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Sample records for brain reveals glioma

  1. Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Holtkamp, Nikola . E-mail: nikola.holtkamp@charite.de; Afanasieva, Anastasia; Elstner, Anja; Landeghem, Frank K.H. van; Koenneker, Matthias; Kuhn, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut; Deimling, Andreas von

    2005-11-04

    Invasion of tumor cells into adjacent brain areas is one of the major problems in treatment of glioma patients. To identify genes that might contribute to invasion, fluorescent F98 glioma cells were allowed to invade an organotypic brain slice. Gene expression analysis revealed 5 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated genes in invasive glioma cells as compared to non-invasive glioma cells. Two gene products, ferritin and cyclin B1, were verified in human gliomas by immunohistochemistry. Ferritin exhibited high mRNA levels in migratory F98 cells and also showed higher protein expression in the infiltrating edge of human gliomas. Cyclin B1 with high mRNA expression levels in stationary F98 cells showed marked protein expression in the central portions of gliomas. These findings are compatible with the concept of tumor cells either proliferating or migrating. Our study is the first to apply brain slice cultures for the identification of differentially regulated genes in glioma invasion.

  2. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  3. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  4. [Genetics and brain gliomas].

    PubMed

    Alentorn, Agusti; Labussière, Marianne; Sanson, Marc; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Chromosome arms 1p and 19q codeletion, corresponding to an unbalanced reciprocal translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10), is seen in oligodendroglial tumours and is associated with better prognosis and better chemosensitivity. BRAF abnormalities are observed in pilocytic astrocytomas (tandem duplication-rearrangement) and in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (BRAF V600E mutation). The vast majority of primary or de novo glioblastomas exhibit genetic abnormalities disrupting the intracellular signaling pathways of: transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors to growth factors and their downstream signaling pathways (i.e. NF1-RAS-RAF-MAPK and PTEN-PI3K-AKT-TSC-mTOR); RB and; TP53. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are frequent in diffuse grade II and grade III gliomas and in secondary glioblastomas. They are diagnostic and favorable independent prognostic biomarkers. In contrast, they are rare in primary or de novo glioblastomas and not reported in pilocytic astrocytomas. Germlin mutations in MSH2/MLH1/PMS2/MSH6, CDKN2A, TSC1/TSC2, PTEN, TP53 and NF1/NF2 predispose to glial tumors in the setting of hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in TERT,CCDC26, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, RTEL, EGFR and PHLDB1 confer an inherited susceptibility to glial tumors.

  5. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are called mixed gliomas. Tumors such as “optic nerve glioma” and “brain stem glioma” are named ... Oligodendroglioma: Click here to learn more about oligodendroglioma. Optic Glioma: These tumors may involve any part of ...

  6. Brain stem glioma: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Ruth K

    2005-01-01

    The paths taken by each family in coming to terms with the dismal prognosis associated with brain stem glioma can be quite different. The case studies of 2 school-age girls diagnosed with a brain stem glioma within weeks of each other are presented. The multi-disciplinary team response to each family was individualized at each stage of diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care, as expected. The ultimate chronologic union of these 2 families as each child neared death was somewhat uncanny. The experience of each family, and their relationship with the team through this process, was an intense challenge and learning experience.

  7. Circulating tumor cell is a common property of brain glioma and promotes the monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faliang; Cui, Yong; Jiang, Haihui; Sui, Dali; Wang, Yonggang; Jiang, Zhongli; Zhao, Jizong; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary intracranial tumor characterized by dismal prognosis and frequent recurrence, yet a real-time and reliable biological approach to monitor tumor response and progression is still lacking. Recently, few studies have reported that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be detected in glioblastoma multiform (GBM), providing the possibility of its application in brain glioma monitoring system. But its application limits still exist, because the detection rate of CTCs is still low and was exclusively limited to high- grade gliomas. Here, we adopted an advanced integrated cellular and molecular approach of SE-iFISH to detect CTCs in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with 7 different subtypes of brain glioma, uncovering the direct evidences of glioma migration. We identified CTCs in the PB from 24 of 31 (77%) patients with glioma in all 7 subtypes. No statistical difference of CTC incidence and count was observed in different pathological subtypes or WHO grades of glioma. Clinical data revealed that CTCs, to some extent, was superior to MRI in monitoring the treatment response and differentiating radionecrosis from recurrence of glioma. Conclusively, CTCs is a common property of brain gliomas of various pathological subtypes, which has provided an ultimate paradox for the hypothesis “soil and seed”. It can be used to monitor the microenvironment of gliomas dynamically, which will be a meaningful complement to radiographic imaging. PMID:27517490

  8. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  9. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-min; Wang, Yan-hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood–brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  10. Unsupervised analysis of transcriptomic profiles reveals six glioma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Aiguo; Walling, Jennifer; Ahn, Susie; Kotliarov, Yuri; Su, Qin; Quezado, Martha; Oberholtzer, J Carl; Park, John; Zenklusen, Jean C; Fine, Howard A

    2009-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumors in adults and a significant cause of cancer-related mortality. Defining glioma subtypes based on objective genetic and molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications based on gene expression data have been attempted in the past with varying success and with only some concordance between studies, possibly due to inherent bias that can be introduced through the use of analytic methodologies that make a priori selection of genes before classification. To overcome this potential source of bias, we have applied two unsupervised machine learning methods to genome-wide gene expression profiles of 159 gliomas, thereby establishing a robust glioma classification model relying only on the molecular data. The model predicts for two major groups of gliomas (oligodendroglioma-rich and glioblastoma-rich groups) separable into six hierarchically nested subtypes. We then identified six sets of classifiers that can be used to assign any given glioma to the corresponding subtype and validated these classifiers using both internal (189 additional independent samples) and two external data sets (341 patients). Application of the classification system to the external glioma data sets allowed us to identify previously unrecognized prognostic groups within previously published data and within The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma samples and the different biological pathways associated with the different glioma subtypes offering a potential clue to the pathogenesis and possibly therapeutic targets for tumors within each subtype.

  11. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  12. Reversible neurotoxicity following hyperfractionated radiation therapy of brain stem glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M.; Friedman, H.S.; Halperin, E.C.; Wiener, M.D.; Marks, L.; Oakes, W.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; DeLong, G.R.; Schold, S.C.; Hockenberger, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with brain stem gliomas were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFR) (7,020 and 7,560 cGy, respectively). Despite initial clinical improvement during irradiation, both patients demonstrated clinical deterioration approximately 3 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a progressive increase in distribution of abnormal brain stem signal consistent with either tumor or edema. {sup 18}FDG positron emission tomography (PET) was obtained in one patient and demonstrated a hypermetabolic lesion at diagnosis and a hypometabolic lesion at the time of clinical deterioration postirradiation. Management with a tapering dose of dexamethasone alone resulted in marked clinical (both patients) and radiographic (one patient) improvement, allowing reduction or discontinuation of this medication. These results suggest that patients with brain stem tumors demonstrating clinical and radiographic evidence of progressive tumor shortly after completion of HFR should be initially managed conservatively with dexamethasone, since these findings may be manifestations of reversible radiation-related neurotoxicity.

  13. Tesmilifene modifies brain endothelial functions and opens the blood-brain/blood-glioma barrier.

    PubMed

    Walter, Fruzsina R; Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Péterfi, Zoltán A; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Cervenak, László; Ábrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2015-09-01

    Tesmilifene, a tamoxifen analog with antihistamine action, has chemopotentiating properties in experimental and clinical cancer studies. In our previous works, tesmilifene increased the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in animal and culture models. Our aim was to investigate the effects of tesmilifene on brain microvessel permeability in the rat RG2 glioma model and to reveal its mode of action in brain endothelial cells. Tesmilifene significantly increased fluorescein extravasation in the glioma. Short-term treatment with tesmilifene reduced the resistance and increased the permeability for marker molecules in a rat triple co-culture BBB model. Tesmilifene also affected the barrier integrity in brain endothelial cells co-cultured with RG2 glioblastoma cells. Tesmilifene inhibited the activity of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 efflux pumps and down-regulated the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, efflux pumps, solute carriers, and metabolic enzymes important for BBB functions. Among the possible signaling pathways that regulate BBB permeability, tesmilifene activated the early nuclear translocation of NFκB. The MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt kinase pathways were also involved. We demonstrate for the first time that tesmilifene increases permeability marker molecule extravasation in glioma and inhibits efflux pump activity in brain endothelial cells, which may have therapeutic relevance. Tesmilifene, a chemopotentiator in experimental and clinical cancer studies increases vascular permeability in RG2 glioma in rats and permeability for marker molecules in a culture model of the blood-brain barrier. Tesmilifene inhibits the activity of efflux pumps and down-regulates the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, transporters, and metabolic enzymes important for the blood-brain barrier functions, which may have therapeutic relevance.

  14. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  15. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-10

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  16. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  17. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  18. c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery to brain glioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, YuKun; Liu, Wenchao; Gao, Feng; Fang, Xiaoling; Chen, Yanzuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain glioma therapy is an important challenge in oncology. Here, doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide (c(RGDyK))-decorated Pluronic micelles (cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide-decorated Pluronic micelles loaded with doxorubicin and paclitaxel [RGD-PF-DP]) were designed as a potential targeted delivery system to enhance blood–brain barrier penetration and improve drug accumulation via integrin-mediated transcytosis/endocytosis and based on integrin overexpression in blood–brain barrier and glioma cells. The physicochemical characterization of RGD-PF-DP revealed a satisfactory size of 28.5±0.12 nm with uniform distribution and core-shell structure. The transport rates across the in vitro blood–brain barrier model, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis of U87 malignant glioblastoma cells of RGD-PF-DP were significantly greater than those of non-c(RGDyK)-decorated Pluronic micelles. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated the specificity and efficacy of intracranial tumor accumulation of RGD-PF-DP. RGD-PF-DP displayed an extended median survival time of 39 days, with no serious body weight loss during the regimen. No acute toxicity to major organs was observed in mice receiving treatment doses via intravenous administration. In conclusion, RGD-PF-DP could be a promising vehicle for enhanced doxorubicin and paclitaxel delivery in patients with brain glioma. PMID:27143884

  19. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  20. Sulfasalazine impacts on ferroptotic cell death and alleviates the tumor microenvironment and glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Ghoochani, Ali; Rauh, Manfred; Engelhorn, Tobias; Minakaki, Georgia; Dörfler, Arnd; Klucken, Jochen; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The glutamate transporter xCT (SCL7a11, system Xc-, SXC) is an emerging key player in glutamate/cysteine/glutathione homeostasis in the brain and in cancer. xCT expression correlates with the grade of malignancy. Here, we report on the use of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and EMA-approved xCT inhibitor, sulfasalazine (SAS) in gliomas. SAS does not affect cell viability in gliomas at concentrations below 200 μM. At higher concentrations SAS becomes gliomatoxic. Mechanistically SAS inhibits xCT and induces ferroptotic cell death in glioma cells. There is no evidence for impact on autophagic flux following SAS application. However, SAS can potentiate the efficacy of the standard chemotherapeutic and autophagy-inducing agent temozolomide (Temcat, Temodal or Temodar®). We also investigated SAS in non-transformed cellular constituents of the brain. Neurons and brain tissue are almost non-responding to SAS whereas isolated astrocytes are less sensitive towards SAS toxicity compared to gliomas. In vivo SAS treatment does not affect experimental tumor growth and treated animals revealed comparable tumor volume as untreated controls. However, SAS treatment resulted in reduced glioma-derived edema and, hence, total tumor volume burden as revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Altogether, we show that SAS can be utilized for targeting the glutamate antiporter xCT activity as a tumor microenvironment-normalizing drug, while crucial cytotoxic effects in brain tumors are minor. PMID:27074570

  1. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  2. White Matter Change Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Chul-Kee; Koo, Bang-Bon; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-related white matter change is detected at late stages with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when mass effect or prominent edema is present. We analyzed if diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) white matter change earlier than conventional MRI. Methods Twenty-six patients with gliomas (World Health Organization grade II, 5; grade III, 12; and grade IV, 9) within 2 cm from the posterior limb of the internal capsule (IC) were studied. Fifteen normal adults were enrolled as controls. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI showed a high signal change at the posterior limb of the IC (HSIC) in 9 patients with grade III or IV gliomas. We classified the gliomas as WHO grade II (gliomas II), grade III or IV without HSIC [gliomas III/IV(-)] and grade III or IV with HSIC [gliomas III/IV(+)], as an indicator of the increase in the severity of the white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated for the pyramidal tract. Tumor progression along pyramidal tract was evaluated by follow-up MRI in 16 patients at 40±18 months. Results FA showed no significant difference between gliomas II and control (p=0.694), but was lower in gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) (p<0.001). ADCs were higher in gliomas II, gliomas III/IV(-) and gliomas III/IV(+) than control (p<0.001). Tumor progression was detected in 2/16 patients. Conclusion DTI detected white matter changes that appeared to be normal in MRI. ADC changed even in low grade glioma, indicating ADC may be a better parameter for the early detection of white matter change. PMID:27867919

  3. The long non-coding RNA TP73-AS1 interacted with miR-142 to modulate brain glioma growth through HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jin, Hekun; Lou, Fan

    2017-04-05

    P73 antisense RNA 1T (non-protein coding), also known as TP73-AS1 or PDAM, is a long non-coding RNA which may regulate apoptosis via regulation of p53-dependent anti-apoptotic genes. An abnormal change of TP73-AS1 expression was noticed in cancers. The effects of TP73-AS1 in brain glioma growth and the underlying mechanism remain unclear so far. In the present study, TP73-AS1 was specifically upregulated in brain glioma tissues and cell lines and was associated with poorer prognosis in patients with glioma. TP73-AS1 knocking down suppressed human brain glioma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, as well as HMGB1 protein. MiR-142 has been reported to play a pivotal role in cancers; here we observed that TP73-AS1 and miR-142 could negatively regulate each other. Results from luciferase assays suggested that TP73-AS1 might compete with HMGB1 for miR-142 binding. Further, HMGB1/RAGE was involved in TP73-AS1/miR-142 regulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In glioma tissues, TP73-AS1 and HMGB1 expression was up-regulated, whereas miR-142 expression was down-regulated. Data from the present study revealed that TP73-AS1 promoted the brain glioma growth and invasion through acting as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) to promote HMGB1 expression by sponging miR-142. In conclusion, we regarded TP73-AS1 as an oncogenic lncRNA promoting brain glioma proliferation and invasion and a potential target for human brain glioma treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  5. Liposome formulated with TAT-modified cholesterol for improving brain delivery and therapeutic efficacy on brain glioma in animals.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yao; Chen, Huali; Zhang, Qianyu; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Wenmin; Kuai, Rui; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhirong; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Ji; He, Qin

    2011-11-28

    The treatment of central nervous system diseases such as brain glioma is a major challenge due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A cell-penetrating peptide TAT (AYGRKKRRQRRR), which appears to enter cells with alacrity, was employed to enhance the delivery efficiency of normal drug formulation to the brain. Targeting liposomal formulations often apply modified phospholipids as anchors. However, cholesterol, another liposomal component more stable and cheaper, has not been fully investigated as an alternative anchor. In our study, TAT was covalently conjugated with cholesterol for preparing doxorubicin-loaded liposome for brain glioma therapy. Cellular uptake by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and C6 glioma cells was explored. The anti-proliferative activity against C6s confirmed strong inhibitory effect of the liposomes modified with doxorubicin-loaded TAT. The bio-distribution findings in brains and hearts were evident of higher efficiency of brain delivery and lower cardiotoxic risk. The results on survival of the brain glioma-bearing animals indicate that survival time of the glioma-bearing rats treated with TAT-modified liposome was much longer than in the other groups. In conclusion, the potency of the TAT-modified liposome to enter the BBB appears to be related with the TAT on the liposome's surface. The TAT-modified liposome may improve the therapeutic efficacy on brain glioma in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Transcriptional network analysis reveals that AT1 and AT2 angiotensin II receptors are both involved in the regulation of genes essential for glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  7. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals that AT1 and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptors Are Both Involved in the Regulation of Genes Essential for Glioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  8. C-type natriuretic peptide-modified lipid vesicles: fabrication and use for the treatment of brain glioma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Shuan; Mu, Li-Min; Bu, Ying-Zi; Liu, Lei; Yan, Yan; Hu, Ying-Jie; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Lu, Weiyue; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2017-03-29

    Chemotherapy of brain glioma faces a major obstacle owing to the inability of drug transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Besides, neovasculatures in brain glioma site result in a rapid infiltration, making complete surgical removal virtually impossible. Herein, we reported a novel kind of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) modified vinorelbine lipid vesicles for transferring drug across the BBB, and for treating brain glioma along with disrupting neovasculatures. The studies were performed on brain glioma U87-MG cells in vitro and on glioma-bearing nude mice in vivo. The results showed that the CNP-modified vinorelbine lipid vesicles could transport vinorelbine across the BBB, kill the brain glioma, and destroy neovasculatures effectively. The above mechanisms could be associated with the following aspects, namely, long circulation in the blood; drug transport across the BBB via natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPRB)-mediated transcytosis; elimination of brain glioma cells and disruption of neovasculatures by targeting uptake and cytotoxic injury. Besides, CNP-modified vinorelbine lipid vesicles could induce apoptosis of the glioma cells. The mechanisms could be related to the activations of caspase 8, caspase 3, p53, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and inhibition of survivin. Hence, CNP-modified lipid vesicles could be used as a carrier material for treating brain glioma and disabling glioma neovasculatures.

  9. Effects of metformin treatment on glioma-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hailiang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that metformin can activate 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in protection of endothelial cell permeability. Hence, the present study evaluated the effects of metformin on blood brain barrier permeability and AQP4 expression in vitro, and assessed the effects of metformin treatment on tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. Hypoxia or VEGF exposure enhanced bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer permeability and attenuated the expression of tight junction proteins including Occludin, Claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2. However, 0.5 mM metformin treatment protected bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer from hypoxia or VEGF-induced permeability, which was correlated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. Furthermore, metformin treatment attenuated AQP4 protein expression in cultured astrocytes. Such an effect involved the activation of AMPK and inhibition of NF-κB. Finally, metformin treatment dose-dependently reduced glioma induced vascular permeability and cerebral edema in vivo in rats. Thus, our results suggested that metformin may protect endothelial cell tight junction, prevent damage to the blood brain barrier induced by brain tumor growth, and alleviate the formation of cerebral edema. Furthermore, since the formation of cytotoxic edema and AQP4 expression was positively correlated, our results indicated that metformin may reduce the formation of cytotoxic edema. However, given that AQP4 plays a key role in the elimination of cerebral edema, attenuation of AQP4 expression by metformin may reduce the elimination of cerebral edema. Hence, future studies will be necessary to dissect the specific mechanisms of metformin underlying the dynamics of tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. PMID:27648126

  10. Effects of metformin treatment on glioma-induced brain edema.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hailiang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that metformin can activate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in protection of endothelial cell permeability. Hence, the present study evaluated the effects of metformin on blood brain barrier permeability and AQP4 expression in vitro, and assessed the effects of metformin treatment on tumor-induced brain edema in vivo. Hypoxia or VEGF exposure enhanced bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer permeability and attenuated the expression of tight junction proteins including Occludin, Claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2. However, 0.5 mM metformin treatment protected bEnd3 endothelial cell monolayer from hypoxia or VEGF-induced permeability, which was correlated with increased expression of tight junction proteins. Furthermore, metformin treatment attenuated AQP4 protein expression in cultured astrocytes. Such an effect involved the activation of AMPK and inhibition of NF-κB. Finally, metformin treatment dose-dependently reduced glioma induced vascular permeability and cerebral edema in vivo in rats. Thus, our results suggested that metformin may protect endothelial cell tight junction, prevent damage to the blood brain barrier induced by brain tumor growth, and alleviate the formation of cerebral edema. Furthermore, since the formation of cytotoxic edema and AQP4 expression was positively correlated, our results indicated that metformin may reduce the formation of cytotoxic edema. However, given that AQP4 plays a key role in the elimination of cerebral edema, attenuation of AQP4 expression by metformin may reduce the elimination of cerebral edema. Hence, future studies will be necessary to dissect the specific mechanisms of metformin underlying the dynamics of tumor-induced brain edema in vivo.

  11. Mixed Glioma (Oligoastrocytoma) in the brain of an African Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Benneter, S S; Summers, B A; Schulz-Schaeffer, W J; Härtig, W; Mollidor, J; Schöniger, S

    2014-11-01

    This report describes an oligoastrocytoma in the brain of a 3.5-year-old female pet African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) that showed progressive central nervous system signs for 6 months. Microscopical examination of the brain revealed a widely infiltrative, deep-seated glioma within the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres, basal nuclei, hippocampus, thalamus, midbrain, pons and the medulla of the cerebellum with extension of neoplastic cells into the cerebral cortex and overlying leptomeninges. Morphological features of the neoplastic cells, together with variable immunohistochemical expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Olig-2 and Nogo-A, indicated the presence of intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumour cells with an astrocytic component of approximately 40% consistent with an oligoastrocytoma. The distribution of the tumour is consistent with gliomatosis cerebri.

  12. "Unusual brain stone": heavily calcified primary neoplasm with some features suggestive of angiocentric glioma.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Bermingham, Niamh; Marks, Charles; Keohane, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    This 40-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of progressive right-sided headache associated with visual blurring. He also had a history of epilepsy but had been seizure free with medication for the past 10 years. An initial CT scan of his brain performed 16 years previously had revealed a small area of calcification in the right parietal region. In the current presentation, he had a left-sided homonymous hemianopia but no other neurological deficits. A CT scan of his brain showed a much larger calcified, partly cystic lesion in the right parietal region. Because he was symptomatic, the lesion was excised and the cyst was drained. Histological examination of the excised tissue showed an unusual primary tumor that was difficult to classify but had some features of angiocentric glioma. The heavy calcification, mixed-density cell population, and regions with features of angiocentric glioma were most unusual. The patient remained asymptomatic 5 years after surgery, and follow-up scans did not show recurrence.

  13. Chloride channel-mediated brain glioma targeting of chlorotoxin-modified doxorubicine-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Liang, Liang; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-06-30

    The chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion-derived peptide, binding to gliomas with high specificity, was firstly applied to establish the ClTx-modified doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome delivery system for targeting the brain glioma and improving the anticancer efficacy. In vitro physicochemical characterization of the novel liposome system presented satisfactory size of 100 nm with uniform distribution, high encapsulation efficiency and adequate loading capacity of both fluorescent probe and anticancer drug. It was demonstrated quantitatively by the spectrophotofluorometry and flow cytometry and qualitatively by the confocal microscopy that ClTx highly facilitated the uptake of liposomes by three glioma cell lines and one endothelial cell line. In vitro cytotoxicity studies proved that the presence of ClTx increased the cytotoxicity against glioma cells and endothelial cells with various levels for different cell lines. In BALB/c mice bearing U87 tumor xenografts, biodistribution of DiR-loaded liposomes by body imaging and anti-glioma pharmacodynamics of DOX-loaded liposomes were investigated. The ClTx-modified liposomes showed more accumulation in the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors, higher tumor growth inhibition and lower blood toxicity in the armpit tumor model. The in vitro and in vivo results exhibited good correlation of glioma targeting of the ClTx-modified liposomes. Significantly, with the ClTx as the targeting ligand, the liposomes might serve as an applicable delivery system for brain glioma therapy or imaging.

  14. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  15. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant; Kanevsky, Ariel S; Wu, Haitao; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Fung, Steve H; Sousa, Alioscka A; Auh, Sungyoung; Wilson, Colin M; Sharma, Kamal; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Griffiths, Gary L; Hall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives. PMID:19094226

  16. A dual-mediated liposomal drug delivery system targeting the brain: rational construction, integrity evaluation across the blood–brain barrier, and the transporting mechanism to glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Na; Wang, Gui-Ling; Hei, Yu; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Ling-Fei; Yuan, Lan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    As the global population ages, cancer rates increase worldwide, and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), brain tumors, and inflammation threaten human health more frequently. We designed a dual-mediated (receptor-mediated and adsorption-mediated) liposome, named transferrin–cell penetrating peptide–sterically stabilized liposome (TF-CPP-SSL), to improve therapy for gliomas through combining molecular recognition of transferrin receptors (TF-Rs) on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells with the internalization and lysosomal escaping ability of CPP. Based on the systematic investigation of structure–activity relations on the cellular level, we constructed TF-CPP-SSL rationally by conjugating TF and CPP moieties to the liposomes via PEG3.4K and PEG2.0K, respectively, and found the optimum densities of TF and CPP were 1.8% and 4%, respectively. These liposomes had the highest targeting efficacy for brain microvascular endothelial cell and C6 cell uptake but avoided capture by normal cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology and coculture models of BBB and glioma C6 cells indicated that TF-CPP-SSL was transported across the BBB without drug leakage, liposome breakup, or cleavage of ligand. TF-CPP-SSL offered advantages for crossing the BBB and entering into glioma C6 cells. Real-time confocal viewing revealed that TF-CPP-SSL was entrapped in endosomes of glioma C6 cells and then escaped from lysosomes successfully to release the liposomal contents into the cytosol. Entrapped contents, such as doxorubicin, could then enter the nucleus to exert pharmacological effects.

  17. Gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in rat brain after implantation of 9L rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J X; Yang, L P; Wang, Y F; Qin, L P; Liu, D Q; Bai, C X; Nan, X; Shi, S S; Pei, X J

    2007-05-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have come to be highlighted by their close relation to the cell invasion of gliomas. The inhibitors of MMPs have undergone extensive development because of its effectiveness against tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Therefore, a suitable animal model is necessary for searching new MMPs inhibitors against gliomas. In this study, we established an experimental model by implanting 9L glioma cells stereotactically into Fisher344 (F344) rat's brain, and the expression and enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in 9L glioma cells and in tumor tissue was determined by means of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) zymography, in situ film zymography and immunostaining. The results of RT-PCR showed that the mRNA level of MMP-2 in 9L glioma cells was higher than that of MMP-9, and the mRNA expression of MMP-9 was increased along with the growth of malignant gliomas. SDS-PAGE zymography revealed that the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were significantly increased in tumor tissues, and the MMP-9 wasn't detected in normal tissue. The positive stain of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was enhanced with the growth of malignant gliomas, especially for MMP-9. The expression of active gelatinase was found in tumor tissue. In conclusion, the expression of active MMP-2 and MMP-9 was increased in 9L/F344 rat brain during the growth of malignant gliomas at different time intervals, which indicate that 9L/F344 animal model may be a prospective animal model to test new MMPs inhibitors.

  18. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  19. Compression stiffening of brain and its effect on mechanosensing by glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoda, Katarzyna; Chin, LiKang; Georges, Penelope C.; Byfield, FitzRoy J.; Bucki, Robert; Kim, Richard; Weaver, Michael; Wells, Rebecca G.; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-07-01

    Many cell types, including neurons, astrocytes and other cells of the central nervous system, respond to changes in the extracellular matrix or substrate viscoelasticity, and increased tissue stiffness is a hallmark of several disease states, including fibrosis and some types of cancers. Whether the malignant tissue in brain, an organ that lacks the protein-based filamentous extracellular matrix of other organs, exhibits the same macroscopic stiffening characteristic of breast, colon, pancreatic and other tumors is not known. In this study we show that glioma cells, like normal astrocytes, respond strongly in vitro to substrate stiffness in the range of 100 to 2000 Pa, but that macroscopic (mm to cm) tissue samples isolated from human glioma tumors have elastic moduli in the order of 200 Pa that are indistinguishable from those of normal brain. However, both normal brain and glioma tissues increase their shear elastic moduli under modest uniaxial compression, and glioma tissue stiffens more strongly under compression than normal brain. These findings suggest that local tissue stiffness has the potential to alter glial cell function, and that stiffness changes in brain tumors might arise not from increased deposition or crosslinking of the collagen-rich extracellular matrix, but from pressure gradients that form within the tumors in vivo.

  20. Expression of metastasis-associated protein 3 in human brain glioma related to tumor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shouqin; Hui, Guangyan; Hou, Fanggao; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Guoqing; Yan, Han; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Glioma represents a disparate group of tumors characterized by high invasion ability, and therefore it is of clinical significance to identify molecular markers and therapeutic targets for better clinical management. Previously, metastasis-associated protein family (MTA) is considered to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis of human malignancies. Recently, the newly identified MTA3 has been shown to play conflicting roles in human malignancies, while the expression pattern and potential clinical significance of MTA3 in human glioma have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we investigated the protein expression of MTA3 by immunohistochemistry assay and analyzed its association with glioma prognosis in 186 cases of patients. Results showed that MTA3 expression was decreased in glioma compared with that in normal brain (P < 0.05). In addition, tumors with high MTA3 expression were more likely to be of low WHO grade (P = 0.005) and reserve of body function (P = 0.014). Survival analysis showed that decreased MTA3 expression was independently associated with unfavorable overall survival of patients (P < 0.001). These results provide the first evidence that MTA3 expression was decreased in human glioma and negatively associated with prognosis of patients, suggesting that MTA3 may play a tumor suppressor role in glioma.

  1. ALA-PDT of glioma cell micro-clusters in BD-IX rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Carper, Stephen W.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A significant contributory factor to the poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is the inability of conventional treatments to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells. A syngeneic rat brain tumor model is used to investigate the effects of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on small clusters of tumor cells sequestered in normal brain. The intrinsic sensitivity of rat glioma cells to PDT was investigated by exposing ALA-incubated cells to a range of radiant exposures and irradiances using 635 nm light. Biodistribution studies were undertaken on tumor-bearing animals in order to determine the tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer following systemic administration (i.p.) of ALA. Effects of ALA-PDT on normal brain and gross tumor were evaluated using histopathology. Effects of PDT on isolated glioma cells in normal brain were investigated by treating animals 48 h after tumor cell implantation: a time when the micro-clusters of cells are protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Rat glioma cells in monolayer are susceptible to ALA-PDT - lower irradiances are more effective than higher ones. Fluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections showed that photosensitizer is produced with better than 200:1 tumor-to-normal tissue selectivity following i.p. ALA administration. ALA-PDT resulted in significant damage to both gross tumor and normal brain, however, the treatment failed to prolong survival of animals with newly implanted glioma cells compared to non-treated controls if the drug was delivered either i.p. or directly into the brain. In contrast, animals inoculated with tumor cells pre-incubated in vitro with ALA showed a significant survival advantage in response to PDT.

  2. Ribosome Profiling Reveals a Cell-Type-Specific Translational Landscape in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Christian; Sims, Jennifer S.; Hornstein, Nicholas; Mela, Angeliki; Garcia, Franklin; Lei, Liang; Gass, David A.; Amendolara, Benjamin; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma growth is driven by signaling that ultimately regulates protein synthesis. Gliomas are also complex at the cellular level and involve multiple cell types, including transformed and reactive cells in the brain tumor microenvironment. The distinct functions of the various cell types likely lead to different requirements and regulatory paradigms for protein synthesis. Proneural gliomas can arise from transformation of glial progenitors that are driven to proliferate via mitogenic signaling that affects translation. To investigate translational regulation in this system, we developed a RiboTag glioma mouse model that enables cell-type-specific, genome-wide ribosome profiling of tumor tissue. Infecting glial progenitors with Cre-recombinant retrovirus simultaneously activates expression of tagged ribosomes and delivers a tumor-initiating mutation. Remarkably, we find that although genes specific to transformed cells are highly translated, their translation efficiencies are low compared with normal brain. Ribosome positioning reveals sequence-dependent regulation of ribosomal activity in 5′-leaders upstream of annotated start codons, leading to differential translation in glioma compared with normal brain. Additionally, although transformed cells express a proneural signature, untransformed tumor-associated cells, including reactive astrocytes and microglia, express a mesenchymal signature. Finally, we observe the same phenomena in human disease by combining ribosome profiling of human proneural tumor and non-neoplastic brain tissue with computational deconvolution to assess cell-type-specific translational regulation. PMID:25122893

  3. Functional recovery after surgical resection of low grade gliomas in eloquent brain: hypothesis of brain compensation

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, H; Capelle, L; Denvil, D; Sichez, N; Gatignol, P; Lopes, M; Mitchell, M; Sichez, J; Van Effenterre, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe functional recovery after surgical resection of low grade gliomas (LGG) in eloquent brain areas, and discuss the mechanisms of compensation. Methods: Seventy-seven right-handed patients without deficit were operated on for a LGG invading primary and/or secondary sensorimotor and/or language areas, as shown anatomically by pre-operative MRI and intraoperatively by electrical brain stimulation and cortico-subcortical mapping. Results: Tumours involved 31 supplementary motor areas, 28 insulas, 8 primary somatosensory areas, 4 primary motor areas, 4 Broca's areas, and 2 left temporal language areas. All patients had immediate post-operative deficits. Recovery occurred within 3 months in all except four cases (definitive morbidity: 5%). Ninety-two percent of the lesions were either totally or extensively resected on post-operative MRI. Conclusions: These findings suggest that spatio-temporal functional re-organisation is possible in peritumoural brain, and that the process is dynamic. The recruitment of compensatory areas with long term perilesional functional reshaping would explain why: before surgery, there is no clinical deficit despite the tumour growth in eloquent regions; immediately after surgery, the occurrence of a deficit, which could be due to the resection of invaded areas participating (but not essential) to the function; and why three months after surgery, almost complete recovery had occurred. This brain plasticity, which decreases the long term risk of surgical morbidity, may be used to extend the limits of surgery in eloquent areas. PMID:12810776

  4. Inhibitors of Glioma Growth that Reveal the Tumour to the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Valle-Argos, Beatriz; Gómez-Nicola, Diego; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Nieto-Díaz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Treated glioblastoma patients survive from 6 to 14 months. In the first part of this review, we describe glioma origins, cancer stem cells and the genomic alterations that generate dysregulated cell division, with enhanced proliferation and diverse response to radiation and chemotherapy. We review the pathways that mediate tumour cell proliferation, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion, as well as necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Then, we examine the ability of gliomas to evade and suppress the host immune system, exhibited at the levels of antigen recognition and immune activation, limiting the effective signaling between glioma and host immune cells. The second part of the review presents current therapies and their drawbacks. This is followed by a summary of the work of our laboratory during the past 20 years, on oligosaccharide and glycosphingolipid inhibitors of astroblast and astrocytoma division. Neurostatins, the O-acetylated forms of gangliosides GD1b and GT1b naturally present in mammalian brain, are cytostatic for normal astroblasts, but cytotoxic for rat C6 glioma cells and human astrocytoma grades III and IV, with ID50 values ranging from 200 to 450 nM. The inhibitors do not affect neurons or fibroblasts up to concentrations of 4 μM or higher. At least four different neurostatin-activated, cell-mediated antitumoral processes, lead to tumor destruction: (i) inhibition of tumor neovascularization; (ii) activation of microglia; (iii) activation of natural killer (NK) cells; (iv) activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL). The enhanced antigenicity of neurostatin-treated glioma cells, could be related to their increased expression of connexin 43. Because neurostatins and their analogues show specific activity and no toxicity for normal cells, a clinical trial would be the logical next step. PMID:22084619

  5. Glioma targeting and blood-brain barrier penetration by dual-targeting doxorubincin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Ming; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Li, Fan-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min

    2013-07-01

    Effective chemotherapy for glioblastoma requires a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the glioma cells. Dual-targeting doxorubincin (Dox) liposomes were produced by conjugating liposomes with both folate (F) and transferrin (Tf), which were proven effective in penetrating the BBB and targeting tumors, respectively. The liposome was characterized by particle size, Dox entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. Drug accumulation in cells, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, and drug transport across the BBB in the dual-targeting liposome group were examined by using bEnd3 BBB models. In vivo studies demonstrated that the dual-targeting Dox liposomes could transport across the BBB and mainly distribute in the brain glioma. The anti-tumor effect of the dual-targeting liposome was also demonstrated by the increased survival time, decreased tumor volume, and results of both hematoxylin-eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis. The dual-targeting Dox liposome could improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma and were less toxic than the Dox solution, showing a dual-targeting effect. These results indicate that this dual-targeting liposome can be used as a potential carrier for glioma chemotherapy.

  6. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies.

  7. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13–1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03–1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05–1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28–1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22–2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males. PMID:26332834

  8. Influence of glioma cells on a new co-culture in vitro blood-brain barrier model for characterization and validation of permeability.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bárbara; Marques, Cláudia; Carvalho, Isabel; Costa, Paulo; Martins, Susana; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-07-25

    The blood-brain barrier plays an important role in protecting the brain from injury and diseases, but also restrains the delivery of potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of brain illnesses, such as tumors. Glioma is most common cancer type of central nervous system in adults and the most lethal in children. The treatment is normally poor and ineffective. To better understand the ability of drug delivery systems to permeate this barrier, a blood-brain barrier model using human brain endothelial cells and a glioma cell line is herein proposed. The consistent trans-endothelial electrical values, immunofluorescence and scanning electronic microscopy showed a confluent endothelial cell monolayer with high restrictiveness. Upon inclusion of glioma cell line, the trans-endothelial electrical resistance decreased, with consequent increase of apparent permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran used as model drug, revealing a reduction of the barrier robustness. In addition, it was demonstrated a cell shape modification in the co-culture, with loss of tight junctions. The microenvironment of co-cultured model presented significant increase of of CCL2/MCP-1 and IL-6 production, correlating with the modulation of permeation. The results encourage the use of the proposed in vitro model as a screening tool when performing drugs permeability for the treatment of disorders among the central nervous system.

  9. Selective activity of phenylacetate against malignant gliomas: resemblance to fetal brain damage in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Samid, D; Ram, Z; Hudgins, W R; Shack, S; Liu, L; Walbridge, S; Oldfield, E H; Myers, C E

    1994-02-15

    Phenylacetate, a deaminated metabolite of phenylalanine, has been implicated in damage to immature brain in phenylketonuria. Because primary brain tumors are highly reminiscent of the immature central nervous system, these neoplasms should be equally vulnerable. We show here that sodium phenylacetate can induce cytostasis and reversal of malignant properties of cultured human glioblastoma cells, when used at pharmacological concentrations that are well tolerated by children and adults. Treated tumor cells exhibited biochemical alterations similar to those observed in phenylketonuria-like conditions, including selective decline in de novo cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate. Because gliomas, but not mature normal brain cells, are highly dependent on mevalonate for production of sterols and isoprenoids vital for cell growth, sodium phenylacetate would be expected to affect tumor growth in vivo while sparing normal tissues. Systemic treatment of rats bearing intracranial gliomas resulted in significant tumor suppression with no apparent toxicity to the host. The data indicate that phenylacetate, acting through inhibition of protein prenylation and other mechanisms, may offer a safe and effective novel approach to treatment of malignant gliomas and perhaps other neoplasms as well.

  10. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  11. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-19

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks' robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  12. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  13. Lipidomic analysis reveals a radiosensitizing role of gamma-linolenic acid in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Antal, Otilia; Péter, Mária; Hackler, László; Mán, Imola; Szebeni, Gábor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Hideghéty, Katalin; Vigh, László; Kitajka, Klára; Balogh, Gábor; Puskás, Laszló G

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is effective against glioma cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In the present study we determined how GLA alone or in combination with irradiation alters the fatty acid (FA) and lipid profiles, the lipid droplet (LD) content, the lipid biosynthetic gene expression and the apoptosis of glioma cells. In GLA-treated cells direct correlations were found between the levels of various FAs and the expression of the corresponding FA biosynthetic genes. The total levels of saturated and monosaturated FAs decreased in concert with the down-regulation of FASN and SCD1 gene expression. Similarly, decreased FADS1 gene expression was paralleled by lowered arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) contents, while the down-regulation of FADS2 expression was accompanied by a diminished docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) content. Detailed mass spectrometric analyses revealed that individual treatments gave rise to distinct lipidomic fingerprints. Following uptake, GLA was subjected to elongation, resulting in dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3 n-6, DGLA), which was used for the synthesis of the LD constituent triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters. Accordingly, an increased number of LDs were observed in response to GLA administration after irradiation. GLA increased the radioresponsiveness of U87 MG cells, as demonstrated by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells determined by FACS analysis. In conclusion, treatment with GLA increased the apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells, and GLA might therefore increase the therapeutic efficacy of irradiation in the treatment of gliomas.

  14. Resection Probability Maps for Quality Assessment of Glioma Surgery without Brain Location Bias

    PubMed Central

    De Witt Hamer, Philip C.; Hendriks, Eef J.; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Barkhof, Frederik; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative brain stimulation mapping reduces permanent postoperative deficits and extends tumor removal in resective surgery for glioma patients. Successful functional mapping is assumed to depend on the surgical team's expertise. In this study, glioma resection results are quantified and compared using a novel approach, so-called resection probability maps (RPM), exemplified by a surgical team comparison, here with long and short experience in mapping. Methods Adult patients with glioma were included by two centers with two and fifteen years of mapping experience. Resective surgery was targeted at non-enhanced MRI extension and was limited by functional boundaries. Neurological outcome was compared. To compare resection results, we applied RPMs to quantify and compare the resection probability throughout the brain at 1 mm resolution. Considerations for spatial dependence and multiple comparisons were taken into account. Results The senior surgical team contributed 56, and the junior team 52 patients. The patient cohorts were comparable in age, preoperative tumor volume, lateralization, and lobe localization. Neurological outcome was similar between teams. The resection probability on the RPMs was very similar, with none (0%) of 703,967 voxels in left-sided tumors being differentially resected, and 124 (0.02%) of 644,153 voxels in right-sided tumors. Conclusion RPMs provide a quantitative volumetric method to compare resection results, which we present as standard for quality assessment of resective glioma surgery because brain location bias is avoided. Stimulation mapping is a robust surgical technique, because the neurological outcome and functional-based resection results using stimulation mapping are independent of surgical experience, supporting wider implementation. PMID:24039922

  15. Intraarterial Infusion Of Erbitux and Bevacizumab For Relapsed/Refractory Intracranial Glioma In Patients Under 22

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-12

    Glioblastoma Multiforme; Fibrillary Astrocytoma of Brain; Glioma of Brainstem; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Mixed Oligodendroglioma-Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  16. Molecular genetics of pediatric brain stem gliomas. Application of PCR techniques to small and archival brain tumor specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Correa, K.M.; Gusella, J.F.; Deimling, A. von )

    1993-09-01

    Brain stem gliomas are pediatric astrocytomas that histologically resemble adult supratentorial astrocytomas such as gliobastomas multiforme (GBM). The molecular genetic studies have suggested that adult GBM can be divided into two genetic subsets: Tumors with p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations and chromosome 17p loss that occur more commonly in younger patients; and tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification that occur more commonly in older patients. Brain stem gliomas have not been studied since biopsies of these tumors are rare and extremely small. The authors investigated the molecular genetic composition of seven brain stem glioblastomas (two small biopsies, five autopsies) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for chromosomal loss, gene mutation and gene amplification. Four cases lost portions of chromosome 17p that included the 53p gene. These four cases and one additional case had mutations in the p53 gene. None of the cases showed amplification of the EGFR gene. Allelic losses of the long arm of chromosome 10 were noted in four cases. These results suggest similarities between pediatric brain stem glioblastomas and those GBM that occur in younger adult patients, and confirm the utility of PCR-based means of studying small and archival brain tumor specimens. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Theranostic 3-Dimensional nano brain-implant for prolonged and localized treatment of recurrent glioma.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Gowd, G Siddaramana; Ashokan, Anusha; Thomas, John; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Thomas, Anoop; Unni, Ayalur Kodakara Kochugovindan; Panikar, Dilip; Nair, Shantikumar V; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2017-03-06

    Localized and controlled delivery of chemotherapeutics directly in brain-tumor for prolonged periods may radically improve the prognosis of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we report a unique method of nanofiber by fiber controlled delivery of anti-cancer drug, Temozolomide, in orthotopic brain-tumor for one month using flexible polymeric nano-implant. A library of drug loaded (20 wt%) electrospun nanofiber of PLGA-PLA-PCL blends with distinct in vivo brain-release kinetics (hours to months) were numerically selected and a single nano-implant was formed by co-electrospinning of nano-fiber such that different set of fibres releases the drug for a specific periods from days to months by fiber-by-fiber switching. Orthotopic rat glioma implanted wafers showed constant drug release (116.6 μg/day) with negligible leakage into the peripheral blood (<100 ng) rendering ~1000 fold differential drug dosage in tumor versus peripheral blood. Most importantly, implant with one month release profile resulted in long-term (>4 month) survival of 85.7% animals whereas 07 day releasing implant showed tumor recurrence in 54.6% animals, rendering a median survival of only 74 days. In effect, we show that highly controlled drug delivery is possible for prolonged periods in orthotopic brain-tumor using combinatorial nanofibre libraries of bulk-eroding polymers, thereby controlling glioma recurrence.

  18. Theranostic 3-Dimensional nano brain-implant for prolonged and localized treatment of recurrent glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Ranjith; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Gowd, G. Siddaramana; Ashokan, Anusha; Thomas, John; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Thomas, Anoop; Unni, Ayalur Kodakara Kochugovindan; Panikar, Dilip; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2017-01-01

    Localized and controlled delivery of chemotherapeutics directly in brain-tumor for prolonged periods may radically improve the prognosis of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we report a unique method of nanofiber by fiber controlled delivery of anti-cancer drug, Temozolomide, in orthotopic brain-tumor for one month using flexible polymeric nano-implant. A library of drug loaded (20 wt%) electrospun nanofiber of PLGA-PLA-PCL blends with distinct in vivo brain-release kinetics (hours to months) were numerically selected and a single nano-implant was formed by co-electrospinning of nano-fiber such that different set of fibres releases the drug for a specific periods from days to months by fiber-by-fiber switching. Orthotopic rat glioma implanted wafers showed constant drug release (116.6 μg/day) with negligible leakage into the peripheral blood (<100 ng) rendering ~1000 fold differential drug dosage in tumor versus peripheral blood. Most importantly, implant with one month release profile resulted in long-term (>4 month) survival of 85.7% animals whereas 07 day releasing implant showed tumor recurrence in 54.6% animals, rendering a median survival of only 74 days. In effect, we show that highly controlled drug delivery is possible for prolonged periods in orthotopic brain-tumor using combinatorial nanofibre libraries of bulk-eroding polymers, thereby controlling glioma recurrence. PMID:28262735

  19. ROS and Brain Gliomas: An Overview of Potential and Innovative Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Caffo, Maria; Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Squadrito, Francesco; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Valenti, Andrea; Barresi, Valeria; Altavilla, Domenica; Passalacqua, Marcello; Caruso, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent reactive products belonging to the partial reduction of oxygen. It has been reported that ROS are involved in different signaling pathways to control cellular stability. Under normal conditions, the correct function of redox systems leads to the prevention of cell oxidative damage. When ROS exceed the antioxidant defense system, cellular stress occurs. The cellular redox impairment is strictly related to tumorigenesis. Tumor cells, through the generation of hydrogen peroxide, tend to the alteration of cell cycle phases and, finally to cancer progression. In adults, the most common form of primary malignant brain tumors is represented by gliomas. The gliomagenesis is characterized by numerous molecular processes all characterized by an altered production of growth factor receptors. The difficulty to treat brain cancer depends on several biological mechanisms such as failure of drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier, tumor response to chemotherapy, and intrinsic resistance of tumor cells. Understanding the mechanisms of ROS action could allow the formulation of new therapeutic protocols to treat brain gliomas. PMID:27338365

  20. Theranostic 3-Dimensional nano brain-implant for prolonged and localized treatment of recurrent glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Ranjith; Junnuthula, Vijayabhaskar Reddy; Gowd, G. Siddaramana; Ashokan, Anusha; Thomas, John; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Thomas, Anoop; Unni, Ayalur Kodakara Kochugovindan; Panikar, Dilip; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2017-03-01

    Localized and controlled delivery of chemotherapeutics directly in brain-tumor for prolonged periods may radically improve the prognosis of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we report a unique method of nanofiber by fiber controlled delivery of anti-cancer drug, Temozolomide, in orthotopic brain-tumor for one month using flexible polymeric nano-implant. A library of drug loaded (20 wt%) electrospun nanofiber of PLGA-PLA-PCL blends with distinct in vivo brain-release kinetics (hours to months) were numerically selected and a single nano-implant was formed by co-electrospinning of nano-fiber such that different set of fibres releases the drug for a specific periods from days to months by fiber-by-fiber switching. Orthotopic rat glioma implanted wafers showed constant drug release (116.6 μg/day) with negligible leakage into the peripheral blood (<100 ng) rendering ~1000 fold differential drug dosage in tumor versus peripheral blood. Most importantly, implant with one month release profile resulted in long-term (>4 month) survival of 85.7% animals whereas 07 day releasing implant showed tumor recurrence in 54.6% animals, rendering a median survival of only 74 days. In effect, we show that highly controlled drug delivery is possible for prolonged periods in orthotopic brain-tumor using combinatorial nanofibre libraries of bulk-eroding polymers, thereby controlling glioma recurrence.

  1. Expression profiles of 151 pediatric low-grade gliomas reveal molecular differences associated with location and histological subtype

    PubMed Central

    Bergthold, Guillaume; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Hoshida, Yujin; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Rich, Benjamin; Maire, Cecile L.; Paolella, Brenton R.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Tabak, Barbara; Ferrer-Luna, Ruben; Ozek, Memet; Sav, Aydin; Santagata, Sandro; Wen, Patrick Yung; Goumnerova, Liliana C.; Ligon, Azra H.; Stiles, Charles; Segal, Rosalind; Golub, Todd; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Keith L.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kieran, Mark W.; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs), the most frequent pediatric brain tumor, comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. Recent genomic analyses suggest that these tumors are mostly driven by mitogene-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway alterations. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics inherent to their clinical and histological heterogeneity. Methods We performed gene expression profiling on 151 paraffin-embedded PLGGs from different locations, ages, and histologies. Using unsupervised and supervised analyses, we compared molecular features with age, location, histology, and BRAF genomic status. We compared molecular differences with normal pediatric brain expression profiles to observe whether those patterns were mirrored in normal brain. Results Unsupervised clustering distinguished 3 molecular groups that correlated with location in the brain and histological subtype. “Not otherwise specified” (NOS) tumors did not constitute a unified class. Supratentorial pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) were significantly enriched with genes involved in pathways related to inflammatory activity compared with infratentorial tumors. Differences based on tumor location were not mirrored in location-dependent differences in expression within normal brain tissue. We identified significant differences between supratentorial PAs and diffuse astrocytomas as well as between supratentorial PAs and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors but not between supratentorial PAs and gangliogliomas. Similar expression patterns were observed between childhood and adolescent PAs. We identified differences between BRAF-duplicated and V600E-mutated tumors but not between primary and recurrent PLGGs. Conclusion Expression profiling of PLGGs reveals significant differences associated with tumor location, histology, and BRAF genomic status. Supratentorial PAs, in particular, are enriched in inflammatory pathways that appear to be tumor-related. PMID:25825052

  2. Targeting vincristine plus tetrandrine liposomes modified with DSPE-PEG2000-transferrin in treatment of brain glioma.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Li; Liu, Shuang; Jiang, Ying; Gu, Li-Yan; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Lan; Li, Xue-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent primary tumor, and the treatment efficiency is unsatisfactory for the obstacle of the blood brain barrier (BBB), the multidrug resistance (MDR) and the properties of cancer cell invasion and vasculogenic mimicry (VM) formation. In this study, a kind of TF modified vincristine plus tetrandrine liposomes was developed to overcome those limitations. In vitro results showed that TF modified vincristine plus tetrandrine liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport across the BBB, increase the cellular uptake, inhibit the MDR, and block the cancer cell invasion and VM channels. In vivo results demonstrated that TF modified vincristine plus tetrandrine liposomes could significantly prolong the circulation time, obviously accumulate in brain tumor location, thus leading to a robust anticancer efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggest that TF modified vincristine plus tetrandrine liposomes offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma.

  3. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy.

  4. Targeting brain cancer: advances in the molecular pathology of malignant glioma and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C

    2010-05-01

    Malignant brain tumours continue to be the cause of a disproportionate level of morbidity and mortality across a wide range of individuals. The most common variants in the adult and paediatric populations - malignant glioma and medulloblastoma, respectively - have been the subject of increasingly intensive research over the past two decades that has led to considerable advances in the understanding of their basic biology and pathogenesis. This Review summarizes these developments in the context of the evolving notion of molecular pathology and discusses the implications that this work has on the design of new treatment regimens.

  5. A Probabilistic Atlas of Diffuse WHO Grade II Glioma Locations in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Cédric; Zouaoui, Sonia; Yordanova, Yordanka; Blonski, Marie; Rigau, Valérie; Chemouny, Stéphane; Taillandier, Luc; Bauchet, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Paragios, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse WHO grade II gliomas are diffusively infiltrative brain tumors characterized by an unavoidable anaplastic transformation. Their management is strongly dependent on their location in the brain due to interactions with functional regions and potential differences in molecular biology. In this paper, we present the construction of a probabilistic atlas mapping the preferential locations of diffuse WHO grade II gliomas in the brain. This is carried out through a sparse graph whose nodes correspond to clusters of tumors clustered together based on their spatial proximity. The interest of such an atlas is illustrated via two applications. The first one correlates tumor location with the patient’s age via a statistical analysis, highlighting the interest of the atlas for studying the origins and behavior of the tumors. The second exploits the fact that the tumors have preferential locations for automatic segmentation. Through a coupled decomposed Markov Random Field model, the atlas guides the segmentation process, and characterizes which preferential location the tumor belongs to and consequently which behavior it could be associated to. Leave-one-out cross validation experiments on a large database highlight the robustness of the graph, and yield promising segmentation results. PMID:26751577

  6. A Probabilistic Atlas of Diffuse WHO Grade II Glioma Locations in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Sarah; Darlix, Amélie; Baumann, Cédric; Zouaoui, Sonia; Yordanova, Yordanka; Blonski, Marie; Rigau, Valérie; Chemouny, Stéphane; Taillandier, Luc; Bauchet, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Paragios, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse WHO grade II gliomas are diffusively infiltrative brain tumors characterized by an unavoidable anaplastic transformation. Their management is strongly dependent on their location in the brain due to interactions with functional regions and potential differences in molecular biology. In this paper, we present the construction of a probabilistic atlas mapping the preferential locations of diffuse WHO grade II gliomas in the brain. This is carried out through a sparse graph whose nodes correspond to clusters of tumors clustered together based on their spatial proximity. The interest of such an atlas is illustrated via two applications. The first one correlates tumor location with the patient's age via a statistical analysis, highlighting the interest of the atlas for studying the origins and behavior of the tumors. The second exploits the fact that the tumors have preferential locations for automatic segmentation. Through a coupled decomposed Markov Random Field model, the atlas guides the segmentation process, and characterizes which preferential location the tumor belongs to and consequently which behavior it could be associated to. Leave-one-out cross validation experiments on a large database highlight the robustness of the graph, and yield promising segmentation results.

  7. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates microglia/brain macrophage MT1-MMP expression and glioma expansion

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Katyayni; Hu, Feng; Ku, Min-Chi; Georgieva, Petya B.; Szulzewsky, Frank; Pohlmann, Andreas; Waiczies, Sonia; Waiczies, Helmar; Niendorf, Thoralf; Lehnardt, Seija; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Synowitz, Michael; Markovic, Darko; Wolf, Susanne A.; Glass, Rainer; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most aggressive primary brain tumors in humans. Microglia/brain macrophage accumulation in and around the tumor correlates with malignancy and poor clinical prognosis of these tumors. We have previously shown that microglia promote glioma expansion through upregulation of membrane type 1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP). This upregulation depends on signaling via the Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). Methods Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo techniques, we identified TLR2 as the main TLR controlling microglial MT1-MMP expression and promoting microglia-assisted glioma expansion. Results The implantation of mouse GL261 glioma cells into TLR2 knockout mice resulted in significantly smaller tumors, reduced MT1-MMP expression, and enhanced survival rates compared with wild-type control mice. Tumor expansion studied in organotypic brain slices depended on both parenchymal TLR2 expression and the presence of microglia. Glioma-derived soluble factors and synthetic TLR2 specific ligands induced MT1-MMP expression in microglia from wild-type mice, but no such change in MT1-MMP gene expression was observed in microglia from TLR2 knockout mice. We also found evidence that TLR1 and TLR6 cofunction with TLR2 as heterodimers in regulating MT1-MMP expression in vitro. Conclusions Our results thus show that activation of TLR2 along with TLRs 1 and/or 6 converts microglia into a glioma supportive phenotype. PMID:24014382

  8. Strengths and weaknesses of 1.5T and 3T MRS data in brain glioma classification.

    PubMed

    Kounelakis, M G; Dimou, I N; Zervakis, M E; Tsougos, I; Tsolaki, E; Kousi, E; Kapsalaki, E; Theodorou, K

    2011-07-01

    Although magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods of 1.5Tesla (T) and 3T have been widely applied during the last decade for noninvasive diagnostic purposes, only a few studies have been reported on the value of the information extracted in brain cancer discrimination. The purpose of this study is threefold. First, to show that the diagnostic value of the information extracted from two different MRS scanners of 1.5T and 3T is significantly influenced in terms of brain gliomas discrimination. Second, to statistically evaluate the discriminative potential of publicly known metabolic ratio markers, obtained from these two types of scanners in classifying low-, intermediate-, and high-grade gliomas. Finally, to examine the diagnostic value of new metabolic ratios in the discrimination of complex glioma cases where the diagnosis is both challenging and critical. Our analysis has shown that although the information extracted from 3T MRS scanner is expected to provide better brain gliomas discrimination; some factors like the features selected, the pulse-sequence parameters, and the spectroscopic data acquisition methods can influence the discrimination efficiency. Finally, it is shown that apart from the bibliographical known, new metabolic ratio features such as N-acetyl aspartate/ S, Choline/ S, Creatine/ S , and myo-Inositol/ S play significant role in gliomas grade discrimination.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  10. Compression Stiffening of Brain and its Effect on Mechanosensing by Glioma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoda, Katarzyna

    The stiffness of tissues, often characterized by their time-dependent elastic properties, is tightly controlled under normal condition and central nervous system tissue is among the softest tissues. Changes in tissue and organ stiffness occur in some physiological conditions and are frequently symptoms of diseases such as fibrosis, cardiovascular disease and many forms of cancer. Primary cells isolated from various tissues often respond to changes in the mechanical properties of their substrates, and the range of stiffness over which these responses occur appear to be limited to the tissue elastic modulus from which they are derived. Our goal was to test the hypotheses that the stiffness of tumors derived from CNS tissue differs from that of normal brain, and that transformed cells derived from such tumors exhibit mechanical responses that differ from those of normal glial cells. Unlike breast and some other cancers where the stroma and the tumor itself is substantially stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, our data suggest that gliomas can arise without a gross change in the macroscopic tissue stiffness when measured at low strains without compression. However, both normal brain and glioma samples stiffen with compression, but not in elongation and increased shear strains. On the other hand, different classes of immortalized cells derived from human glioblastoma show substantially different responses to the stiffness of substrates in vitrowhen grown on soft polyacrylamide and hyaluronic acid gels. This outcome supports the hypothesis that compression stiffening, which might occur with increased vascularization and interstitial pressure gradients that are characteristic of tumors, effectively stiffens the environment of glioma cells, and that in situ, the elastic resistance these cells sense might be sufficient to trigger the same responses that are activated in vitro by increased substrate stiffness.

  11. Convection enhanced delivery of cisplatin-loaded brain penetrating nanoparticles cures malignant glioma in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Clark; Nance, Elizabeth A; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Chisholm, Jane; Berry, Sneha; Eberhart, Charles; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry; Suk, Jung Soo; Hanes, Justin

    2017-03-07

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is highly invasive and uniformly fatal, with median survival<20months after diagnosis even with the most aggressive treatment that includes surgery, radiation, and systemic chemotherapy. Cisplatin is a particularly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its use to treat GBM is limited by severe systemic toxicity and inefficient penetration of brain tumor tissue even when it is placed directly in the brain within standard delivery systems. We describe the development of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles that are small enough (70nm in diameter) to move within the porous extracellular matrix between cells and that possess a dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona that prevents them from being trapped by adhesion as they move through the brain tumor parenchyma. As a result, these "brain penetrating nanoparticles" penetrate much deeper into brain tumor tissue compared to nanoparticles without a dense PEG corona following local administration by either manual injection or convection enhanced delivery. The nanoparticles also provide controlled release of cisplatin in effective concentrations to kill the tumor cells that they reach without causing toxicity-related deaths that were observed when cisplatin was infused into the brain without a delivery system. Median survival time of rats bearing orthotopic glioma was significantly enhanced when cisplatin was delivered in brain penetrating nanoparticles (median survival not reached; 80% long-term survivors) compared to cisplatin in conventional un-PEGylated particles (median survival=40days), cisplatin alone (median survival=12days) or saline-treated controls (median survival=28days).

  12. Pathophysiology of glioma cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Adn, Mahmoudreza; Saikali, Stephan; Guegan, Yvon; Hamlat, Abderrahmane

    2006-01-01

    Fluid filled cystic cavities are accompaniments of some cerebral gliomas. These tumoural cysts together with peritumoural vasogenic brain oedema add to the morbid effects of the gliomas in terms of mass effect and increased intracranial pressure. Although different mechanisms have been suggested as to the pathogenesis of glioma-associated cysts, it is still unclear why these cysts appear in only a limited number of cerebral gliomas while brain oedema, a probable precursor of glioma cysts, is a usual accompaniment of most gliomas. Here, the authors present a two-hit hypothesis of brain glioma cyst formation. We suggest that after the formation of vasogenic tumoural brain oedema, microvascular phenomena may lead to the formation of microcysts, which might later become confluent and grow to form macroscopic cysts. Progress in the understanding of pathogenesis of cerebral glioma cysts might set targets for treatment of brain edema and glioma cysts.

  13. Mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor TrkB are upregulated in human glioma tissues.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing; Zhou, L I; Lim, Yoon; Yang, Miao; Zhu, Yu-Hong; Li, Zhi-Wei; Fu, Deng-Li; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2015-07-01

    There are two forms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), precursor of BDNF (proBDNF) and mature BDNF, which each exert opposing effects through two different transmembrane receptor signaling systems, consisting of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB). Previous studies have demonstrated that proBDNF promotes cell death and inhibits the growth and migration of C6 glioma cells through p75NTR in vitro, while mature BDNF has opposite effects on C6 glioma cells. It is hypothesized that mature BDNF is essential in the development of malignancy in gliomas. However, histological data obtained in previous studies were unable distinguish mature BDNF from proBDNF due to the lack of specific antibodies. The present study investigated the expression of mature BDNF using a specific sheep monoclonal anti-mature BDNF antibody in 42 human glioma tissues of different grades and 10 control tissues. The correlation between mature BDNF and TrkB was analyzed. Mature BDNF expression was significantly increased in high-grade gliomas, and was positively correlated with the malignancy of the tumor and TrkB receptor expression. The present data have demonstrated that increased levels of mature BDNF contribute markedly to the development of malignancy of human gliomas through the primary BDNF receptor TrkB.

  14. Function of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Restriction of Drug Delivery to Invasive Glioma Cells: Findings in an Orthotopic Rat Xenograft Model of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sagar; Manchanda, Pooja; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and chemotherapy, recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is inevitable. The objective of this study was to show that the blood-brain barrier (BBB), through a combination of tight junctions and active efflux transporters in the brain microvasculature, can significantly restrict delivery of molecularly targeted agents to invasive glioma cells. Transgenic mice lacking P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) were used to study efflux of erlotinib at the BBB. A U87 rat xenograft model of GBM was used to investigate the regional distribution of erlotinib to the tumor, and brain regions surrounding the tumor. The effect of concurrent administration of elacridar on regional tumor distribution of erlotinib was evaluated. We show that erlotinib transport across an intact BBB is significantly restricted due to P-gp- and Bcrp-mediated efflux transport. We then show that the BBB is sufficiently intact in areas of brain adjacent to the tumor core to significantly restrict erlotinib delivery. Inhibition of P-gp and Bcrp by the dual inhibitor elacridar dramatically increased erlotinib delivery to the tumor core, rim, and normal brain. These results provide conclusive evidence of the impact that active efflux at the BBB has on the delivery of molecularly targeted therapy to different tumor regions in glioma. These data also support the possibility that the repeated failure of clinical trials of new drugs for gliomas may be in part due to a failure to achieve effective concentrations in invasive tumor cells that reside behind an intact BBB. PMID:23014761

  15. Magnetoencephalographic Imaging of Resting-State Functional Connectivity Predicts Postsurgical Neurological Outcome in Brain Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tarapore, Phiroz E.; Martino, Juan; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Owen, Julia; Honma, Susanne M.; Findlay, Anne; Berger, Mitchel S.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The removal of brain tumors in peri-eloquent or eloquent cortex risks causing new neurological deficits in patients. The assessment of the functionality of peri-lesional tissue is essential to avoidance of postoperative neurological morbidity. Objective To evaluate preoperative magnetoencephalography (MEG)-based functional connectivity as a predictor of short- and medium-term neurological outcome after removal of gliomas in peri-eloquent and eloquent areas. Methods Resting-state whole-brain MEG recordings were obtained from 79 consecutive subjects with focal brain gliomas near or within motor, sensory, or language areas. Neural activity was estimated using adaptive spatial filtering. The mean imaginary coherence between voxels in and around brain tumors was compared to contralesional voxels and used as an index of their functional connectivity with the rest of the brain. The connectivity values of the tissue resected during surgery were correlated to the early (one week post-operatively) and medium-term (six months post-operatively) neurological morbidity. Results Patients undergoing resection of tumors with decreased functional connectivity had a 29% rate of new neurological deficit 1 week after surgery and a 0% rate at 6-month follow-up. Patients undergoing resection of tumors with increased functional connectivity had a 60% rate of new deficit at 1 week and a 25% rate at 6 months. Conclusion MEG connectivity analysis gives a valuable preoperative evaluation of the functionality of the tissue surrounding tumors in peri-eloquent and eloquent areas. These data may be used to optimize pre-operative patient counseling and surgical strategy. PMID:22895403

  16. Genetics of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Jenkins, Robert B

    2012-12-01

    Gliomas make up approximately 30% of all brain and central nervous system tumors and 80% of all malignant brain tumors. Despite the frequency of gliomas, the etiology of these tumors remains largely unknown. Diffuse gliomas, including astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, belong to a single pathologic class but have very different histologies and molecular etiologies. Recent genomic studies have identified separate molecular subtypes within the glioma classification that appear to correlate with biological etiology, prognosis, and response to therapy. The discovery of these subtypes suggests that molecular genetic tests are and will be useful, beyond classical histology, for the clinical classification of gliomas. While a familial susceptibility to glioma has been identified, only a small percentage of gliomas are thought to be due to single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes. Through the use of linkage studies and genome-wide association studies, multiple germline variants have been identified that are beginning to define the genetic susceptibility to glioma.

  17. Brain PDD and PDT unlocking the mystery of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Eljamel, M Sam

    2004-12-01

    Malignant brain tumours (MBTs) have one of the worst outcomes of human cancers today and their incidence is on the increase. Current treatment failure is usually due to local recurrence of the tumour rather than distant metastasis. In the last three decades we have seen many novel and potentially effective treatment strategies rise rapidly to the rescue. Sadly, however, the majority of these approaches were not good enough to withstand the harsh reality of the sceptical gaze of the scientific eye or the stringent health economics of this millennium. PDD and PDT, however, is one of the few therapies fighting back and still standing today. The results of its randomised controlled trials are eagerly awaited. To date the literature suggests that both PDD and PDT significantly prolong the time to tumour progression, reduce local recurrence, increase radical resection and prolong overall survival of MBTs. PDD and PDT are well tolerated by patients and worthwhile pursuing.

  18. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  19. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  20. Pc 4 photodynamic therapy of U87 (human glioma) orthotopic tumor in nude rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; George, John E., III; Ahmad, Yusra; Wolfe, Michael S.; Lilge, Lothar; Morris, Rachel L.; Peterson, Allyn; Lust, W. D.; Totonchi, Ali; Varghai, Davood; Li, Xiaolin; Hoppel, Charles L.; Sun, Jiayang; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for Barrett"s esophagus, advanced esophageal cancer, and both early and late inoperable lung carcinoma is now FDA-approved using the first generation photosensitizer PhotofrinTM (Axcan Pharma, Birmingham, AL). Photofrin-mediated PDT of glioma is now in Phase III clinical trials. A variety of second generation photosensitizers have been developed to provide improved: (1) specificity for the target tissue, (2) tumoricidal capability, and (3) rapid clearance the vascular compartment, skin, and eyes. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 is a second generation photosensitizer that is in early phase I clinical trials for skin cancer. We have undertaken a preclinical study that seeks to determine if Pc 4-mediated PDT can be of benefit for the intra-operative localization and treatment of glioma. Methods: Using a stereotactic frame, 250,000 U87 cells were injected via Hamilton syringe through a craniotomy, and the dura, 1-2 mm below the cortical surface of nude (athymic) rat brains (N=91). The craniotomy was filled with a piece of surgical PVC and the scalp closed. After two weeks of tumor growth, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg Pc 4 via tail vein injection. One day later the scalp was re-incised, and the PVC removed. The tumor was then illuminated with either 5 or 30 Joule/cm2 of 672-nm light from a diode laser at 50 mW/cm2. The animals were sacrificed one day later and the brain was cold-perfused with formaldehyde. Two thirds of the explanted brains are now being histologically surveyed for necrosis after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and for apoptosis via immunohistochemistry (i.e., TUNEL assay). The other third were analyzed by HPLC-mass spectrometry for the presence of drug in tumor, normal brain, and plasma at sacrifice. Initial histological results show PDT-induced apoptosis and necrosis confined to the growing (live) portion of the tumor. Preliminary analysis shows an average selectivity of Pc 4 uptake in the bulk tumor to be 3

  1. Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Michele; Barthel, Floris P; Malta, Tathiane M; Sabedot, Thais S; Salama, Sofie R; Murray, Bradley A; Morozova, Olena; Newton, Yulia; Radenbaugh, Amie; Pagnotta, Stefano M; Anjum, Samreen; Wang, Jiguang; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ling, Shiyun; Rao, Arjun A; Grifford, Mia; Cherniack, Andrew D; Zhang, Hailei; Poisson, Laila; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Rao, Arvind; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lau, Ching C; Yung, W K Alfred; Rabadan, Raul; Huse, Jason; Brat, Daniel J; Lehman, Norman L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Zheng, Siyuan; Hess, Kenneth; Rao, Ganesh; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cooper, Lee; Akbani, Rehan; Wrensch, Margaret; Haussler, David; Aldape, Kenneth D; Laird, Peter W; Gutmann, David H; Noushmehr, Houtan; Iavarone, Antonio; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-01-28

    Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes.

  2. Increasing of Blood-Brain Tumor Barrier Permeability through Transcellular and Paracellular Pathways by Microbubble-Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in a C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinlong; Liu, Heng; Du, Xuesong; Guo, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Shunan; Fang, Jingqin; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Most of the anticancer agents cannot be efficiently delivered into the brain tumor because of the existence of blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this study was to explore the effect of microbubble-enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (MEUS) on the BTB permeability and the possible mechanism. Glioma-bearing rats were randomized into three groups as follows: the microbubble-enhanced continued diagnostic ultrasound (MECUS) group; the microbubble-enhanced intermittent diagnostic ultrasound (MEIUS) group and the control group. The gliomas were insonicated through the skull with a diagnostic ultrasound and injected with microbubbles through the tail veins. Evans Blue (EB) and dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI were used to test changes in the BTB permeability. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the deposition of the EB in the tumor tissues. The distribution and expression of junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) and calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa channels) were detected by a Western blot, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemical staining. In the MEUS groups, the EB extravasation (11.0 ± 2.2 μg/g in MECUS group and 17.9 ± 2.3 μg/g in MEIUS group) exhibited a significant increase compared with the control group (5.3 ± 0.9 μg/g). The MEIUS group had more EB extravasation than the MECUS group. The Ktrans value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI in the MEUS groups was higher than that of the control group and correlated strongly with the EB extravasation in the tumor (R2 = 0.97). This showed that the Ktrans value might be a non-invasive method to evaluate the BTB permeability in rat glioma after microbubble-enhanced ultrasound treatment.Western blot, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining revealed that MEUS increased the KCa channels expression and reduced JAM-A expression in glioma. This change was more obvious in the MEIUS group than in the MECUS group. The results demonstrated that MEUS effectively increased the BTB permeability in

  3. Gadobutrol Versus Gadopentetate Dimeglumine or Gadobenate Dimeglumine Before DCE-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Multiple Sclerosis, Grade II-IV Glioma, or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Multiple Sclerosis; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  4. Lessons from brain mapping in surgery for low-grade glioma: insights into associations between tumour and brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Duffau, Hugues

    2005-08-01

    Surgical treatment of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) aims to maximise the amount of tumour tissue resected, while minimising the risk of functional sequelae. In this review I address the issue of how to reconcile these two conflicting goals. First, I review the natural history of LGG-growth, invasion, and anaplastic transformation. Second, I discuss the contribution of new techniques, such as functional mapping, to our understanding of brain reorganisation in response to progressive growth of LGG. Third, I consider the clinical implications of interactions between tumour progression and brain plasticity. In particular, I show how longitudinal studies (preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative) could allow us to optimise the surgical risk-to-benefit ratios. I will also discuss controversial issues such as defining surgical indications for LGGs, predicting the risk of postoperative deficit, aspects of operative surgical neuro-oncology (eg, preoperative planning and preservation of functional areas and tracts), and postoperative functional recovery.

  5. Characteristics of sequential targeting of brain glioma for transferrin-modified cisplatin liposome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Min; Han, Min; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Yao, Jin-Na; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Li, Fan-Zhu; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2013-02-28

    Methods on how to improve the sequential targeting of glioma subsequent to passing of drug through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been occasionally reported. However, the characteristics involved are poorly understood. In the present study, cisplatin (Cis) liposome (lipo) was modified with transferrin (Tf) to investigate the characteristics of potential sequential targeting to glioma. In bEnd3/C6 co-culture BBB models, higher transport efficiency across the BBB and cytotoxicity in basal C6 cells induced by Cis-lipo(Tf) than Cis-lipo and Cis-solution, suggest its sequential targeting effect. Interestingly, similar liposomal morphology as that of donor compartment was first demonstrated in the receptor solution of BBB models. Meanwhile, a greater acquisition in the lysosome of bEnd3, distributed sequentially into the nucleus of C6 cells were found for the Cis-lipo(Tf). Pre-incubation of chlorpromazine and Tf inhibited this process, indicating that a clathrin-dependent endocytosis is involved in the transport of Cis-lipo(Tf) across the BBB.

  6. Mustard-inspired delivery shuttle for enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and effective drug delivery in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Pei; Lv, Mingming; Tong, Gangsheng; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-04-05

    Effective penetration through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a challenge for the treatment of many brain diseases. In this study, a small molecule, sinapic acid (SA), extracted from mustard, was selected as a novel bioinspired BBB-permeable ligand for efficient drug delivery in glioma treatment. SA was conjugated on the surface of zwitterionic polymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC)-encapsulated bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles, yielding nBSA-SA. The PMPC shell serves as a protective layer to prolong the in vivo blood circulation time with a better chance to cross the BBB. Furthermore, temozolomide (TMZ), which can be loaded onto the nanoparticles via electrostatic interactions with acrylic acid (AA) to generate AA-nBSA-SA-TMZ, was applied as an excellent chemotherapeutic drug for glioma therapy. The obtained nanoparticles with a distinct size show great BBB permeability. Through the mechanism study, it was found that the cell internalization of the SA-conjugated nanoparticles is an energy-dependent process with only transient disruption of the BBB. The biological evaluation results unambiguously suggest that drug-loaded nanoparticles can lead to strong apoptosis on the tumor site and increase the median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. Overall, this novel BBB-permeable ligand SA paves the way for the delivery of cargo into the brain and provides a powerful nanoplatform for glioma therapy via intravenous administration.

  7. Targeting Glioma with a Dual Mode Optical and Paramagnetic Nanoprobe across the Blood-brain Tumor Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Kishor; Ewing, James R; Ali, Meser M

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumors, delivering nanoparticles across the blood-tumor barrier presents major hurdles. A clinically relevant MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, DL680 were conjugated to a G5 PAMAM dendrimer, thus producing a dual-mode MRI and NIR imaging agent. Systemic delivery of the subsequent nano-sized agent demonstrated glioma-specific accumulation, probably due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vivo MRI detected the agent in glioma tissue, but not in normal contralateral tissue; this observation was validated with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. A biodistribution study showed the agent to have accumulated in the glioma tumor and the liver, the latter being the excretion path for a G5 dendrimer-based agent. PMID:27695645

  8. The impact of chemo brain on the patient with a high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Michele R

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life for patients with high-grade gliomas has always been poor. The multiple insults to the brain-tumor existence and surgical procedures, irradiation, the level of stress and anxiety suffered and the adjuvant medications--steroids and anti-convulsants, all combine to diminish their health-related quality of life. Prior to the development of chemotherapy agents capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier, prognosis was 6 to 18 months. Life expectancy was short and there was little time to address the health-related quality of life. The newer agents have served to extend life, but have added another condition to the existing poor health-related quality of life, i.e., chemo brain. Chemo brain affects all cognitive function. The patients have great difficulty processing information. They have reduced attentional and concentration capability and cannot learn new information. The overall impact on their lives renders them unemployable and places a great burden on their families and on society. This chapter provides an overview of the patient experience and the burden placed on their families and on society.

  9. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  10. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  11. Interaction of brain fatty acid-binding protein with the polyunsaturated fatty acid environment as a potential determinant of poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Emara, Marwan; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common adult brain cancers. In spite of aggressive treatment, recurrence occurs in the great majority of patients and is invariably fatal. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are abundant in brain, particularly ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although the levels of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are tightly regulated in brain, the ω-6:ω-3 ratio is dramatically increased in malignant glioma, suggesting deregulation of fundamental lipid homeostasis in brain tumor tissue. The migratory properties of malignant glioma cells can be modified by altering the ratio of AA:DHA in growth medium, with increased migration observed in AA-rich medium. This fatty acid-dependent effect on cell migration is dependent on expression of the brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) previously shown to bind DHA and AA. Increased levels of enzymes involved in eicosanoid production in FABP7-positive malignant glioma cells suggest that FABP7 is an important modulator of AA metabolism. We provide evidence that increased production of eicosanoids in FABP7-positive malignant glioma growing in an AA-rich environment contributes to tumor infiltration in the brain. We discuss pathways and molecules that may underlie FABP7/AA-mediated promotion of cell migration and FABP7/DHA-mediated inhibition of cell migration in malignant glioma. PMID:23981365

  12. Asn-Gly-Arg-modified polydopamine-coated nanoparticles for dual-targeting therapy of brain glioma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiangang; Zhang, Xiang; Wen, Zuhuang; Tan, Ying; Huang, Ning; Cheng, Si; Zheng, Huzhi; Cheng, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the major clinical obstacle in the chemotherapeutic management of brain glioma. Here we synthesized a pH-sensitive dual-targeting doxorubicin (DOX) carrier to compromise tumor endothelial cells, enhance BBB transportation, and improve drug accumulation in glioma cells. The drug delivery system was constructed with polydopamine (PDA)-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (NPs, MSNs) and the PDA coating was functionalized with Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR), a ligand with specific affinity for cluster of differentiation 13 (CD13). MSN-DOX-PDA-NGR showed a higher intracellular accumulation in primary brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and C6 cells and greater BBB permeability than the non-targeting NPs (MSN-DOX-PDA) did in vitro. Ex vivo and in vivo tests showed that MSN-DOX-PDA-NGR had a higher accumulation in intracranial tumorous tissue than the undecorated NPs did. Furthermore, the antiangiogenesis and antitumor efficacy of MSN-DOX-PDA-NGR were stronger than that of MSN-DOX-PDA. Therefore, these results indicate that the dual-targeting vehicles are potentially useful in brain glioma therapy. PMID:27655664

  13. Enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and glioma therapy mediated by a new peptide modified gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui; Wang, Kaiyuan; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Jianfeng; Lou, Jinning; Ye, Liya; Yan, Xueying; Lu, Weiyue; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Successful glioma gene therapy lays on two important factors, the therapeutic genes and efficient delivery vehicles to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reach gliomas. In this work, a new gene vector was constructed based on dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGL) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG), conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, the nucleolar translocation signal (NoLS) sequence of the LIM Kinase 2 (LIMK2) protein (LIMK2 NoLS peptide, LNP), yielding DGL-PEG-LNP. Plasmid DNA encoding inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) was applied as the therapeutic gene. DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA nanoparticles (NPs) were monodispersed, with a mean diameter of 90.6 ± 8.9 nm. The conjugation of LNP significantly enhanced the BBB-crossing efficiency, cellular uptake and gene expression within tumor cells. Mechanism studies suggested the involvement of energy, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis in cellular uptake of LNP-modified NPs. MTT results showed that no apparent cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with synthesized vectors. Furthermore, LNP-modified NPs mediated strongest and most intensive apoptosis on the tumor site, and the longest median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. All the results demonstrated that LNP is a kind of efficient CPPs especially for BBB-crossing application, and DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA is a potential non-viral platform for glioma gene therapy via intravenous administration.

  14. An integrated transcriptomic and computational analysis for biomarker identification in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenli; Zeng, Chun

    2016-06-01

    Malignant glioma is one of the most common primary brain tumors and is among the deadliest of human cancers. The molecular mechanism for human glioma is poorly understood. Early prognosis of this disease and early treatment are vital. Thus, it is crucial to target the key genes controlling pathogenesis in the early stage of glioma. In this study, differentially expressed genes in human glioma and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. Following gene microarray analysis, the gene expression profile in the differential grade glioma was further validated by bioinformatic analyses, co-expression network construction. Microarray analysis revealed that 1725 genes were differentially expressed and classified into different glioma stage. The analysis revealed 14 genes that were significantly associated with survival with a false discovery rate. Among these genes, macrophage capping protein (CAPG), a member of the actin-regulatory protein, was the key gene in a 20-gene network that modulates cell motility by interacting with the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the prognostic impact of CAPG was validated by use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry on human glioma tissue. CAPG protein was significantly upregulated in clinical high-grade glioblastoma as compared with normal brain tissues. Overexpression of CAPG levels also predict shorter overall survival of glioma patients. These data demonstrated CAPG protein expression in human glioma was associated with tumorigenesis and may be a biomarker for identification of the pathological grade of glioma.

  15. Effects of Adrenal Cortical Steroids and Osmotic Blood-Brain Barrier Opening on Methotrexate Delivery to Gliomas in the Rodent: The Factor of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuwelt, Edward A.; Barnett, Peggy A.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Frenkel, Eugene P.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of adrenal cortical steroids and osmotic blood-brain barrier modification on methotrexate delivery to normal and glioma-bearing rats was studied. In animals with the avian sarcoma virus-induced glioma, osmotic blood-brain barrier modification resulted in significantly increased delivery of methotrexate to the tumor-bearing hemisphere (including the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor), compared to the nonmodified hemisphere or to control animals. The administration of adrenal steroids, followed by intracarotid methotrexate, resulted in slightly decreased chemotherapeutic agent (methotrexate) delivery to the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor. When adrenal steroids were given prior to barrier modification and methotrexate therapy, the level of methotrexate was significantly less in the tumor. These studies provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier exists in tumors and is a factor in drug delivery to tumors. Steroid administration greatly interferes with the enhancement of drug delivery to tumors that can be achieved with osmotic blood-brain barrier modification.

  16. Evidence for potentials and limitations of brain plasticity using an atlas of functional resectability of WHO grade II gliomas: towards a "minimal common brain".

    PubMed

    Ius, Tamara; Angelini, Elsa; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Duffau, Hugues

    2011-06-01

    Despite recent advances in non-invasive brain mapping imaging, the resectability of a given area in a patient harboring a WHO grade II glioma cannot be predicted preoperatively with high reliability, due to mechanisms of functional reorganization. Therefore, intraoperative mapping by direct electrical stimulation remains the gold standard for detection and preservation of eloquent areas during glioma surgery, because it enables to perform on-line anatomo-functional correlations. To study potentials and limitations of brain plasticity, we gathered 58 postoperative MRI of patients operated on for a WHO grade II glioma under direct electrical cortico-subcortical stimulation. Postoperative images were registered on the MNI template to construct an atlas of functional resectability for which each voxel represents the probability to observe residual non-resectable tumor, that is, non-compensable area. The resulting atlas offers a rigorous framework to identify areas with high plastic potential (i.e. with probabilities of residual tumor close to 0), with low compensatory capabilities (i.e. probabilities of residual tumor close to 1) and with intermediate level of resectability (probability around 0.5). The resulting atlas highlights the utmost importance of preserving a core of connectivity through the main associative pathways, namely, it supports the existence of a "minimal common brain" among patients.

  17. IDH1/2 Mutation and MGMT Promoter Methylation - the Relevant Survival Predictors in Czech Patients with Brain Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kramář, F; Minárik, M; Benešová, L; Halková, T; Netuka, D; Bradáč, O; Beneš, V

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours varying in prognosis, treatment approach, and overall survival. Recently, novel markers have been identified which are linked to patient prognosis and therapeutic response. Especially the mutation of the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) gene and the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status seem to be the most important predictors of survival. From 2012 to 2015, 94 Czech patients with primary brain tumours were enrolled into the study. The IDH1/2 mutation was detected by denaturing capillary electrophores.The methylation status of the MGMT gene and other 46 genes was revealed by MS-MLPA. In all 94 patients, the clinical data were correlated with molecular markers by Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox regression model. The MGMT promoter methylation status was established and compared to clinical data. In our study eight different probes were used to elucidate the MGMT methylation status; hypermethylation was proclaimed if four and more probes were positive. This 3 : 5 ratio was tested and confirmed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox analyses. The study confirmed the importance of the IDH1/2 mutation and hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter being present in tumour tissue. Both markers are independent positive survival predictors; in the Cox model the IDH hazard ratio was 0.10 and in the case of MGMT methylation it reached 0.32. The methylation analysis of the panel of additional 46 genes did not reveal any other significant epigenetic markers; none of the candidate genes have been confirmed in the Cox regression analyses as an independent prognostic factor.

  18. Decreased Expression of MiRNA-204-5p Contributes to Glioma Progression and Promotes Glioma Cell Growth, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Although increasing evidence indicated that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and invasion, little is known about the roles of miR-204-5p in human gliomas. In the present study, the expression of miR-204-5p in clinical glioma tissues was measured by qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204-5p on glioma cell growth and metastasis were examined by overexpressing or inhibiting miR-204-5p. We found that the expression level of miR-204-5p was significantly reduced in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. Moreover, we revealed that the introduction of miR-204-5p dramatically suppressed glioma cell growth, migration and invasion. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that RAB22A, a member of the RAS oncogene family, is a direct functional target of miR-204-5p in gliomas. In vivo, restoring miR-204-5p expression in glioma cells suppressed tumorigenesis and increased overall host survival. Our findings suggest that miR-204-5p is a cancer suppressor miRNA and overexpression of miR-204-5p is a novel glioma treatment strategy. PMID:26134825

  19. Epidemiology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Stetson, Lindsay; Virk, Selene M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary intracranial tumors. Some glioma subtypes cause significant mortality and morbidity that are disproportionate to their relatively rare incidence. A very small proportion of glioma cases can be attributed to inherited genetic disorders. Many potential risk factors for glioma have been studied to date, but few provide explanation for the number of brain tumors identified. The most significant of these factors includes increased risk due to exposure to ionizing radiation, and decreased risk with history of allergy or atopic disease. The potential effect of exposure to cellular phones has been studied extensively, but the results remain inconclusive. Recent genomic analyses, using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) design, have identified several inherited risk variants that are associated with increased glioma risk. The following chapter provides an overview of the current state of research in the epidemiology of intracranial glioma.

  20. [Value of the nucleolar organizers (AgNOR) in brain gliomas].

    PubMed

    Ducrot, P; Joundi, A; Diebold, M D; Pluot, M

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and possible contribution of silver stained nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) to prognostic considerations, in a series of 55 supratentorial gliomas: eight grade II astrocytomas, twelve grade III astrocytomas, thirty grade IV astrocytomas, two glioblastomas, one anaplastic oligodendroglioma, one oligodendroglioma and one ependymoma. Silver NORs (AgNORs) were demonstrated according to the method of Crocker et al. A difference between AgNOR sizes in peritumor and tumor tissue is noted. The mean NOR numbers in the tumor areas range from 0.871 to 2.677, without overlap between peritumor gliosis and glial tumors. A comparative analysis reveals significant correlations between the mean NOR number per nucleus and histological grading. This technique can play a practical role in the diagnosis and grading of tumors sampled by stereotactic biopsies: a count higher than 0.8 is highly suggestive of malignancy. In addition, the distribution of NORs may be important: intratumoral heterogeneity expresses various degrees of transcriptional activity between different glial tumors of the same grade. This technique provides information about the biological behaviour of glial tumors supplementary to that obtained from growth fraction analysis.

  1. Molecular neuropathology of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Markus J; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption.

  3. Targeted detection of genetic alterations reveal the prognostic impact of H3K27M and MAPK pathway aberrations in paediatric thalamic glioma.

    PubMed

    Ryall, Scott; Krishnatry, Rahul; Arnoldo, Anthony; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Mistry, Matthew; Siddaway, Robert; Ling, Cino; Pajovic, Sanja; Yu, Man; Rubin, Joshua B; Hukin, Juliette; Steinbok, Paul; Bartels, Ute; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2016-08-31

    Paediatric brain tumours arising in the thalamus present significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to physicians due to their sensitive midline location. As such, genetic analysis for biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these tumours is needed. Here, we identified 64 thalamic gliomas with clinical follow-up and characterized targeted genomic alterations using newly optimized droplet digital and NanoString-based assays. The median age at diagnosis was 9.25 years (range, 0.63-17.55) and median survival was 6.43 (range, 0.01-27.63) years. Our cohort contained 42 and 22 tumours reviewed as low and high grade gliomas, respectively. Five (12 %) low grade and 11 (50 %) high grade gliomas were positive for the H3F3A/HIST1H3B K27M (H3K27M) mutation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly worse overall survival for patients harbouring the H3K27M mutation versus H3F3A/HIST1H3B wild type (H3WT) samples (log-rank p < 0.0001) with a median survival of 1.02 vs. 9.12 years. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation via BRAF or FGFR1 hotspot mutations or fusion events were detected in 44 % of patients, and was associated with long-term survival in the absence of H3K27M (log-rank p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated H3K27M status and high grade histology to be the most significant independent predictors of poor overall survival with hazard ratios of 6.945 and 7.721 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, MAPK pathway activation is a predictor of favourable patient outcome, although not independent of other clinical factors. Importantly, we show that low grade malignancies may harbour H3K27M mutations and that these tumours show a dismal survival compared to low grade H3WT cases. Our data strongly supports the inclusion of targeted genetic testing in childhood thalamic tumours to most accurately stratify patients into appropriate risk groups.

  4. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  5. Molecular and clinical characterization of PD-L1 expression at transcriptional level via 976 samples of brain glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Xing; Wang, Zhiliang; Sun, Lihua; Li, Guanzhang; Liang, Jingshan; Hu, Huimin; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background: PD-L1 has been widely reported as immune check points in a range of malignancies as well as some immune-originated diseases. In glioma, the role of PD-L1 remains unclear. We aimed at investigating its role at transcriptome level and relationship with clinical practice. Method and patients: In total, 976 glioma samples with transcriptome data, including 301 microarray data from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA project) and 675 RNAseq data from TCGA project, were enrolled into our study. Clinical and IDH mutation data were also available. R language was used as the main tool for statistical analysis and graphical work. Results: PD-L1 expression was found to be positively correlated with WHO grade of glioma. PD-L1 seemed to express more in mesenchymal subtype according to TCGA transcriptional classification scheme and may contribute as a potential marker for mesenchymal subtype in glioblastoma. Pearson correlation test indicated that PD-L1 showed robust correlation with PD1, PD-L2, and CD80 in CGGA dataset. Subsequent gene ontology analysis based on significantly correlated genes of PD-L1 revealed that PD-L1 seemed to be profoundly associated with T cell activation. To further investigate the relationship between PD-L1 expression and immune response, we selected a series of immune signatures, which were then transformed into metagenes, and found that PD-L1 expression was particularly paralleled with T-cells and macrophages-related immune response instead of B cell linage-related immune response. In line with the corresponding biological process, PD-L1 exhibited predictive value for glioma patients: Higher PD-L1 indicated significantly shorter survival, especially in glioblastoma. Conclusion: PD-L1 is upregulated in glioblastoma, and is synergistic with other check point members. Moreover, PD-L1 is significantly associated with T-cell activation and macrophage-related immune response and predicts much worse survival for patients, warranting clinical trials

  6. Molecular and clinical characterization of PD-L1 expression at transcriptional level via 976 samples of brain glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Xing; Wang, Zhiliang; Sun, Lihua; Li, Guanzhang; Liang, Jingshan; Hu, Huimin; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: PD-L1 has been widely reported as immune check points in a range of malignancies as well as some immune-originated diseases. In glioma, the role of PD-L1 remains unclear. We aimed at investigating its role at transcriptome level and relationship with clinical practice. Method and patients: In total, 976 glioma samples with transcriptome data, including 301 microarray data from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA project) and 675 RNAseq data from TCGA project, were enrolled into our study. Clinical and IDH mutation data were also available. R language was used as the main tool for statistical analysis and graphical work. Results: PD-L1 expression was found to be positively correlated with WHO grade of glioma. PD-L1 seemed to express more in mesenchymal subtype according to TCGA transcriptional classification scheme and may contribute as a potential marker for mesenchymal subtype in glioblastoma. Pearson correlation test indicated that PD-L1 showed robust correlation with PD1, PD-L2, and CD80 in CGGA dataset. Subsequent gene ontology analysis based on significantly correlated genes of PD-L1 revealed that PD-L1 seemed to be profoundly associated with T cell activation. To further investigate the relationship between PD-L1 expression and immune response, we selected a series of immune signatures, which were then transformed into metagenes, and found that PD-L1 expression was particularly paralleled with T-cells and macrophages-related immune response instead of B cell linage-related immune response. In line with the corresponding biological process, PD-L1 exhibited predictive value for glioma patients: Higher PD-L1 indicated significantly shorter survival, especially in glioblastoma. Conclusion: PD-L1 is upregulated in glioblastoma, and is synergistic with other check point members. Moreover, PD-L1 is significantly associated with T-cell activation and macrophage-related immune response and predicts much worse survival for patients, warranting

  7. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  8. Molecular fingerprinting reflects different histotypes and brain region in low grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs) encompass a heterogeneous set of tumours of different histologies, site of lesion, age and gender distribution, growth potential, morphological features, tendency to progression and clinical course. Among LGGs, Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children. They are typically well-circumscribed, classified as grade I by the World Health Organization (WHO), but recurrence or progressive disease occurs in about 10-20% of cases. Despite radiological and neuropathological features deemed as classic are acknowledged, PA may present a bewildering variety of microscopic features. Indeed, tumours containing both neoplastic ganglion and astrocytic cells occur at a lower frequency. Methods Gene expression profiling on 40 primary LGGs including PAs and mixed glial-neuronal tumours comprising gangliogliomas (GG) and desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas (DIG) using Affymetrix array platform was performed. A biologically validated machine learning workflow for the identification of microarray-based gene signatures was devised. The method is based on a sparsity inducing regularization algorithm l1l2 that selects relevant variables and takes into account their correlation. The most significant genetic signatures emerging from gene-chip analysis were confirmed and validated by qPCR. Results We identified an expression signature composed by a biologically validated list of 15 genes, able to distinguish infratentorial from supratentorial LGGs. In addition, a specific molecular fingerprinting distinguishes the supratentorial PAs from those originating in the posterior fossa. Lastly, within supratentorial tumours, we also identified a gene expression pattern composed by neurogenesis, cell motility and cell growth genes which dichotomize mixed glial-neuronal tumours versus PAs. Our results reinforce previous observations about aberrant activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase

  9. Resecting diffuse low-grade gliomas to the boundaries of brain functions: a new concept in surgical neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2015-12-01

    The traditional dilemma making surgery for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs) challenging is underlain by the need to optimize tumor resection in order to significantly increase survival versus the risk of permanent neurological morbidity. Development of neuroimaging led neurosurgeons to achieve tumorectomy according to the oncological limits provided by preoperative or intraoperative structural and metabolic imaging. However, this principle is not coherent, neither with the infiltrative nature of DLGGs nor with the limited resolution of current neuroimaging. Indeed, despite technical advances, MRI still underestimates the actual spatial extent of gliomas, since tumoral cells are present several millimeters to centimeters beyond the area of signal abnormalities. Furthermore, cortical and subcortical structures may be still crucial for brain functions despite their invasion by this diffuse tumoral disease. Finally, the lack of reliability of functional MRI has also been demonstrated. Therefore, to talk about "maximal safe resection" based upon neuroimaging is a non-sense, because oncological MRI does not show the tumor and functional MRI does not show critical neural pathways. This review proposes an original concept in neuro-oncological surgery, i.e. to resect DLGG to the boundaries of brain functions, thanks to intraoperative electrical mapping performed in awake patients. This paradigmatic shift from image-guided resection to functional mapping-guided resection, based upon an accurate study of brain connectomics and neuroplasticity in each patient throughout tumor removal has permitted to solve the classical dilemma, by increasing both survival and quality of life in DLGG patients. With this in mind, brain surgeons should also be neuroscientists.

  10. Agonistic antibodies reveal the function of GPR56 in human glioma U87-MG cells.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeyuki; Sakaguchi, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mizuno, Norikazu; Tago, Kenji; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and is highly expressed in parts of tumor cells. The involvement of GPR56 in tumorigenesis has been reported. We generated agonistic monoclonal antibodies against human GPR56 and analyzed the action and signaling pathway of GPR56. The antibodies inhibited cell migration through the Gq and Rho pathway in human glioma U87-MG cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that the interaction between the GPR56 extracellular domain and transmembrane domain was potentiated by agonistic antibodies. These results demonstrated that functional antibodies are invaluable tools for GPCR research and should open a new avenue for therapeutic treatment of tumors.

  11. Lipid metabolism as a target for brain cancer therapy: synergistic activity of lovastatin and sodium phenylacetate against human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, P; Thibault, A; Liu, L; Samid, D

    1996-02-01

    Malignant gliomas, the most common form of primary brain tumors, are highly dependent on the mevalonate (MVA) pathway for the synthesis of lipid moieties critical to cell replication. Human glioblastoma cells were found to be uniquely vulnerable to growth arrest by lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme regulating MVA synthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. The sodium salt of phenylacetic acid (NaPA), an inhibitor of MVA-pyrophosphate decarboxylase, the enzyme that controls MVA use, acted synergistically with lovastatin to suppress malignant growth. When used at pharmacologically attainable concentrations, the two compounds induced profound cytostasis and loss of malignant properties such as invasiveness and expression of the transforming growth factor-beta 2 gene, coding for a potent immunosuppressive cytokine. Supplementation with exogenous ubiquinone, an end product of the MVA pathway, failed to rescue the cells, suggesting that decreased synthesis of intermediary products are responsible for the antitumor effects observed. In addition to blocking the MVA pathway, lovastatin alone and in combination with NaPA increased the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, a transcription factor implicated in the control of lipid metabolism, cell growth, and differentiation. Our results indicate that targeting lipid metabolism with lovastatin, used alone or in combination with the aromatic fatty acid NaPA, may offer a novel approach to the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  12. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA for glioma therapy by a brain targeting system: angiopep-2-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Yongwei; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yalin; Meng, Dehui; Li, Dong; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to treat brain cancer because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricting therapeutic drug or gene to access the brain. In this research project, angiopep-2 (ANG) was used as a brain-targeted peptide for preparing multifunctional ANG-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), which encapsulated both doxorubicin (DOX) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) siRNA, designated as ANG/PLGA/DOX/siRNA. This system could efficiently deliver DOX and siRNA into U87MG cells leading to significant cell inhibition, apoptosis and EGFR silencing in vitro. It demonstrated that this drug system was capable of penetrating the BBB in vivo, resulting in more drugs accumulation in the brain. The animal study using the brain orthotopic U87MG glioma xenograft model indicated that the ANG-targeted co-delivery of DOX and EGFR siRNA resulted in not only the prolongation of the life span of the glioma-bearing mice but also an obvious cell apoptosis in glioma tissue.

  13. A systematic pipeline for the objective comparison of whole-brain spectroscopic MRI with histology in biopsy specimens from grade III glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Zhongxing; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Neill, Stewart G.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and management of patients with gliomas are largely dictated by the pathological analysis of tissue biopsied from a selected region within the lesion. However, due to the heterogeneous and infiltrative nature of gliomas, identifying the optimal region for biopsy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quite difficult. This is especially true for low grade gliomas, which often are non-enhancing tumors. To improve the management of patients with these tumors, the field of neuro-oncology requires an imaging modality that can specifically identify a tumor’s most anaplastic/aggressive region(s) for biopsy targeting. The addition of metabolic mapping using spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) to supplement conventional MRI could improve biopsy targeting and, ultimately, diagnostic accuracy. Here, we describe a pipeline for the integration of state-of-the-art, high-resolution whole-brain 3D sMRI maps into a stereotactic neuronavigation system for guiding biopsies in gliomas with nonenhancing components. We also outline a machine-learning method for automated histology analysis that generates normalized, quantitative metrics describing tumor infiltration in immunohistochemically-stained tissue specimens. As a proof of concept, we describe the combination of these two techniques in a small cohort of grade III glioma patients. In this work, we aim to set forth a systematic pipeline to stimulate histopathology-image validation of advanced MRI techniques, such as sMRI. PMID:27489883

  14. Brain rhythms reveal a hierarchical network organization.

    PubMed

    Steinke, G Karl; Galán, Roberto F

    2011-10-01

    Recordings of ongoing neural activity with EEG and MEG exhibit oscillations of specific frequencies over a non-oscillatory background. The oscillations appear in the power spectrum as a collection of frequency bands that are evenly spaced on a logarithmic scale, thereby preventing mutual entrainment and cross-talk. Over the last few years, experimental, computational and theoretical studies have made substantial progress on our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms underlying the generation of network oscillations and their interactions, with emphasis on the role of neuronal synchronization. In this paper we ask a very different question. Rather than investigating how brain rhythms emerge, or whether they are necessary for neural function, we focus on what they tell us about functional brain connectivity. We hypothesized that if we were able to construct abstract networks, or "virtual brains", whose dynamics were similar to EEG/MEG recordings, those networks would share structural features among themselves, and also with real brains. Applying mathematical techniques for inverse problems, we have reverse-engineered network architectures that generate characteristic dynamics of actual brains, including spindles and sharp waves, which appear in the power spectrum as frequency bands superimposed on a non-oscillatory background dominated by low frequencies. We show that all reconstructed networks display similar topological features (e.g. structural motifs) and dynamics. We have also reverse-engineered putative diseased brains (epileptic and schizophrenic), in which the oscillatory activity is altered in different ways, as reported in clinical studies. These reconstructed networks show consistent alterations of functional connectivity and dynamics. In particular, we show that the complexity of the network, quantified as proposed by Tononi, Sporns and Edelman, is a good indicator of brain fitness, since virtual brains modeling diseased states display lower

  15. Regression/Eradication of gliomas in mice by a systemically-deliverable ATF5 dominant-negative peptide

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Charles C.; Arias, Angelo D.; Wong, Lynn S. Nakayama; Lamé, Michael W.; Sidorov, Maxim; Cayanan, Geraldine; Rowland, Douglas J.; Fung, Jennifer; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Siegelin, Markus D.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Angelastro, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas have poor prognosis and urgently require new therapies. Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) is highly expressed in gliomas, and interference with its expression/function precipitates targeted glioma cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We designed a novel deliverable truncated-dominant-negative (d/n) form of ATF5 fused to a cell-penetrating domain (Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP) that can be intraperitoneally/subcutaneously administered to mice harboring malignant gliomas generated; (1) by PDGF-B/sh-p53 retroviral transformation of endogenous neural progenitor cells; and (2) by human U87-MG xenografts. In vitro Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP entered into glioma cells and triggered massive apoptosis. In vivo, subcutaneously-administered Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP passed the blood brain barrier, entered normal brain and tumor cells, and then caused rapid selective tumor cell death. MRI verified elimination of retrovirus-induced gliomas within 8-21 days. Histopathology revealed growth-suppression of intracerebral human U87-MG cells xenografts. For endogenous PDGF-B gliomas, there was no recurrence or mortality at 6-12 months versus 66% mortality in controls at 6 months. Necropsy and liver-kidney blood enzyme analysis revealed no adverse effects on brain or other tissues. Our findings thus identify Pen-d/n-ATF5-RP as a potential therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:26863637

  16. Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles for magnetic resonance/near-infrared fluorescence dual-modal imaging of brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Shao, Chen; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zihao; Qu, Yanming; Gu, Wei; Yu, Chunjiang; Ye, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection of tumors. Herein, we prepared the PEG-Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles (MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs) with magnetic resonance (MR) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging modalities. The applicability of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe for the detection of brain gliomas was investigated. In vivo MR contrast enhancement of the MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 nanoprobe in the tumor region was demonstrated. Meanwhile, whole-body NIRF imaging of glioma bearing nude mouse exhibited distinct tumor localization upon injection of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs. Moreover, ex vivo CLSM imaging of the brain slice hosting glioma indicated the preferential accumulation of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs in the glioma region. Our results therefore demonstrated the potential of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe in improving the diagnostic efficacy by simultaneously providing anatomical information from deep inside the body and more sensitive information at the cellular level.

  17. Metallothinein 1E Enhances Glioma Invasion through Modulation Matrix Metalloproteinases-2 and 9 in U87MG Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Chun-Hao; Kim, In Young; Jang, Woo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma cells invading surrounding normal brain are inoperable and resistant to radio- and chemotherapy, and eventually lead to tumor regrowth. Identification of genes related to motility is important for understanding the molecular biological behavior of invasive gliomas. According to our previous studies, Metallothionein 1E (MT1E) was identified to enhance migration of human malignant glioma cells. The purpose of this study was to confirm that MT1E could modulate glioma invasion in vivo. Firstly we established 2 cell lines; MTS23, overexpressed by MT1E complementary DNA construct and pV12 as control. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 were increased in MTS23 compared with pV12. Furthermore it was confirmed that MT1E could modulate MMPs secretion and translocation of NFkB p50 and B-cell lymphoma-3 through small interfering ribonucleic acid knocked U87MG cells. Then MTS23 and pV12 were injected into intracranial region of 5 week old male nude mouse. After 4 weeks, for brain tissues of these two groups, histological analysis, and immunohistochemical stain of MMP-2, 9 and Nestin were performed. As results, the group injected with MTS23 showed irregular margin and tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding normal brain, while that of pV12 (control) had round and clear margin. And regrowth of tumor cells in MTS23 group was observed in another site apart from tumor cell inoculation. MT1E could enhance tumor proliferation and invasion of malignant glioma through regulation of activation and expression of MMPs. PMID:27847566

  18. Probing the infiltrating character of brain tumors: inhibition of RhoA/ROK-mediated CD44 cell surface shedding from glioma cells by the green tea catechin EGCg.

    PubMed

    Annabi, Borhane; Bouzeghrane, Mounia; Moumdjian, Robert; Moghrabi, Albert; Béliveau, Richard

    2005-08-01

    Glioma cell-surface binding to hyaluronan (HA), a major constituent of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) environment, is regulated through a complex membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)/CD44/caveolin interaction that takes place at the leading edges of invading cells. In the present study, intracellular transduction pathways required for the HA-mediated recognition by infiltrating glioma cells in brain was investigated. We show that the overexpression of the GTPase RhoA up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and triggered CD44 shedding from the U-87 glioma cell surface. This potential implication in cerebral metastatic processes was also observed in cells overexpressing the full-length recombinant MT1-MMP, while the overexpression of a cytoplasmic domain truncated from of MT1-MMP failed to do so. This suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of MT1-MMP transduces intracellular signaling leading to RhoA-mediated CD44 shedding. Treatment of glioma cells with the Rho-kinase (ROK) inhibitor Y27632, or with EGCg, a green tea catechin with anti-MMP and anti-angiogenesis activities, antagonized both RhoA- and MT1-MMP-induced CD44 shedding. Conversely, overexpression of recombinant ROK stimulated CD44 release. Taken together, our results suggest that RhoA/ROK intracellular signaling regulates MT1-MMP-mediated CD44 recognition of HA. These molecular processes may partly explain the diffuse brain-infiltrating character of glioma cells within the surrounding parenchyma and thus be a target for new approaches to anti-tumor therapy.

  19. Transient receptor potential canonical channels are essential for chemotactic migration of human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bomben, Valerie C; Turner, Kathryn L; Barclay, Tia-Tabitha C; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-07-01

    The majority of malignant primary brain tumors are gliomas, derived from glial cells. Grade IV gliomas, Glioblastoma multiforme, are extremely invasive and the clinical prognosis for patients is dismal. Gliomas utilize a number of proteins and pathways to infiltrate the brain parenchyma including ion channels and calcium signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the localization and functional relevance of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels in glioma migration. We show that gliomas are attracted in a chemotactic manner to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Stimulation with EGF results in TRPC1 channel localization to the leading edge of migrating D54MG glioma cells. Additionally, TRPC1 channels co-localize with the lipid raft proteins, caveolin-1 and β-cholera toxin, and biochemical assays show TRPC1 in the caveolar raft fraction of the membrane. Chemotaxis toward EGF was lost when TRPC channels were pharmacologically inhibited or by shRNA knockdown of TRPC1 channels, yet without affecting unstimulated cell motility. Moreover, lipid raft integrity was required for gliomas chemotaxis. Disruption of lipid rafts not only impaired chemotaxis but also impaired TRPC currents in whole cell recordings and decreased store-operated calcium entry as revealed by ratiomeric calcium imaging. These data indicated that TRPC1 channel association with lipid rafts is essential for glioma chemotaxis in response to stimuli, such as EGF.

  20. Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 degradation inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion by reducing cytoplasmic localization of p27(Kip1).

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Gong, Hui; Cao, Kuan; Zou, Shenshan; Zhu, Bingxin; Bao, Hanmo; Wu, Yuxuan; Gao, Yong; Tang, Yuan; Yu, Rutong

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that loss of Nrdp1 contributes to human glioma progression by reducing apoptosis. However, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma migration and invasion has not been investigated. Here, we report that ErbB3, a substrate of Nrdp1, is undetectable in normal brain tissues and grade II/III glioma tissues, but is abundant in a certain percentage of grade IV glioma tissues and is associated with the loss of Nrdp1. This suggests that Nrdp1 may be involved in glioma migration and invasion by regulating ErbB3. Thus, the role of Nrdp1/ErbB3 signaling in glioma cell migration and invasion was investigated using Nrdp1 loss- and gain-of-function. The results show that down-regulation of Nrdp1 by use of short hairpin RNA promoted glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, overexpression of Nrdp1 significantly inhibited glioma cell migration and invasion. Further investigation on molecular targets revealed that Nrdp1 decreased the level of ErbB3, which resulted in decreasing p-AKT thereby reducing cytoplasmic p27(Kip1). Taken together, these findings suggest that Nrdp1-mediated ErbB3 degradation suppresses glioma migration and invasion and that loss of Nrdp1 may amplify ErbB3 signaling to contribute to glioma migration and invasion. These findings suggest that Nrdp1 may be a target for glioma therapy.

  1. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  2. DNA sequences within glioma-derived extracellular vesicles can cross the intact blood-brain barrier and be detected in peripheral blood of patients

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Peris-Celda, María; Alonso, Marta M.; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; de Mendivil, Ana Ortiz; García-Duque, Sara; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Prat-Acín, Ricardo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-cell-secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) can cross the disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the bloodstream. However, in certain gliomas, the BBB remains intact, which might limit EVs release. To evaluate the ability of tumor-derived EVs to cross the BBB, we used an orthotopic xenotransplant mouse model of human glioma-cancer stem cells featuring an intact BBB. We demonstrated that all types of tumor cells-derived EVs−apoptotic bodies, shedding microvesicles and exosomes−cross the intact BBB and can be detected in the peripheral blood, which provides a minimally invasive method for their detection compared to liquid biopsies obtained from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Furthermore, these EVs can be readily distinguished from total murine EVs, since they carry human-specific DNA sequences relevant for GBM biology. In a small cohort of glioma patients, we finally demonstrated that peripheral blood EVs cargo can be successfully used to detect the presence of IDH1G395A, an essential biomarker in the current management of human glioma PMID:27902458

  3. Molecular alterations of KIT oncogene in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana L; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lopes, José M; Martinho, Olga; Lambros, Maryou B K; Martins, Albino; Schmitt, Fernando; Pardal, Fernando; Reis, Rui M

    2007-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117) immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179) of cases, namely in 25% (1/4) of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20) of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5) of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77) of glioblastomas and one third (3/9) of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35) of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0-22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24) of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK inhibitors.

  4. Differential Lipid Profiles of Normal Human Brain Matter and Gliomas by Positive and Negative Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization – Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Valentina; Hattab, Eyas M.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization—mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging was used to analyze unmodified human brain tissue sections from 39 subjects sequentially in the positive and negative ionization modes. Acquisition of both MS polarities allowed more complete analysis of the human brain tumor lipidome as some phospholipids ionize preferentially in the positive and others in the negative ion mode. Normal brain parenchyma, comprised of grey matter and white matter, was differentiated from glioma using positive and negative ion mode DESI-MS lipid profiles with the aid of principal component analysis along with linear discriminant analysis. Principal component–linear discriminant analyses of the positive mode lipid profiles was able to distinguish grey matter, white matter, and glioma with an average sensitivity of 93.2% and specificity of 96.6%, while the negative mode lipid profiles had an average sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 97.4%. The positive and negative mode lipid profiles provided complementary information. Principal component–linear discriminant analysis of the combined positive and negative mode lipid profiles, via data fusion, resulted in approximately the same average sensitivity (94.7%) and specificity (97.6%) of the positive and negative modes when used individually. However, they complemented each other by improving the sensitivity and specificity of all classes (grey matter, white matter, and glioma) beyond 90% when used in combination. Further principal component analysis using the fused data resulted in the subgrouping of glioma into two groups associated with grey and white matter, respectively, a separation not apparent in the principal component analysis scores plots of the separate positive and negative mode data. The interrelationship of tumor cell percentage and the lipid profiles is discussed, and how such a measure could be used to measure residual tumor at surgical margins. PMID:27658243

  5. Decreased Expression of miR-15b in Human Gliomas Is Associated with Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guan; Yan, Shushan; Shi, Lei; Wan, Zhengqiang; Jiang, Nan; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNA-15b (miR-15b) has been demonstrated to suppress proliferation by arresting cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis in glioma cells. However, the prognostic value of miR-15b expression in human gliomas remains unclear. In the present study, the authors examined the expression profile in glioma specimens and the prognostic value of miR-15b in patients with gliomas. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was employed to detect the expression levels of miR-15b in 92 glioma tissues categorized by World Health Organization (WHO) histopathological grades. However, the prognostic value of miR-15b in human glioma has not been evaluated yet. MiR-15b expression in human glioma tissues was distinctly lower than in normal brain tissues. Furthermore, the expression of miR-15b notably decreased with the ascending histopathological grade of gliomas. Additionally, Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that low miR-15b expression was associated with poor overall survival in patients with gliomas. Similarly, miR-15b reduction occurred with increasing frequency in glioma patients with lower Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) scores than in those with higher KPS scores. No significant difference was observed between miR-15b expression and gender, age, and tumor location. These findings revealed that a lower expression level of miR-15b was closely related to a shorter overall survival, suggesting that miR-15b could be an intrinsic factor that plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas. PMID:25811315

  6. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  7. Antibody guided diagnosis and therapy of brain gliomas using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor and placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Kalofonos, H.P.; Pawlikowska, T.R.; Hemingway, A.; Courtenay-Luck, N.; Dhokia, B.; Snook, D.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hooker, G.R.; McKenzie, C.G.; Lavender, P.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with brain glioma were scanned using {sup 123}I-labeled monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR1) or placental alkaline phosphatase (H17E2). Successful localization was achieved in 18 out of 27 patients. Eleven out of 27 patients were also studied using a nonspecific control antibody (11.4.1) of the same immunoglobulin subclass and observable tumor localization was also achieved in five patients. The specificity of targeting was assessed by comparing images obtained with specific and nonspecific antibodies and by examining tumor and normal tissue biopsies after dual antibody administration. Ten patients with recurrent grade III or IV glioma who showed good localization of radiolabeled antibody were treated with 40-140 mCi of {sup 131}I-labeled antibody delivered to the tumor area intravenously (n = 5) or by infusion into the internal carotid artery (n = 5). Six patients showed clinical improvement lasting from 6 mo to 3 yr. One patient continues in remission (3 yr after therapy), but the other five who responded initially relapsed 6-9 mo after therapy and died. No major toxicity was attributable to antibody-guided irradiation. Targeted irradiation by monoclonal antibody may be clinically useful and should be explored further in the treatment of brain gliomas resistant to conventional forms of treatment.

  8. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  9. The histone deacetylase SIRT6 suppresses the expression of the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin; Hao, Bin; Liu, Ying; Dai, Dongwei; Han, Guosheng; Li, Yanan; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Xiaoping; Yue, Zhijian; Wang, Laixing; Cao, Yiqun Liu, Jianmin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • PCBP2 expression is over-expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • SIRT6 is decreased in glioma and correlated with PCBP2. • SIRT6 inhibits PCBP2 expression by deacetylating H3K9. • SIRT6 inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: More than 80% of tumors that occur in the brain are malignant gliomas. The prognosis of glioma patients is still poor, which makes glioma an urgent subject of cancer research. Previous evidence and our present data show that PCBP2 is over-expressed in human glioma tissues and predicts poor outcome. However, the mechanism by which PCBP2 is regulated in glioma remains elusive. We find that SIRT6, one of the NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase SIRTUINs, is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and that the level of SIRT6 is negatively correlated with PCBP2 level while H3K9ac enrichment on the promoter of PCBP2 is positively correlated with PCBP2 expression. Furthermore, we identify PCBP2 as a target of SIRT6. We demonstrate that PCBP2 expression is inhibited by SIRT6, which depends upon deacetylating H3K9ac. Finally, our results reveal that SIRT6 inhibits glioma cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and glioma cell growth in vivo in a PCBP2 dependent manner. In summary, our findings implicate that SIRT6 inhibits PCBP2 expression through deacetylating H3K9ac and SIRT6 acts as a tumor suppressor in human glioma.

  10. Bradykinin enhances invasion of malignant glioma into the brain parenchyma by inducing cells to undergo amoeboid migration

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The molecular and cellular mechanisms governing cell motility and directed migration in response to the neuropeptide bradykinin are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human glioma cells whose migration is guided by bradykinin generate bleb-like protrusions. We found that activation of the B2 receptor leads to a rise in free Ca2+ from internal stores that activates actomyosin contraction and subsequent cytoplasmic flow into protrusions forming membrane blebs. Furthermore Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl− channels, which participate in bleb regulation. Treatment of gliomas with bradykinin in situ increased glioma growth by increasing the speed of cell migration at the periphery of the tumour mass. To test if bleb formation is related to bradykinin-promoted glioma invasion we blocked glioma migration with blebbistatin, a blocker of myosin kinase II, which is necessary for proper bleb retraction. Our findings suggest a pivotal role of bradykinin during glioma invasion by stimulating amoeboid migration of glioma cells. PMID:25194042

  11. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-07

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  12. Tissue motion and strain in the human brain assessed by intraoperative ultrasound in glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Selbekk, Tormod; Brekken, Reidar; Solheim, Ole; Lydersen, Stian; Hernes, Toril A N; Unsgaard, Geirmund

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate tissue motion and strain imposed by cardiovascular pulsation in pathologic and normal brain parenchyma, as quantified from in vivo ultrasound data. Ultrasound acquired during surgery of 16 patients with glial tumors was retrospectively processed and analyzed. The tissue velocity was quantified at depths of 1cm, 2cm and 3cm from brain cortex to investigate spatial dependency with depth. Comparison of strain and velocity in tumor and adjacent normal parenchyma was performed by selecting two regions-of-interest in the hyperechoic tumor and two regions in the low-echogenic areas interpreted as mainly normal tissue with some degree of tumor cell infiltration. The absolute maximum tissue velocity is seen to increase with increasing depths in 14 of 16 cases (87.5%). The maximum tissue velocities in the four regions close to the ultrasound visible tumor border are not statistically different (p=0.163 to p=0.975). The strain magnitudes are significantly higher in the regions with expected normal brain parenchyma than in regions with expected glial tumor tissue, both for the two regions being closest to the tumor border (p=0.0004) and for the two regions further away from the tumor border (p=0.0009). We conclude that the velocity of the brain parenchyma imposed by arterial pulsation during a cardiac cycle is generally increasing with increasing depth from cortex. The maximum velocity appears to be similar in regions with expected normal brain and tumor tissue, thus, does not seem to be affected by pathology. Strain magnitude is, however, a suitable parameter for discrimination of glial tumor and normal brain parenchyma. (E-mail: Tormod.Selbekk@sintef.no).

  13. Where are we now? And where are we going? A report from the Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC2) low-grade glioma research workshop.

    PubMed

    Huse, Jason T; Wallace, Max; Aldape, Kenneth D; Berger, Mitchel S; Bettegowda, Chetan; Brat, Daniel J; Cahill, Daniel P; Cloughesy, Timothy; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Marra, Marco; Miller, C Ryan; Nelson, Sarah J; Salama, Sofie R; Soffietti, Riccardo; Wen, Patrick Y; Yip, Stephen; Yen, Katharine; Costello, Joseph F; Chang, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse gliomas consist of both low- and high-grade varieties, each with distinct morphological and biological features. The often extended periods of relative indolence exhibited by low-grade gliomas (LGG; WHO grade II) differ sharply from the aggressive, rapidly fatal clinical course of primary glioblastoma (GBM; WHO grade IV). Nevertheless, until recently, the molecular foundations underlying this stark biological contrast between glioma variants remained largely unknown. The discoveries of distinctive and highly recurrent genomic and epigenomic abnormalities in LGG have both informed a more accurate classification scheme and pointed to viable avenues for therapeutic development. As such, the field of neuro-oncology now seems poised to capitalize on these gains to achieve significant benefit for LGG patients. This report will briefly recount the proceedings of a workshop held in January 2013 and hosted by Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure (ABC(2)) on the subject of LGG. While much of the meeting covered recent insights into LGG biology, its focus remained on how best to advance the clinical management, whether by improved preclinical modeling, more effective targeted therapeutics and clinical trial design, or innovative imaging technology.

  14. Clinical implications of molecular neuropathology and biomarkers for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Hegi, Monika; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are currently diagnosed based on morphological criteria and graded according to the World Health Organization classification of primary brain tumors. This algorithm of diagnosis and classification provides clinicians with an estimated prognosis of the natural course of the disease. It does not reflect the expected response to specific treatments beyond surgery (eg, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy). Clinical experience has revealed that gliomas sharing similar histomorphological criteria might indeed have different clinical courses and exhibit highly heterogenous responses to treatments. This was very impressively demonstrated first for oligodendrogliomas. The presence or lack of combined deletions of the chromosomal segments 1p/19q was associated with different benefit from radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We review current molecular markers for malignant gliomas and discuss their current and future impact on clinical neuro-oncology.

  15. FIBULIN-3 IS UNIQUELY UPREGULATED IN MALIGNANT GLIOMAS AND PROMOTES TUMOR CELL MOTILITY AND INVASION

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K.; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared to other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here we describe the unique expression and pro-invasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared to controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and pro-tumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  16. Melatonergic system-based two-gene index is prognostic in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kinker, Gabriela S; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia E; Muxel, Sandra M; Marie, Suely K N; Markus, Regina P; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas, the most common primary brain tumors in adults, are classified into four malignancy grades according to morphological features. Recent studies have shown that melatonin treatment induces cytotoxicity in glioma-initiating cells and reduces the invasion and migration of glioma cell lines, inhibiting the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) oncopathway. Given that C6 rat glioma cells produce melatonin, we investigated the correlation between the capacity of gliomas to synthesize/metabolize melatonin and their overall malignancy. We first characterized the melatonergic system of human gliomas cell lines with different grades of aggressiveness (HOG, T98G, and U87MG) and demonstrated that glioma-synthesized melatonin exerts an autocrine antiproliferative effect. Accordingly, the sensitivity to exogenous melatonin was higher for the most aggressive cell line, U87MG, which synthesized/accumulated less melatonin. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas RNAseq data of 351 glioma patients, we designed a predictive model of the content of melatonin in the tumor microenvironment, the ASMT:CYP1B1 index, combining the gene expression levels of melatonin synthesis and metabolism enzymes. The ASMT:CYP1B1 index negatively correlated with tumor grade, as well as with the expression of pro-proliferation and anti-apoptotic NFκB target genes. More importantly, the index was a grade- and histological type-independent prognostic factor. Even when considering only high-grade glioma patients, a low ASMT:CYP1B1 value, which suggests decreased melatonin and enhanced aggressiveness, was strongly associated with poor survival. Overall, our data reveal the prognostic value of the melatonergic system of gliomas and provide insights into the therapeutic role of melatonin.

  17. Overexpression of TIP30 inhibits the growth and invasion of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    HU, YINGYING; CHEN, FENGSHENG; LIU, FEIYE; LIU, XINHUI; HUANG, NA; CAI, XIAOLI; SUN, YI; LI, AIMIN; LUO, RONGCHENG

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is an aggressive malignancy with limited effective treatment and poor prognosis. Therefore, the identification of novel prognostic markers and effective therapeutic targets is important for the treatment of human glioma. TIP30 is a tumor suppressor involved in the regulation of numerous cellular processes, including tumor cell growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis in various human cancers. The present study investigated whether Tat-interacting protein (TIP)30 was able to regulate tumorigenesis and predict the clinical outcome of patients with glioma. A total of 92 human glioma tissue samples and 10 normal brain tissue samples were examined by immunostaining. The results indicated that the expression levels of TIP30 significantly decreased in glioma tissue samples. as compared with normal brain tissue samples. Furthermore, TIP30 expression was inversely correlated with tumor histological classification, pathological grade, tumor size, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression; however, no association was detected between TIP30 expression and patient age and gender. In addition, patients with positive TIP30 expression exhibited significantly longer median overall survival rates, as compared with those with negative TIP30 expression. In vitro experiments revealed that upregulation of TIP30 expression by lentiviral vector transfection inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis, as determined by MTT assay and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining, respectively. In addition, TIP30 expression markedly attenuated cell migration and invasion, as determined by wound healing and transwell assays. Upregulation of TIP30 expression in glioma cells decreased the expression levels of EGFR and its associated downstream molecules phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and phosphorylated AKT, as determined by western blot analysis. The results of the present study indicated that TIP30 may suppress oncogenesis and glioma

  18. Microscopic DTI accurately identifies early glioma cell migration: correlation with multimodal imaging in a new glioma stem cell model.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Perles-Barbacaru, Adriana-T; Millet, Arnaud; Appaix, Florence; El-Atifi, Michele; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring glioma cell infiltration in the brain is critical for diagnosis and therapy. Using a new glioma Glio6 mouse model derived from human stem cells we show how diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may predict glioma cell migration/invasion. In vivo multiparametric MRI was performed at one, two and three months of Glio6 glioma growth (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). This longitudinal study reveals the existence of a time window to study glioma cell/migration/invasion selectively. Indeed, at two months only Glio6 cell invasion was detected, while tumor mass formation, edema, blood-brain barrier leakage and tumor angiogenesis were detected later, at three months. To robustly confirm the potential of DTI for detecting glioma cell migration/invasion, a microscopic 3D-DTI (80 μm isotropic spatial resolution) technique was developed and applied to fixed mouse brains (Glio6 (n = 6), sham (n = 3)). DTI changes were predominant in the corpus callosum (CC), a known path of cell migration. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and perpendicular diffusivity (D⊥ ) changes derived from ex vivo microscopic 3D-DTI were significant at two months of tumor growth. In the caudate putamen an FA increase of +38% (p < 0.001) was observed, while in the CC a - 28% decrease in FA (p < 0.005) and a + 95% increase in D⊥ (p < 0.005) were observed. In the CC, DTI changes and fluorescent Glio6 cell density obtained by two-photon microscopy in the same brains were correlated (p < 0.001, r = 0.69), validating FA and D⊥ as early quantitative biomarkers to detect glioma cell migration/invasion. The origin of DTI changes was assessed by electron microscopy of the same tract, showing axon bundle disorganization. During the first two months, Glio6 cells display a migratory phenotype without being associated with the constitution of a brain tumor mass. This offers a unique opportunity to apply microscopic 3D-DTI and to validate DTI parameters FA and D⊥ as biomarkers for glioma cell

  19. LncRNA profile study reveals four-lncRNA signature associated with the prognosis of patients with anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Haoyuan; Wu, Fan; Liang, Tingyu; Yan, Xiaoyan; Li, Jiye; Lan, Qing; Wang, Jiangfei; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic glioma is Grade III and the median overall survival is about 37.6 months. However, there are still other factors that affect the prognosis for anaplastic glioma patients due to variable overall survival. So we screened four-lncRNA signature (AGAP2-AS1, TPT1-AS1, LINC01198 and MIR155HG) from the lncRNA expression profile from the GSE16011, CGGA and REMBRANDT datasets. The patients in low risk group had longer overall survival than high risk group (median OS 2208.25 vs. 591.30 days; P < 0.0001). Moreover, patients in the low risk group showed similar overall survival to Grade II patients (P = 0.1669), while the high risk group showed significant different to Grade IV (P = 0.0005) with similar trend. So based on the four-lncRNA, the anaplastic gliomas could be divided into grade II-like and grade IV-like groups. On the multivariate analysis, it showed the signature was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.000). The expression of four lncRNAs in different grades showed that AGAP2-AS1, LINC01198 and MIR155HG were increased with tumor grade, while TPT1-AS1 was decreased. Knockdown of AGAP2-AS1 can inhibit the cell proliferation, migration and invasion, while increase the apoptosis cell rates in vitro. In conclusion, our results showed that the four-lncRNA signature has prognostic value for anaplastic glioma. Moreover, clinicians should conduct corresponding therapies to achieve best treatment with less side effects for two groups patients. PMID:27764782

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  1. 7-Tesla Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging to Assess the Effects of Radiotherapy on Normal-Appearing Brain in Patients With Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, Janine M.; Chuang, Cynthia F.; Chang, Susan M.; Barani, Igor J.; Jimenez, Bert; Hess, Christopher P.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intermediate- and long-term imaging manifestations of radiotherapy on normal-appearing brain tissue in patients with treated gliomas using 7T susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods and Materials: SWI was performed on 25 patients with stable gliomas on a 7 Tesla magnet. Microbleeds were identified as discrete foci of susceptibility that did not correspond to vessels. The number of microbleeds was counted within and outside of the T2-hyperintense lesion. For 3 patients, radiation dosimetry maps were reconstructed and fused with the 7T SWI data. Results: Multiple foci of susceptibility consistent with microhemorrhages were observed in patients 2 years after chemoradiation. These lesions were not present in patients who were not irradiated. The prevalence of microhemorrhages increased with the time since completion of radiotherapy, and these lesions often extended outside the boundaries of the initial high-dose volume and into the contralateral hemisphere. Conclusions: High-field SWI has potential for visualizing the appearance of microbleeds associated with long-term effects of radiotherapy on brain tissue. The ability to visualize these lesions in normal-appearing brain tissue may be important in further understanding the utility of this treatment in patients with longer survival.

  2. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  3. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  4. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  5. Mapping extracellular pH in rat brain gliomas in vivo by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: comparison with maps of metabolites.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, M L; Hérigault, G; Rémy, C; Farion, R; Ballesteros, P; Coles, J A; Cerdán, S; Ziegler, A

    2001-09-01

    The value of extracellular pH (pH(e)) in tumors is an important factor in prognosisand choice of therapy. We demonstrate here that pH(e) can be mappedin vivo in a rat brain glioma by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (SI) of the pH buffer (+/-)2-imidazole-1-yl-3-ethoxycarbonylpropionic acid (IEPA). (1)H SI also allowed us to map metabolites, and, to better understand the determinants of pH(e), we compared maps of pH(e), metabolites, and the distribution of the contrast agent gadolinium1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraaceticacid (Gd-DOTA). C6 cells injected in caudate nuclei of four Wistar rats gave rise to gliomas of approximately 10 mm in diameter. Three mmols of IEPA were injected in the right jugular vein from t = 0 to t = 60 min. From t = 50 min to t = 90 min, spin-echo (1)H SI was performed with an echo time of 40 ms in a 2.5-mm slice including the glioma (nominal voxel size, 2.2 microl). IEPA resonances were detected only within the glioma and were intense enough for pH(e) to be calculated from the chemical shift of the H2 resonance in almost all voxels of the glioma. (1)H spectroscopic images with an echo time of 136 ms were then acquired to map metabolites: lactate, choline-containing compounds (tCho), phosphocreatine/creatine, and N-acetylaspartate. Finally, T(1)-weighted imaging after injection of a bolus of Gd-DOTA gave a map indicative of extravasation. On average, the gradient of pH(e) (measured where sufficient IEPA was present) from the center to the periphery was not statistically significant. Mean pH(e) was calculated for each of the four gliomas, and the average was 7.084 +/- 0.017 (+/- SE; n = 4 rats), which is acid with respect to pH(e) of normal tissue. After normalization of spectra to their water peak, voxel-by-voxel comparisons of peak areas showed that N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neurons, correlated negatively with IEPA (P < 0.0001) and lactate (P < 0.05), as expected of a glioma surrounded by normal tissue. t

  6. Cognitive Rehabilitation in Patients with Gliomas and Other Brain Tumors: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Pambuku, A.; Della Puppa, A.; Bellu, L.; D'Avella, D.; Zagonel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Disease prognosis is very poor in patients with brain tumors. Cognitive deficits due to disease or due to its treatment have an important weight on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. Studies often take into account quality of life as a fundamental element in the management of disease and interventions have been developed for cognitive rehabilitation of neuropsychological deficits with the aim of improving the quality of life and daily-life autonomy of patients. In this literature review, we will consider the published studies of cognitive rehabilitation over the past 20 years. PMID:27493954

  7. Sox2 is translationally activated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E in human glioma-initiating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhou, Fengbiao; Chen, Hong; Cui, Chunhong; Liu, Dan; Li, Qiuping; Yang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Guoqiang; Sun, Shuhui; Gu, Jianxin; Wei, Yuanyan; Jiang, Jianhai

    2010-07-09

    Sox2, a master transcription factor, contributes to the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and plays significant roles in sustaining the self-renewal of neural stem cells and glioma-initiating cells. Understanding the functional differences of Sox2 between glioma-initiating cells and normal neural stem cells would contribute to therapeutic approach for treatment of brain tumors. Here, we first demonstrated that Sox2 could contribute to the self-renewal and proliferation of glioma-initiating cells. The following experiments showed that Sox2 was activated at translational level in a subset of human glioma-initiating cells compared with the normal neural stem cells. Further investigation revealed there was a positive correlation between Sox2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in glioma tissues. Down-regulation of eIF4E decreased Sox2 protein level without altering its mRNA level in glioma-initiating cells, indicating that Sox2 was activated by eIF4E at translational level. Furthermore, eIF4E was presumed to regulate the expression of Sox2 by its 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) sequence. Our results suggest that the eIF4E-Sox2 axis is a novel mechanism of unregulated self-renewal of glioma-initiating cells, providing a potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  8. Brain tissue characterisation by infrared imaging in a rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Amharref, Nadia; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Vistelle, Richard; Manfait, Michel

    2006-07-01

    Pathological changes associated with the development of brain tumor were investigated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FT-IRM) with high spatial resolution. Using multivariate statistical analysis and imaging, all normal brain structures were discriminated from tumor and surrounding tumor tissues. These structural changes were mainly related to qualitative and quantitative changes in lipids (tumors contain little fat) and were correlated to the degree of myelination, an important factor in several neurodegenerative disorders. Lipid concentration and composition may thus be used as spectroscopic markers to discriminate between healthy and tumor tissues. Additionally, we have identified one peculiar structure all around the tumor. This structure could be attributed to infiltrative events, such as peritumoral oedema observed during tumor development. Our results highlight the ability of FT-IRM to identify the molecular origin that gave rise to the specific changes between healthy and diseased states. Comparison between pseudo-FT-IRM maps and histological examinations (Luxol fast blue, Luxol fast blue-cresyl violet staining) showed the complementarities of both techniques for early detection of tissue abnormalities.

  9. Single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy for complex brain gliomas: is there an advantage as compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy or by adding a partial arc?

    PubMed

    Davidson, M T M; Masucci, G L; Follwell, M; Blake, S J; Xu, W; Moseley, D J; Sanghera, P; Wong, C S; Perry, J; Tsao, M; Sahgal, A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) offers advantages over intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for complex brain gliomas and evaluate the role of an additional partial arc. Twelve patients with glioma involving critical organs at risk (OAR) were selected [six low grade brainstem glioma (BG) and six glioblastoma (GB) cases]. BGs were prescribed 54 Gy/30 fractions (frx), and GB treated to 50 Gy/30 frx to a lower dose PTV (PTV50) with a simultaneous integrated boost delivering a total dose of 60 Gy/30 frx to a higher dose PTV (PTV60). VMAT was planned with a single arc (VMAT1) and with an additional coplanar partial arc spanning 90° (VMAT2). We observed VMATI improving the PTV equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for BG cases (p=0.027), improving the V95 for the PTV50 in GB cases (p=0.026) and resulting in more conformal GB plans (p=0.008) as compare to IMRT. However, for the GB PTV60, IMRT achieved favorable V95 over VMAT1 and VMAT2 (0.0046 and 0.008, respectively). The GB total integral dose (ID) was significantly lower with VMAT1 and VMAT2 (p=0.049 and p=0.006, respectively). Both VMAT1 and VMAT2 reduced the ID, however, only at the 5 Gy threshold for BG cases (p=0.011 and 0.005, respectively). VMAT achieved a lower spinal cord maximum dose and EUD for BG cases and higher optic nerve doses, otherwise no significant differences were observed. VMAT1 yielded the fastest treatment times and least MU. We conclude that VMAT offers faster treatment delivery for complex brain tumors while maintaining similar dosimetric qualities to IMRT. Selective dosimetric advantages in terms of spinal cord sparing and lowering the ID are observed favoring the use of an additional coplanar partial arc.

  10. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients.

  11. Low Expression of CAPON in Glioma Contributes to Cell Proliferation via the Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shangfeng; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Guangping; Jin, Lei; Ji, Daofei; Wang, Peng; Meng, Qingming; Zhu, Yufu; Yu, Rutong

    2016-01-01

    CAPON is an adapter protein for nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1). CAPON has two isoforms in the human brain: CAPON-L (long form of CAPON) and CAPON-S (short form of CAPON). Recent studies have indicated the involvement of CAPON in tumorigenesis beyond its classical role in NOS1 activity regulation. In this study, we found that the protein levels of CAPON-S, but not than CAPON-L, were significantly decreased in glioma tissues. Therefore, we established lentivirus-mediated stable cell lines with CAPON-S overexpression or down-regulation, and investigated the role of CAPON-S in the proliferation of glioma cells by using CCK8, EdU, and flow cytometry assays. Overexpression of CAPON-S reduced the cell variability and the percentage of EdU-positive cells, and arrested the cells in the G1 phase in glioma cells. Silencing of CAPON by short-hairpin RNA showed the opposite effects. Furthermore, an intracellular signaling array revealed that overexpression of CAPON-S resulted in a remarkable reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein in glioma cells, which was further confirmed by Western blot. These findings suggest that CAPON may function as a tumor suppressor in human brain glioma and that the inactivation of the Akt signaling pathway caused by CAPON-S overexpression may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of CAPON in glioma cell proliferation. PMID:27869735

  12. Genetically engineered rat gliomas: PDGF-driven tumor initiation and progression in tv-a transgenic rats recreate key features of human brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Schneider, Craig S.; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Xu, Su; Galisteo, Rebeca; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Kim, Anthony J.; Simard, J. Marc; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Holland, Eric C.; Woodworth, Graeme F.

    2017-01-01

    Previously rodent preclinical research in gliomas frequently involved implantation of cell lines such as C6 and 9L into the rat brain. More recently, mouse models have taken over, the genetic manipulability of the mouse allowing the creation of genetically accurate models outweighed the disadvantage of its smaller brain size that limited time allowed for tumor progression. Here we illustrate a method that allows glioma formation in the rat using the replication competent avian-like sarcoma (RCAS) virus / tumor virus receptor-A (tv-a) transgenic system of post-natal cell type-specific gene transfer. The RCAS/tv-a model has emerged as a particularly versatile and accurate modeling technology by enabling spatial, temporal, and cell type-specific control of individual gene transformations and providing de novo formed glial tumors with distinct molecular subtypes mirroring human GBM. Nestin promoter-driven tv-a (Ntv-a) transgenic Sprague-Dawley rat founder lines were created and RCAS PDGFA and p53 shRNA constructs were used to initiate intracranial brain tumor formation. Tumor formation and progression were confirmed and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The tumors were analyzed using histopathological and immunofluorescent techniques. All experimental animals developed large, heterogeneous brain tumors that closely resembled human GBM. Median survival was 92 days from tumor initiation and 62 days from the first point of tumor visualization on MRI. Each tumor-bearing animal showed time dependent evidence of malignant progression to high-grade glioma by MRI and neurological examination. Post-mortem tumor analysis demonstrated the presence of several key characteristics of human GBM, including high levels of tumor cell proliferation, pseudopalisading necrosis, microvascular proliferation, invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, peri-tumoral reactive astrogliosis, lymphocyte infiltration, presence of numerous tumor

  13. PJ-34 inhibits PARP-1 expression and ERK phosphorylation in glioma-conditioned brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Motta, Carla; D'Angeli, Floriana; Scalia, Marina; Satriano, Cristina; Barbagallo, Davide; Naletova, Irina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella; Spina-Purrello, Vittoria

    2015-08-15

    Inhibitors of PARP-1(Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) act by competing with NAD(+), the enzyme physiological substrate, which play a protective role in many pathological conditions characterized by PARP-1 overactivation. It has been shown that PARP-1 also promotes tumor growth and progression through its DNA repair activity. Since angiogenesis is an essential requirement for these activities, we sought to determine whether PARP inhibition might affect rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (GP8.3) migration, stimulated by C6-glioma conditioned medium (CM). Through wound-healing experiments and MTT analysis, we demonstrated that PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 [N-(6-Oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide] abolishes the migratory response of GP8.3 cells and reduces their viability. PARP-1 also acts in a DNA independent way within the Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, which regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. By western analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM), we analyzed the effects of PJ-34 on PARP-1 expression, phospho-ERK and phospho-Elk-1 activation. The effect of MEK (mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-kinase) inhibitor PD98059 (2-(2-Amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4 H-1-benzopyran-4-one) on PARP-1 expression in unstimulated and in CM-stimulated GP8.3 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR. PARP-1 expression and phospho-ERK activation were significantly reduced by treatment of GP8.3 cells with PJ-34 or PD98059. By LSM, we further demonstrated that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK are coexpressed and share the same subcellular localization in GP8.3 cells, in the cytoplasm as well as in nucleoplasm. Based on these data, we propose that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK interact in the cytosol and then translocate to the nucleus, where they trigger a proliferative response. We also propose that PARP-1 inhibition blocks CM-induced endothelial migration by interfering with ERK signal-transduction pathway.

  14. Phase II study of thalidomide and radiation in children with newly diagnosed brain stem gliomas and glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher D; Chi, Susan; Marcus, Karen J; MacDonald, Tobey; Packer, Roger J; Poussaint, Tina Young; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Ullrich, Nicole; Goumnerova, Liliana C; Scott, R Michael; Briody, Caitlin; Chordas, Christine; Zimmerman, Mary Ann; Kieran, Mark W

    2007-03-01

    A phase II study was conducted to assess the efficacy of administering daily thalidomide concomitantly with radiation and continuing for up to 1 year following radiation in children with brain stem gliomas (BSG) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Secondary objectives were to obtain preliminary evidence of biologic activity of thalidomide and to evaluate toxicities from chronic administration of thalidomide in this population. Thirteen patients (2-14 years old) with newly diagnosed BSG (12 patients) or GBM (one patient) were enrolled between July 1999 and June 2000. All patients received focal radiotherapy to a total dose of 5,580 cGy. Thalidomide was administered once daily beginning on the first day of radiation and continued for 12 months or until the patient came off study. The starting dose was 12 mg/kg (rounded down to the nearest 50 mg) and was increased by 20% weekly, if tolerated, to 24 mg/kg or 1,000 mg (whichever was lower). Advanced imaging techniques and urine and serum analysis for anti-angiogenic markers were performed in some patients in an attempt to correlate changes with clinical effect of therapy. No patients completed the planned 12 months of thalidomide therapy and all have since died of disease progression. The median duration of therapy was 5 months (range 2-11 months). Nine patients came off study for progressive disease (PD), three patients due to toxicity and one patient withdrew consent. Several patients on this study required more extended courses of high dose steroids than would have been otherwise expected for this population due to significant peritumoral edema and necrosis. No consistent pattern emerged from the biologic correlative studies from 11 patients. However, advanced imaging with techniques such as MR spectroscopy, MR perfusion and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) were helpful in distinguishing growing tumor from treatment effect and necrosis in some patients. The median time to progression (TTP

  15. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  16. Functional analysis of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus implicates PHLDB1 and DDX6 in glioma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Rebekah; Woods, Nicholas T.; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Forsyth, Peter; Egan, Kathleen M.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is associated with poor prognosis. Genetic factors contributing to glioma risk have recently been investigated through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), implicating seven independent glioma risk loci in six chromosomal regions. Here, we performed an in-depth functional analysis of the risk locus proximal to the PHLDB1 gene on 11q23.3. We retrieved all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.2) with the glioma-associated SNP (rs498872) and performed a comprehensive bioinformatics and experimental functional analysis for the region. After testing candidate SNPs for allele-specific activity in a luciferase-based enhancer scanning assay, we established a subset of 10 functional SNPs in the promoters of PHLDB1 and DDX6, and in a putative enhancer element. Chromatin conformation capture (3C) identified a physical interaction between the enhancer element containing a functional SNP (rs73001406) and the promoter of the DDX6 gene. Knockdown experiments in cell culture and 3D assays to evaluate the role of PHLDB1 and DDX6 suggest that both genes may contribute to the phenotype. These studies reveal the functional landscape of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus and identify a network of functional SNPs in regulatory elements and two target genes as a possible mechanism driving glioma risk association. PMID:26610392

  17. Functional analysis of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus implicates PHLDB1 and DDX6 in glioma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Rebekah; Woods, Nicholas T; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Forsyth, Peter; Egan, Kathleen M; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2015-11-27

    Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is associated with poor prognosis. Genetic factors contributing to glioma risk have recently been investigated through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), implicating seven independent glioma risk loci in six chromosomal regions. Here, we performed an in-depth functional analysis of the risk locus proximal to the PHLDB1 gene on 11q23.3. We retrieved all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) ≥ 0.2) with the glioma-associated SNP (rs498872) and performed a comprehensive bioinformatics and experimental functional analysis for the region. After testing candidate SNPs for allele-specific activity in a luciferase-based enhancer scanning assay, we established a subset of 10 functional SNPs in the promoters of PHLDB1 and DDX6, and in a putative enhancer element. Chromatin conformation capture (3C) identified a physical interaction between the enhancer element containing a functional SNP (rs73001406) and the promoter of the DDX6 gene. Knockdown experiments in cell culture and 3D assays to evaluate the role of PHLDB1 and DDX6 suggest that both genes may contribute to the phenotype. These studies reveal the functional landscape of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus and identify a network of functional SNPs in regulatory elements and two target genes as a possible mechanism driving glioma risk association.

  18. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  19. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  20. An Interindividual Comparison of O-(2- [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)-L-Tyrosine (FET)- and L-[Methyl-{sup 11}C]Methionine (MET)-PET in Patients With Brain Gliomas and Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Astner, Sabrina T.; Riedel, Eva; Nieder, Carsten; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Heinemann, Felix; Schwaiger, Markus; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) has a high sensitivity and specificity for imaging of gliomas and metastatic brain tumors. The short half-life of {sup 11}C (20 minutes) limits the use of MET-PET to institutions with onsite cyclotron. O-(2- [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) is labeled with {sup 18}F (half-life, 120 minutes) and could be used much more broadly. This study compares the uptake of FET and MET in gliomas and metastases, as well as treatment-induced changes. Furthermore, it evaluates the gross tumor volume (GTV) of gliomas defined on PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: We examined 42 patients with pretreated gliomas (29 patients) or brain metastases (13 patients) prospectively by FET- and MET-PET on the same day. Uptake of FET and MET was quantified by standardized uptake values. Imaging contrast was assessed by calculating lesion-to-gray matter ratios. Tumor extension was quantified by contouring GTV in 17 patients with brain gliomas. Gross tumor volume on PET was compared with GTV on MRI. Sensitivity and specificity of MET- and FET-PET for differentiation of viable tumor from benign changes were evaluated by comparing the PET result with histology or clinical follow-up. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between standardized uptake values calculated for both tracers in cortex and lesions: r = 0.78 (p = 0.001) and r = 0.84 (p < 0.001), respectively. Image contrast was similar for MET- and FET-PET (lesion-to-gray matter ratios of 2.36 {+-} 1.01 and 2.33 {+-} 0.77, respectively). Mean GTV in 17 glioma patients was not significantly different on MET- and FET-PET. Both MET- and FET-PET delineated tumor tissue outside of MRI changes. Both tracers provided differentiated tumor tissue and treatment-related changes with a sensitivity of 91% at a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: O-(2- [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine-PET and MET-PET provide comparable diagnostic

  1. Targeted delivery of nano-PTX to the brain tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lei; Tao, Youhua; Payne, Gregory; Do, Linh; Thomas, Tima; Rodriguez, Juan; Dou, Huanyu

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing mixed lipid monolayer shell, biodegradable polymer core and rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) peptide as brain targeting ligand, were developed for brain targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to treat malignant glioma. RVG conjugated PTX loaded NPs (RVG-PTX-NPs) had the desirable size (~140 nm), narrow size distribution and spherical shape. RVG-PTX-NPs showed poor uptake by neurons and selective targeting to the brain tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) with controlled release and tumor specific toxicity. In vivo studies revealed that RVG-PTX-NPs were significant to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and had specific targeting to the brain. Most importantly, RVG-PTX-NPs showed effectiveness for anti-glioma therapy on human glioma of mice model. We concluded that RVG-PTX-NPs provided an effective approach for brain-TAMs targeted delivery for the treatment of glioma. PMID:28036254

  2. Precursor N-cadherin mediates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-promoted human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ye; Liu, Liyun; Zhu, Shuang; Zhang, Baole; Qin, Yuxia; Yao, Ruiqin; Zhou, Hao; Gao, Dian Shuai

    2017-02-12

    As the most prevalent primary brain tumor, gliomas are highly metastatic, invasive and are characteristic of high levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is an important factor for invasive glioma cell growth; however, the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, we affirm a significantly higher expression of the precursor of N-cadherin (proN-cadherin) in most gliomas compared with normal brain tissues. Our findings reveal that GDNF interacts with the extracellular domain of proN-cadherin, which suggests that proN-cadherin mediates GDNF-induced glioma cell migration and invasion. We hypothesize that proN-cadherin might cause homotypic adhesion loss within neighboring cells and at the same time promote heterotypic adhesion within the extracellular matrix (ECM) through a certain mechanism. This study also demonstrates that the interaction between GDNF and proN-cadherin activates specific intracellular signaling pathways; furthermore, GDNF promoted the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which degrades the ECM via proN-cadherin. To reach the future goal of developing novel therapies of glioma, this study, reveals a unique mechanism of glioma cell migration and invasion.

  3. [Controversy on treatments for gliomas].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1998-09-01

    Gliomas are representative primary malignant brain tumors, and with such tumors it is difficult to define the advanced stage. If the advanced stage indicates no curability by surgery alone, most gliomas would belong to this criterion because of their poor prognosis without any completely effective treatment. In this sense, no one could show a standard therapy to treat these unfortunate patients, for example, patients with glioblastoma, they could permit only 1 year survived even they had any applicable treatments to the lesions, these days. Treatment for low-grade gliomas has been most controversial for a long time, and no standard treatments have been determined so far. In this paper, as the treatment of low-grade gliomas it was intended to report what must be done for this patient and the present results of opinion survey for the treatment of gliomas which was done to professors of 80 institutes, from schools of medicine at all universities and medical colleges in Japan. For high-grade gliomas, some effectiveness of radiation therapy was disclosed as well as chemotherapy from recent papers. Gene therapy was also discussed briefly, its present status and future.

  4. Establishment and maintenance of a standardized glioma tissue bank: Huashan experience.

    PubMed

    Aibaidula, Abudumijiti; Lu, Jun-feng; Wu, Jin-song; Zou, He-jian; Chen, Hong; Wang, Yu-qian; Qin, Zhi-yong; Yao, Yu; Gong, Ye; Che, Xiao-ming; Zhong, Ping; Li, Shi-qi; Bao, Wei-min; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral glioma is the most common brain tumor as well as one of the top ten malignant tumors in human beings. In spite of the great progress on chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as the surgery strategies during the past decades, the mortality and morbidity are still high. One of the major challenges is to explore the pathogenesis and invasion of glioma at various "omics" levels (such as proteomics or genomics) and the clinical implications of biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis or treatment of glioma patients. Establishment of a standardized tissue bank with high quality biospecimens annotated with clinical information is pivotal to the solution of these questions as well as the drug development process and translational research on glioma. Therefore, based on previous experience of tissue banks, standardized protocols for sample collection and storage were developed. We also developed two systems for glioma patient and sample management, a local database for medical records and a local image database for medical images. For future set-up of a regional biobank network in Shanghai, we also founded a centralized database for medical records. Hence we established a standardized glioma tissue bank with sufficient clinical data and medical images in Huashan Hospital. By September, 2013, tissues samples from 1,326 cases were collected. Histological diagnosis revealed that 73 % were astrocytic tumors, 17 % were oligodendroglial tumors, 2 % were oligoastrocytic tumors, 4 % were ependymal tumors and 4 % were other central nervous system neoplasms.

  5. Relationship between Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 binding and nucleolar organizer regions in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, S; Hara, A; Shirakami, S; Zhang, W; Sakai, N; Yamada, H; Shimokawa, K

    1993-06-01

    Histochemical staining using lectins from Ricinus communis (RCA-1), Arachis hypogaea, and Canavalia ensiformis was investigated in 40 human gliomas, three central neurocytomas, one human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR-32), and two normal brain tissues. Staining was uniform in low-grade gliomas, but heterogeneous in high-grade gliomas, particularly with RCA-1. The correlation between RCA-1 reactivity and cellular proliferative potential was investigated in 10 high-grade gliomas using a combined staining technique: the silver colloid method for nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs) and histochemistry with RCA-1. The mean number of Ag-NORs counted on a simple preparation was significantly greater in the nuclei of RCA-1-negative cells than in those of RCA-1-positive cells (p < 0.001). The staining intensity of inflammatory cells was obviously higher than that of neoplastic cells, and therefore inflammatory cells were easily discriminated from neoplastic cells. Combined RCA-1 histochemical and Ag-NOR silver colloid staining revealed heterogeneous expression of RCA-1 receptor in high-grade gliomas with changes in Ag-NOR number. This result seems to show that high-grade gliomas express heterogeneous cellular carbohydrate structure and proliferative potential even within the same tumor.

  6. Discrimination between two different grades of human glioma based on blood vessel infrared spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Forfar, Isabelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2015-09-01

    Gliomas are brain tumours classified into four grades with increasing malignancy from I to IV. The development and the progression of malignant glioma largely depend on the tumour vascularization. Due to their tissue heterogeneity, glioma cases can be difficult to classify into a specific grade using the gold standard of histological observation, hence the need to base classification on a quantitative and reliable analytical method for accurately grading the disease. Previous works focused specifically on vascularization study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proving this method to be a way forward to detect biochemical changes in the tumour tissue not detectable by visual techniques. In this project, we employed FTIR imaging using a focal plane array (FPA) detector and globar source to analyse large areas of glioma tumour tissue sections via molecular fingerprinting in view of helping to define markers of the tumour grade. Unsupervised multivariate analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis) of blood vessel spectral data, retrieved from the FPA images, revealed the fine structure of the borderline between two areas identified by a pathologist as grades III and IV. Spectroscopic indicators are found capable of discriminating different areas in the tumour tissue and are proposed as biomolecular markers for potential future use of grading gliomas. Graphical Abstract Infrared imaging of glioma blood vessels provides a means to revise the pathologists' line of demarcation separating grade III (GIII) from grade IV (GIV) parts.

  7. A neurocentric perspective on glioma invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Robel, Stefanie; Watkins, Stacey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are devastating tumours that frequently kill patients within 1 year of diagnosis. The major obstacle to a cure is diffuse invasion, which enables tumours to escape complete surgical resection and chemo- and radiation therapy. Gliomas use the same tortuous extracellular routes of migration that are travelled by immature neurons and stem cells, frequently using blood vessels as guides. They repurpose ion channels to dynamically adjust their cell volume to accommodate to narrow spaces and breach the blood-brain barrier through disruption of astrocytic endfeet, which envelop blood vessels. The unique biology of glioma invasion provides hitherto unexplored brain-specific therapeutic targets for this devastating disease. PMID:24946761

  8. Glioma-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) promotes mast cell recruitment in a STAT5-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Põlajeva, Jelena; Bergström, Tobias; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Lundequist, Anders; Sjösten, Anna; Nilsson, Gunnar; Smits, Anja; Bergqvist, Michael; Pontén, Fredrik; Westermark, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar; Forsberg Nilsson, Karin; Tchougounova, Elena

    2014-02-01

    Recently, glioma research has increased its focus on the diverse types of cells present in brain tumors. We observed previously that gliomas are associated with a profound accumulation of mast cells (MCs) and here we investigate the underlying mechanism. Gliomas express a plethora of chemoattractants. First, we demonstrated pronounced migration of human MCs toward conditioned medium from cultures of glioma cell lines. Subsequent cytokine array analyses of media from cells, cultured in either serum-containing or -free conditions, revealed a number of candidates which were secreted in high amounts in both cell lines. Among these, we then focused on macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which has been reported to be pro-inflammatory and -tumorigenic. Infiltration of MCs was attenuated by antibodies that neutralized MIF. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of MIF in a large cohort of human glioma tissue samples was observed. Further, both glioma-conditioned media and purified MIF promoted differential phosphorylation of a number of signaling molecules, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), in MCs. Inhibition of pSTAT5 signaling significantly attenuated the migration of MCs toward glioma cell-conditioned medium shown to contain MIF. In addition, analysis of tissue microarrays (TMAs) of high-grade gliomas revealed a direct correlation between the level of pSTAT5 in MCs and the level of MIF in the medium. In conclusion, these findings indicate the important influence of signaling cascades involving MIF and STAT5 on the recruitment of MCs to gliomas.

  9. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined.

  10. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate (r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM(-1) s(-1). In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian

  11. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate ( r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM-1 s-1. In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian blue staining of the section clearly

  12. Overexpression of CAP1 and its significance in tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue-Chao; Cui, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Yi-Shuo; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Meng; Yu, Jin-Song; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2016-09-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), a protein related to the regulation of actin filaments and the Ras/cAMP pathway, is associated with tumor progression. Nevertheless, the expression level and effects of CAP1 in regards to glioma have not been reported. In the present study, we examined the expression of CAP1 in glioma and tumor adjacent normal brain tissues by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that CAP1 was overexpressed in glioma tissues in comparison with that noted in the tumor adjacent normal brain tissues and increased staining of CAP1 was found to be correlated with WHO stage. In addition, we discovered that knockdown of CAP1 by specific RNA interference markedly inhibited cell growth and caused downregulation of the proliferation markers, PCNA and cyclin A. We further demonstrated that knockdown of CAP1 inhibited cell metastatic abilities by downregulating N-cadherin and vimentin and upregulating E-cadherin. These findings revealed that CAP1 expression is markedly increased in human glioma and that downregulation of CAP1 in tumors may serve as a treatment for glioma patients.

  13. Covert Waking Brain Activity Reveals Instantaneous Sleep Depth

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Scott M.; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Solet, Jo M.; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8–13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise—a measure of sleep depth—throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep. PMID:21408616

  14. Incidence of gliomas by anatomic location

    PubMed Central

    Larjavaara, Suvi; Mäntylä, Riitta; Salminen, Tiina; Haapasalo, Hannu; Raitanen, Jani; Jääskeläinen, Juha; Auvinen, Anssi

    2007-01-01

    The anatomic location of a glioma influences prognosis and treatment options. The aim of our study was to describe the distribution of gliomas in different anatomic areas of the brain. A representative population-based sample of 331 adults with glioma was used for preliminary analyses. The anatomic locations for 89 patients from a single center were analyzed in more detail from radiologic imaging and recorded on a three-dimensional 1 × 1 × 1– cm grid. The age-standardized incidence rate of gliomas was 4.7 per 100,000 person-years. The most frequent subtypes were glioblastoma (47%) and grade II–III astrocytoma (23%), followed by oligodendroglioma and mixed glioma. The gliomas were located in the frontal lobe in 40% of the cases, temporal in 29%, parietal in 14%, and occipital lobe in 3%, with 14% in the deeper structures. The difference in distribution between lobes remained after adjustment for their tissue volume: the tumor:volume ratio was 4.5 for frontal, 4.8 for temporal, and 2.3 for parietal relative to the occipital lobe. The area with the densest occurrence was the anterior subcortical brain. Statistically significant spatial clustering was found in the three-dimensional analysis. No differences in location were found among glioblastoma, diffuse astrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma. Our results demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the anatomic distribution of gliomas within the brain. PMID:17522333

  15. The impact of coexisting genetic mutations on murine optic glioma biology

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome are prone to the development of optic pathway gliomas resulting from biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene. Recent studies have revealed the presence of other molecular alterations in a small portion of these NF1-associated brain tumors. The purpose of this study was to leverage Nf1 genetically engineered mouse strains to define the functional significance of these changes to optic glioma biology. Methods Nf1+/− mice were intercrossed with Nf1flox/flox mice, which were then crossed with Nf1flox/flox; GFAP-Cre mice, to generate Nf1flox/mut; GFAP-Cre (FMC) mice. These mice were additionally mated with conditional KIAA1549:BRAF knock-in or Ptenflox/wt mice to generate Nf1flox/mut; f-BRAF; GFAP-Cre (FMBC) mice or Nf1flox/mut; Ptenflox/wt; GFAP-Cre (FMPC) mice, respectively. The resulting optic gliomas were analyzed for changes in tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell loss. Results While KIAA1549:BRAF conferred no additional biological properties on Nf1 optic glioma, FMPC mice had larger optic gliomas with greater proliferative indices and microglial infiltration. In addition, all 3 Nf1 murine optic glioma strains exhibited reduced retinal ganglion cell survival and numbers; however, FMPC mice had greater retinal nerve fiber layer thinning near the optic head relative to FMC and FMBC mice. Conclusions Collectively, these experiments demonstrate genetic cooperativity between Nf1 loss and Pten heterozygosity relevant to optic glioma biology and further underscore the value of employing genetically engineered mouse strains to define the contribution of discovered molecular alterations to brain tumor pathogenesis. PMID:25246427

  16. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-10-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes.

  17. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  18. A mathematical model of pre-diagnostic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Marc; Hao, Wenrui; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Rempala, Grzegorz A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their location, the malignant gliomas of the brain in humans are very difficult to treat in advanced stages. Blood-based biomarkers for glioma are needed for more accurate evaluation of treatment response as well as early diagnosis. However, biomarker research in primary brain tumors is challenging given their relative rarity and genetic diversity. It is further complicated by variations in the permeability of the blood brain barrier that affects the amount of marker released into the bloodstream. Inspired by recent temporal data indicating a possible decrease in serum glucose levels in patients with gliomas yet to be diagnosed, we present an ordinary differential equation model to capture early stage glioma growth. The model contains glioma-glucose-immune interactions and poses a potential mechanism by which this glucose drop can be explained. We present numerical simulations, parameter sensitivity analysis, linear stability analysis and a numerical experiment whereby we show how a dormant glioma can become malignant. PMID:26073722

  19. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Haruka; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Okada, Atsumasa; Hirata, Nobue; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs)-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs) were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM), in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs) to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals. PMID:26061227

  20. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  1. Surgical management of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; Straus, David; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Low-grade gliomas represent a wide spectrum of intra-axial brain tumors with diverse presentations, radiographic and surgical appearances, and prognoses. While there remains a role for biopsy, a growing body of evidence shows that aggressive surgical resection of low-grade gliomas may improve symptoms, extend progression-free survival (PFS), and even cure a select few patients. With the application of preoperative functional imaging, intraoperative navigation, and cortical stimulation, neurosurgeons are able to perform more complete resections while limiting the risk to patients. In this article, we describe the surgical management and current operative techniques used in the treatment of low-grade gliomas.

  2. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  3. Inherited predisposition to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kyritsis, Athanassios P.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rao, Jasti S.; Sioka, Chrissa

    2010-01-01

    In gliomas, germline gene alterations play a significant role during malignant transformation of progenitor glial cells, at least for families with occurrence of multiple cancers or with specific hereditary cancer syndromes. Scientific evidence during the last few years has revealed several constitutive genetic abnormalities that may influence glioma formation. These germline abnormalities are manifested as either gene polymorphisms or hemizygous mutations of key regulatory genes that are involved either in DNA repair or in apoptosis. Such changes, among others, include hemizygous alterations of the neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and p53 genes that are involved in apoptotic pathways, and alterations in multiple DNA repair genes such as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, x-ray cross-complementary genes (XRCC), and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) genes. Subsequent cellular changes include somatic mutations in cell cycle regulatory genes and genes involved in angiogenesis and invasion, leading eventually to tumor formation in various stages. Future molecular diagnosis may identify new genomic regions that could harbor genes important for glioma predisposition and aid in the early diagnosis of these patients and genetic counseling of their families. PMID:20150373

  4. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  5. Early and late stage positron emission tomography (PET) studies on the haemocirculation and metabolism of seemingly normal brain tissue in patients with gliomas following radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mineura, K; Suda, Y; Yasuda, T; Kowada, M; Ogawa, T; Shishido, F; Uemura, K

    1988-01-01

    Haemocirculatory and metabolic changes in seemingly normal brain tissue following radiochemotherapy including nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) and tegafur (FT) were analyzed using oxygen-15 and fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (PET) in seven patients with gliomas. At an early stage (within one month) after radiochemotherapy, marginal increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were found contralateral to the tumour in gray matter which was apparently normal brain structure, as seen on computerized tomography (CT). The oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05 by a paired-t test) from that of the pretreatment study, due to surgical decompression and radiochemotherapy. At the late stage (three to thirty-one months with a mean of thirteen months), rCBF decreased significantly from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); oxygen consumption (rCMRO2) fell in all cases significantly from the pretreatment study (p less than 0.01) and from the early stage study (p less than 0.05); consequently, rOEF remained unchanged at a level similar to the early stage study. Glucose consumption (rCMRG1) increased slightly as compared with the early stage study but failed to be restored to the level of the pretreatment study. Noteworthy was a coupling reduction of rCBF and rCMRO2--presumably, a late delayed effect of radiochemotherapy. These preliminary results indicate that with PET studies it may be possible to predict damage to normal brain tissue after radiochemotherapy.

  6. Impact of epidemiological characteristics of supratentorial gliomas in adults brought about by the 2016 world health organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihui; Cui, Yong; Wang, Junmei; Lin, Song

    2016-11-24

    The latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) integrates both histological and molecular features in the definition of diagnostic entities. This new approach enrolls novel entities of gliomas. In this study, we aimed to reveal the epidemiological characteristics, including age at diagnosis, gender ratio, tumor distribution and survival, of these new entities. We retrospectively reclassified 1210 glioma samples according to the 2016 CNS WHO diagnostic criteria. In our cohort, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with wildtype isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) was the most common malignant tumor in the brain. Almost all gliomas were more prevalent in males, especially in the cluster of WHO grade III gliomas and IDH-wildtype GBM. Age at diagnosis was directly proportional to tumor grade. With respect to the distribution by histology, we found that gliomas concurrent with IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted or with single IDH-mutant were mainly distributed in frontal lobe, while those with IDH-wildtype were dominant in temporal lobe. Lesions located in insular lobe were more likely to be IDH-mutant astrocytoma. In summary, our results elucidated the epidemiological characteristics as well as the regional constituents of these new gliomas entities, which could bring insights into tumorigenesis and personalized treatment of Chinese glioma population.

  7. D-amino acid oxidase gene therapy sensitizes glioma cells to the antiglycolytic effect of 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; Abou El-Magd, R M; Shishido, Y; Chung, S P; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-01-01

    Glioma tumors are refractory to conventional treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive type of primary brain tumors in humans. In this study, we introduce oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy as a new suggested treatment for glioblastoma. OSED utilizes D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), which is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress and apoptosis through generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). OSED combines DAO with 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II (HK II) inhibitor that interferes with Warburg effect, a metabolic alteration of most tumor cells that is characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Our data revealed that 3BP induced depletion of energetic capabilities of glioma cells. 3BP induced H2O2 production as a novel mechanism of its action. C6 glioma transfected with DAO and treated with D-serine together with 3BP-sensitized glioma cells to 3BP and decreased markedly proliferation, clonogenic power and viability in a three-dimensional tumor model with lesser effect on normal astrocytes. DAO gene therapy using atelocollagen as an in vivo transfection agent proved effective in a glioma tumor model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, especially after combination with 3BP. OSED treatment was safe and tolerable in SD rats. OSED therapy may be a promising therapeutic modality for glioma.

  8. Progression of motor deficits in glioma-bearing mice: impact of CNF1 therapy at symptomatic stages.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Eleonora; Maltese, Federica; Olimpico, Francesco; Fabbri, Alessia; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo; Baroncelli, Laura

    2017-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain tumor. In this context, animal models represent excellent tools for the early detection and longitudinal mapping of neuronal dysfunction, that are critical in the preclinical validation of new therapeutic strategies. In a mouse glioma model, we developed sensitive behavioral readouts that allow early recognizing and following neurological symptoms. We injected GL261 cells into the primary motor cortex of syngenic mice and we used a battery of behavioral tests to longitudinally monitor the dysfunction induced by tumor growth. Grip strength test revealed an early onset of functional deficit associated to the glioma growth, with a significant forelimb weakness appearing 9 days after tumor inoculation. A later deficit was observed in the rotarod and in the grid walk tasks. Using this model, we found reduced tumor growth and maintenance of behavioral functions following treatment with Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) at a symptomatic stage. Our data provide a detailed and precise examination of how tumor growth reverberates on the behavioral functions of glioma-bearing mice, providing normative data for the study of therapeutic strategies for glioma treatment. The reduced tumor volume and robust functional sparing observed in CNF1-treated, glioma-bearing mice strengthen the notion that CNF1 delivery is a promising strategy for glioma therapy.

  9. Rapid and fulminant leptomeningeal spread following radiotherapy in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Tinkle, Christopher L; Orr, Brent A; Lucas, John T; Klimo, Paul; Patay, Zoltan; Baker, Suzanne J; Broniscer, Alberto; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2017-01-13

    A 4-year-old male presented with rapid-onset cranial nerve palsy and ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pontine mass lesion with discordant conventional and advanced imaging. A stereotactic core biopsy revealed glioblastoma with immunostaining suggestive of histone H3K27M and TP53 mutation, consistent with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. MRI 3 months after radiotherapy revealed extensive new leptomeningeal metastatic disease involving both the supra- and infratentorial brain, as well as the imaged portion of the spine. Tissue procured at the time of needle biopsy has undergone striking in vivo expansion as an orthotopic xenograft.

  10. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  11. T Cells Enhance Stem-Like Properties and Conditional Malignancy in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Dwain K.; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Duvall, Gretchen; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Zhai, Yuying; Sarayba, Danielle; Seksenyan, Akop; Panwar, Akanksha; Black, Keith L.; Wheeler, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Small populations of highly tumorigenic stem-like cells (cancer stem cells; CSCs) can exist within, and uniquely regenerate cancers including malignant brain tumors (gliomas). Many aspects of glioma CSCs (GSCs), however, have been characterized in non-physiological settings. Methods We found gene expression similarity superiorly defined glioma “stemness”, and revealed that GSC similarity increased with lower tumor grade. Using this method, we examined stemness in human grade IV gliomas (GBM) before and after dendritic cell (DC) vaccine therapy. This was followed by gene expression, phenotypic and functional analysis of murine GL26 tumors recovered from nude, wild-type, or DC-vaccinated host brains. Results GSC similarity was specifically increased in post-vaccine GBMs, and correlated best to vaccine-altered gene expression and endogenous anti-tumor T cell activity. GL26 analysis confirmed immune alterations, specific acquisition of stem cell markers, specifically enhanced sensitivity to anti-stem drug (cyclopamine), and enhanced tumorigenicity in wild-type hosts, in tumors in proportion to anti-tumor T cell activity. Nevertheless, vaccine-exposed GL26 cells were no more tumorigenic than parental GL26 in T cell-deficient hosts, though they otherwise appeared similar to GSCs enriched by chemotherapy. Finally, vaccine-exposed GBM and GL26 exhibited relatively homogeneous expression of genes expressed in progenitor cells and/or differentiation. Conclusions T cell activity represents an inducible physiological process capable of proportionally enriching GSCs in human and mouse gliomas. Stem-like gliomas enriched by strong T cell activity, however, may differ from other GSCs in that their stem-like properties may be disassociated from increased tumor malignancy and heterogeneity under specific host immune conditions. PMID:20539758

  12. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  13. Erythropoietin Augments Survival of Glioma Cells After Radiation and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouna, Imam; Sperling, Swetlana; Kim, Ella; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Despite beneficial effects of irradiation/chemotherapy on survival of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, collateral damage to intact neural tissue leads to 'radiochemobrain' and reduced quality of life in survivors. For prophylactic neuroprotection, erythropoietin (EPO) is a promising candidate, provided that concerns regarding potential tumor promoting effects are alleviated. Methods and Materials: Human GBM-derived cell lines U87, G44, G112, and the gliosarcoma-derived line G28 were treated with EPO, with and without combinations of irradiation or temozolomide (TMZ). Responsiveness of glioma cells to EPO was measured by cell migration from spheroids, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival. Implantation of U87 cells into brains of nude mice, followed 5 days later by EPO treatment (5,000 U/kg intraperitoneal every other day for 2 weeks) should reveal effects of EPO on tumor growth in vivo. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed for EPOR, HIF-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)vIII in cell lines and 22 human GBM specimens. Results: EPO did not modulate basal glioma cell migration and stimulated proliferation in only one of four cell lines. Importantly, EPO did not enhance tumor growth in mouse brains. Preincubation of glioma cells with EPO for 3 h, followed by irradiation and TMZ for another 24 h, resulted in protection against chemoradiation-induced cytotoxicity in three cell lines. Conversely, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in survival of G28 gliosarcoma cells. In GBM specimens, expression of HIF-1{alpha} correlated positively with expression of EPOR and EGFRvIII. EPOR and EGFRvIII expression did not correlate. Conclusions: EPO is unlikely to appreciably influence basal glioma growth. However, concomitant use of EPO with irradiation/chemotherapy in GBM patients is not advisable.

  14. FANCD2 re-expression is associated with glioma grade and chemical inhibition of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway sensitises gliomas to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Patil, Abhijit A; Sayal, Parag; Depondt, Marie-Lise; Beveridge, Ryan D; Roylance, Anthony; Kriplani, Deepti H; Myers, Katie N; Cox, Angela; Jellinek, David; Fernando, Malee; Carroll, Thomas A; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-08-15

    Brain tumours kill more children and adults under 40 than any other cancer. Around half of primary brain tumours are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs) where treatment remains a significant challenge, where survival rates have improved little over the last 40 years, thus highlighting an unmet need for the identification/development of novel therapeutic targets and agents to improve GBM treatment. Using archived and fresh glioma tissue, we show that in contrast to normal brain or benign schwannomas GBMs exhibit re-expression of FANCD2, a key protein of the Fanconi Anaemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, and possess an active FA pathway. Importantly, FANCD2 expression levels are strongly associated with tumour grade, revealing a potential exploitable therapeutic window to allow inhibition of the FA pathway in tumour cells, whilst sparing normal brain tissue. Using several small molecule inhibitors of the FA pathway in combination with isogenic FA-proficient/deficient glioma cell lines as well as primary GBM cultures, we demonstrate that inhibition of the FA pathway sensitises gliomas to the chemotherapeutic agents Temozolomide and Carmustine. Our findings therefore provide a strong rationale for the development of novel and potent inhibitors of the FA pathway to improve the treatment of GBMs, which may ultimately impact on patient outcome.

  15. FANCD2 re-expression is associated with glioma grade and chemical inhibition of the Fanconi Anaemia pathway sensitises gliomas to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Sayal, Parag; Depondt, Marie-Lise; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Roylance, Anthony; Kriplani, Deepti H.; Myers, Katie N.; Cox, Angela; Jellinek, David; Fernando, Malee; Carroll, Thomas A.; Collis, Spencer J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumours kill more children and adults under 40 than any other cancer. Around half of primary brain tumours are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs) where treatment remains a significant challenge. GBM survival rates have improved little over the last 40 years, thus highlighting an unmet need for the identification/development of novel therapeutic targets and agents to improve GBM treatment. Using archived and fresh glioma tissue, we show that in contrast to normal brain or benign schwannomas GBMs exhibit re-expression of FANCD2, a key protein of the Fanconi Anaemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, and possess an active FA pathway. Importantly, FANCD2 expression levels are strongly associated with tumour grade, revealing a potential exploitable therapeutic window to allow inhibition of the FA pathway in tumour cells, whilst sparing normal brain tissue. Using several small molecule inhibitors of the FA pathway in combination with isogenic FA-proficient/deficient glioma cell lines as well as primary GBM cultures, we demonstrate that inhibition of the FA pathway sensitises gliomas to the chemotherapeutic agents Temozolomide and Carmustine. Our findings therefore provide a strong rationale for the development of novel and potent inhibitors of the FA pathway to improve the treatment of GBMs, which may ultimately impact on patient outcome. PMID:25071006

  16. Microglia-glioma cross-talk: a two way approach to new strategies against glioma.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Cataldo; Fioretti, Bernard; Bianchi, Roberta; Mecca, Carmen; Tubaro, Claudia; Beccari, Tommaso; Franciolini, Fabio; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant and aggressive among primary brain tumors, characterized by very low life expectancy. In vivo, glioma and glioblastoma in particular contain large numbers of immune cells (myeloid cells) such as microglia and tumour-infiltrating macrophages (or glioma associated macrophages). These glioma-infiltrating myeloid cells comprise up to 30% of total tumor mass and have been suggested to play several roles in glioma progression including proliferation, survival, motility and immunosuppression. Although tumor microglia and macrophages can acquire proinflammatory (M1) phenotype being capable of releasing proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosing and presenting antigens, their effector immune function in gliomas appears to be suppressed by the acquisition of an anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. In the present work we review the microglia-glioma interactions to highlight the close relationship between the two cell types and the factors that can influence their properties (chemokines, cytokines, S100B protein). A future therapeutic possibility might be to simultaneously targeting, for example with nanomedicine, glioma cells and microglia to push the microglia towards an antitumor phenotype (M1) and/or prevent glioma cells from "conditioning" by microglia.

  17. Dissection of the Process of Brain Metastasis Reveals Targets and Mechanisms for Molecular-based Intervention.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Birzele, Fabian; Kollmorgen, Gwendlyn; Rüger, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases outnumber the incidence of brain tumors by a factor of ten. Patients with brain metastases have a dismal prognosis and current treatment modalities achieve only a modest clinical benefit. We discuss the process of brain metastasis with respect to mechanisms and involved targets to outline options for therapeutic intervention and focus on breast and lung cancer, as well as melanoma. We describe the process of penetration of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) by disseminated tumor cells, establishment of a metastatic niche, colonization and outgrowth in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in colonization of the brain parenchyma, interactions of extravasated tumor cells with microglia and astrocytes, as well as their propensity for neuromimicry, is discussed. We outline targets suitable for prevention of metastasis and summarize targets suitable for treatment of established brain metastases. Finally, we highlight the implications of findings revealing druggable mutations in brain metastases that cannot be identified in matching primary tumors.

  18. Novel paracrine modulation of Notch-DLL4 signaling by fibulin-3 promotes angiogenesis in high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan E.; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J.; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2014-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are characterized by exuberant vascularization, diffuse invasion and significant chemoresistance, resulting in a recurrent phenotype that makes them impossible to eradicate in the long-term. Targeting pro-tumoral signals in the glioma microenvironment could have significant impact against tumor cells and the supporting niche that facilitates their growth. Fibulin-3 is a protein secreted by glioma cells, but absent in normal brain, that promotes tumor invasion and survival. We show here that fibulin-3 is a paracrine activator of Notch signaling in endothelial cells and promotes glioma angiogenesis. Fibulin-3 overexpression increased tumor VEGF levels, microvascular density, and vessel permeability, while fibulin-3 knockdown reduced vessel density in xenograft models of glioma. Fibulin-3 localization in human glioblastomas showed dense fiber-like condensations around tumor blood vessels, which were absent in normal brain, suggesting a remarkable association of this protein with tumor endothelium. At the cellular level, fibulin-3 enhanced endothelial cell motility and association to glioma cells, reduced endothelial cell sprouting, and increased formation of endothelial tubules, in a VEGF-independent and Notch-dependent manner. Fibulin-3 increased ADAM10/17 activity in endothelial cells by inhibiting the metalloprotease inhibitor TIMP3; this resulted in increased Notch cleavage and increased expression of DLL4 independently of VEGF signaling. Inhibition of ADAM10/17 or knockdown of DLL4 reduced the pro-angiogenic effects of fibulin-3 in culture. Taken together, these results reveal a novel, pro-angiogenic role of fibulin-3 in gliomas, highlighting the relevance of this protein as an important molecular target in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25139440

  19. Delivery of a peptide-drug conjugate targeting the blood brain barrier improved the efficacy of paclitaxel against glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Xuemin; Gong, Min; Zhang, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to the brain has created an entire field of active research devoted to overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently delivering drugs to the brain. Angiopep-2 can trigger transcytosis and traverse the BBB by recognizing low-density lipoprotein related protein-1 (LRP-1) expressed on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Here, we designed a novel strategy for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The novel drug delivery system was a combination of a receptor-targeting ligand, such as low-density lipoprotein related protein 1, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was hypothesized that this conjugate will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB and increase the permeability of a solid tumor. Our findings indicate that the combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle significantly improved translocation of small molecules (paclitaxel) into the brain compared to the vehicle treatment, which contained only receptor-targeting ligand. The application of this strategy could potentially expand the horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27765902

  20. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  1. EFEMP2 is upregulated in gliomas and promotes glioma cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao; Tian, Daofeng; Xu, Haitao; Cai, Qiang; Liu, Baohui; Deng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor. Although EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2), an extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein, is regarded as a candidate oncogene, little is known about the association of EFEMP2 and gliomas. Here, the expression of EFEMP2 was significantly increased in glioma tissues (n=60) compared to non-tumorous brain tissues (n=25). Silencing of EFEMP2 expression through RNA interference in two glioma cell lines (U87 and U373) remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and G1/S transition. More importantly, EFEMP2 silencing significantly induced cell apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bax and Bcl-2. Additionally, knockdown of EFEMP2 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of both glioma cells, which was associated with the downregulated expression of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. In conclusion, expression of EFEMP2 was associated with the oncogenic potential of gliomas and silencing of its expression can suppress cancer cell growth and metastasis. Inhibition of EFEMP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for gliomas. PMID:26617746

  2. CD133 Expression Is Not Synonymous to Immunoreactivity for AC133 and Fluctuates throughout the Cell Cycle in Glioma Stem-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Renovanz, Mirjam; Eich, Marcus; Braukmann, Alina; Sprang, Bettina; Spirin, Pavel; Pardo, Luis A; Giese, Alf; Kim, Ella L

    2015-01-01

    A transmembrane protein CD133 has been implicated as a marker of stem-like glioma cells and predictor for therapeutic response in malignant brain tumours. CD133 expression is commonly evaluated by using antibodies specific for the AC133 epitope located in one of the extracellular domains of membrane-bound CD133. There is conflicting evidence regarding the significance of the AC133 epitope as a marker for identifying stem-like glioma cells and predicting the degree of malignancy in glioma cells. The reasons for discrepant results between different studies addressing the role of CD133/AC133 in gliomas are unclear. A possible source for controversies about CD133/AC133 is the widespread assumption that expression patterns of the AC133 epitope reflect linearly those of the CD133 protein. Consequently, the readouts from AC133 assessments are often interpreted in terms of the CD133 protein. The purpose of this study is to determine whether and to what extent do the readouts obtained with anti-AC133 antibody correspond to the level of CD133 protein expressed in stem-like glioma cells. Our study reveals for the first time that CD133 expressed on the surface of glioma cells is poorly immunoreactive for AC133. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the level of CD133 occupancy on the surface of glioma cells fluctuates during the cell cycle. Our results offer a new explanation for numerous inconsistencies regarding the biological and clinical significance of CD133/AC133 in human gliomas and call for caution in interpreting the lack or presence of AC133 epitope in glioma cells.

  3. Tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in glioma cells by suppressing miR-155 expression and activating FBXW7 function

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuanzhu; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Jinquan; Lv, Mingliang; Niu, Haitao; Tian, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The human metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA associated with metastasis, and is a favorable prognostic factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have shown that MALAT1 plays an important role in many malignancies. However, little is known about the role of MALAT1 in glioma. In this study, we determined the expression of MALAT1 and explored its prognostic value in glioma. Further, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of MALAT1 in glioma progression. Our results showed that the expression of MALAT1 was significantly decreased in glioma specimens than in noncancerous brain tissues. In addition, MALAT1 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size, WHO grade and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), and was an independent prognostic factor for survival of glioma patients. The gain- and loss-of-function experiments revealed miR-155 down-regulation by MALAT1, resulting in reciprocal effects. Further, MALAT1 suppresses cell viability by down-regulating miR-155. FBXW7 mRNA was identified as a direct target of miR-155 in glioma. The miR-155-induced tumorigenesis is mediated through FBXW7 function. Finally, we found that MALAT1 positively regulated FBXW7 expression, which was responsible for glioma progression mediated by MALAT1-miR-155 pathway. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that MALAT1 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in glioma. Restoration of MALAT1 levels represents a novel therapeutic strategy against glioma. PMID:27904771

  4. Inference of Low and High-Grade Glioma Gene Regulatory Networks Delineates the Role of Rnd3 in Establishing Multiple Hallmarks of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Kim; Daubon, Thomas; Turan, Nil; Soulet, Fabienne; Mohd Zahari, Maihafizah; Ryan, Katie R; Durant, Sarah; He, Shan; Herbert, John; Ankers, John; Heath, John K; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Bicknell, Roy; Hotchin, Neil A; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Gliomas are a highly heterogeneous group of brain tumours that are refractory to treatment, highly invasive and pro-angiogenic. Glioblastoma patients have an average survival time of less than 15 months. Understanding the molecular basis of different grades of glioma, from well differentiated, low-grade tumours to high-grade tumours, is a key step in defining new therapeutic targets. Here we use a data-driven approach to learn the structure of gene regulatory networks from observational data and use the resulting models to formulate hypothesis on the molecular determinants of glioma stage. Remarkably, integration of available knowledge with functional genomics datasets representing clinical and pre-clinical studies reveals important properties within the regulatory circuits controlling low and high-grade glioma. Our analyses first show that low and high-grade gliomas are characterised by a switch in activity of two subsets of Rho GTPases. The first one is involved in maintaining normal glial cell function, while the second is linked to the establishment of multiple hallmarks of cancer. Next, the development and application of a novel data integration methodology reveals novel functions of RND3 in controlling glioma cell migration, invasion, proliferation, angiogenesis and clinical outcome.

  5. Long Noncoding RNA MEG3 Suppresses Glioma Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion By Acting As Competing Endogenous RNA of MiR-19a.

    PubMed

    Tong, Gui-Feng; Qin, Nan; Sun, Li-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Lin

    2017-03-08

    Glioma, with varying malignancy grades and histological subtypes, is the commonest primary brain tumor in adults. Longnon-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts and have been proven to play important roles in tumorigenesis. Our study aims to elucidate the combined effect of lncRNA MEG3 and microRNA-19a in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Real time PCR revealed that MEG3 was down-regulated and miR-19a was up-regulated in malignant glioma tissues and cell lines. Bioinformatics analyses (TargetScan, miRanda and starBase V2.0) showed that PTEN is a target of miR-19a with complementary binding sites in the 3'-UTR. As expected, luciferase results verify the putative target site and also reveal the complementary binding between miR-19a and MEG3. MiR-19a represses the expression of PTEN and promotes glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. However, MEG3 could directly bind to miR-19a and effectively act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-19a to suppress tumorigenesis. Our data firstly demonstrates that lncRNA MEG3 suppresses glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion via acting as competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) of miR-19a, which provides a novel insight about the pathogenesis of glioma.

  6. Depot delivery of dexamethasone and cediranib for the treatment of brain tumor associated edema in an intracranial rat glioma model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Qunya; Hochberg, Fred H; Cima, Michael J

    2015-11-10

    Treatments of brain tumor associated edema with systemically delivered dexamethasone, the standard of care, and cediranib, a novel anti-edema agent, are associated with systemic toxicities in brain tumor patients. A tunable, reservoir-based drug delivery device was developed to investigate the effects of delivering dexamethasone and cediranib locally in the brain in an intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat model. Reproducible, sustained releases of both dexamethasone and solid dispersion of cediranib in polyvinylpyrrolidone (AZD/PVP) from these devices were achieved. The water-soluble AZD/PVP, which exhibited similar bioactivity as cediranib, was developed to enhance the release of cediranib from the device. Local and systemic administration of both dexamethasone and cediranib was equally efficacious in alleviating edema but had no effect on tumor growth. Edema reduction led to modest but significant improvement in survival. Local delivery of dexamethasone prevented dexamethasone-induced weight loss, an adverse effect seen in animals treated with systemic dexamethasone. Local deliveries of dexamethasone and cediranib via these devices used only 2.36% and 0.21% of the systemic doses respectively, but achieved similar efficacy as systemic drug deliveries without the side effects associated with systemic administration. Other therapeutic agents targeting brain tumor can be delivered locally in the brain to provide similar improved treatment outcomes.

  7. Glutamine Metabolism in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan

    2016-01-01

    By histological, morphological criteria, and malignancy, brain tumors are classified by WHO into grades I (most benign) to IV (highly malignant), and gliomas are the most frequently occurring class throughout the grades. Similar to peripheral tumors, the growth of glia-derived tumor cells largely depends on glutamine (Gln), which is vividly taken up by the cells, using mostly ASCT2 and SN1 as Gln carriers. Tumor growth-promoting effects of Gln are associated with its phosphate-activated glutaminase (GA) (specifically KGA)-mediated degradation to glutamate (Glu) and/or with its entry to the energy- and intermediate metabolite-generating pathways related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. However, a subclass of liver-type GA are absent in glioma cells, a circumstance which allows phenotype manipulations upon their transfection to the cells. Gln-derived Glu plays a major role in promoting tumor proliferation and invasion. Glu is relatively inefficiently recycled to Gln and readily leaves the cells by exchange with the extracellular pool of the glutathione (GSH) precursor Cys mediated by xc- transporter. This results in (a) cell invasion-fostering interaction of Glu with ionotropic Glu receptors in the surrounding tissue, (b) intracellular accumulation of GSH which increases tumor resistance to radio- and chemotherapy.

  8. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  9. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  10. Progress on molecular biomarkers and classification of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanbao; Bao, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    2013-06-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Anaplastic gliomas (WHO grade III) and glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) represent the major groups of malignant gliomas in the brain. Several diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers for malignant gliomas have been reported over the last few decades, and these markers have made great contributions to the accuracy of diagnosis, therapeutic decision making, and prognosis of patients. However, heterogeneity in patient outcomes may still be observed, which highlights the insufficiency of a classification system based purely on histopathology. Great efforts have been made to incorporate new information about the molecular landscape of gliomas into novel classifications that may potentially guide treatment. In this review, we summarize three distinctive biomarkers, three most commonly altered pathways, and three classifications based on microarray data in malignant gliomas.

  11. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  12. What Brain Sciences Reveal about Integrating Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Theory and practice are integrated in the human brain. Situation recognition and response are key to this integration. Scholars of decision making and expertise have found that people with great expertise are more adept at situational recognition and intentional about their decision-making processes. Several interdisciplinary fields of inquiry…

  13. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  14. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  15. Dexamethasone effects on (/sup 125/I)albumin distribution in experimental RG-2 gliomas and adjacent brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, H.; Groothuis, D.R.; Owens, E.S.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1987-12-01

    A total of 72 RG-2 transplanted gliomas were studied in 58 rats at three time points (1, 30, 240 min) after intravenous injection of (/sup 125/I)radioiodinated serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)RISA). The animals were divided into two groups: a control group that received no treatment and a second group that was treated with five doses of 1.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone over 2.5 days. Local tissue concentrations of (/sup 125/I)RISA were measured with quantitative autoradiography based on morphological features of the tumors and used to calculate the tissue distribution space. Two models were used to analyze the data. A two compartment model yielded estimates of local blood-to-tissue influx constants (K1), lower limit extracellular volumes (Ve), and plasma vascular volumes (Vp) in different tumor regions. Treatment with dexamethasone consistently reduced the RISA distribution space in the RG-2 tumors; the reduction in Ve was statistically significant in almost all tumor regions: whole tumor Ve (mean +/- SE) was reduced from 0.14 +/- 0.02 ml g-1 in control animals to 0.08 +/- 0.01 ml g-1 in dexamethasone treated animals. K1 and Vp were also decreased in all tumor regions after treatment with dexamethasone (whole tumor K1 decreased from 2.36 +/- 0.89 to 0.83 +/- 0.29 microliter g-1 min-1 and Vp decreased slightly from 0.016 +/- 0.013 to 0.010 +/- 0.005 ml g-1 after dexamethasone treatment), but these changes were not statistically significant. A comparison of the tumor influx constants in control animals and the aqueous diffusion constants of two different size molecules (RISA and aminoisobutyric acid) suggests that the ''pores'' across RG-2 capillaries are large and may not restrict the free diffusion of RISA (estimated minimum pore diameter greater than 36 nm) and that the total pore area is approximately 6.2 X 10(-5) cm2 g-1 in RG-2 tumor tissue.

  16. Natural killer cells require monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells to eradicate orthotopically engrafted glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Zamler, Daniel; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell immune surveillance. However, the mechanisms used by these cancers to suppress antitumor NK cell activity remain poorly understood. We have recently reported on a novel mechanism of innate immune evasion characterized by the overexpression of the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-1 by both mouse and rat malignant glioma. Here, we investigate the cytokine profile of galectin-1-deficient GL26 cells and describe the process by which these tumors are targeted by the early innate immune system in RAG1(-/-) and C57BL/6J mice. Our data reveal that galectin-1 knockdown in GL26 cells heightens their inflammatory status leading to the rapid recruitment of Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells and NK1.1(+) NK cells into the brain tumor microenvironment, culminating in tumor clearance. We show that immunodepletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells in RAG1(-/-) mice permits the growth of galectin-1-deficient glioma despite the presence of NK cells, thus demonstrating an essential role for myeloid cells in the clearance of galectin-1-deficient glioma. Further characterization of tumor-infiltrating Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells reveals that these cells also express CCR2 and Ly-6C, markers consistent with inflammatory monocytes. Our results demonstrate that Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells, often referred to as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are required for antitumor NK cell activity against galectin-1-deficient GL26 glioma. We conclude that glioma-derived galectin-1 represents an important factor in dictating the phenotypic behavior of monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells. Galectin-1 suppression may be a valuable treatment approach for clinical glioma by promoting their innate immune-mediated recognition and clearance through the concerted effort of innate myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages.

  17. Dexamethasone alleviates tumor-associated brain damage and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Sehm, Tina; Rauh, Manfred; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Savaskan, Nicolai E

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults with the most aggressive form of brain cancer, malignant gliomas or glioblastoma, often develop cerebral edema as a life-threatening complication. This complication is routinely treated with dexamethasone (DEXA), a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with pleiotropic action profile. Here we show that dexamethasone reduces murine and rodent glioma tumor growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of DEXA are already capable of inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and at higher levels induce cell death. Further, the expression of the glutamate antiporter xCT (system Xc-; SLC7a11) and VEGFA is up-regulated after DEXA treatment indicating early cellular stress responses. However, in human gliomas DEXA exerts differential cytotoxic effects, with some human glioma cells (U251, T98G) resistant to DEXA, a finding corroborated by clinical data of dexamethasone non-responders. Moreover, DEXA-resistant gliomas did not show any xCT alterations, indicating that these gene expressions are associated with DEXA-induced cellular stress. Hence, siRNA-mediated xCT knockdown in glioma cells increased the susceptibility to DEXA. Interestingly, cell viability of primary human astrocytes and primary rodent neurons is not affected by DEXA. We further tested the pharmacological effects of DEXA on brain tissue and showed that DEXA reduces tumor-induced disturbances of the microenvironment such as neuronal cell death and tumor-induced angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that DEXA inhibits glioma cell growth in a concentration and species-dependent manner. Further, DEXA executes neuroprotective effects in brains and reduces tumor-induced angiogenesis. Thus, our investigations reveal that DEXA acts pleiotropically and impacts tumor growth, tumor vasculature and tumor-associated brain damage.

  18. Dexamethasone Alleviates Tumor-Associated Brain Damage and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Sehm, Tina; Rauh, Manfred; Buchfelder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults with the most aggressive form of brain cancer, malignant gliomas or glioblastoma, often develop cerebral edema as a life-threatening complication. This complication is routinely treated with dexamethasone (DEXA), a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with pleiotropic action profile. Here we show that dexamethasone reduces murine and rodent glioma tumor growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of DEXA are already capable of inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and at higher levels induce cell death. Further, the expression of the glutamate antiporter xCT (system Xc−; SLC7a11) and VEGFA is up-regulated after DEXA treatment indicating early cellular stress responses. However, in human gliomas DEXA exerts differential cytotoxic effects, with some human glioma cells (U251, T98G) resistant to DEXA, a finding corroborated by clinical data of dexamethasone non-responders. Moreover, DEXA-resistant gliomas did not show any xCT alterations, indicating that these gene expressions are associated with DEXA-induced cellular stress. Hence, siRNA-mediated xCT knockdown in glioma cells increased the susceptibility to DEXA. Interestingly, cell viability of primary human astrocytes and primary rodent neurons is not affected by DEXA. We further tested the pharmacological effects of DEXA on brain tissue and showed that DEXA reduces tumor-induced disturbances of the microenvironment such as neuronal cell death and tumor-induced angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that DEXA inhibits glioma cell growth in a concentration and species-dependent manner. Further, DEXA executes neuroprotective effects in brains and reduces tumor-induced angiogenesis. Thus, our investigations reveal that DEXA acts pleiotropically and impacts tumor growth, tumor vasculature and tumor-associated brain damage. PMID:24714627

  19. Targeted Theranostic Approach for Glioma Using Dendrimer-Based Curcumin Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Gamage, NH; Jing, Li; Worsham, MJ; Ali, MM

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of anti-cancer agents to brain tumors represent a challenge because the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB) effectively limits the delivery of many agents. A new generation 3 (G3) dendrimer-based curcumin (Curc) conjugate was synthesized. The synthesized G3-Curc conjugate demonstrated full solubility in aqueous media. The in vitro study revealed that G3-Curc nanoparticles were internalized into glioma U-251 cells. Systemic delivery of G3-Curc conjugate led to preferentially accumulation in an orthotopic preclinical glioma model minimizing systemic toxic effect. Multicolor microscopy images of the tumor tissue showed that G3-Curc particles were internalized inside tumor cells selectively and further localized within nuclei. Enhanced bioavailability of G3-Curc conjugate was also observed with improved therapeutic efficacy against different cancers cells. PMID:27699139

  20. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Motsch, Sebastien; Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Mineharu, Yohei; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra Ines; Orringer, Daniel; Bannykh, Serguei; Nichols, Wesley S.; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM), and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients. PMID:25117977

  1. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  2. Behaviourally driven gene expression reveals song nuclei in hummingbird brain.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, E D; Ribeiro, S; da Silva, M L; Ventura, D; Vielliard, J; Mello, C V

    2000-08-10

    Hummingbirds have developed a wealth of intriguing features, such as backwards flight, ultraviolet vision, extremely high metabolic rates, nocturnal hibernation, high brain-to-body size ratio and a remarkable species-specific diversity of vocalizations. Like humans, they have also developed the rare trait of vocal learning, this being the ability to acquire vocalizations through imitation rather than instinct. Here we show, using behaviourally driven gene expression in freely ranging tropical animals, that the forebrain of hummingbirds contains seven discrete structures that are active during singing, providing the first anatomical and functional demonstration of vocal nuclei in hummingbirds. These structures are strikingly similar to seven forebrain regions that are involved in vocal learning and production in songbirds and parrots--the only other avian orders known to be vocal learners. This similarity is surprising, as songbirds, parrots and hummingbirds are thought to have evolved vocal learning and associated brain structures independently, and it indicates that strong constraints may influence the evolution of forebrain vocal nuclei.

  3. Brain potentials reveal unconscious translation during foreign-language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Guillaume; Wu, Yan Jing

    2007-07-24

    Whether the native language of bilingual individuals is active during second-language comprehension is the subject of lively debate. Studies of bilingualism have often used a mix of first- and second-language words, thereby creating an artificial "dual-language" context. Here, using event-related brain potentials, we demonstrate implicit access to the first language when bilinguals read words exclusively in their second language. Chinese-English bilinguals were required to decide whether English words presented in pairs were related in meaning or not; they were unaware of the fact that half of the words concealed a character repetition when translated into Chinese. Whereas the hidden factor failed to affect behavioral performance, it significantly modulated brain potentials in the expected direction, establishing that English words were automatically and unconsciously translated into Chinese. Critically, the same modulation was found in Chinese monolinguals reading the same words in Chinese, i.e., when Chinese character repetition was evident. Finally, we replicated this pattern of results in the auditory modality by using a listening comprehension task. These findings demonstrate that native-language activation is an unconscious correlate of second-language comprehension.

  4. The interface between glial progenitors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain and spinal cord contain heterogeneous populations of cycling, immature cells. These include cells with stem cell-like properties as well as progenitors in various stages of early glial differentiation. This latter population is distributed widely throughout gray and white matter and numerically represents an extremely large cell pool. In this review, we discuss the possibility that the glial progenitors that populate the adult CNS are one source of gliomas. Indeed, the marker phenotypes, morphologies, and migratory properties of cells in gliomas strongly resemble glial progenitors in many ways. We review briefly some salient features of normal glial development and then examine the similarities and differences between normal progenitors and cells in gliomas, focusing on the phenotypic plasticity of glial progenitors and the responses to growth factors in promoting proliferation and migration of normal and glioma cells, and discussing known mutational changes in gliomas in the context of how these might affect the proliferative and migratory behaviors of progenitors. Finally, we will discuss the “cancer stem cell” hypothesis in light of the possibility that glial progenitors can generate gliomas. PMID:18784926

  5. Delivery of a novel nitrosourea, MCNU, to the brain tissue in glioma-bearing rats. Intracarotid versus intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Hodozuka, A; Sako, K; Nakai, H; Tomabechi, M; Suzuki, N; Yonemasu, Y

    1993-01-01

    We observed the tissue delivery of a novel water-soluble nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranos-6-yl)-1-nitros our ea (MCNU) in rats bearing experimental brain tumors by conducting autoradiography on all. Prior to this study, the development of a streaming phenomenon was ascertained (and thus finding the optimum velocity for intra-arterial infusion) by 14C-iodoantipyrine (IAP) autoradiography. Furthermore, a single pass extraction value of MCNU was measured. At an arterial infusion rate of 0.2 ml/min., the streaming phenomenon was recognized but the tracer was fairly evenly distributed at a rate of 1.0 ml/min. On the other hand, the single pass extraction value for MCNU was 0.18 +/- 0.036 (mean +/- S.D., n = 3, under pentobarbital anesthesia). It was suggested that MCNU is very unlikely to be transported into the normal rat brain. We conducted 14C-MCNU autoradiography to observe tissue distribution of MCNU following its intra-arterial and intravenous infusions in a brain tumor model using rats. The normal side (the side where no infusions were given) and the cerebral cortex at the side affected by the tumor (the side where the infusion was given) showed hardly any uptake of 14C-MCNU in both the intra-arterial and intravenous infusion groups. The tumorous section was divided into the periphery and the center to measure tissue concentration of the tracer in each section. Compared against the cortical section, the periphery and the center showed significant increases in the concentration (approximately 11 to 15 times and 3 to 7 times, respectively, the figure for the cortical region) for both the intra-arterial and intravenous groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08 mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical

  7. Glioma residual or recurrence versus radiation necrosis: accuracy of pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT compared to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS): initial results.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Moustafa, Hosna; Ahmed, Ebaa; El-Toukhy, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    We compared pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) for the detection of residual or recurrent gliomas after surgery and radiotherapy. A total of 24 glioma patients, previously operated upon and treated with radiotherapy, were studied. SPECT was acquired 2-3 h post-administration of 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m (V) DMSA. Lesion to normal (L/N) delayed uptake ratio was calculated as: mean counts of tumor ROI (L)/mean counts of normal mirror symmetric ROI (N). (1)H-MRS was performed using a 1.5-T scanner equipped with a spectroscopy package. SPECT and (1)H-MRS results were compared with pathology or follow-up neuroimaging studies. SPECT and (1)H-MRS showed concordant residue or recurrence in 9/24 (37.5%) patients. Both were true negative in 6/24 (25%) patients. SPECT and (1)H-MRS disagreed in 9 recurrences [7/9 (77.8%) and 2/9 (22.2%) were true positive by SPECT and (1)H-MRS, respectively]. Sensitivity of SPECT and (1)H-MRS in detecting recurrence was 88.8 and 61.1% with accuracies of 91.6 and 70.8%, respectively. A positive association between the delayed L/N ratio and tumor grade was found; the higher the grade, the higher is the L/N ratio (r = 0.62, P = 0.001). Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT is more accurate compared to (1)H-MRS for the detection of tumor residual tissues or recurrence in glioma patients with previous radiotherapy. It allows early and non-invasive differentiation of residual tumor or recurrence from irradiation necrosis.

  8. Overexpression of RACK1 Promotes Metastasis by Enhancing Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Predicts Poor Prognosis in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qiao-Li; Huang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Gui-Hua; Liu, Yan-Ling; Huang, Jin; Qu, Qiang; Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Cheng, Lin; Chen, Shu-Hui; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies show that dysregulation of the receptor of activated protein kinase C1 (RACK1) plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis and progression of various cancers. However, the biological function and underlying mechanism of RACK1 in glioma remains poorly defined. Here, we found that RACK1 was significantly up-regulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues, being closely related to clinical stage of glioma both in mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with high RACK1 expression had a poor prognosis (p = 0.0062, HR = 1.898, 95% CI: 1.225–3.203). In vitro functional assays indicated that silencing of RACK1 could dramatically promote apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. More importantly, knockdown of RACK1 led to a vast accumulation of cells in G0/G1 phase and their reduced proportions at the S phase by suppressing the expression of G1/S transition key regulators Cyclin D1 and CDK6. Additionally, this forced down-regulation of RACK1 significantly suppressed migration and invasion via inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as MMP2, MMP9, ZEB1, N-Cadherin, and Integrin-β1. Collectively, our study revealed that RACK1 might act as a valuable prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:27763568

  9. Functional assessment of glioma pathogenesis by in vivo multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging and in vitro analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nai-Wei; Chang, Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Ting; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with poor prognosis. In this study, we report a novel approach combining both in vivo multi-parametric MRI and in vitro cell culture assessments to evaluate the pathogenic development of gliomas. Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic factor, has been implicated in the formation and progression of various human cancers, including gliomas, through its functions in regulating cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and migration. Using rat C6 glioma model, the combined approach successfully monitors the acquisition and decrease of cancer hallmarks. We show that knockdown of the expression of OPN reduces C6 cell proliferation, survival, viability and clonogenicity in vitro, and reduces tumor burden and prolongs animal survival in syngeneic rats. OPN depletion is associated with reduced tumor growth, decreased angiogenesis, and an increase of tumor-associated metabolites, as revealed by T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images, Ktrans maps, and 1H-MRS, respectively. These strategies allow us to define an important role of OPN in conferring cancer hallmarks, which can be further applied to assess the functional roles of other candidate genes in glioma. In particular, the non-invasive multi-parametric MRI measurement of cancer hallmarks related to proliferation, angiogenesis and altered metabolism may serve as a useful tool for diagnosis and for patient management. PMID:27198662

  10. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  11. Comparative analysis of encephalization in mammals reveals relaxed constraints on anthropoid primate and cetacean brain scaling.

    PubMed

    Boddy, A M; McGowen, M R; Sherwood, C C; Grossman, L I; Goodman, M; Wildman, D E

    2012-05-01

    There is a well-established allometric relationship between brain and body mass in mammals. Deviation of relatively increased brain size from this pattern appears to coincide with enhanced cognitive abilities. To examine whether there is a phylogenetic structure to such episodes of changes in encephalization across mammals, we used phylogenetic techniques to analyse brain mass, body mass and encephalization quotient (EQ) among 630 extant mammalian species. Among all mammals, anthropoid primates and odontocete cetaceans have significantly greater variance in EQ, suggesting that evolutionary constraints that result in a strict correlation between brain and body mass have independently become relaxed. Moreover, ancestral state reconstructions of absolute brain mass, body mass and EQ revealed patterns of increase and decrease in EQ within anthropoid primates and cetaceans. We propose both neutral drift and selective factors may have played a role in the evolution of brain-body allometry.

  12. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  13. Early presentation of de novo high grade glioma with epileptic seizures: electroclinical and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Figus, Andrea; Corraine, Simona

    2010-10-01

    We report the clinical, EEG and neuroradiologic findings from three adult patients who developed new-onset seizure disorders as early clinical manifestations of de novo high grade glioma. The malignancies could not be recognised at the time of the first epileptic seizure because of minimal non-specific brain abnormalities, which showed no signs of necrosis or significant contrast enhancement on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Focal EEG abnormalities were recorded in all cases and appeared consistent with the neuroradiologic findings. The patients regained normal neurological status after the first seizure but rapidly developed space-occupying necrotic lesions. Two patients underwent surgery and received histological diagnoses of the tumours. Another patient was finally diagnosed with a malignant glioma based on the neuroradiologic picture and rapid progression of the cerebral lesion. It should be noted that in adult patients, new-onset epileptic seizures might reveal the presence of malignant gliomas at a very early stage in the tumour formation process. This report indicates that typical anatomoradiologic features of de novo high grade glioma, such as necrosis and rim-contrast enhancement, could be absent at the time of the first epileptic seizure but become clear within a short period after clinical presentation.

  14. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  15. Direct brain recordings reveal hippocampal rhythm underpinnings of language processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristopher L.; Lin, Jack J.; Dewar, Callum; Parvizi, Josef; Dronkers, Nina F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Language is classically thought to be supported by perisylvian cortical regions. Here we provide intracranial evidence linking the hippocampal complex to linguistic processing. We used direct recordings from the hippocampal structures to investigate whether theta oscillations, pivotal in memory function, track the amount of contextual linguistic information provided in sentences. Twelve participants heard sentences that were either constrained (“She locked the door with the”) or unconstrained (“She walked in here with the”) before presentation of the final word (“key”), shown as a picture that participants had to name. Hippocampal theta power increased for constrained relative to unconstrained contexts during sentence processing, preceding picture presentation. Our study implicates hippocampal theta oscillations in a language task using natural language associations that do not require memorization. These findings reveal that the hippocampal complex contributes to language in an active fashion, relating incoming words to stored semantic knowledge, a necessary process in the generation of sentence meaning. PMID:27647880

  16. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  17. [Guidelines for the radiotherapy of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Feuvret, L; Antoni, D; Biau, J; Truc, G; Noël, G; Mazeron, J-J

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumours. Treating these tumours is difficult because of the proximity of organs at risk, infiltrating nature, and radioresistance. Clinical prognostic factors such as age, Karnofsky performance status, tumour location, and treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have long been recognized in the management of patients with gliomas. Molecular biomarkers are increasingly evolving as additional factors that facilitate diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making. These practice guidelines aim at helping in choosing the best treatment, in particular radiation therapy.

  18. MiR-124 governs glioma growth and angiogenesis and enhances chemosensitivity by targeting R-Ras and N-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhumei; Chen, Qiudan; Li, Chongyong; Wang, Lin; Qian, Xu; Jiang, Chengfei; Liu, Xue; Wang, Xiefeng; Li, Hai; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioma is one of the most aggressive and lethal human brain tumors. Accumulating evidence shows that microRNAs play important roles in cancers, including glioma. Previous studies reported that miR-124 levels were downregulated in glioma specimens. Here, we further investigate the potential role of miR-124 in glioma. Methods The expression levels of miR-124 were detected in glioma specimens by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The direct targets of miR-124 were identified by bioinformatics analysis and were further validated by immunoblotting and luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-124 on glioma cell proliferation and chemosensitivity to temozolomide were analyzed by Cell-Counting Kit 8 assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. A xenograft model was used to study the effect of miR-124 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Results Expression levels of miR-124 were greatly downregulated in glioma specimens. related Ras viral oncogene homolog (R-Ras) and neuroblastoma Ras viral oncogene homolog (N-Ras) were identified as direct targets of miR-124. MiR-124 inhibited glioma cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor growth and increased chemosensitivity to temozolomide treatment by negatively regulating the Ras family and its downstream signaling pathways: phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt and Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Furthermore, overexpression of R-Ras rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-124. Meanwhile, overexpression of R-Ras and N-Ras restored miR-124–inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription activation. In clinical glioma specimens, protein levels of R-Ras and N-Ras were upregulated and inversely correlated with miR-124 expression levels. Conclusions Taken together, these results revealed that miR-124 levels in tumor tissues are associated with glioma occurrence, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance and that miR-124 may be used as a new diagnostic marker

  19. The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Zhou, Renke; Lau, Ching C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Merrell, Ryan T.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Davis, Faith G.; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Aldape, Kenneth; Alafuzoff, Irina; Brännström, Thomas; Broholm, Helle; Collins, Peter; Giannini, Caterina; Rosenblum, Marc; Tihan, Tarik; Melin, Beatrice S.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010–2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions. PMID:26656478

  20. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. Patients and methods We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. Results This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. Conclusion This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible. PMID:23137305

  1. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    PubMed Central

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research. PMID:26257697

  2. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    PubMed

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  3. Tubulin nitration in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Gabriella; Di Cristo, Carlo; Monti, Gianluca; Amoresano, Angela; Columbano, Laura; Pucci, Pietro; Cioffi, Fernando A; Di Cosmo, Anna; Palumbo, Anna; d'Ischia, Marco

    2006-02-06

    Immunohistochemical and biochemical investigations showed that significant protein nitration occurs in human gliomas, especially in grade IV glioblastomas at the level of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neurones. Enhanced alpha-tubulin immunoreactivity was co-present in the same elements in the glioblastomas. Proteomic methodologies were employed to identify a nitrated protein band at 55 kDa as alpha-tubulin. Peptide mass fingerprinting procedures demonstrated that tubulin is nitrated at Tyr224 in grade IV tumour samples but is unmodified in grade I samples and in non-cancerous brain tissue. These results provide the first characterisation of endogenously nitrated tubulin from human tumour samples.

  4. Multigene sets for clinical application in glioma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, John F; Sulman, Erik P; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-04-01

    Diffuse gliomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies with highly variable outcomes, and diagnosis is largely based on histologic appearance. Tumor classification according to cell type and grade provides some prognostic information. However, significant clinical and biologic heterogeneity exists in glioma, even after accounting for known clinicopathologic variables. Significant advances in knowledge of the molecular genetics of brain tumors have occurred in the past decade, largely because of the availability of high-throughput profiling techniques, including new sequencing methodologies and multidimensional profiling by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. The large amount of data generated from these efforts has enabled the identification of prognostic and predictive factors and helped to identify pathways driving tumor growth. Implementing these signatures into the clinic to personalize therapy presents a new challenge. Identification of relevant biomarkers, especially when coupled with clinical trials of newer targeted therapies, will enable better patient stratification and individualization of treatment for patients with glioma.

  5. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  6. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  7. Cognition and resective surgery for diffuse infiltrative glioma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klein, Martin; Duffau, Hugues; De Witt Hamer, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    Compared to classical oncological outcome measures such as time to progression and survival, the importance of cognitive functioning in patients with diffuse infiltrative brain tumors has only recently been recognized. Apart from the relatively low incidence and the invariably fatal outcome of gliomas, the general assumption that cognitive assessment is time-consuming and burdensome contributes to this notion. Our understanding of the effects of brain surgery on cognition, for instance, is largely based on studies in surgical patients with refractory epilepsy, with only a limited number of studies in surgical patients with gliomas. The impact of other factors affecting cognition in glioma patients such as direct tumor effects, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and medical treatment, including anti-epileptic drugs and steroids, have been studied more extensively. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of cognition in patients with diffuse infiltrative gliomas and the impact of resective surgery as well as other tumor and treatment-related factors.

  8. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-01-18

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Corticosterone Inhibits the Proliferation of C6 Glioma Cells via the Translocation of Unphosphorylated Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Amano, Taku; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Astroglial cells have been considered to have passive brain function by helping to maintain neurons. However, recent studies have revealed that the dysfunction of such passive functions may be associated with various neuropathological diseases, such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and major depression. Corticosterone (CORT), which is often referred to as the stress hormone, is a well-known regulator of peripheral immune responses and also shows anti-inflammatory properties in the brain. However, it is still obscure how CORT affects astroglial cell function. In this study, we investigated the effects of CORT on the proliferation and survival of astroglial cells using C6 glioma cells. Under treatment with CORT for 24h, the proliferation of C6 glioma cells decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, this inhibition was diminised by treatment with mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, but not by spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, and was independent of GR phosphorylation and other GR-related intracellular signaling cascades. Furthermore, it was observed that the translocation of GR from the cytosol to the nucleus was promoted by the treatment with CORT. These results indicate that CORT decreases the proliferation of C6 glioma cells by modifying the transcription of a particular gene related to cell proliferation independent of GR phosphorylation.

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain. PMID:26539535

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Human Brain Anatomical Network Revealed by Diffusion Tensor Tractography.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-01-01

    The topological architecture of the cerebral anatomical network reflects the structural organization of the human brain. Recently, topological measures based on graph theory have provided new approaches for quantifying large-scale anatomical networks. However, few studies have investigated the hemispheric asymmetries of the human brain from the perspective of the network model, and little is known about the asymmetries of the connection patterns of brain regions, which may reflect the functional integration and interaction between different regions. Here, we utilized diffusion tensor imaging to construct binary anatomical networks for 72 right-handed healthy adult subjects. We established the existence of structural connections between any pair of the 90 cortical and subcortical regions using deterministic tractography. To investigate the hemispheric asymmetries of the brain, statistical analyses were performed to reveal the brain regions with significant differences between bilateral topological properties, such as degree of connectivity, characteristic path length, and betweenness centrality. Furthermore, local structural connections were also investigated to examine the local asymmetries of some specific white matter tracts. From the perspective of both the global and local connection patterns, we identified the brain regions with hemispheric asymmetries. Combined with the previous studies, we suggested that the topological asymmetries in the anatomical network may reflect the functional lateralization of the human brain.

  12. The chemopreventive properties of chlorogenic acid reveal a potential new role for the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate translocase in brain tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Anissa; Currie, Jean-Christophe; Desgagnés, Julie; Annabi, Borhane

    2006-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid (CHL), the most potent functional inhibitor of the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate translocase (G6PT), is thought to possess cancer chemopreventive properties. It is not known, however, whether any G6PT functions are involved in tumorigenesis. We investigated the effects of CHL and the potential role of G6PT in regulating the invasive phenotype of brain tumor-derived glioma cells. Results RT-PCR was used to show that, among the adult and pediatric brain tumor-derived cells tested, U-87 glioma cells expressed the highest levels of G6PT mRNA. U-87 cells lacked the microsomal catalytic subunit glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)-α but expressed G6Pase-β which, when coupled to G6PT, allows G6P hydrolysis into glucose to occur in non-glyconeogenic tissues such as brain. CHL inhibited U-87 cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 secretion, two prerequisites for tumor cell invasion. Moreover, CHL also inhibited cell migration induced by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent mitogen for glioblastoma multiform cells, as well as the rapid, S1P-induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation potentially mediated through intracellular calcium mobilization, suggesting that G6PT may also perform crucial functions in regulating intracellular signalling. Overexpression of the recombinant G6PT protein induced U-87 glioma cell migration that was, in turn, antagonized by CHL. MMP-2 secretion was also inhibited by the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-depleting agents 2-deoxyglucose and 5-thioglucose, a mechanism that may inhibit ATP-mediated calcium sequestration by G6PT. Conclusion We illustrate a new G6PT function in glioma cells that could regulate the intracellular signalling and invasive phenotype of brain tumor cells, and that can be targeted by the anticancer properties of CHL. PMID:16566826

  13. Glutamine Addiction In Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A

    2017-03-09

    Cancer cells develop and succeed by shifting to different metabolic programs compared with their normal cell counterparts. One of the classical hallmarks of cancer cells is their higher glycolysis rate and lactate production even in the presence of abundant O2 (Warburg effect). Another common metabolic feature of cancer cells is a high rate of glutamine (Gln) consumption normally exceeding their biosynthetic and energetic needs. The term Gln addiction is now widely used to reflect the strong dependence shown by most cancer cells for this essential nitrogen substrate after metabolic reprogramming. A Gln/glutamate (Glu) cycle occurs between host tissues and the tumor in order to maximize its growth and proliferation rates. The mechanistic basis for this deregulated tumor metabolism and how these changes are connected to oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways are becoming increasingly understood. Based on these advances, new avenues of research have been initiated to find novel therapeutic targets and to explore strategies that interfere with glutamine metabolism as anticancer therapies. In this review, we provided an updated overview of glutamine addiction in glioma, the most prevalent type of brain tumor.

  14. Impaired inter-hemispheric integration in bipolar disorder revealed using brain network analyses

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Alex; Ajilore, Olusola; Zhan, Liang; Arienzo, Donatello; GadElkarim, Johnson; Zhang, Aifeng; Moody, Teena; Van Horn, John; Feusner, Jamie; Kumar, Anand; Thompson, Paul; Altshuler, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Background This represents the first graph theory based brain network analysis study in bipolar disorder, a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by severe mood swings. Many imaging studies have investigated white matter in bipolar disorder with results suggesting abnormal white matter structural integrity, particularly in the fronto-limbic and callosal systems. However, many inconsistencies remain in the literature, and no study to-date has conducted brain network analyses using a graph-theoretic approach. Methods We acquired 64-direction diffusion-weighted MRI on 25 euthymic bipolar I disorder subjects and 24 gender and age equivalent healthy subjects. White matter integrity measures including fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were compared in the whole brain. Additionally, structural connectivity matrices based on whole brain deterministic tractography were constructed followed by the computation of both global and local brain network measures. We also designed novel metrics to further probe inter-hemispheric integration. Results Network analyses revealed that the bipolar brain networks exhibited significantly longer characteristic path length, lower clustering coefficient, and lower global efficiency relative to those of controls. Further analyses revealed impaired inter-hemispheric but relatively preserved intra-hemispheric integration. These findings were supported by whole brain white matter analyses that revealed significantly lower integrity in the corpus callosum in bipolar subjects. There were also abnormalities in nodal network measures in structures within the limbic system, especially the left hippocampus, the left lateral orbito-frontal cortex, and the bilateral isthmus cingulate. Conclusions These results suggest abnormalities in structural network organization in bipolar disorder, particularly in inter-hemispheric integration and within the limbic system. PMID:23122540

  15. A novel brain tumour model in zebrafish reveals the role of YAP activation in MAPK- and PI3K-induced malignant growth

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Gourain, Victor; Reischl, Markus; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Benelli, Matteo; Demichelis, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Sieger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Somatic mutations activating MAPK and PI3K signalling play a pivotal role in both tumours and brain developmental disorders. We developed a zebrafish model of brain tumours based on somatic expression of oncogenes that activate MAPK and PI3K signalling in neural progenitor cells and found that HRASV12 was the most effective in inducing both heterotopia and invasive tumours. Tumours, but not heterotopias, require persistent activation of phospho (p)-ERK and express a gene signature similar to the mesenchymal glioblastoma subtype, with a strong YAP component. Application of an eight-gene signature to human brain tumours establishes that YAP activation distinguishes between mesenchymal glioblastoma and low grade glioma in a wide The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) sample set including gliomas and glioblastomas (GBMs). This suggests that the activation of YAP might be an important event in brain tumour development, promoting malignant versus benign brain lesions. Indeed, co-expression of dominant-active YAP (YAPS5A) and HRASV12 abolishes the development of heterotopias and leads to the sole development of aggressive tumours. Thus, we have developed a model proving that neurodevelopmental disorders and brain tumours might originate from the same activation of oncogenes through somatic mutations, and established that YAP activation is a hallmark of malignant brain tumours. PMID:27935819

  16. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  17. In-depth mapping of the mouse brain N-glycoproteome reveals widespread N-glycosylation of diverse brain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pan; Wang, Xin-jian; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ming-qi; Zeng, Wen-feng; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Xing; Yan, Guo-quan; Yao, Jun; Shen, Hua-li; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2016-01-01

    N-glycosylation is one of the most prominent and abundant posttranslational modifications of proteins. It is estimated that over 50% of mammalian proteins undergo glycosylation. However, the analysis of N-glycoproteins has been limited by the available analytical technology. In this study, we comprehensively mapped the N-glycosylation sites in the mouse brain proteome by combining complementary methods, which included seven protease treatments, four enrichment techniques and two fractionation strategies. Altogether, 13492 N-glycopeptides containing 8386 N-glycosylation sites on 3982 proteins were identified. After evaluating the performance of the above methods, we proposed a simple and efficient workflow for large-scale N-glycosylation site mapping. The optimized workflow yielded 80% of the initially identified N-glycosylation sites with considerably less effort. Analysis of the identified N-glycoproteins revealed that many of the mouse brain proteins are N-glycosylated, including those proteins in critical pathways for nervous system development and neurological disease. Additionally, several important biomarkers of various diseases were found to be N-glycosylated. These data confirm that N-glycosylation is important in both physiological and pathological processes in the brain, and provide useful details about numerous N-glycosylation sites in brain proteins. PMID:27259237

  18. Glioma associated microglial MMP9 expression is up regulated by TLR2 signalling and sensitive to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feng; Ku, Min-Chi; Markovic, Darko; Dzaye, Omar Dildar a; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The invasiveness of malignant gliomas is one of the major obstacles in glioma therapy and the reason for the poor survival of patients. Glioma cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and thereby escape surgical resection. Glioma associated microglia/macrophages support glioma infiltration into the brain parenchyma by increased expression and activation of extracellular matrix degrading proteases such as matrix-metalloprotease 2, matrix-metalloprotease 9 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease. In this work we demonstrate that, matrix-metalloprotease 9 is predominantly expressed by glioma associated microglia/macrophages in mouse and human glioma tissue but not by the glioma cells. Supernatant from glioma cells induced the expression of matrix-metalloprotease 9 in cultured microglial cells. Using mice deficient for different Toll-like receptors we identified Toll-like receptor 2/6 as the signalling pathway for the glioma induced upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Also in an experimental mouse glioma model, Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency attenuated the upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Moreover, glioma supernatant triggered an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 2 expression in microglia. Both, the upregulation of matrix-metalloprotease 9 and Toll-like receptor 2 were attenuated by the antibiotic minocycline and a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase antagonist in vitro. Minocycline also extended the survival rate of glioma bearing mice when given to the drinking water. Thus glioma cells change the phenotype of glioma associated microglia/macrophages in a complex fashion using Toll-like receptor 2 as an important signalling pathway and minocycline further proved to be a potential candidate for adjuvant glioma therapy. PMID:24752463

  19. Association between small heat shock protein B11 and the prognostic value of MGMT promoter methylation in patients with high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen; Li, Mingyang; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Chuanbao; Cai, Jinquan; Wang, Kuanyu; Wu, Anhua

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This study investigated the role and prognostic value of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in glioma. METHODS Data from 3 large databases of glioma samples (Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas, Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data, and GSE16011), which contained whole-genome messenger RNA microarray expression data and patients' clinical data, were analyzed. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to validate protein expression in another set of 50 glioma specimens. RESULTS Of 28 HSPs, 11 were overexpressed in high-grade glioma (HGG) compared with low-grade glioma. A univariate Cox analysis revealed that HSPB11 has significant prognostic value for each glioma grade, which was validated by a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. HSPB11 expression was associated with poor prognosis and was independently correlated with overall survival (OS) in HGG. This study further explored the combined role of HSPB11 and other molecular markers in HGG, such as isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status. HSPB11 expression was able to refine the prognostic value of IDH1 mutation in patients with HGG. However, when combined with MGMT promoter methylation status, among patients with a methylated MGMT promoter, those with lower levels of HSPB11 expression had longer OS and progression-free survival than patients with higher levels of HSPB11 expression or with an unmethylated MGMT promoter. Moreover, within the MGMT promoter methylation group, patients with low levels of HSPB11 expression were more sensitive to combined radiochemotherapy than those with high levels of HSPB11 expression, which may explain why some patients with HGG with a methylated MGMT promoter show tolerance to radiochemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS HSPB11 was identified as a novel prognostic marker in patients with HGG. Together with MGMT promoter methylation status, HSPB11 expression can predict outcome for patients with HGG and identify those who

  20. Algebraic Topology of Multi-Brain Connectivity Networks Reveals Dissimilarity in Functional Patterns during Spoken Communications

    PubMed Central

    Tadić, Bosiljka; Andjelković, Miroslav; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Levnajić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviour in various circumstances mirrors the corresponding brain connectivity patterns, which are suitably represented by functional brain networks. While the objective analysis of these networks by graph theory tools deepened our understanding of brain functions, the multi-brain structures and connections underlying human social behaviour remain largely unexplored. In this study, we analyse the aggregate graph that maps coordination of EEG signals previously recorded during spoken communications in two groups of six listeners and two speakers. Applying an innovative approach based on the algebraic topology of graphs, we analyse higher-order topological complexes consisting of mutually interwoven cliques of a high order to which the identified functional connections organise. Our results reveal that the topological quantifiers provide new suitable measures for differences in the brain activity patterns and inter-brain synchronisation between speakers and listeners. Moreover, the higher topological complexity correlates with the listener’s concentration to the story, confirmed by self-rating, and closeness to the speaker’s brain activity pattern, which is measured by network-to-network distance. The connectivity structures of the frontal and parietal lobe consistently constitute distinct clusters, which extend across the listener’s group. Formally, the topology quantifiers of the multi-brain communities exceed the sum of those of the participating individuals and also reflect the listener’s rated attributes of the speaker and the narrated subject. In the broader context, the presented study exposes the relevance of higher topological structures (besides standard graph measures) for characterising functional brain networks under different stimuli. PMID:27880802

  1. Pilocytic Midbrain Astrocytoma Presenting with Fresh Bleed after Twenty-one-years Survival Following First Surgery: A Unique Case of Longest Brainstem Glioma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sudhan, M. D.; Mehta, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem glioma usually carries a poor prognosis and prolonged survival is very infrequent. In a detailed Pubmed, Medline search for prolonged survival, authors could got a longest survival only up to seventeen years, reported by Umehara et al, who was subjected to gamma knife therapy and got symptomatic, MRI brain reveled large tumor growth during pregnancy necessitating emergency surgery and histopathological diagnosis was pilocytic astrocytoma. Authors report an interesting case of midbrain glioma diagnosed 21 years back, who underwent gross resection in the year 1993, histopathology was pilocytic astrocytoma, WHO grade I, and received gamma knife surgery for residual subsequently and he presented with sudden onset left sided hemiplegia on the current admission. The cranial MRI imaging revealed an infarct involving right hemi midbrain, contrast MRI brain revealed no residual glioma. To the best knowledge of authors such prolonged survival is not reported with a case of brainstem glioma survived twenty- one years with non residual tumor on the last imaging study represents first case of its kind in the western literature and probably developed hemiplegia due to bleed, highlighting bleed as delayed complication following gamma knife therapy for cranial tumors PMID:28163514

  2. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation.

  3. Activation of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling in pediatric low-grade glioma and pilocytic astrocytoma reveals mTOR as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Zagzag, David; Shah, Smit; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cameron, J. Douglas; Jain, Deepali; Eberhart, Charles G.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies support a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway signaling, and more recently Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG), including pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Here we further evaluate the role of the mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway in order to better direct pharmacologic blockade in these common childhood tumors. Methods We studied 177 PLGGs and PAs using immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of mTOR blockade on 2 PLGG cell lines (Res186 and Res259) in vitro. Results Moderate (2+) to strong (3+) immunostaining was observed for pS6 in 107/177 (59%) PAs and other PLGGs, while p4EBP1 was observed in 35/115 (30%), pElF4G in 66/112 (59%), mTOR (total) in 53/113 (47%), RAPTOR (mTORC1 component) in 64/102 (63%), RICTOR (mTORC2 component) in 48/101 (48%), and pAkt (S473) in 63/103 (61%). Complete phosphatase and tensin homolog protein loss was identified in only 7/101 (7%) of cases. In PA of the optic pathways, compared with other anatomic sites, there was increased immunoreactivity for pS6, pElF4G, mTOR (total), RICTOR, and pAkt (P < .05). We also observed increased pS6 (P = .01), p4EBP1 (P = .029), and RICTOR (P = .05) in neurofibromatosis type 1 compared with sporadic tumors. Treatment of the PLGG cell lines Res186 (PA derived) and Res259 (diffuse astrocytoma derived) with the rapalog MK8669 (ridaforolimus) led to decreased mTOR pathway activation and growth. Conclusions These findings suggest that the mTOR pathway is active in PLGG but varies by clinicopathologic subtype. Additionally, our data suggest that mTORC2 is differentially active in optic pathway and neurofibromatosis type 1–associated gliomas. MTOR represents a potential therapeutic target in PLGG that merits further investigation. PMID:24203892

  4. Characterization of traumatic brain injury in human brains reveals distinct cellular and molecular changes in contusion and pericontusion.

    PubMed

    Harish, Gangadharappa; Mahadevan, Anita; Pruthi, Nupur; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Shankar, Susarla Krishna; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to fatalities and neurological disabilities worldwide. While primary injury causes immediate damage, secondary events contribute to long-term neurological defects. Contusions (Ct) are primary injuries correlated with poor clinical prognosis, and can expand leading to delayed neurological deterioration. Pericontusion (PC) (penumbra), the region surrounding Ct, can also expand with edema, increased intracranial pressure, ischemia, and poor clinical outcome. Analysis of Ct and PC can therefore assist in understanding the pathobiology of TBI and its management. This study on human TBI brains noted extensive neuronal, astroglial and inflammatory changes, alterations in mitochondrial, synaptic and oxidative markers, and associated proteomic profile, with distinct differences in Ct and PC. While Ct displayed petechial hemorrhages, thrombosis, inflammation, neuronal pyknosis, and astrogliosis, PC revealed edema, vacuolation of neuropil, axonal loss, and dystrophic changes. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic, and mitochondrial dysfunction, among others, in Ct, while PC displayed altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture, among others. TBI brains displayed oxidative damage, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and loss of synaptic proteins, with these changes being more profound in Ct. We suggest that analysis of markers specific to Ct and PC may be valuable in the evaluation of TBI pathobiology and therapeutics. We have characterized the primary injury in human traumatic brain injury (TBI). Contusions (Ct) - the injury core displayed hemorrhages, inflammation, and astrogliosis, while the surrounding pericontusion (PC) revealed edema, vacuolation, microglial activation, axonal loss, and dystrophy. Proteomic analysis demonstrated altered immune response, synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in Ct, and altered regulation of neurogenesis and cytoskeletal architecture in

  5. Resting-state brain networks revealed by granger causal connectivity in frogs.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Fang, Guangzhan; Yue, Xizi; Zhao, Ermi; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-10-15

    Resting-state networks (RSNs) refer to the spontaneous brain activity generated under resting conditions, which maintain the dynamic connectivity of functional brain networks for automatic perception or higher order cognitive functions. Here, Granger causal connectivity analysis (GCCA) was used to explore brain RSNs in the music frog (Babina daunchina) during different behavioral activity phases. The results reveal that a causal network in the frog brain can be identified during the resting state which reflects both brain lateralization and sexual dimorphism. Specifically (1) ascending causal connections from the left mesencephalon to both sides of the telencephalon are significantly higher than those from the right mesencephalon, while the right telencephalon gives rise to the strongest efferent projections among all brain regions; (2) causal connections from the left mesencephalon in females are significantly higher than those in males and (3) these connections are similar during both the high and low behavioral activity phases in this species although almost all electroencephalograph (EEG) spectral bands showed higher power in the high activity phase for all nodes. The functional features of this network match important characteristics of auditory perception in this species. Thus we propose that this causal network maintains auditory perception during the resting state for unexpected auditory inputs as resting-state networks do in other species. These results are also consistent with the idea that females are more sensitive to auditory stimuli than males during the reproductive season. In addition, these results imply that even when not behaviorally active, the frogs remain vigilant for detecting external stimuli.

  6. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  7. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Children with Low-Grade Gliomas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ris, M. Douglas; Beebe, Dean W.

    2008-01-01

    As a group, children with low-grade gliomas (LGGs) enjoy a high rate of long-term survival and do not require the intensity of neurotoxic treatments used with higher risk pediatric brain tumors. Because they are generally considered to have favorable neurobehavioral outcomes, they have not been studied as thoroughly as higher-grade brain tumors by…

  8. Expression of the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway in glioma tissues is associated with the clinical manifestations of glioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengjin; Han, Huamin; He, Xin; Li, Shouwei; Wu, Chenxing; Yu, Chunjiang; Wang, Shengdian

    2016-03-01

    Glioma is known to induce local and systemic immunosuppression, which inhibits antitumor T cell responses. The galectin-9-Tim-3-pathway negatively regulates T cell pathways in the tumor immunosuppressive environment. The present study assessed the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 in glioma patients, and evaluated the association between the expression of Tim-3 and galectin-9 with clinical characteristics. The present study identified that Tim-3 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood T cells of glioma patients compared with those of healthy controls, and was additionally increased on tumor-infiltrating T cells. The expression of Tim-3 on tumor-infiltrating T cells was associated with the World Health Organization (WHO) grade of glioma, but negatively correlated with the Karnofsky Performance Status score of the glioma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of galectin-9 in tumor tissues was associated with Tim-3 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells and the WHO grade of glioma. These findings suggest that the galectin-9-Tim-3 pathway may be critical in the immunoevasion of glioma and may be a potent target for immunotherapy in glioma patients.

  9. Primary Role for Kinin B1 and B2 Receptors in Glioma Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Natália Fontana; Sénécal, Jacques; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; Roxo, Marcelo R; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; de Morais, Rafael Leite T; Pesquero, João Bosco; Campos, Maria Martha; Couture, Réjean; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno

    2016-11-16

    This study investigated the role of kinins and their receptors in malignant brain tumors. As a first approach, GL-261 glioma cells were injected (2 × 10(5) cells in 2 μl/2 min) into the right striatum of adult C57/BL6 wild-type, kinin B1 and B2 receptor knockout (KOB1R and KOB2R) and B1 and B2 receptor double knockout mice (KOB1B2R). The animals received the selective B1R (SSR240612) and/or B2R (HOE-140) antagonists by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route at 5, 10, and 15 days. The tumor size quantification, mitotic index, western blot analysis, quantitative autoradiography, immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy were carried out in brain tumor samples, 20 days after tumor induction. Our results revealed an uncontrolled tumor growing in KOB1R or SSR240612-treated mice, which was blunted by B2R blockade with HOE-140, suggesting a crosstalk between B1R and B2R in tumor growing. Combined treatment with B1R and B2R antagonists normalized the upregulation of tumor B1R and decreased the tumor size and the mitotic index, as was seen in double KOB1B2R. The B1R was detected on astrocytes in the tumor, indicating a close relationship between this receptor and astroglial cells. Noteworthy, an immunohistochemistry analysis of tumor samples from 16 patients with glioma diagnosis revealed a marked B1R immunopositivity in low-grade gliomas or in older glioblastoma individuals. Furthermore, the clinical data revealed a significantly higher immunopositivity for B1R, when compared to a lower B2R immunolabeling. Taken together, our results show that blocking simultaneously both kinin receptors or alternatively stimulating B1R may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of brain glioblastoma growth and malignancy.

  10. Immunotherapeutic targeting of shared melanoma-associated antigens in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Prins, Robert M; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Immune-based treatments for central nervous system gliomas have traditionally lagged behind those of more immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. The relative paucity of defined glioma-associated antigens that can be targeted by the immune system may partially account for this situation. Antigens present on melanomas have been extensively characterized, both in humans and in murine preclinical models. Melanocytes and astrocytes are both derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their neoplastic counterparts, malignant melanomas and gliomas, have been shown in humans to share common antigens at the RNA level. However, little is known concerning whether gliomas can be targeted by immune-based strategies that prime T cells to epitopes from melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs). In this study, we provide evidence that two common murine glioma cell lines (GL26 and GL261) express the melanoma antigens gp100 and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). To understand the immunogenicity of murine gliomas to CD8(+) T cells, we examined the ability of a MAA-specific CTL cell line to lyse the glioma cells, as well as the in vivo expansion of MAA-specific CD8(+) T cells in animals harboring gliomas. Both glioma cell lines were lysed by a human gp100-specific CTL cell line in vitro. Mice harboring s.c. GL26 gliomas possessed TRP-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing further evidence that these gliomas express the protein products in the context of MHC class I. Furthermore, MAA peptide-pulsed dendritic cells could prime T cells that specifically recognize GL26 glioma cells in vitro. Lastly, mice that were prevaccinated with human gp100 and TRP-2 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells had significantly extended survival when challenged with tumor cells in the brain, resulting in >50% long-term survival. These results suggest that shared MAAs on gliomas can be targeted immunotherapeutically, pointing the way to a new potential treatment option for patients with malignant gliomas.

  11. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma. PMID:28356945

  12. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  13. Evaluation of nano-magnetic fluid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongsheng; Zong, Hailiang; Ma, Chong; Ming, Xing; Shang, Ming; Li, Kai; He, Xiaoguang; Cao, Lei

    2017-02-01

    The temperature variation rule of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field and the effect on the treatment of malignant glioma were examined. The temperature variation of nano-magnetic fluid in the specific magnetic field was investigated by heating in vitro, and cell morphology was observed through optical microscopy and electron microscopy. MTT detection also was used to detect the effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) on the proliferation of human U251 glioma cell line. The Fe3O4 nano MFH experiment was used to detect the inhibition rate of the tumor volume in nude mice with tumors. The results of the experiment showed that the heating ability of magnetic fluid was positively correlated with its concentration at the same intensity of the magnetic field. The results also indicated the prominent inhibitory effect of nanometer MFH on the proliferation of glioma cells, which was a dose-dependent relationship with nanometer magnetic fluid concentration. The hyperthermia experiment of nude mice with tumors displayed a significant inhibiting effect of Fe3O4 nanometer magnetic fluid in glioma volume. These results explain that iron (II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanometer MFH can inhibit the proliferation of U251 glioma cells, and has an obvious inhibitory effect on glioma volume, which plays a certain role in the treatment of brain glioma.

  14. Estrogen activation of microglia underlies the sexually dimorphic differences in Nf1 optic glioma-induced retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Joseph A; Solga, Anne C; Ma, Yu; Gutmann, David H

    2017-01-01

    Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop low-grade brain tumors throughout the optic pathway. Nearly 50% of children with optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) experience visual impairment, and few regain their vision after chemotherapy. Recent studies have revealed that girls with optic nerve gliomas are five times more likely to lose vision and require treatment than boys. To determine the mechanism underlying this sexually dimorphic difference in clinical outcome, we leveraged Nf1 optic glioma (Nf1-OPG) mice. We demonstrate that female Nf1-OPG mice exhibit greater retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and only females have retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning, despite mice of both sexes harboring tumors of identical volumes and proliferation. Female gonadal sex hormones are responsible for this sexual dimorphism, as ovariectomy, but not castration, of Nf1-OPG mice normalizes RGC survival and RNFL thickness. In addition, female Nf1-OPG mice have threefold more microglia than their male counterparts, and minocycline inhibition of microglia corrects the retinal pathology. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of microglial estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) function corrects the retinal abnormalities in female Nf1-OPG mice. Collectively, these studies establish that female gonadal sex hormones underlie the sexual dimorphic differences in Nf1 optic glioma-induced retinal dysfunction by operating at the level of tumor-associated microglial activation.

  15. Nanotechnology Applications for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    PubMed

    Bredlau, Amy Lee; Dixit, Suraj; Chen, Chao; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are invariably fatal tumors found in the pons of elementary school aged children. These tumors are grade II-IV gliomas, with a median survival of less than 1 year from diagnosis when treated with standard of care (SOC) therapy. Nanotechnology may offer therapeutic options for the treatment of DIPGs. Multiple nanoparticle formulations are currently being investigated for the treatment of DIPGs. Nanoparticles based upon stable elements, polymer nanoparticles, and organic nanoparticles are under development for the treatment of brain tumors, including DIPGs. Targeting of nanoparticles is now possible as delivery techniques that address the difficulty in crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB) are developed. Theranostic nanoparticles, a combination of therapeutics and diagnostic nanoparticles, improve imaging of the cancerous tissue while delivering therapy to the local region. However, additional time and attention should be directed to developing a nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of the uniformly fatal pediatric disease of DIPG.

  16. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  17. Whole-brain activity maps reveal stereotyped, distributed networks for visuomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Portugues, Ruben; Feierstein, Claudia E; Engert, Florian; Orger, Michael B

    2014-03-19

    Most behaviors, even simple innate reflexes, are mediated by circuits of neurons spanning areas throughout the brain. However, in most cases, the distribution and dynamics of firing patterns of these neurons during behavior are not known. We imaged activity, with cellular resolution, throughout the whole brains of zebrafish performing the optokinetic response. We found a sparse, broadly distributed network that has an elaborate but ordered pattern, with a bilaterally symmetrical organization. Activity patterns fell into distinct clusters reflecting sensory and motor processing. By correlating neuronal responses with an array of sensory and motor variables, we find that the network can be clearly divided into distinct functional modules. Comparing aligned data from multiple fish, we find that the spatiotemporal activity dynamics and functional organization are highly stereotyped across individuals. These experiments systematically reveal the functional architecture of neural circuits underlying a sensorimotor behavior in a vertebrate brain.

  18. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Blue B.; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E.; Salathia, Neeraj S.; Yung, Yun C.; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from post-mortem brain, generating 3,227 sets of single neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish novel and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity within the human brain. PMID:27339989

  19. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  20. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  1. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  2. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using “eyes open” versus “eyes closed” conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders. PMID:26712010

  3. Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zanni, Giulia; Michno, Wojciech; Di Martino, Elena; Tjärnlund-Wolf, Anna; Pettersson, Jean; Mason, Charlotte Elizabeth; Hellspong, Gustaf; Blomgren, Klas; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Lithium (Li) is a potent mood stabilizer and displays neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, especially in the juvenile, developing brain. Here we characterized lithium distribution in the juvenile mouse brain during 28 days of continuous treatment that result in clinically relevant serum concentrations. By using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry- (ToF-SIMS) based imaging we were able to delineate temporospatial lithium profile throughout the brain and concurrent distribution of endogenous lipids with high chemical specificity and spatial resolution. We found that Li accumulated in neurogenic regions and investigated the effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Lithium increased proliferation, as judged by Ki67-immunoreactivity, but did not alter the number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts at the end of the treatment period. Moreover, ToF-SIMS revealed a steady depletion of sphingomyelin in white matter regions during 28d Li-treatment, particularly in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, cortical levels of cholesterol and choline increased over time in Li-treated mice. This is the first study describing ToF-SIMS imaging for probing the brain-wide accumulation of supplemented Li in situ. The findings demonstrate that this technique is a powerful approach for investigating the distribution and effects of neuroprotective agents in the brain. PMID:28098178

  4. Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giulia; Michno, Wojciech; Di Martino, Elena; Tjärnlund-Wolf, Anna; Pettersson, Jean; Mason, Charlotte Elizabeth; Hellspong, Gustaf; Blomgren, Klas; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-01-18

    Lithium (Li) is a potent mood stabilizer and displays neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, especially in the juvenile, developing brain. Here we characterized lithium distribution in the juvenile mouse brain during 28 days of continuous treatment that result in clinically relevant serum concentrations. By using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry- (ToF-SIMS) based imaging we were able to delineate temporospatial lithium profile throughout the brain and concurrent distribution of endogenous lipids with high chemical specificity and spatial resolution. We found that Li accumulated in neurogenic regions and investigated the effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Lithium increased proliferation, as judged by Ki67-immunoreactivity, but did not alter the number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts at the end of the treatment period. Moreover, ToF-SIMS revealed a steady depletion of sphingomyelin in white matter regions during 28d Li-treatment, particularly in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, cortical levels of cholesterol and choline increased over time in Li-treated mice. This is the first study describing ToF-SIMS imaging for probing the brain-wide accumulation of supplemented Li in situ. The findings demonstrate that this technique is a powerful approach for investigating the distribution and effects of neuroprotective agents in the brain.

  5. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P; Ploner, Markus; Friston, Karl J; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-12

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using "eyes open" versus "eyes closed" conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders.

  6. Interspecies activity correlations reveal functional correspondence between monkey and human brain areas.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-02-05

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. For cases in which functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assessed similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we revealed regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models.

  7. Magnetic resonance volumetry reveals focal brain atrophy in transient epileptic amnesia.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christopher; van Erp, Willemijn; Bhaduri, Amit; Hammers, Alexander; Heckemann, Rolf; Zeman, Adam

    2013-09-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is a recently described epilepsy syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of isolated memory loss. It is associated with two unusual forms of interictal memory impairment: accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF) and autobiographical amnesia. We investigated the neural basis of TEA using manual volumetry and automated multi-atlas-based segmentation of whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 40 patients with TEA and 20 healthy controls. Both methods confirmed the presence of subtle, bilateral hippocampal atrophy. Additional atrophy was revealed in perirhinal and orbitofrontal cortices. The volumes of these regions correlated with anterograde memory performance. No structural correlates were found for ALF or autobiographical amnesia. The results support the hypothesis that TEA is a focal medial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome but reveal additional pathology in connected brain regions. The unusual interictal memory deficits of TEA remain unexplained by structural pathology and may reflect physiological disruption of memory networks by subclinical epileptiform activity.

  8. Fatty acid oxidation is required for the respiration and proliferation of malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hua; Patel, Shaan; Affleck, Valerie S.; Wilson, Ian; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Joshi, Abhijit R.; Maxwell, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background. Glioma is the most common form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults, with approximately 4 cases per 100 000 people each year. Gliomas, like many tumors, are thought to primarily metabolize glucose for energy production; however, the reliance upon glycolysis has recently been called into question. In this study, we aimed to identify the metabolic fuel requirements of human glioma cells. Methods. We used database searches and tissue culture resources to evaluate genotype and protein expression, tracked oxygen consumption rates to study metabolic responses to various substrates, performed histochemical techniques and fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based mitotic profiling to study cellular proliferation rates, and employed an animal model of malignant glioma to evaluate a new therapeutic intervention. Results. We observed the presence of enzymes required for fatty acid oxidation within human glioma tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that this metabolic pathway is a major contributor to aerobic respiration in primary-cultured cells isolated from human glioma and grown under serum-free conditions. Moreover, inhibiting fatty acid oxidation reduces proliferative activity in these primary-cultured cells and prolongs survival in a syngeneic mouse model of malignant glioma. Conclusions. Fatty acid oxidation enzymes are present and active within glioma tissues. Targeting this metabolic pathway reduces energy production and cellular proliferation in glioma cells. The drug etomoxir may provide therapeutic benefit to patients with malignant glioma. In addition, the expression of fatty acid oxidation enzymes may provide prognostic indicators for clinical practice. PMID:27365097

  9. Alphaxalone inhibits growth, migration and invasion of rat C6 malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huawei; Zheng, Xiaoke; Zhou, Yuehan; Zhu, Wenbo; Ou, Yanqiu; Shu, Minfeng; Gao, Xiuren; Leng, Tiandong; Qiu, Pengxin; Yan, Guangmei

    2013-10-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most devastating and aggressive brain tumors affecting the central nervous system. The insidious growth and infiltration are the most prominent characteristics of malignant gliomas, which render the current therapies for malignant gliomas including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy unsuccessful. Inhibition of infiltration as well as proliferation in combination with surgery might be more effective in the treatment of malignant gliomas. In the current study, we demonstrate the alphaxalone (3-hydroxypregnane-11,20-dione) could effectively inhibit the proliferation of C6 glioma cells in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, this compound could also suppress the migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells at a concentration without causing significant cytotoxicity. Except the in vitro anti-glioma activity, alphaxalone effectively delayed the growth of rat C6 malignant glioma xenografts in vivo. Together, these findings suggest alphaxalone might be a promising candidate for the treatment of malignant gliomas and may also provide helpful clues for anti-glioma drugs development in future.

  10. SRL-Coated PAMAM Dendrimer Nano-Carrier for Targeted Gene Delivery to the Glioma Cells and Competitive Inhibition by Lactoferrin

    PubMed Central

    zarebkohan, Amir; Najafi, Farhood; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Hemmati, Mohammad; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Kazemi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Glioma, as a primary tumor of central nervous system, is the main cause of death in patients with brain cancer. Therefore, development of an efficient strategy for treatment of glioma is worthy. The aim of the current study was to develop a SRL peptide-coated dendrimer as a novel dual gene delivery system for targeting the LRP receptor, an up-regulated gene in both BBB and glioma cells. To perform this investigation, our newly developed nanocarrier (PAMAM-PEG-SRL) was used for gene delivery to C6 glioma cell lines. DNA (GFP) was loaded in these functionalized nanoparticles and their cellular uptake/distribution and gene transfection efficacy was evaluated by fluorescence and confocal microscopy. In vitro studies showed that SRL-modified nanoparticles have good transfection efficacy. Results revealed improved gene transfection efficiency of newly-synthesized delivery system. We also found that lactoferrin, as a LRP ligand, reduced the gene transfection efficacy of the delivery system due to its higher affinity compared to SRL peptides (Competitive inhibition). The present results suggest that the synthesized delivery system has the potential to be used as an alternative targeted drug delivery system for brain tumors. PMID:28243262

  11. The effects of CD147 on the cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis in glioma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haoyuan; Shao, Ying; Chen, Xuan

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the effects of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) on glioma proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Tissue samples were obtained from 101 glioma cases while normal brain tissues were obtained from 30 brain injury cases. Immunohistochemical assay was performed to detect the expressions of CD147, CD34, and VEGF in tissue samples. QRT-PCR was performed to detect the relative expression of CD147 mRNA in human glioma cell lines. CD147 siRNA was transfected into glioma cell line U251. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and angiogenesis were tested by MTT, flow cytometry, Transwell assay, and vasculogenic mimicry assay, respectively. Expressions of relative proteins were analyzed with western blot. CD147 was positively expressed with the percentage of 0, 37.5, 44.8, 67.9, and 85.7 % in normal tissues and glioma tissues with WHO grades I-IV, respectively, and the scores of MVDand VEGF were associated with the expression of CD147. CD147 was significantly upregulated in the human glioma cell lines (P < 0.05). Downregulated the expression of CD147 suppressed cell proliferation, blocked cell cycle, induced apoptosis, inhibited cell invasion and angiogenesis in glioma cells in vitro. The expression of CD147 was significantly associated with WHO tumor grade and angiogenesis; silencing of CD147 contributed to inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Our study provided firm evidence that CD 147 is a potential glioma target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  12. Vorinostat and Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Therapy With Vorinostat in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  13. Revealing Time-Unlocked Brain Activity from MEG Measurements by Common Waveform Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kentaro; Yamagishi, Noriko; Sato, Masa-aki

    2014-01-01

    Brain activities related to cognitive functions, such as attention, occur with unknown and variable delays after stimulus onsets. Recently, we proposed a method (Common Waveform Estimation, CWE) that could extract such brain activities from magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG) measurements. CWE estimates spatiotemporal MEG/EEG patterns occurring with unknown and variable delays, referred to here as unlocked waveforms, without hypotheses about their shapes. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of CWE for cognitive neuroscience. For this purpose, we show procedures to estimate unlocked waveforms using CWE and to examine their role. We applied CWE to the MEG epochs during Go trials of a visual Go/NoGo task. This revealed unlocked waveforms with interesting properties, specifically large alpha oscillations around the temporal areas. To examine the role of the unlocked waveform, we attempted to estimate the strength of the brain activity of the unlocked waveform in various conditions. We made a spatial filter to extract the component reflecting the brain activity of the unlocked waveform, applied this spatial filter to MEG data under different conditions (a passive viewing, a simple reaction time, and Go/NoGo tasks), and calculated the powers of the extracted components. Comparing the powers across these conditions suggests that the unlocked waveforms may reflect the inhibition of the task-irrelevant activities in the temporal regions while the subject attends to the visual stimulus. Our results demonstrate that CWE is a potential tool for revealing new findings of cognitive brain functions without any hypothesis in advance. PMID:24879410

  14. Revealing pathologies in the liquid crystalline structures of the brain by polarimetric studies (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshetyan, Karen; Melkonyan, Gurgen G.; Galstian, Tigran V.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Natural or "self" alignment of molecular complexes in living tissue represents many similarities with liquid crystals (LC), which are anisotropic liquids. The orientational characteristics of those complexes may be related to many important functional parameters and their study may reveal important pathologies. The know-how, accumulated thanks to the study of LC materials, may thus be used to this end. One of the traditionally used methods, to characterize those materials, is the polarized light imaging (PLI) that allows for label-free analysis of anisotropic structures in the brain tissue and can be used, for example, for the analysis of myelinated fiber bundles. In the current work, we first attempted to apply the PLI on the mouse histological brain sections to create a map of anisotropic structures using cross-polarizer transmission light. Then we implemented the PLI for comparative study of histological sections of human postmortem brain samples under normal and pathological conditions, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imaging the coronal, sagittal and horizontal sections of mouse brain allowed us to create a false color-coded fiber orientation map under polarized light. In human brain datasets for both control and PD groups we measured the pixel intensities in myelin-rich subregions of internal capsule and normalized these to non-myelinated background signal from putamen and caudate nucleus. Quantification of intensities revealed a statistically significant reduction of fiber intensity of PD compared to control subjects (2.801 +/- 0.303 and 3.724 +/- 0.07 respectively; *p < 0.05). Our study confirms the validity of PLI method for visualizing myelinated axonal fibers. This relatively simple technique can become a promising tool for study of neurodegenerative diseases where labeling-free imaging is an important benefit.

  15. Image-Guided Synthesis Reveals Potent Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that several histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which are used to study/treat brain diseases, show low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. In addition to low HDAC potency and selectivity observed, poor brain penetrance may account for the high doses needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Here we report the development and evaluation of highly potent and blood-brain barrier permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications based on an image-guided approach involving the parallel synthesis and radiolabeling of a series of compounds based on the benzamide HDAC inhibitor, MS-275 as a template. BBB penetration was optimized by rapid carbon-11 labeling and PET imaging in the baboon model and using the imaging derived data on BBB penetration from each compound to feed back into the design process. A total of 17 compounds were evaluated, revealing molecules with both high binding affinity and BBB permeability. A key element conferring BBB penetration in this benzamide series was a basic benzylic amine. These derivatives exhibited 1–100 nM inhibitory activity against recombinant human HDAC1 and HDAC2. Three of the carbon-11 labeled aminomethyl benzamide derivatives showed high BBB penetration (∼0.015%ID/cc) and regional binding heterogeneity in the brain (high in thalamus and cerebellum). Taken together this approach has afforded a strategy and a predictive model for developing highly potent and BBB permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications and for the discovery of novel candidate molecules for small molecule probes and drugs. PMID:24780082

  16. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by kainic acid mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through a NF-kappaB dependent mechanism in C6 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hana; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Jung Yeon; Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hie; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo; Choe, Wonchae; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug

    2008-07-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Kainic acid (KA), a prototype excitotoxin is known to induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain. In this study, we examined the role of AMPK in KA-induced BDNF expression in C6 glioma cells. We showed that KA and KA receptor agonist induced activation of AMPK and KA-induced AMPK activation was blocked by inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) {beta}. We then showed that inhibition of AMPK by compound C, a selective inhibitor of AMPK, or small interfering RNA of AMPK{alpha}1 blocked KA-induced BDNF mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition of AMPK blocked KA-induced phosphorylation of CaMKII and I kappaB kinase (IKK) in C6 cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of AMPK reduced DNA binding and transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) in KA-treated cells. These results suggest that AMPK mediates KA-induced BDNF expression by regulating NF-{kappa}B activation.

  17. 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT in the Evaluation of Glioma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 is overexpressed in both neovasculature and glioma cells. We aimed to evaluate 68gallium-BNOTA-PRGD2 (68Ga-PRGD2) as a new reagent for noninvasive integrin αvβ3 imaging in glioma patients. With informed consent, 12 patients with suspicious brain glioma, as diagnosed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, were enrolled to undergo 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans before surgery. The preoperative images were compared and correlated with the pathologically determined WHO grade. Next, the expression of integrin αvβ3, CD34, and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemical staining of the resected brain tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrated that 68Ga-PRGD2 specifically accumulated in the brain tumors that were rich of integrin αvβ3 and other neovasculature markers, but not in the brain parenchyma other than the choroid plexus. Therefore, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT was able to evaluate the glioma demarcation more specifically than 18F-FDG PET/CT. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of 68Ga-PRGD2, rather than those of 18F-FDG, were significantly correlated with the glioma grading. The maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmax) of both tracers were significantly correlated with glioma grading, whereas 68Ga-PRGD2 seemed to be more superior to 18F-FDG in differentiating high-grade glioma (HGG) from low-grade glioma (LGG). Moreover, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT showed different accumulation patterns for HGG of WHO grades III and IV. This is the first noninvasive integrin imaging study, to the best of our knowledge, conducted in preoperative patients with different grades of glioma, and it preliminarily indicated the effectiveness of this novel method for evaluating glioma grading and demarcation. PMID:25093246

  18. Angiopep-2-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-co- poly(ε-caprolactone) polymersomes for dual-targeting drug delivery to glioma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Pang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jingjing; Jin, Kai; Li, Haichun; Pang, Qiang; Zhang, Long; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier is a formidable obstacle for glioma chemotherapy due to its compact structure and drug efflux ability. In this study, a dual-targeting drug delivery system involving Angiopep-2-conjugated biodegradable polymersomes loaded with doxorubicin (Ang-PS-DOX) was developed to exploit transport by the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), which is overexpressed in both blood–brain barrier and glioma cells. The polymersomes (PS) were prepared using a thin-film hydration method. The PS were loaded with doxorubicin using the pH gradient method (Ang-PS-DOX). The resulting PS were uniformly spherical, with diameters of ~135 nm and with ~159.9 Angiopep-2 molecules on the surface of each PS. The drug-loading capacity and the encapsulation efficiency for doxorubicin were 7.94%±0.17% and 95.0%±1.6%, respectively. Permeability tests demonstrated that the proton diffusion coefficient across the PS membrane was far slower than that across the liposome membrane, and the common logarithm value was linearly dependent on the dioxane content in the external phase. Compared with PS-DOX, Ang-PS-DOX demonstrated significantly higher cellular uptake and stronger cytotoxicity in C6 cells. In vivo pharmacokinetics and brain distribution experiments revealed that Ang-PS-DOX achieved a more extensive distribution and more abundant accumulation in glioma cells than PS-DOX. Moreover, the survival time of glioma-bearing rats treated with Ang-PS-DOX was significantly prolonged compared with those treated with PS-DOX or a solution of free doxorubicin. These results suggested that Ang-PS-DOX can target glioma cells and enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy. PMID:28356732

  19. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  20. Children processing music: electric brain responses reveal musical competence and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Grossmann, Tobias; Gunter, Thomas C; Hahne, Anja; Schröger, Erich; Friederici, Angela D

    2003-07-01

    Numerous studies investigated physiological correlates of the processing of musical information in adults. How these correlates develop during childhood is poorly understood. In the present study, we measured event-related electric brain potentials elicited in 5- and 9-year-old children while they listened to (major-minor tonal) music. Stimuli were chord sequences, infrequently containing harmonically inappropriate chords. Our results demonstrate that the degree of (in)appropriateness of the chords modified the brain responses in both groups according to music-theoretical principles. This suggests that already 5-year-old children process music according to a well-established cognitive representation of the major-minor tonal system and according to music-syntactic regularities. Moreover, we show that, in contrast to adults, an early negative brain response was left predominant in boys, whereas it was bilateral in girls, indicating a gender difference in children processing music, and revealing that children process music with a hemispheric weighting different from that of adults. Because children process, in contrast to adults, music in the same hemispheres as they process language, results indicate that children process music and language more similarly than adults. This finding might support the notion of a common origin of music and language in the human brain, and concurs with findings that demonstrate the importance of musical features of speech for the acquisition of language.

  1. Lack of expression of the liver-type glutaminase (LGA) mRNA in human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Sidoryk, Marta; Matyja, Ewa; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Albrecht, Jan

    2005-02-21

    In the central nervous system (CNS), liver-type glutaminase (LGA) shows a unique nuclear localization suggesting its role in the regulation of transcription rather than in the cellular glutamine metabolism. RT-PCR analysis of RNA derived from postoperative tissue samples revealed the absence or only traces of LGA mRNA in all (9) cases of malignant gliomas (astrocytoma anaplasticum, AA, WHO grade III; glioblastoma multiforme, WHO grade IV) examined. The RNA was strongly expressed in the non-neoplastic tissue derived from the same patients (6 cases), and in most of the brain metastases from different organs (5 out of 7 cases). By contrast, the mRNAs coding for the kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and its less ubiquitous isoform GAC, which catalyze degradation of the cytoplasmic pool of Gln, were expressed in all the tissues examined. The lack of LGA may be thus considered as a useful negative diagnostic marker of highly malignant gliomas in situ.

  2. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  3. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5) mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development. PMID:21466694

  4. Smoking and Glioma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Zhao, Wei; Qi, Zhenyu; He, Jiaquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To systematically assess the relationship between smoking and glioma risk. A dose–response meta-analysis of case–control and cohort studies was performed. Pertinent studies were identified by searching database and reference lists. Random-effects model was employed to pool the estimates of the relative risks (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 19 case–control and 6 cohort studies were included. Overall, compared with those who never smoked, the pooled RR and 95% CI was 0.98 (0.92–1.05) for ever smoker. The subgroups were not significantly different regarding risk of glioma except the group of age at start smoking (RR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.93–1.48 for age < 20; RR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02–1.52 for age ≥ 20). Dose–response analysis also suggested no significant association between smoking and the risk of glioma, although some evidence for a linear relationship between smoking and glioma risk was observed. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides little support for a causal relationship between smoking and risk of glioma. PMID:26765433

  5. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  6. The organization of thinking: what functional brain imaging reveals about the neuroarchitecture of complex cognition.

    PubMed

    Just, Marcel Adam; Varma, Sashank

    2007-09-01

    Recent findings in brain imaging, particularly in fMRI, are beginning to reveal some of the fundamental properties of the organization of the cortical systems that underpin complex cognition. We propose an emerging set of operating principles that govern this organization, characterizing the system as a set of collaborating cortical centers that operate as a large-scale cortical network. Two of the network's critical features are that it is resource constrained and dynamically configured, with resource constraints and demands dynamically shaping the network topology. The operating principles are embodied in a cognitive neuroarchitecture, 4CAPS, consisting of a number of interacting computational centers that correspond to activating cortical areas. Each 4CAPS center is a hybrid production system, possessing both symbolic and connectionist attributes. We describe 4CAPS models of sentence comprehension, spatial problem solving, and complex multitasking and compare the accounts of these models with brain activation and behavioral results. Finally, we compare 4CAPS with other proposed neuroarchitectures.

  7. Whole-brain activity maps reveal stereotyped, distributed networks for visuomotor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Portugues, Ruben; Feierstein, Claudia E.; Engert, Florian; Orger, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Most behaviors, even simple innate reflexes, are mediated by circuits of neurons spanning areas throughout the brain. However, in most cases, the distribution and dynamics of firing patterns of these neurons during behavior are not known. We imaged activity, with cellular resolution, throughout the whole brains of zebrafish performing the optokinetic response. We found a sparse, broadly distributed network that has an elaborate, but ordered, pattern, with a bilaterally symmetrical organization. Activity patterns fell into distinct clusters reflecting sensory and motor processing. By correlating neuronal responses with an array of sensory and motor variables, we find that the network can be clearly divided into distinct functional modules. Comparing aligned data from multiple fish, we find that the spatiotemporal activity dynamics and functional organization are highly stereotyped across individuals. These experiments reveal, for the first time in a vertebrate, the comprehensive functional architecture of the neural circuits underlying a sensorimotor behavior. PMID:24656252

  8. [Histological and molecular classification of gliomas].

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Colin, C; Coulibaly, B; Quilichini, B; Maues De Paula, A; Fernandez, C; Bouvier, C

    2008-01-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent tumors of the central nervous system. The WHO classification, based on the presumed cell origin, distinguishes astrocytic, oligodendrocytic and mixed gliomas. A grading system is based on the presence of the following criteria: increased cellular density, nuclear atypias, mitosis, vascular proliferation and necrosis. The main histological subtype of grade I gliomas are pilocytic astrocytomas, which are benign. Diffuse astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas are low-grade (II) or high-grade (III and IV) tumors. Glioblastomas correspond to grade IV astrocytomas. C. Daumas-Duport et al. have proposed another classification based on histology and imaging data, which distinguishes oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade A (without endothelial proliferation and/or contrast enhancement), oligodendrogliomas and mixed gliomas of grade B (with endothelial proliferation or contrast enhancement), glioblastomas and glioneuronal malignant tumors. Both classifications lack reproducibility. Many studies have searched for a molecular classification. Recurrent abnormalities in gliomas have been found. They encompassed recurrent chromosomal alterations, such as lost of chromosome 10, gain of chromosome 7, deletion of chromosome 1p and 19q, but also activation of the Akt pathway (amplification of EGFR), dysregulation of the cell cycle (deletion of p16, p53). These studies have enabled the description of two molecular subtypes for glioblastomas. De novo glioblastomas, which occur in young patients without of a prior history of brain tumor and harbor frequent amplification of EGFR, deletion of p16 and mutation of PTEN while mutation of p53 is infrequent. Secondary glioblastomas occur in the context of a preexisting low-grade glioma and are characterized by more frequent mutation of p53. On the other side, combined complete deletion of 1p and 19q as the result of the translocation t(1;19)(q10;p10) is highly specific of oligodendrogliomas

  9. Contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor genetic variants to the risk of glioma and PAH-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Gu, Aihua; Ji, Guixiang; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Ailin; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Luo, Chengzhang; Yan, Wei; Zhao, Peng

    2012-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene is involved in the response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. To investigate the hypothesis that the genetic variants in the AHR gene might be a causal genetic susceptibility to PAH-DNA adduct formation and glioma risk, we conducted a case-control study of 384 glioma cases and 384 cancer-free controls to explore the association between six common single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the AHR gene and glioma risk. Using PAH-DNA adducts as biomarkers, we then evaluated the association between PAH-DNA adduct levels and glioma risk based on a tissue microarray including 11 controls and 77 glioma patients. We further explored the contributions of the glioma risk-associated AHR polymorphisms to the levels of PAH-DNA adducts in glioma tissues based on 77 glioma patients. We found that PAH-DNA adduct staining existed in normal brain tissues and grades I-IV gliomas, and the staining intensity was significantly associated with the glioma grade. Two AHR polymorphisms (rs2066853 and rs2158041) demonstrated significant association with glioma risk. Intriguingly, we also found statistically significant associations between these two variants and PAH-DNA adduct levels in glioma tissue. These data suggest the contributions of AHR rs2066853 and rs2158041 to glioma risk and the PAH-DNA adduct levels, which shed new light on gene-environment interactions in the etiology of glioma. Further studies with a larger sample size and ethnically diverse populations are required to elucidate the potential biological mechanism for, as well as the impact of, the susceptibility to glioma due to genetic variants of AHR.

  10. Gefitinib and Radiation Therapy in Treating Children With Newly Diagnosed Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood Oligodendroglioma

  11. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma or Recurrent or Progressive Meningioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-09

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  12. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas: Pharmacotherapeutic Potential of Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Guntuku, Lalita; Naidu, G.M.; Yerra, Veera Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors either benign or malignant originating from the glial tissue. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive form among all gliomas, associated with decimal prognosis due to it's high invasive nature. GBM is also characterized by high recurrence rate and apoptosis resistance features which make the therapeutic targeting very challenging. Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that are acting as focal points in diverse array of cellular functions such as cellular energy metabolism, regulation of ion homeostasis, redox signaling and cell death. Eventual findings of mitochondrial dysfunction include preference of glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and abnormal mitochondria mediated apoptotic machinery are frequently observed in various malignancies including gliomas. In particular, gliomas harbor mitochondrial structure abnormalities, genomic mutations in mtDNA, altered energy metabolism (Warburg effect) along with mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzyme. Numerous natural compounds have shown efficacy in the treatment of gliomas by targeting mitochondrial aberrant signaling cascades. Some of the natural compounds directly target the components of mitochondria whereas others act indirectly through modulating metabolic abnormalities that are consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction. The present review offers a molecular insight into mitochondrial pathology in gliomas and therapeutic mechanisms of some of the promising natural compounds that target mitochondrial dysfunction. This review also sheds light on the challenges and possible ways to overcome the hurdles associated with these natural compounds to enter into the clinical market. PMID:26791479

  13. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-03-15

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes.

  14. Human immunoglobulin G levels of viruses and associated glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Sara; Hjalmars, Ulf; Juto, Per; Wadell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Tjönneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Manjer, Jonas; Almquist, Martin; Melin, Beatrice S

    2011-09-01

    Few consistent etiological factors have been identified for primary brain tumors. Inverse associations to asthma and low levels of varicella-zoster virus, immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in prevalent cases have indicted a role for the immune system in the development of glioma. Because samples from prevalent cases of glioma could be influenced by treatments such as steroids and chemotherapy, we investigated pre-diagnostic samples from three large Scandinavian cohorts. To test the hypothesis that immune response levels to these viruses are associated etiologically with glioma risk, we investigated pre-diagnostic immunoglobulin levels for cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus (Ad), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) including the nuclear antigen (EBNA1) using plasma samples from 197 cases of adult glioma and 394 controls collected from population-based cohorts in Sweden and Denmark. Low VZV IgG levels were marginally significantly more common in glioma cases than the controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.13) for the fourth compared with the first quartile (p = 0.06 for trend). These results were more prominent when analyzing cases with blood sampling at least 2 years before diagnosis (OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.37-1.08) (p = 0.03). No association with glioma risk was observed for CMV, EBV, and adenovirus.

  15. Nicotinic acid inhibits glioma invasion by facilitating Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiejing; Qu, Jiagui; Shi, Yu; Perfetto, Mark; Ping, Zhuxian; Christian, Laura; Niu, Hua; Mei, Shuting; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Xiangcai; Wei, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a formidable disease that commonly leads to death, mainly due to the invasion of tumor cells into neighboring tissues. Therefore, inhibition of tumor cell invasion may provide an effective therapy for malignant glioma. Here we report that nicotinic acid (NA), an essential vitamin, inhibits glioma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of the U251 glioma cells with NA in vitro results in reduced invasion, which is accompanied by a loss of mesenchymal phenotype and an increase in cell-cell adhesion. At the molecular level, transcription of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin is upregulated, leading to accumulation of E-cadherin protein at the cell-cell boundary. This can be attributed to NA’s ability to facilitate the ubiquitination and degradation of Snail1, a transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression. Similarly, NA transiently inhibits neural crest migration in Xenopus embryos in a Snail1-dependent manner, indicating that the mechanism of action for NA in cell migration is evolutionarily conserved. We further show that NA injection blocks the infiltration of tumor cells into the adjacent brain tissues and improves animal survival in a rat model of glioma. These results suggest that NA treatment may be developed into a potential therapy for malignant glioma. PMID:28256591

  16. Targeting the bHLH transcriptional networks by mutated E proteins in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Sarah; Joly, Sandrine; Fries, Michel; Obermair, Franz-Josef; Burn, Felice; Mehmood, Rashid; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Raineteau, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GB) are aggressive primary brain tumors. Helix-loop-helix (HLH, ID proteins) and basic HLH (bHLH, e.g., Olig2) proteins are transcription factors that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation throughout development and into adulthood. Their convergence on many oncogenic signaling pathways combined with the observation that their overexpression in GB correlates with poor clinical outcome identifies these transcription factors as promising therapeutic targets. Important dimerization partners of HLH/bHLH proteins are E proteins that are necessary for nuclear translocation and DNA binding. Here, we overexpressed a wild type or a dominant negative form of E47 (dnE47) that lacks its nuclear localization signal thus preventing nuclear translocation of bHLH proteins in long-term glioma cell lines and in glioma-initiating cell lines and analyzed the effects in vitro and in vivo. While overexpression of E47 was sufficient to induce apoptosis in absence of bHLH proteins, dnE47 was necessary to prevent nuclear translocation of Olig2 and to achieve similar proapoptotic responses. Transcriptional analyses revealed downregulation of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2L1 and the proproliferative gene CDC25A as underlying mechanisms. Overexpression of dnE47 in glioma-initiating cell lines with high HLH and bHLH protein levels reduced sphere formation capacities and expression levels of Nestin, BCL2L1, and CDC25A. Finally, the in vivo induction of dnE47 expression in established xenografts prolonged survival. In conclusion, our data introduce a novel approach to jointly neutralize HLH and bHLH transcriptional networks activities, and identify these transcription factors as potential targets in glioma.

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha . E-mail: narayana@mskcc.org; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.

  18. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-12-08

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma.

  19. Evaluation of Eight Plasma Proteins as Candidate Blood-Based Biomarkers for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Ryan P.; Everett, Allen; Dulloor, Pratima; Korley, Frederick K.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Blair, Cherie; Grossman, Stuart A.; Holdhoff, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Eight brain-derived proteins were evaluated regarding their potential for further development as a blood-based biomarker for malignant gliomas. Plasma levels for glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurogranin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, intracellular adhesion molecule 5, metallothionein-3, beta-synuclein, S100 and neuron specific enolase were tested in plasma of 23 patients with high-grade gliomas (WHO grade IV), 11 low-grade gliomas (WHO grade II), and 15 healthy subjects. Compared to the healthy controls, none of the proteins appeared to be specific for glioblastomas. However, the data are suggestive of higher protein levels in gliosarcomas (n = 2), which may deserve further exploration. PMID:25019213

  20. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-08

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization.

  1. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  2. Electrical brain imaging reveals spatio-temporal dynamics of timbre perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Baumann, Simon; Jancke, Lutz

    2006-10-01

    Timbre is a major attribute of sound perception and a key feature for the identification of sound quality. Here, we present event-related brain potentials (ERPs) obtained from sixteen healthy individuals while they discriminated complex instrumental tones (piano, trumpet, and violin) or simple sine wave tones that lack the principal features of timbre. Data analysis yielded enhanced N1 and P2 responses to instrumental tones relative to sine wave tones. Furthermore, we applied an electrical brain imaging approach using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) to estimate the neural sources of N1/P2 responses. Separate significance tests of instrumental vs. sine wave tones for N1 and P2 revealed distinct regions as principally governing timbre perception. In an initial stage (N1), timbre perception recruits left and right (peri-)auditory fields with an activity maximum over the right posterior Sylvian fissure (SF) and the posterior cingulate (PCC) territory. In the subsequent stage (P2), we uncovered enhanced activity in the vicinity of the entire cingulate gyrus. The involvement of extra-auditory areas in timbre perception may imply the presence of a highly associative processing level which might be generally related to musical sensations and integrates widespread medial areas of the human cortex. In summary, our results demonstrate spatio-temporally distinct stages in timbre perception which not only involve bilateral parts of the peri-auditory cortex but also medially situated regions of the human brain associated with emotional and auditory imagery functions.

  3. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  4. Neural correlates of apathy revealed by lesion mapping in participants with traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristine M; Monte, Olga Dal; Raymont, Vanessa; Wassermann, Eric M; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Apathy, common in neurological disorders, is defined as disinterest and loss of motivation, with a reduction in self-initiated activity. Research in diseased populations has shown that apathy is associated with variations in the volume of brain regions such as the anterior cingulate and the frontal lobes. The goal of this study was to determine the neural signatures of apathy in people with penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBIs), as to our knowledge, these have not been studied in this sample. We studied 176 male Vietnam War veterans with pTBIs using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and apathy scores from the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), a structured inventory of symptoms completed by a caregiver. Our results revealed that increased apathy symptoms were associated with brain damage in limbic and cortical areas of the left hemisphere including the anterior cingulate, inferior, middle, and superior frontal regions, insula, and supplementary motor area. Our results are consistent with the literature, and extend them to people with focal pTBI. Apathy is a significant symptom since it can reduce participation of the patient in family and other social interactions, and diminish affective decision-making.

  5. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Varela, Juan A; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  6. Abnormal Spontaneous Brain Activity in Women with Premenstrual Syndrome Revealed by Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hai; Pang, Yong; Liu, Peng; Liu, Huimei; Duan, Gaoxiong; Liu, Yanfei; Tang, Lijun; Tao, Jien; Wen, Danhong; Li, Shasha; Liang, Lingyan; Deng, Demao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have revealed that the etiologies of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refer to menstrual cycle related brain changes. However, its intrinsic neural mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to assess abnormal spontaneous brain activity and to explicate the intricate neural mechanism of PMS using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). Materials and Methods: The data of 20 PMS patients (PMS group) and 21 healthy controls (HC group) were analyzed by regional homogeneity (ReHo) method during the late luteal phase of menstrual cycle. In addition, all the participants were asked to complete a daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) questionnaire. Results: Compared with HC group, the results showed that PMS group had increased ReHo mainly in the bilateral precuneus, left inferior temporal cortex (ITC), right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and left middle frontal cortex (MFC) and decreased ReHo in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) at the luteal phase. Moreover, the PMS group had higher DRSP scores, and the DRSP scores positively correlated with ReHo in left MFC and negatively correlated with ReHo in the right ACC. Conclusion: Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity is found in PMS patients and the severity of symptom is specifically related to the left MFC and right ACC. The present findings may be beneficial to explicate the intricate neural mechanism of PMS. PMID:28243196

  7. Human subcortical brain asymmetries in 15,847 people worldwide reveal effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Mathias, Samuel R; vanErp, Theo G M; Whelan, Christopher D; Zwiers, Marcel P; Abe, Yoshinari; Abramovic, Lucija; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Arolt, Volker; Artiges, Eric; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Baboyan, Vatche G; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth; Bastin, Mark E; Baune, Bernhard T; Blangero, John; Bokde, Arun L W; Boedhoe, Premika S W; Bose, Anushree; Brem, Silvia; Brodaty, Henry; Bromberg, Uli; Brooks, Samantha; Büchel, Christian; Buitelaar, Jan; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cattrell, Anna; Cheng, Yuqi; Conrod, Patricia J; Conzelmann, Annette; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crivello, Fabrice; Dannlowski, Udo; de Zubicaray, Greig I; de Zwarte, Sonja M C; Deary, Ian J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Doan, Nhat Trung; Donohoe, Gary; Dørum, Erlend S; Ehrlich, Stefan; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Flor, Herta; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Frouin, Vincent; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gill, Michael; Suarez, Andrea Gonzalez; Gowland, Penny; Grabe, Hans J; Grotegerd, Dominik; Gruber, Oliver; Hagenaars, Saskia; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hauser, Tobias U; Heinz, Andreas; Hibar, Derrek P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoogman, Martine; Howells, Fleur M; Hu, Hao; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Huyser, Chaim; Ittermann, Bernd; Jahanshad, Neda; Jönsson, Erik G; Jurk, Sarah; Kahn, Rene S; Kelly, Sinead; Kraemer, Bernd; Kugel, Harald; Kwon, Jun Soo; Lemaitre, Herve; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Lochner, Christine; Luciano, Michelle; Marquand, Andre F; Martin, Nicholas G; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mataix-Cols, David; Mather, Karen; McDonald, Colm; McMahon, Katie L; Medland, Sarah E; Menchón, José M; Morris, Derek W; Mothersill, Omar; Maniega, Susana Munoz; Mwangi, Benson; Nakamae, Takashi; Nakao, Tomohiro; Narayanaswaamy, Janardhanan C; Nees, Frauke; Nordvik, Jan E; Onnink, A Marten H; Opel, Nils; Ophoff, Roel; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Papadopoulos Orfanos, Dimitri; Pauli, Paul; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Reddy, Janardhan Yc; Renteria, Miguel E; Roiz-Santiáñez, Roberto; Roos, Annerine; Royle, Natalie A; Sachdev, Perminder; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Schmaal, Lianne; Schumann, Gunter; Shumskaya, Elena; Smolka, Michael N; Soares, Jair C; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Stein, Dan J; Strike, Lachlan T; Toro, Roberto; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Uhlmann, Anne; Hernández, Maria Valdés; van den Heuvel, Odile A; van der Meer, Dennis; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Dick J; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Vetter, Nora C; Vuletic, Daniella; Walitza, Susanne; Walter, Henrik; Walton, Esther; Wang, Zhen; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wen, Wei; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Robert; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolfers, Thomas; Wright, Margaret J; Xu, Jian; Xu, Xiufeng; Yun, Je-Yeon; Zhao, JingJing; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Mazoyer, Bernard; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2016-10-13

    The two hemispheres of the human brain differ functionally and structurally. Despite over a century of research, the extent to which brain asymmetry is influenced by sex, handedness, age, and genetic factors is still controversial. Here we present the largest ever analysis of subcortical brain asymmetries, in a harmonized multi-site study using meta-analysis methods. Volumetric asymmetry of seven subcortical structures was assessed in 15,847 MRI scans from 52 datasets worldwide. There were sex differences in the asymmetry of the globus pallidus and putamen. Heritability estimates, derived from 1170 subjects belonging to 71 extended pedigrees, revealed that additive genetic factors influenced the asymmetry of these two structures and that of the hippocampus and thalamus. Handedness had no detectable effect on subcortical asymmetries, even in this unprecedented sample size, but the asymmetry of the putamen varied with age. Genetic drivers of asymmetry in the hippocampus, thalamus and basal ganglia may affect variability in human cognition, including susceptibility to psychiatric disorders.

  8. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  9. Alpinetin targets glioma stem cells by suppressing Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yan, Zhiyong; Liu, Xia; Che, Shusheng; Wang, Chao; Yao, Weicheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is among the most common human malignancies with poor prognosis. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are the culprit of glioma, suggesting that GSCs are potential therapeutic targets. Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role for the function of GSCs, implying that suppression of Notch pathway may be an effective strategy for GSC-targeting therapy. In this study, we found that alpinetin, a natural compound, can suppress the proliferation and invasiveness of GSCs and induce apoptosis in GSCs. Immunoblot analysis and luciferase assay revealed that Notch signaling was suppressed by alpinetin. Furthermore, restoration of Notch signaling activity rescued the effect of alpinetin on GSC's function. The anti-tumor activity of alpinetin was further confirmed in an animal model. Collectively, targeting of GSC by alpinetin is an effective strategy for glioma therapy.

  10. A functional genomics screen in planarians reveals regulators of whole-brain regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Brubacher, John L; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Planarians regenerate all body parts after injury, including the central nervous system (CNS). We capitalized on this distinctive trait and completed a gene expression-guided functional screen to identify factors that regulate diverse aspects of neural regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea. Our screen revealed molecules that influence neural cell fates, support the formation of a major connective hub, and promote reestablishment of chemosensory behavior. We also identified genes that encode signaling molecules with roles in head regeneration, including some that are produced in a previously uncharacterized parenchymal population of cells. Finally, we explored genes downregulated during planarian regeneration and characterized, for the first time, glial cells in the planarian CNS that respond to injury by repressing several transcripts. Collectively, our studies revealed diverse molecules and cell types that underlie an animal’s ability to regenerate its brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17002.001 PMID:27612384

  11. A functional genomics screen in planarians reveals regulators of whole-brain regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Brubacher, John L; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-09-09

    Planarians regenerate all body parts after injury, including the central nervous system (CNS). We capitalized on this distinctive trait and completed a gene expression-guided functional screen to identify factors that regulate diverse aspects of neural regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea. Our screen revealed molecules that influence neural cell fates, support the formation of a major connective hub, and promote reestablishment of chemosensory behavior. We also identified genes that encode signaling molecules with roles in head regeneration, including some that are produced in a previously uncharacterized parenchymal population of cells. Finally, we explored genes downregulated during planarian regeneration and characterized, for the first time, glial cells in the planarian CNS that respond to injury by repressing several transcripts. Collectively, our studies revealed diverse molecules and cell types that underlie an animal's ability to regenerate its brain.

  12. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  13. Wild-Type Reovirus in Combination With Sargramostim in Treating Younger Patients With High-Grade Relapsed or Refractory Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-09

    Childhood Astrocytoma; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Refractory Brain Neoplasm

  14. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0 · 05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings.

  15. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0·05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  16. Combining functional and anatomical connectivity reveals brain networks for auditory language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Saur, Dorothee; Schelter, Björn; Schnell, Susanne; Kratochvil, David; Küpper, Hanna; Kellmeyer, Philipp; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Klöppel, Stefan; Glauche, Volkmar; Lange, Rüdiger; Mader, Wolfgang; Feess, David; Timmer, Jens; Weiller, Cornelius

    2010-02-15

    Cognitive functions are organized in distributed, overlapping, and interacting brain networks. Investigation of those large-scale brain networks is a major task in neuroimaging research. Here, we introduce a novel combination of functional and anatomical connectivity to study the network topology subserving a cognitive function of interest. (i) In a given network, direct interactions between network nodes are identified by analyzing functional MRI time series with the multivariate method of directed partial correlation (dPC). This method provides important improvements over shortcomings that are typical for ordinary (partial) correlation techniques. (ii) For directly interacting pairs of nodes, a region-to-region probabilistic fiber tracking on diffusion tensor imaging data is performed to identify the most probable anatomical white matter fiber tracts mediating the functional interactions. This combined approach is applied to the language domain to investigate the network topology of two levels of auditory comprehension: lower-level speech perception (i.e., phonological processing) and higher-level speech recognition (i.e., semantic processing). For both processing levels, dPC analyses revealed the functional network topology and identified central network nodes by the number of direct interactions with other nodes. Tractography showed that these interactions are mediated by distinct ventral (via the extreme capsule) and dorsal (via the arcuate/superior longitudinal fascicle fiber system) long- and short-distance association tracts as well as commissural fibers. Our findings demonstrate how both processing routines are segregated in the brain on a large-scale network level. Combining dPC with probabilistic tractography is a promising approach to unveil how cognitive functions emerge through interaction of functionally interacting and anatomically interconnected brain regions.

  17. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  18. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo.

  19. Simultaneous PET-MRI reveals brain function in activated and resting state on metabolic, hemodynamic and multiple temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Wehrl, Hans F; Hossain, Mosaddek; Lankes, Konrad; Liu, Chih-Chieh; Bezrukov, Ilja; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz; Reischl, Gerald; Pichler, Bernd J

    2013-09-01

    Combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new tool to study functional processes in the brain. Here we study brain function in response to a barrel-field stimulus simultaneously using PET, which traces changes in glucose metabolism on a slow time scale, and functional MRI (fMRI), which assesses fast vascular and oxygenation changes during activation. We found spatial and quantitative discrepancies between the PET and the fMRI activation data. The functional connectivity of the rat brain was assessed by both modalities: the fMRI approach determined a total of nine known neural networks, whereas the PET method identified seven glucose metabolism-related networks. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combined PET-MRI for the simultaneous study of the brain at activation and rest, revealing comprehensive and complementary information to further decode brain function and brain networks.

  20. K-shell decomposition reveals hierarchical cortical organization of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahav, Nir; Ksherim, Baruch; Ben-Simon, Eti; Maron-Katz, Adi; Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo

    2016-08-01

    In recent years numerous attempts to understand the human brain were undertaken from a network point of view. A network framework takes into account the relationships between the different parts of the system and enables to examine how global and complex functions might emerge from network topology. Previous work revealed that the human brain features ‘small world’ characteristics and that cortical hubs tend to interconnect among themselves. However, in order to fully understand the topological structure of hubs, and how their profile reflect the brain’s global functional organization, one needs to go beyond the properties of a specific hub and examine the various structural layers that make up the network. To address this topic further, we applied an analysis known in statistical physics and network theory as k-shell decomposition analysis. The analysis was applied on a human cortical network, derived from MRI\\DSI data of six participants. Such analysis enables us to portray a detailed account of cortical connectivity focusing on different neighborhoods of inter-connected layers across the cortex. Our findings reveal that the human cortex is highly connected and efficient, and unlike the internet network contains no isolated nodes. The cortical network is comprised of a nucleus alongside shells of increasing connectivity that formed one connected giant component, revealing the human brain’s global functional organization. All these components were further categorized into three hierarchies in accordance with their connectivity profile, with each hierarchy reflecting different functional roles. Such a model may explain an efficient flow of information from the lowest hierarchy to the highest one, with each step enabling increased data integration. At the top, the highest hierarchy (the nucleus) serves as a global interconnected collective and demonstrates high correlation with consciousness related regions, suggesting that the nucleus might serve as a

  1. AKT Axis, miR-21, and RECK Play Pivotal Roles in Dihydroartemisinin Killing Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Tao-Lan; Wu, Lan-Xiang; Zou, He-Cun; Li, Shuang; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is known to play important roles in inhibiting proliferation rate, inducing apoptosis, as well as hindering the metastasis and invasion of glioma cells, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear so far. In this study, methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), colony-forming, wound healing, invasion, and apoptosis assays were performed to investigate the effect of DHA on malignant glioma cells. Results showed that DHA induced apoptosis of malignant glioma cells through Protein Kinase B (AKT) axis, induced death of malignant glioma cells by downregulating miR-21, and inhibited the invasion of malignant glioma cells corresponding with up-regulation of the reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK). These results revealed that AKT axis, miR-21, and RECK play pivotal roles in DHA killing malignant glioma cells, suggesting that DHA is a potential agent for treating glioma. PMID:28208619

  2. The transglutaminase 2 gene is aberrantly hypermethylated in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lisa M.; Schooler, Kevin P.; Ai, Lingbao; Klop, Corinne; Qiu, Jingxin; Robertson, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that catalyzes protein/protein crosslinking. Because extracellular TG2 crosslinks components of the extracellular matrix, TG2 is thought to function as a suppressor of cellular invasion. We have recently uncovered that the TG2 gene (TGM2) is a target for epigenetic silencing in breast cancer, highlighting a molecular mechanism that drives reduced TG2 expression, and this aberrant molecular event may contribute to invasiveness in this tumor type. Because tumor invasiveness is a primary determinant of brain tumor aggressiveness, we sought to determine if TGM2 is targeted for epigenetic silencing in glioma. Analysis of TGM2 gene methylation in a panel of cultured human glioma cells indicated that the 5′ flanking region of the TGM2 gene is hypermethylated and that this feature is associated with reduced TG2 expression as judged by immunoblotting. Further, culturing glioma cells in the presence of the global DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A resulted in re-expression of TG2 in these lines. In primary brain tumors we observed that the TGM2 promoter is commonly hypermethylated and that this feature is a cancer-associated phenomenon. Using publically available databases, TG2 expression in gliomas was found to vary widely, with many tumors showing overexpression or underexpression of this gene. Since overexpression of TG2 leads to resistance to doxorubicin through the ectopic activation of NFκB, we sought to examine the effects of recombinant TG2 expression in glioma cells treated with commonly used brain tumor therapeutics. We observed that in addition to doxorubicin, TG2 expression drove resistance to CCNU; however, TG2 expression did not alter sensitivity to other drugs tested. Finally, a catalytically null mutant of TG2 was also able to support doxorubicin resistance in glioma cells indicating that transglutaminase activity is not necessary

  3. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    PubMed

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration.

  4. Steroid requirements during radiotherapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Marantidou, Athina; Levy, Christine; Duquesne, Alyette; Ursu, Renata; Bailon, Olivier; Coman, Irene; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is the standard treatment for high-grade gliomas. However, toxicity may develop during RT, such as brain edema or worsening of neurological symptoms. Surprisingly, no dedicated study had focused on steroid requirements during RT in adult patients with malignant gliomas. We evaluated prospectively all patients with malignant gliomas treated by RT in a single center from July 2006 to May 2009. Age, sex, initial Karnofsky performance status (KPS), tumor localization and histology, type of surgical resection, clinical target volume, total dose and duration of RT, concomitant treatment with temozolomide, and steroid dosage during RT and at 1 and 3 months after RT were recorded in all patients. Most of the 80 patients (70%) were already taking steroids before RT. Half of them (55%) required initiation or further steroids increase during RT. The median time to steroid increase was 8 days. Only 13% of patients remained free of steroids during RT, and the mean maximal dosage of prednisone was 55 ± 48 mg. At 3 months after RT, 29% of patients were free of steroids, and the mean prednisone dosage was 32 ± 50 mg. Unresected tumors and initial KPS ≤80% were the only variables associated with higher steroid requirements on multivariate analysis. In our series, almost all patients required steroids during RT. Poor initial KPS and biopsy were associated with higher steroid requirements.

  5. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  6. Application of iron oxide nanoparticles in glioma imaging and therapy: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiao; Du, Xue-Song; Zhang, Jin-Long; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and have a very dismal prognosis. However, recent advancements in nanomedicine and nanotechnology provide opportunities for personalized treatment regimens to improve the poor prognosis of patients suffering from glioma. This comprehensive review starts with an outline of the current status facing glioma. It then provides an overview of the state-of-the-art applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to glioma diagnostics and therapeutics, including MR contrast enhancement, drug delivery, cell labeling and tracking, magnetic hyperthermia treatment and magnetic particle imaging. It also addresses current challenges associated with the biological barriers and IONP design with an emphasis on recent advances and innovative approaches for glioma targeting strategies. Opportunities for future development are highlighted.

  7. Gab3 overexpression in human glioma mediates Akt activation and tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weiting; Zhang, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    This current study tested expression and potential biological functions of Gab3 in human glioma. Gab3 mRNA and protein expression was significantly elevated in human glioma tissues and glioma cells. Its level was however low in normal brain tissues and primary human astrocytes. In both established (U251MG cell line) and primary human glioma cells, Gab3 knockdown by shRNA/siRNA significantly inhibited Akt activation and cell proliferation. Reversely, forced Gab3 overexpression in U251MG cells promoted Akt activation and cell proliferation. In vivo, the growth of U251MG tumors in nude mice was inhibited following expressing Gab3 shRNA. Akt activation in cancer tissues was also suppressed by Gab3 shRNA. Together, we conclude that Gab3 overexpression in human glioma mediates Akt activation and cancer cell proliferation. PMID:28291820

  8. Silencing of WNK2 is associated with upregulation of MMP2 and JNK in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Angela Margarida; Pinto, Filipe; Martinho, Olga; Oliveira, Maria José; Jordan, Peter; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes that degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), thus assisting invasion. Upregulation of MMPs, frequently reported in gliomas, is associated with aggressive behavior. WNK2 is a tumor suppressor gene expressed in normal brain, and silenced by promoter methylation in gliomas. Patients without WNK2 exhibited poor prognosis, and its downregulation was associated with increased glioma cell invasion. Here we showed that MMP2 expression and activity are increased in glioma cell lines that do not express WNK2. Also, WNK2 inhibited JNK, a process associated with decreasing levels of MMP2. Thus, WNK2 promoter methylation and silencing in gliomas is associated with increased JNK activation and MMP2 expression and activity, thus explaining in part tumor cell invasion potential. PMID:25596741

  9. Centrosomal Protein of 55 Regulates Glucose Metabolism, Proliferation and Apoptosis of Glioma Cells via the Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangzhi; Liu, Mingna; Wang, Hongjun; Yu, Shan; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Jiahang; Han, Ke; Shen, Jia; Zhu, Minwei; Lin, Zhiguo; Jiang, Chuanlu; Guo, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioma is one of the most common and most aggressive brain tumors in humans. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the onset and the progression of glioma are elusive and controversial. Centrosomal protein of 55 (CEP55) was initially described as a highly coiled-coil protein that plays critical roles in cell division, but was recently identified as being overexpressed in many human cancers. The function of CEP55 has not previously been characterized in glioma. We aim to discover the effect and mechanism of CEP55 in glioma development. Method: qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze CEP55 expression. Glucose uptake, western blot, MTS, CCK-8, Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining assays were performed to investigate the role and mechanism of CEP55 on glioma cell process. Results: We found that the levels of CEP55 expression were upregulated in glioma. In addition, CEP55 appeared to regulate glucose metabolism of glioma cells. Furthermore, knockdown of CEP55 inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in glioma. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence that knockdown of CEP55 inhibited glioma development via suppressing the activity of Akt/mTOR signaling. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that CEP55 regulates glucose metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis of glioma cells via the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and its promotive effect on glioma tumorigenesis can be a potential target for glioma therapy in the future. PMID:27471559

  10. Expression of TIP-1 Confers Radioresistance of Malignant Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas represent one group of tumors that poorly respond to ionizing radiation (IR) alone or combined with chemotherapeutic agents because of the intrinsic or acquired resistance. In this study, TIP-1 was identified as one novel protein that confers resistance of glioma cells to IR. Methodology/Principal Findings Meta-analysis indicated that high TIP-1 expression levels correlate with the poor prognosis of human malignant gliomas after radiotherapy. Studies with established human glioma cell lines demonstrated that TIP-1 depletion with specific shRNAs sensitized the cells to IR, whereas an ectopic expression of TIP-1 protected the glioma cells from the IR-induced DNA damage and cell death. Biochemical studies indicated that TIP-1 protein promoted p53 ubiquitination and resulted in a reduced p53 protein level. Furthermore, p53 and its ubiquitination are required for the TIP-1 regulated cellular response to IR. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified that TIP-1, through its single PDZ domain, binds to the carboxyl terminus of LZAP that has been studied as one tumor suppressor functioning through ARF binding and p53 activation. It was revealed that the presence of TIP-1 enhances the protein association between LZAP and ARF and modulates the functionality of ARF/HDM2 toward multi-ubiquitination of p53, while depleting TIP-1 rescued p53 from polyubiquitination and degradation in the irradiated glioma cells. Studies with a mouse xenograft model indicated that depleting TIP-1 within D54 cells improved the tumor growth control with IR. Conclusions/Significance This study provided the first evidence showing that TIP-1 modulates p53 protein stability and is involved in the radioresistance of malignant gliomas, suggesting that antagonizing TIP-1 might be one novel approach to sensitize malignant gliomas to radiotherapy. PMID:23028987

  11. Brain Network Activation (BNA) reveals scopolamine-induced impairment of visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Reches, Amit; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Laufer, Ilan; Shani-Hershkovitch, Revital; Ziv, Keren; Kerem, Dani; Gal, Noga; Stern, Yaki; Cukierman, Guy; Romach, Myroslava K; Sellers, Edward M; Geva, Amir B

    2014-09-01

    The overarching goal of this event-related potential (ERP) study was to examine the effects of scopolamine on the dynamics of brain network activation using a novel ERP network analysis method known as Brain Network Activation (BNA). BNA was used for extracting group-common stimulus-activated network patterns elicited to matching probe stimuli in the context of a delayed matching-to-sample task following placebo and scopolamine treatments administered to healthy participants. The BNA extracted networks revealed the existence of two pathophysiological mechanisms following scopolamine, disconnection, and compensation. Specifically, weaker frontal theta and parietal alpha coupling was accompanied with enhanced fronto-centro-parietal theta activation relative to placebo. In addition, using the characteristic BNA network of each treatment as well as corresponding literature-guided selective subnetworks as combined biomarkers managed to differentiate between individual responses to each of the treatments. Behavioral effects associated with scopolamine included delayed response time and impaired response accuracy. These results indicate that the BNA method is sensitive to the effects of scopolamine on working memory and that it may potentially enable diagnosis and treatment assessment of dysfunctions associated with cholinergic deficiency.

  12. Language-specific phoneme representations revealed by electric and magnetic brain responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näätänen, Risto; Lehtokoski, Anne; Lennes, Mietta; Cheour, Marie; Huotilainen, Minna; Iivonen, Antti; Vainio, Martti; Alku, Paavo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Luuk, Aavo; Allik, Jüri; Sinkkonen, Janne; Alho, Kimmo

    1997-01-01

    There is considerable debate about whether the early processing of sounds depends on whether they form part of speech. Proponents of such speech specificity postulate the existence of language-dependent memory traces, which are activated in the processing of speech1-3 but not when equally complex, acoustic non-speech stimuli are processed. Here we report the existence of these traces in the human brain. We presented to Finnish subjects the Finnish phoneme prototype /e/ as the frequent stimulus, and other Finnish phoneme prototypes or a non-prototype (the Estonian prototype /õ/) as the infrequent stimulus. We found that the brain's automatic change-detection response, reflected electrically as the mismatch negativity (MMN)4-10, was enhanced when the infrequent, deviant stimulus was a prototype (the Finnish /ö/) relative to when it was a non-prototype (the Estonian /õ/). These phonemic traces, revealed by MMN, are language-specific, as /õ/ caused enhancement of MMN in Estonians. Whole-head magnetic recordings11,12 located the source of this native-language, phoneme-related response enhancement, and thus the language-specific memory traces, in the auditory cortex of the left hemisphere.

  13. Source-based morphometry reveals distinct patterns of aberrant brain volume in delusional infestation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Robert Ch; Huber, Markus; Lepping, Peter; Sambataro, Fabio; Depping, Malte S; Karner, Martin; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2014-01-03

    Little is known about the neural correlates of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. So far, evidence comes mainly from case reports and case series. We investigated brain morphology in 16 DI patients and 16 healthy controls using structural magnetic resonance imaging and a multivariate data analysis technique, i.e. source-based morphometry (SBM). In addition, we explored differences in brain structure in patient subgroups based on disease aetiology. SBM revealed two patterns exhibiting significantly (p<0.05, Bonferroni-corrected) lower grey and higher white matter volume in DI patients compared to controls. Lower grey matter volume was found in medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, medial temporal lobe structures (parahippocampus and hippocampus), sensorimotor cortices, bilateral insula and thalamus and inferior parietal regions. Higher white matter volume was found in medial and middle frontal and temporal cortices, left insula and lentiform nucleus. Grey matter volume was abnormal in both "psychiatric" (primary DI and DI associated with an affective disorder) and "organic" DI (DI due to a medical condition). In contrast, aberrant white matter volume was only confirmed for the "organic" DI patient subgroup. These results suggest prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal dysfunction underlying DI. Moreover, the data suggest that aetiologically distinct presentations of DI share similar patterns of abnormal grey matter volume, whereas aberrant white matter volume appears to be restricted to organic cases.

  14. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals brain regions mediating the response to resistive expiratory loads in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, D; Omidvar, O; Kirlew, K A; Hathout, G M; Lufkin, R B; Harper, R M

    1996-01-01

    Obstructive lung disease is the most common form of respiratory disturbance. However, the location of brain structures underlying the ventilatory response to resistive expiratory loads is unknown in humans. To study this issue, midsagittal magnetic resonance images were acquired in eight healthy volunteers before and after application of a moderate resistive expiratory load (30 cmH2O/liter/s), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) strategies (1.5-T magnetic resonance; repetition time: 72 ms; echo time: 45 ms; flip angle: 30 degrees; field of view: 26 cm; slice thickness: 5 mm; 128 x 256 x 1 number of excitations). Digital image subtractions and region of interest analyses revealed significant increases in fMRI signal intensity in discrete areas of the ventral medulla, ventral and dorsal pontomedullary structures, basal forebrain, and cerebellum. Upon load withdrawal, a rapid fMRI signal off-transient occurred in all activated sites. Application of an identical load immediately after recovery from the initial stimulus resulted in smaller signal increases (P < 0.02). Prolongation of load duration was associated with progressive fMRI signal decrease across activated regions. In three additional subjects, the threshold for significant MRI signal increases was established at expiratory loads > or = 15 cmH2O/liter/s and was dose dependent with increasing loads. We conclude that resistive expiratory loads > or = 15 cmH2O/liter/s elicit regional activation of discrete brain locations in humans. PMID:8550849

  16. Glycogen distribution in the microwave‐fixed mouse brain reveals heterogeneous astrocytic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Otto; Ashida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kouichi C.

    2016-01-01

    In the brain, glycogen metabolism has been implied in synaptic plasticity and learning, yet the distribution of this molecule has not been fully described. We investigated cerebral glycogen of the mouse by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two monoclonal antibodies that have different affinities depending on the glycogen size. The use of focused microwave irradiation yielded well‐defined glycogen immunoreactive signals compared with the conventional periodic acid‐Schiff method. The IHC signals displayed a punctate distribution localized predominantly in astrocytic processes. Glycogen immunoreactivity (IR) was high in the hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and cerebellar molecular layer, whereas it was low in the white matter and most of the subcortical structures. Additionally, glycogen distribution in the hippocampal CA3‐CA1 and striatum had a ‘patchy’ appearance with glycogen‐rich and glycogen‐poor astrocytes appearing in alternation. The glycogen patches were more evident with large‐molecule glycogen in young adult mice but they were hardly observable in aged mice (1–2 years old). Our results reveal brain region‐dependent glycogen accumulation and possibly metabolic heterogeneity of astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:1532–1545 PMID:27353480

  17. Subgroup characteristics of insular low-grade glioma based on clinical and molecular analysis of 42 cases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Chen, Ling-chao; Sun, Zelin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Zhiyong; Yao, Yu; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2016-02-01

    Although the classification of insular glioma has been established based on the anatomical location in order to facilitate personalized surgical resection, the diagnosis based on anatomical and functional characteristics becomes more complex when insular tumors extend into either the frontobasal brain region and/or the temporal lobe, as part of the limbic system. Moreover, prognosis of insular tumor resection is still controversial. Further analysis of subgroup characteristics of insular grade II gliomas based on clinical and molecular analysis is required to reliably determine patients' survival rates. In this retrospective study 20 purely insular grade II gliomas patients and 22 paralimbic grade II gliomas that involved frontal and/or temporal lobes were compared with regard to epidemiological and clinical characteristics. The molecular profiles including Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, and P53 mutations, 1p19q co-deletion were analyzed, and microRNA profiles were assessed by microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Purely insular grade II gliomas displayed a high frequency of IDH1 mutations with favorable outcome. IDH1 mutated paralimbic glioma shared many parameters with the purely insular glioma in respect to growth patterns, survival, and microRNA profile, but differed significantly from the IDH1 wild type paralimbic gliomas. Our findings suggest that IDH1 mutations can define subpopulations of insular gliomas with distinct disease entities regardless of tumor extension patterns. These findings could be useful to develop a customized treatment strategy for insular glioma patients.

  18. Skull and brain of a 300-million-year-old chimaeroid fish revealed by synchrotron holotomography

    PubMed Central

    Pradel, Alan; Langer, Max; Maisey, John G.; Geffard-Kuriyama, Didier; Cloetens, Peter; Janvier, Philippe; Tafforeau, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Living cartilaginous fishes, or chondrichthyans, include numerous elasmobranch (sharks and rays) species but only few chimaeroid (ratfish) species. The early history of chimaeroids, or holocephalans, and the modalities of their divergence from elasmobranchs are much debated. During Carboniferous times, 358–300 million years (Myr) ago, they underwent a remarkable evolutionary radiation, with some odd and poorly understood forms, including the enigmatic iniopterygians that were known until now from poorly informative flattened impressions. Here, we report iniopterygian skulls found preserved in 3 dimensions in ≈300-Myr-old concretions from Oklahoma and Kansas. The study was performed by using conventional X-ray microtomography (μCT), as well as absorption-based synchrotron microtomography (SR-μCT) [Tafforeau P, et al. (2006) Applications of X-ray synchrotron microtomography for non-destructive 3D studies of paleontological specimens. Appl Phys A 83:95–202] and a new holotomographic approach [Guigay P, Langer M, Boistel R, Cloetens P (2007) Mixed transfer function and transport of intensity approach for phase retrieval in the Fresnel region. Opt Lett 32:1617–1619], which revealed their peculiar anatomy. Iniopterygians also share unique characters with living chimaeroids, suggesting that the key chimaeroid skull features were already established 300 Myr ago. Moreover, SR-μCT of an articulated skull revealed a strikingly brain-shaped structure inside the endocranial cavity, which seems to be an exceptional case of soft-tissue mineralization of the brain, presumably as a result of microbially induced postmortem phosphatization. This was imaged with exceptional accuracy by using holotomography, which demonstrates its great potential to image preserved soft parts in dense fossils. PMID:19273859

  19. Serum proteomics of glioma: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Nijaguna, Mamatha B; Kumar, Durairaj Mohan

    2009-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with glioblastoma, the most malignant adult glial brain tumor, remains poor in spite of advances in treatment procedures, including surgical resection, irradiation and chemotherapy. Genetic heterogeneity of glioblastoma warrants extensive studies in order to gain a thorough understanding of the biology of this tumor. While there have been several studies of global transcript profiling of glioma with the identification of gene signatures for diagnosis and disease management, translation into clinics is yet to happen. Serum biomarkers have the potential to revolutionize the process of cancer diagnosis, grading, prognostication and treatment response monitoring. Besides having the advantage that serum can be obtained through a less invasive procedure, it contains molecules at an extraordinary dynamic range of ten orders of magnitude in terms of their concentrations. While the conventional methods, such as 2DE, have been in use for many years, the ability to identify the proteins through mass spectrometry techniques such as MALDI-TOF led to an explosion of interest in proteomics. Relatively new high-throughput proteomics methods such as SELDI-TOF and protein microarrays are expected to hasten the process of serum biomarker discovery. This review will highlight the recent advances in the proteomics platform in discovering serum biomarkers and the current status of glioma serum markers. We aim to provide the principles and potential of the latest proteomic approaches and their applications in the biomarker discovery process. Besides providing a comprehensive list of available serum biomarkers of glioma, we will also propose how these markers will revolutionize the clinical management of glioma patients.

  20. CCL2-Expressing Astrocytes Mediate the Extravasation of T Lymphocytes in the Brain. Evidence from Patients with Glioma and Experimental Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ros, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Eduardo D.; Perez-Vallés, Ana; Gallego-Sanchez, José M.; Fernández-Villalba, Emiliano; Barcia, Carlos; Barcia, Carlos; Herrero, Maria-Trinidad

    2012-01-01

    CCL2 is a chemokine involved in brain inflammation, but the way in which it contributes to the entrance of lymphocytes in the parenchyma is unclear. Imaging of the cell type responsible for this task and details on how the process takes place in vivo remain elusive. Herein, we analyze the cell type that overexpresses CCL2 in multiple scenarios of T-cell infiltration in the brain and in three different species. We observe that CCL2+ astrocytes play a part in the infiltration of T-cells in the brain and our analysis shows that the contact of T-cells with perivascular astrocytes occurs, suggesting that may be an important event for lymphocyte extravasation. PMID:22319587

  1. Polyadenylated mRNA staining reveals distinct neuronal phenotypes following endothelin 1, focal brain ischemia, and global brain ischemia/ reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Jill T.; Lewis, Monique K.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Rafols, Jose A.; DeGracia, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Most work on ischemia-induced neuronal death has revolved around the relative contributions of necrosis and apoptosis, but this work has not accounted for the role of ischemia-induced stress responses. An expanded view recognizes a competition between ischemia-induced damage mechanisms and stress responses in the genesis of ischemia-induced neuronal death. An important marker of post-ischemic stress responses is inhibition of neuronal protein synthesis, a morphological correlate of which is the compartmentalization of mRNA away from ribosomes in the form of cytoplasmic mRNA granules. Methods Here we assessed the generality of this mRNA granule response following either 10 or 15 minutes global brain ischemia and 1 hour reperfusion, 4 hours focal cerebral ischemia alone, and endothelin 1 intraventricular injection. Results Both global and focal ischemia led to prominent neuronal cytoplasmic mRNA granule formation in layer II cortical neurons. In addition, we report here new post-ischemic cellular phenotypes characterized by the loss of nuclear polyadenylated mRNA staining in cortical neurons following endothelin 1 treatment and 15 minutes global ischemia. Both mRNA granulation and loss of nuclear mRNAs occurred in non-shrunken post-ischemic neurons. Discussion Where cytoplasmic mRNA granules generally appear to mark a protective response in surviving cells, loss of nuclear mRNAs may mark cellular damage leading to cell atrophy/death. Hence, staining for total mRNA may reveal facets of the competition between stress responses and damage mechanisms at early stages in post-ischemic neurons. PMID:21499502

  2. Synaptic protein ubiquitination in rat brain revealed by antibody-based ubiquitome analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Jones, Drew R; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Yanji; Peng, Junmin

    2012-09-07

    Protein ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification regulating neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, and its dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Here we report a systematic analysis of ubiquitinated proteome (ubiquitome) in rat brain using a newly developed monoclonal antibody that recognizes the diglycine tag on lysine residues in trypsinized peptides (K-GG peptides). Initial antibody specificity analysis showed that the antibody can distinguish K-GG peptides from linear GG peptides or pseudo K-GG peptides derived from iodoacetamide. To evaluate the false discovery rate of K-GG peptide matches during database search, we introduced a null experiment using bacterial lysate that contains no such peptides. The brain ubiquitome was then analyzed by this antibody enrichment with or without strong cation exchange (SCX) prefractionation. During SCX chromatography, although the vast majority of K-GG peptides were detected in the fractions containing at least three positive charged peptides, specific K-GG peptides with two positive charges (e.g., protein N-terminal acetylated and C-terminal non-K/R peptides) were also identified in early fractions. The reliability of C-terminal K-GG peptides was also extensively investigated. Finally, we collected a data set of 1786 K-GG sites on 2064 peptides in 921 proteins and estimated their abundance by spectral counting. The study reveals a wide range of ubiquitination events on key components in presynaptic region (e.g., Bassoon, NSF, SNAP25, synapsin, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin) and postsynaptic density (e.g., PSD-95, GKAP, CaMKII, as well as receptors for NMDA, AMPA, GABA, serotonin, and acetylcholine). We also determined ubiquitination sites on amyloid precursor protein and alpha synuclein that are thought to be causative agents in Alzhermer's and Parkinson's disorders, respectively. As K-GG peptides can also be produced from Nedd8 or ISG15 modified

  3. KCa3.1 inhibition switches the phenotype of glioma-infiltrating microglia/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, A; D'Alessandro, G; Golia, M T; Grössinger, E M; Di Angelantonio, S; Ragozzino, D; Santoro, A; Esposito, V; Wulff, H; Catalano, M; Limatola, C

    2016-01-01

    Among the strategies adopted by glioma to successfully invade the brain parenchyma is turning the infiltrating microglia/macrophages (M/MΦ) into allies, by shifting them toward an anti-inflammatory, pro-tumor phenotype. Both glioma and infiltrating M/MΦ cells express the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (KCa3.1), and the inhibition of KCa3.1 activity on glioma cells reduces tumor infiltration in the healthy brain parenchyma. We wondered whether KCa3.1 inhibition could prevent the acquisition of a pro-tumor phenotype by M/MΦ cells, thus contributing to reduce glioma development. With this aim, we studied microglia cultured in glioma-conditioned medium or treated with IL-4, as well as M/MΦ cells acutely isolated from glioma-bearing mice and from human glioma biopsies. Under these different conditions, M/MΦ were always polarized toward an anti-inflammatory state, and preventing KCa3.1 activation by 1-[(2-Chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34), we observed a switch toward a pro-inflammatory, antitumor phenotype. We identified FAK and PI3K/AKT as the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenotype switch, activated in sequence after KCa3.1. Anti-inflammatory M/MΦ have higher expression levels of KCa3.1 mRNA (kcnn4) that are reduced by KCa3.1 inhibition. In line with these findings, TRAM-34 treatment, in vivo, significantly reduced the size of tumors in glioma-bearing mice. Our data indicate that KCa3.1 channels are involved in the inhibitory effects exerted by the glioma microenvironment on infiltrating M/MΦ, suggesting a possible role as therapeutic targets in glioma. PMID:27054329

  4. Critical Neural Networks in Awake Surgery for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, Masashi; MIYASHITA, Katsuyoshi; TSUTSUI, Taishi; FURUTA, Takuya; NAKADA, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    From the embarrassing character commonly infiltrating eloquent brain regions, the surgical resection of glioma remains challenging. Owing to the recent development of in vivo visualization techniques for the human brain, white matter regions can be delineated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a routine clinical practice in neurosurgery. In confirmation of the results of DTI tractography, a direct electrical stimulation (DES) substantially influences the investigation of cortico-subcortical networks, which can be identified via specific symptoms elicited in the concerned white matter tracts (eg., the arcuate fascicle, superior longitudinal fascicles, inferior fronto-occipital fascicle, inferior longitudinal fascicle, frontal aslant tract, sensori-motor tracts, optic radiation, and so forth). During awake surgery for glioma using DES, it is important to identify the anatomo-functional structure of white matter tracts to identify the surgical boundaries of brain regions not only to achieve maximal resection of the glioma but also to maximally preserve quality of life. However, the risk exists that neurosurgeons may be misled by the inability of DTI to visualize the actual anatomy of the white matter fibers, resulting in inappropriate decisions regarding surgical boundaries. This review article provides information of the critical neuronal network that is necessary to identify and understand in awake surgery for glioma, with special references to white matter tracts and the author’s experiences. PMID:27250817

  5. Exploiting macrophages as targeted carrier to guide nanoparticles into glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Liang; Qin, Jing; Han, Limei; Zhao, Wenjie; Liang, Jianming; Xie, Zhongyi; Yang, Pei; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The restriction of anti-cancer drugs entry to tumor sites in the brain is a major impediment to the development of new strategies for the treatment of glioma. Based on the finding that macrophages possess an intrinsic homing property enabling them to migrate to tumor sites across the endothelial barriers in response to the excretion of cytokines/chemokines in the diseased tissues, we exploited macrophages as ‘Trojan horses’ to carry drug-loading nanoparticles (NPs), pass through barriers, and offload them into brain tumor sites. Anticancer drugs were encapsulated in nanoparticles to avoid their damage to the cells. Drug loading NPs was then incubated with RAW264.7 cells in vitro to prepare macrophage-NPs (M-NPs). The release of NPs from M-NPs was very slow in medium of DMEM and 10% FBS and significantly accelerated when LPS and IFN-γ were added to mimic tumor inflammation microenvironment. The viability of macrophages was not affected when the concentration of doxorubicin lower than 25 μg/ml. The improvement of cellular uptake and penetration into the core of glioma spheroids of M-NPs compared with NPs was verified in in vitro studies. The tumor-targeting efficiency of NPs was also significantly enhanced after loading into macrophages in nude mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma. Our results provided great potential of macrophages as an active biocarrier to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor sites in the brain and improve therapeutic effects of glioma. PMID:27213597

  6. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  7. The epidemiology of glioma in adults: a "state of the science" review.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Bauchet, Luc; Davis, Faith G; Deltour, Isabelle; Fisher, James L; Langer, Chelsea Eastman; Pekmezci, Melike; Schwartzbaum, Judith A; Turner, Michelle C; Walsh, Kyle M; Wrensch, Margaret R; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2014-07-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing 81% of malignant brain tumors. Although relatively rare, they cause significant mortality and morbidity. Glioblastoma, the most common glioma histology (∼45% of all gliomas), has a 5-year relative survival of ∼5%. A small portion of these tumors are caused by Mendelian disorders, including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genomic analyses of glioma have also produced new evidence about risk and prognosis. Recently discovered biomarkers that indicate improved survival include O⁶-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and a glioma cytosine-phosphate-guanine island methylator phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified heritable risk alleles within 7 genes that are associated with increased risk of glioma. Many risk factors have been examined as potential contributors to glioma risk. Most significantly, these include an increase in risk by exposure to ionizing radiation and a decrease in risk by history of allergies or atopic disease(s). The potential influence of occupational exposures and cellular phones has also been examined, with inconclusive results. We provide a “state of the science” review of current research into causes and risk factors for gliomas in adults.

  8. Novel cancer-testis antigen expression on glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Komiyama, Masaru; Miyata, Haruo; Yagoto, Mika; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Akira; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Nogami, Masahiro; Ito, Ichiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugino, Takashi; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant and aggressive tumors, and has a very poor prognosis with a mean survival time of <2 years, despite intensive treatment using chemo-radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches including immunotherapy have been developed against GBM. For the purpose of identifying novel target antigens contributing to GBM treatment, we developed 17 primary glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients, and analyzed the expression of various tumor antigens and glioma-associated markers using a quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A quantitative PCR using 54 cancer-testis (CT) antigen-specific primers showed that 36 CT antigens were positive in at least 1 of 17 serum-derived cell lines, and 17 antigens were positive in >50% cell lines. Impressively, 6 genes (BAGE, MAGE-A12, CASC5, CTAGE1, DDX43 and IL-13RA2) were detected in all cell lines. The expression of other 13 glioma-associated antigens than CT genes were also investigated, and 10 genes were detected in >70% cell lines. The expression of CT antigen and glioma-associated antigen genes with a high frequency were also verified in IHC analysis. Moreover, a relationship of antigen gene expressions with a high frequency to overall survival was investigated using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) database of the National Cancer Institute, and expression of 6 genes including IL-13RA2 was inversely correlated to overall survival time. Furthermore, 4 genes including DDX43, TDRD1, HER2 and gp100 were identified as MGMT-relevant factors. In the present study, several CT antigen including novel genes were detected in high-grade glioma primary cell lines, which might contribute to developing novel immunotherapy and glioma-specific biomarkers in future.

  9. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  10. Investigation of Adhesion and Mechanical Properties of Human Glioma Cells by Single Cell Force Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma -HG- and Gasc for low-grade glioma -LG-) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25390644

  11. Cloning and characterization of human RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of RTVP-1 in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Cunli; Sarid, Ronit; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Lee, Hae-Kyung; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya

    2007-10-26

    Here, we report the cloning and characterization of RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of human RTVP-1, which was isolated from the U87 glioma cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that RTVP-1b contains an additional 71 base exon between exons 2 and 3 that is missing in RTVP-1, leading to a frame-shift and a different putative protein. The deduced protein was 237 amino acids in length, sharing the N-terminal 141 amino acids with RTVP-1. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that RTVP-1b was expressed in a wide range of tissues and that its expression was different from that of RTVP-1. In contrast, RTVP-1 and RTVP-1b showed similar patterns of expression in astrocytic tumors; highly expressed in glioblastomas as compared to normal brains, low-grade astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Overexpression of RTVP-1b increased glioma cell proliferation but did not affect cell migration. Our results suggest that RTVP-1b represents a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in gliomas.

  12. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Koski, Raymond A; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  13. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  14. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials.

  15. SNTF Immunostaining Reveals Previously Undetected Axonal Pathology in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Victoria E.; Stewart, William; Weber, Maura T.; Cullen, D. Kacy; Siman, Robert; Smith, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a common feature of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may also be a predominant pathology in mild TBI or “concussion”. The rapid deformation of white matter at the instant of trauma can lead to mechanical failure and calcium-dependent proteolysis of the axonal cytoskeleton in association with axonal transport interruption. Recently, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-II spectrin, “SNTF”, was detected in serum acutely following mild TBI in patients and was prognostic for poor clinical outcome. However, direct evidence that this fragment is a marker of DAI has yet to be demonstrated in either humans following TBI or in models of mild TBI. Here we used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to examine for SNTF in brain tissue following both severe and mild TBI. Human severe TBI cases (survival <7d; n=18) were compared to age-matched controls (n=16) from the Glasgow TBI archive. We also we examined brains from an established model of mild TBI at 6h, 48h and 72h post-injury versus shams. IHC specific for SNTF was compared to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP), the current standard for DAI diagnosis and other known markers of axonal pathology including non-phosphorylated neurofilament-H (SMI-32), neurofilament-68 (NF-68) and compacted neurofilament-medium (RMO-14) using double and triple immunofluorescent labelling. Supporting its use as a biomarker of DAI, SNTF immunoreactive axons were observed at all time-points following both human severe TBI and in the model of mild TBI. Interestingly, SNTF revealed a subpopulation of degenerating axons, undetected by the gold-standard marker of transport interruption, APP. While there was greater axonal co-localization between SNTF and APP after severe TBI in humans, a subset of SNTF positive axons displayed no APP accumulation. Notably, some co-localization was observed between SNTF and the less abundant neurofilament subtype markers. Other SNTF positive axons, however, did not co-localize with

  16. SNTF immunostaining reveals previously undetected axonal pathology in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Victoria E; Stewart, William; Weber, Maura T; Cullen, D Kacy; Siman, Robert; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a common feature of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may also be a predominant pathology in mild TBI or "concussion". The rapid deformation of white matter at the instant of trauma can lead to mechanical failure and calcium-dependent proteolysis of the axonal cytoskeleton in association with axonal transport interruption. Recently, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-II spectrin, "SNTF", was detected in serum acutely following mild TBI in patients and was prognostic for poor clinical outcome. However, direct evidence that this fragment is a marker of DAI has yet to be demonstrated in either humans following TBI or in models of mild TBI. Here, we used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to examine for SNTF in brain tissue following both severe and mild TBI. Human severe TBI cases (survival <7d; n = 18) were compared to age-matched controls (n = 16) from the Glasgow TBI archive. We also examined brains from an established model of mild TBI at 6, 48 and 72 h post-injury versus shams. IHC specific for SNTF was compared to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP), the current standard for DAI diagnosis, and other known markers of axonal pathology including non-phosphorylated neurofilament-H (SMI-32), neurofilament-68 (NF-68) and compacted neurofilament-medium (RMO-14) using double and triple immunofluorescent labeling. Supporting its use as a biomarker of DAI, SNTF immunoreactive axons were observed at all time points following both human severe TBI and in the model of mild TBI. Interestingly, SNTF revealed a subpopulation of degenerating axons, undetected by the gold-standard marker of transport interruption, APP. While there was greater axonal co-localization between SNTF and APP after severe TBI in humans, a subset of SNTF positive axons displayed no APP accumulation. Notably, some co-localization was observed between SNTF and the less abundant neurofilament subtype markers. Other SNTF positive axons, however, did not co-localize with any

  17. Clinical Neuropathology practice news 2-2014: ATRX, a new candidate biomarker in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Haberler, Christine; Wöhrer, Adelheid

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide molecular approaches have substantially elucidated molecular alterations and pathways involved in the oncogenesis of brain tumors. In gliomas, several molecular biomarkers including IDH mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion, and MGMT promotor methylation status have been introduced into neuropathological practice. Recently, mutations of the ATRX gene have been found in various subtypes and grades of gliomas and were shown to refine the prognosis of malignant gliomas in combination with IDH and 1p/19q status. Mutations of ATRX are associated with loss of nuclear ATRX protein expression, detectable by a commercially available antibody, thus turning ATRX into a promising prognostic candidate biomarker in the routine neuropathological setting.

  18. Gliomas Genomics and Epigenomics: Arriving at the Start and Knowing It for the First Time.

    PubMed

    Filbin, Mariella G; Suvà, Mario L

    2016-05-23

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors and occur in both adults and children. Over the past few years, systematic large-scale genomic and epigenomic profiling has provided unprecedented insight into their pathogenesis, uncovering alterations in an unanticipated number of genes and regulatory elements. In this review, we discuss recent discoveries about the genomics and epigenomics of adult and pediatric gliomas and highlight how some of the founding genetic mutations reshape the cancer epigenome. These studies provide an in-depth view of the molecular routes leading to glioma development, offer insight into the cancer stem cell model, help refine classifications, and should lay the foundation for improved clinical care.

  19. Atorvastatin suppresses glioma invasion and migration by reducing microglial MT1-MMP expression.

    PubMed

    Yongjun, Yi; Shuyun, Huang; Lei, Chen; Xiangrong, Chen; Zhilin, Yang; Yiquan, Ke

    2013-07-15

    Microglia, the immune cells of the brain, often present in large numbers in gliomas, where they promote tumor growth and invasiveness. This study found that atorvastatin reduced the pro-tumorigenic effects of microglia on glioma migration and invasion by reducing the microglial expression of membrane type 1 metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The results suggest that down-regulation of MT1-MMP is controlled by a p38 MAPK pathway in microglia. Taken together, the results support further research on atorvastatin as a candidate for glioma therapy by targeting microglia.

  20. Molecular and genetic pathways in gliomas: the future of personalized therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ryan; Kolb, Luis; Moliterno, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    In the last few decades, we have seen significant advances in brain imaging, which have resulted in more detailed anatomic and functional localization of gliomas in relation to the eloquent cortex, as well as improvements in microsurgical techniques and enhanced delivery of adjuvant stereotactic radiation. While these advancements have led to a relatively modest improvement in clinical outcomes for patients with malignant gliomas, much more work remains to be done. As with other types of cancer, we are now rapidly moving past the era of histopathology dictating treatment for brain tumors and into the realm of molecular diagnostics and associated targeted therapies, specifically based on the genomic architecture of individual gliomas. In this review, we discuss the current era of molecular glioma characterization and how these profiles will allow for individualized, patient-specific targeted treatments.

  1. Correlation of (18)F-FDG PET and MR Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Histogram Metrics with Survival in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Fahey, Frederic H; Kocak, Mehmet; Brown, Douglas; Ricci, Kelsey; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Fouladi, Maryam; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2017-03-30

    Rationale: To describe baseline (18)F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) voxel characteristics in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and to correlate these metrics with baseline magnetic resonance (MR) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Methods: Baseline brain FDG-PET and MR scans were obtained in 33 children from Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) clinical DIPG trials. FDG-PET, post-gadolinium (PG) and ADC images were registered to baseline fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Three-dimensional regions of interest on FLAIR and PG images and FDG-PET and ADC histograms were generated. Metrics evaluated included peak number, skewness and kurtosis. Correlation between PET and ADC histogram metrics was evaluated. PET pixel values within the ROI for each tumor were plotted against ADC values. Association of these imaging markers with survival was described. Results: PET histograms were almost always unimodal (94% vs. 6% bimodal). None of the PET histogram parameters (skewness or kurtosis) had a significant association with PFS, although a higher PET PG skewness tended towards less favorable PFS (Hazard Ratio (95% CI)=3.48 (0.75, 16.28); P = 0.11). There was a significant association of higher ADC PG skewness with shorter PFS (Hazard Ratio (95% CI)=2.56 (1.11, 5.91); P = 0.028) and the suggestion that this also led to shorter OS (Hazard Ratio (95% CI)=2.18 (0.95, 5.04); P = 0.067). Higher ADC PG kurtosis tended towards shorter PFS (Hazard Ratio (95% CI)=1.30 (0.98, 1.74); P = 0.073). In a number of cases, PET and ADC pixel values were negatively correlated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Further, the level of PET and ADC correlation was significantly positively associated with PFS; tumors with higher values of ADC-PET correlation had more favorable PFS (Hazard Ratio (95% CI)=0.17 (0.03, 0.89), P = 0

  2. Accurate grading of brain gliomas by soft independent modeling of class analogy based on non-negative matrix factorization of proton magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, K; Khanmohammadi, M; Saligheh Rad, H

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H-MRS) is a non-invasive technique which provides a 'frequency-signal intensity' spectrum of biochemical compounds of tissues in the body. Although this method is currently used in human brain studies, accurate classification of in-vivo (1) H-MRS is a challenging task in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Problems such as overlapping metabolite peaks, incomplete information on background component and low signal-to-noise ratio disturb classification results of this spectroscopic method. This study presents an alternative approach to the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) technique, using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for dimensionality reduction. In the adopted strategy, the performance of SIMCA was improved by application of a robust algorithm for classification in the presence of noisy measurements. Total of 219 spectra from two databases were taken by water-suppressed short echo-time (1) H-MRS, acquired from different subjects with different stages of glial brain tumors (Grade II (26 cases), grade III (24 cases), grade IV (41 cases), as well as 25 healthy cases). The SIMCA was performed using two approaches: (i) principal component analysis (PCA) and (ii) non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), as a modified approach. Square prediction error was considered to assess the class membership of the external validation set. Finally, several figures of merit such as the correct classification rate (CCR), sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results of SIMCA based on NMF showed significant improvement in percentage of correctly classified samples, 91.4% versus 83.5% for PCA-based model in an independent test set.

  3. Disrupted Brain Functional Organization in Epilepsy Revealed by Graph Theory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A; Gaggl, Wolfgang; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-06-01

    The human brain is a complex and dynamic system that can be modeled as a large-scale brain network to better understand the reorganizational changes secondary to epilepsy. In this study, we developed a brain functional network model using graph theory methods applied to resting-state fMRI data acquired from a group of epilepsy patients and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. A brain functional network model was constructed based on resting-state functional connectivity. A minimum spanning tree combined with proportional thresholding approach was used to obtain sparse connectivity matrices for each subject, which formed the basis of brain networks. We examined the brain reorganizational changes in epilepsy thoroughly at the level of the whole brain, the functional network, and individual brain regions. At the whole-brain level, local efficiency was significantly decreased in epilepsy patients compared with the healthy controls. However, global efficiency was significantly increased in epilepsy due to increased number of functional connections between networks (although weakly connected). At the functional network level, there were significant proportions of newly formed connections between the default mode network and other networks and between the subcortical network and other networks. There was a significant proportion of decreasing connections between the cingulo-opercular task control network and other networks. Individual brain regions from different functional networks, however, showed a distinct pattern of reorganizational changes in epilepsy. These findings suggest that epilepsy alters brain efficiency in a consistent pattern at the whole-brain level, yet alters brain functional networks and individual brain regions differently.

  4. Convection-enhanced Delivery of Therapeutics for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Ryuta; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2017-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) circumvents the blood–brain barrier by delivering agents directly into the tumor and surrounding parenchyma. CED can achieve large volumes of distribution by continuous positive-pressure infusion. Although promising as an effective drug delivery method in concept, the administration of therapeutic agents via CED is not without challenges. Limitations of distribution remain a problem in large brains, such as those of humans. Accurate and consistent delivery of an agent is another challenge associated with CED. Similar to the difficulties caused by immunosuppressive environments associated with gliomas, there are several mechanisms that make effective local drug distribution difficult in malignant gliomas. In this review, methods for local drug application targeting gliomas are discussed with special emphasis on CED. Although early clinical trials have failed to demonstrate the efficacy of CED against gliomas, CED potentially can be a platform for translating the molecular understanding of glioblastomas achieved in the laboratory into effective clinical treatments. Several clinical studies using CED of chemotherapeutic agents are ongoing. Successful delivery of effective agents should prove the efficacy of CED in the near future. PMID:27980285

  5. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    PubMed

    Frame, M C; Freshney, R I; Vaughan, P F; Graham, D I; Shaw, R

    1984-03-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density.

  6. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, M. C.; Freshney, R. I.; Vaughan, P. F.; Graham, D. I.; Shaw, R.

    1984-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:6200130

  7. [Anaplastic glioma. Neuropathology, molecular diagnostics and current study concepts].

    PubMed

    Wick, W; Weller, M

    2010-08-01

    According to the current WHO classification anaplastic gliomas comprise pure astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and mixed tumors. This review summarizes findings, discusses problems and defines new questions from the phase III trials on anaplastic gliomas. The molecular subgroup analyses of the NOA-04 trial identified three molecular parameters, which predict longer progression-free and overall survival independent from the mode of therapy, radiotherapy or alkylating chemotherapy-. These are 1p/19q codeletion, methylation of the promoter of the O(6)-methylguanyl methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and hot-spot mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. The prognostic relevance of these markers is not lower than that of histopathological subclassification but determination is potentially more robust. Therefore, marker profiles should be included into the next WHO brain tumor classification. The current standard of care for first-line treatment in anaplastic gliomas is radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The next steps, e.g. within the international CATNON trial, are to define the role and optimal sequencing of combined modality treatment focusing on radiotherapy and temozolomide. Inclusion in this trial is already based on the WHO grade and the 1p/19q status and not on the histopathological subtype. Furthermore, anaplastic gliomas are an important group of brain tumors for developing future molecular targeted therapies and should therefore be in the main focus of academic and industrial drug development, which aims at improved efficacy and avoiding long-term side-effects.

  8. Perceptual shift in bilingualism: brain potentials reveal plasticity in pre-attentive colour perception.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-09-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour oddball detection task with Greek and English speakers, a recent study suggests that language effects may exist at early stages of perceptual integration [Thierry, G., Athanasopoulos, P., Wiggett, A., Dering, B., & Kuipers, J. (2009). Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on pre-attentive colour perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106, 4567-4570]. In this paper, we test whether in Greek speakers exposure to a new cultural environment (UK) with contrasting colour terminology from their native language affects early perceptual processing as indexed by an electrophysiological correlate of visual detection of colour luminance. We also report semantic mapping of native colour terms and colour similarity judgements. Results reveal convergence of linguistic descriptions, cognitive processing, and early perception of colour in bilinguals. This result demonstrates for the first time substantial plasticity in early, pre-attentive colour perception and has important implications for the mechanisms that are involved in perceptual changes during the processes of language learning and acculturation.

  9. The categorization of natural scenes: brain attention networks revealed by dense sensor ERPs.

    PubMed

    Codispoti, Maurizio; Ferrari, Vera; Junghöfer, Markus; Schupp, Harald T

    2006-08-15

    The present study examined cortical indicators of selective attention underlying categorization based on target features in natural scenes. The primary focus was to determine the neural sources associated with the processing of target stimuli containing animals compared to non-target control stimuli. Neural source estimation techniques [current source density (CSD) and L2-minimum norm estimate (L2-MNE)] were used to determine the sources of the potential fields measured from 58 sensor sites. Assuring an excellent signal-to-noise ratio, the categorization task consisted of 2400 trials. Replicating previous findings, target and non-target ERP activity diverged sharply around 150 ms after stimulus onset and the early differential ERP activity appeared as positive deflection over fronto-central sensor sites and as negative deflection over temporo-occipital regions. Both source estimation techniques (CSD and L2-MNE) suggested primary sources of the early differential ERP activity in posterior, visual-associative brain regions and, although less pronounced, revealed the contribution of additional anterior sources. These findings suggest that selective attention to category-relevant features reflects the interactions between prefrontal and inferior temporal cortex during visual processing of natural scenes.

  10. Brain Signals of Face Processing as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ela I.; Iglesias, Jaime; Saavedra, Cristina; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the functional significance of different event-related potentials (ERPs) as electrophysiological indices of face perception and face recognition, according to cognitive and neurofunctional models of face processing. Initially, the processing of faces seems to be supported by early extrastriate occipital cortices and revealed by modulations of the occipital P1. This early response is thought to reflect the detection of certain primary structural aspects indicating the presence grosso modo of a face within the visual field. The posterior-temporal N170 is more sensitive to the detection of faces as complex-structured stimuli and, therefore, to the presence of its distinctive organizational characteristics prior to within-category identification. In turn, the relatively late and probably more rostrally generated N250r and N400-like responses might respectively indicate processes of access and retrieval of face-related information, which is stored in long-term memory (LTM). New methods of analysis of electrophysiological and neuroanatomical data, namely, dynamic causal modeling, single-trial and time-frequency analyses, are highly recommended to advance in the knowledge of those brain mechanisms concerning face processing. PMID:26160999

  11. Discovery of methylfarnesoate as the annelid brain hormone reveals an ancient role of sesquiterpenoids in reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sven; Krauditsch, Christian; Frühauf, Peter; Gerner, Christopher; Raible, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Animals require molecular signals to determine when to divert resources from somatic functions to reproduction. This decision is vital in animals that reproduce in an all-or-nothing mode, such as bristle worms: females committed to reproduction spend roughly half their body mass for yolk and egg production; following mass spawning, the parents die. An enigmatic brain hormone activity suppresses reproduction. We now identify this hormone as the sesquiterpenoid methylfarnesoate. Methylfarnesoate suppresses transcript levels of the yolk precursor Vitellogenin both in cell culture and in vivo, directly inhibiting a central energy–costly step of reproductive maturation. We reveal that contrary to common assumptions, sesquiterpenoids are ancient animal hormones present in marine and terrestrial lophotrochozoans. In turn, insecticides targeting this pathway suppress vitellogenesis in cultured worm cells. These findings challenge current views of animal hormone evolution, and indicate that non-target species and marine ecosystems are susceptible to commonly used insect larvicides. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17126.001 PMID:27894418

  12. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  13. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  14. Corpus callosum involvement and postoperative outcomes of patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Ting; Wu, Tai-Wei Erich; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chang, Chen-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Pai, Ping-Ching; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Corpus callosum involvement is associated with poorer survival in high grade glioma (HGG), but the prognostic value in low grade glioma (LGG) is unclear. To determine the prognostic impact of corpus callosum involvement on progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG and LGG, the records of 233 glioma patients treated from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to identify corpus callosum involvement. Age, sex, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale, postoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and extent of resection (EOR) were evaluated with respect to PFS and OS. The incidence of corpus callosum involvement was similar among HGG (14 %) and LGG (14.5 %). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS and OS were significantly shorter in both WHO grade II and grade IV glioma with corpus callosum involvement (both, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that grade II glioma with corpus callosum involvement have shorter PFS (p = 0.03), while EOR, instead of corpus callosum involvement (p = 0.16), was an independent factor associated with PFS in grade IV glioma (p < 0.05). Corpus callosum involvement was no longer significantly associated with OS after adjusting age, gender, EOR, preoperative and postoperative performance status (p = 0.16, 0.17 and 0.56 in grade II, III and IV gliomas, respectively). Corpus callosum involvement happened in both LGG and HGG, and is associated with lower EOR and higher postoperative ECOG score both in LGG and HGG. Corpus callosum involvement tends to be an independent prognostic factor for PFS in LGG, but not for OS in LGG or in HGG.

  15. Overexpression of IL-7 enhances cisplatin resistance in glioma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Fu, Jun; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Fu-Rong; Shi, Hong-Liu; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for glioma patients. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used to identify genes associated with cisplatin resistance in a human glioma cell line. The cisplatin-resistant U251/CP2 cell line was derived by stepwise selection using cisplatin. The genetic aberrations of the U251 parental cell line and the U251/CP2 cells were analyzed using aCGH. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of the altered genes revealed by aCGH. The sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin was determined by using the MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The IC 50 value of cisplatin in U251/CP2 cells was five times higher than its IC 50 in U251 cells. The U251 cells lost at least one copy each of the CFHR1 and CFHR3 genes, and both CFHR1 and CFHR3 were homozygously deleted in U251/CP2 cells. The U251/CP2 cells gained two to three copies of C8orf70 and IL-7 genes. IL-7 mRNA expression was studied in 12 glioma cell lines, and expression was positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin. Furthermore, IL-7 mRNA expression was also positively correlated with the IC 50 of cisplatin in 91 clinical glioma specimens. Additionally, treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) enhanced cisplatin resistance and increased the relative growth rate of the glioma cells. Moreover, the apoptosis induced by cisplatin could be inhibited by IL-7. In conclusion, our results suggest that IL-7 may play an important role in cisplatin resistance in glioma.

  16. Long noncoding RNA FTX is upregulated in gliomas and promotes proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by negatively regulating miR-342-3p.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguang; Bi, Yunke; Li, Jianhua; Peng, Fei; Li, Hui; Li, Chenguang; Wang, Laizang; Ren, Fubin; Xie, Chen; Wang, Pengwei; Liang, Weiwei; Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Dan

    2017-04-01

    Gliomas remain a major public health challenge, posing a high risk for brain tumor-related morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms that drive the development of gliomas remain largely unknown. Emerging evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs are key factors in glioma pathogenesis. qRT-PCR analysis was used to assess the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p in the different stages of gliomas in tissues. Bioinformatics tool DIANA and TargetSCan were used to predict the targets of FTX and miR-342-3p, respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to test the correlation between the expression levels of FTX, miR-342-3p, and astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1). To examine the role of FTX in regulating proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, specific siRNA was used to knockdown FTX, and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and transwell assays were performed. Furthermore, rescue experiments were performed to further confirm the regulation of miR-342-3p by FTX. We then found that the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p was associated with progression of gliomas. FTX directly inhibited the expression of miR-342-3p, which subsequently regulates the expression of AEG-1. Collectively, FTX is critical for proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by regulating miR-342-3p and AEG-1. Our findings indicate that FTX and miR-342-3p may serve as a biomarker of glioma diagnosis, and offer potential novel therapeutic targets of treatment of gliomas.

  17. Control of human glioma cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Merzak, A.; McCrea, S.; Koocheckpour, S.; Pilkington, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Factors involved in the control of the biological properties of gliomas, the major form of brain tumour in man, are poorly documented. We investigated the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the control of proliferation of human glioma cell lines as well as normal human fetal brain cells. The data presented show that TGF-beta 1 exerts a growth-inhibitory action on both human fetal brain cells and three cell lines derived from human glioma of different grades of malignancy. In addition, this growth-inhibitory effect is dose dependent and serum independent. Since TGF-beta 1 is known to be involved in the control of cell migration during ontogenesis and oncogenesis, we investigated the role of this factor in the motile and invasive behaviour that characterises human gliomas in vivo. TGF-beta 1 was found to elicit a strong stimulation of migration and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro. In combination with recent data showing an inverse correlation between TGF-beta 1 expression in human gliomas and survival, these findings may suggest that TGF-beta 1 plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas in man. A study of the molecular mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative action and the invasion-promoting action of TGF-beta 1 may help to identify new targets in therapy for brain tumours. A combined antiproliferative and anti-invasive therapy could be envisaged. Images Figure 3 PMID:8054266

  18. The involvement of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in stem cell differentiation and in malignant glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Soumi; Xiong, Anqi; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPG) are major components of the extracellular matrix. They interact with a plethora of macromolecules that are of physiological importance. The pattern of sulfation of the HS chain determines the specificity of these interactions. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade HS are thus key regulators of processes ranging from embryonic development to tissue homeostasis and tumor development. Formation of the nervous system is also critically dependent on appropriate HSPGs as shown by several studies on the role of HS in neural induction from embryonic stem cells. High-grade glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor among adults, and the prognosis is poor. Neural and glioma stem cells share several traits, including sustained proliferation and highly efficient migration in the brain. There are also similarities between the neurogenic niche where adult neural stem cells reside and the tumorigenic niche, including their interactions with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The levels of many of these components, for example HSPGs and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and modification of HS are attenuated in gliomas. In this paper, HS regulation of pathways involved in neural differentiation and how these may be of importance for brain development are discussed. The literature suggesting that modifications of HS could regulate glioma growth and invasion is reviewed. Targeting the invasiveness of glioma cells by modulating HS may improve upon present therapeutic options, which only marginally enhance the survival of glioma patients.

  19. Microglial Contribution to Glioma Progression: an Immunohistochemical Study in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Krishnendu; Ghosh, Samarendranath; Chatterjee, Uttara; Chaudhuri, Swapna; Anirban, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Human glioma, arising from glial cells of the central nervous system, accounts for almost 30%of all brain tumours , neoplasms with a poor prognosis and high mortality rates worldwide. In the present study we assessed tissue architectural modifications associated with macrophage lineage cells, controversial major immune effector cells within the brain, in human glioma tissue samples from eastern India. Ethically cleared post-operative human glioma samples from our collaborative neurosurgery unit with respective CT/MRI and patient history were collected from the Nodal Centre of Neurosciences in Kolkata, over 9 months. Along with conventional histopathology, samples were subjected to silver-gold staining and fluorescence tagged immunophenotyping for the detection of electron dense brain macrophage/microglia cells in glioma tissue, followed by immune-phenotyping of cells. With higher grades, CD11b+/Iba-1+ macrophage/microglia architecture with de-structured boundaries of glioma lesions indicated malfunction and invasive effector state. Present study documented a contribution of microglia to glioma progression in Eastern India.

  20. Immunocytochemical study of transforming growth factor expression in benign and malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, V.; Barrett, J. M.; Bockman, S.; Pantazis, C. G.; Allen, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    Immunocytochemical studies using polyclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) alpha and beta were performed on 20 cases of human gliomas. EGF immunoreactive material was detected in both benign and malignant glial tumors. In addition, EGF immunoreactive material was detected in normal brain. TGF-beta was detected in both benign and malignant tumors, but was not detected in normal brain. In contrast, TGF-alpha was highly conserved in its expression, occurring predominantly in malignant compared with benign or normal brain tissue (P less than 0.0001). In malignant gliomas, glioblastomas contained 76% TGF-alpha reactivity (immunoreactive product), and anaplastic types contained 85% reactivity. Benign gliomas contained only 13% TGF-alpha reactivity. These findings support the role of TGF-alpha as an oncoprotein marker in brain neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2705509

  1. Association of BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism with glioma risk in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qian, Chunfa; Wang, Linxiong; Teng, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2014-03-01

    Glioma is the most common type of primary brain malignancy in adults. The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of glioma. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association between BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism and glioma susceptibility. This case-control study was conducted in Chinese Han populations consisting of 248 glioma cases and 252 cancer-free controls. The BCL2-938C>A genetic polymorphism was detected by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and verified using DNA sequencing methods. Our data suggested that the genotype/allele of BCL2-938C>A polymorphism were statistically associated with the increased risk of glioma where the risk of glioma for genotype AA or allele A is significantly higher than wild genotype CC (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-4.10, p = 0.009) or allele C (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.06-1.82, p = 0.016), respectively. In addition, the BCL2-938AA genotype was significantly more common in patients with glioblastoma and in patients with grade IV glioma. Our findings indicate that the BCL2-938C>A polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to glioma in Chinese Han populations and might be used as molecular markers for evaluating glioma risk.

  2. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  3. Gene therapy for malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hidehiro; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current treatment modalities, such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, only modest improvements in median survival have been achieved. Frequent recurrence and invasiveness of GBM are likely due to the resistance of glioma stem cells to conventional treatments; therefore, novel alternative treatment strategies are desperately needed. Recent advancements in molecular biology and gene technology have provided attractive novel treatment possibilities for patients with GBM. Gene therapy is defined as a technology that aims to modify the genetic complement of cells to obtain therapeutic benefit. To date, gene therapy for the treatment of GBM has demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy in pre-clinical studies and promising safety profiles in clinical studies. However, while this approach is obviously promising, concerns still exist regarding issues associated with transduction efficiency, viral delivery, the pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Tumor development and progression involve alterations in a wide spectrum of genes, therefore a variety of gene therapy approaches for GBM have been proposed. Improved viral vectors are being evaluated, and the potential use of gene therapy alone or in synergy with other treatments against GBM are being studied. In this review, we will discuss the most commonly studied gene therapy approaches for the treatment of GBM in preclinical and clinical studies including: prodrug/suicide gene therapy; oncolytic gene therapy; cytokine mediated gene therapy; and tumor suppressor gene therapy. In addition, we review the principles and mechanisms of current gene therapy strategies as well as advantages and disadvantages of each.

  4. Investigation of enzyme-sensitive lipid nanoparticles for delivery of siRNA to blood-brain barrier and glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Jonas; Larsen, Trine B; Jølck, Rasmus I; Eliasen, Rasmus; Holm, René; Gjetting, Torben; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical applications of siRNA for treating disorders in the central nervous system require development of systemic stable, safe, and effective delivery vehicles that are able to cross the impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB). Engineering nanocarriers with low cellular interaction during systemic circulation, but with high uptake in targeted cells, is a great challenge and is further complicated by the BBB. As a first step in obtaining such a delivery system, this study aims at designing a lipid nanoparticle (LNP) able to efficiently encapsulate siRNA by a combination of titratable cationic lipids. The targeted delivery is obtained through the design of a two-stage system where the first step is conjugation of angiopep to the surface of the LNP for targeting the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 expressed on the BBB. Second, the positively charged LNPs are masked with a negatively charged PEGylated (poly(ethylene glycol)) cleavable lipopeptide, which contains a recognition sequence for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a class of enzymes often expressed in the tumor microenvironment and inflammatory BBB conditions. Proteolytic cleavage induces PEG release, including the release of four glutamic acid residues, providing a charge switch that triggers a shift of the LNP charge from weakly negative to positive, thus favoring cellular endocytosis and release of siRNA for high silencing efficiency. This work describes the development of this two-stage nanocarrier-system and evaluates the performance in brain endothelial and glioblastoma cells with respect to uptake and gene silencing efficiency. The ability of activation by MMP-triggered dePEGylation and charge shift is demonstrated to substantially increase the uptake and the silencing efficiency of the LNPs.

  5. Introduction of novel semiquantitative evaluation of (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT before and after treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Deltuva, Vytenis Pranas; Jurkienė, Nemira; Kulakienė, Ilona; Bunevičius, Adomas; Matukevičius, Algimantas; Tamašauskas, Arimantas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. There is a need for objective semiquantitative indexes for the evaluation of results of single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) in patients with brain glioma. The aim of this study was to validate the total size index (TSI) and total intensity index (TII) based on technetium-99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((99m)Tc-MIBI) SPECT scans to discriminate the patients with high-grade glioma versus low-grade glioma and to evaluate the changes of viable glioma tissue by the means of TSI and TII after surgery and after radiation treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Thirty-two patients (mean age, 55 years [SD, 18]; 20 men) underwent a (99m)Tc-MIBI-SPECT scan before surgery. Of these patients, 27 underwent a postoperative (99m)Tc-MIBI-SPECT scan and 7 patients with grade IV glioma underwent a third (99m)Tc-MIBI-SPECT scan after radiation treatment. TII that corresponds to the area and intensity of tracer uptake and TSI that corresponds to the area of tracer uptake were calculated before surgery, after surgery, and after radiation treatment. RESULTS. The TII and TSI were found to be valid in discriminating the patients with high-grade versus low-grade glioma with optimal cutoff values of 3.0 and 2.5, respectively. Glioma grade correlated with the preoperative TSI score (r=0.76, P<0.001) and preoperative TII score (r=0.64, P<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the TII and TSI after surgery in patients with grade IV glioma. After radiation treatment, there was a significant increase in the TII in patients with grade IV glioma. CONCLUSIONS. TSI and TII were found to be reliable in discriminating the patients with high-grade versus low-grade glioma and allowed for the semiquantitative evaluation of change in viable glioma tissue after surgery and after radiation treatment in patients with grade IV glioma.

  6. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R.; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  7. Brain network analysis reveals affected connectome structure in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Collin, Guusje; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Abramovic, Lucija; Vreeker, Annabel; de Reus, Marcel A; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A; Kahn, René S

    2016-01-01

    The notion that healthy brain function emerges from coordinated neural activity constrained by the brain's network of anatomical connections--i.e., the connectome--suggests that alterations in the connectome's wiring pattern may underlie brain disorders. Corroborating this hypothesis, studies in schizophrenia are indicative of altered connectome architecture including reduced communication efficiency, disruptions of central brain hubs, and affected "rich club" organization. Whether similar deficits are present in bipolar disorder is currently unknown. This study examines structural connectome topology in 216 bipolar I disorder patients as compared to 144 healthy controls, focusing in particular on central regions (i.e., brain hubs) and connections (i.e., rich club connections, interhemispheric connections) of the brain's network. We find that bipolar I disorder patients exhibit reduced global efficiency (-4.4%, P =0.002) and that this deficit relates (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) to reduced connectivity strength of interhemispheric connections (-13.0%, P = 0.001). Bipolar disorder patients were found not to show predominant alterations in the strength of brain hub connections in general, or of connections spanning brain hubs (i.e., "rich club" connections) in particular (all P > 0.1). These findings highlight a role for aberrant brain network architecture in bipolar I disorder with reduced global efficiency in association with disruptions in interhemispheric connectivity, while the central "rich club" system appears not to be particularly affected.

  8. MiR-221/222 promote human glioma cell invasion and angiogenesis by targeting TIMP2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Chunhui; Xi, Wenjin; Yuan, Lu; Chen, Xu; Li, Yufang; Yang, Angang; Zhang, Jianning; Wang, Tao

    2015-05-01

    miR-221/222 are two highly homologous microRNAs that are frequently upregulated in solid tumors. However, the effects of miR-221/222 in malignant gliomas have not been investigated thoroughly. In this study, we found that miR-221/222 were significantly upregulated in human glioma samples and glioma cell lines. Both gain- and loss-of-function studies showed that miR-221/222 regulate cell proliferation, the cell cycle and apoptosis, in addition to, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis in glioma cell lines. Subsequent investigations revealed that TIMP2 is a direct target of miR-221/222, and overexpression of TIMP2 reduced the miR-221/222-mediated invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis of glioma cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the suppression of miR-221/222 may be a feasible approach for inhibiting the malignant behaviors of glioma.

  9. ASYMMETRIC CELL DIVISION: IMPLICATIONS FOR GLIOMA DEVELOPMENT AND TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Petritsch, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Glioma is a heterogeneous disease process with differential histology and treatment response. It was previously thought that the histological features of glial tumors indicated their cell of origin. However, the discovery of continuous neuro-gliogenesis in the normal adult brain and the identification of brain tumor stem cells within glioma have led to the hypothesis that these brain tumors originate from multipotent neural stem or progenitor cells, which primarily divide asymmetrically during the postnatal period. Asymmetric cell division allows these cell types to concurrently self-renew whilst also producing cells for the differentiation pathway. It has recently been shown that increased symmetrical cell division, favoring the self-renewal pathway, leads to oligodendroglioma formation from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In contrast, there is some evidence that asymmetric cell division maintenance in tumor stem-like cells within astrocytoma may lead to acquisition of treatment resistance. Therefore cell division mode in normal brain stem and progenitor cells may play a role in setting tumorigenic potential and the type of tumor formed. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor cell populations and their respective cell division mode may confer differential sensitivity to therapy. This review aims to shed light on the controllers of cell division mode which may be therapeutically targeted to prevent glioma formation and improve treatment response.

  10. Comparison of Dolphins' Body and Brain Measurements with Four Other Groups of Cetaceans Reveals Great Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Sam H; Carlin, Kevin P; Van Alstyne, Kaitlin R; Hanson, Alicia C; Tarpley, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    We compared mature dolphins with 4 other groupings of mature cetaceans. With a large data set, we found great brain diversity among 5 different taxonomic groupings. The dolphins in our data set ranged in body mass from about 40 to 6,750 kg and in brain mass from 0.4 to 9.3 kg. Dolphin body length ranged from 1.3 to 7.6 m. In our combined data set from the 4 other groups of cetaceans, body mass ranged from about 20 to 120,000 kg and brain mass from about 0.2 to 9.2 kg, while body length varied from 1.21 to 26.8 m. Not all cetaceans have large brains relative to their body size. A few dolphins near human body size have human-sized brains. On the other hand, the absolute brain mass of some other cetaceans is only one-sixth as large. We found that brain volume relative to body mass decreases from Delphinidae to a group of Phocoenidae and Monodontidae, to a group of other odontocetes, to Balaenopteroidea, and finally to Balaenidae. We also found the same general trend when we compared brain volume relative to body length, except that the Delphinidae and Phocoenidae-Monodontidae groups do not differ significantly. The Balaenidae have the smallest relative brain mass and the lowest cerebral cortex surface area. Brain parts also vary. Relative to body mass and to body length, dolphins also have the largest cerebellums. Cortex surface area is isometric with brain size when we exclude the Balaenidae. Our data show that the brains of Balaenidae are less convoluted than those of the other cetaceans measured. Large vascular networks inside the cranial vault may help to maintain brain temperature, and these nonbrain tissues increase in volume with body mass and with body length ranging from 8 to 65% of the endocranial volume. Because endocranial vascular networks and other adnexa, such as the tentorium cerebelli, vary so much in different species, brain size measures from endocasts of some extinct cetaceans may be overestimates. Our regression of body length on endocranial

  11. MicroRNA-146a inhibits glioma development by targeting Notch1.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jie; Bachoo, Robert; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2011-09-01

    Dysregulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through either genomic amplification or dominant-active mutation (EGFR(vIII)), in combination with the dual inactivation of INK4A/ARF and PTEN, is a leading cause of gliomagenesis. Our global expression analysis for microRNAs revealed that EGFR activation induces miR-146a expression, which is further potentiated by inactivation of PTEN. Unexpectedly, overexpression of miR-146a attenuates the proliferation, migration, and tumorigenic potential of Ink4a/Arf(-/-) Pten(-/-) Egfr(vIII) murine astrocytes. Its ectopic expression also inhibits the glioma development of a human glioblastoma cell line in an orthotopic xenograft model. Such an inhibitory function of miR-146a on gliomas is largely through downregulation of Notch1, which plays a key role in neural stem cell maintenance and is a direct target of miR-146a. Accordingly, miR-146a modulates neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation and reduces the formation and migration of glioma stem-like cells. Conversely, knockdown of miR-146a by microRNA sponge upregulates Notch1 and promotes tumorigenesis of malignant astrocytes. These findings indicate that, in response to oncogenic cues, miR-146a is induced as a negative-feedback mechanism to restrict tumor growth by repressing Notch1. Our results provide novel insights into the signaling pathways that link neural stem cells to gliomagenesis and may lead to new strategies for treating brain tumors.

  12. Impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity in C6 glioma-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Yi; Liu, Shi-Chang; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao

    2011-07-01

    For many glioblastoma multiforme patients, cognitive deficits are part of the disease process. In this study we attempted to determine the role of synaptic plasticity and glutamate (Glu) in C6 glioma-bearing rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to tumor implantation in the right caudate putamen nucleus. At 17 days after tumor implantation, animals were exposed to an open field test. The numbers of crossings and rearings were used as measures of exploration processes. An input/output (I/O) curve was first determined using the measurements of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) slope in response to a series of stimulation intensities. The short-term potentiation (STP) and long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the CA1 region of the contralateral hippocampus to the tumor were recorded. The glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content of contralateral hippocampus were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). C6 glioma-bearing rats showed a trend for a rightward shift of input/output relationship and significant deficits in maintenance of STP and LTP. Quantitative analysis by HPLC of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid revealed that Glu concentration and Glu/GABA ratio were increased significantly in contralateral hippocampus, suggesting impairment of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. The results suggest that the neurocognitive deficits in C6 glioma-bearing rats may be mediated via profound changes in neuroplasticity and elevated Glu concentration and Glu/GABA ratio in hippocampus area of the brain.

  13. Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Mora, Victor; Hosking, Fay J.; Kinnersley, Ben; Wang, Yufei; Shete, Sanjay; Zelenika, Diana; Broderick, Peter; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Marie, Yannick; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Labussière, Marianne; Dobbins, Sara; Boisselier, Blandine; Ciccarino, Pietro; Rossetto, Marta; Armstrong, Georgina; Liu, Yanhong; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Lau, Ching; Hepworth, Sarah J.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10−38) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10−67). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10−28). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10−94). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development. PMID:23399484

  14. 2-methoxyestradiol as a potential cytostatic drug in gliomas?

    PubMed

    Kirches, E; Warich-Kirches, M

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas of astrocytic origin show only a limited chemotherapy response. Chemoresistance is most pronounced in glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and most malignant glioma, with median survival times not much longer than one year. Failure of chemotherapy partly relies on protective mechanisms against the commonly used DNA alkylating agents, but also on the constitutive activation of the pro-survival PI3K-Akt pathway in glioma cells, which inhibits apoptosis. Therefore, new drugs with an alternative mechanism, independent of DNA alkylation, are required. The microtubule targeting drug 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) efficiently induces mitotic arrest, apoptosis, but also autophagic cell death in glioma cells in vitro. Moreover, it may be able to inhibit vascularization of the highly vascular gliobastomas, because the drug influences blood vessel sprouting via a HIF-1-dependent mechanism. Although high doses of i.p. injected 2-ME were recently shown to be effective in an orthothopic rat glioma model, clinical phase I/II trials revealed low oral bioavailability. One of the most exciting future perspectives will be the currently ongoing development of improved 2-ME analogs. Compounds, sulphamoylated at positions 3 and 17, combine sufficient toxicity against tumor cells with resistance against metabolic degradation and sufficient plasma levels in experimental animals. They were found to be superior in some animal models of tumor growth and vascularization, following oral application.

  15. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bosiocic, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate. PMID:27853608

  16. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  17. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  18. Small-world anatomical networks in the human brain revealed by cortical thickness from MRI.

    PubMed

    He, Yong; Chen, Zhang J; Evans, Alan C

    2007-10-01

    An important issue in neuroscience is the characterization for the underlying architectures of complex brain networks. However, little is known about the network of anatomical connections in the human brain. Here, we investigated large-scale anatomical connection patterns of the human cerebral cortex using cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance images. Two areas were considered anatomically connected if they showed statistically significant correlations in cortical thickness and we constructed the network of such connections using 124 brains from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping database. Significant short- and long-range connections were found in both intra- and interhemispheric regions, many of which were consistent with known neuroanatomical pathways measured by human diffusion imaging. More importantly, we showed that the human brain anatomical network had robust small-world properties with cohesive neighborhoods and short mean distances between regions that were insensitive to the selection of correlation thresholds. Additionally, we also found that this network and the probability of finding a connection between 2 regions for a given anatomical distance had both exponentially truncated power-law distributions. Our results demonstrated the basic organizational principles for the anatomical network in the human brain compatible with previous functional networks studies, which provides important implications of how functional brain states originate from their structural underpinnings. To our knowledge, this study provides the first report of small-world properties and degree distribution of anatomical networks in the human brain using cortical thickness measurements.

  19. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  20. Recognition of Transmembrane Protein 39A as a Tumor-Specific Marker in Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jisoo; Lee, Hyunji; Tran, Quangdon; Mun, Kisun; Kim, Dohoon; Hong, Youngeun; Kwon, So Hee; Brazil, Derek; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Seon-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 39A (TMEM39A) belongs to the TMEM39 family. TMEM39A gene is a susceptibility locus for multiple sclerosis. In addition, TMEM39A seems to be implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus. However, any possible involvement of TMEM39A in cancer remains largely unknown. In the present report, we provide evidence that TMEM39A may play a role in brain tumors. Western blotting using an anti-TMEM39A antibody indicated that TMEM39A was overexpressed in glioblastoma cell lines, including U87-MG and U251-MG. Deep-sequencing transcriptomic profiling of U87-MG and U251-MG cells revealed that TMEM39A transcripts were upregulated in such cells compared with those of the cerebral cortex. Confocal microscopic analysis of U251-MG cells stained with anti-TMEM39A antibody showed that TMEM39A was located in dot-like structures lying close to the nucleus. TMEM39A probably located to mitochondria or to endosomes. Immunohistochemical analysis of glioma tissue specimens indicated that TMEM39A was markedly upregulated in such samples. Bioinformatic analysis of the Rembrandt knowledge base also supported upregulation of TMEM39A mRNA levels in glioma patients. Together, the results afford strong evidence that TMEM39A is upregulated in glioma cell lines and glioma tissue specimens. Therefore, TMEM39A may serve as a novel diagnostic marker of, and a therapeutic target for, gliomas and other cancers. PMID:28133515

  1. Three-dimensional mouse brain cytoarchitecture revealed by laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Vincenz, Daniel; Stöber, Franziska; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Salditt, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Studies of brain cytoarchitecture in mammals are routinely performed by serial sectioning of the specimen and staining of the sections. The procedure is labor-intensive and the 3D architecture can only be determined after aligning individual 2D sections, leading to a reconstructed volume with non-isotropic resolution. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography offers a unique potential for high-resolution 3D imaging of intact biological specimen due to the high penetration depth and potential resolution. We here show that even compact laboratory CT at an optimized liquid-metal jet microfocus source combined with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms and a novel tissue preparation can provide cellular and subcellular resolution in millimeter sized samples of mouse brain. We removed water and lipids from entire mouse brains and measured the remaining dry tissue matrix in air, lowering absorption but increasing phase contrast. We present single-cell resolution images of mouse brain cytoarchitecture and show that axons can be revealed in myelinated fiber bundles. In contrast to optical 3D techniques our approach does neither require staining of cells nor tissue clearing, procedures that are increasingly difficult to apply with increasing sample and brain sizes. The approach thus opens a novel route for high-resolution high-throughput studies of brain architecture in mammals.

  2. Three-dimensional mouse brain cytoarchitecture revealed by laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Vincenz, Daniel; Stöber, Franziska; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Salditt, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Studies of brain cytoarchitecture in mammals are routinely performed by serial sectioning of the specimen and staining of the sections. The procedure is labor-intensive and the 3D architecture can only be determined after aligning individual 2D sections, leading to a reconstructed volume with non-isotropic resolution. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography offers a unique potential for high-resolution 3D imaging of intact biological specimen due to the high penetration depth and potential resolution. We here show that even compact laboratory CT at an optimized liquid-metal jet microfocus source combined with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms and a novel tissue preparation can provide cellular and subcellular resolution in millimeter sized samples of mouse brain. We removed water and lipids from entire mouse brains and measured the remaining dry tissue matrix in air, lowering absorption but increasing phase contrast. We present single-cell resolution images of mouse brain cytoarchitecture and show that axons can be revealed in myelinated fiber bundles. In contrast to optical 3D techniques our approach does neither require staining of cells nor tissue clearing, procedures that are increasingly difficult to apply with increasing sample and brain sizes. The approach thus opens a novel route for high-resolution high-throughput studies of brain architecture in mammals. PMID:28240235

  3. MicroRNA-217 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion by targeting Runx2 in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yonggang; Zhao, Hongguang; Feng, Li; Xu, Songbai

    2016-01-01

    MircroRNA-217 (miR-217) has been showed to involve in the initiation and development of human cancers, and is recognize as a tumor suppressor miRNA in several tumors. However, the clinical significance and its underlying role in human glioma remain unclear. Herein, we found that the expression of miR-217 was significantly down-regulated in glioma tissues as compared with adjacent normal brain tissues. Clinical association analysis disclosed that low-expression of miR-217 was evidently negative associated with advanced tumor stage (grade III + IV) in glioma. Further function assays showed that miR-217 inhibited proliferation, colony formation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. Notably, runt-related transcription factors 2 (Runx2) was identified as a functional target of miR-217 in glioma. Furthermore, an inverse correlation between miR-217 and Runx2 expression was observed in glioma tissues. Downregulation of Runx2 has similar with inhibition effect of overexpression of miR-217, and upregulation of Runx2 reversed the effects of overexpressing of miR-217. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role of miR-217 in suppressing proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma by targeting Runx2. PMID:27186274

  4. Overexpression of FZD7 promotes glioma cell proliferation by upregulating TAZ

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most prevalent type of primary brain tumors in adults, accounting for more than 40% of neoplasm in the central nervous system. Frizzled-7 (FZD7) is a seven-pass trans-membrane Wnt receptor that plays a critical role in the development of various tumors. In this study, we detected high-level FZD7 expression in glioma and its overexpression was associated with advanced tumor stage. In vitro functional assays showed that forced overexpression of FZD7 promoted proliferation of gliomas cells, whereas knockdown of endogenous FZD7 significantly suppressed proliferation ability of these cells. In a xenograft assay, FZD7 was also found to promote the growth of glioma cells. We further found that FZD7 could activate transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), and TAZ was required for FZD7 to promote cell proliferation in glioma. Furthermore, the univariate analysis of survival shows that glioma patients with high FZD7 expression have a shorter survival. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that FZD7 may promote glioma cell proliferation via upregulation of TAZ. PMID:27852064

  5. Genetic variants of SOX9 contribute to susceptibility of gliomas among Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Xiaoshan; Qi, Jing; Ren, Dongni; Zhang, Pengxing; Zhang, Yongsheng; Tu, Yanyang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas make up about 80% of all malignant brain tumors, and cause serious public health problem. Genetic factors and environmental factors jointly caused the development of gliomas, and understanding of the genetic basis is a key component of preventive oncology. However, most genetic factors underlying carcinogenesis of gliomas remain largely unclear. In current study, we systematically evaluated whether genetic variants of SOX9 gene, a transcription factor that plays a central role in the development and differentiation of tumors, contribute to susceptibility of gliomas among Chinese population using a two-stage, case–control study. Results showed that SOX9 rs1042667 was significant associated with increased gliomas risk after adjusted by age, gender, family history of cancer, smoking status and alcohol status (Allele C vs A: OR=1.25; 95% CI=1.11-1.40; P=1.2×10−4). Compared with the carriers of genotype AA, both those of genotype AC (OR=1.37; 95% CI=1.13-1.66) and CC (OR=1.53; 95% CI=1.22-1.91) had significantly increased gliomas risk. This should be the first genetic association study which aims to evaluated the association between genetic variants of SOX9 and susceptibility of gliomas. Additional functional and association studies with different ethnic groups included are needed to further confirm our results. PMID:27589569

  6. Does Tenascin have Clinical Implications in Pathological Grade of Glioma Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyi; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Wang, Yu; Guan, Jian; Gao, Jun; Wei, Junji; Yao, Yong; Lian, Wei; Xu, Zhiqin; Dou, Wanchen; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Renzhi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tenascin (TN) is an extracellular oligomeric glycoprotein that participates in the adhesion of cells to extracellular matrixc (ECM). Studies have shown that the expression levels of TN are upregulated in a variety of cancers, including colon cancer, lung cancer, brain tumor, and breast cancer. However, the implications and utilities of TN in clinical grading and prognosis of glioma patients were seldom reported and the effects of its pathway are still unclear and controversial. Thus, it is essential to carry out a meta-analysis to draw a convincing conclusion. A literature search was carried out up to April 2015. Data was collected using a purpose-designed form including glioma's WHO grade, etc. Differences were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) or standard mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Galbr figure, Cochran's Q test, and I2 test were all performed to judge the heterogeneity between included studies. To examine the stability of the pooled results, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Potential publication bias was assessed by visual inspection of funnel plot. As this meta-analysis, as a systematic review, does not involve animal experiments or direct human trials, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. In this meta-analysis, 8 eligible studies involving 456 patients were incorporated. Six studies with dichotomous data revealed TN overexpression in glioma tissues and/or surrounding neoplastic vessels was closely associated with high WHO grade (III + IV) (odds ratio 3.398, 95% confidence interval 1.933, 5.974; P = 0.000); three continuous data studies showed there were close statistical associations between TN and WHO grade (SMD −2.114, 95% CI −2.580, −1.649; P = 0.000) too. Sensitivity analysis indicated a statistically robust result. No publication bias was revealed. Our meta-analysis suggests that TN expression is potentially associated with higher WHO

  7. Graph Theoretical Analysis Reveals: Women's Brains Are Better Connected than Men's.

    PubMed

    Szalkai, Balázs; Varga, Bálint; Grolmusz, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Deep graph-theoretic ideas in the context with the graph of the World Wide Web led to the definition of Google's PageRank and the subsequent rise of the most popular search engine to date. Brain graphs, or connectomes, are being widely explored today. We believe that non-trivial graph theoretic concepts, similarly as it happened in the case of the World Wide Web, will lead to discoveries enlightening the structural and also the functional details of the animal and human brains. When scientists examine large networks of tens or hundreds of millions of vertices, only fast algorithms can be applied because of the size constraints. In the case of diffusion MRI-based structural human brain imaging, the effective vertex number of the connectomes, or brain graphs derived from the data is on the scale of several hundred today. That size facilitates applying strict mathematical graph algorithms even for some hard-to-compute (or NP-hard) quantities like vertex cover or balanced minimum cut. In the present work we have examined brain graphs, computed from the data of the Human Connectome Project, recorded from male and female subjects between ages 22 and 35. Significant differences were found between the male and female structural brain graphs: we show that the average female connectome has more edges, is a better expander graph, has larger minimal bisection width, and has more spanning trees than the average male connectome. Since the average female brain weighs less than the brain of males, these properties show that the female brain has better graph theoretical properties, in a sense, than the brain of males. It is known that the female brain has a smaller gray matter/white matter ratio than males, that is, a larger white matter/gray matter ratio than the brain of males; this observation is in line with our findings concerning the number of edges, since the white matter consists of myelinated axons, which, in turn, roughly correspond to the connections in the brain graph

  8. PERK silence inhibits glioma cell growth under low glucose stress by blockage of p-AKT and subsequent HK2's mitochondria translocation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xu; Liu, Yaohua; Liu, Huailei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Min; Che, Hui; Guo, Fei; Wang, Chunlei; Zhang, Daming; Wu, Jianing; Chen, Xiaofeng; Shen, Chen; Li, Chenguang; Peng, Fei; Bi, Yunke; Yang, Zhuowen; Yang, Guang; Ai, Jing; Gao, Xin; Zhao, Shiguang

    2015-03-12

    Glioma relies on glycolysis to obtain energy and sustain its survival under low glucose microenvironment in vivo. The mechanisms on glioma cell glycolysis regulation are still unclear. Signaling mediated by Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) - like ER kinase (PERK) is one of the important pathways of unfolded protein response (UPR) which is comprehensively activated in cancer cells upon the hypoxic and low glucose stress. Here we show that PERK is significantly activated in human glioma tissues. PERK silencing results in decreased glioma cell viability and ATP/lactate production upon low glucose stress, which is mediated by partially blocked AKT activation and subsequent inhibition of Hexokinase II (HK2)'s mitochondria translocation. More importantly, PERK silenced glioma cells show decreased tumor formation capacity. Our results reveal that PERK activation is involved in glioma glycolysis regulation and may be a potential molecular target for glioma treatment.

  9. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  10. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain.

    PubMed

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Adam D; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region-specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development.

  11. Comparison of 3 and 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Obstructive Hydrocephalus Caused by Tectal Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyeong Cheol; Baek, Hyeon-Man

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma, which relived by neuroendoscopy, have been described using 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) so far, we present the results obtained from 3T and 7T MRI in this patient. A 21-year-old woman presented at our hospital with gait disturbance, hormonal insufficiency, and urinary incontinence that began prior to 6 years of age. 3.0T MRI revealed a non-enhancing tectal mass along with obstructive hydrocephalus. The mass measured approximately 1.1×1.0×1.2 cm. An endoscopic third ventriculostomy was performed to relieve the hydrocephalus. We compared hydrocephalus and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow findings from 3T and 7T MRI, both preoperative and postoperative at 1, 6 months. Intraventricular CSF voiding on T2-weighted images obtained with 7T MRI showed greater fluid inversion than those obtained with 3T MRI. This study shows that 7T brain MRI can provide detailed information on hydrocephalus caused by tectal glioma. Further studies are needed to develop refined 7T MRI protocols for better images of hydrocephalus. PMID:27867929

  12. Fluorine F 18 Fluorodopa-Labeled PET Scan in Planning Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High- or Low-Grade Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  13. Laminin isoforms and their integrin receptors in glioma cell migration and invasiveness: Evidence for a role of alpha5-laminin(s) and alpha3beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Yamane, Tetsu; Naganuma, Hirofumi; Rousselle, Patricia; Andurén, Ingegerd; Tryggvason, Karl; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2007-11-01

    Glioma cell infiltration of brain tissue often occurs along the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels. In the present study we have investigated the role of laminins, major structural components of BMs and strong promoters of cell migration. Immunohistochemical studies of glioma tumor tissue demonstrated expression of alpha2-, alpha3-, alpha4- and alpha5-, but not alpha1-, laminins by the tumor vasculature. In functional assays, alpha3 (Lm-332/laminin-5)- and alpha5 (Lm-511/laminin-10)-laminins strongly promoted migration of all glioma cell lines tested. alpha1-Laminin (Lm-111/laminin-1) displayed lower activity, whereas alpha2 (Lm-211/laminin-2)- and alpha4 (Lm-411/laminin-8)-laminins were practically inactive. Global integrin phenotyping identified alpha3beta1 as the most abundant integrin in all the glioma cell lines, and this laminin-binding integrin exclusively or largely mediate the cell migration. Moreover, pretreatment of U251 glioma cells with blocking antibodies to alpha3beta1 integrin followed by intracerebral injection into nude mice inhibited invasion of the tumor cells into the brain tissue. The cell lines secreted Lm-211, Lm-411 and Lm-511, at different ratios. The results indicate that glioma cells secrete alpha2-, alpha4- and alpha5-laminins and that alpha3- and alpha5-laminins, found in brain vasculature, selectively promote glioma cell migration. They identify alpha3beta1 as the predominant integrin and laminin receptor in glioma cells, and as a brain invasion-mediating integrin.

  14. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly-Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  15. Differential brain activity states during the perception and nonperception of illusory motion as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Crowe, David A; Leuthold, Arthur C; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2010-12-28

    We studied visual perception using an annular random-dot motion stimulus called the racetrack. We recorded neural activity using magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed variants of this stimulus that contained no inherent motion or various degrees of embedded motion. Subjects reported seeing rotary motion during viewing of all stimuli. We found that, in the absence of any motion signals, patterns of brain activity differed between states of motion perception and nonperception. Furthermore, when subjects perceived motion, activity states within the brain did not differ across stimuli of different amounts of embedded motion. In contrast, we found that during periods of nonperception brain-activity states varied with the amount of motion signal embedded in the stimulus. Taken together, these results suggest that during perception the brain may lock into a stable state in which lower-level signals are suppressed.

  16. Molecular classification and survival prediction in human gliomas based on proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Sakaida, Tsukasa; Hiwasa, Takaki; Nagai, Yuichiro; Ishikura, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Masaki; Yamaura, Akira

    2004-04-01

    The biological features of gliomas, which are characterized by highly heterogeneous biological aggressiveness even in the same histological category, would be precisely described by global gene expression data at the protein level. We investigated whether proteome analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry can identify differences in protein expression between high- and low-grade glioma tissues. Proteome profiling patterns were compared in 85 tissue samples: 52 glioblastoma multiforme, 13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 10 atrocytomas, and 10 normal brain tissues. We could completely distinguish the normal brain tissues from glioma tissues by cluster analysis based on the proteome profiling patterns. Proteome-based clustering significantly correlated with the patient survival, and we could identify a biologically distinct subset of astrocytomas with aggressive nature. Discriminant analysis extracted a set of 37 proteins differentially expressed based on histological grading. Among them, many of the proteins that were increased in high-grade gliomas were categorized as signal transduction proteins, including small G-proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the expression of identified proteins in glioma tissues. The present study shows that proteome analysis is useful to develop a novel system for the prediction of biological aggressiveness of gliomas. The proteins identified here could be novel biomarkers for survival prediction and rational targets for antiglioma therapy.

  17. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wanho; Lim, Sookkyung; Kim, Yangjin

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization. PMID:28166231

  18. Role of Yes-associated protein 1 in gliomas: pathologic and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Chang; Wang, Yan-zhou

    2015-04-01

    The activation of proline-rich phosphoprotein Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) possesses a possible link between stem/progenitor cells, organ size, and cancer. YAP1 has been indicated as an oncoprotein, and overexpression of YAP1 is reported in many human brain tumors, including infiltrating gliomas. During normal brain development, the neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) protein suppresses YAP1 activity in neural progenitor cells to promote guidepost cell differentiation, but loss of NF2 causes elevating YAP1 activity in midline neural progenitors, which disrupts guidepost formation. Overexpression of endogenous CD44 (cancer stem cell marker) promotes phosphorylation/inactivation of NF2, and upregulates YAP1 expression and leads to cancer cell resistance in glioblastoma. The hippo pathway is also related to the YAP1 action. However, the mechanism of YAP1 action in glioma is still far from clear understanding. Advances in clinical management based on an improved understanding of the function of YAP1 may help to serve as a molecular target in glioma therapeutics. Knockdown of YAP1 by shRNA technology has been shown to reduce glioma in vitro; however, clinical implications are still under investigation. YAP1 can be used as a diagnostic marker for gliomas to monitor the disease status and may help to evaluate its treatment effects. More functional experiments are needed to support the direct roles of YAP1 on gliomas at molecular and cellular levels.

  19. Metabolite mapping reveals severe widespread perturbation of multiple metabolic processes in Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Reid, Suzanne J; Kim, Eric H; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Snell, Russell G; Unwin, Richard D; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    2016-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetically-mediated neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein (Htt) through lengthening of its polyglutamine tract, thus initiating a cascade that ultimately leads to premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and mechanisms linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Brain metabolism is severely perturbed in HD, and some studies have indicated a potential role for mutant Htt as a driver of these metabolic aberrations. Here, our objective was to determine the effects of HD on brain metabolism by measuring levels of polar metabolites in regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We performed gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analyses in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine matched controls. In each patient, we measured metabolite content in representative tissue-samples from eleven brain regions that display varying degrees of damage in HD, thus identifying the presence and abundance of 63 different metabolites from several molecular classes, including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleosides, and neurotransmitters. Robust alterations in regional brain-metabolite abundances were observed in HD patients: these included changes in levels of small molecules that play important roles as intermediates in the tricarboxylic-acid and urea cycles, and amino-acid metabolism. Our findings point to widespread disruption of brain metabolism and indicate a complex phenotype beyond the gradient of neuropathologic damage observed in HD brain.

  20. Single cell transcriptomics reveals specific RNA editing signatures in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Picardi, Ernesto; Horner, David Stephen; Pesole, Graziano

    2017-03-03

    While RNA editing by A-to-I deamination is a requisite for neuronal function in humans, it is under investigated in single cells. Here we fill this gap by analysing RNA editing profiles of single cells from the brain cortex of living human subjects. We show that RNA editing levels per cell are bimodally distributed and distinguish between major brain cell types thus providing new insights into neuronal dynamics.

  1. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience. PMID:28197089

  2. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangzhe; Zhang, Yanjun; Feng, Hongbo; Jiang, Donglang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs), followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized characteristic path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM. PMID:27303259

  3. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  4. Hierarchical Neural Representation of Dreamed Objects Revealed by Brain Decoding with Deep Neural Network Features.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2017-01-01

    Dreaming is generally thought to be generated by spontaneous brain activity during sleep with patterns common to waking experience. This view is supported by a recent study demonstrating that dreamed objects can be predicted from brain activity during sleep using statistical decoders trained with stimulus-induced brain activity. However, it remains unclear whether and how visual image features associated with dreamed objects are represented in the brain. In this study, we used a deep neural network (DNN) model for object recognition as a proxy for hierarchical visual feature representation, and DNN features for dreamed objects were analyzed with brain decoding of fMRI data collected during dreaming. The decoders were first trained with stimulus-induced brain activity labeled with the feature values of the stimulus image from multiple DNN layers. The decoders were then used to decode DNN features from the dream fMRI data, and the decoded features were compared with the averaged features of each object category calculated from a large-scale image database. We found that the feature values decoded from the dream fMRI data positively correlated with those associated with dreamed object categories at mid- to high-level DNN layers. Using the decoded features, the dreamed object category could be identified at above-chance levels by matching them to the averaged features for candidate categories. The results suggest that dreaming recruits hierarchical visual feature representations associated with objects, which may support phenomenal aspects of dream experience.

  5. Functional brain imaging in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia reveals right inferolateral prefrontal hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Eggers, Carsten; Reinhold, Nadine; Fujiwara, Esther; Kessler, Josef; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2009-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is a condition usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning in the absence of structural brain damage. Recent case studies nevertheless found functional brain changes in patients suffering from autobiographical-episodic memory loss in the cause of dissociative amnesia. Functional changes were demonstrated in both resting state and memory retrieval conditions. In addition, some but not all cases also showed other neuropsychological impairments beyond retrograde memory deficits. However, there is no group study available that examined potential functional brain abnormalities and accompanying neuropsychological deteriorations in larger samples of patients with dissociative retrograde amnesia. We report functional imaging and neuropsychological data acquired in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia following stressful or traumatic events. All patients suffered from autobiographical memory loss. In addition, approximately half of the patients had deficits in anterograde memory and executive functioning. Accompanying functional brain changes were measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Regional glucose utilization of the patients was compared with that of 19 healthy subjects, matched for age and gender. We found significantly decreased glucose utilization in the right inferolateral prefrontal cortex in the patients. Hypometabolism in this brain region, known to be involved in retrieval of autobiographical memories and self-referential processing, may be a functional brain correlate of dissociative amnesia.

  6. Gene expression profiling of gliomas: merging genomic and histopathological classification for personalised therapy.

    PubMed

    Vitucci, M; Hayes, D N; Miller, C R

    2011-02-15

    The development of DNA microarray technologies over the past decade has revolutionised translational cancer research. These technologies were originally hailed as more objective, comprehensive replacements for traditional histopathological cancer classification systems, based on microscopic morphology. Although DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling (GEP) remains unlikely in the near term to completely replace morphological classification of primary brain tumours, specifically the diffuse gliomas, GEP has confirmed that significant molecular heterogeneity exists within the various morphologically defined gliomas, particularly glioblastoma (GBM). Herein, we provide a 10-year progress report on human glioma GEP, with focus on development of clinical diagnostic tests to identify molecular subtypes, uniquely responsive to adjuvant therapies. Such progress may lead to a more precise classification system that accurately reflects the cellular, genetic, and molecular basis of gliomagenesis, a prerequisite for identifying subsets uniquely responsive to specific adjuvant therapies, and ultimately in achieving individualised clinical care of glioma patients.

  7. Molecular Markers in Low-Grade Glioma-Toward Tumor Reclassification.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Sulman, Erik P

    2015-07-01

    Low-grade diffuse gliomas are a heterogeneous group of primary glial brain tumors with highly variable survival. Currently, patients with low-grade diffuse gliomas are stratified into risk subgroups by subjective histopathologic criteria with significant interobserver variability. Several key molecular signatures have emerged as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictor biomarkers for tumor classification and patient risk stratification. In this review, we discuss the effect of the most critical molecular alterations described in diffuse (IDH1/2, 1p/19q codeletion, ATRX, TERT, CIC, and FUBP1) and circumscribed (BRAF-KIAA1549, BRAF(V600E), and C11orf95-RELA fusion) gliomas. These molecular features reflect tumor heterogeneity and have specific associations with patient outcome that determine appropriate patient management. This has led to an important, fundamental shift toward developing a molecular classification of World Health Organization grade II-III diffuse glioma.

  8. Molecular subtypes, stem cells and heterogeneity: Implications for personalised therapy in glioma.

    PubMed

    Morokoff, Andrew; Ng, Wayne; Gogos, Andrew; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-08-01

    We discuss a number of recent developments that have led to new concepts regarding the biology of gliomas. Collective tissue banking, large-scale genomic, transcriptomic and methylomic expression profiling, and discoveries such as isocitrate dehydrogenase gene mutation and the C-phosphate-G island methylation phenotype have improved glioma classification schemes. Furthermore, the discovery of glioma stem cells has both enhanced and complicated our understanding. Gene signatures describing a proneural versus mesenchymal subtype within glioblastoma multiforme is reflected in both parental tumour as well as glioma stem cells and correlates with differential prognosis and response to radiation and chemotherapy. Finally, we discuss how these factors integrate with the known heterogeneity within brain cancers and the implications of this for the development of personalised therapy.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  10. Intrinsic protective mechanisms of the neuron-glia network against glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Matsutani, Tomoo; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2016-04-01

    Gliomas arising in the brain parenchyma