide fused to an Fc portion of human IgG1. There was no benefit from the combined blockades compared with individual blockades or after repeated treatments for 11 days after injury compared with one treatment at 1 hr after injury, when measured at 6 hr or 18 days, based on changes in neuropathology. There was also no further enhancement of blockade benefits after 18 days. Given that both Kineret and etanercept given singly or in combination showed similar beneficial effects and that TNFα also has a gliotransmitter role regulating AMPA receptor traffic, thus confounding effects of a TNFα blockade, we chose to focus on a single treatment with Kineret. PMID:26172557

  9. Ebola virus entry requires the host-programmed recognition of an intracellular receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily Happy; Obernosterer, Gregor; Raaben, Matthijs; Herbert, Andrew S; Deffieu, Maika S; Krishnan, Anuja; Ndungo, Esther; Sandesara, Rohini G; Carette, Jan E; Kuehne, Ana I; Ruthel, Gordon; Pfeffer, Suzanne R; Dye, John M; Whelan, Sean P; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Chandran, Kartik

    2012-04-18

    Ebola and Marburg filoviruses cause deadly outbreaks of haemorrhagic fever. Despite considerable efforts, no essential cellular receptors for filovirus entry have been identified. We showed previously that Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal cholesterol transporter, is required for filovirus entry. Here, we demonstrate that NPC1 is a critical filovirus receptor. Human NPC1 fulfills a cardinal property of viral receptors: it confers susceptibility to filovirus infection when expressed in non-permissive reptilian cells. The second luminal domain of NPC1 binds directly and specifically to the viral glycoprotein, GP, and a synthetic single-pass membrane protein containing this domain has viral receptor activity. Purified NPC1 binds only to a cleaved form of GP that is generated within cells during entry, and only viruses containing cleaved GP can utilize a receptor retargeted to the cell surface. Our findings support a model in which GP cleavage by endosomal cysteine proteases unmasks the binding site for NPC1, and GP-NPC1 engagement within lysosomes promotes a late step in entry proximal to viral escape into the host cytoplasm. NPC1 is the first known viral receptor that recognizes its ligand within an intracellular compartment and not at the plasma membrane. PMID:22395071

  10. Quantification of metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors in brain by an equilibrium method using 18F-SP203

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Zhang, Yi; Hatazawa, Jun; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    A new PET ligand, 3-fluoro-5-(2-(2-18F-(fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile (18F-SP203) can quantify metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors (mGluR5) in human brain by a bolus injection and kinetic modeling. As an alternative approach to a bolus injection, binding can simply be measured as a ratio of tissue to metabolite-corrected plasma at a single time point under equilibrium conditions achieved by administering the radioligand with a bolus injection followed by a constant infusion. The purpose of this study was to validate the equilibrium method as an alternative to the standard kinetic method for measuring 18F-SP203 binding in brain. Nine healthy subjects were injected with 18F-SP203 using a bolus plus constant infusion for 300 minutes. A single ratio of bolus-to-constant infusion (the activity of bolus equaled to that of infusion over 219 minutes) was applied to all subjects to achieve equilibrium in approximately 120 minutes. As a measure of ligand binding, we compared total distribution volume (VT) calculated by the equilibrium and kinetic methods in each scan. The equilibrium method calculated VT by the ratio of radioactivity in brain to the concentration of 18 F-SP203 in arterial plasma at 120 minutes, and the kinetic method calculated VT by a two-tissue compartment model using brain and plasma dynamic data from 0 to 120 minutes. VT obtained via the equilibrium method was highly correlated with VT obtained via kinetic modeling. Inter-subject variability of VT obtained via the equilibrium method was slightly smaller than VT obtained via the kinetic method. VT obtained via the equilibrium method was ~10% higher than VT obtained via the kinetic method, indicating a small difference between the measurements. Taken together, the results of this study show that using the equilibrium method is an acceptable alternative to the standard kinetic method when using 18F-SP203 to measure mGluR5. Although small differences in the measurements obtained via

  11. Quantification of metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors in the brain by an equilibrium method using 18F-SP203.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Siméon, Fabrice G; Zoghbi, Sami S; Zhang, Yi; Hatazawa, Jun; Pike, Victor W; Innis, Robert B; Fujita, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    A new PET ligand, 3-fluoro-5-(2-(2-(18)F-(fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile (18F-SP203) can quantify metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors (mGluR5) in human brain by a bolus injection and kinetic modeling. As an alternative approach to a bolus injection, binding can simply be measured as a ratio of tissue to metabolite-corrected plasma at a single time point under equilibrium conditions achieved by administering the radioligand with a bolus injection followed by a constant infusion. The purpose of this study was to validate the equilibrium method as an alternative to the standard kinetic method for measuring 18F-SP203 binding in the brain. Nine healthy subjects were injected with 18F-SP203 using a bolus plus constant infusion for 300 min. A single ratio of bolus-to-constant infusion (the activity of bolus equaled to that of infusion over 219 min) was applied to all subjects to achieve equilibrium in approximately 120 min. As a measure of ligand binding, we compared total distribution volume (VT) calculated by the equilibrium and kinetic methods in each scan. The equilibrium method calculated VT by the ratio of radioactivity in the brain to the concentration of 18F-SP203 in arterial plasma at 120 min, and the kinetic method calculated VT by a two-tissue compartment model using brain and plasma dynamic data from 0 to 120 min. VT obtained via the equilibrium method was highly correlated with VT obtained via kinetic modeling. Inter-subject variability of VT obtained via the equilibrium method was slightly smaller than VT obtained via the kinetic method. VT obtained via the equilibrium method was ~10% higher than VT obtained via the kinetic method, indicating a small difference between the measurements. Taken together, the results of this study show that using the equilibrium method is an acceptable alternative to the standard kinetic method when using 18F-SP203 to measure mGluR5. Although small differences in the measurements obtained via the

  12. Cannabinoid receptors in brain: pharmacogenetics, neuropharmacology, neurotoxicology, and potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2009-01-01

    Much progress has been achieved in cannabinoid research. A major breakthrough in marijuana-cannabinoid research has been the discovery of a previously unknown but elaborate endogenous endocannabinoid system (ECS), complete with endocannabinoids and enzymes for their biosynthesis and degradation with genes encoding two distinct cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors (CBRs) that are activated by endocannabinoids, cannabinoids, and marijuana use. Physical and genetic localization of the CBR genes CNR1 and CNR2 have been mapped to chromosome 6 and 1, respectively. A number of variations in CBR genes have been associated with human disorders including osteoporosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug dependency, obesity, and depression. Other family of lipid receptors including vanilloid (VR1) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors appear to be related to the CBRs at the phylogenetic level. The ubiquitous abundance and differential distribution of the ECS in the human body and brain along with the coupling to many signal transduction pathways may explain the effects in most biological system and the myriad behavioral effects associated with smoking marijuana. The neuropharmacological and neuroprotective features of phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoid associated neurogenesis have revealed roles for the use of cannabinoids in neurodegenerative pathologies with less neurotoxicity. The remarkable progress in understanding the biological actions of marijuana and cannabinoids have provided much richer results than previously appreciated cannabinoid genomics and raised a number of critical issues on the molecular mechanisms of cannabinoid induced behavioral and biochemical alterations. These advances will allow specific therapeutic targeting of the different components of the ECS in health and disease. This review focuses on these recent advances in cannabinoid genomics and the surprising new fundamental roles that the

  13. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  14. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the subfornical organ are required for deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hilzendeger, Aline M; Cassell, Martin D; Davis, Deborah R; Stauss, Harald M; Mark, Allyn L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2013-03-01

    Although elevated renin-angiotensin system activity and angiotensinergic signaling within the brain are required for hypertension, polydipsia, and increased metabolic rate induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt, the contribution of specific receptor subtypes and brain nuclei mediating these responses remains poorly defined. We hypothesized that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT(1a)R) within the subfornical organ (SFO) mediate these responses. Transgenic mice carrying a conditional allele of the endogenous AT(1a)R (AT(1a)R(flox)) were administered an adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or adenovirus encoding eGFP alone into the lateral cerebral ventricle. Adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase reduced AT(1a)R mRNA and induced recombination in AT(1a)R(flox) genomic DNA specifically in the SFO, without significant effect in the paraventricular or arcuate nuclei, and also induced SFO-specific recombination in ROSA(TdTomato) reporter mice. The effect of SFO-targeted ablation of endogenous AT(1a)R was evaluated in AT(1a)R(flox) mice at 3 time points: (1) baseline, (2) 1 week after virus injection but before DOCA-salt, and (3) after 3 weeks of DOCA-salt. DOCA-salt-treated mice with deletion of AT(1a)R in SFO exhibited a blunted increase in arterial pressure. Increased sympathetic cardiac modulation and urine copeptin, a marker of vasopressin release, were both significantly reduced in DOCA-salt mice when AT(1a)R was deleted in the SFO. Additionally, deletion of AT(1a)R in the SFO significantly attenuated the polydipsia, polyuria, and sodium intake in response to DOCA-salt. Together, these data highlight the contribution of AT(1a)R in the SFO to arterial pressure regulation potentially through changes on sympathetic cardiac modulation, vasopressin release, and hydromineral balance in the DOCA-salt model of hypertension.

  15. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  16. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:27186358

  17. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    PubMed

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  18. Requirement for interleukin-1 to drive brain inflammation reveals tissue-specific mechanisms of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Giles, James A; Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Davies, Claire L; Denes, Adam; Shaw, Tovah; Coutts, Graham; Rothwell, Nancy J; McColl, Barry W; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-02-01

    The immune system is implicated in a wide range of disorders affecting the brain and is, therefore, an attractive target for therapy. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a potent regulator of the innate immune system important for host defense but is also associated with injury and disease in the brain. Here, we show that IL-1 is a key mediator driving an innate immune response to inflammatory challenge in the mouse brain but is dispensable in extracerebral tissues including the lung and peritoneum. We also demonstrate that IL-1α is an important ligand contributing to the CNS dependence on IL-1 and that IL-1 derived from the CNS compartment (most likely microglia) is the major source driving this effect. These data reveal previously unknown tissue-specific requirements for IL-1 in driving innate immunity and suggest that IL-1-mediated inflammation in the brain could be selectively targeted without compromising systemic innate immune responses that are important for resistance to infection. This property could be exploited to mitigate injury- and disease-associated inflammation in the brain without increasing susceptibility to systemic infection, an important complication in several neurological disorders.

  19. [CROSS-TALK BETWEEN 5-HT1A AND 5-HT7 RECEPTORS: ROLE IN THE AUTOREGULATION OF THE BRAIN SEROTONIN SYSTEM AND IN MECHANISM OF ANTIDEPRESSANTS ACTION].

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Ponimaskin, E G; Naumenko, V S

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies considerably extended our knowledge of the mechanisms and physiological role of the interaction between different receptors in the brain. Current review summarizes data on the formation of receptor complexes and the role of such complexes in the autoregulation of the brain serotonin system, behavioral abnormalities and mechanism of antidepressants action. Particular attention is paid to 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor heterodimers. The results described in the present review indicate that: i) dimerization and formation of mobile receptor complexes is a common feature for the members of G-protein coupled receptor superfamily; ii) 5-HT7 receptor appears to be a modulator for 5-HT1A receptor - the key autoregulator of the brain serotonin system; iii) 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor complexes formation is one of the mechanisms for inactivation and desensitization of the 5-HTIA receptors in the brain; iv) differences in the 5-HT7 receptor and 5-HTIA/5-HT7 heterodimers density define different sensitivity of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTlA receptors to chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  20. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  1. Gustatory Receptors Required for Avoiding the Toxic Compound Coumarin in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Seeta; Lee, Youngseok

    2016-04-30

    Coumarin is a phenolic compound that mainly affects the liver due to its metabolization into a toxic compound. The deterrent and ovicidal activities of coumarin in insect models such as Drosophila melanogaster have been reported. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms by which these insects protect themselves and their eggs from this toxic plant metabolite. Coumarin was fatal to the flies in a dosage-dependent manner. However, coumarin feeding could be inhibited through activation of the aversive gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), but not the olfactory receptor neurons. Furthermore, three gustatory receptors, GR33a, GR66a, and GR93a, functioned together in coumarin detection by the proboscis. However, GR33a, but not GR66a and GR93a, was required to avoid coumarin during oviposition, with a choice of the same substrates provided as in binary food choice assay. Taken together, these findings suggest that anti-feeding activity and oviposition to avoid coumarin occur via separate mechanisms.

  2. Qualification of LSP1-2111 as a Brain Penetrant Group III Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Orthosteric Agonist

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    LSP1-2111 is a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist with preference toward the mGlu4 receptor subtype. This compound has been extensively used as a tool to explore the pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation in preclinical animal behavioral models. However, the blood–brain barrier penetration of this amino acid derivative has never been studied. We report studies on the central nervous system (CNS) disposition of LSP1-2111 using quantitative microdialysis in rat. Significant unbound concentrations of the drug relative to its in vitro binding affinity and functional potency were established in extracellular fluid (ECF). These findings support the use of LSP1-2111 to study the CNS pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation through orthosteric agonist mechanisms. PMID:24900783

  3. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  4. Brain purine metabolism and xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase conversion in hyperammonemia are under control of NMDA receptors and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Yury; Kosenko, Elena

    2009-10-19

    In hyperammonemia, a decrease in brain ATP can be a result of adenine nucleotide catabolism. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are the end steps in the purine catabolic pathway and directly involved in depletion of the adenylate pool in the cell. Besides, XD can easily be converted to XO to produce reactive oxygen species in the cell. In this study, the effects of acute ammonia intoxication in vivo on brain adenine nucleotide pool and xanthine and hypoxanthine, the end degradation products of adenine nucleotides, during the conversion of XD to XO were studied. Injection of rats with ammonium acetate was shown to lead to the dramatic decrease in the ATP level, adenine nucleotide pool size and adenylate energy charge and to the great increase in hypoxanthine and xanthine 11 min after the lethal dose indicating rapid degradation of adenylates. Conversion of XD to XO in hyperammonemic rat brain was evidenced by elevated XO/XD activity ratio. Injection of MK-801, a NMDA receptor blocker, prevented ammonia-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides and conversion of XD to XO suggesting that in vivo these processes are mediated by activation of NMDA receptors. The in vitro dose-dependent effects of sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, on XD and XO activities are indicative of the direct modification of the enzymes by nitric oxide. This is the first report evidencing the increase in brain xanthine and hypoxanthine levels and adenine nucleotide breakdown in acute ammonia intoxication and NMDA receptor-mediated prevention of these alterations.

  5. Transition of arrestin into the active receptor-binding state requires an extended interdomain hinge.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Hirsch, Joel A; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Gurevich, Yulia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2002-11-15

    Arrestins selectively bind to the phosphorylated activated form of G protein-coupled receptors, thereby blocking further G protein activation. Structurally, arrestins consist of two domains topologically connected by a 12-residue long loop, which we term the "hinge" region. Both domains contain receptor-binding elements. The relative size and shape of arrestin and rhodopsin suggest that dramatic changes in arrestin conformation are required to bring all of its receptor-binding elements in contact with the cytoplasmic surface of the receptor. Here we use the visual arrestin/rhodopsin system to test the hypothesis that the transition of arrestin into its active receptor-binding state involves a movement of the two domains relative to each other that might be limited by the length of the hinge. We have introduced three insertions and 24 deletions in the hinge region and measured the binding of all of these mutants to light-activated phosphorylated (P-Rh*), dark phosphorylated (P-Rh), dark unphosphorylated (Rh), and light-activated unphosphorylated rhodopsin (Rh*). The addition of 1-3 extra residues to the hinge has no effect on arrestin function. In contrast, sequential elimination of 1-8 residues results in a progressive decrease in P-Rh* binding without changing arrestin selectivity for P-Rh*. These results suggest that there is a minimum length of the hinge region necessary for high affinity binding, consistent with the idea that the two domains move relative to each other in the process of arrestin transition into its active receptor-binding state. The same length of the hinge is also necessary for the binding of "constitutively active" arrestin mutants to P-Rh*, dark P-Rh, and Rh*, suggesting that the active (receptor-bound) arrestin conformation is essentially the same in both wild type and mutant forms.

  6. Phrenic long-term facilitation requires NMDA receptors in the phrenic motonucleus in rats

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Michelle; Zhang, Yi; White, David P; Ling, Liming

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to episodic hypoxia induces a persistent augmentation of respiratory activity, known as long-term facilitation (LTF). LTF of phrenic nerve activity has been reported to require serotonin receptor activation and protein syntheses. However, the underlying cellular mechanism still remains poorly understood. NMDA receptors play key roles in synaptic plasticity (e.g. some forms of hippocampal long-term potentiation). The present study was designed to examine the role of NMDA receptors in phrenic LTF and test if the relevant receptors are located in the phrenic motonucleus. Integrated phrenic nerve activity was measured in anaesthetized, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked and artificially ventilated rats before, during and after three episodes of 5 min isocapnic hypoxia (Pa,O2= 30–45 mmHg), separated by 5 min hyperoxia (50% O2). Either saline (as control) or the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.2 mg kg−1, i.p.) was systemically injected ∼1 h before hypoxia. Phrenic LTF was eliminated by the MK-801 injection (vehicle, 32.8 ± 3.7% above baseline in phrenic amplitude at 60 min post-hypoxia; MK-801, −0.5 ± 4.1%, means ± s.e.m.), with little change in both the CO2-apnoeic threshold and the hypoxic phrenic response (HPR). Vehicle (saline, 5 × 100 nl) or MK-801 (10 μm; 5 × 100 nl) was also microinjected into the phrenic motonucleus region in other groups. Phrenic LTF was eliminated by the MK-801 microinjection (vehicle, 34.2 ± 3.4%; MK-801, −2.5 ± 2.8%), with minimal change in HPR. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of NMDA receptors in the phrenic motonucleus is required for the episodic hypoxia-induced phrenic LTF. PMID:15932891

  7. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide. PMID:27585115

  8. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain.

  9. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  10. mRNA expression profile of serotonin receptor subtypes and distribution of serotonergic terminations in marmoset brain

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Rammohan; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    To better understand serotonin function in the primate brain, we examined the mRNA expression patterns of all the 13 members of the serotonin receptor (5HTR) family, by in situ hybridization (ISH) and the distribution of serotonergic terminations by serotonin transporter (SERT) protein immunohistochemical analysis. Ten of the 13 5HTRs showed significant mRNA expressions in the marmoset brain. Our study shows several new features of the organization of serotonergic systems in the marmoset brain. (1) The thalamus expressed only a limited number of receptor subtypes compared with the cortex, hippocampus, and other subcortical regions. (2) In the cortex, there are layer-selective and area-selective mRNA expressions of 5HTRs. (3) Highly localized mRNA expressions of 5HT1F and 5HT3A were observed. (4) There was a conspicuous overlap of the mRNA expressions of receptor subtypes known to have somatodendritic localization of receptor proteins with dense serotonergic terminations in the visual cortex, the central lateral (CL) nucleus of the thalamus, the presubiculum, and the medial mammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. This suggests a high correlation between serotonin availability and receptor expression at these locations. (5) The 5HTRs show differences in mRNA expression pattern between the marmoset and mouse cortices whereas the patterns of both the species were much similar in the hippocampus. We discuss the possible roles of 5HTRs in the marmoset brain revealed by the analysis of their overall mRNA expression patterns. PMID:24904298

  11. in Silico investigation of the structural requirements for the AMPA receptor antagonism by quinoxaline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Abugrain, Ismaiel Mohamed; Sanalla, Mohamed Hussin; Elnaas, Radwan Fatahalla; Rajab, Ibrahim Abdassalam Ibn

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders and their antagonism offers a suitable approach for the treatment of such disorders. The field of drug design and discovery aims to find best medicines to prevent, treat and cure diseases quickly and efficiently. In this regard, computational tools have helped medicinal chemists modify and optimize molecules to potent drug candidates with better pharmacokinetic profiles, and guiding biologists and pharmacologists to explore new disease genes as well as novel drug targets. In the present study, to understand the structural requirements for AMPA receptor antagonism, molecular docking study was performed on 41 structurally diverse antagonists based on quinoxaline nucleus. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was employed for docking simulations using AutoDock 4.2 program. The results obtained signify that the molecular docking approach is reliable and produces a good correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.6) between experimental and docking predicted AMPA receptor antagonistic activity. The aromatic moiety of quinoxaline core has been proved to be vital for hydrophobic contacts exhibiting - interactions in docked conformations. However, polar moieties such as carboxylic group and 1,2,4-triazole moieties were noted to be sites for hydrophilic interactions in terms of hydrogen bonding with the receptor. These analyses can be exploited to design and develop novel AMPA receptor antagonists for the treatment of different neurological disorders. PMID:24250113

  12. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 Receptors, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type-2 (VMAT2) and Dopamine Transporter (DAT) Densities in Aged Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Jinbin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77–107.8, mean: 91 years) by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D2 and D3 receptors was calculated using the D3-preferring radioligand, [3H]WC-10 and the D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The density of the DAT is 10–20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D3 receptor density exceeded D2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D3 receptors with negligible D2 receptors. The density of dopamine D1 linearly correlated with D3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D1 and D2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D3 and D2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D2 or D3 receptors. PMID:23185343

  13. Effects of ketamine exposure on dopamine concentrations and dopamine type 2 receptor mRNA expression in rat brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Liu, Mei-Li; Wu, Xiu-Ping; Jia, Juan; Cao, Jie; Wei, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Yu-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of ketamine abuse on the concentration of dopamine (DA), a monoamine neurotransmitter, and the mRNA expression of dopamine type 2 (D2) receptors in brain tissue, we used male Wistar rats to model ketamine abuse through chronic intraperitoneal infusion of ketamine across different doses. Methods: The rats were sacrificed 45 minutes and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after initiating the administration of ketamine or normal saline, as well as 3 days following discontinuation. Brain tissue was harvested to examine the concentration of 2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, the primary metabolites of DA, as well as the expression of D2 receptor mRNA. In addition, behavioral changes were observed within 30 minutes of administration, and withdrawal symptoms were also documented. A factorial experimental design was used to investigate variations and correlations in the primary outcome measures across the four doses and five time points. Brain DA concentrations were significantly higher in the ketamine-treated groups compared with the saline-treated group, with 30 mg/kg > 10 mg/kg > 60 mg/kg > saline (P < 0.05). The D2 receptor mRNA expression exhibited an inverse downregulation pattern, with 30 mg/kg < 10 mg/kg < 60 mg/kg < saline (P < 0.05). In the 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg ketamine-treated groups, the DA concentration and D2 receptor mRNA level in the brain tissue correlated with the dose of ketamine (r = 0.752, r = -0.806), but no significant correlation was found in the 60 mg/kg group. Result: These findings indicated that chronic dosing with ketamine increased the concentration of DA in rat brain tissue by increasing DA release or interrupting DA degradation. D2 receptor mRNA expression likely decreased because of stimulation with excessive DA. Conclusion: High-dose (60 mg/kg) ketamine had potent paralyzing effects on the central nervous system of rats and weakened the excitatory effects of the limbic system. Brain DA and D2 receptor m

  14. Brain energy metabolism in glutamate-receptor activation and excitotoxicity: role for APC/C-Cdh1 in the balance glycolysis/pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Patricia; Almeida, Angeles; Bolaños, Juan P

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of brain energy metabolism strongly suggest that glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission is coupled with molecular signals that switch-on glucose utilization pathways to meet the high energetic requirements of neurons. Failure to adequately coordinate energy supply for neurotransmission ultimately results in a positive amplifying loop of receptor over-activation leading to neuronal death, a process known as excitotoxicity. In this review, we revisited current concepts in excitotoxic mechanisms, their involvement in energy substrate utilization, and the signaling pathways that coordinate both processes. In particular, we have focused on the novel role played by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-Cdh1, in cell metabolism. Our laboratory identified 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3) -a key glycolytic-promoting enzyme- as an APC/C-Cdh1 substrate. Interestingly, APC/C-Cdh1 activity is inhibited by over-activation of glutamate receptors through a Ca(2+)-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, by inhibiting APC/C-Cdh1 activity, glutamate-receptors activation promotes PFKFB3 stabilization, leading to increased glycolysis and decreased pentose-phosphate pathway activity. This causes a loss in neuronal ability to regenerate glutathione, triggering oxidative stress and delayed excitotoxicity. Further investigation is critical to identify novel molecules responsible for the coupling of energy metabolism with glutamatergic neurotransmission and excitotoxicity, as well as to help developing new therapeutic strategies against neurodegeneration.

  15. Assessing the lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Sauls, Daniel; Machu, Tina K; Blanton, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    The lipid requirements of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were assessed by reconstituting purified receptors into lipid vesicles of defined composition and by using photolabeling with 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([125I]TID) to determine functionality. Earlier studies demonstrated that nAChRs reconstituted into membranes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC), the anionic lipid phosphatidic acid (PA), and cholesterol (CH) are particularly effective at stabilizing the nAChR in the resting (closed) state that is capable of undergoing agonist-induced conformational transitions (i.e., functionality). The present studies demonstrate that (1) there is no obligatory requirement for PC, (2) increasing the CH content serves to increase the degree to which nAChRs are stabilized in the resting state, and this effect saturates at approximately 35 mol % (molar lipid percentage), and (3) the effect of increasing levels of PA saturates at approximately 12 mol % and in the absence of PA nAChRs are stabilized in the desensitized state (i.e., nonfunctional). Native Torpedo membranes contain approximately 35 mol % CH but less than 1 mol % PA, suggesting that other anionic lipids may substitute for PA. We report that (1) phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), anionic lipids that are abundant in native Torpedo membranes, also stabilize the receptor in the resting state although with reduced efficacy (approximately 50-60%) compared to PA, and (2) for nAChRs reconstituted into PA/CH membranes at different lipid-protein molar ratios, receptor functionality decreases rapidly below approximately 65 lipids per receptor. Collectively, these results are consistent with a functional requirement of a single shell of lipids surrounding the nAChR and specific anionic lipid- and sterol (CH)-protein interactions.

  16. Endothelin in human brain and pituitary gland: Presence of immunoreactive endothelin, endothelin messenger ribonucleic acid, and endothelin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Ghatei, M.A.; Jones, P.M.; Murphy, J.K.; Lam, H.C.; O'Halloran, D.J.; Bloom, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The presence of immunoreactive (IR) endothelin, endothelin mRNA, and endothelin receptors in human brain and pituitary gland has been studied by RIA, Northern blot hybridization, and receptor assay. IR endothelin was detected in all five brain regions examined (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus) (6-10 fmol/g wet wt) and spinal cord (22 +/- 6 fmol/g wet wt, n = 7, mean +/- SEM). Higher concentrations of IR endothelin were found in the pituitary gland (147 +/- 30 fmol/g wet wt). Fast protein liquid chromatographic analysis of the IR endothelin in pituitary gland showed a large IR peak in the position of endothelin-3 and a smaller peak in the position of endothelin-1, whereas IR endothelin in the hypothalamus and brain stem was mainly endothelin-1. Endothelin messenger RNA was detected by Northern blot hybridization in the pituitary but not in hypothalamus. The receptor assay showed that 125I-endothelin-1 binding sites were present in large numbers in all five brain regions but were much less abundant in the pituitary gland. Binding capacity and dissociation constant were 5052 +/- 740 fmol/mg protein and 0.045 +/- 0.007 nM in brain stem and 963 +/- 181 fmol/mg protein and 0.034 +/- 0.009 nM in hypothalamus. In the pituitary gland, there were two classes of binding sites for endothelin with dissociation constants of 0.059 +/- 0.002 nM (binding capacity = 418 +/- 63 fmol/mg protein) and 0.652 +/- 0.103 nM (binding capacity = 1717 +/- 200 fmol/mg protein). Endothelin-1, -2 and -3 were almost equipotent in displacing the binding (IC50 approximately 0.04 nM). These findings are in accord with the possibility that endothelin acts as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone in man.

  17. Contribution of non-genetic factors to dopamine and serotonin receptor availability in the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Borg, J; Cervenka, S; Kuja-Halkola, R; Matheson, G J; Jönsson, E G; Lichtenstein, P; Henningsson, S; Ichimiya, T; Larsson, H; Stenkrona, P; Halldin, C; Farde, L

    2016-08-01

    The dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission systems are of fundamental importance for normal brain function and serve as targets for treatment of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite central interest for these neurotransmission systems in psychiatry research, little is known about the regulation of receptor and transporter density levels. This lack of knowledge obscures interpretation of differences in protein availability reported in psychiatric patients. In this study, we used positron emission tomography (PET) in a twin design to estimate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors, respectively, on dopaminergic and serotonergic markers in the living human brain. Eleven monozygotic and 10 dizygotic healthy male twin pairs were examined with PET and [(11)C]raclopride binding to the D2- and D3-dopamine receptor and [(11)C]WAY100635 binding to the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor. Heritability, shared environmental effects and individual-specific non-shared effects were estimated for regional D2/3 and 5-HT1A receptor availability in projection areas. We found a major contribution of genetic factors (0.67) on individual variability in striatal D2/3 receptor binding and a major contribution of environmental factors (pairwise shared and unique individual; 0.70-0.75) on neocortical 5-HT1A receptor binding. Our findings indicate that individual variation in neuroreceptor availability in the adult brain is the end point of a nature-nurture interplay, and call for increased efforts to identify not only the genetic but also the environmental factors that influence neurotransmission in health and disease. PMID:26821979

  18. The diversity of GABA(A) receptor subunit distribution in the normal and Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L M

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are assembled into pentameric receptor complexes from a total of 19 different subunits derived from a variety of different subunit classes (α1-6, β1-3, γ1-3, δ, ɛ, θ, and π) which surround a central chloride ion channel. GABA(A) receptor complexes are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain and spinal cord and are activated by the extensive GABAergic inhibitory system. In this chapter, we describe the heterogeneous distribution of six of the most widely distributed subunits (α1, α2, α3, β2,3, and γ2) throughout the human basal ganglia. This review describes the studies we have carried out on the normal and Huntington's disease human basal ganglia using autoradiographic labeling and immunohistochemistry in the human basal ganglia. GABA(A) receptors are known to react to changing conditions in the brain in neurological disorders, especially in Huntington's disease and display a high degree of plasticity which is thought to compensate for loss of function caused by disease. In Huntington's disease, the variable loss of GABAergic medium spiny striatopallidal projection neurons is associated with a loss of GABA(A) receptor subunits in the striosome and/or the matrix compartments of the striatum. By contrast in the globus pallidus, a loss of the GABAergic striatal projection neurons results in a dramatic upregulation of subunits on the large postsynaptic pallidal neurons; this is thought to be a compensatory plastic mechanism resulting from the loss of striatal GABAergic input. Most interestingly, our studies have revealed that the subventricular zone overlying the caudate nucleus contains a variety of proliferating progenitor stem cells that possess a heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor subunits which may play a role in human brain repair mechanisms.

  19. Indices of brain beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the learned helplessness animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Gurguis, G N; Kramer, G; Petty, F

    1996-01-01

    Both stress response and antidepressant drug action may be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta AR). Since learned helplessness is a stress-induced animal model of depression, beta AR are relevant to investigate in this model. To date, studies have measured changes in total receptor density (RT), but have not examined more detailed aspects of signal transduction mechanisms such as coupling of the receptor to GS protein. We have investigated brain beta AR coupling in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats exposed to inescapable shock and then tested for learned helplessness, and in both tested and naive controls using [125I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as the ligand. Both antagonist-saturation and agonist-displacement experiments were conducted, and the specificity for the beta AR was optimized by excluding ICYP binding to 5HT1B receptors. The percentage receptor density in the high-conformational state (%RH) and the ratio of agonist (isoproterenol) dissociation constant from the receptor in the low-/high-conformational states (KL/KH) were used as indices of coupling to GS protein. No significant differences were found between rats developing learned helplessness and non-helpless rats after inescapable stress in any parameter measured in any brain region. In the frontal cortex, exposure to inescapable shock induced beta AR uncoupling from GS protein as suggested by a low KL/KH ratio both in helpless and non-helpless rats but not in either control group. In the hypothalamus, there were trends for higher RL, RT and KL/KH ratio in helpless rats and stressed controls compared to naive controls. These findings suggest that beta AR binding parameters in frontal cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus did not differentiate between helpless and non-helpless rats. Changes in beta AR coupling observed in these brain regions may reflect effects of stress, which appeared to be region-specific, rather than stress-induced behavioral depression.

  20. Cysteamine-induced depletion of brain somatostatin is associated with up-regulation of cerebrocortical somatostatin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Srikant, C.B.; Patel, Y.C.

    1984-09-01

    Cysteamine (CSH) administered as a single sc injection to rats produced rapid depletion of cerebrocortical Somatostatin-14 like immunoreactivity (S-14 LI) with a significant 48% reduction occurring within 5 min and maximum (72%) decrease at 4 h. The depletion of S-14 LI was associated with a 1.7 fold increase in Bmax of the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors 5 min after CSH administration and a concomitant but slower increase in the affinity of these receptors. Incubation of intact synaptosomes with 1 mM CSH at 37 C in vitro for 60 min also caused a rapid depletion of S-14 LI, but there was no change in the Bmax or Kd of the S-14 receptors for up to 30 min beyond which time a 2.8-fold decrease in the affinity of S-14 receptors was observed. Higher concentrations of CSH (greater than or equal to 10 mM) added during the incubation of synaptosomes in vitro completely abolished the specific binding of these receptors. The pituitary S-14 receptors were studied 30 min after CSH administration and unlike the cerebrocortical S-14 receptors at this time did not exhibit any change in Bmax or affinity. When added at the time of the binding assay CSH (1 mM) was without a direct effect on cerebrocortical as well as pituitary membrane S-14 receptors. Furthermore, addition of CSH at the time of binding assay did not destroy the integrity of (/sup 125/I-Tyr11)S-14. It is concluded that administration of CSH to rats in vivo depletes brain S-14 LI and up-regulates synaptosomal S-14 receptors. Exposure of synaptosomes to CSH in vitro for 30 min also depletes S-14 LI but has no effect on S-14 receptors. CSH has a direct inhibitory effect on S-14 receptor binding after prolonged in vitro incubation. Pituitary S-14 receptors unlike those in the brain are unaffected by S-14 LI depletion at least acutely.

  1. The impact of tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition on neuronal excitability varies across brain region and cell type

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vallent; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits and the numerous configurations during subunit assembly give rise to a variety of receptors with different functional properties. This heterogeneity results in variations in GABAergic conductances across numerous brain regions and cell types. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptically-localized receptors with a low affinity for GABA and results in a transient, rapidly desensitizing GABAergic conductance; whereas, tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic receptors with a high affinity for GABA and results in a persistent GABAergic conductance. The specific functions of tonic versus phasic GABAergic inhibition in different cell types and the impact on specific neural circuits are only beginning to be unraveled. Here we review the diversity in the magnitude of tonic GABAergic inhibition in various brain regions and cell types, and highlight the impact on neuronal excitability in different neuronal circuits. Further, we discuss the relevance of tonic inhibition in various physiological and pathological contexts as well as the potential of targeting these receptor subtypes for treatment of diseases, such as epilepsy. PMID:24550784

  2. Delivery of gold nanoparticles to the brain by conjugation with a peptide that recognizes the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Prades, Roger; Guerrero, Simón; Araya, Eyleen; Molina, Claudia; Salas, Edison; Zurita, Esther; Selva, Javier; Egea, Gustavo; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Teixidó, Meritxell; Kogan, Marcelo J; Giralt, Ernest

    2012-10-01

    The treatment of Alzheimer's disease and many other brain-related disorders is limited because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which highly regulate the crossing of drugs. Metal nanoparticles have unique features that could contribute to the development of new therapies for these diseases. Nanoparticles have the capacity to carry several molecules of a drug; furthermore, their unique physico-chemical properties allow, for example, photothermal therapy to produce molecular surgery to destroy tumor cells and toxic structures. Recently, we demonstrated that gold nanoparticles conjugated to the peptide CLPFFD are useful to destroy the toxic aggregates of β-amyloid, similar to the ones found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, nanoparticles, like many other compounds, have null or very low capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier. In order to devise a strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, here we introduced the peptide sequence THRPPMWSPVWP into the gold nanoparticle-CLPFFD conjugate. This peptide sequence interacts with the transferrin receptor present in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, thus causing an increase in the permeability of the conjugate in brain, as shown by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Our results are highly relevant for the therapeutic applications of gold nanoparticles for molecular surgery in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Glycine and GABA(A) ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors as novel tools for alcohol and brain research.

    PubMed

    Naito, Anna; Muchhala, Karan H; Asatryan, Liana; Trudell, James R; Homanics, Gregg E; Perkins, Daya I; Davies, Daryl L; Alkana, Ronald L

    2014-12-01

    A critical obstacle to developing effective medications to prevent and/or treat alcohol use disorders is the lack of specific knowledge regarding the plethora of molecular targets and mechanisms underlying alcohol (ethanol) action in the brain. To identify the role of individual receptor subunits in ethanol-induced behaviors, we developed a novel class of ultra-sensitive ethanol receptors (USERs) that allow activation of a single receptor subunit population sensitized to extremely low ethanol concentrations. USERs were created by mutating as few as four residues in the extracellular loop 2 region of glycine receptors (GlyRs) or γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which are implicated in causing many behavioral effects linked to ethanol abuse. USERs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and tested using two-electrode voltage clamp, demonstrated an increase in ethanol sensitivity of 100-fold over wild-type receptors by significantly decreasing the threshold and increasing the magnitude of ethanol response, without altering general receptor properties including sensitivity to the neurosteroid, allopregnanolone. These profound changes in ethanol sensitivity were observed across multiple subunits of GlyRs and GABA(A)Rs. Collectively, our studies set the stage for using USER technology in genetically engineered animals as a unique tool to increase understanding of the neurobiological basis of the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  4. On the role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in behavioral effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Popova, Nina K

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were made on a congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76C (76C) mouse strain created by transferring a chromosome 13 fragment containing the 5-HT1A receptor gene from a CBA strain to an AKR background. It was shown that 76C mice differed from AKR mice by decreased 5-HT1A receptor and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (tph-2) genes expression in the midbrain. Functional activity of 5-HT2A receptors and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the midbrain and hippocampus of 76C mice were decreased compared with AKR mice. Central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) administration (300 ng i.c.v.) reduced 5-HT1A and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex and tph-2 mRNA level in the midbrain of AKR mice. However, BDNF failed to produce any effect on the expression of 5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(2A) , and tph-2 genes in 76C mice but decreased functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in 76C mice and increased it in AKR mice. BDNF restored social deficiency in 76C mice but produced asocial behavior (aggressive attacks towards young mice) in AKR mice. The data indicate that a small genetic variation altered the response to BDNF and show an important role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the 5-HT system response to BDNF treatment and in behavioral effects of BDNF.

  5. Heterogeneity in expression of functional ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors in astrocytes across brain regions: insights from the thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Höft, Simon; Griemsmann, Stephanie; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes may express ionotropic glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which allow them to sense and to respond to neuronal activity. However, so far the properties of astrocytes have been studied only in a few brain regions. Here, we provide the first detailed receptor analysis of astrocytes in the murine ventrobasal thalamus and compare the properties with those in other regions. To improve voltage-clamp control and avoid indirect effects during drug applications, freshly isolated astrocytes were employed. Two sub-populations of astrocytes were found, expressing or lacking α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. AMPA receptor-bearing astrocytes displayed a lower Kir current density than cells lacking the receptors. In contrast, all cells expressed GABAA receptors. Single-cell RT-PCR was employed to identify the receptor subunits in thalamic astrocytes. Our findings add to the emerging evidence of functional heterogeneity of astrocytes, the impact of which still remains to be defined. PMID:25225096

  6. Widespread Expression of Erythropoietin Receptor in Brain and Its Induction by Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Christoph; Martens, Henrik; Hassouna, Imam; Oliveira, Bárbara; Erck, Christian; Zafeiriou, Maria-Patapia; Peteri, Ulla-Kaisa; Hesse, Dörte; Gerhart, Simone; Altas, Bekir; Kolbow, Tekla; Stadler, Herbert; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Jahn, Olaf; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) exerts potent neuroprotective, neuroregenerative and procognitive functions. However, unequivocal demonstration of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression in brain cells has remained difficult since previously available anti-EPOR antibodies (EPOR-AB) were unspecific. We report here a new, highly specific, polyclonal rabbit EPOR-AB directed against different epitopes in the cytoplasmic tail of human and murine EPOR and its characterization by mass spectrometric analysis of immuno-precipitated endogenous EPOR, Western blotting, immunostaining and flow cytometry. Among others, we applied genetic strategies including overexpression, Lentivirus-mediated conditional knockout of EpoR and tagged proteins, both on cultured cells and tissue sections, as well as intracortical implantation of EPOR-transduced cells to verify specificity. We show examples of EPOR expression in neurons, oligodendroglia, astrocytes and microglia. Employing this new EPOR-AB with double-labeling strategies, we demonstrate membrane expression of EPOR as well as its localization in intracellular compartments such as the Golgi apparatus. Moreover, we show injury-induced expression of EPOR. In mice, a stereotactically applied stab wound to the motor cortex leads to distinct EpoR expression by reactive GFAP-expressing cells in the lesion vicinity. In a patient suffering from epilepsy, neurons and oligodendrocytes of the hippocampus strongly express EPOR. To conclude, this new analytical tool will allow neuroscientists to pinpoint EPOR expression in cells of the nervous system and to better understand its role in healthy conditions, including brain development, as well as under pathological circumstances, such as upregulation upon distress and injury. PMID:26349059

  7. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F.; Sparks, R.B.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  8. Pituitary and Brain Dopamine D2 Receptors Regulate Liver Gene Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria Cecilia; Ornstein, Ana Maria; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Garcia-Tornadu, Isabel; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Liver sexual gene dimorphism, which depends mainly on specific patterns of GH secretion, may underlie differential susceptibility to some liver diseases. Because GH and prolactin secretion are regulated by dopaminergic pathways, we studied the participation of brain and lactotrope dopamine 2 receptors (D2Rs) on liver gene sexual dimorphism, to explore a link between the brain and liver gene expression. We used global D2R knockout mice (Drd2−/−) and conducted a functional dissection strategy based on cell-specific Drd2 inactivation in neurons (neuroDrd2KO) or pituitary lactotropes. Disruption of neuronal D2Rs (which impaired the GH axis) decreased most of male or female-predominant class I liver genes and increased female–predominant class II genes in males, consistent with the positive (class I) or negative (class II) regulation of these genes by GH. Notably, sexual dimorphism was lost for class I and II genes in neuroDrd2KO mice. Disruption of lactotrope D2Rs did not modify class I or II genes in either sex, because GH axis was preserved. But surprisingly, 1 class II gene (Prlr) and female-predominant class I genes were markedly up-regulated in lacDrd2KO females, pointing to direct or indirect effects of prolactin in the regulation of selected female-predominant liver genes. This suggestion was strengthened in the hyperprolactinemic Drd2−/− female mouse, in which increased expression of the same 4 liver genes was observed, despite a decreased GH axis. We hereby demonstrate endocrine-mediated D2R actions on sexual dimorphic liver gene expression, which may be relevant during chronic dopaminergic medications in psychiatric disease. PMID:25545383

  9. Expression of the AMF/neuroleukin receptor in developing and adult brain cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, N; Vallée, A; Nabi, I R

    2000-06-01

    The peptide sequence of autocrine motility factor (AMF), a tumor secreted cytokine that induces cell motility, corresponds to that of the previously identified cytokine/enzyme, neuroleukin/glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. Neuroleukin is a neurotrophic factor that promotes neuronal survival and sprouting at the neuromuscular junction. The AMF receptor (AMF-R) has been identified and shown to be highly expressed in malignant tumors with minimal expression in adjacent normal tissue. Neuroleukin mRNA is highly expressed in the cerebellum and we therefore undertook a developmental study of AMF-R expression in rat cerebellum. As determined by immunoblot, AMF-R is expressed at equivalent high levels in brain and cerebellum of postnatal day 5 (P5) and 12 (P12) rats and at significantly reduced levels in the adult. Coimmunofluorescence studies with MAP-2 and gamma-actin revealed that at P12, AMF-R was mainly localized to Purkinje and granule cells. Moreover, the premigratory cells of the external granular layer were also immunoreactive for AMF-R suggesting a role for AMF-R in granule cell migration during cerebellar development in the first two weeks after birth. In the adult, AMF-R distribution was similar to P12, although weaker, and was localized to Purkinje and granule cells. AMF-R labeling of GFAP positive glial processes could not be detected in cerebellar sections although in cerebellar primary cultures, both neurons and glial cells were labeled for AMF-R. In neurons, AMF-R labeling was present in the cell body, neurites and growth cones. These data indicate that regulation of the neurotrophic function of neuroleukin might be regulated spatially and temporally by expression of its receptor, AMF-R, in developing and adult cerebellum.

  10. Regional distribution of somatostatin receptor binding and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L; Garlind, A; Nilsson, L; Alafuzoff, I; Fowler, C J; Winblad, B; Cowburn, R F

    1991-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the superior temporal cortex of a group of Alzheimer's disease cases, compared to a group of matched controls. In the present study, the levels of high affinity 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding, its modulation by guanine nucleotides and the effects of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity have been measured in preparations of frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and cerebellum from the same patient and control groups. A significant reduction in 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding was observed in the frontal cortex, but not other regions, of the Alzheimer's disease group, compared with control values. The profiles of inhibition of specific 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding by Gpp(NH)p were similar in all regions in both groups. No significant differences in basal, forskolin-stimulated, or somatostatin and neuropeptide Y inhibitions of adenylyl cyclase activity were found between the two groups. The pattern of change of somatostatin binding in the Alzheimer's disease cases observed in the present study differs from the reported pattern of loss of somatostatin neurons and may be secondary to the degeneration of somatostatin receptor-bearing cholinergic afferents arising from the nucleus basalis. The results of this study indicate that impaired somatostatin modulation of adenylyl cyclase is not a global phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease brain and also that there are no major disruptions of somatostatin receptor-G-protein coupling or of adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity in this disorder. PMID:1684616

  11. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field exposure on adenosine receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Fini, Milena; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Different effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure on brain tissue have been described in pre-clinical models and in clinical settings. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action and the possible interaction with membrane receptors such as adenosine receptors (ARs) has not been investigated. The present study focused on the effect of PEMFs on A1 and A2A ARs in the rat cerebral cortex and cortical neurons. Affinity and density of ARs were evaluated by means of saturation binding experiments while mRNA expression was investigated through retro-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PEMF treatment of the intact rat cerebral cortex or cortical neurons at 1.5 mT mediated a transient and significant increase in A2A ARs after 4 h (2.0-fold increase) and 6 h (1.4- and 1.8-fold increase, respectively) of exposure. In addition, PEMF treatment of the rat cerebral cortex and rat cortical neurons at 3 mT upregulated A2A ARs after 2 h (2.0- and 2.2-fold increase, respectively) and 4 h (1.6- and 1.9-fold increase, respectively). The treatment of rat cortex membranes with PEMFs at 1.5 and 3 mT induced an increase in A2A AR density after 2 h (1.9- and 2.2-fold increase, respectively) and was constant at all incubation times investigated. In rat cortical neurons, mRNA levels of A1 and A2A ARs were not affected by PEMF exposure for the times and intensities used. These results suggest that PEMF treatment has different biological effects in whole organs or cells in comparison with isolated membranes.

  12. Data on Arc and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α-2A adrenergic receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    The α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) is widely distributed in the brain with distinct roles for α2-AR subtypes (A, B and C). In this article, data are provided on Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton Associated Protein (Arc) and Zif268 expression in the brain of the α2A-AR knockout (α2A-AR KO) mouse. These data are supplemental to an original research article examining Arc and Zif268 expression in rats injected with the α2-AR antagonist, RX821002 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2015.12.002. [1]). PMID:26952134

  13. Brain Interleukin-1β and the Intrinsic Receptor Antagonist Control Peripheral Toll-Like Receptor 3-Mediated Suppression of Spontaneous Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Masanori; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Eguchi, Asami; Kume, Satoshi; Miyashige, Yukiharu; Nakano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2014-01-01

    During acute viral infections such as influenza, humans often experience not only transient fever, but also prolonged fatigue or depressive feelings with a decrease in social activity for days or weeks. These feelings are thought to be due to neuroinflammation in the brain. Recent studies have suggested that chronic neuroinflammation is a precipitating event of various neurological disorders, but the mechanism determining the duration of neuroinflammation has not been elucidated. In this study, neuroinflammation was induced by intraperitoneal injection of polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C), a Toll-like receptor-3 agonist that mimics viral infection in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and then investigated how the neuroinflammation shift from acute to the chronic state. The rats showed transient fever and prolonged suppression of spontaneous activity for several days following poly I:C injection. NS-398, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, completely prevented fever, but did not improve spontaneous activity, indicating that suppression of spontaneous activity was not induced by the arachidonate cascade that generated the fever. The animals overexpressed interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in the brain including the cerebral cortex. Blocking the IL-1 receptor in the brain by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of recombinant IL-1ra completely blocked the poly I:C-induced suppression of spontaneous activity and attenuated amplification of brain interferon (IFN)-α expression, which has been reported to produce fatigue-like behavior by suppressing the serotonergic system. Furthermore, i.c.v. infusion of neutralizing antibody for IL-1ra prolonged recovery from suppression of spontaneous activity. Our findings indicated that IL-1β is the key trigger of neuroinflammation and that IL-1ra prevents the neuroinflammation entering the chronic state. PMID:24621600

  14. Molecular cloning of a somatostatin-28 receptor and comparison of its expression pattern with that of a somatostatin-14 receptor in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhof, W; Wulfsen, I; Schönrock, C; Fehr, S; Richter, D

    1992-01-01

    The tetradecapeptide somatotropin-release inhibiting factor somatostatin-14 regulates the release of peptide hormones and also functions as neurotransmitter. The octacosapeptide somatostatin-28, the N-terminally extended form of somatostatin-14, shows similar biological activities yet with different potencies. Both peptides most likely function through distinct receptors. Here we report on the molecular and functional characterization of a somatostatin-28 receptor (SSR-28) cloned from a rat brain cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence contains an open reading frame for a protein of 428 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 47 kDa. Binding assays using radiolabeled somatostatin-14 and membranes from COS cells transfected with the cloned cDNA show that this receptor, SSR-28, has a higher binding affinity for somatostatin-28 (IC50 = 0.24 nM) than for somatostatin-14 (IC50 = 0.89 nM). RNA blot analysis reveals a 4.4-kilobase mRNA in rat cerebellum and at significantly lower abundance in other brain regions. In situ hybridization indicates that SSR-28 mRNA is present in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellum and in the large cells of the hypoglossal nucleus of the brain stem. Signals for SSR-28 mRNA do not overlap with those of a previously cloned rat receptor that preferentially binds somatostatin-14 (SSR-14). SSR-14 mRNA is found in the medial cerebellar nucleus, horizontal limb of the diagonal band, various hypothalamic nuclei, and in layers IV and V of the cortex. In the rat cerebellum, SSR-14 and SSR-28 mRNAs are developmentally regulated; the levels of the former are highest around birth and levels of the latter are highest at the adult stage. Images PMID:1279674

  15. Intermolecular disulfide bonds are not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, E; Gironès, N; Davis, R J

    1989-01-01

    The human transferrin receptor is expressed as a disulfide-linked dimer at the cell surface. The sites of intermolecular disulfide bonds are Cys-89 and Cys-98. We have examined the functional significance of the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor by substitution of Cys-89 and Cys-98 with serine residues. Wild-type and mutated transferrin receptors were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (clone TF-) that lack detectable endogenous transferrin receptors. The rates of receptor endocytosis and recycling were measured and the accumulation of iron by cells incubated with [59Fe]diferric transferrin was investigated. No significant differences between these rates were observed when cells expressing wild-type and mutated receptors were compared. The structure of the mutant receptor lacking intermolecular disulfide bonds was investigated. The presence of a population of mutant receptors with a non-covalent dimeric structure was indicated by cross-linking studies using diferric [125I]transferrin and the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberimidate. However, sucrose density gradient sedimentation analysis of Triton X-100 solubilized transferrin receptors demonstrated that the mutant receptor existed as a monomer in the absence of diferric transferrin and as an apparent dimer in the presence of this receptor ligand. We conclude that the covalent dimeric structure of the transferrin receptor is not required for the expression of the dimeric state and functional activity of the receptor. Images PMID:2507316

  16. The proneurotrophin receptor sortilin is required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis control by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Cristina L; Rodgers, Angela; Herbst, Susanne; Coade, Stephen; Gronow, Achim; Guzman, Carlos A; Wilson, Mark S; Kanzaki, Makoto; Nykjaer, Anders; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-01-01

    Sorting of luminal and membrane proteins into phagosomes is critical for the immune function of this organelle. However, little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to the spatiotemporal regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the role of the proneurotrophin receptor sortilin during phagosome maturation and mycobacterial killing. We show that this receptor is acquired by mycobacteria-containing phagosomes via interactions with the adaptor proteins AP-1 and GGAs. Interestingly, the phagosomal association of sortilin is critical for the delivery of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) and required for efficient phagosome maturation. Macrophages from Sort1(-/-) mice are less efficient in restricting the growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. In vivo, Sort1(-/-) mice showed a substantial increase in cellular infiltration of neutrophils in their lungs and higher bacterial burden after infection with M. tuberculosis. Altogether, sortilin defines a pathway required for optimal intracellular mycobacteria control and lung inflammation in vivo. PMID:27389464

  17. Receptor-type guanylate cyclase is required for carbon dioxide sensation by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Spencer, W Clay; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Miller, David M; Horvitz, H Robert; Sternberg, Paul W; Ringstad, Niels

    2011-01-01

    CO(2) is both a critical regulator of animal physiology and an important sensory cue for many animals for host detection, food location, and mate finding. The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans shows CO(2) avoidance behavior, which requires a pair of ciliated sensory neurons, the BAG neurons. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we show that CO(2) specifically activates the BAG neurons and that the CO(2)-sensing function of BAG neurons requires TAX-2/TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels and the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. Our results delineate a molecular pathway for CO(2) sensing and suggest that activation of a receptor-type guanylate cyclase is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which animals detect environmental CO(2).

  18. Receptor-type guanylate cyclase is required for carbon dioxide sensation by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Spencer, W Clay; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Miller, David M; Horvitz, H Robert; Sternberg, Paul W; Ringstad, Niels

    2011-01-01

    CO(2) is both a critical regulator of animal physiology and an important sensory cue for many animals for host detection, food location, and mate finding. The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans shows CO(2) avoidance behavior, which requires a pair of ciliated sensory neurons, the BAG neurons. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we show that CO(2) specifically activates the BAG neurons and that the CO(2)-sensing function of BAG neurons requires TAX-2/TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels and the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. Our results delineate a molecular pathway for CO(2) sensing and suggest that activation of a receptor-type guanylate cyclase is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which animals detect environmental CO(2). PMID:21173231

  19. The proneurotrophin receptor sortilin is required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis control by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Cristina L.; Rodgers, Angela; Herbst, Susanne; Coade, Stephen; Gronow, Achim; Guzman, Carlos A.; Wilson, Mark S.; Kanzaki, Makoto; Nykjaer, Anders; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    Sorting of luminal and membrane proteins into phagosomes is critical for the immune function of this organelle. However, little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to the spatiotemporal regulation of this process. Here, we investigated the role of the proneurotrophin receptor sortilin during phagosome maturation and mycobacterial killing. We show that this receptor is acquired by mycobacteria-containing phagosomes via interactions with the adaptor proteins AP-1 and GGAs. Interestingly, the phagosomal association of sortilin is critical for the delivery of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) and required for efficient phagosome maturation. Macrophages from Sort1−/− mice are less efficient in restricting the growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. In vivo, Sort1−/− mice showed a substantial increase in cellular infiltration of neutrophils in their lungs and higher bacterial burden after infection with M. tuberculosis. Altogether, sortilin defines a pathway required for optimal intracellular mycobacteria control and lung inflammation in vivo. PMID:27389464

  20. Brain penetration, target engagement, and disposition of the blood-brain barrier-crossing bispecific antibody antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Webster, Carl I; Caram-Salas, Nadia; Haqqani, Arsalan S; Thom, George; Brown, Lee; Rennie, Kerry; Yogi, Alvaro; Costain, Willard; Brunette, Eric; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2016-05-01

    Receptor mediated transcytosis harnessing the cellular uptake and transport of natural ligands across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been identified as a means for antibody delivery to the CNS. In this study, we characterized bispecific antibodies in which a BBB-crossing antibody fragment FC5 was used as a BBB carrier. Cargo antibodies were either a high-affinity, selective antibody antagonist of the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (BBB-mGluR1), a widely abundant CNS target, or an IgG that does not bind the CNS target (BBB-NiP). Both BBB-NiP and BBB-mGluR1 demonstrated a similar 20-fold enhanced rate of transcytosis across an in vitro BBB model compared with mGluR1 IgG fused to a control antibody fragment. All 3 bispecific antibodies exhibited identical pharmacokinetics in vivo Comparative assessment of BBB-NiP and BBB-mGluR1 revealed that, whereas their serum pharmacokinetics and BBB penetration were identical, their central disposition (brain levels) and elimination (cerebrospinal fluid levels) were widely different, due to central target-mediated removal of the mGluR1-engaging antibody. Central mGluR1 target engagement after systemic administration was demonstrated by a dose-dependent inhibition of mGluR-1-mediated thermal hyperalgesia and by colocalization of the antibody with thalamic neurons involved in mGluR1-mediated pain processing. We demonstrate the feasibility of targeting central G-protein-coupled receptors using a BBB-crossing bispecific antibody approach and emerging principles that govern brain distribution and disposition of these antibodies. These data will be important for designing safe and selective CNS antibody therapeutics.-Webster, C. I., Caram-Salas, N., Haqqani, A. S., Thom, G., Brown, L., Rennie, K., Yogi, A., Costain, W., Brunette, E., Stanimirovic, D. B. Brain penetration, target engagement, and disposition of the blood-brain barrier-crossing bispecific antibody antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1.

  1. Chronic treatment with selective I2-imidazoline receptor ligands decreases the content of pro-apoptotic markers in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Garau, Celia; Miralles, Antonio; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2013-02-01

    Selective I(2)-imidazoline receptor ligands induce neuroprotection through various molecular mechanisms including blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. To investigate new neuroprotective mechanisms associated with I(2)-imidazoline receptors, the effects of selective