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Sample records for brain spet perfusion

  1. Myocardial perfusion imaging parameters: IQ-SPECT and conventional SPET system comparison.

    PubMed

    Havel, Martin; Kolacek, Michal; Kaminek, Milan; Dedek, Vladimir; Kraft, Otakar; Sirucek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancement in hardware and software development in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) leads to the shortening of acquisition time and reduction of the radiation burden to patients. We compared semiquantitative perfusion results and functional parameters of the left ventricle between new dedicated cardiac system with astigmatic collimators called IQ-SPECT (Siemens Medical Solutions, USA) and conventional single photon emission tomography (SPET) system equipped with standard low energy high resolution collimators. A group of randomly selected 81 patients underwent consecutively the MPI procedure on IQ-SPECT and on conventional SPET systen, both without attenuation correction. The summed scores and the values of the functional parameters of the left ventricle: ejection fraction (EF), end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes (ESV, EDV) received from the automatic analysis software were compared and statistically analyzed. Our results showed that summed scores values were significantly higher for the IQ-SPECT system in comparison to the conventional one. Calculated EF were significantly lower for IQ-SPECT, whereas evaluated left ventricular volumes (LVV) were significantly higher for this system. In conclusion, we recorded significant differences in automatically calculated semiquantitative perfusion and functional parameters when compared uncorrected studies obtained by the IQ-SPECT with the conventional SPET system.

  2. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  3. Early serial SPET in acute middle cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, J; Kuikka, J; Roivainen, R; Vanninen, E; Sivenius, J

    2000-05-01

    The size and severity of perfusion defects in acute cerebral ischaemia on single photon emission tomographic (SPET) images may provide useful information regarding long-term (> 3 month) stroke outcome. A decreased predictive value has been reported with delayed SPET more than 24 h after stroke onset. We examined 20 patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions using serial 99Tcm-ECD or 99Tcm-HMPAO SPET (SPET 1 one day and SPET 2 three days after stroke onset). Neurological (NIH, SSS) and functional (Barthel, Rankin) scores were calculated simultaneously and 3 months poststroke. The two SPET scans correlated equally well with the severity of functional and neurological deficits evaluated 3 months after stroke onset. In comparison to clinical assessment, the prognostic value of SPET was relatively better on the first day than the third day. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis correlated with early SPET deficits, but did not predict functional outcome. Our results suggest that SPET, either with 99Tcm-ECD or 99Tcm-HMPAO, can be used to predict stroke outcome in acute MCA infarction up to 72 h poststroke without significant interference from luxury perfusion.

  4. Validation of quantitative brain dopamine D2 receptor imaging with a conventional single-head SPET camera.

    PubMed

    Nikkinen, P; Liewendahl, K; Savolainen, S; Launes, J

    1993-08-01

    Phantom measurements were performed with a conventional single-head single-photon emission tomography (SPET) camera in order to validate the relevance of the basal ganglia/frontal cortex iodine-123 iodobenzamide (IBZM) uptake ratios measured in patients. Inside a cylindrical phantom (diameter 22 cm), two cylinders with a diameter of 3.3 cm were inserted. The activity concentrations of the cylinders ranged from 6.0 to 22.6 kBq/ml and the cylinder/background activity ratios varied from 1.4 to 3.8. From reconstructed SPET images the cylinder/background activity ratios were calculated using three different regions of interest (ROIs). A linear relationship between the measured activity ratio and the true activity ratio was obtained. In patient studies, basal ganglia/frontal cortex IBZM uptake ratios determined from the reconstructed slices using attenuation correction prior to reconstruction were 1.30 +/- 0.03 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 9), 1.33 +/- 0.09 in infantile and juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (n = 7) and 1.34 +/- 0.05 in narcolepsy (n = 8). Patients with Huntington's disease had significantly lower ratios (1.09 +/- 0.04, n = 5). The corrected basal ganglia/frontal cortex ratios, determined using linear regression, were about 80% higher. The use of dural-window scatter correction increased the measured ratios by about 10%. Although comprehensive correction methods can further improve the resolution in SPET images, the resolution of the SPET system used by us (1.5-2 cm) will determine what is achievable in basal ganglia D2 receptor imaging.

  5. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  7. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development.

  8. The additive value of transient left ventricular dilation using two-day dipyridamole 99mTc-MIBI SPET for screening coronary artery disease in patients with otherwise normal myocardial perfusion: a comparison between diabetic and non-diabetic cases.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Akbarpour, Saeed; Abolhassani, Arash; Kakhki, Vahid Reza Dabbagh; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The prognostic value of transient ischemic dilation (TID) has been previously confirmed; however, its clinical significance for screening coronary artery disease (CAD) with balanced ischemia, as a cause of false negative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the additive diagnostic value of TID ratio for screening CAD in separate subgroups of diabetic and non-diabetics with normal perfusion. Eighty six patients with intermediate probability of CAD who had TID more than one in the presence of otherwise normal MPI using two-day technetium-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile ((99m)Tc-MIBI) single photon emission tomography (SPET) and dipyridamole stress (summed stress score<3 and left ventricular cavity<90 mL) were included in a prospective cohort study comprising two subgroups of diabetic and non- diabetic patients. An inclusive work-up with multiple noninvasive tests was performed for all patients from whom 38 cases subsequently underwent coronary angiography and 48 cases were categorized in the group with a very low likelihood (<5%) of CAD on the basis of clinical and paraclinical data over a minimum of 18 months follow up. The TID ratio was calculated using automated software. Gensini score (GS) as an indicator of severity/extent of stenosis and coronary artery index (CAI) as the number of arteries with more than 50% narrowing were calculated based on angiographic findings. Our results showed that only in diabetic patients with three-vessel disease, TID ratio (1.47 ± 0.23) differs significantly from the other groups of CAD. In diabetic patients subgroup, TID ratio correlated strongly with GS (r=0.957, P<0.0001) and CAI (r=0.659, P=0.001), while such correlations were not seen in the non-diabetic patients. On the basis of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for screening CAD in diabetic patients with normal myocardial perfusion, 100% sensitivity and 77.8% normalcy rate were achieved when TID more than 1

  9. Brain perfusion asymmetry in patients with oral somatic delusions.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Sakuma, Tomomi; Sako, Emi; Sato, Yusuke; Toriihara, Akira; Uezato, Akihito; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Motomura, Haruhiko; Toyofuku, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Oral cenesthopathy is a somatic delusion or hallucination involving the oral area and is categorized as a delusional disorder, somatic type. The pathophysiology of this intractable condition remains obscure. In this study, we clarified the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy by evaluating regional brain perfusion. We performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer in 16 subjects (cenesthopathy:control = 8:8). The SPECT images were visually assessed qualitatively, and quantitative analyses were also performed using a three-dimensional stereotactic region-of-interest template. The visual assessment revealed a right > left perfusion asymmetry in broad areas of the brain among the patients. The quantitative analysis confirmed that the regional cerebral blood flow values on the right side were significantly larger than those on the left side for most areas of the brain in the patients. A comparison of the R/(R + L) ratios in both groups confirmed the significant brain perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the callosomarginal, precentral, and temporal regions in the patients. Qualitative evaluation of the SPECT images revealed right > left brain perfusion asymmetry in broad regions of the brain. Moreover, the quantitative analyses confirmed the perfusion asymmetry between the two sides in the frontal and temporal areas. Those may provide the key for elucidation of the pathophysiology of oral cenesthopathy.

  10. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  11. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  12. A comparison of (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPET changes in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease using statistical parametric mapping.

    PubMed

    Colloby, Sean J; Fenwick, John D; Williams, E David; Paling, Sean M; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Ballard, Clive; McKeith, Ian; O'Brien, John T

    2002-05-01

    Differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and healthy volunteers were investigated using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). Forty-eight AD, 23 DLB and 20 age-matched control subjects participated. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scans were acquired for each subject using a single-headed rotating gamma camera (IGE CamStar XR/T). The SPET images were spatially normalised and group comparison was performed by SPM99. In addition, covariate analysis was undertaken on the standardised images taking the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores as a variable. Applying a height threshold of P < or = 0.001 uncorrected, significant perfusion deficits in the parietal and frontal regions of the brain were observed in both AD and DLB groups compared with the control subjects. In addition, significant temporoparietal perfusion deficits were identified in the AD subjects, whereas the DLB patients had deficits in the occipital region. Comparison of dementia groups (height threshold of P < or = 0.01 uncorrected) yielded hypoperfusion in both the parietal [Brodmann area (BA) 7] and occipital (BA 17, 18) regions of the brain in DLB compared with AD. Abnormalities in these areas, which included visual cortex and several areas involved in higher visual processing and visuospatial function, may be important in understanding the visual hallucinations and visuospatial deficits which are characteristic of DLB. Covariate analysis indicated group differences between AD and DLB in terms of a positive correlation between cognitive test score and temporoparietal blood flow. In conclusion, we found evidence of frontal and parietal hypoperfusion in both AD and DLB, while temporal perfusion deficits were observed exclusively in AD and parieto-occipital deficits in DLB.

  13. Focally perfused succinate potentiates brain metabolism in head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Howe, Duncan J; Shannon, Richard J; Grice, Peter; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Stovell, Matthew G; van der Heide, Susan; Murphy, Michael P; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri Lh

    2016-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, complex cerebral energy perturbations occur. Correlating with unfavourable outcome, high brain extracellular lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests hypoxic metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether focal administration of succinate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate interacting directly with the mitochondrial electron transport chain, could improve cerebral metabolism. Microdialysis perfused disodium 2,3-(13)C2 succinate (12 mmol/L) for 24 h into nine sedated traumatic brain injury patients' brains, with simultaneous microdialysate collection for ISCUS analysis of energy metabolism biomarkers (nine patients) and nuclear magnetic resonance of (13)C-labelled metabolites (six patients). Metabolites 2,3-(13)C2 malate and 2,3-(13)C2 glutamine indicated tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, and 2,3-(13)C2 lactate suggested tricarboxylic acid cycle spinout of pyruvate (by malic enzyme or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate kinase), then lactate dehydrogenase-mediated conversion to lactate. Versus baseline, succinate perfusion significantly decreased lactate/pyruvate ratio (p = 0.015), mean difference -12%, due to increased pyruvate concentration (+17%); lactate changed little (-3%); concentrations decreased for glutamate (-43%) (p = 0.018) and glucose (-15%) (p = 0.038). Lower lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests better redox status: cytosolic NADH recycled to NAD(+) by mitochondrial shuttles (malate-aspartate and/or glycerol 3-phosphate), diminishing lactate dehydrogenase-mediated pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, and lowering glutamate. Glucose decrease suggests improved utilisation. Direct tricarboxylic acid cycle supplementation with 2,3-(13)C2 succinate improved human traumatic brain injury brain chemistry, indicated by biomarkers and (13)C-labelling patterns in metabolites.

  14. Serial changes in regional blood flow in the cerebrum and cerebellum of stroke patients imaged by 99Tcm-HMPAO SPET.

    PubMed

    Lin, W Y; Kao, C H; Wang, P Y; Changlai, S P; Wang, S J

    1996-03-01

    Luxury perfusion is a well-known phenomenon that can mask ischaemic lesions in patients with cerebral infarction, thus making diagnosis difficult. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of luxury perfusion over a 3-week period following a stroke episode. The usefulness of crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) as a complementary feature in the diagnosis of cerebral infarction was also evaluated using 99Tcm-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (99TcmHMPAO) brain single photon emission tomography (SPET). Twelve patients diagnosed as having a hemispheric ischaemic stroke of the middle cerebral arterial territory were enrolled in the study. Each patient underwent a total of four 99Tcm-HMPAO brain SPET examinations, 1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks following the stroke episode. Our results show that the incidence of luxury perfusion was 67% (8/12) after 1 week, 75% (9/12) after 2 weeks and 83% (10/12) after 3 weeks. The incidence of CCD was 33% (4/12) after 1 day, 50% (6/12) after 1 week, 42% (5/12) after 2 weeks and 33% (4/12) after 3 weeks. We conclude that the detection of cerebral infarction is difficult 2 weeks or more after a stroke episode. The interval between the stroke episode and examination must be considered when reading the 99Tcm-HMPAO image. In addition, CCD may be helpful for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction within the first week after a stroke episode, especially in cases of an unidentified ischaemic region on the 99Tcm-HMPAO hemispheric image. However, the value of CCD is limited 2 weeks or more following the stroke episode.

  15. Affective psychosis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and brain perfusion abnormalities: case report

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background It has recently become evident that circulating thyroid antibodies are found in excess among patients suffering from mood disorders. Moreover, a manic episode associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis has recently been reported as the first case of bipolar disorder due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy. We report a case in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis was suspected to be involved in the deteriorating course of mood disorder and discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms linking thyroid autoimmunity with psychopathology. Case presentation A 43-year-old woman, with a history of recurrent depression since the age of 31, developed manic, psychotic, and soft neurological symptoms across the last three years in concomitance with her first diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient underwent a thorough medical and neurological workup. Circulating thyroperoxidase antibodies were highly elevated but thyroid function was adequately maintained with L-thyroxine substitution. EEG was normal and no other signs of current CNS inflammation were evidenced. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging evidenced several non-active lesions in the white matter from both hemispheres, suggestive of a non-specific past vasculitis. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography showed cortical perfusion asymmetry particularly between frontal lobes. Conclusion We hypothesize that abnormalities in cortical perfusion might represent a pathogenic link between thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders, and that the rare cases of severe Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with mood disorder might be only the tip of an iceberg. PMID:18096026

  16. Different uptake of 99mTc-ECD adn 99mTc-HMPAO in the same brains: analysis by statistical parametric mapping.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Y; Lee, J S; Rha, J H; Lee, I K; Ha, C K; Lee, D S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) uptake in the same brains by means of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. We examined 20 patients (9 male, 11 female, mean age 62+/-12 years) using 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain less than 7 days after onset of stroke. MRI showed no cortical infarctions. Infarctions in the pons (6 patients) and medulla (1), ischaemic periventricular white matter lesions (13) and lacunar infarction (7) were found on MRI. Split-dose and sequential SPET techniques were used for 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPET, without repositioning of the patient. All of the SPET images were spatially transformed to standard space, smoothed and globally normalized. The differences between the 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO SPET images were statistically analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 96 software. The difference between two groups was considered significant at a threshold of uncorrected P values less than 0.01. Visual analysis showed no hypoperfused areas on either 99mTc-ECD or 99mTc-HMPAO SPET images. SPM analysis revealed significantly different uptake of 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO in the same brains. On the 99mTc-ECD SPET images, relatively higher uptake was observed in the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes, in the left superior temporal lobe and in the superior region of the cerebellum. On the 99mTc-HMPAO SPET images, relatively higher uptake was observed in the medial temporal lobes, thalami, periventricular white matter and brain stem. These differences in uptake of the two tracers in the same brains on SPM analysis suggest that interpretation of cerebral perfusion is possible using SPET with 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO.

  17. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.; King, M.A.; Kling, A.S.; Fitten, L.J.; O'Rear, J.; Bronca, G.A.; Gan, M.; Servrin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n ({sup 123}I)IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed.

  18. Comparison of heterogeneity quantification algorithms for brain SPECT perfusion images

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several algorithms from the literature were compared with the original random walk (RW) algorithm for brain perfusion heterogeneity quantification purposes. Algorithms are compared on a set of 210 brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) simulations and 40 patient exams. Methods Five algorithms were tested on numerical phantoms. The numerical anthropomorphic Zubal head phantom was used to generate 42 (6 × 7) different brain SPECT simulations. Seven diffuse cortical heterogeneity levels were simulated with an adjustable Gaussian noise function and six focal perfusion defect levels with temporoparietal (TP) defects. The phantoms were successively projected and smoothed with Gaussian kernel with full width at half maximum (FWHM = 5 mm), and Poisson noise was added to the 64 projections. For each simulation, 5 Poisson noise realizations were performed yielding a total of 210 datasets. The SPECT images were reconstructed using filtered black projection (Hamming filter: α = 0.5). The five algorithms or measures tested were the following: the coefficient of variation, the entropy and local entropy, fractal dimension (FD) (box counting and Fourier power spectrum methods), the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and the new RW. The heterogeneity discrimination power was obtained with a linear regression for each algorithm. This regression line is a mean function of the measure of heterogeneity compared to the different diffuse heterogeneity and focal defect levels generated in the phantoms. A greater slope denotes a larger separation between the levels of diffuse heterogeneity. The five algorithms were computed using 40 99mTc-ethyl-cysteinate-dimer (ECD) SPECT images of patients referred for memory impairment. Scans were blindly ranked by two physicians according to the level of heterogeneity, and a consensus was obtained. The rankings obtained by the algorithms were compared with the physicians' consensus ranking. Results The GLCM method

  19. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart–lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart–lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart–lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures. PMID:27729705

  20. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  1. A perfusion protocol for lizards, including a method for brain removal

    PubMed Central

    Hoops, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The goal of fixation is to rapidly and uniformly preserve tissue in a life-like state. Perfusion achieves optimal fixation by pumping fixative directly through an animal’s circulatory system. Standard perfusion techniques were developed primarily for application in mammals, which are traditional neuroscience research models. Increasingly, other vertebrate groups are also being used in neuroscience. Following mammalian perfusion protocols for non-mammalian vertebrates often results in failed perfusions. Here, I present a modified perfusion protocol suitable for lizards. Though geared towards standard brain perfusion, this protocol is easily modified for the perfusion of other tissues and for various specialized histological techniques. • The two aortas of the lizard heart, emerging from a single ventricle, mean that care must be taken to place the perfusion needle in the correct aorta, unlike in mammals. • Only the head and neck perfuse – the visceral organs will not decolour, and the body may not twitch. • I also include a method for removing a lizard brain, which differs from mammals due to the incomplete and thicker skull of the lizard. PMID:26150986

  2. Correction for partial volume effects in brain perfusion ECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koole, Michel; Staelens, Steven; Van de Walle, Rik; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    2003-05-01

    The accurate quantification of brain perfusion for emission computed tomography data (PET-SPECT) is limited by partial volume effects (PVE). This study presents a new approach to estimate accurately the true tissue tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment. The methodology is based on the availability of additional anatomical side information and on the assumption that activity concentration within the white matter tissue compartment is constant. Starting from an initial estimate for the white matter grey matter activity, the true tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment is estimated by an alternating ML-EM-algorithm. During the updating step the constant activity concentration within the white matter compartment is modelled in the forward projection in order to reconstruct the true activity distribution within the grey matter tissue compartment, hence reducing partial volume averaging. Consequently the estimate for the constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment is updated based on the new estimated activity distribution in the grey matter tissue compartment. We have tested this methodology by means of computer simulations. A T1-weighted MR brainscan of a patient was segmented into white matter, grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid, using the segmentation package of the SPM-software (Statistical Parametric Mapping). The segmented grey and white matter were used to simulate a SPECT acquisition, modelling the noise and the distance dependant detector response. Scatter and attenuation were ignored. Following the above described strategy, simulations have shown it is possible to reconstruct the true activity distribution for the grey matter tissue compartment (activity/tissue volume), assuming constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment.

  3. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  4. DRAG REDUCING POLYMER ENCHANCES MICROVASCULAR PERFUSION IN THE TRAUMATIZED BRAIN WITH INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Denis E.; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V.; Nemoto, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood soluble non-toxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. Recently, we demonstrated that that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using the in-vivo 2-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both un-traumatized and traumatized rat brains at high ICP. Our study suggests that DRP could be an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high ICP after TBI. PMID:27165871

  5. The adverse effects of reduced cerebral perfusion on cognition and brain structure in older adults with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Gunstad, John; Jerskey, Beth A; Xu, Xiaomeng; Clark, Uraina S; Hassenstab, Jason; Cote, Denise M; Walsh, Edward G; Labbe, Donald R; Hoge, Richard; Cohen, Ronald A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that aging and vascular processes interact to disrupt cerebral hemodynamics in older adults. However, the independent effects of cerebral perfusion on neurocognitive function among older adults remain poorly understood. We examined the associations among cerebral perfusion, cognitive function, and brain structure in older adults with varying degrees of vascular disease using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods 52 older adults underwent neuroimaging and were administered the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), and measures of attention/executive function. ASL and T1-weighted MRI were used to quantify total brain perfusion, total brain volume (TBV), and cortical thickness. Results Regression analyses showed reduced total brain perfusion was associated with poorer performance on the MMSE, RBANS total index, immediate and delayed memory composites, and Trail Making Test B. Reduced frontal lobe perfusion was associated with worse executive and memory function. A similar pattern emerged between temporal lobe perfusion and immediate memory. Regression analyses revealed that decreased total brain perfusion was associated with smaller TBV and mean cortical thickness. Regional effects of reduced total cerebral perfusion were found on temporal and parietal lobe volumes and frontal and temporal cortical thickness. Discussion Reduced cerebral perfusion is independently associated with poorer cognition, smaller TBV, and reduced cortical thickness in older adults. Conclusion Prospective studies are needed to clarify patterns of cognitive decline and brain atrophy associated with cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:24363966

  6. Brain/language relationships identified with diffusion and perfusion MRI: Clinical applications in neurology and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Argye E

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion and perfusion MRI have contributed to stroke management by identifying patients with tissue "at risk" for further damage in acute stroke. However, the potential usefulness of these imaging modalities, along with diffusion tensor imaging, can be expanded by using these imaging techniques with concurrent assessment of language and other cognitive skills to identify the specific cognitive deficits that are associated with diffusion and perfusion abnormalities in particular brain regions. This paper illustrates how this combined behavioral and imaging methodology can yield information that is useful for predicting specific positive effects of intervention to restore blood flow in hypoperfused regions of brain identified with perfusion MRI, and for predicting negative effects of resection of particular brain regions or fiber bundles. Such data allow decisions about neurological and neurosurgical interventions to be based on specific risks and benefits in terms of functional consequences.

  7. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Murray, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain. PMID:26193290

  8. [CT perfusion for assessment of brain stem ischemic lesions].

    PubMed

    Saifullina, E I; Iksanova, G R

    2007-01-01

    Modern neurovisualization modalities - CT and MRI with cerebral circulation assessment was used for diagnosis of cerebrovascular disturbances in patients admitted to the Emergency Care Hospital of Ufa. CT and MRI perfusion methods appeared to be highly effective both in diagnosis and treatment efficacy monitoring of acute stroke.

  9. Brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Alegret, Montserrat; Vinyes-Junqué, Georgina; Boada, Mercè; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Cuberas, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Roca, Isabel; Hernández, Isabel; Valero, Sergi; Rosende-Roca, Maitée; Mauleón, Ana; Becker, James T.; Tárraga, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Background Visuoperceptual processing is impaired early in the clinical course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The 15-Objects Test (15-OT) detects such subtle performance deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild AD. Reduced brain perfusion in the temporal, parietal and prefrontal regions have been found in early AD and MCI patients. Objectives To confirm the role of the 15-OT in the diagnosis of MCI and AD, and to investigate the brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual dysfunction (15-OT) in subjects with MCI, AD and normal aging. Methods Forty-two AD, 42 MCI and 42 healthy elderly control (EC) subjects underwent a brain Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) and separately completed the 15-OT. An analysis of variance compared 15-OT scores between groups. SPM5 was used to analyse the SPECT data. Results 15-OT performace was impaired in the MCI and AD patients. In terms of the SPECT scans, AD patients showed reduced perfusion in temporal-parietal regions, while the MCI subjects had decreased perfusion in the middle and posterior cingulate. When MCI and AD groups were compared, a significant brain perfusion reduction was found in temporo-parietal regions. In the whole sample, 15-OT performance was significantly correlated with the clinical dementia rating scores, and with the perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole, with no significant correlation in each separate group. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the 15-OT performance provides a useful gradation of impairment from normal aging to AD, and it seems to be related to perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole. PMID:20555146

  10. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  11. A 4D CT digital phantom of an individual human brain for perfusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Christoph; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Brain perfusion is of key importance to assess brain function. Modern CT scanners can acquire perfusion maps of the cerebral parenchyma in vivo at submillimeter resolution. These perfusion maps give insights into the hemodynamics of the cerebral parenchyma and are critical for example for treatment decisions in acute stroke. However, the relations between acquisition parameters, tissue attenuation curves, and perfusion values are still poorly understood and cannot be unraveled by studies involving humans because of ethical concerns. We present a 4D CT digital phantom specific for an individual human brain to analyze these relations in a bottom-up fashion. Validation of the signal and noise components was based on 1,000 phantom simulations of 20 patient imaging data. This framework was applied to quantitatively assess the relation between radiation dose and perfusion values, and to quantify the signal-to-noise ratios of penumbra regions with decreasing sizes in white and gray matter. This is the first 4D CT digital phantom that enables to address clinical questions without having to expose the patient to additional radiation dose. PMID:27917312

  12. Cerebral abnormalities in cocaine abusers: Demonstration by SPECT perfusion brain scintigraphy. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Moore, M.; Holman, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion brain scans with iodine-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained in 12 subjects who acknowledged using cocaine on a sporadic to a daily basis. The route of cocaine administration varied from nasal to intravenous. Concurrent abuse of other drugs was also reported. None of the patients were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Brain scans demonstrated focal defects in 11 subjects, including seven who were asymptomatic, and no abnormality in one. Among the findings were scattered focal cortical deficits, which were seen in several patients and which ranged in severity from small and few to multiple and large, with a special predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes. No perfusion deficits were seen on I-123 SPECT images in five healthy volunteers. Focal alterations in cerebral perfusion are seen commonly in asymptomatic drug users, and these focal deficits are readily depicted by I-123 IMP SPECT.

  13. Feasibility of Flat Panel Detector CT in Perfusion Assessment of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Okell, T W; Gloor, M; Chappell, M A; Jezzard, P; Bieri, O; Byrne, J V

    2017-02-16

    The different results from flat panel detector CT in various pathologies have provoked some discussion. Our aim was to assess the role of flat panel detector CT in brain arteriovenous malformations, which has not yet been assessed. Five patients with brain arteriovenous malformations were studied with flat panel detector CT, DSC-MR imaging, and vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling. In glomerular brain arteriovenous malformations, perfusion was highest next to the brain arteriovenous malformation with decreasing values with increasing distance from the lesion. An inverse tendency was observed in the proliferative brain arteriovenous malformation. Flat panel detector CT, originally thought to measure blood volume, correlated more closely with arterial spin-labeling-CBF and DSC-CBF than with DSC-CBV. We conclude that flat panel detector CT perfusion depends on the time point chosen for data collection, which is triggered too early in these patients (ie, when contrast agent appears in the superior sagittal sinus after rapid shunting through the brain arteriovenous malformation). This finding, in combination with high data variability, makes flat panel detector CT inappropriate for perfusion assessment in brain arteriovenous malformations.

  14. Resting State Brain Function Analysis Using Concurrent BOLD in ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Hu, Siyuan; Wang, Ze; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen astounding discoveries about resting-state brain activity patterns in normal brain as well as their alterations in brain diseases. While the vast majority of resting-state studies are based on the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion fMRI can simultaneously capture BOLD and cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals, providing a unique opportunity for assessing resting brain functions with concurrent BOLD (ccBOLD) and CBF signals. Before taking that benefit, it is necessary to validate the utility of ccBOLD signal for resting-state analysis using conventional BOLD (cvBOLD) signal acquired without ASL modulations. To address this technical issue, resting cvBOLD and ASL perfusion MRI were acquired from a large cohort (n = 89) of healthy subjects. Four widely used resting-state brain function analyses were conducted and compared between the two types of BOLD signal, including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis, independent component analysis (ICA), analysis of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo). Consistent default mode network (DMN) as well as other resting-state networks (RSNs) were observed from cvBOLD and ccBOLD using PCC-FC analysis and ICA. ALFF from both modalities were the same for most of brain regions but were different in peripheral regions suffering from the susceptibility gradients induced signal drop. ReHo showed difference in many brain regions, likely reflecting the SNR and resolution differences between the two BOLD modalities. The DMN and auditory networks showed highest CBF values among all RSNs. These results demonstrated the feasibility of ASL perfusion MRI for assessing resting brain functions using its concurrent BOLD in addition to CBF signal, which provides a potentially useful way to maximize the utility of ASL perfusion MRI. PMID:23750275

  15. ASFNR Recommendations for Clinical Performance of MR Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Welker, K.; Boxerman, J.; Kalnin, A.; Kaufmann, T.; Shiroishi, M.; Wintermark, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Brain Perfusion SPECT with Brodmann Areas Mapping in Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on clinical criteria alone may be problematic, while current and future treatments should be administered earlier in order to be more effective. Thus, various disease biomarkers could be used for early detection of AD. We evaluated brain perfusion with 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Brodmann areas (BAs) mapping in mild AD using an automated software (NeuroGam) for the semi-quantitative evaluation of perfusion in BAs and the comparison with the software's normal database. We studied 34 consecutive patients with mild AD: 9 men, 25 women, mean age 70.9 ± 8.1 years, mean Mini-Mental State Examination 22.6 ± 2.5. BAs 25L, 25R, 38L, 38R, 28L, 28R, 36L, and 36R had the lower mean perfusion values, while BAs 31L, 31R, 19R, 18L, 18R, 17L, and 17R had the higher mean values. Compared with healthy subjects of the same age, perfusion values in BAs 25L, 25R, 28R, 28L, 36L, and 36R had the greatest deviations from the healthy sample, while the lowest deviations were found in BAs 32L, 32R, 19R, 24L, 17L, 17R, 18L, and 18R. A percentage of ≥94% of patients had perfusion values more than -2SDs below the mean of healthy subjects in BAs 38R, 38L, 36L, 36R, 23L, 23R, 22L, 44L, 28L, 28R, 25L, and 25R. The corresponding proportion was less than 38% for BAs 11L, 19R, 32L, 32R, 18L, 18R, 24L, and 17R. In conclusion, brain SPECT studies with automated perfusion mapping could be useful as an ancillary tool in daily practice, revealing perfusion impairments in early AD.

  17. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  18. Management of traumatic brain injury: nursing practice guidelines for cerebral perfusion and brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) systems.

    PubMed

    Hession, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Traditional modes of preventing brain cell death in traumatic brain injury (TBI) focus on the enhancement of cerebral perfusion pressure and control of intracranial pressure. Brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) monitoring systems are currently available to provide early detection of diminished cerebral oxygenation, and ultimately, ischemia. Research has demonstrated that early detection in PbtO2 is a more delicate measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. Monitoring PbtO2, in conjunction with cerebral perfusion pressure and intracranial pressure, has been shown to be a better guide to the prevention and treatment of secondary cerebral ischemia. This article reviews TBI, a PbtO2 monitor system description and indications for use, and the importance of nursing practice guidelines and education. With proper guidelines and education, this new technology can be used effectively by bedside clinicians and educators in adult and pediatric intensive care units.

  19. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  20. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Methods Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Results Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. Conclusion We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients. PMID:25068113

  1. Enhanced task related brain activation and resting perfusion in healthy older adults after chronic blueberry supplementation.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Aboo-Bakkar, Zainie; Conway, Myra; Adlam, Anna-Lynne R; Fulford, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Blueberries are rich in flavonoids, which possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. High flavonoid intakes attenuate age-related cognitive decline, but data from human intervention studies are sparse. We investigated whether 12 weeks of blueberry concentrate supplementation improved brain perfusion, task-related activation and cognitive function in healthy older adults. Participants were randomised to consume either 30 ml blueberry concentrate providing 387 mg anthocyanidins (5 female, 7 male; age 67.5±3.0 y; BMI, 25.9±3.3 kg.m-2) or isoenergetic placebo (8 female, 6 male; age 69.0 ±3.3 y; BMI, 27.1±.4.0 kg.m-2). Pre- and post-supplementation, participants undertook a battery of cognitive function tests and a numerical Stroop test within a 1.5T MRI scanner while functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were continuously acquired. Quantitative resting brain perfusion was determined using an arterial spin labelling (ASL) technique, and blood biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were measured. Significant increases in brain activity were observed in response to blueberry supplementation relative to the placebo group within Brodmann areas 4/6/10/21/40/44/45, precuneus, anterior cingulate, and insula/thalamus (p<0.001), as well as significant improvements in grey matter perfusion in the parietal (5.0±1.8 vs -2.9±2.4 %, p=0.013) and occipital (8.0±2.6 vs -0.7±3.2 %, p=0.031) lobes. There was also evidence suggesting improvement in working memory (two back test) after blueberry versus placebo supplementation (p=0.05). Supplementation with an anthocyanin rich blueberry concentrate improved brain perfusion and activation in brain areas associated with cognitive function in healthy older adults.

  2. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, Eric; Taïeb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; de Laforte, Catherine; Niboyet, Jean; Mundler, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 ( p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  3. Deconvolution-Based CT and MR Brain Perfusion Measurement: Theoretical Model Revisited and Practical Implementation Details.

    PubMed

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Kowarschik, Markus; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Deconvolution-based analysis of CT and MR brain perfusion data is widely used in clinical practice and it is still a topic of ongoing research activities. In this paper, we present a comprehensive derivation and explanation of the underlying physiological model for intravascular tracer systems. We also discuss practical details that are needed to properly implement algorithms for perfusion analysis. Our description of the practical computer implementation is focused on the most frequently employed algebraic deconvolution methods based on the singular value decomposition. In particular, we further discuss the need for regularization in order to obtain physiologically reasonable results. We include an overview of relevant preprocessing steps and provide numerous references to the literature. We cover both CT and MR brain perfusion imaging in this paper because they share many common aspects. The combination of both the theoretical as well as the practical aspects of perfusion analysis explicitly emphasizes the simplifications to the underlying physiological model that are necessary in order to apply it to measured data acquired with current CT and MR scanners.

  4. Automated three-dimensional quantification of myocardial perfusion and brain SPECT.

    PubMed

    Slomka, P J; Radau, P; Hurwitz, G A; Dey, D

    2001-01-01

    To allow automated and objective reading of nuclear medicine tomography, we have developed a set of tools for clinical analysis of myocardial perfusion tomography (PERFIT) and Brain SPECT/PET (BRASS). We exploit algorithms for image registration and use three-dimensional (3D) "normal models" for individual patient comparisons to composite datasets on a "voxel-by-voxel basis" in order to automatically determine the statistically significant abnormalities. A multistage, 3D iterative inter-subject registration of patient images to normal templates is applied, including automated masking of the external activity before final fit. In separate projects, the software has been applied to the analysis of myocardial perfusion SPECT, as well as brain SPECT and PET data. Automatic reading was consistent with visual analysis; it can be applied to the whole spectrum of clinical images, and aid physicians in the daily interpretation of tomographic nuclear medicine images.

  5. Cholinergic and perfusion brain networks in Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Wyper, David J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate muscarinic M1/M4 cholinergic networks in Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and their association with changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) after 12 weeks of treatment with donepezil. Methods: Forty-nine participants (25 PDD and 24 elderly controls) underwent 123I-QNB and 99mTc-exametazime SPECT scanning. We implemented voxel principal components (PC) analysis, producing a series of PC images of patterns of interrelated voxels across individuals. Linear regression analyses derived specific M1/M4 and perfusion spatial covariance patterns (SCPs). Results: We found an M1/M4 SCP of relative decreased binding in basal forebrain, temporal, striatum, insula, and anterior cingulate (F1,47 = 31.9, p < 0.001) in cholinesterase inhibitor–naive patients with PDD, implicating limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks. The corresponding regional cerebral blood flow SCP showed relative decreased uptake in temporoparietal and prefrontal areas (F1,47 = 177.5, p < 0.001) and nodes of the frontoparietal and default mode networks (DMN). The M1/M4 pattern that correlated with an improvement in MMSE (r = 0.58, p = 0.005) revealed relatively preserved/increased pre/medial/orbitofrontal, parietal, and posterior cingulate areas coinciding with the DMN and frontoparietal networks. Conclusion: Dysfunctional limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks were associated with PDD. Established cholinergic maintenance of the DMN and frontoparietal networks may be prerequisite for cognitive remediation following cholinergic treatment in this condition. PMID:27306636

  6. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  7. Multiphysics simulation of a microfluidic perfusion chamber for brain slice physiology.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Hector H; Hernandez, Maximiliano; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2010-10-01

    Understanding and optimizing fluid flows through in vitro microfluidic perfusion systems is essential in mimicking in vivo conditions for biological research. In a previous study a microfluidic brain slice device (microBSD) was developed for microscale electrophysiology investigations. The device consisted of a standard perfusion chamber bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel substrate. Our objective in this study is to characterize the flows through the microBSD by using multiphysics simulations of injections into a pourous matrix to identify optimal spacing of ports. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are performed with CFD-ACE + software to model, simulate, and assess the transport of soluble factors through the perfusion bath, the microchannels, and a material that mimics the porosity, permeability and tortuosity of brain tissue. Additionally, experimental soluble factor transport through a brain slice is predicted by and compared to simulated fluid flow in a volume that represents a porous matrix material. The computational results are validated with fluorescent dye experiments.

  8. Brain slice stimulation using a microfluidic network and standard perfusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Shaikh Mohammed, Javeed; Caicedo, Hugo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated the fabrication of a two-level microfluidic device that can be easily integrated with existing electrophysiology setups. The two-level microfluidic device is fabricated using a two-step standard negative resist lithography process. The first level contains microchannels with inlet and outlet ports at each end. The second level contains microscale circular holes located midway of the channel length and centered along with channel width. Passive pumping method is used to pump fluids from the inlet port to the outlet port. The microfluidic device is integrated with off-the-shelf perfusion chambers and allows seamless integration with the electrophysiology setup. The fluids introduced at the inlet ports flow through the microchannels towards the outlet ports and also escape through the circular openings located on top of the microchannels into the bath of the perfusion. Thus the bottom surface of the brain slice placed in the perfusion chamber bath and above the microfluidic device can be exposed with different neurotransmitters. The microscale thickness of the microfluidic device and the transparent nature of the materials [glass coverslip and PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane)] used to make the microfluidic device allow microscopy of the brain slice. The microfluidic device allows modulation (both spatial and temporal) of the chemical stimuli introduced to the brain slice microenvironments.

  9. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro.

    PubMed

    Killian, Nathaniel J; Vernekar, Varadraj N; Potter, Steve M; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations.

  10. Acquisition of brains from the African elephant (Loxodonta africana): perfusion-fixation and dissection.

    PubMed

    Manger, Paul R; Pillay, Praneshri; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Gravett, Nadine; Moon, Don-Joon; Jillani, Ngalla; Hemingway, Jason

    2009-04-30

    The current correspondence describes the in situ perfusion-fixation of the brain of the African elephant. Due to both the large size of proboscidean brains and the complex behaviour of these species, the acquisition of good quality material for comparative neuroanatomical analysis from these species is important. Three male African elephants (20-30 years) that were to be culled as part of a larger population management strategy were used. The animals were humanely euthanized and the head removed from the body. Large tubes were inserted into to the carotid arteries and the cranial vasculature flushed with a rapid (20 min) rinse of 100 l of cold saline (4 degrees C). Following the rinse the head was perfusion-fixed with a slower rinse (40 min) of 100 l of cold (4 degrees C) 4% paraformaldehyde in 0.1M phosphate buffer. This procedure resulted in well-fixed neural and other tissue. After perfusion the brains were removed from the skull with the aid of power tools, a procedure taking between 2 and 6h. The brains were immediately post-fixed in the same solution for 72 h at 4 degrees C. The brains were subsequently placed in a sucrose solution and finally an antifreeze solution and are stored in a -20 degrees C freezer. The acquisition of high quality neural material from African elephants that can be used for immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy is of importance in understanding the "hardware" underlying the behaviour of this species. This technique can be used on a variety of large mammals to obtain high quality material for comparative neuroanatomical studies.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  12. [Electrophysiological features (EEG) of ethanol withdrawal syndromes on isolated perfused rat brain].

    PubMed

    Tezikov, E B; Litvicki, P F

    2015-01-01

    On isolated rat brains we studied native EEC and its derivates (mean EEC amplitude and power spectrums - Fourier transformation) during perfusion with ethanol (65 Mm/ L) and after its withdrawal. Previously rats were undergone ethanol burden for 6 days according to Majchrowicz procedures to get alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Duration perfusion without ethanol was 5, 10 and 20 min depending on the experimental schedule. Ethanol infusion between periods of withdrawal comprised 20 min. 55% of isolated brains shown epileptiform activity after 1-2 min of ethanol withdrawal but others manifested only increased mean amplitude and the power spectrums of EEC as well as an appearance of single or batch spikes. Differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions can be explained by the accelerated rate of ethanol elimination. The high positive correlation was obtained between EEC findings at the 5-th min of the first ethanol withdrawal and the same findings at the 5-th min of ethanol withdrawal in the second and the third episodes of ethanol withdrawal. Prolongation of withdrawal period more than 5th min caused brain death showing epileptiform activity. Isolated rat brain is the convenient subject to study pathogenesis of excitability of neurons and examination of drugs to treat alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

  13. SPECT brain perfusion imaging with Tc-99m ECD: Semi-quantitative regional analysis and database mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Schiepers, C.; Hegge, J.; De Roo, M.

    1994-05-01

    Brain SPECT is a well accepted method for the assessment of brain perfusion in various disorders such as epilepsy, stroke, dementia. A program for handling the tomographic data was developed, using a commercial spreadsheet (Microsoft EXCEL) with a set of macro`s for analysis, graphic display and database management of the final results.

  14. Indian-ink perfusion based method for reconstructing continuous vascular networks in whole mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Xue, Songchao; Gong, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Weihua; Meng, Yuanzheng; Liu, Qian; Chen, Shangbin; Li, Anan

    2014-01-01

    The topology of the cerebral vasculature, which is the energy transport corridor of the brain, can be used to study cerebral circulatory pathways. Limited by the restrictions of the vascular markers and imaging methods, studies on cerebral vascular structure now mainly focus on either observation of the macro vessels in a whole brain or imaging of the micro vessels in a small region. Simultaneous vascular studies of arteries, veins and capillaries have not been achieved in the whole brain of mammals. Here, we have combined the improved gelatin-Indian ink vessel perfusion process with Micro-Optical Sectioning Tomography for imaging the vessel network of an entire mouse brain. With 17 days of work, an integral dataset for the entire cerebral vessels was acquired. The voxel resolution is 0.35×0.4×2.0 µm(3) for the whole brain. Besides the observations of fine and complex vascular networks in the reconstructed slices and entire brain views, a representative continuous vascular tracking has been demonstrated in the deep thalamus. This study provided an effective method for studying the entire macro and micro vascular networks of mouse brain simultaneously.

  15. Indian-Ink Perfusion Based Method for Reconstructing Continuous Vascular Networks in Whole Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Songchao; Gong, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Weihua; Meng, Yuanzheng; Liu, Qian; Chen, Shangbin; Li, Anan

    2014-01-01

    The topology of the cerebral vasculature, which is the energy transport corridor of the brain, can be used to study cerebral circulatory pathways. Limited by the restrictions of the vascular markers and imaging methods, studies on cerebral vascular structure now mainly focus on either observation of the macro vessels in a whole brain or imaging of the micro vessels in a small region. Simultaneous vascular studies of arteries, veins and capillaries have not been achieved in the whole brain of mammals. Here, we have combined the improved gelatin-Indian ink vessel perfusion process with Micro-Optical Sectioning Tomography for imaging the vessel network of an entire mouse brain. With 17 days of work, an integral dataset for the entire cerebral vessels was acquired. The voxel resolution is 0.35×0.4×2.0 µm3 for the whole brain. Besides the observations of fine and complex vascular networks in the reconstructed slices and entire brain views, a representative continuous vascular tracking has been demonstrated in the deep thalamus. This study provided an effective method for studying the entire macro and micro vascular networks of mouse brain simultaneously. PMID:24498247

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion for differentiating between melanoma and lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hatzoglou, Vaios; Tisnado, Jamie; Mehta, Alpesh; Peck, Kyung K; Daras, Mariza; Omuro, Antonio M; Beal, Kathryn; Holodny, Andrei I

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases originating from different primary sites overlap in appearance and are difficult to differentiate with conventional MRI. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can assess tumor microvasculature and has demonstrated utility in characterizing primary brain tumors. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of plasma volume (Vp) and volume transfer coefficient (K(trans) ) derived from DCE-MRI in distinguishing between melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Forty-seven NSCLC and 23 melanoma brain metastases were retrospectively assessed with DCE-MRI. Regions of interest were manually drawn around the metastases to calculate Vpmean and Kmeantrans. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) were performed to compare perfusion parameters between the two groups. The Vpmean of melanoma brain metastases (4.35, standard deviation [SD] = 1.31) was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than Vpmean of NSCLC brain metastases (2.27, SD = 0.96). The Kmeantrans values were higher in melanoma brain metastases, but the difference between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.12). Based on ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 3.02 for Vpmean (area under curve = 0.659 with SD = 0.074) distinguished between melanoma brain metastases and NSCLC brain metastases (P < 0.01) with 72% specificity. Our data show the DCE-MRI parameter Vpmean can differentiate between melanoma and NSCLC brain metastases. The ability to noninvasively predict tumor histology of brain metastases in patients with multiple malignancies can have important clinical implications.

  17. Evolution and resolution of human brain perfusion responses to the stress of induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teh, Ming Ming; Dunn, Joel T; Choudhary, Pratik; Samarasinghe, Yohan; Macdonald, Ian; O'Doherty, Michael; Marsden, Paul; Reed, Laurence J; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2010-11-01

    The relationship between the human brain response to acute stress and subjective, behavioural and physiological responses is poorly understood. We have examined the human cerebral response to the intense interoceptive stressor of hypoglycemia, controlling plasma glucose at either normal fasting concentrations (5 mmol/l, n=7) or at hypoglycemia (2.7 mmol/l, n=10) for 1 h in healthy volunteers. Hypoglycemia was associated with symptomatic responses, counterregulatory neuroendocrine responses and a sequential pattern of brain regional engagement, mapped as changes in relative cerebral perfusion using [(15)O]-H(2)O water positron emission tomography. The early cerebral response comprised activation bilaterally in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and thalamic pulvinar, with deactivation in posterior parahippocampal gyrus. Later responses (>20 min) engaged bilateral anterior insula, ventral striatum and pituitary. Following resolution of hypoglycemia, the majority of responses returned to baseline, save persistent engagement of the ACC and sustained elevation of growth hormone and cortisol. Catecholamine responses correlated with increased perfusion in pulvinar and medial thalamus, ACC and pituitary, while growth hormone and cortisol responses showed no correlation with thalamic activation but did show additional correlation with the hypothalamus and ventral striatum bilaterally. These data demonstrate complex dynamic responses to the stressor of hypoglycemia that would be expected to drive physiological and behavioural changes to remedy the state. Further, these data show that sustained stress and its aftermath engage distinct sets of brain regions, providing a neural substrate for adaptive or 'allostasic' responses to stressors.

  18. Brain hemorrhage after endovascular reperfusion therapy of ischemic stroke: a threshold-finding whole-brain perfusion CT study.

    PubMed

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Tudela, Raúl; Urra, Xabier; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Oleaga, Laura; Amaro, Sergio; Chamorro, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular reperfusion therapy is increasingly used for acute ischemic stroke treatment. The occurrence of parenchymal hemorrhage is clinically relevant and increases with reperfusion therapies. Herein we aimed to examine the optimal perfusion CT-derived parameters and the impact of the duration of brain ischemia for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage after endovascular therapy. A cohort of 146 consecutive patients with anterior circulation occlusions and treated with endovascular reperfusion therapy was analyzed. Recanalization was assessed at the end of reperfusion treatment, and the rate of parenchymal hemorrhage at follow-up neuroimaging. In regression analyses, cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow performed better than Delay Time maps for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage. The most informative thresholds (receiver operating curves) for relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow were values lower than 2.5% of normal brain. In binary regression analyses, the volume of regions with reduced relative cerebral blood volume and/or relative cerebral blood flow was significantly associated with an increased risk of parenchymal hemorrhage, as well as delayed vessel recanalization. These results highlight the relevance of the severity and duration of ischemia as drivers of blood-brain barrier disruption in acute ischemic stroke and support the role of perfusion CT for the prediction of parenchymal hemorrhage.

  19. 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT imaging for the assessment of brain perfusion in cerebral palsy (CP) patients with evaluation of the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asl, Mina Taghizadeh; Yousefi, Farzaneh; Nemati, Reza; Assadi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was carried out to evaluate cerebral perfusion in different types of cerebral palsy (CP) patients. For those patients who underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, brain perfusion before and after the therapy was compared. Methods: A total of 11 CP patients were enrolled in this study, of which 4 patients underwent oxygen therapy. Before oxygen therapy and at the end of 40 sessions of oxygen treatment, 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed , and the results were compared. Results: A total of 11 CP patients, 7 females and 4 males with an age range of 5-27 years participated in the study. In brain SPECT studies, all the patients showed perfusion impairments. The region most significantly involved was the frontal lobe (54.54%), followed by the temporal lobe (27.27%), the occipital lobe (18.18%), the visual cortex (18.18%), the basal ganglia (9.09%), the parietal lobe (9.09%), and the cerebellum (9.09%). Frontal-lobe hypoperfusion was seen in all types of cerebral palsy. Two out of 4 patients (2 males and 2 females) who underwent oxygen therapy revealed certain degree of brain perfusion improvement. Conclusion: This study demonstrated decreased cerebral perfusion in different types of CP patients. The study also showed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved cerebral perfusion in a few CP patients. However, it could keep the physiological discussion open and strenghten a link with other areas of neurology in which this approach may have some value. PMID:25785099

  20. Brain perfusion and markers of neurodegeneration in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Vendette, Mélanie; Gagnon, Jean-François; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Gosselin, Nadia; Postuma, Ronald B; Tuineag, Maria; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2011-08-01

    Potential early markers of neurodegeneration such as subtle motor signs, reduced color discrimination, olfactory impairment, and brain perfusion abnormalities have been reported in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, a risk factor for Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia. The aim of this study was to reproduce observations of regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in a larger independent sample of patients and to explore correlations between regional cerebral blood flow and markers of neurodegeneration. Twenty patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and 20 healthy controls were studied by single-photon emission computerized tomography. Motor examination, color discrimination, and olfactory identification were examined. Patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder showed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the frontal cortex and in medial parietal areas and increased regional cerebral blood flow in subcortical regions including the bilateral pons, putamen, and hippocampus. In rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, brain perfusion in the frontal cortex and occipital areas was associated with poorer performance in the color discrimination test. Moreover, a relationship between loss of olfactory discrimination and regional cerebral blood flow reduction in the bilateral anterior parahippocampal gyrus, a region known to be involved in olfactory functions, was found. This study provides further evidence of regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder that are similar to those seen in Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia. Moreover, regional cerebral blood flow anomalies were associated with markers of neurodegeneration.

  1. Changes in Regional Brain Perfusion During Functional Brain Activation: Comparison of [64Cu]-PTSM with [14C]-Iodoantipyrine

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, DP; Yang, J; Sadler, TR; Galifianakis, NB; Bozorgzadeh, MH; Bading, JR; Conti, PS; Maarek, J-M I

    2008-01-01

    A dilemma in behavioral brain mapping is that conventional techniques immobilize the subject, extinguishing all but the simplest behaviors. This is avoided if brain activation is imaged after completion of the behavior and tissue capture of the tracer. A single-pass flow tracer proposed for positron emission tomography (PET) is a radiolabeled copper(II) complex of pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone), [Cu64]-PTSM. [Cu64]-PTSM reaches steady-state cerebral distribution more rapidly than the metabolic tracer [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, allowing imaging with substantially greater temporal resolution. Using dual-label autoradiography, this study compares the relative regional cerebral blood flow tracer distribution (CBF-TR) of [64Cu]-PTSM to that of the classic perfusion tracer [14C]-iodoantipyrine in a rat model during treadmill walking. Rats were exposed to continuous walking on a treadmill and compared to quiescent controls. [64Cu]-PTSM was bolus injected (iv) after 1 minute, followed by a 5 minute uptake and subsequent bolus injection of [14C]-iodoantipyrine. CBF-TR was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in the three-dimensionally reconstructed brain by statistical parametric mapping, as well as by region-of-interest analysis. A high homology was found between the [64Cu]-PTSM and [14C]-iodoantipyrine patterns of cerebral activation in cortical and subcortical regions. For white matter, however, [64Cu]-PTSM showed lower perfusion than [14Cu]-iodoantipyrine. [64Cu]-PTSM is a useful tracer for functional brain mapping in freely-moving subjects. Its application in conjunction with PET promises to increase our understanding of the neural circuitry of behaviors dependent on locomotion. PMID:18687316

  2. Cerebral perfusion pressure directed therapy following traumatic brain injury and hypotension in swine.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ajai K; Schweitzer, John B; Fox, Jerry L; Fabian, Timothy C; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2003-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies, clinical and experimental, attesting to the benefit of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) directed pressor therapy following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study evaluates this therapy in a swine model of TBI and hypotension. Forty-five anesthetized and ventilated swine received TBI followed by a 45% blood volume bleed. After 1 h, all animals were resuscitated with 0.9% sodium chloride equal to three times the shed blood volume. The experimental group (PHE) received phenylephrine to maintain CPP > 80 mm Hg; the control group (SAL) did not. Outcomes in the first phase (n = 33) of the study were as follows: cerebro-venous oxygen saturation (S(cv)O(2)), cerebro-vascular carbon dioxide reactivity (DeltaS(cv)O(2)), and brain structural damage (beta-amyloid precursor protein [betaAPP] immunoreactivity). In the second phase (n = 12) of the study, extravascular blood free water (EVBFW) was measured in the brain and lung. After resuscitation, intracranial and mean arterial pressures were >15 and >80 mm Hg, respectively, in both groups. CPP declined to 64 +/- 5 mm Hg in the SAL group, despite fluid supplements. CPP was maintained at >80 mm Hg with pressors in the PHE group. PHE animals maintained better S(cv)O(2) (p < 0.05 at 180, 210, 240, 270, and 300 min post-TBI). At baseline, 5% CO(2) evoked a 16 +/- 4% increase in S(cv)O(2), indicating cerebral vasodilatation and luxury perfusion. By 240 min, this response was absent in SAL animals and preserved in PHE animals (p < 0.05). Brain EVBFW was higher in SAL animals; however, lung EVBFW was higher in PHE animals. There was no difference in betaAPP immunoreactivity between the SAL and PHE groups (p > 0.05). In this swine model of TBI and hypotension, CPP directed pressor therapy improved brain oxygenation and maintained cerebro-vascular CO(2) reactivity. Brain edema was lower, but lung edema was greater, suggesting a higher propensity for pulmonary complications.

  3. Real-time ultrasound brain perfusion imaging with analysis of microbubble replenishment in acute MCA stroke.

    PubMed

    Kern, Rolf; Diels, Anna; Pettenpohl, Johanna; Kablau, Micha; Brade, Joachim; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) allows visualization of microbubbles flowing through the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesized that analysis of microbubble tissue replenishment would enable for characterization of perfusion deficits in acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory stroke. Twenty-three patients (mean age 70.2 ± 13.2 years, 9 weeks) were included. Sequential images of bubble replenishment were acquired by transcranial rt-UPI at low mechanical index immediately after microbubble destruction. Different parameters were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs): real-time time to peak (rt-TTP), rise rate (β), and plateau (A) of acoustic intensity, and A × β was used as an index of blood flow. Results were compared with diffusion-weighted and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Parameters of rt-UPI had lower values in ROIs of ischemic as compared with normal tissue (β=0.58 ± 0.40 versus 1.25 ± 0.83; P=0.001; A=1.44 ± 1.75 versus 2.63 ± 2.31; P=0.05; A × β=1.14 ± 2.25 versus 2.98 ± 2.70; P=0.01). Real-time time to peak was delayed in ischemic tissue (11.43 ± 2.67 versus 8.88 ± 1.66 seconds; P<0.001). From the analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves, β and A × β had the largest areas under the curve with optimal cutoff values of β<0.76 and A × β<1.91. We conclude that rt-UPI with analysis of microbubble replenishment correctly identifies ischemic brain tissue in acute MCA stroke.

  4. Stroke prognosis by applying double thresholds on CT-perfusion-brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokchaitam, Somchart; Santipromwong, Nittaya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2013-03-01

    The CT-perfusion image shows information of brain abnormalities such as its size and location. Generally, neurologist diagnoses stroke disease using CT-perfusion images such as Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV). In our previous report, we applied threshold technique to divide amount of CBV and CBF into low and high level. Then, their levels are applied to identify normal tissue areas, dead tissue areas (infract core) and blood-cot tissue areas (infract penumbra). However, it's not totally correct, if the same threshold is applied to the whole area (it must depend on size of blood vessel in that area. In this report, we propose double thresholds to divided CBV and CBF into 3 levels: very low, medium and very high levels. Very low and very high levels are definitely implied to bad areas and good areas, respectively. The proposed double thresholds makes stroke prognosis more accurate. The simulation results confirm that our proposed results closed to results defined from neurologist comparing to the conventional results.

  5. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  6. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  7. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  8. d-Amino Acid Levels in Perfused Mouse Brain Tissue and Blood: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Choyce A; Du, Siqi; Parpia, Curran; Santos, Polan T; Hartman, Adam L; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2017-02-16

    The l-enantiomer is the predominant type of amino acid in all living systems. However, d-amino acids, once thought to be "unnatural", have been found to be indigenous even in mammalian systems and increasingly appear to be functioning in essential biological and neurological roles. Both d- and l-amino acid levels in the hippocampus, cortex, and blood samples from NIH Swiss mice are reported. Perfused brain tissues were analyzed for the first time, thereby eliminating artifacts due to endogenous blood, and decreased the mouse-to-mouse variability in amino acid levels. Total amino acid levels (l- plus d-enantiomers) in brain tissue are up to 10 times higher than in blood. However, all measured d-amino acid levels in brain tissue are typically ∼10 to 2000 times higher than blood levels. There was a 13% reduction in almost all measured d-amino acid levels in the cortex compared to those in the hippocampus. There is an approximate inverse relationship between the prevalence of an amino acid and the percentage of its d-enantiomeric form. Interestingly, glutamic acid, unlike all other amino acids, had no quantifiable level of its d-antipode. The bioneurological reason for the unique and conspicuous absence/removal of this d-amino acid is yet unknown. However, results suggest that d-glutamate metabolism is likely a unidirectional process and not a cycle, as per the l-glutamate/glutamine cycle. The results suggest that there might be unreported d-amino acid racemases in mammalian brains. The regulation and function of specific other d-amino acids are discussed.

  9. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Stockbower, Grace E.; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Detre, John A.; Wolk, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or “stress test”, may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  10. Development of a realistic, dynamic digital brain phantom for CT perfusion validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divel, Sarah E.; Segars, W. Paul; Christensen, Soren; Wintermark, Max; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Physicians rely on CT Perfusion (CTP) images and quantitative image data, including cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and bolus arrival delay, to diagnose and treat stroke patients. However, the quantification of these metrics may vary depending on the computational method used. Therefore, we have developed a dynamic and realistic digital brain phantom upon which CTP scans can be simulated based on a set of ground truth scenarios. Building upon the previously developed 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom containing a highly detailed brain model, this work consisted of expanding the intricate vasculature by semi-automatically segmenting existing MRA data and fitting nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces to the new vessels. Using time attenuation curves input by the user as reference, the contrast enhancement in the vessels changes dynamically. At each time point, the iodine concentration in the arteries and veins is calculated from the curves and the material composition of the blood changes to reflect the expected values. CatSim, a CT system simulator, generates simulated data sets of this dynamic digital phantom which can be further analyzed to validate CTP studies and post-processing methods. The development of this dynamic and realistic digital phantom provides a valuable resource with which current uncertainties and controversies surrounding the quantitative computations generated from CTP data can be examined and resolved.

  11. Early whole-brain CT perfusion for detection of patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Dolatowski, Karoline; Schramm, Peter; Moerer, Onnen; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This prospective study investigated the role of whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) studies in the identification of patients at risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) and of tissue at risk for delayed cerebral infarction (DCI). METHODS Forty-three patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were included in this study. A CTP study was routinely performed in the early phase (Day 3). The CTP study was repeated in cases of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)-measured blood flow velocity (BFV) increase of > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours and/or on Day 7 in patients who were intubated/sedated. RESULTS Early CTP studies revealed perfusion deficits in 14 patients, of whom 10 patients (72%) developed DIND, and 6 of these 10 patients (60%) had DCI. Three of the 14 patients (21%) with early perfusion deficits developed DCI without having had DIND, and the remaining patient (7%) had neither DIND nor DCI. There was a statistically significant correlation between early perfusion deficits and occurrence of DIND and DCI (p < 0.0001). A repeated CTP was performed in 8 patients with a TCD-measured BFV increase > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours, revealing a perfusion deficit in 3 of them (38%). Two of the 3 patients (67%) developed DCI without preceding DIND and 1 patient (33%) had DIND without DCI. In 4 of the 7 patients (57%) who were sedated and/or comatose, additional CTP studies on Day 7 showed perfusion deficits. All 4 patients developed DCI. CONCLUSIONS Whole-brain CTP on Day 3 after aSAH allows early and reliable identification of patients at risk for DIND and tissue at risk for DCI. Additional CTP investigations, guided by TCD-measured BFV increase or persisting coma, do not contribute to information gain.

  12. Simulation of realistic abnormal SPECT brain perfusion images: application in semi-quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T.; Fleming, J. S.; Hoffmann, S. M. A.; Kemp, P. M.

    2005-11-01

    Simulation is useful in the validation of functional image analysis methods, particularly when considering the number of analysis techniques currently available lacking thorough validation. Problems exist with current simulation methods due to long run times or unrealistic results making it problematic to generate complete datasets. A method is presented for simulating known abnormalities within normal brain SPECT images using a measured point spread function (PSF), and incorporating a stereotactic atlas of the brain for anatomical positioning. This allows for the simulation of realistic images through the use of prior information regarding disease progression. SPECT images of cerebral perfusion have been generated consisting of a control database and a group of simulated abnormal subjects that are to be used in a UK audit of analysis methods. The abnormality is defined in the stereotactic space, then transformed to the individual subject space, convolved with a measured PSF and removed from the normal subject image. The dataset was analysed using SPM99 (Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College, London) and the MarsBaR volume of interest (VOI) analysis toolbox. The results were evaluated by comparison with the known ground truth. The analysis showed improvement when using a smoothing kernel equal to system resolution over the slightly larger kernel used routinely. Significant correlation was found between effective volume of a simulated abnormality and the detected size using SPM99. Improvements in VOI analysis sensitivity were found when using the region median over the region mean. The method and dataset provide an efficient methodology for use in the comparison and cross validation of semi-quantitative analysis methods in brain SPECT, and allow the optimization of analysis parameters.

  13. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  14. Cerebral perfusion pressure, microdialysis biochemistry and clinical outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. It has been postulated that brain metabolic status, intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) are related to patients' outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CPP, ICP and microdialysis parameters and clinical outcome in TBIs. Results Thirty four individuals with severe brain injury hospitalized in an intensive care unit participated in this study. Microdialysis data were collected, along with ICP and CPP values. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate patient outcome at 6 months after injury. Fifteen patients with a CPP greater than 75 mmHg, L/P ratio lower than 37 and Glycerol concentration lower than 72 mmol/l had an excellent outcome (GOS 4 or 5), as opposed to the remaining 19 patients. No patient with a favorable outcome had a CPP lower than 75 mmHg or Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio greater than 72 mmol/l and 37 respectively. Data regarding L/P ratio and Glycerol concentration were statistically significant at p = 0.05 when patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome were compared. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, a CPP greater than 75 mmHg was marginally statistically significantly related to outcome at 6 months after injury. Conclusions Patients with favorable outcome had certain common features in terms of microdialysis parameters and CPP values. An individualized approach regarding CPP levels and cut -off points for Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio are proposed. PMID:22168902

  15. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found

  16. Relationships between perfusion defects and static brain scan positivity in patients with ischaemic completed stroke: considerations about the origin of the increased uptake

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Alfredo

    1982-01-01

    The relation between perfusion defects shown by radionuclide angiography and static brain scan positivity was evaluated in patients with ischaemic completed stroke at various intervals from the onset of symptoms. An inverse relation between radionuclide angiography and static scan positivity was found for the period within 15 days of the onset of symptoms. The possible relation between changes in perfusion and static brain scan positivity is discussed. PMID:6279782

  17. Characterization of technetium-99m-L,L-ECD for brain perfusion imaging, Part 2: Biodistribution and brain imaging in humans.

    PubMed

    Léveillé, J; Demonceau, G; De Roo, M; Rigo, P; Taillefer, R; Morgan, R A; Kupranick, D; Walovitch, R C

    1989-11-01

    The safety, biodistribution and kinetics of a new perfusion imaging agent [99mTc-L,L]-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was evaluated in normal volunteers. Technetium-99m-L,L-ECD is a neutral, lipophilic complex, which is radiochemically pure and stable. Twelve healthy adults were injected with 25-30 mCi of 99mTc-L,L-ECD and imaged periodically for up to 24 hr. Planar imaging showed rapid brain uptake with a peak concentration of 4.9% injected dose and very slow brain washout (approximately 6% per hour during the first 6 hr). Repeat or dynamic tomographic imaging of the brain using either a rotating gamma camera or a multidetector system was performed up to 6 hr postinjection. The distribution of 99mTc-L,L-ECD in the brain did not change and was similar to the pattern seen with other perfusion agents. Background facial areas and lungs cleared rapidly. Peak blood activity was below 10% injected dose at all times and 99mTc-L,L-ECD cleared rapidly through the kidneys. Vital signs, blood and urine chemistries were normal in all volunteers and no adverse reactions were noted. These results suggest that 99mTc-L,L-ECD should be useful for routine assessment of cerebral perfusion in humans.

  18. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  19. TU-AB-204-01: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  20. Stress-first single photon emission computed myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, C I; Scarano, M; Squame, F; Casaburi, G; Nori, S L; Pace, L

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in coronary artery disease evaluation. Recently major dosimetric concerns have arisen. The aim of this study was to evaluate if a pre-test scoring system could predict the results of stress SPET MPI, thus avoiding two radionuclide injections. Methods All consecutive patients (n=309) undergoing SPET MPI during the first 6 months of 2014 constituted the study group. The scoring system is based on these characteristics: age >65 years (1 point), diabetes (2 points), typical chest pain (2 points), congestive heart failure (3 points), abnormal ECG (4 points), male gender (4 points), and documented previous CAD (5 points). The patients were divided on the basis of the prediction score into 3 classes of risk for an abnormal stress-first protocol. Results An abnormal stress SPET MPI was present in 7/31 patients (23%) with a low risk score, in 24/90 (27%) with an intermediate score risk, and in 124/188 (66%) with an high score risk. ROC curve analysis showed good prediction of abnormal stress MPI. Conclusions Our results suggest an appropriate use of a pre-test clinical prediction formula of abnormal stress MPI in a routine clinical setting. PMID:27896227

  1. Evaluating the feasibility of C-arm CT for brain perfusion imaging: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Fieselmann, A.; Boese, J.; Rohkohl, C.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2010-02-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly being used to supplement 2D real-time data with 3D information. Temporal resolution is currently limited by the mechanical rotation speed of the C-arm which presents challenges for applications such as imaging of contrast flow in brain perfusion CT (PCT). We present a novel scheme where multiple scans are obtained at different start times with respect to the contrast injection. The data is interleaved temporally and interpolated during 3D reconstruction. For evaluation we developed a phantom to generate the range of temporal frequencies relevant for PCT. The highest requirements are for imaging the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function. Fourier transform analysis of the AIF showed that 90% of the spectral energy is contained at frequencies lower than 0.08Hz. We built an acrylic cylinder phantom of diameter 1.9 cm, with 25 sections of 1cm length each. Iodine concentration in each compartment was varied to produce a half-cycle sinusoid variation in HU in version 1, and 2.5 cycles in version 2 of the phantom. The phantom was moved linearly at speeds from 0.5cm/s to 4cm/s (temporal frequencies of 0.02Hz to 0.09Hz) and imaged using a C-arm system. Phantom CT numbers in a slice reconstructed at isocenter were measured and sinusoidal fits to the data were obtained. The fitted sinusoids had frequencies that were within 3+/-2% of the actual temporal frequencies of the sinusoid. This suggests that the imaging and reconstruction scheme is adequate for PCT imaging.

  2. Brain Tissue Volumes and Perfusion Change with the Number of Optic Neuritis Attacks in Relapsing Neuromyelitis Optica: A Voxel-Based Correlation Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Almaguer Melián, William; Giroud Benítez, José Luis; Rodríguez Rojas, Rafael; Bayard, Jorge Bosch; Galán, Lídice; Sánchez, Reinaldo Galvizu; Fuentes, Nancy Pavón; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies show that brain abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are more frequent than earlier described. Yet, more research considering multiple aspects of NMO is necessary to better understand these abnormalities. A clinical feature of relapsing NMO (RNMO) is that the incremental disability is attack-related. Therefore, association between the attack-related process and neuroimaging might be expected. On the other hand, the immunopathological analysis of NMO lesions has suggested that CNS microvasculature could be an early disease target, which could alter brain perfusion. Brain tissue volume changes accompanying perfusion alteration could also be expected throughout the attack-related process. The aim of this study was to investigate in RNMO patients, by voxel-based correlation analysis, the assumed associations between regional brain white (WMV) and grey matter volumes (GMV) and/or perfusion on one side, and the number of optic neuritis (ON) attacks, myelitis attacks and/or total attacks on the other side. For this purpose, high resolution T1-weighted MRI and perfusion SPECT imaging were obtained in 15 RNMO patients. The results showed negative regional correlations of WMV, GMV and perfusion with the number of ON attacks, involving important components of the visual system, which could be relevant for the comprehension of incremental visual disability in RNMO. We also found positive regional correlation of perfusion with the number of ON attacks, mostly overlapping the brain area where the WMV showed negative correlation. This provides evidence that brain microvasculature is an early disease target and suggests that perfusion alteration could be important in the development of brain structural abnormalities in RNMO.

  3. The electrophysiology of the olfactory-hippocampal circuit in the isolated and perfused adult mammalian brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Paré, D; Llinás, R R

    1991-10-01

    The viability and general electrophysiological properties of the limbic system in the adult mammalian brain isolated and maintained in vitro by arterial perfusion are described. The isolated brain preparation combines the advantages of intact synaptic connectivity and accessibility of different areas of the encephalic mass with those of the in vitro approach, i.e., stability and control of the ionic environment. Extracellular field potential as well as intracellular recordings were performed at different levels in the limbic system of isolated adult guinea pig brains. The results demonstrate that in the piriform, entorhinal, and hippocampal cortices, the intrinsic electrical properties of individual cells as well as the spontaneous and evoked electrical activity in the neuronal ensembles they comprise, were virtually identical to those observed in vivo. The properties of the limbic system loop were determined.

  4. Mapping the dynamics of brain perfusion using functional ultrasound in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Clément; Isabel, Clothilde; Martin, Abraham; Dussaux, Clara; Savoye, Anne; Emmrich, Julius; Montaldo, Gabriel; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Urban, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, tissue outcome ranges from normal to infarcted depending on depth and duration of hypoperfusion as well as occurrence and efficiency of reperfusion. However, the precise time course of these changes in relation to tissue and behavioral outcome remains unsettled. To address these issues, a three-dimensional wide field-of-view and real-time quantitative functional imaging technique able to map perfusion in the rodent brain would be desirable. Here, we applied functional ultrasound imaging, a novel approach to map relative cerebral blood volume without contrast agent, in a rat model of brief proximal transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess perfusion in penetrating arterioles and venules acutely and over six days thanks to a thinned-skull preparation. Functional ultrasound imaging efficiently mapped the acute changes in relative cerebral blood volume during occlusion and following reperfusion with high spatial resolution (100 µm), notably documenting marked focal decreases during occlusion, and was able to chart the fine dynamics of tissue reperfusion (rate: one frame/5 s) in the individual rat. No behavioral and only mild post-mortem immunofluorescence changes were observed. Our study suggests functional ultrasound is a particularly well-adapted imaging technique to study cerebral perfusion in acute experimental stroke longitudinally from the hyper-acute up to the chronic stage in the same subject.

  5. Resting cerebral blood flow alterations in chronic traumatic brain injury: an arterial spin labeling perfusion FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghoon; Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Avants, Brian; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Slattery, John; Gee, James C; Coslett, H Branch; Detre, John A

    2010-08-01

    Non-invasive measurement of resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) may reflect alterations of brain structure and function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, previous imaging studies of resting state brain in chronic TBI have been limited by several factors, including measurement in relative rather than absolute units, use of crude spatial registration methods, exclusion of subjects with substantial focal lesions, and exposure to ionizing radiation, which limits repeated assessments. This study aimed to overcome those obstacles by measuring absolute CBF with an arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI technique, and using an image preprocessing protocol that is optimized for brains with mixed diffuse and focal injuries characteristic of moderate and severe TBI. Resting state CBF was quantified in 27 individuals with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage, and 22 demographically matched healthy controls. In addition to global CBF reductions in the TBI subjects, more prominent regional hypoperfusion was found in the posterior cingulate cortices, the thalami, and multiple locations in the frontal cortices. Diffuse injury, as assessed by tensor-based morphometry, was mainly associated with reduced CBF in the posterior cingulate cortices and the thalami, where the greatest volume losses were detected. Hypoperfusion in superior and middle frontal cortices, in contrast, was associated with focal lesions. These results suggest that structural lesions, both focal and diffuse, are the main contributors to the absolute CBF alterations seen in chronic TBI, and that CBF may serve as a tool to assess functioning neuronal volume. We also speculate that resting reductions in posterior cingulate perfusion may reflect alterations in the default-mode network, and may contribute to the attentional deficits common in TBI.

  6. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mandavilli M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing (pranayama) is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relive mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  7. Criteria for definition of regional functional improvement on quantitative post-stress gated myocardial SPET after bypass surgery in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Ki Bong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-08-01

    Myocardial viability can be defined as functional improvement of dysfunctional myocardium after revascularization. The purpose of this study was to define the optimal criteria for definition of regional functional improvement after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery on quantitative gated single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Thirty-two patients (26 men, 6 women; age 56 +/- 13 years) with coronary artery disease (three-vessel disease, 17; two-vessel disease, 15; previous history of myocardial infarction, 9) and severe left ventricular dysfunction (LVEF < or = 35%) underwent CABG. Rest thallium-201/dipyridamole stress technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile gated myocardial SPET was performed before and 3 months after CABG. Global LV functional improvement was defined as either an improvement in LVEF of 10% ( n = 15) or an improvement in LVEF of 5% combined with a decrease in end-systolic volume of 10 ml ( n = 2) after CABG on quantitative gated SPET. Postoperative regional wall thickening improvement (DeltaRWT), regional wall motion improvement (DeltaRWM) and regional resting (DeltaRP) and stress perfusion improvement (DeltaRstrP) were used to determine global functional improvement by ROC curve analysis, and the optimal criteria for definition of viable regional dysfunctional myocardium were defined on the ROC curves. Correlations were verified by determining the number of improved myocardial regions and LVEF improvement. LVEF was improved from 25% +/- 6% to 34% +/- 11% after CABG. A total of 229 segments were dysfunctional (wall motion < or = 2 mm, thickening < or = 20%) before CABG. On ROC curve analysis using global functional improvement as an indicator of viability, the areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) of DeltaRWT and DeltaRWM were 0.717 and 0.620, respectively. The AUC of DeltaRWT was significantly larger than that of DeltaRWM ( P = 0.009) and the optimal cut-off value of DeltaRWT was 15%. The AUCs of DeltaRP and DeltaRstrP were not significant

  8. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mandavilli M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-04-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relieve mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brian, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  9. NeuroGam Software Analysis in Epilepsy Diagnosis Using 99mTc-ECD Brain Perfusion SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peng; Zhang, Fang; Gao, Jianqing; Jing, Jianmin; Pan, Liping; Li, Dongxue; Wei, Lingge

    2015-09-20

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the value of NeuroGam software in diagnosis of epilepsy by 99Tcm-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS NeuroGam was used to analyze 52 cases of clinically proven epilepsy by 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging. The results were compared with EEG and MRI, and the positive rates and localization to epileptic foci were analyzed. RESULTS NeuroGam analysis showed that 42 of 52 epilepsy cases were abnormal. 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging revealed a positive rate of 80.8% (42/52), with 36 out of 42 patients (85.7%) clearly showing an abnormal area. Both were higher than that of brain perfusion SPECT, with a consistency of 64.5% (34/52) using these 2 methods. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was observed in frontal (18), temporal (20), and parietal lobes (2). Decreased rCBF was seen in frontal and temporal lobes in 4 out of 36 patients, and in temporal and parietal lobes of 2 out of 36 patients. NeuroGam further showed that the abnormal area was located in a different functional area of the brain. EEG abnormalities were detected in 29 out of 52 patients (55.8%) with 16 cases (55.2%) clearly showing an abnormal area. MRI abnormalities were detected in 17 out of 43 cases (39.5%), including 9 cases (52.9%) clearly showing an abnormal area. The consistency of NeuroGam software analysis, and EEG and MRI were 48.1% (25/52) and 34.9% (15/43), respectively. CONCLUSIONS NeuroGam software analysis offers a higher sensitivity in detecting epilepsy than EEG or MRI. It is a powerful tool in 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging.

  10. Sonographic parenchymal and brain perfusion imaging: preliminary results in four patients following decompressive surgery for malignant middle cerebral artery infarct.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, F; Hoelscher, T; Dorenbeck, U; Greiffenberg, B; Marienhagen, J; Ullrich, O W; Bogdahn, U

    2001-01-01

    To investigate new methods of diagnostic transcranial sonography for brain parenchymal, vascular and perfusion imaging, we performed 3-D native tissue harmonic transcranial sonography (3D-nthTCS), 3-D transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (3D-TCCS), and "loss-of-correlation" imaging (LOC-TCCS) in four patients following early hemicraniectomy due to space-occupying "malignant" middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI). Three-dimensional datasets, utilizing 3D-nthTCS and 3D-TCCS, were created and up to 10 axial 2-D B-mode image planes, similar to CCT, reconstructed in each patient. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the circle of Willis documented one persistent carotid-T occlusion and three recanalizations of the MCA. LOC-TCCS, based on stimulated acoustic emission from an ultrasound (US) contrast agent, demonstrated a perfusion deficit in 2 of 3 patients, with regard to their infarcts. Concluding, 3D-nthTCS, 3D-TCCS and LOC-TCCS are promising tools for bedside monitoring, early prognosis and treatment evaluation for MMCAI in the postoperative period. Further studies should be performed to standardize these new methods and evaluate their applications through the intact calvarina.

  11. A new brain perfusion imaging agent: [I-123]HIPDM:N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-[2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl]-1,3-propanediamine.

    PubMed

    Kung, H F; Tramposch, K M; Blau, M

    1983-01-01

    Based on the pH-shift mechanism, a new brain imaging agent I-124 HIPDM (N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-[2-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-[123I]iodobenzyl]-1,3-propanediamine ) has been developed. This agent can be prepared by a simple exchange reaction suitable for routine clinical use. The physicochemical parameters, partition coefficient vs. pH profile, and protein binding, as well as biodistribution in rats, were very similar to those of I-123 IMP (N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine). High brain uptake was found in animals after i.v. injection. The brain radioactivity persists for at least 1 hr in rats and monkeys. Regional distribution in sections of rat brain appeared to reflect regional perfusion. In conjunction with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), this agent may provide useful information on local cerebral perfusion in humans.

  12. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in major psychiatric disorders: From basics to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Amburanjan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a well-established and reliable method to assess brain function through measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). It can be used to define a patient's pathophysiological status when neurological or psychiatric symptoms cannot be explained by anatomical neuroimaging findings. Though there is ample evidence validating brain SPECT as a technique to track human behavior and correlating psychiatric disorders with dysfunction of specific brain regions, only few psychiatrists have adopted brain SPECT in routine clinical practice. It can be utilized to evaluate the involvement of brain regions in a particular patient, to individualize treatment on basis of SPECT findings, to monitor the treatment response and modify treatment, if necessary. In this article, we have reviewed the available studies in this regard from existing literature and tried to present the evidence for establishing the clinical role of brain SPECT in major psychiatric illnesses. PMID:25400359

  13. Outcome, Pressure Reactivity and Optimal Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Calculation in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison of Two Variants.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Santos, Edgar; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the outcome prediction and calculation of optimal cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPopt) in 307 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on cerebrovascular reactivity calculation of a moving correlation correlation coefficient, named PRx, between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). The correlation coefficient was calculated from simultaneously recorded data using different frequencies. PRx was calculated from oscillations between 0.008 and 0.05Hz and the longPRx (L-PRx) was calculated from oscillations between 0.0008 and 0.016 Hz. PRx was a significant mortality predictor, whereas L-PRx was not. CPPopt for pooled data was higher for L-PRx than for PRx, with no statistical difference. Mortality was associated with mean CPP below CPPopt. Severe disability was associated with CPP above CPPopt (PRx). These relationships were not statistically significant for CPPopt (L-PRx). We conclude that PRx and L-PRx cannot be used interchangeably.

  14. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest

  15. Technetium-99m bis (aminoethanethiol) complexes with amine sidechains--potential brain perfusion imaging agents for SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Efange, S.M.; Kung, H.F.; Billings, J.; Guo, Y.Z.; Blau, M.

    1987-06-01

    In an effort to develop new clinically useful technetium-99m bis(aminoethanethiol) ((/sup 99m/Tc)BAT) complexes for the evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion, two new BAT ligands containing amines in the sidechain were synthesized and subsequently complexed with /sup 99m/Tc to yield the target complexes: (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA and (/sup 99m/Tc)TMPDA. Each complex was obtained as mixtures of two isomers, syn and anti, which were separated chromatographically. In biodistribution studies, both isomers of (/sup 99m/Tc)TMPDA showed little uptake in the brain. In contrast, the brain uptake values at 2 and 15 min for (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA-anti were 0.99 and 0.26, whereas, the corresponding values for DEA-syn were 2.27, 0.64% dose/organ, respectively. Autoradiographic studies (in rats) using both isomers of (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA show a fixed regional distribution and a higher concentration of radioactivity in the gray matter relative to the white matter. Planar imaging using (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA-syn clearly demonstrates localization of the complex in the brain with a T 1/2 of 41 min, suggesting some potential for use with single photon emission computed tomography.

  16. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  17. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  18. 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT/CT in the diagnosis of brain death.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of brain death (BD) evaluated by 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). A 16-year-old boy with a history of rapid unexpected brain herniation due to pilocytic astrocytoma underwent 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT/CT for evaluation of brain death in the context of organ donation. Flow images demonstrated lack of blood flow to the brain, and delayed images showed absence of demonstrable radionuclide activity within the brain. SPECT/CT confirmed absence of tracer accumulation, and was deemed helpful for evaluation of the brain stem. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT/CT is a valuable tool enabling imaging-based confirmation of BD.

  19. Contrast MR of the brain after high-perfusion cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, T.M.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Hindman, B.J.; Embrey, R.P.; Halloran, J.I.; Behrendt, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    To study the efficacy of contrast MR imaging in the evaluation of central nervous system complications in the cardiopulmonary bypass patient and attempt to explain their pathophysiology based on the MR appearance and the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol. Nineteen patients were prospectively studied with contrast MR examinations the day before and 3 to 7 days after cardiopulmonary bypass, to determine the nature, extent, and number of new postoperative MR abnormalities. Cardiopulmonary bypass parameters used in our institution included: membrane oxygenation, arterial filtration with a pore size of 25 [mu]m, and a relatively high perfusion rate to produce a cardiac index of 2.0 to 2.5 L min per m[sup 2]. The preoperative noncontrast MR examination showed age-related changes and/or signs of ischemia in 60% of patients on the day before surgery. However, there was no abnormal enhancement or new T2 abnormalities on any postoperative MR examination to suggest hypoperfusion or emboli. None of the 19 patients developed overt neurologic deficits postoperatively. Review of the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol used indicated significant variations in technique at different institutions. Contrast MR imaging demonstrated no new abnormalities in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass performed with strict in-line arterial filtration and relatively high perfusion. MR imaging is feasible in the early postoperative period after cardiopulmonary bypass and may offer a convenient method for evaluation of the neurologic impact of technical factors associated with cardiopulmonary bypass. 17 refs.

  20. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion.

  1. Effects of minocycline add-on treatment on brain morphometry and cerebral perfusion in recent-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Cristiano; Marque, Cristiane R; Maia-de-Oliveira, João P; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Ferrari, Thiago B; Santos, Antonio C; Araújo, David; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Elkis, Helio; Crippa, José A; Guimarães, Francisco S; Zuardi, Antônio W; Baker, Glen B; Dursun, Serdar M; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the tetracycline antibiotic minocycline has neuroprotective effects and is a potential treatment for schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms of action of minocycline in the CNS remain elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of minocycline on brain morphology and cerebral perfusion in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia after 12months of a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of minocycline add-on treatment. This study included 24 outpatients with recent-onset schizophrenia randomized for 12months of adjuvant treatment with minocycline (200mg/d) or placebo. MRI (1.5T) and [(99m)Tc]-ECD SPECT brain scans were performed at the end of the 12-month of trial. Between-condition comparisons of SPECT and MRI brain images were performed using statistical parametric mapping and analyzed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Minocycline adjuvant treatment significantly reduced positive and negative symptoms when compared with placebo. The VBM analysis of MRI scans showed that the patients in the placebo group had significant lower gray matter volumes in the midposterior cingulate cortex and in the precentral gyrus in comparison with the patients in the minocycline group. In addition, a decreased ECD uptake in the minocycline condition was observed in fronto-temporal areas. These results suggest that minocycline may protect against gray matter loss and modulate fronto-temporal areas involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, minocycline add-on treatment may be a potential treatment in the early stages of schizophrenia and may ameliorate clinical deterioration and brain alterations observed in this period.

  2. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Study Brain Perfusion in Newborns with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, P.; Hansen, A.; Warfield, SK.; Dukhovny, D.; Soul, JS.

    2014-01-01

    Background The measurement of brain perfusion may provide valuable information for assessment and treatment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). While arterial spin labeled perfusion (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides noninvasive and direct measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, it is logistically challenging to obtain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) might be an alternative, as it permits noninvasive and continuous monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation at the bedside. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between measurements of brain perfusion by NIRS and by MRI in term newborns with HIE treated with hypothermia. Design/Methods In this prospective cohort study, ASL-MRI and NIRS performed during hypothermia were used to assess brain perfusion in these newborns. Regional cerebral blood flow values (CBF), measured from 1–2 MRI scans for each patient, were compared to mixed venous saturation values (SctO2) recorded by NIRS just before and after each MRI. Analysis included groupings into moderate versus severe HIE based on their initial background pattern of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Results Twelve concomitant recordings were obtained of seven neonates. Strong correlation was found between SctO2 and CBF in asphyxiated newborns with severe HIE (r = 0.88; p value = 0.0085). Moreover, newborns with severe HIE had lower CBF (likely lower oxygen supply) and extracted less oxygen (likely lower oxygen demand or utilization) when comparing SctO2 and CBF to those with moderate HIE. Conclusions NIRS is an effective bedside tool to monitor and understand brain perfusion changes in term asphyxiated newborns, which in conjunction with precise measurements of CBF obtained by MRI at particular times, may help tailor neuroprotective strategies in term newborns with HIE. PMID:23631990

  3. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  4. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Grova, C; Jannin, P; Biraben, A; Buvat, I; Benali, H; Bernard, A M; Scarabin, J M; Gibaud, B

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  5. Nevirapine uptake into the central nervous system of the Guinea pig: an in situ brain perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J E; Gaffen, Z; Thomas, S A

    2006-05-01

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS) is associated with the development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD), a major cause of HIV-related mortality. To eradicate HIV in the CNS, anti-HIV drugs need to reach the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in therapeutic concentrations. This involves passage through the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers. Using a well established guinea pig in situ brain perfusion model, this study investigated whether nevirapine [6H-dipyrido(3,2-b:2',3'-e)(1,4)diazepin-6-one,11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl], a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), could effectively accumulate in the CNS. [(3)H]Nevirapine was coperfused with [(14)C]mannitol (a vascular/paracellular permeability marker) through the carotid arteries for up to 30 min, and accumulation in the brain, CSF, and choroid plexus was measured. [(3)H]Nevirapine uptake into the cerebrum was greater than uptake of [(14)C]mannitol, indicating significant passage across the blood-brain barrier and accumulation into the brain (this was further confirmed with capillary depletion and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses). Likewise, [(3)H]nevirapine showed a great ability to cross the blood-CSF barrier and accumulate in the CSF, compared with [(14)C]mannitol. The CNS accumulation of [(3)H]nevirapine was unaffected by 100 muM nevirapine, suggesting that passage across the blood-brain barrier can occur by diffusion. Furthermore, coperfusion with 100 muM efavirenz [2H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one, 6-chloro-4-(cyclopropylethynyl)-1,4-dihydro-4-(trifluoromethyl)-, (4S)-; another NNRTI] did not significantly alter CNS accumulation of [(3)H]nevirapine, indicating that the efficacy of nevirapine in the CNS would not be altered by the addition of this drug to a combination therapy. Together, these data indicate that this anti-HIV drug should be beneficial in the eradication of HIV within the CNS and the subsequent treatment of

  6. Macro- and microelements in the rat liver, kidneys, and brain tissues; sex differences and effect of blood removal by perfusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orct, Tatjana; Jurasović, Jasna; Micek, Vedran; Karaica, Dean; Sabolić, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Concentrations of macro- and microelements in animal organs indicate the animal health status and represent reference data for animal experiments. Their levels in blood and tissues could be different between sexes, and could be different with and without blood in tissues. To test these hypotheses, in adult female and male rats the concentrations of various elements were measured in whole blood, blood plasma, and tissues from blood-containing (nonperfused) and blood-free liver, kidneys, and brain (perfused in vivo with an elements-free buffer). In these samples, 6 macroelements (Na, Mg, P, S, K, Ca) and 14 microelements (Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, I, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Li, B, Sr) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following nitric acid digestion. In blood and plasma, female- or male-dominant sex differences were observed for 6 and 5 elements, respectively. In nonperfused organs, sex differences were observed for 3 (liver, brain) or 9 (kidneys) elements, whereas in perfused organs, similar differences were detected for 9 elements in the liver, 5 in the kidneys, and none in the brain. In females, perfused organs had significantly lower concentrations of 4, 5, and 2, and higher concentrations of 10, 4, and 7 elements, respectively, in the liver, kidneys, and brain. In males, perfusion caused lower concentrations of 4, 7, and 2, and higher concentrations of 1, 1, and 7 elements, respectively, in the liver, kidneys, and brain. Therefore, the residual blood in organs can significantly influence tissue concentrations of various elements and their sex-dependency.

  7. Chemical Gradients within Brain Extracellular Space Measured using Low Flow Push–Pull Perfusion Sampling in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although populations of neurons are known to vary on the micrometer scale, little is known about whether basal concentrations of neurotransmitters also vary on this scale. We used low-flow push–pull perfusion to test if such chemical gradients exist between several small brain nuclei. A miniaturized polyimide-encased push–pull probe was developed and used to measure basal neurotransmitter spatial gradients within brain of live animals with 0.004 mm3 resolution. We simultaneously measured dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), aspartate (Asp), glycine (Gly), acetylcholine (ACh), and several neurotransmitter metabolites. Significant differences in basal concentrations between midbrain regions as little as 200 μm apart were observed. For example, dopamine in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) was 4.8 ± 1.5 nM but in the red nucleus was 0.5 ± 0.2 nM. Regions of high glutamate concentration and variability were found within the VTA of some individuals, suggesting hot spots of glutamatergic activity. Measurements were also made within the nucleus accumbens core and shell. Differences were not observed in dopamine and 5-HT in the core and shell; but their metabolites homovanillic acid (460 ± 60 nM and 130 ± 60 nM respectively) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (720 ± 200 nM and 220 ± 50 nM respectively) did differ significantly, suggesting differences in dopamine and 5-HT activity in these brain regions. Maintenance of these gradients depends upon a variety of mechanisms. Such gradients likely underlie highly localized effects of drugs and control of behavior that have been found using other techniques. PMID:23421683

  8. Peripheral osmotic stimulation inhibits the brain's innate immune response to microdialysis of acidic perfusion fluid adjacent to supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanmei

    2009-01-01

    During the brain's innate immune response microglia, astroglia and ependymal cells resolve/repair damaged tissue and control infection. Released interleukin-1β (IL-1β) reaching cerebroventricles stimulates circumventricular organs (CVOs; subfornical organ, SFO; organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, OVLT), the median preoptic nucleus (MePO), and magnocellular and parvocellular neurons in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. Hypertonic saline (HS) also activates these osmosensory CVOs and neuroendocrine systems, but, in contrast to IL-1β, inhibits the peripheral immune response. To examine whether the brain's innate immune response is attenuated by osmotic stimulation, sterile acidic perfusion fluid was microdialyzed (2 μl/min) in the SON area of conscious rats for 6 h with sterile HS (1.5 M NaCl) injected subcutaneously (15 ml/kg) at 5 h. Immunohistochemistry identified cytokine sources (IL-1β+; OX-42+ microglia) and targets (IL-1R+; inducible cyclooxygenase, COX-2+; c-Fos+) near the probe, in CVOs, MePO, ependymal cells, periventricular hypothalamus, SON, and PVN. Inserting the probe stimulated magnocellular neurons (c-Fos+; SON; PVN) via the MePO (c-Fos+), a response enhanced by HS. Microdialysis activated microglia (OX-42+; amoeboid/hypertrophied; IL-1β+) in the adjacent SON and bilaterally in perivascular areas of the PVN, periventricular hypothalamus and ependyma, coincident with c-Fos expression in ependymal cells and COX-2 in the vasculature. These microglial responses were attenuated by HS, coincident with activating parvocellular and magnocellular neuroendocrine systems and elevating circulating IL-1β, oxytocin, and vasopressin. Acidosis-induced cellular injury from microdialysis activated the brain's innate immune response by a mechanism inhibited by peripheral osmotic stimulation. PMID:19759333

  9. Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in aortic arch surgery: efficacy and possible mechanisms of brain protection.

    PubMed

    Bavaria, J E; Pochettino, A

    1997-07-01

    Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was first introduced to treat air embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Its use was reintroduced to extend the safety of hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) during operations involving an open aortic arch. RCP seems to prevent cerebral rewarming during HCA. Both clinical and animal data suggest that RCP provides between 10% and 30% of baseline cerebral blood flow when administered through the superior vena cava (SVC) at jugular pressures of 20 to 25 mm Hg. RCP flows producing jugular venous pressures higher than 30 mm Hg may cause cerebral edema. Cerebral blood flow generated by RCP is able to sustain some cerebral metabolic activity, yet is not able to fully meet cerebral energy demands even at temperatures of 12 degrees to 18 degrees C. RCP may further prevent embolic events during aortic arch surgery when administered at moderate jugular vein pressures (< 40 mm Hg). Clinical results suggest that RCP, when applied during aortic arch reconstruction, may extend the safe HCA period and improve morbidity and mortality, especially when HCA times are more than 60 minutes. RCP applied in patients and severe carotid and brachiocephalic occlusive disease may be ineffective, and caution is in order when RCP times are greater than 90 minutes.

  10. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  11. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-03-07

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m(-1), 115  ±  4 dB m(-1) and 175  ±  9 dB m(-1), respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m(-3) and 1545  ±  44 m s(-1), respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m(-1) K(-1). The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  12. Detection of free radicals by isolated perfusion of the rat brain following hemorrhagic stroke: a novel approach to cerebrovascular biomarker research.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Hubert J; Pillai, Deepu R; Schlachetzki, Felix; Gruber, Michael; Dittmar, Michael S

    2010-10-01

    Blood-borne biomarkers are a mainstay of diagnosis and follow-up in many diseases. For stroke, however, no reliable biomarkers have thus far been identified. To remedy this situation, we investigated the usefulness of a modified in situ isolated brain perfusion (IBP) technique for screening potential biomarker candidates. As a proof of concept, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was estimated in a rat model of experimental intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). After stereotactic infusion of whole blood into the rat striatum, we initiated IBP without intracranial manipulation or discontinuation of cerebral blood flow. To detect ROS, we employed the salicylate trapping method, which involves the hydroxylation of salicylic acid during oxidative stress into dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), and quantification of the latter in venous eluate by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Venous eluate was collected separately from both injured and healthy hemispheres (n=10). Control groups consisted of sham-injured (n=4) and healthy animals (n=3). In animals subjected to ICH (n=10), 50% more 2,5-DHBA was detected in venous eluate on the injured side than in eluate on the contralateral side. Hemorrhagic hemispheres produced more 2,5-DHBA than hemispheres in sham-injured and healthy animals (72 and 110% more 2,5-DHBA, respectively). Isolated brain perfusion combined with salicylate trapping produced data indicating an elevation in the formation of ROS subsequent to ICH. Our findings suggest that isolated in situ brain perfusion is a promising approach to detecting biomarkers of cerebrovascular pathologic conditions.

  13. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  14. 99Tcm-MIBI single photon emission tomography (SPET) for detecting myocardial ischaemia and necrosis in patients with significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sciammarella, M G; Fragasso, G; Gerundini, P; Maffioli, L; Cappelletti, A; Margonato, A; Savi, A; Chierchia, S

    1992-12-01

    The ability of 99Tcm-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission tomography (SPET) to detect myocardial ischaemia and necrosis was assessed in 56 patients (45 male, 11 female, aged 55 +/- 5 years), with clinically recognized ischaemic heart disease (IHD). All underwent coronary angiography (CA) and left ventriculography (LV). SPET images were obtained at rest and at peak exercise (Modified Bruce) 90 min after injection of 99Tcm-MIBI (650-850 MBq). Data were acquired in 30 min over 180 degrees (from 45 degrees RAO to 45 degrees LPO) with no correction for attenuation, using a 64 x 64 matrix. The presence of persistent (P) or reversible (R) perfusion defects (PD) was then correlated to the resting and exercise ECG and to the results of CA and LV. Of the 56 patients, 34 had reversible underperfusion (RPD), 46 persistent underperfusion (PPD) and 31 had both. The occurrence of RPD correlated well with the occurrence of exercise-induced ST segment depression and/or angina (27 patients of 34 patients, 79%) and with the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) (33 of 44, 73%). In 45 of 46 patients (98%) PPD corresponded to akinetic or severely hypokinetic segments (LV) usually explored by ECG leads exhibiting diagnostic Q waves (42 of 46 patients, 91%). The scan was normal both at rest and after stress in four of 11 patients with no CAD, and in two of 45 patients with CAD. Finally, an abnormal resting scan was seen in seven of 11 patients with normal coronary arteries, of whom six had regional wall motion abnormalities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Perfusion for Traumatic Brain Injury: Technical Challenges and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Andre, Jalal B

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), including concussion, is a public health concern, as it affects over 1.7 million persons in the United States per year. Yet, the diagnosis of TBI, particularly mild TBI (mTBI), can be controversial, as neuroimaging findings can be sparse on conventional magnetic resonance and computed tomography examinations, and when present, often poorly correlate with clinical signs and symptoms. Furthermore, the discussion of TBI, concussion, and head impact exposure is immediately complicated by the many differing opinions of what constitutes each, their respective severities, and how the underlying biomechanics of the inciting head impact might alter the distribution, severity, and prognosis of the underlying brain injury. Advanced imaging methodologies hold promise in improving the sensitivity and detectability of associated imaging biomarkers that might better correlate with patient outcome and prognostication, allowing for improved triage and therapeutic guidance in the setting of TBI, particularly in mTBI. This work will examine the defining symptom complex associated with mTBI and explore changes in cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labeling, as a potential imaging biomarker for TBI, and briefly correlate these observations with findings identified by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging.

  16. Two Cases of Oral Somatic Delusions Ameliorated With Brain Perfusion Asymmetry: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral cenesthopathy is the complaint of abnormal oral sensation where no underlying organic cause can be identified. It is also called oral dysesthesia or oral somatic delusion and classified as delusional disorder, somatic type. The patients with oral cenesthopathy show right > left asymmetric regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the broad brain region. However, the studies scrutinizing the rCBF change before and after the successful treatment are still a few so far. Case We present 2 cases of oral cenesthopathy, who responded well to aripiprazole. The asymmetric rCBF patterns were attenuated after successful treatment in both cases. Conclusions We found a marked improvement of oral cenesthopathy with aripiprazole. It is suggested that right > left rCBF asymmetry in the frontal and temporal lobes and thalamus, and the dopaminergic and serotonergic dysfunctions are involved in the pathology of oral cenesthopathy. PMID:28225385

  17. Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Targets Individualized to Pressure-Reactivity Index in Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Needham, Edward; McFadyen, Charles; Newcombe, Virginia; Synnot, Anneliese J; Czosnyka, Marek; Menon, David

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently triggers a disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) at which autoregulation is optimal ("CPPopt") varies between individuals, and can be calculated based on fluctuations between arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure. This review assesses the effect of individualizing CPP targets to pressure reactivity index (a measure of autoregulation) in patients with TBI. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE®, Embase, and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched in March 2015 for studies assessing the effect of targeting CPPopt in TBI. We included all studies that assessed the impact of targeting CPPopt on outcomes including mortality, neurological outcome, and physiological changes. Risk of bias was assessed using the RTI Item Bank and evidence quality was considered using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Eight cohort studies (based on six distinct data sets) assessing the association between CPPopt and mortality, Glasgow Outcome Scale and physiological measures in TBI were included. The quality of evidence was deemed very low based on the GRADE criteria. Although the data suggest an association between variation from CPPopt and poor clinical outcome at 6 months, the quality of evidence prevents firm conclusions, particularly regarding causality, from being drawn. Available data suggest that targeting CPPopt might represent a technique to improve outcomes following TBI, but currently there is insufficient high-quality data to support a recommendation for use in clinical practice. Further prospective, randomized controlled studies should be undertaken to clarify its role in the acute management of TBI.

  18. An electrophysiological study of the in vitro, perfused brain stem-cerebellum of adult guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Mühlethaler, M

    1988-01-01

    1. We describe here a technique which allows the long-term in vitro survival of the perfused isolated brain stem-cerebellum of adult guinea-pig. The viability of this preparation was assessed by comparing the electrophysiological properties of individual neurones and of neuronal pools to those obtained in vivo or in brain slices. The areas investigated included the cerebellar cortex, the inferior olive and the pontine nuclei. 2. Cerebellar field potential and intra- and extracellular single-cell recordings could be obtained for as long as 15 h after the preparation was initially isolated. The waveforms of field potentials recorded at various depths in the cerebellar cortex following surface folial stimulation were similar to those recorded in vivo. Extracellular recordings from single Purkinje cells following white matter stimulation demonstrated antidromic as well as mossy- and climbing fibre-mediated excitation. Stimulation of the cerebellar surface elicited orthodromic parallel fibre excitation of Purkinje cells and basket-stellate and Golgi cell inhibition. 3. Intrasomatic and intradendritic recordings from Purkinje cells reproduced all the phenomenology described earlier under in vivo conditions and in vitro slice preparations. In addition, spontaneous excitatory synaptic potentials generating simple spikes (mossy fibre-parallel fibre-mediated activity) and complex spikes (climbing fibre-mediated activity) were consistently observed. 4. Extracellular field potentials and extra- and intracellular recordings from inferior olive neurones were similar to those previously shown for the mammalian inferior olive. 5. Intracellular recordings were also obtained from pontine nuclei neurones, a major source of mossy fibre afferents to the cerebellum. Stimulation of the contralateral superior cerebellar peduncle produced antidromic invasion of these neurones whereas stimulation of the ipsilateral inferior cerebral peduncle resulted in their orthodromic activation. 6. The

  19. Comparison of BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and DSC MR perfusion imaging for prediction of neurovascular uncoupling potential in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Jay J; Zacà, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    metrics obtained by T2* gadolinium perfusion MR imaging were compared to BOLD percentage signal change on BH CVR maps in a group of 19 patients with intracranial brain tumors of different nature and grade. Single pixel maximum rCBV and rCBF within holotumoral regions of interest (i.e., "ipsilesional" ROIs) were normalized to contralateral hemispheric homologous (i.e., "contralesional") normal tissue. Furthermore, percentage signal change on BH CVR maps within ipsilesional ROIs were normalized to the percentage signal change within contralesional homologous ROIs. Inverse linear correlation was found between normalized rCBF (r(flow)) or rCBV (r(vol)) and normalized CVR percentage signal change (r(CVR)) in grade IV lesions. In the grade III lesions a less steep inverse linear trend was seen that did not reach statistical significance, whereas no correlation at all was seen in the grade II group. Statistically significant difference was present for r(flow) and r(vol) between the grade II and IV groups and between the grade III and IV groups but not for r(CVR). The r(CVR) was significantly lower than 1 in every group. Our results demonstrate that while T2*MR perfusion maps and CVR maps are both adequate to map tumoral regions at risk of NVU in high grade gliomas, CVR maps can detect areas of decreased CVR also in low and intermediate grade gliomas where NVU may be caused by factors other than tumor neovascularity alone. Comparison of areas of abnormally decreased regional CVR with areas of absent BOLD task-based activation in expected eloquent cortical regions infiltrated by or adjacent to the tumors revealed overall 95% concordance, thus confirming the capability of BH CVR mapping to effectively demonstrate areas of NVU. ed by factors other than tumor neovascularity alone. Comparison of areas of abnormally decreased regional CVR with areas of absent BOLD task-based activation in expected eloquent cortical regions infiltrated by or adjacent to the tumors revealed overall 95

  20. Evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Brodmann areas in Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease using automated 3-D voxel based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotassiou, V.; Papatriantafyllou, J.; Sifakis, N.; Karageorgiou, C.; Tsougos, I.; Tzavara, C.; Zerva, C.; Georgoulias, P.

    2009-05-01

    Introduction. Brain perfusion studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been applied in demented patients to provide better discrimination between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim. To assess the perfusion of specific Brodmann (Br) areas of the brain cortex in FTD and AD patients, using NeuroGam processing program to provide 3D voxel-by-voxel cerebral SPECT analysis. Material and methods. We studied 34 consecutive patients. We used the established criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and the specific established criteria for the diagnosis of FTD and AD. All the patients had a neuropsychological evaluation with a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination (MMSE).Twenty-six patients (16 males, 10 females, mean age 68.76±6.51 years, education 11.81±4.25 years, MMSE 16.69±9.89) received the diagnosis of FTD and 8 patients (all females, mean age 71.25±10.48 years, education 10±4.6 years, MMSE 12.5±3.89) the diagnosis of AD. All the patients underwent a brain SPECT. We applied the NeuroGam Software for the evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Br areas in the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Results. Statistically significant hypoperfusion in FTD compared to AD patients, was found in the following Br areas: 11L (p<0.0001), 11R, 20L, 20R, 32L, 38L, 38R, 44L (p<0.001), 32R, 36L, 36R, 45L, 45R, 47R (p<0.01), 9L, 21L, 39R, 44R, 46R, 47L (p<0.05). On the contrary, AD patients presented significant (p<0.05) hypoperfusion in 7R and 39R Br areas. Conclusion. NeuroGam processing program of brain perfusion SPECT could result in enhanced accuracy for the differential diagnosis between AD and FTD patients.

  1. Evaluating the Role of Reduced Oxygen Saturation and Vascular Damage in Traumatic Brain Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Perfusion-Weighted Imaging and Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Mapping.

    PubMed

    Kou, Zhifeng; Ye, Yongquan; Haacke, Ewart Mark

    2015-10-01

    The cerebral vasculature, along with neurons and axons, is vulnerable to biomechanical insult during traumatic brain injury (TBI). Trauma-induced vascular injury is still an underinvestigated area in TBI research. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism could be important future treatment targets in neural critical care. Magnetic resonance imaging offers a number of key methods to probe vascular injury and its relationship with traumatic hemorrhage, perfusion deficits, venous blood oxygen saturation changes, and resultant tissue damage. They make it possible to image the hemodynamics of the brain, monitor regional damage, and potentially show changes induced in the brain's function not only acutely but also longitudinally following treatment. These methods have recently been used to show that even mild TBI (mTBI) subjects can have vascular abnormalities, and thus they provide a major step forward in better diagnosing mTBI patients.

  2. Optimising Golgi–Cox staining for use with perfusion-fixed brain tissue validated in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Olsen, Elliott; Harrison, David J.; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Golgi–Cox stain is an established method for characterising neuron cell morphology. The method highlights neurite processes of stained cells allowing the complexity of dendritic branching to be measured. New methods Conventional rapid Golgi and Golgi–Cox methods all require fresh impregnation in unfixed brain blocks. Here, we describe a modified method that gives high quality staining on brain tissue blocks perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) and post-fixed by immersion for 24 h. Results Tissue perfused with 4% PFA and post fixed for 24 h remained viable for the modified Golgi–Cox silver impregnation staining of mouse striatum from perfused wild type and zQ175. It was not found necessary to impregnate tissue blocks with Golgi solutions prior to sectioning, as post-sectioned tissues yielded equally good impregnation. Impregnation for 14 days resulted in optimal visualisation of striatal neuron and dendritic morphology. Although no modifications applied to the rapid Golgi method were reliable, the modified Golgi–Cox method yielded consistently reliable high-quality staining. Comparison with existing methods The current method used fixed tissues to reduce damage and preserve cell morphology. The revised method was found to be fast, reliable and cost effective without the need for expensive staining kits and could be performed in any neuroscience lab with limited specialist equipment. Conclusions The present study introduces a robust reproducible and inexpensive staining method for identifying neuronal morphological changes in the post fixed mouse brain, and is suitable for assessing changes in cell morphology in models of neurodegeneration and in response to experimental treatment. PMID:26459195

  3. 123I-labeling and evaluation of Ro 43-0463, a SPET tracer for MAO-B imaging.

    PubMed

    Beer, H F; Rossetti, I; Frey, L D; Hasler, P H; Schubiger, P A

    1995-10-01

    Using the copper assisted halogen exchange the MAO-B inhibitor Ro 43-0463, N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-iodo-2-pyridinecarboxamide, was labelled with 123I as well as with 125I to allow in vitro and in vivo investigations including SPET with healthy volunteers. Ro 43-0463 is known to inhibit reversibly and specifically MAO-B, having an IC50 of 3 x 10(-8) Mol/L. The labeling in the presence of CuSO4 and ascorbic acid was optimised, varying time (30 to 105 min), precursor concentration (1-3.5 mg) and temperature (130-200 degrees C). The labeling yield ranged between 60 and 70%. Purification was achieved with Lichrosorb RP-18 (5 micron, 250 x 8 mm) and 1.5 mL/min 0.36 M H3PO4/EtOH 97/3 [0.01 M (NH4)2HPO4]. After neutralisation and sterile filtration the final activity concentration ranged between 18.5 and 37 MBq/mL. Biodistribution studies showed a brain to blood ratio greater than 1 within 1 h p.i. The main radiation burden calculated from these animal data is to alimentary and excretory organs and the ovaries. Autoradiography was performed using rat brain slices and 5 nM [125I]Ro 43-0463 in TRIS-buffer pH 7.4 for 90 min at 20 degrees C. Its radioactivity pattern corresponds to the known distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. By displacement with L-deprneyl the highly specific binding of R0 43-0463 was proven in vitro. SPECT studies with normal volunteers corresponded with the pattern found in autoradiography.

  4. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  5. Thyroxine transfer from cerebrospinal fluid into choroid plexus and brain is affected by brefeldin A, low sodium, BCH, and phloretin, in ventriculo-cisternal perfused rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zibara, Kazem; El-Zein, Ali; Joumaa, Wissam; El-Sayyad, Mohammad; Mondello, Stefania; Kassem, Nouhad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroxine (T4) hormone is synthesized by the thyroid gland and then released into the systemic circulation where it binds to a number of proteins. Dysfunction in T4 transport mechanisms has been demonstrated in multiple central nervous system (CNS) diseases including Alzheimer's disease. In the presence of different compounds that inhibit potential T4 transport mechanisms, this study investigated the transfer of T4 from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into Choroid Plexus (CP) and other brain tissues. The compounds used were brefeldin A, low sodium artificial CSF (aCSF), BCH, phloretin, and taurocholate (TA). Methods: Radiolabeled T4 (125I-T4) was perfused continuously into the CSF and was assessed in several brain compartments with reference molecule 14C-mannitol and blue dextran, using the in vivo ventriculo-cisternal perfusion (V-C) technique in the rabbit. The aCSF containing the drug of interest was infused after 1 h of perfusion. Drugs were applied independently to the aCSF after 1 h of control perfusion. Results: Of interest, in presence of low sodium or BCH, the percentage recovery of 125I-T4, was increased compared to controls, with concomitant increase in T4 clearance. Conversely, brefeldin A, phloretin, and TA did not exert any significant effect on the recovery and clearance of 125I-T4 assessed in aCSF. On the other hand, the uptake of 125I-T4 into CP was raised by 18 fold compared to controls in the presence of brefeldin A. In addition, low sodium, BCH, or phloretin alone, enhanced the uptake of 125I-T4 by almost 3-fold, whereas TA did not show any significant effect. Finally, the uptake and distribution of 125I-T4 into other brain regions including ependymal region (ER) and caudate putamen (CAP) were significantly higher than in controls. Conclusion: Our study suggests the involvement of different mechanisms for the transfer of 125I-T4 from CSF into CP and other brain regions. This transfer may implicate sodium-dependent mechanisms, amino acid

  6. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Eric S; Prah, Douglas E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma.

  7. Discrepancies in brain perfusion SPECT findings between Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD: evaluation using dynamic SPECT in patients with hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, N; Koizumi, K; Mitsuka, S; Nukui, H

    1998-10-01

    Discrepancies have been reported between the findings of Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT imaging. This study investigated the discrepancies in the accumulation of these tracers using dynamic SPECT to detect the super early phase of distribution. Thirteen patients with luxury perfusion or high flow states were studied with both dynamic and standard SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD within 1-3 days. Standard SPECT showed discrepancies in 6 of 13 patients. Patients with meningioma and cerebral thrombosis had increased accumulation of Tc-99m HMPAO and decreased uptake of Tc-99m ECD. Patients with arteriovenous malformation, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and cavernous angioma had decreased accumulation of both tracers, but to different degrees. Dynamic SPECT showed increased or normal accumulation (i.e., essentially no discrepancy) in the first few minutes. However, Tc-99m HMPAO had a longer retention time than Tc-99m ECD in the ensuing 5-10 minutes. Dynamic SPECT revealed a similar accumulation pattern but different washout rates for the two tracers. Tc-99m HMPAO might be a more suitable tracer to detect high flow states or luxury perfusion because the findings on standard SPECT were more in agreement with those of dynamic SPECT using this tracer.

  8. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Eric S.; Prah, Douglas E.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:28090589

  9. Monitoring stroke progression: in vivo imaging of cortical perfusion, blood-brain barrier permeability and cellular damage in the rat photothrombosis model.

    PubMed

    Schoknecht, Karl; Prager, Ofer; Vazana, Udi; Kamintsky, Lyn; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Figge, Lena; Chassidim, Yoash; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kovács, Richard; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2014-11-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia is among the main causes of death and disability worldwide. The ischemic core often progresses, invading the peri-ischemic brain; however, assessing the propensity of the peri-ischemic brain to undergo secondary damage, understanding the underlying mechanisms, and adjusting treatment accordingly remain clinically unmet challenges. A significant hallmark of the peri-ischemic brain is dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), yet the role of disturbed vascular permeability in stroke progression is unclear. Here we describe a longitudinal in vivo fluorescence imaging approach for the evaluation of cortical perfusion, BBB dysfunction, free radical formation and cellular injury using the photothrombosis vascular occlusion model in male Sprague Dawley rats. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction propagated within the peri-ischemic brain in the first hours after photothrombosis and was associated with free radical formation and cellular injury. Inhibiting free radical signaling significantly reduced progressive cellular damage after photothrombosis, with no significant effect on blood flow and BBB permeability. Our approach allows a dynamic follow-up of cellular events and their response to therapeutics in the acutely injured cerebral cortex.

  10. Role of Brain Perfusion SPECT with 99mTc HMPAO in the Assessment of Response to Drug Therapy in Patients with Autoimmune Vasculitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Liberatore; Manuela, Morreale; Valentina, Megna; Sara, Collorone; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maria, Drudi Francesco; Christos, Anagnostou; Liana, Civitelli; Ada, Francia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of vasculitis in the brain remains a quite difficult achievement. To the best of our knowledge, there is no imaging method reported in literature which is capable of reaching to a diagnosis of vasculitis with very high sensitivity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be usefully employed in monitoring the treatment of vasculitis, allowing treating only potentially responder patients and avoiding the side effects on patients who do not respond. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (two males and 18 females) suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 5), Behcet's disease (BD; n = 5), undifferentiated vasculitis (UV; n = 5), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS; n = 5) were included in the study. All patients underwent a wide neurological anamnestic investigation, a complete objective neurological examination and SPECT of the brain with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO). The brain SPECT was then repeated after appropriate medical treatment. The neurological and neuropsychiatric follow-up was performed at 6 months after the start of the treatment. Results: Overall, the differences between the scintigraphic results obtained after and before the medical treatment indicated a statistically significant increase of the cerebral perfusion (CP). In 19 out of 200 regions of interest (ROI) studied, the difference between pre- and post treatment percentages had negative sign, indicating a worsening of CP. This latter event has occurred six times (five in the same patients) in the UV, 10 times (eight in the same patients) in the SLE, never in BD, and three times (two in the same patient) in the SS. Conclusion: The reported results seem to indicate the possibility of identifying, by the means of a brain SPECT, responder and nonresponder (unchanged or worsened CP) patients, affected by autoimmune vasculitis, to the therapy. PMID:25973400

  11. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate

  12. Countercurrent transfer of dopamine from venous blood in the cavernous sinus to the arterial blood supplying the brain - the perfused rabbit head as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Muszak, J; Krzymowski, T; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to check whether countercurrent transfer of dopamine occurs in the cavernous sinus of the rabbit and whether the rabbit can be used as an animal model to study cavernous sinus function. After exsanguination of the animal, oxygenated and warmed (37°C) Hanseneleit-Krebs buffer with autologous or homologous blood (in a 3:1 or 1:1 ratio) was pumped through both common carotid arteries into the head (60 ml/min; 80-100 mm Hg) and radiolabeled dopamine (3(H)-DA, 10 μCi) was infused into the cavernous sinus through the angular oculi vein. Cerebral blood from the basilar artery was collected from the cannulated vertebral artery during 3(H)-DA infusion and for 10 minutes after completion of infusion. Selected brain tissue samples were collected after completion of the head perfusion. It was demonstrated that dopamine can penetrate from the rabbit's cavernous sinus to the internal carotid artery supplying the brain. Dopamine permeation was greater when the rabbit head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio than with 1:1 (P<0.01). When the head was perfused with buffer and blood in a 3:1 ratio, significant radioactivity was found in samples collected from the brain basilar artery during and after 3(H)-DA infusion (P<0.001). The radioactivity was identified as 34.13 ± 2.7% unmetabolized 3(H)-DA and 65.9 ± 2.7% its metabolites. Significant radioactivity was also found in some brain tissue samples in both groups (P<0.05). The concentration of free radiolabeled dopamine particles in the dialysate of blood plasma and plasma diluted with buffer did not differ significantly. Because the structures of the cavernous sinus and cavernous fragment of the internal carotid artery of the rabbit are similar to those in humans, it suggests that rabbits can serve as a model for experimental physiological studies of cavernous sinus function and retrograde dopamine transfer in the cavernous sinus should be considered as an important link in

  13. Discrepancies and priorities in staging and restaging malignant lymphoma by SPET, SPET/CT, PET/CT and PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Chavdarova, Lidia Ivanova; Tzonevska, Antonia Dencheva; Piperkova, Elena Nikolova

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of modern imaging methods and also of medical oncology, there has been a significant progress in diagnosis and treatment of malignant lymphomas in the last few years. Nuclear medicine (NM) imaging methods gained new perspectives via the so called hybrid technologies-single-photon emission tomography combined with computed tomography (SPET/CT), positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and recently even positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), which have led to a better image quality and diagnostic findings. Since SPET/CT evolved later than the "gold standard" 18F-FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma diagnostics, there are fewer studies with it, but it seems to be an excellent alternative to PET/CT. The role of PET/CT is confirmed up-to-date for typically 18F-FDG-avid lymphomas, in staging and restaging diffuse large B-cell and some aggressive follicular lymphomas, in a suspected relapse of treatment of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. There are many discussions about the "interim-PET" but the recent results indicate its important prognostic role for predicting disease-free survival and the possibility to modify treatment intensity in order to reduce late side effects. On the other hand, the routine and approbated use of conventional morphologic imaging methods CT and MRI serve as a "reference standard" for the newer hybrid technologies not only in diagnostics but also in the cost-benefit ratio analysis and remain the basic imaging modalities when hybrid methods are not available. In conclusion, our review points at the main advantages and disadvantages of each NM method mentioned above in the diagnosis and follow-up of malignant lymphomas. Specifically, problems in differential diagnostics and further possibilities to better optimize the diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm are mentioned.

  14. Guidelines for brain radionuclide imaging. Perfusion single photon computed tomography (SPECT) using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose. The Belgian Society for Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vander Borght, T; Laloux, P; Maes, A; Salmon, E; Goethals, I; Goldman, S

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of brain perfusion SPECT studies using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism PET studies using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These guidelines have been adapted and extended from those produced by the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Juni et al., 1998) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine by a Belgian group of experts in the field trained in neurology and/or nuclear medicine. Some indications are not universally approved (e.g. brain death), but largely supported by the literature. They have been included in these guidelines in order to provide recommendations and a standardised protocol.

  15. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    PubMed

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals.

  16. Imaging brain fatigue from sustained mental workload: an ASL perfusion study of the time-on-task effect.

    PubMed

    Lim, Julian; Wu, Wen-Chau; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A; Dinges, David F; Rao, Hengyi

    2010-02-15

    During sustained periods of a taxing cognitive workload, humans typically display time-on-task (TOT) effects, in which performance gets steadily worse over the period of task engagement. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in this study to investigate the neural correlates of TOT effects in a group of 15 subjects as they performed a 20-min continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). Subjects displayed significant TOT effects, as seen in progressively slower reaction times and significantly increased mental fatigue ratings after the task. Perfusion data showed that the PVT activates a right lateralized fronto-parietal attentional network in addition to the basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortices. The fronto-parietal network was less active during post-task rest compared to pre-task rest, and regional CBF decrease in this network correlated with performance decline. These results demonstrate the persistent effects of cognitive fatigue in the fronto-parietal network after a period of heavy mental work and indicate the critical role of this attentional network in mediating TOT effects. Furthermore, resting regional CBF in the thalamus and right middle frontal gyrus prior to task onset was predictive of subjects' subsequent performance decline, suggesting that resting CBF quantified by ASL perfusion fMRI may be a useful indicator of performance potential and a marker of the level of fatigue in the neural attentional system.

  17. Time-resolved multi-channel optical system for assessment of brain oxygenation and perfusion by monitoring of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milej, D.; Gerega, A.; Kacprzak, M.; Sawosz, P.; Weigl, W.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy is an optical technique which can be applied in tissue oxygenation assessment. In the last decade this method is extensively tested as a potential clinical tool for noninvasive human brain function monitoring and imaging. In the present paper we show construction of an instrument which allows for: (i) estimation of changes in brain tissue oxygenation using two-wavelength spectroscopy approach and (ii) brain perfusion assessment with the use of single-wavelength reflectometry or fluorescence measurements combined with ICG-bolus tracking. A signal processing algorithm based on statistical moments of measured distributions of times of flight of photons is implemented. This data analysis method allows for separation of signals originating from extra- and intracerebral tissue compartments. In this paper we present compact and easily reconfigurable system which can be applied in different types of time-resolved experiments: two-wavelength measurements at 687 and 832 nm, single wavelength reflectance measurements at 760 nm (which is at maximum of ICG absorption spectrum) or fluorescence measurements with excitation at 760 nm. Details of the instrument construction and results of its technical tests are shown. Furthermore, results of in-vivo measurements obtained for various modes of operation of the system are presented.

  18. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  19. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  20. [Intracranial, cerebral perfusion pressure and systemic hemodynamic parameters during anesthesia induction in patients with traumatic brain compression].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The study reports the dynamic of ICP, CPP and systemic hemodynamic rates during midazolam induction of anesthesia in patients with traumatic brain compression. Patients who need urgent surgery to eliminate brain compression of various degrees generally have intracranial hypertension. Midazolam administration decreases ICP by 22% from baseline under condition of stable hemodynamic and CPP. Depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents' administration, mechanical ventilation and tracheal intubation lead to ICP elevation and CPP decreasing. The combination of midazolam and fentanil provides more reliable protection from hypertensive reactions.

  1. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  2. Whole-brain CT perfusion combined with CT angiography for ischemic complications following microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling of ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Qing; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Li, Jian Rui; Zhang, Zong Jun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Huang, Wei; Lu, Guang Ming

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic complications associated with microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling affects the outcome of patients with intracranial aneurysms. We prospectively evaluated 58 intracranial aneurysm patients who had neurological deterioration or presented with poor grade (Hunt-Hess grades III and IV), aneurysm size >13 mm and multiple aneurysms after clipping or coiling. Thirty patients had ischemic complications (52%) as demonstrated by whole-brain CT perfusion (WB-CTP) combined with CT angiography (CTA). Half of these 30 patients had treatment-associated reduction in the diameter of the parent vessels (n=6), ligation of the parent vessels or perforating arteries (n=2), and unexplained or indistinguishable vascular injury (n=7); seven of these 15 (73%) patients suffered infarction. The remaining 15 patients had disease-associated cerebral ischemia caused by generalized vasospasm (n=6) and focal vessel vasospasm (n=9); six of these 15 (40%) patients developed infarction. Three hemodynamic patterns of ischemic complications were found on WB-CTP, of which increased time to peak, time to delay and mean transit time associated with decreased cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume were the main predictors of irreversible ischemic lesions. In conclusion, WB-CTP combined with CTA can accurately determine the cause of neurological deterioration and classify ischemic complications. This combined approach may be helpful in assessing hemodynamic patterns and monitoring operative outcomes.

  3. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  4. Reflection imaging of China ink-perfused brain vasculature using confocal laser-scanning microscopy after clarification of brain tissue by the Spalteholz method.

    PubMed

    Gutierre, R C; Vannucci Campos, D; Mortara, R A; Coppi, A A; Arida, R M

    2017-01-05

    Confocal laser-scanning microscopy is a useful tool for visualizing neurons and glia in transparent preparations of brain tissue from laboratory animals. Currently, imaging capillaries and venules in transparent brain tissues requires the use of fluorescent proteins. Here, we show that vessels can be imaged by confocal laser-scanning microscopy in transparent cortical, hippocampal and cerebellar preparations after clarification of China ink-injected specimens by the Spalteholz method. This method may be suitable for global, three-dimensional, quantitative analyses of vessels, including stereological estimations of total volume and length and of surface area of vessels, which constitute indirect approaches to investigate angiogenesis.

  5. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    automated real-time vital signs monitoring data” was funded by USAF (MSA); UM PI: Deborah Stein  The project, titled “Noninvasive intracranial pressure ...scoring of cerebral perfusion pressure and intracranial pressure provides a Brain Trauma Index that predicts outcome in patients with severe TBI... intracranial pressure dose index: Dynamic 3-D scoring in the assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury Proceedings of American Association for the Surgery of

  6. Residual Effects of THC via Novel Measures of Brain Perfusion and Metabolism in a Large Group of Chronic Cannabis Users.

    PubMed

    Filbey, Francesca M; Aslan, Sina; Lu, Hanzhang; Peng, Shin-Lei

    2017-03-22

    Given the known vascular effects of cannabis, this study examined the neurophysiological factors that may affect studies of brain activity in cannabis users. We conducted a systematic evaluation in 72 h abstinent, chronic cannabis users (N=74) and nonusing controls (N=101) to determine the association between prolonged cannabis use and the following neurophysiological indicators: (1) global and regional resting cerebral blood flow (CBF), (2) oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and (3) cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). We found that cannabis users had greater global OEF and CMRO2 compared with nonusers. Regionally, we found higher CBF in the right pallidum/putamen of the cannabis users compared with nonusers. Global resting CBF and regional CBF of right superior frontal cortex correlated positively with creatinine-normalized Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels. These findings demonstrate residual effects of cannabis use whereby global and regional brain metabolism are altered in those with prolonged cannabis exposure. These neurophysiological alterations should be considered in both research and clinical applications.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 22 March 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.44.

  7. [A 15oxygen positron study of relative local perfusion and oxygen extraction of the brain in lacunar hemiparesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rougemont, D; Baron, J C; Lebrun-Grandié, P; Bousser, M G; Soisson, T; Comar, D

    1982-05-01

    The oxygen-15 non-invasive continuous inhalation technique coupled with positron emission tomography (PET) allows the local study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism. Recent PET studied have demonstrated the frequent occurrence of widespread metabolic depression remote from the site of middle cerebral artery territory infarct per se, especially over the cortical mantle and thalamus ipsilaterally, and over the cerebellar hemisphere contralaterally. These phenomena have been taken as indicative of a transneural depression (i.e. diaschisis). We thought interesting to study the possible occurrence of such abnormalities in patients with lacunar syndromes. We have applied the 15O technique to seven patients (2 with pure motor hemiplegia, 5 with ataxic hemiparesis) in whom no large causal ischemic lesion could be demonstrated on CT Scans; in only one patient was a lacunar lesion, presumably responsible for the clinical deficit, evidenced. Compared to a set of 19 patients without brain disease, the semi-quantitative results (analyzed in terms of asymmetry indices between homologous brain regions) in our patients did not disclose any pathophysiologically significant abnormality. More specifically, no evidence of physiological dysfunction similar to that reported in internal carotid artery territory infarcts, was detected over the cerebral or the cerebellar cortices. These original findings are commented upon in view of the presumably small size and the uncertain topography of the causal lesion.

  8. Unique roles of SPET brain imaging in clinical and research studies. Lessons from Parkinson's disease research.

    PubMed

    Seibyl, J; Jennings, D; Tabamo, R; Marek, K

    2005-06-01

    The increasing availability of PET imaging in nuclear medicine expands the armamentarium of clinical and research tools for improving diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, the role of SPECT imaging remains critical to both research and clinical practice. The development of rational strategies for guiding the selection of imaging modalities flows from primarily the nature of the clinical or research question and the availability of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals. There has been extensive SPECT and PET work in Parkinson's disease (PD) which highlights the value of both these scintigraphic modalities. Three main areas of interest in PD include imaging for improving diagnostic accuracy, for monitoring the progression of disease, and for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of drugs with neuroprotective potential. The demands of the clinical or research question posed to imaging dictates the selection of radiotracer and imaging modality. Diagnosis of PD represents the easiest challenge with many imaging biomarkers showing high sensitivity for detecting abnormal reduction of dopaminergic function based on qualitative review of images. On the other hand, using imaging to evaluate treatments which purportedly slow the rate of disease progression, indicated by the reduction in the rate of loss in a quantitative imaging signal in patients studied over time, represents the most rigorous requirement of the imaging measure. In each of these applications presynaptic markers of dopaminergic function using SPECT and PET have been extremely valuable. Review of neuroimaging studies of PD provides a useful example of optimized approaches to clinical and research studies in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Intracranial pressure monitoring, cerebral perfusion pressure estimation, and ICP/CPP-guided therapy: a standard of care or optional extra after brain injury?

    PubMed

    Kirkman, M A; Smith, M

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) is used to derive cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and to guide targeted therapy of acute brain injury (ABI) during neurointensive care. Here we provide a narrative review of the evidence for ICP monitoring, CPP estimation, and ICP/CPP-guided therapy after ABI. Despite its widespread use, there is currently no class I evidence that ICP/CPP-guided therapy for any cerebral pathology improves outcomes; indeed some evidence suggests that it makes no difference, and some that it may worsen outcomes. Similarly, no class I evidence can currently advise the ideal CPP for any form of ABI. 'Optimal' CPP is likely patient-, time-, and pathology-specific. Further, CPP estimation requires correct referencing (at the level of the foramen of Monro as opposed to the level of the heart) for MAP measurement to avoid CPP over-estimation and adverse patient outcomes. Evidence is emerging for the role of other monitors of cerebral well-being that enable the clinician to employ an individualized multimodality monitoring approach in patients with ABI, and these are briefly reviewed. While acknowledging difficulties in conducting robust prospective randomized studies in this area, such high-quality evidence for the utility of ICP/CPP-directed therapy in ABI is urgently required. So, too, is the wider adoption of multimodality neuromonitoring to guide optimal management of ICP and CPP, and a greater understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the different forms of ABI and what exactly the different monitoring tools used actually represent.

  10. Sequential hypothesis testing for automatic detection of task-related changes in cerebral perfusion in a brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Hayley G; Myrden, Andrew; Li, Michael; Mamun, Khondaker; Chau, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that the cerebral blood flow patterns accompanying cognitive activity are retained in many locked-in patients. These patterns can be monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), a medical imaging technique that measures bilateral cerebral blood flow velocities. Recently, TCD has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, most previous TCD-BCI studies have performed offline analyses with impractically lengthy tasks. In this study, we designed a BCI that automatically differentiates between counting and verbal fluency tasks using sequential hypothesis testing to make decisions as quickly as possible. Ten able-bodied participants silently alternated between counting and verbal fluency tasks within the paradigm of a simulated on-screen keyboard. During this experiment, blood flow velocities were recorded within the left and right middle cerebral arteries using bilateral TCD. Twelve features were used to characterize TCD signals. In a simulated online analysis, sequential hypothesis testing was used to update estimates of class probability every 250 ms as TCD data were processed. Classification was terminated once a threshold level of certainty was reached. Mean classification accuracy across all participants was 72% after an average of 23s, compared to an offline analysis which obtained a classification accuracy of 80% after 45 s. This represents a substantial gain in data transmission rate, while maintaining classification accuracies exceeding 70%. Furthermore, a range of decision times between 19 and 28s was observed, suggesting that the ability of sequential hypothesis testing to adapt the task duration for each individual participant is critical to achieving consistent performance across participants. These results indicate that sequential hypothesis testing is a promising alternative for online TCD-BCIs.

  11. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  12. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  13. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  14. Brain luxury perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in humans. A study of the cerebral blood flow response to changes in CO2, O2, and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, L

    1986-06-01

    CBF and related parameters were studied in 68 patients before, during, and following cardiopulmonary bypass. CBF was measured using the intraarterial 133Xe injection method. The extracorporeal circuit was nonpulsatile with a bubble oxygenator administering 3-5% CO2 in the main group of hypercapnic patients (n = 59) and no CO2 in a second group of hypocapnic patients. In the hypercapnic patients, marked changes in CBF occurred during bypass. Evidence was found of a brain luxury perfusion that could not be related to the effect of CO2 per se. Mean CBF was 29 ml/100 g/min just before bypass, 49 ml/100 g/min at steady-state hypothermia (27 degrees C), reached a maximum of 73 ml/100 g/min during the rewarming phase (32 degrees C), fell to 56 ml/100 g/min at steady-state normothermic bypass (37 degrees C), and was 48 ml/100 g/min shortly after bypass was stopped. Addition of CO2 evoked systemic vasodilation with low blood pressure and a rebound hyperemia. The hypocapnic group responded more physiologically to the induced changes in hematocrit (Htc) and temperature, CBF being 25, 23, 25, 34, and 35 ml/100 g/min, respectively, during the five corresponding periods. Carbon dioxide was an important regulator of CBF during all phases of cardiac surgery, the responsiveness of CBF being approximately 4% for each 1-mm Hg change of PaCO2. The level of MABP was important for the CO2 response. At low blood pressure states, the CBF responsiveness to changes in PaCO2 was almost abolished. An optimal level of PaCO2 during hypothermic bypass of approximately 25 mm Hg (at actual temperature) is recommended. A normal autoregulatory response of CBF to changes in blood pressure was found during and following bypass. The lower limit of autoregulation was at pressure levels of approximately 50-60 mm Hg. CBF autoregulation was almost abolished at PaCO2 levels of greater than 50 mm Hg. The degree of hemodilution neither affected the CO2 response nor impaired CBF autoregulation, although, as

  15. Iterative reconstruction with correction of the spatially variant fan-beam collimator response in neurotransmission SPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Pareto, Deborah; Cot, Albert; Pavía, Javier; Falcón, Carles; Juvells, Ignacio; Lomeña, Francisco; Ros, Domènec

    2003-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Although visual inspection is often sufficient to assess DAT imaging, quantification could improve the diagnostic accuracy of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of the dopaminergic system. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of quantification of the striatal/background uptake ratio when correction for attenuation, scatter and spatially variant fan-beam collimator response is performed in technetium-99m and iodine-123 SPET imaging. A numerical striatal phantom was implemented, and simulated projections of low-energy photons were obtained by using the SimSET Monte Carlo code. High-energy contamination in 123I studies was modelled from experimental measurements with 99mTc and 123I. The ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM) algorithm was employed in reconstruction. Mean improvements of 8% and 16% were obtained in the calculated striatal/background uptake ratio in the putamen and the caudate, respectively, when the spatially variant point spread function was included in the transition matrix. Ideal scatter correction resulted in improvements in the putamen and caudate of 9% for 99mTc agents and 19% for 123I agents. Improvements averaged 31% in the putamen and 43% in the caudate when correction for attenuation, scatter and spatially variant collimator response was included in the reconstruction.

  16. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Technical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This and its companion article address the 10 most frequently asked questions that radiologists face when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting different MR perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23255738

  17. A reappraisal of retrograde cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brain protection during aortic arch surgery by perfusing cold oxygenated blood into the superior vena cava was first reported by Lemole et al. In 1990 Ueda and associates first described the routine use of continuous retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in thoracic aortic surgery for the purpose of cerebral protection during the interval of obligatory interruption of anterograde cerebral flow. The beneficial effects of RCP may be its ability to sustain brain hypothermia during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and removal of embolic material from the arterial circulation of the brain. RCP can offer effective brain protection during HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes. Animal experiments revealed that RCP provided inadequate cerebral perfusion and that neurological recovery was improved with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP), however, both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates by risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study. RCP still remains a valuable adjunct for brain protection during aortic arch repair in particular pathologies and patients. PMID:23977600

  18. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  19. Coupling between resting cerebral perfusion and EEG.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Poil, S-S; Brandeis, D; Klaver, P; Bollmann, S; Ghisleni, C; Lüchinger, R; Martin, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Alsop, D C; Michels, L

    2013-07-01

    While several studies have investigated interactions between the electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal fluctuations, less is known about the associations between EEG oscillations and baseline brain haemodynamics, and few studies have examined the link between EEG power outside the alpha band and baseline perfusion. Here we compare whole-brain arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI and EEG in a group of healthy adults (n = 16, ten females, median age: 27 years, range 21-48) during an eyes closed rest condition. Correlations emerged between perfusion and global average EEG power in low (delta: 2-4 Hz and theta: 4-7 Hz), middle (alpha: 8-13 Hz), and high (beta: 13-30 Hz and gamma: 30-45 Hz) frequency bands in both cortical and sub-cortical regions. The correlations were predominately positive in middle and high-frequency bands, and negative in delta. In addition, central alpha frequency positively correlated with perfusion in a network of brain regions associated with the modulation of attention and preparedness for external input, and central theta frequency correlated negatively with a widespread network of cortical regions. These results indicate that the coupling between average EEG power/frequency and local cerebral blood flow varies in a frequency specific manner. Our results are consistent with longstanding concepts that decreasing EEG frequencies which in general map onto decreasing levels of activation.

  20. Siblings with the adult-onset slowly progressive type of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and a novel mutation, Ile346Ser, in PANK2: clinical features and (99m)Tc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT findings.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Koyano, Shigeru; Miyatake, Satoko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Tomita, Atsuko; Miyaji, Yosuke; Suzuki, Yume; Sawaishi, Yukio; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-03-15

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome (HSS), is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene are known to be responsible for PKAN. Several studies have revealed correlations between clinical phenotypes and particular PANK2 mutations. The adult-onset slowly progressive type of PKAN with PANK2 mutations is very rare. In this report, we describe siblings with the adult-onset slowly progressive type of PKAN with a novel mutation, Ile346Ser, in PANK2. The siblings had the same mutation in PANK2 and had common clinical signs such as misalignment of teeth, a high arched palate, hollow feet, a slight cognitive decline, and an apparent executive dysfunction, although they showed different patterns of movement disorders. Thus, even if PKAN patients have identical mutations, it is likely that they will present with different types of movement disorders. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in both patients showed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral frontoparietal lobes, the globus pallidus, the striatum, and around the ventriculus quartus. Cardiac uptake of [(123)I] meta-iodobenzylguanidine was normal in both patients. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations and the elucidation of mutational effects on pantothenate kinase 2 function, expression, and structure are important for understanding the mechanisms of PKAN.

  1. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  2. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  3. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  4. Higher Brain Perfusion May Not Support Memory Functions in Cognitively Normal Carriers of the ApoE ε4 Allele Compared to Non-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Hays, Chelsea C.; Liu, Thomas T.; Meloy, M. J.; Rissman, Robert A.; Bondi, Mark W.; Wierenga, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), which carries necessary nutrients to the brain, are associated with increased risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Whether the association between CBF and cognition is moderated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 genotype, a known risk factor for AD, remains understudied, with most research focusing on exploring brain regions in which there are diagnostic group differences in CBF (i.e., cognitively normal vs. MCI vs. AD). This study measured resting CBF via arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and verbal memory functions using a composite score in 59 older adults with normal cognition (38 ε3; 21 ε4). Linear mixed effect models were employed to investigate if the voxel-wise relationship between verbal memory performance and resting CBF was modified by ApoE genotype. Results indicated that carriers of the ApoE ε4 allele display negative associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, medial and lateral temporal cortex, parietal regions, insula, and the basal ganglia. Contrarily, ε3 carriers exhibited positive associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, thalamus, insula, and basal ganglia. Findings suggest that higher CBF was associated with worse verbal memory functions in cognitively normal ε4 carriers, perhaps reflecting dysregulation within the neurovascular unit, which is no longer supportive of cognition. Results are discussed within the context of the vascular theory of AD risk. PMID:27445794

  5. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  6. Three-dimensional whole-brain perfusion quantification using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI at multiple post-labeling delays: accounting for both arterial transit time and impulse response function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Huang, Alan J; Hua, Jun; Desmond, John E; Stevens, Robert D; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) with whole-brain coverage is challenging in terms of both acquisition and quantitative analysis. In order to fit arterial spin labeling-based perfusion kinetic curves, an empirical three-parameter model which characterizes the effective impulse response function (IRF) is introduced, which allows the determination of CBF, the arterial transit time (ATT) and T(1,eff). The accuracy and precision of the proposed model were compared with those of more complicated models with four or five parameters through Monte Carlo simulations. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling images were acquired on a clinical 3-T scanner in 10 normal volunteers using a three-dimensional multi-shot gradient and spin echo scheme at multiple post-labeling delays to sample the kinetic curves. Voxel-wise fitting was performed using the three-parameter model and other models that contain two, four or five unknown parameters. For the two-parameter model, T(1,eff) values close to tissue and blood were assumed separately. Standard statistical analysis was conducted to compare these fitting models in various brain regions. The fitted results indicated that: (i) the estimated CBF values using the two-parameter model show appreciable dependence on the assumed T(1,eff) values; (ii) the proposed three-parameter model achieves the optimal balance between the goodness of fit and model complexity when compared among the models with explicit IRF fitting; (iii) both the two-parameter model using fixed blood T1 values for T(1,eff) and the three-parameter model provide reasonable fitting results. Using the proposed three-parameter model, the estimated CBF (46 ± 14 mL/100 g/min) and ATT (1.4 ± 0.3 s) values averaged from different brain regions are close to the literature reports; the estimated T(1,eff) values (1.9 ± 0.4 s) are higher than the tissue T1 values, possibly reflecting a contribution from the microvascular arterial blood compartment.

  7. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation.

  8. [Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Magallón Pedrera, I; Soto Torres, I

    1999-11-01

    Portable peristaltic perfusion pumps allow one to administer pharmaceuticals in hospitals as well as in primary health care centers and furthermore these pumps present multiple advantages for patients and their families since they make it possible to carry out treatment in a patient's home while at the same time lowering the costs involved. The authors analyze the most out standing aspects of portable peristaltic perfusion pumps along with their characteristics, installation, programming, and how to turn them on; in addition, the authors list the maintenance care which these pumps require.

  9. [Evaluation by statistical brain perfusion SPECT analysis on MRI findings, kana pick-out test and Mini-Mental State Examination results in patients with forgetfulness].

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Matsubara, Ichirou; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) study was to determine the abnormality of the regional cerebral blood flow(rCBF) using a three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3 D-SSP) in 18 patients who were referred to the hospital because of forgetfulness. Two intergroup comparison by 3 D-SSP analysis was conducted based on MRI, kana pick-out test and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) results. Of the MRI findings, in the brain atrophy group, rCBF was decreased in the posterior cingulate gyrus, medial temporal structure and parieto-temporal association cortex; these rCBF-decreased areas are similar to the Alzheimer disease pattern. In the group where the MMSE was normal but the kana pick-out test was abnormal, rCBF was decreased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and cinguloparietal transitional area. In the group where both the MMSE and kana pick-out test were abnormal, rCBF was decreased in the parieto-temporal association cortex, temporal cortex and medial temporal structure. These results suggest that 3 D-SSP analysis of the SPECT with MMSE and the kana pick-out test provides the possibility of early diagnosis of initial stage of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Quantitative measurement of tissue perfusion and diffusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Pipe, J G; Williams, D M; Brunberg, J A

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques designed for sensitivity to microscopic motions of water diffusion and blood flow in the capillary network are also exceptionally sensitive to bulk motion properties of the tissue, which may lead to contrast artifact and large quantitative errors. The magnitude of bulk motion error that exists in human brain perfusion/diffusion imaging and the inability of cardiac gating to adequately control this motion are demonstrated by direct measurement of phase stability of voxels localized in the brain. Two methods are introduced to reduce bulk motion phase error. The first, a postprocessing phase correction algorithm, reduces coarse phase error but is inadequate by itself for quantitative perfusion/diffusion MRI. The second method employs orthogonal slice selection gradients to define a column of tissue in the object, from which echoes may be combined in a phase-insensitive manner to measure more reliably the targeted signal attenuation. Applying this acquisition technique and a simplistic model of perfusion and diffusion signal attenuations yields an estimated perfusion fraction of 3.4 +/- 1.1% and diffusion coefficient of 1.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-5) cm2/s in the white matter of one normal volunteer. Successful separation of perfusion and diffusion effects by this technique is supported in a dynamic study of calf muscle. Periods of normal blood flow, low flow, and reactive hyperemia are clearly distinguished in the quantitative perfusion results, whereas measured diffusion remained nearly constant.

  11. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  12. Analysis of D2 dopamine receptor occupancy with quantitative SPET using the high-affinity ligand [123I]epidepride: resolving conflicting findings.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Mulligan, Rachel S; Ell, Peter J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Pilowsky, Lyn S

    2003-07-01

    Recent studies of limbic cortical dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by clozapine using high-affinity PET and SPET radioligands have produced conflicting findings. It has been suggested that these divergent findings are due to between-study differences in the method used to estimate D(2) receptor-binding potential. We compared different methods for estimating striatal and temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy with high-affinity tracers. In vivo experimental SPET data, obtained with [(123)I]epidepride were analysed with reference tissue kinetic modeling and with the ratio method, applied to data corresponding to short (60 min) and long (240 min) acquisition times. Dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone was evaluated. Simulation experiments were also performed, comparing occupancy values obtained for different receptor densities in relation to different data acquisition times. The simulation results revealed that previously published data regarding errors in occupancy estimation by analysis of time activity data acquired for 60 min cannot be extrapolated to studies performed over 240 min. The ratio method provided accurate temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy values when applied to data from a late time period, but underestimated the occupancy with earlier data. In striatum, both the late data ratio method and reference tissue kinetic modeling using all data underestimated D(2) receptor occupancy. However, more accurate analyses of striatal D(2) occupancy still showed selective limbic/cortical occupancy by risperidone. Our results substantiate the previous [(123)I]epidepride findings of high temporal cortical occupancy by other atypical antipsychotic drugs and suggest that a potential source of conflicting findings might be short scanning times imposed by [(11)C]FLB 457, leading to underestimation of temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy by this method.

  13. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  14. Radioiodinated tracers for the evaluation of dopamine receptors in the neonatal rat brain after hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zouakia, A; Chalon, S; Kung, H F; Dognon, A M; Saliba, E; Besnard, J C; Guilloteau, D

    1994-06-01

    In order to evaluate in vivo single-photon emission tomography (SPET) method of assessing cerebral function after hypoxic-ischemic injury in human neonates, we studied D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in a rat model. Seven-day-old rats underwent permanent unilateral common carotid ligation followed by exposure to 8% O2. Two weeks later, in brains with no visible loss of hemispheric volume, striatal dopaminergic receptors were studied, with [125I]TISCH and [125I]IBZM for the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, respectively. Using [125I]TISCH, we observed no modifications of D1 receptors, but in contrast, ex vivo and in vitro autoradiographic experiments showed a 40% decrease in the striatal binding of [125I]IBZM on both the ipsilateral and the contralateral side to the carotid ligation. These alterations were detected with IBZM, a D2 dopamine receptor ligand usable for SPET imaging. Therefore, exploration of D2 receptors by SPET in human neonates suffering from perinatal hypoxia-ischemia may be valuable for the diagnosis and follow-up of cerebral function damages.

  15. Scaling of cerebral blood perfusion in primates and marsupials.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Angove, Sophie E; Snelling, Edward P; Cassey, Phillip

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of primates involved increasing body size, brain size and presumably cognitive ability. Cognition is related to neural activity, metabolic rate and rate of blood flow to the cerebral cortex. These parameters are difficult to quantify in living animals. This study shows that it is possible to determine the rate of cortical brain perfusion from the size of the internal carotid artery foramina in skulls of certain mammals, including haplorrhine primates and diprotodont marsupials. We quantify combined blood flow rate in both internal carotid arteries as a proxy of brain metabolism in 34 species of haplorrhine primates (0.116-145 kg body mass) and compare it to the same analysis for 19 species of diprotodont marsupials (0.014-46 kg). Brain volume is related to body mass by essentially the same exponent of 0.70 in both groups. Flow rate increases with haplorrhine brain volume to the 0.95 power, which is significantly higher than the exponent (0.75) expected for most organs according to 'Kleiber's Law'. By comparison, the exponent is 0.73 in marsupials. Thus, the brain perfusion rate increases with body size and brain size much faster in primates than in marsupials. The trajectory of cerebral perfusion in primates is set by the phylogenetically older groups (New and Old World monkeys, lesser apes) and the phylogenetically younger groups (great apes, including humans) fall near the line, with the highest perfusion. This may be associated with disproportionate increases in cortical surface area and mental capacity in the highly social, larger primates.

  16. Harmonic analysis of perfusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, F Carroll; Donovan, F M; Townsley, Mary I

    2003-12-01

    The controversy over the use of nonpulsatile versus pulsatile pumps for maintenance of normal organ function during ex vivo perfusion has continued for many years, but resolution has been limited by lack of a congruent mathematical definition of pulsatility. We hypothesized that the waveform frequency and amplitude, as well as the underlying mean distending pressure are all key parameters controlling vascular function. Using discrete Fourier Analysis, our data demonstrate the complexity of the pulmonary arterial pressure waveform in vivo and the failure of commonly available perfusion pumps to mimic in vivo dynamics. In addition, our data show that the key harmonic signatures are intrinsic to the perfusion pumps, are similar for flow and pressure waveforms, and are unchanged by characteristics of the downstream perfusion circuit or perfusate viscosity.

  17. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  18. Cerebral-Body Perfusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    compared to the 0.5g curve) fall in flow. Fig. 9b, showing the 5g case, strongly suggests a possible, so-called, " luxury perfusion ", in which natural...as the luxury perfusion situation which bypasses the flow with the nutrients it carries (through newly opened collaterals) and result in a "blackout...89-0054 CEREBRAL-BODY PERFUSION MODEL S. Sorek’, J. Bear2, and M., Feinsod3 in Collaboration with K. Allen4, L. Bunt5 and S. Ben-IHaiM6 July 1990

  19. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  20. Framework for cognitive analysis of dynamic perfusion computed tomography with visualization of large volumetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R.

    2012-10-01

    The proposed framework for cognitive analysis of perfusion computed tomography images is a fusion of image processing, pattern recognition, and image analysis procedures. The output data of the algorithm consists of: regions of perfusion abnormalities, anatomy atlas description of brain tissues, measures of perfusion parameters, and prognosis for infracted tissues. That information is superimposed onto volumetric computed tomography data and displayed to radiologists. Our rendering algorithm enables rendering large volumes on off-the-shelf hardware. This portability of rendering solution is very important because our framework can be run without using expensive dedicated hardware. The other important factors are theoretically unlimited size of rendered volume and possibility of trading of image quality for rendering speed. Such rendered, high quality visualizations may be further used for intelligent brain perfusion abnormality identification, and computer aided-diagnosis of selected types of pathologies.

  1. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  2. Double tracer autoradiographic method for sequential evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Tsuji, S.; Oba, H.; Kinuya, K.; Terada, H.; Sumiya, H.; Shiba, K.; Mori, H.; Hisada, K.; Maeda, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A new double tracer autoradiographic method for the sequential evaluation of altered regional cerebral perfusion in the same animal is presented. This method is based on the sequential injection of two tracers, {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and N-isopropyl-({sup 125}I)p-iodoamphetamine. This method is validated in the assessment of brovincamine effects on regional cerebral perfusion in an experimental model of chronic brain ischemia in the rat. The drug enhanced perfusion recovery in low-flow areas, selectively in surrounding areas of infarction. The results suggest that this technique is of potential use in the study of neuropharmacological effects applied during the experiment.

  3. Visualization of pressure-dependent luxury perfusion in a patient with subacute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, I H; Hayashida, K; Kume, N; Shimotsu, Y; Miyashita, K

    1998-08-01

    Luxury perfusion characterized by depressed metabolism compared with CBF might be changed by decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure during the sitting position. A 77-yr-old man with subacute cerebral infarction was studied with brain X-ray computed tomography (CT), raise-up test with 99mTc-d,1-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) brain single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Brain X-ray CT revealed a low-density area in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) anterior area. Raise-up 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT revealed decreased uptake in the left MCA anterior area in the sitting position and subsequent supine 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT revealed hot accumulation there. PET study in the supine position demonstrated some differences between CBF and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen in the left MCA anterior area, indicating luxury perfusion. CBF in the area of luxury perfusion might be decreased during the sitting or standing position and increased during the supine position by dysautoregulation of the cerebral vessels in the luxury perfusion during the subacute infarct.

  4. Mapping of cerebral perfusion territories using territorial arterial spin labeling: techniques and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2013-08-01

    A knowledge of the exact cerebral perfusion territory which is supplied by any artery is of great importance in the understanding and diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. The development and optimization of territorial arterial spin labeling (T-ASL) MRI techniques in the past two decades have made it possible to visualize and determine the cerebral perfusion territories in individual patients and, more importantly, to do so without contrast agents or otherwise invasive procedures. This review provides an overview of the development of ASL techniques that aim to visualize the general cerebral perfusion territories or the territory of a specific artery of interest. The first efforts of T-ASL with pulsed, continuous and pseudo-continuous techniques are summarized and subsequent clinical studies using T-ASL are highlighted. In the healthy population, the perfusion territories of the brain-feeding arteries are highly variable. This high variability requires special consideration in specific patient groups, such as patients with cerebrovascular disease, stroke, steno-occlusive disease of the large arteries and arteriovenous malformations. In the past, catheter angiography with selective contrast injection was the only available method to visualize the cerebral perfusion territories in vivo. Several T-ASL methods, sometimes referred to as regional perfusion imaging, are now available that can easily be combined with conventional brain MRI examinations to show the relationship between the cerebral perfusion territories, vascular anatomy and brain infarcts or other pathology. Increased availability of T-ASL techniques on clinical MRI scanners will allow radiologists and other clinicians to gain further knowledge of the relationship between vasculature and patient diagnosis and prognosis. Treatment decisions, such as surgical revascularization, may, in the near future, be guided by information provided by T-ASL MRI in close correlation with structural MRI and quantitative

  5. Association of frontal gray matter volume and cerebral perfusion in heroin addiction: a multimodal neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structure and function are closely related in the healthy human brain. In patients with chronic heroin exposure, brain imaging studies have identified long-lasting changes in gray matter (GM) volume. More recently, we showed that acute application of heroin in dependent patients results in hypoperfusion of fronto-temporal areas compared with the placebo condition. However, the relationship between structural and cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in heroin addiction has not yet been investigated. Moreover, it is not known whether there is any interaction between the chronic structural changes and the short and long-term effects on perfusion caused by heroin. Using a double-blind, within-subject design, heroin or placebo (saline) was administered to 14 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program, in order to observe acute short-term effects. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) was used to calculate perfusion quantification maps in both treatment conditions, while Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was conducted to calculate regional GM density. VBM and ASL data were used to calculate homologous correlation fields by Biological Parametric Mapping (BPM) and a whole-brain Pearson r correlation. We correlated each perfusion condition (heroin and placebo) separately with a VBM sample that was identical for the two treatment conditions. It was assumed that heroin-associated perfusion is manifested in short-term effects, while placebo-associated perfusion is more related to long-term effects. In order to restrict our analyses to fronto-temporal regions, we used an explicit mask for our analyses. Correlation analyses revealed a significant positive correlation in frontal areas between GM and both perfusion conditions (heroin and placebo). Heroin-associated perfusion was also negatively correlated with GM in the inferior temporal gyrus on both hemispheres. These findings indicate that, in heroin-dependent patients, low GM volume is positively associated with

  6. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  7. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  8. Viable neurons with luxury perfusion in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Luciano, M G; MacIntyre, W J; Brunken, R C; Hahn, J F; Go, R T

    1997-09-01

    A woman with hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis had functional imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism to demonstrate the effects of endoscopic third ventriculostomy--a new form of internal surgical shunting. Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT and 18F-FDG PET showed regional luxury perfusion at the left frontal region. Three months after a successful third ventriculostomy, a repeated imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism showed resolution of luxury perfusion and global improvement of both perfusion and metabolism. This concurred with postoperative clinical improvement. The paired imaging of cerebral perfusion and metabolism provides more information than just imaging perfusion or metabolism. Thus, the detection of perfusion and metabolism mismatch may open a new window of opportunity for surgical intervention.

  9. Utility of CT perfusion scanning in patient selection for acute stroke intervention: experience at University at Buffalo Neurosurgery-Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter T; Snyder, Kenneth V; Yashar, Parham; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2011-06-01

    Computed tomography perfusion scanning generates physiological flow parameters of the brain parenchyma, allowing differentiation of ischemic penumbra and core infarct. Perfusion maps, along with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, are used as the bases for endovascular stroke intervention at the authors' institute, regardless of the time interval from stroke onset. With case examples, the authors illustrate their perfusion-based imaging guidelines in patient selection for endovascular treatment in the setting of acute stroke.

  10. Perfusion decellularization of whole organs.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Jacques P; Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Tapias, Luis F; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2014-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) outlines the architecture of organs and tissues. It provides a unique niche of composition and form, which serves as a foundational scaffold that supports organ-specific cell types and enables normal organ function. Here we describe a standard process for pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization of whole organs for generating acellular 3D scaffolds with preserved ECM protein content, architecture and perfusable vascular conduits. By applying antegrade perfusion of detergents and subsequent washes to arterial vasculature at low physiological pressures, successful decellularization of complex organs (i.e., hearts, lungs and kidneys) can be performed. By using appropriate modifications, pressure-controlled perfusion decellularization can be achieved in small-animal experimental models (rat organs, 4-5 d) and scaled to clinically relevant models (porcine and human organs, 12-14 d). Combining the unique structural and biochemical properties of native acellular scaffolds with subsequent recellularization techniques offers a novel platform for organ engineering and regeneration, for experimentation ex vivo and potential clinical application in vivo.

  11. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  12. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-08-01

    TI-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in six patients with clinically documented myocarditis. Each case manifested electrocardiographic abnormalities with elevation of serum cardiac enzymes and no significant stenosis of the coronary arteries observed on angiogram. Resting TI-201 images were visually assessed by three observers. Focal perfusion defects were observed in three cases (50%), among which two showed multiple perfusion defects. Emission computed tomography using TI-201 clearly delineated multifocal lesions in the first case. On the other hand, no significant perfusion defects were noted in the remaining three cases. Thus, myocarditis should be considered as one of the disease entities that may produce perfusion defects on TI-201 myocardial imaging.

  13. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  14. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  15. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: Development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa; Scremin, Oscar; Maarek, Jean-Michel; Holschneider, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex--changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  16. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Scremin, Oscar U.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex—changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  17. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  18. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  19. Perfusion Neuroimaging Abnormalities Alone Distinguish National Football League Players from a Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G.; Willeumier, Kristen; Omalu, Bennet; Newberg, Andrew; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Raji, Cyrus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: National Football League (NFL) players are exposed to multiple head collisions during their careers. Increasing awareness of the adverse long-term effects of repetitive head trauma has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public. Objective: To determine whether low perfusion in specific brain regions on neuroimaging can accurately separate professional football players from healthy controls. Method: A cohort of retired and current NFL players (n = 161) were recruited in a longitudinal study starting in 2009 with ongoing interval follow up. A healthy control group (n = 124) was separately recruited for comparison. Assessments included medical examinations, neuropsychological tests, and perfusion neuroimaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Perfusion estimates of each scan were quantified using a standard atlas. We hypothesized that hypoperfusion particularly in the orbital frontal, anterior cingulate, anterior temporal, hippocampal, amygdala, insular, caudate, superior/mid occipital, and cerebellar sub-regions alone would reliably separate controls from NFL players. Cerebral perfusion differences were calculated using a one-way ANOVA and diagnostic separation was determined with discriminant and automatic linear regression predictive models. Results: NFL players showed lower cerebral perfusion on average (p < 0.01) in 36 brain regions. The discriminant analysis subsequently distinguished NFL players from controls with 90% sensitivity, 86% specificity, and 94% accuracy (95% CI 95-99). Automatic linear modeling achieved similar results. Inclusion of age and clinical co-morbidities did not improve diagnostic classification. Conclusion: Specific brain regions commonly damaged in traumatic brain injury show abnormally low perfusion on SPECT in professional NFL players. These same regions alone can distinguish this group from healthy subjects with high diagnostic accuracy. This

  20. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  1. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  2. Excorporeal Normothermic Machine Perfusion Resuscitates Pig DCD Livers with Extended Warm Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongzhi; Berendsen, Tim; Kim, Karen; Soto-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Bertheium, Francios; Yarmush, Martin L.; Hertl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background The shortage in donor livers has led to increased use of allografts derived from donation after cardiac death (DCD). The compromised viability in these livers leads to inferior post-transplantation allograft function and survival compared with donation after brain death (DBD) donor grafts. In this study, we reconditioned DCD livers using an optimized normothermic machine perfusion system. Methods Livers from 12 Yorkshire pigs (20–30 kg) were subjected to either 0 min (WI-0 group, n = 6) or 60 min (WI-60 group, n = 6) of warm ischemia and 2 h of cold storage in UW solution, followed by 4 h of oxygenated sanguineous normothermic machine perfusion. Liver viability and metabolic function were analyzed hourly. Results Warm ischemic livers showed elevated transaminase levels and reduced ATP concentration. After the start of machine perfusion, transaminase levels stabilized and there was recovery of tissue ATP, coinciding with an increase in bile production. These parameters reached comparable levels to the control group after 1 h of machine perfusion. Histology and gross morphology confirmed recovery of the ischemic allografts. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that metabolic and functional parameters of livers with extended warm ischemic time (60 min) can be significantly improved using normothermic machine perfusion. We hereby compound the existing body of evidence that machine perfusion is a viable solution for reconditioning marginal organs. PMID:22099594

  3. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  4. [99mTc-ECD dynamic SPECT in "luxury perfusion" of subacute stroke].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, K; Fujiwara, S; Yoshimoto, T

    1995-11-01

    To evaluate the cerebral pharmacokinetics of 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) at blood flow levels beyond the normal range, we investigated "luxury perfusion" in subacute stroke, ictal hyperperfusion in epilepsy and post-decompressive hyperemia in head trauma. All 7 patients showed a hyperactive area on SPECT studies using 99mTc-HM-PAO. 99mTc-ECD static image demonstrated a hyperactive area in both epilepsy and head trauma, and a hypoactive area in "luxury perfusion." On the dynamic SPECT of 99mTc-ECD in both epilepsy and head trauma, brain distribution of the tracer was determined within 2 min. postinjection and remained stable for up to 1 hour; however, "luxury perfusion" area showed a change from initial hyperactivity to late hypoactivity with the passage of time. The time activity curve in "luxury perfusion" area demonstrated a steep decrease of counts/pixel for up to 4-5 minutes postinjection, and a moderate decrease in the following phase. The early wash-out mechanism of 99mTc-ECD from "luxury perfusion" area can be described by a biexponential function including an initial steep decrease representing the rapid loss of the lipophilic complexes which were not metabolized in injured brain tissue.

  5. Cerebral Perfusion and Gray Matter Changes Associated With Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Kelly N.H.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Wang, Yang; Smith, Dori J.; West, John D.; O'Neill, Darren P.; Zanville, Noah R.; Champion, Victoria L.; Schneider, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the longitudinal relationship between chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) symptoms (sx) and brain perfusion changes in patients with breast cancer. Interaction of CIPN-sx perfusion effects with known chemotherapy-associated gray matter density decrease was also assessed to elucidate the relationship between CIPN and previously reported cancer treatment–related brain structural changes. Methods Patients with breast cancer treated with (n = 24) or without (n = 23) chemotherapy underwent clinical examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging at the following three time points: before treatment (baseline), 1 month after treatment completion, and 1 year after the 1-month assessment. CIPN-sx were evaluated with the self-reported Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy/Gynecologic Oncology Group–Neurotoxicity four-item sensory-specific scale. Perfusion and gray matter density were assessed using voxel-based pulsed arterial spin labeling and morphometric analyses and tested for association with CIPN-sx in the patients who received chemotherapy. Results Patients who received chemotherapy reported significantly increased CIPN-sx from baseline to 1 month, with partial recovery by 1 year (P < .001). CIPN-sx increase from baseline to 1 month was significantly greater for patients who received chemotherapy compared with those who did not (P = .001). At 1 month, neuroimaging showed that for the group that received chemotherapy, CIPN-sx were positively associated with cerebral perfusion in the right superior frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus, regions associated with pain processing (P < .001). Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis in the group receiving chemotherapy indicated that CIPN-sx and associated perfusion changes from baseline to 1 month were also positively correlated with gray matter density change (P < .005). Conclusion Peripheral neuropathy symptoms after systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer are associated with

  6. Effect of vascular crushing on FAIR perfusion kinetics, using a BIR-4 pulse in a magnetization prepared FLASH sequence.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Janneke; Van Osch, Matthias J P; Nicolay, Klaas

    2003-09-01

    Flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) perfusion imaging suffers from high vascular signal, resulting in artifacts and overestimation of perfusion. With TurboFLASH acquisition, crushing of vascular signal by bipolar gradients after each excitation is difficult due to the requirement of an ultrashort repetition time. Therefore, insertion of a preparation phase in the FAIR sequence, after labeling and prior to TurboFLASH acquisition, is proposed. A segmented adiabatic BIR-4 pulse, interleaved with crusher gradients, was used for flow crushing. The effect of the crusher preparation is shown as a function of crusher strength for a flow phantom and in rat brain. Influence of crusher strength on the time-dependent FAIR signal from rat brain was also measured. Signal from flowing spins in a flow phantom and from arterial spins in rat brain was significantly suppressed. Image quality was improved and the overestimation of perfusion at short inflow times was eliminated.

  7. Luxury perfusion syndrome in cerebral vascular disease evaluated with technetium-99m HM-PAO.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, G; Cammelli, F; Gadola, G; Freschi, R; Zancaner, F

    1987-03-01

    A recently developed Tc-99m radiocompound, hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (Tc-99m HM-PAO), exhibits favorable properties for regional cerebral blood flow study in man. The authors present a case of luxury perfusion syndrome observed in a 72-year-old patient with acute stroke and a right-sided hemiplegia, documented by planar scintigraphy and SPECT study in correlation with CT scan. The metabolic basis of this phenomenon is discussed and the usefulness of assessing regional brain perfusion by Tc-99m HM-PAO with conventional nuclear medicine equipment is underlined.

  8. Technetium myocardial perfusion agents: an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Kozlowski, J.; Tumeh, S.S.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-09-01

    This is the third in a series of four Continuing Education articles on developing radiopharmaceuticals. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) understand the basic concepts of myocardial perfusion imaging; and 2) discuss the advantages of the technetium myocardial perfusion complexes over thallium-201.

  9. Luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Friedland, S; Winterkorn, J M; Burde, R M

    1996-09-01

    We present five patients who developed luxury perfusion following anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in whom fluorescein angiography was misinterpreted as "capillary hemangioma" or neovascularization of the disc. In each case, the segment of disc hyperemia corresponded to a spared region of visual field. Luxury perfusion represents a reparative autoregulatory reaction to ischemia.

  10. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  11. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  12. [Compromized myocardial perfusion in arrhythmias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Neumann, G; Felix, R; Hedde, H; Schaede, A; Thurn, P; Winkler, C

    1977-09-15

    In 7 patients with arrhythmias of various origin the myocardial scintigram displayed either a diffuse or circumscript defect of the perfusion. The coronary arteriogram was normal in all patients. The localized defect of the perfusion in 2 patients was in the region of the upper part of the interventricular septum. Both had a left bundle brunch block. A correlation between the perfusion defect and the electrophysiological abnormality seems probable. The perfusion defect in one of the patients is most probably caused by a previous myocarditis followed by fibrous changes. In the other 6 patients the cause for the perfusion defect is not obvious. A history of myocarditis is missing. The presence of "small vessel disease" in those patients has however to be considered. Our results point to the relation between an abnormality of the microcirculation and arrhythmias in younger patients.

  13. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  14. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem.

  15. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  16. The Mouse Isolated Perfused Kidney Technique.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Schweda, Frank; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-11-17

    The mouse isolated perfused kidney (MIPK) is a technique for keeping a mouse kidney under ex vivo conditions perfused and functional for 1 hr. This is a prerequisite for studying the physiology of the isolated organ and for many innovative applications that may be possible in the future, including perfusion decellularization for kidney bioengineering or the administration of anti-rejection or genome-editing drugs in high doses to prime the kidney for transplantation. During the time of the perfusion, the kidney can be manipulated, renal function can be assessed, and various pharmaceuticals administered. After the procedure, the kidney can be transplanted or processed for molecular biology, biochemical analysis, or microscopy. This paper describes the perfusate and the surgical technique needed for the ex vivo perfusion of mouse kidneys. Details of the perfusion apparatus are given and data are presented showing the viability of the kidney's preparation: renal blood flow, vascular resistance, and urine data as functional, transmission electron micrographs of different nephron segments as morphological readouts, and western blots of transport proteins of different nephron segments as molecular readout.

  17. Differential Activation of Pontomedullary Nuclei by Acid Perfusion of Different Regions of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Ivan M.; Medda, Bidyut K.; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the brain stem nuclei and physiological responses activated by esophageal acidification. The effects of perfusion of the cervical (ESOc), or thoracic (ESOt) esophagus with PBS or HCl on c-fos immunoreactivity of the brain stem or on physiological variables, and the effects of vagotomy were examined in anesthetized cats. We found that acidification of the ESOc increased the number of c-fos positive neurons in the area postrema (AP), vestibular nucleus (VN), parabrachial nucleus (PBN), nucleus ambiguus (NA), dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), and all subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), but one. Acidification of the ESOt activated neurons in the central (CE), caudal (CD), dorsomedial (DM), dorsolateral (DL), ventromedial (VM) subnuclei of NTS, and the DMN. Vagotomy blocked all c-fos responses to acid perfusion of the whole esophagus (ESOw). Perfusion of the ESOc or ESOt with PBS activated secondary peristalsis (2P), but had no effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or respiratory rate. Perfusion of the ESOc, but not ESOt, with HCL activated pharyngeal swallowing (PS), profuse salivation, or physiological correlates of emesis. Vagotomy blocked all physiological effects of ESOw perfusion. We conclude that acidification of the ESOc and ESOt activate different sets of pontomedullary nuclei and different physiological responses. The NTSce, NTScom, NTSdm, and DMN are associated with activation of 2P, the NTSim and NTSis, are associated with activation of PS, and the AP, VN, and PBN are associated with activation of emesis and perhaps nausea. All responses to esophageal fluid perfusion or acidification are mediated by the vagus nerves. PMID:20655885

  18. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  19. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  20. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  1. Changes in body temperature of the unanaesthetized monkey produced by sodium and calcium ions perfused through the cerebral ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Myers, R. D.; Veale, W. L.; Yaksh, T. L.

    1971-01-01

    1. In the unanaesthetized Rhesus monkey, solutions containing sodium, calcium, potassium or magnesium in excess of the normal concentration of extracellular fluid were perfused from a lateral to the fourth ventricle through chronically implanted cannulae. 2. Sodium (11·0-88·0 mM in excess of the physiological concentration) perfused through the ventricles, caused an immediate rise in body temperature which was accompanied by vasoconstriction, piloerection and shivering. The latency of the hyperthermia was related directly to the rate of perfusion and the concentration of sodium, whereas the magnitude of the response depended upon the concentration only. When the perfusion was terminated, shivering ceased and the temperature of the monkey returned to the base line level. 3. When calcium ions were perfused in concentrations 2·5-47·9 mM in excess of that of extracellular fluid, a fall in the temperature of the animal occurred. The magnitude of the decreases depended upon the concentration of calcium in the perfusion fluid. Vasodilatation, sedation and a reduction in withdrawal reflexes accompanied the calcium-induced hypothermia. After the perfusion ended, the temperature continued to fall until the monkey began to shiver and vasoconstriction was observed in many skin areas. 4. The perfusion through the cerebral ventricles with modified Krebs solution alone or with the Krebs solution which contained potassium or magnesium ions in concentrations five to ten times normal had virtually no effect on the temperature of the monkey. 5. Since the temperature of the monkey was unchanged as long as the physiological ratio of sodium to calcium in the perfusion fluid remained constant, we conclude that the balance between these two essential cations within the brain stem could determine the neural mechanism whereby the set-point for body temperature of the primate is established. PMID:4999638

  2. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  3. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  4. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  5. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc.

  6. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    for the protocol with pigs and will be submitting to ACURO in the near future. Preliminary experiments performed with human cerebrospinal fluid ...impact traumatic brain injury plus hemorrhagic shock has been successfully developed. • Preliminary experiments performed with human cerebrospinal fluid ...Kreutzer, J. S., Kolakowsky-Hayner, S. A., Marwitz, J. H., & Englander, J. (2003). The relationship between therapy intensity and rehabilitative

  7. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    craniotomy such that the desired cortical area receives a given impact depth, and collect brain in a manner permitting histopathological analyses. The...ICP, CPP, SBP, HR Variability and Pause Pressure Variability) and TBI patient outcome (Mortality, hospital length of stay, time of craniotomy , 3

  8. Luxury perfusion syndrome confirmed by sequential studies of regional cerebral blood flow and volume after extracranial to intracranial bypass surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Higashi, S; Matsuda, H; Fujii, H; Ito, H; Yamashita, J

    1989-07-01

    We report a case of luxury perfusion syndrome with temporary neurological deterioration after extracranial to intracranial bypass surgery. A preoperative computed tomographic scan showed no detectable infarct, and the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow showed severe depression of ipsilateral hemispheric perfusion. The patient developed temporary neurological deterioration after bypass surgery, with no recognizable pathological signs on postoperative computed tomographic and angiographic studies. Regional cerebral blood flow and volume were more elevated during the period of neurological deterioration than after the subsequent recovery. This strongly suggests that excessive blood flow directed into chronically ischemic brain through a graft may induce a luxury perfusion syndrome resulting in neurological deterioration.

  9. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  10. Cerebral perfusion pressure and abnormal intracranial pressure wave forms: their relation to outcome in birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Raju, T N; Vidyasagar, D; Papazafiratou, C

    1981-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) studies were carried out in 14 infants with severe birth asphyxia and brain damage. A markedly low cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was noted in infants who died and in 1 infant who survived with cerebral palsy. The long-term ICP tracing revealed negative waves and plateau waves in 2 infants. Cushing response was noted in 2 infants who had elevated ICP. The value and significance of evaluated CPP and of abnormal waveforms are discussed.

  11. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-07

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings.

  12. Permissive hypotension does not reduce regional organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation: animal study with fluorescent microspheres

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate regional organ perfusion acutely following uncontrolled hemorrhage in an animal model that simulates a penetrating vascular injury and accounts for prehospital times in urban trauma. We set forth to determine if hypotensive resuscitation (permissive hypotension) would result in equivalent organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation. Methods Twenty four (n=24) male rats randomized to 4 groups: Sham, No Fluid (NF), Permissive Hypotension (PH) (60% of baseline mean arterial pressure - MAP), Normotensive Resuscitation (NBP). Uncontrolled hemorrhage caused by a standardised injury to the abdominal aorta; MAP was monitored continuously and lactated Ringer’s was infused. Fluorimeter readings of regional blood flow of the brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and bowel were obtained at baseline and 85 minutes after hemorrhage, as well as, cardiac output, lactic acid, and laboratory tests; intra-abdominal blood loss was assessed. Analysis of variance was used for comparison. Results Intra-abdominal blood loss was higher in NBP group, as well as, lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. No statistical differences in perfusion of any organ between PH and NBP groups. No statistical difference in cardiac output between PH and NBP groups, as well as, in lactic acid levels between PH and NBP. NF group had significantly higher lactic acidosis and had significantly lower organ perfusion. Conclusions Hypotensive resuscitation causes less intra-abdominal bleeding than normotensive resuscitation and concurrently maintains equivalent organ perfusion. No fluid resuscitation reduces intra-abdominal bleeding but also significantly reduces organ perfusion. PMID:23531188

  13. Reduction in cerebral perfusion after heroin administration: a resting state arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine E; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment.

  14. Neurovascular Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Future Directions: Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 149–160. PMID:24328757

  15. Early Support of Intracranial Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    phase resuscitation and are slowly taken off isoflurane anesthesia one hour later. The fixed brains were then stained with Fluoro Jade B (FJB) for...cerebrospinal fluid samples indicate that they can be used in a new and novel assay that detects toxicity of these samples on culture cell lines, using...saving interventions in trauma patients. Sen A, Hu P, Mackenzie C, Dutton R, Jordan S, Xiao Y, Scalea T. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of

  16. Intravascular Perfusion of Carbon Black Ink Allows Reliable Visualization of Cerebral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes1 (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with2 or without3 carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen3. Maeda et al.2 have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound4. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner5. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion5. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries. PMID:23328838

  17. Intravascular perfusion of carbon black ink allows reliable visualization of cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2013-01-04

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with or without carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen. Maeda et al. have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries.

  18. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostopoulos, C.; Cerqueira, M.; Ell, P. J.; Flint, E. J.; Harbinson, M.; Kelion, A. D.; Al-Mohammad, A.; Prvulovich, E. M.; Shaw, L. J.; Tweddel, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  19. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  20. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  1. Perfusion deconvolution in DSC-MRI with dispersion-compliant bases.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Marco; Boutelier, Timothé; Deriche, Rachid

    2017-02-01

    Perfusion imaging of the brain via Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) allows tissue perfusion characterization by recovering the tissue impulse response function and scalar parameters such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT). However, the presence of bolus dispersion causes the data to reflect macrovascular properties, in addition to tissue perfusion. In this case, when performing deconvolution of the measured arterial and tissue concentration time-curves it is only possible to recover the effective, i.e. dispersed, response function and parameters. We introduce Dispersion-Compliant Bases (DCB) to represent the response function in the presence and absence of dispersion. We perform in silico and in vivo experiments, and show that DCB deconvolution outperforms oSVD and the state-of-the-art CPI+VTF techniques in the estimation of effective perfusion parameters, regardless of the presence and amount of dispersion. We also show that DCB deconvolution can be used as a pre-processing step to improve the estimation of dispersion-free parameters computed with CPI+VTF, which employs a model of the vascular transport function to characterize dispersion. Indeed, in silico results show a reduction of relative errors up to 50% for dispersion-free CBF and MTT. Moreover, the DCB method recovers effective response functions that comply with healthy and pathological scenarios, and offers the advantage of making no assumptions about the presence, amount, and nature of dispersion.

  2. Fragile X syndrome and cerebral perfusion abnormalities: single-photon emission computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kabakus, Nimet; Aydin, Mustafa; Akin, Haluk; Balci, Tansel Ansal; Kurt, Abdullah; Kekilli, Ersoy

    2006-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an inherited disorder caused by a defective gene on the X chromosome. It is associated with developmental or behavioral symptoms and various degrees of mental retardation. Morphologic abnormalities and altered perfusion of various brain areas can underlie these functional disturbances. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral perfusion state in patients with fragile X syndrome using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Structural and functional assessment was also performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Eight boys with cytogenetically confirmed fragile X syndrome (mean age 8.8 +/- 4.4 years, range 5-18 years), were included. All patients had mental retardation, with a mean IQ of 58.9 +/- 8.8 (range 40-68), and additional neurobehavioral symptoms. SPECT revealed cerebral perfusion abnormalities in six patients (75%), most commonly in the frontoparietotemporal area and prominent in the right hemisphere. The SPECT and EEG findings were concordant: hypoperfused areas in SPECT corresponded to regions of persistent slow-wave paroxysms on EEG. On the other hand, cranial MRI was abnormal qualitatively only in two patients (25%) showing cerebellar and vermal hypoplasia and cerebral hemispheric asymmetry. Our results indicate that cerebral perfusion abnormalities, which are correlated with electrophysiologic findings but not necessarily with anatomic abnormalities, can underlie the pathogenesis of the clinical findings observed in fragile X syndrome.

  3. The Cadaveric Perfusion and Angiography as a Teaching Tool: Imaging the Intracranial Vasculature in Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  4. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  5. Brain Renin-Angiotensin System: Does It Exist?

    PubMed

    van Thiel, Bibi S; Góes Martini, Alexandre; Te Riet, Luuk; Severs, David; Uijl, Estrellita; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Leijten, Frank P J; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Essers, Jeroen; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Paulis, Ludovit; Rajkovicova, Romana; Domenig, Oliver; Poglitsch, Marko; Danser, A H Jan

    2017-04-10

    Because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier, brain renin-angiotensin system activity should depend on local (pro)renin synthesis. Indeed, an intracellular form of renin has been described in the brain, but whether it displays angiotensin (Ang) I-generating activity (AGA) is unknown. Here, we quantified brain (pro)renin, before and after buffer perfusion of the brain, in wild-type mice, renin knockout mice, deoxycorticosterone acetate salt-treated mice, and Ang II-infused mice. Brain regions were homogenized and incubated with excess angiotensinogen to detect AGA, before and after prorenin activation, using a renin inhibitor to correct for nonrenin-mediated AGA. Renin-dependent AGA was readily detectable in brain regions, the highest AGA being present in brain stem (>thalamus=cerebellum=striatum=midbrain>hippocampus=cortex). Brain AGA increased marginally after prorenin activation, suggesting that brain prorenin is low. Buffer perfusion reduced AGA in all brain areas by >60%. Plasma renin (per mL) was 40× to 800× higher than brain renin (per gram). Renin was undetectable in plasma and brain of renin knockout mice. Deoxycorticosterone acetate salt and Ang II suppressed plasma renin and brain renin in parallel, without upregulating brain prorenin. Finally, Ang I was undetectable in brains of spontaneously hypertensive rats, while their brain/plasma Ang II concentration ratio decreased by 80% after Ang II type 1 receptor blockade. In conclusion, brain renin levels (per gram) correspond with the amount of renin present in 1 to 20 μL of plasma. Brain renin disappears after buffer perfusion and varies in association with plasma renin. This indicates that brain renin represents trapped plasma renin. Brain Ang II represents Ang II taken up from blood rather than locally synthesized Ang II.

  6. Is the cerebellum the optimal reference region for intensity normalization of perfusion MR studies in early Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization.

  7. Is the Cerebellum the Optimal Reference Region for Intensity Normalization of Perfusion MR Studies in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization. PMID:24386081

  8. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  9. Nasal delivery of P-gp substrates to the brain through the nose-brain pathway.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Tomotaka; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Shinji

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in rats the potential utility of the nasal route to enhance central nervous system (CNS) delivery of drugs recognized by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Well-known P-gp substrates verapamil and talinolol were perfused nasally or infused intravenously, and when plasma concentrations following intravenous infusion and nasal perfusion showed similar profiles. The concentration of verapamil in the brain after nasal perfusion was twice that after intravenous infusion. Although talinolol in the brain and the cerebrospinal fluid after i.v. infusion were below the detection limit, it was detected after nasal perfusion. When rats were treated with cyclosporin A, brain concentrations of verapamil after both administration modes were increased significantly, while those of talinolol were not significantly changed. Since the permeability of talinolol is low, talinolol in the brain which was transported directly from the nasal cavity has little chance of transport by P-gp localized in the apical membrane of cerebral microvessel endothelial cells. The potential for drug delivery utilizing the nose-CNS route was confirmed for P-gp substrates. The advantage of nasal delivery over i.v. delivery of talinolol to the brain was more significant than that of verapamil, suggesting that nasal administration is more useful strategy for the brain delivery of low-permeability P-gp substrates than the use of P-gp inhibitors.

  10. Lung Perfusion Scanning in Hepatic Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, N. N.; Ackrill, P.; Wood, J.

    1972-01-01

    Abnormal lung perfusion scans using radioactive particles were found in five out of six cases of hepatic cirrhosis with arterial hypoxaemia. None had clinical evidence of cardiopulmonary disease or signs of pulmonary embolism on arteriography. The scan defects are probably caused by a disorder of the pulmonary microvasculature, which may show regional variation in severity. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4645896

  11. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  12. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  13. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  14. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  15. SU-E-QI-06: Design and Initial Validation of a Precise Capillary Phantom to Test Perfusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R; Iacobucci, G; Khobragade, P; Ying, L; Snyder, K; Wack, D; Rudin, S; Ionita, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a precise perfusion phantom mimicking capillaries of the brain vasculature which could be used to test various perfusion protocols and algorithms which generate perfusion maps. Methods: A perfusion phantom was designed in Solidworks and built using additive manufacturing. The phantom was an overall cylindrical shape of diameter and height 20mm and containing capillaries of 200μm or 300μm which were parallel and in contact making up the inside volume where flow was allowed. We created a flow loop using a peristaltic pump and contrast agent was injected manually. Digital Subtraction Angiographic images and low contrast images with cone beam CT were acquired after the contrast was injected. These images were analyzed by our own code in LabVIEW software and Time-Density Curve, MTT and TTP was calculated. Results: Perfused area was visible in the cone beam CT images; however, individual capillaries were not distinguishable. The Time-Density Curve acquired was accurate, sensitive and repeatable. The parameters MTT, and TTP offered by the phantom were very sensitive to slight changes in the TDC shape. Conclusion: We have created a robust calibrating model for evaluation of existing perfusion data analysis systems. This approach is extremely sensitive to changes in the flow due to the high temporal resolution and could be used as a golden standard to assist developers in calibrating and testing of imaging perfusion systems and software algorithms. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  16. Perfusion-diffusion mismatch: does it identify who will benefit from reperfusion therapy?

    PubMed

    Powers, William J

    2012-06-01

    A method to determine which patients would benefit from reperfusion therapies after 4.5 h would greatly add to our ability to reduce the disability caused by stroke. The goal of magnetic resonance perfusion-diffusion imaging in hyperacute ischemic stroke is to identify regions of the brain that will die if untreated and will live and regain function if quickly reperfused. The clinical value of perfusion-diffusion imaging in hyperacute ischemic stroke can be proven only by demonstrating empirically in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that there is an improvement in patient outcome that depends on the use of the neuroimaging modality to guide therapy. To date, there have been only a few RCTs that have evaluated whether perfusion-diffusion imaging can identify a subgroup of patients with ischemic stroke more than 4.5 h from onset in whom the overall benefit from reperfusion therapy outweighs the risk. None have met the rigorous design requirements of the three-group study necessary to adequately test this hypothesis, and none have even met their own criteria for demonstrating a clinical benefit. While studies are not sufficient to conclusively disprove the hypothesis there are no RCT data to support it, and thus, the clinical value of MRI perfusion-diffusion imaging in this setting remains unproven. It is worthy of further investigation in rigorously designed RCTs. However, the risks of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage with reperfusion therapies in acute ischemic stroke are proven. Unless RCT data are forthcoming to demonstrate that MRI perfusion-diffusion mismatch improves clinical outcome, it should not be used to guide delayed reperfusion therapy.

  17. Early Time Points Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kenneth K.; Reese, Timothy G.; Nelissen, Koen; Wu, Ona; Chan, Suk-Tak; Benner, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Foley, Mary; Vanduffel, Wim; Chesler, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the feasibility of making relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) maps from MR images acquired with short TR by measuring the initial arrival amount of Gd-DTPA evaluated within a time window before any contrast agent has a chance to leave the tissue. We named this rCBF measurement technique utilizing the early data points of the Gd-DTPA bolus the “early time points” method (ET), based on the hypothesis that early time point signals were proportional to rCBF. Simulation data were used successfully to examine the ideal behavior of ET while monkey’s MRI results offered encouraging support to the utility of ET for rCBF calculation. A better brain coverage for ET could be obtained by applying the Simultaneous Echo Refocusing (SER) EPI technique. A recipe to run ET was presented, with attention paid to the noise problem around the time of arrival (TOA) of the contrast agent. PMID:20851196

  18. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  19. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  20. Selective cerebral perfusion for cerebral protection: what we do know

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gilbert H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) for aortic arch surgery has evolved considerably since it was first reported. Various pressure rates have been investigated through animal models, as has the effect of warmer perfusate temperatures and hematocrit. Clinical research into pH management, the role of unilateral and bilateral perfusion, and core temperatures have further refined the procedure. We recommend the following protocol for SACP: perfusion pressure between 40-60 mmHg, flow rates between 6-10 mL/kg/min, and perfusate temperature of 20-28 °C; core cooling to 18-30 °C contingent on duration of arrest; alpha-stat pH management; hematocrit between 25-30%; near infrared spectroscopy to monitor cerebral perfusion; and bilateral perfusion when prolonged durations of SACP is anticipated. PMID:23977601

  1. Insulin resistance is associated with lower arterial blood flow and reduced cortical perfusion in cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Berman, Sara E; Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Krause, Rachel A; Oh, Jennifer M; Beeri, Michal S; Rowley, Howard A; Wieben, Oliver; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Schrage, William G; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with poor cerebrovascular health and increased risk for dementia. Little is known about the unique effect of IR on both micro- and macrovascular flow particularly in midlife when interventions against dementia may be most effective. We examined the effect of IR as indexed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) on cerebral blood flow in macro- and microvessels utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. We hypothesized that higher HOMA-IR would be associated with reduced flow in macrovessels and lower cortical perfusion. One hundred and twenty cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (57 ± 5 yrs) underwent fasting blood draw, phase contrast-vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC VIPR) MRI, and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower arterial blood flow, particularly within the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), and lower cerebral perfusion in several brain regions including frontal and temporal lobe regions. Higher blood flow in bilateral ICAs predicted greater cortical perfusion in individuals with lower HOMA-IR, a relationship not observed among those with higher HOMA-IR. Findings provide novel evidence for an uncoupling of macrovascular blood flow and microvascular perfusion among individuals with higher IR in midlife.

  2. In-vivo Fluorescent X-ray CT Imaging of Mouse Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Wu, J.; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M.; Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T.; Hyodo, K.; Hontani, H.

    2007-01-19

    Using a non-radioactive iodine-127 labeled cerebral perfusion agent (I-127 IMP), fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) clearly revealed the cross-sectional distribution of I-127 IMP in normal mouse brain in-vivo. Cerebral perfusion of cortex and basal ganglion was depicted with 1 mm in-plane spatial resolution and 0.1 mm slice thickness. Degree of cerebral perfusion in basal ganglion was about 2-fold higher than that in cortical regions. This result suggests that in-vivo cerebral perfusion imaging is realized quantitatively by FXCT at high volumetric resolution.

  3. Pulmonary ventilation and perfusion abnormalities and ventilation perfusion imbalance in children with pulmonary atresia or extreme tetralogy of Fallot

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdle, S.C.; Human, D.G.; Mann, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 lung ventilation and perfusion scans were done preoperatively after cardiac catheterization and cineangiocardiography in 19 children; 6 had pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and hypoplastic right ventricle, 4 pulmonary atresia with associated complex univentricular heart, and 9 extreme Tetralogy of Fallot. The four patients with discrepancies in the sizes of the left and right pulmonary arteries on angiography had marked asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance on scintigraphy. Similar degrees of asymmetry and imbalance were present in 6 of the 15 children with equal-size pulmonary vessels. Asymmetry of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation-perfusion imbalance were associated with a poor prognosis.

  4. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  5. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  6. The Groningen hypothermic liver perfusion pump: functional evaluation of a new machine perfusion system.

    PubMed

    van der Plaats, A; Maathuis, M H J; 'T Hart, N A; Bellekom, A A; Hofker, H S; van der Houwen, E B; Verkerke, G J; Leuvenink, H G D; Verdonck, P; Ploeg, R J; Rakhorst, G

    2006-12-01

    To improve preservation of donor livers, we have developed a portable hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) system as an alternative for static cold storage. A prototype of the system was built and evaluated on functionality. Evaluation criteria included 24 h of adequate pressure controlled perfusion, sufficient oxygenation, a maintained 0-4 degrees C temperature and sterile conditions. Porcine livers were perfused with pump pressures that were set at 4 mmHg (continuous, portal vein) and 30/20 mmHg, at 60 BPM (pulsatile, hepatic artery). Control livers were preserved using the clinical golden standard: static cold storage. In the HMP group, pressure, flow and temperature were continuously monitored for 24 h. At time-points t = 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h samples of University of Wisconsin machine preservation solution were taken for measurement of partial oxygen pressure (pO(2)) and lacto-dehydrogenase. Biopsies in every lobe were taken for histology and electron microscopy; samples of ice, preservation solution, liver surface, and bile were taken and cultured to determine sterility. Results showed that temperature was maintained at 0-4 degrees C; perfusion pressure was maintained at 4 mmHg and 30/20 mmHg for portal vein and hepatic artery, respectively. Flow was approximately 350 and 80 ml/min, respectively, but decreased in the portal vein, probably due to edema formation. Arterial pO(2) was kept at 100 kPa. Histology showed complete perfusion of the liver with no major damage to hepatocytes, bile ducts, and non-parenchymal cells compared to control livers. The machine perfusion system complied to the design criteria and will have to demonstrate the superiority of machine perfusion over cold storage in transplant experiments.

  7. Pathophysiology of white matter perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Rachel; Ashby, Emma L; Wellington, Dannielle; Barrow, Vivienne M; Palmer, Jennifer C; Kehoe, Patrick G; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the contributors and physiological responses to white matter hypoperfusion in the human brain. We previously showed the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 in post-mortem human brain tissue correlates with the degree of ante-mortem ischaemia. In age-matched post-mortem cohorts of Alzheimer's disease (n = 49), vascular dementia (n = 17) and control brains (n = 33) from the South West Dementia Brain Bank (Bristol), we have now examined the relationship between the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 and several other proteins involved in regulating white matter vascularity and blood flow. Across the three cohorts, white matter perfusion, indicated by the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1, correlated positively with the concentration of the vasoconstrictor, endothelin 1 (P = 0.0005), and negatively with the concentration of the pro-angiogenic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.0015). The activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme, which catalyses production of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II was not altered. In samples of frontal white matter from an independent (Oxford, UK) cohort of post-mortem brains (n = 74), we confirmed the significant correlations between the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 and both endothelin 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. We also assessed microvessel density in the Bristol (UK) samples, by measurement of factor VIII-related antigen, which we showed to correlate with immunohistochemical measurements of vessel density, and found factor VIII-related antigen levels to correlate with the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.0487), suggesting that upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor tends to increase vessel density in the white matter. We propose that downregulation of endothelin 1 and upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in the context

  8. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  9. Effect of cardiac dysrhythmia on cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sand, B J; Rose, H B; Barker, W F

    1976-07-01

    Extracranial carotid arterial obstructive disease has been the entity most commonly associated with transient cerebrovascular insufficiency. A nonobstructive, frequently overlooked cause of cerebral ischemia is cardiac dysrhythmia. We have explored this by observations of experimental animals and of man. Blood flow and pressure in the carotid arteries of dogs were shown to be decreased by mechnically induced premature ventricular contractions. The significance of the cardiogenic contribution to altered cerebrovascular perfusion was studied by ocular and brachial plethysmography in 210 patients suspected by history of having carotid arterial insufficiency. Of the 210 patients, 62 demonstrated abnormal ocular plethysmographic recordings, and of those, nine had dysrhythmias associated with significant deficits of ocular perfusion. Five patients whose recordings were technically suitable for publication are presented to demonstrate the bizarre ocular plethysmographic recordings seen during the dysrhythmic cycle.

  10. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  11. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  12. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  13. Vascular perfusion in horses with chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Hood, D M; Grosenbaugh, D A; Slater, M R

    1994-05-01

    Vascular perfusion casts were used to define and characterise the macroscopic perfusion defects present in the distal digit of 11 horses affected by chronic laminitis. Five clinically normal horses were used as controls. Based on clinical history and clinical status, horses with chronic laminitis were classified as being potentially treatable or clinically refractory. Eleven macroscopic vascular defects were noted in the casts from horses with laminitis. Four types of lesions were identified in the submural laminar circulation, 3 in the coronary bed and 4 were associated with the solar circulation. Multiple defects were present and a definite trend was noted for the perfusion defects to be worse in the casts of clinically refractory subjects than in those considered treatable. This information suggests that evaluation of circulatory status should add significantly to the ability to separate treatable from clinically refractory patients. Results also indicated that ventral displacement of the third phalanx (sinkers) and compression of the solar vasculature are more prevalent than is presently thought.

  14. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  15. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  16. Perfusion phantom: An efficient and reproducible method to simulate myocardial first-pass perfusion measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chiribiri, Amedeo; Schuster, Andreas; Ishida, Masaki; Hautvast, Gilion; Zarinabad, Niloufar; Morton, Geraint; Otton, James; Plein, Sven; Breeuwer, Marcel; Batchelor, Philip; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nagel, Eike

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a novel hardware perfusion phantom that simulates myocardial first-pass perfusion allowing comparisons between different MR techniques and validation of the results against a true gold standard. MR perfusion images were acquired at different myocardial perfusion rates and variable doses of gadolinium and cardiac output. The system proved to be sensitive to controlled variations of myocardial perfusion rate, contrast agent dose, and cardiac output. It produced distinct signal intensity curves for perfusion rates ranging from 1 to 10 mL/mL/min. Quantification of myocardial blood flow by signal deconvolution techniques provided accurate measurements of perfusion. The phantom also proved to be very reproducible between different sessions and different operators. This novel hardware perfusion phantom system allows reliable, reproducible, and efficient simulation of myocardial first-pass MR perfusion. Direct comparison between the results of image-based quantification and reference values of flow and myocardial perfusion will allow development and validation of accurate quantification methods.

  17. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  18. Microvascular Perfusion Changes following Transarterial Hepatic Tumor Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carmen Gacchina; Sharma, Karun V.; Levy, Elliot B.; Woods, David L.; Morris, Aaron H.; Bacher, John D.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify changes in tumor microvascular (< 1 mm) perfusion relative to commonly used angiographic endpoints. Materials and Methods Rabbit Vx2 liver tumors were embolized with 100–300-µm LC Bead particles to endpoints of substasis or complete stasis (controls were not embolized). Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by delivering two different fluorophore-conjugated perfusion markers (ie, lectins) through the catheter before embolization and 5 min after reaching the desired angiographic endpoint. Tumor microvasculature was labeled with an anti-CD31 antibody and analyzed with fluorescence microscopy for perfusion marker overlap/mismatch. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and post hoc test (n = 3–5 per group; 18 total). Results Mean microvascular density was 70 vessels/mm2 ± 17 (standard error of the mean), and 81% ± 1 of microvasculature (ie, CD31+ structures) was functionally perfused within viable Vx2 tumor regions. Embolization to the extent of substasis eliminated perfusion in 37% ± 9 of perfused microvessels (P > .05 vs baseline), whereas embolization to the extent of angiographic stasis eliminated perfusion in 56% ± 8 of perfused microvessels. Persistent microvascular perfusion following embolization was predominantly found in the tumor periphery, adjacent to normal tissue. Newly perfused microvasculature was evident following embolization to substasis but not when embolization was performed to complete angiographic stasis. Conclusions Nearly half of tumor microvasculature remained patent despite embolization to complete angiographic stasis. The observed preservation of tumor microvasculature perfusion with angiographic endpoints of substasis and stasis may have implications for tumor response to embolotherapy. PMID:26321051

  19. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  20. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  1. Long-term estrogen therapy and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in postmenopausal women; a single photon emission tomography (SPET) study.

    PubMed

    Compton, J; Travis, M J; Norbury, R; Erlandsson, K; van Amelsvoort, T; Daly, E; Waddington, W; Matthiasson, P; Eersels, J L H; Whitehead, M; Kerwin, R W; Ell, P J; Murphy, D G M

    2008-01-01

    Variation in estrogen level is reported by some to affect brain maturation and memory. The neurobiological basis for this may include modulation of the serotonergic system. No neuroimaging studies have directly examined the effect of extended estrogen therapy (ET), on the 5-HT(2A) receptor in human brain. We investigated the effect of long-term ET on cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor availability in postmenopausal women. In a cross-sectional study, we compared cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor availability in 17 postmenopausal ERT-naive women and 17 long-term oophorectomised estrogen-users, age- and IQ-matched using single photon emission tomography and the selective 5-HT(2A) receptor ligand (123)I-5-I-R91150. Also, we used the Revised Wechsler Memory Scale to relate memory function to 5-HT(2A) receptor availability. Never-users had significantly higher 5-HT(2A) receptor availability than estrogen-users in hippocampus (1.17 vs. 1.11, respectively, p=0.02), although this did not remain significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Hippocampal 5-HT(2A) receptor availability correlated negatively with verbal and general memory and delayed recall (r=-0.45, p=0.01; r=-0.40, p=0.02; r=-0.36, p=0.04). Right superior temporal 5-HT(2A) receptor availability correlated negatively with verbal memory (r=-0.36, p=0.04). In estrogen-users, receptor availability correlated negatively with verbal and general memory (r=-0.70, p=0.002; r=-0.69, p=0.002); and in never-users, receptor availability negatively correlated with attention and concentration (r=-0.54, p=0.02). Long-term ET may be associated with lower 5-HT(2A) receptor availability in hippocampus. This may reflect increased activity within the serotonergic pathway leading to down-regulation of post-synaptic receptor. Also, increased availability of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in hippocampus is associated with poorer memory function.

  2. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler–Weber–Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted. PMID:27168866

  3. Multimodal tissue perfusion imaging using multi-spectral and thermographic imaging systems applied on clinical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    Clinical interventions can cause changes in tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature. Real-time imaging of these phenomena could be useful for surgical strategy or understanding of physiological regulation mechanisms. Two noncontact imaging techniques were applied for imaging of large tissue areas: LED based multispectral imaging (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370 nm-880 nm) and thermal imaging (7.5 to 13.5 μm). Oxygenation concentration changes were calculated using different analyzing methods. The advantages of these methods are presented for stationary and dynamic applications. Concentration calculations of chromophores in tissue require right choices of wavelengths The effects of different wavelength choices for hemoglobin concentration calculations were studied in laboratory conditions and consequently applied in clinical studies. Corrections for interferences during the clinical registrations (ambient light fluctuations, tissue movements) were performed. The wavelength dependency of the algorithms were studied and wavelength sets with the best results will be presented. The multispectral and thermal imaging systems were applied during clinical intervention studies: reperfusion of tissue flap transplantation (ENT), effectiveness of local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery in patients with epileptic seizures. The LED multispectral imaging system successfully imaged the perfusion and oxygenation changes during clinical interventions. The thermal images show local heat distributions over tissue areas as a result of changes in tissue perfusion. Multispectral imaging and thermal imaging provide complementary information and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics of physiological processes in medicine.

  4. Measurement of cerebrospinal fluid formation and absorption by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion: what is really measured?

    PubMed Central

    Orešković, Darko; Klarica, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    The generally accepted hypothesis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics suggests that CSF is actively formed mainly by choroid plexuses, circulates unidirectionally along the brain ventricles and subarachnoid space, and is passively absorbed mainly into the dural venous sinuses. CSF formation rate (Vf) has been extensively studied using the ventriculo-cisternal perfusion technique and the results have been used as the key evidence confirming the mentioned hypothesis. This method and the equation for Vf calculation are based on the assumption that the dilution of the indicator substance is a consequence of the newly formed CSF, ie, that a higher CSF formation rate will result in a higher degree of dilution. However, it has been experimentally shown that the indicator substance dilution inside the CSF system does not occur because of a “newly formed” CSF, but as consequence of a number of other factors (departure of substances into the surrounding tissue, flowing around the collecting cannula into the cortical and spinal subarachnoid space, departure into the contralateral ventricle, etc). This technique allows “calculation” of the CSF formation even in dead animals, in an in vitro model, and in any other part of the CSF system outside the ventricles that is being perfused. Therefore, this method is indirect and any dilution of the indicator substance in the perfusate caused by other reasons would result in questionable and often contradictory conclusions regarding CSF formation rates. PMID:25165046

  5. Perfusion lung scanning: differentiation of primary from thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Kreisman, H.; Novales-Diaz, J.; Derbekyan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Of eight patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, final diagnosis established by autopsy or angiography, four had primary hypertension and four hypertension from thromboembolism. The perfusion lung scan was distinctly different in the two groups. The lung scan in primary pulmonary hypertension was associated with nonsegmental, patchy defects of perfusion, while in thromboembolic hypertensives it was characterized by segmental and/or lobar defects of perfusion with or without subsegmental defects. The perfusion lung scan is a valuable, noninvasive study in the evaluation of the patient with pulmonary hypertension of undetermined cause and in the exclusion of occult large-vessel pulmonary thromboembolism.

  6. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  7. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time.

    PubMed

    Taeger, C D; Präbst, K; Beier, J P; Meyer, A; Horch, R E

    2016-04-01

    In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery.

  8. Hyperosmolar opening of the blood-brain barrier in the energy-depleted rat brain. Part 1. Permeability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.; Luthert, P.J.; Pratt, O.E.; Lantos, P.L.

    1988-02-01

    A simple saline perfusion system was used to investigate the effects of hyperosmolar solutions of arabinose and mannitol upon the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. The small, polar molecule (/sup 14/C)mannitol and the larger, visual marker Evans blue were used as indicators of barrier integrity in the perfused energy-depleted brain. One-minute perfusion of hyperosmolar solutions consistently opened the barrier suggesting that the mechanism of osmotic barrier opening is independent of energy-producing metabolism. The accumulation of radiolabel in the brain was expressed as the ratio of tissue to perfusate radioactivity (Rt/Rp) and, for cerebrum, this increased from a control value of 0.0022 +/- 0.0007 (mean +/- SEM; n = 4) to a value of 0.0124 +/- 0.0008 (n = 4) following 0.9 M arabinose and to 0.0495 +/- 0.0072 (n = 4) following 1.8 M arabinose. There was a significant reduction of water content of hyperosmolar perfused brains. These findings support the hypothesis that osmotic barrier opening is the result of the passive shrinkage of endothelial cells and the surrounding tissue.

  9. Brain metastases with exceptional features from papillary thyroid carcinoma: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Song, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2011-01-01

    We present three papillary thyroid carcinoma PTC patients with brain metastases who are unusual in many aspects. The first case is a unique 3mm papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) patient with metastases to the cerebrum and lung. The solitary cerebral lesion was identified by iodine-131 whole- body scan ((131)I-WBS) and (131)I single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPET/CT). Almost complete response achieved after radiosurgery. The second case is a unique PTC patient with coexistent (131)I-negative cerebrum, adrenal gland and ilium metastases, which were identified by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial response achieved after radiosurgery. The third case is a patient with an incident solitary cystic cerebellar mass as a primary presentation of follicular variant of PTC and absent other distant metastases. In conclusion, widespread metastases from small PTMC may occur. Concomitant brain and adrenal metastases may occur in a same PTC patient. Brain metastasis may present as a cystic lesion.

  10. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients with negative CT perfusion: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Ratnesh; Qahwash, Omar; Richards, Boyd; Fessler, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Background Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is a commonly used modality of neurophysiologic imaging to aid the selection of acute ischemic stroke patients for neuroendovascular intervention by identifying the presence of penumbra versus infarcted brain tissue. However many patients present with evidence of cerebral ischemia with normal CTP, and in that case, should intravenous thrombolytics be given? Purpose To demonstrate if tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-eligible stroke patients without perfusion defects demonstrated on CTP would benefit from administration of intravenous thrombolytics. Material and Methods We retrospectively identified patients presenting with acute ischemic symptoms who received intravenous tPA (IV-tPA) from January to June 2012 without a perfusion defect on CTP. Clinical and radiographic findings including the NIHSS at presentation, 24 h, and at discharge, symptomatic and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation, and the modified Rankin score at 30 days were collected. A reduction of NIHSS of greater than 4 points or resolution of symptoms was considered significant. Results Seventeen patients were identified with a mean NIHSS of 8.2 prior to administration of intravenous thrombolytics, 3.5 after 24 h, and 2.5 at discharge. Among them, 13 patients had significant improvement of NIHSS with a mean reduction of 6.15 points at 24 h. One patient initially improved but had delayed hemorrhagic transformation and died. Two patients had improvement in NIHSS but were not significant and two patients had increased in NIHSS at 24 h, although one eventually improved at discharge. There was no asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. Mean mRS at 3 months is 1.76. Conclusion The failure to identify a perfusion deficit by CTP should not be used as a contraindication for intravenous thrombolytics. Criteria for administration of intravenous thrombolytics should still be based on time from symptom onset as previously published by NINDS. PMID

  12. Power Doppler ultrasound appearances of neonatal ischaemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Steventon, D M; John, P R

    1997-02-01

    Following neonatal ischaemic brain injury, irregular vessels increase in size owing to luxury perfusion. These may be demonstrated by conventional colour flow Doppler (CFD) imaging at the periphery of the infarcted area. We present a case in which power Doppler imaging (PDI) was performed in addition to CFD in a neonate with unexplained seizures and which proved more sensitive than CFD in demonstrating luxury perfusion. Ultrasound appearances were compared with those seen on cranial CT. PDI can be a useful adjunct to conventional CFD examination of the neonatal brain in cerebral infarction.

  13. Neurologic applications of whole-brain volumetric multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kenneth V; Mokin, Maxim; Bates, Vernice E

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of computed tomography (CT) scanning in the 1970s revolutionized the way clinicians could diagnose and treat stroke. Subsequent advances in CT technology significantly reduced radiation dose, reduced metallic artifact, and achieved speeds that enable dynamic functional studies. The recent addition of whole-brain volumetric CT perfusion technology has given clinicians a powerful tool to assess parenchymal perfusion parameters as well as visualize dynamic changes in blood vessel flow throughout the brain during a single cardiac cycle. This article reviews clinical applications of volumetric multimodal CT that helped to guide and manage care.

  14. Prolonged cerebral "luxury perfusion" after removal of a convexity meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L D; Selker, R G

    1979-04-01

    Following total removal of a convexity meningioma, serial computerized tomographic scans disclosed massive hemispheric contrast enhancement compatible with "luxury perfusion". Maximum enhancement occurred one month following the operation and resolved two months postoperatively. Luxury perfusion appeared to be associated with slowly resolving cerebral edema.

  15. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides.

  16. Free flap rescue using an extracorporeal perfusion device.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Andreas M; Ritschl, Lucas M; Rau, Andrea; Schwarzer, Claudia; von Bomhard, Achim; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    The warm ischaemia time of microvascular free flaps is limited. Incalculable events, such as lack of adequate recipient vessels or intraoperative medical emergencies, can lead to prolonged ischaemia and potentially to flap loss. In this study, critically perfused ischaemic or congested flaps were temporarily perfused with an extracorporeal perfusion system until anastomosis could be commenced. Temporary extracorporeal perfusion was performed in 8 radial forearm flaps for 147 ± 52 (range 77-237) minutes. Flap perfusion was assessed using Indocyanine Green fluorescence angiography and combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy. Results were compared with those of 30 patients who underwent conventional reconstruction with radial forearm flaps. Flap survival, flap microcirculation, postoperative complications, and hospital stay did not differ between groups. We report successful free flap transfer after short-term extracorporeal perfusion for up to 4 h in 8 patient cases. Temporary extracorporeal free flap perfusion reduces the warm ischaemia time in emergency situations and can help to prevent flap failure in critically perfused or congested flaps. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02449525.

  17. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  18. Arterial spin labeling perfusion predicts longitudinal decline in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Olm, Christopher A; Kandel, Benjamin M; Avants, Brian B; Detre, John A; Gee, James C; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). We acquired pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) MRI and whole-brain T1-weighted structural MRI in svPPA patients (N = 13) with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology. Follow-up T1-weighted MRI was available in a subset of patients (N = 8). We performed whole-brain comparisons of partial volume-corrected CBF and cortical thickness between svPPA and controls, and compared baseline and follow-up cortical thickness in regions of significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Patients with svPPA showed partial volume-corrected hypoperfusion relative to controls in left temporal lobe and insula. svPPA patients also had typical cortical thinning in anterior temporal, insula, and inferior frontal regions at baseline. Volume-corrected hypoperfusion was seen in areas of significant cortical thinning such as the left temporal lobe and insula. Additional regions of hypoperfusion corresponded to areas without cortical thinning. We also observed regions of hyperperfusion, some associated with cortical thinning and others without cortical thinning, including right superior temporal, inferior parietal, and orbitofrontal cortices. Regions of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion near cortical thinning at baseline had significant longitudinal thinning between baseline and follow-up scans, but perfusion changes in distant areas did not show progressive thinning. Our findings suggest ASL MRI may be sensitive to functional changes not readily apparent in structural MRI, and specific changes in perfusion may be prognostic markers of disease progression in a manner consistent with cell-to-cell spreading pathology.

  19. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  20. [Ocular perfusion pressure and its relevance for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Schmidl, D; Werkmeister, R; Garhöfer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2015-02-01

    Ocular perfusion pressure is defined as the difference between arterial and venous pressure in ocular vessels. In practice, mean arterial pressure is used to substitute for arterial pressure in ocular vessels while intraocular pressure gives an estimate for ocular venous pressure. This results in a value that is easy to calculate and which is of importance since several studies have shown that it is correlated to the prevalence, incidence and progression of primary open angle glaucoma. Today, ocular perfusion pressure is used to estimate individual risks. Since no target value for ocular perfusion pressure can be defined, direct therapeutic intervention is difficult. Still, it has to be kept in mind that lowering intraocular pressure automatically leads to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure. The present article also points out problems and limitations in the concept of ocular perfusion pressure and suggests possible solutions for these problems in the future.

  1. Automated quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion lung scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.H.; Vernon, P.; Seed, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    An automated computer analysis of ventilation (Kr-81m) and perfusion (Tc-99m) lung images has been devised that produces a graphical image of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, and of ventilation-perfusion ratios. The analysis has overcome the following problems: the identification of the midline between two lungs and the lung boundaries, the exclusion of extrapulmonary radioactivity, the superimposition of lung images of different sizes, and the format for presentation of the data. Therefore, lung images of different sizes and shapes may be compared with each other. The analysis has been used to develop normal ranges from 55 volunteers. Comparison of younger and older age groups of men and women show small but significant differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, but no differences in ventilation-perfusion ratios.

  2. Impedance plethysmography: a new method for continuous muscle perfusion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Concannon, M J; Stewart, D H; Welsh, C F; Puckett, C L

    1991-08-01

    Vigilant postoperative monitoring of the buried muscle flap is critical after free transfer because early diagnosis of vascular insufficiency is essential to allow prompt correction. We have identified a monitoring method utilizing needle electrodes and impedance plethysmography that gives a beat-to-beat representation of muscular perfusion. In 25 New Zealand White rabbits the gastrocnemius muscle was isolated on its vascular pedicle, and two intramuscular needle electrodes were placed. The instantaneous impedance changes of the muscle (corresponding to the pulsatile volume changes of perfusion) were measured and recorded. Using this representation of perfusion, an independent judge was able to correctly diagnose muscular ischemia 100 percent of the time (n = 25). Further, the judge was able to correctly distinguish the ischemia as arterial (n = 10) or venous (n = 10) in origin 100 percent of the time. Additionally, we monitored muscle perfusion transcutaneously in five free muscle flaps and demonstrated a reliable impedance signal that correlated with perfusion.

  3. An arterially perfused nose-olfactory bulb preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Pérez de los Cobos Pallarés, Fernando; Stanić, Davor; Farmer, David; Dutschmann, Mathias; Egger, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    A main feature of the mammalian olfactory bulb network is the presence of various rhythmic activities, in particular, gamma, beta, and theta oscillations, with the latter coupled to the respiratory rhythm. Interactions between those oscillations as well as the spatial distribution of network activation are likely to determine olfactory coding. Here, we describe a novel semi-intact perfused nose-olfactory bulb-brain stem preparation in rats with both a preserved olfactory epithelium and brain stem, which could be particularly suitable for the study of oscillatory activity and spatial odor mapping within the olfactory bulb, in particular, in hitherto inaccessible locations. In the perfused olfactory bulb, we observed robust spontaneous oscillations, mostly in the theta range. Odor application resulted in an increase in oscillatory power in higher frequency ranges, stimulus-locked local field potentials, and excitation or inhibition of individual bulbar neurons, similar to odor responses reported from in vivo recordings. Thus our method constitutes the first viable in situ preparation of a mammalian system that uses airborne odor stimuli and preserves these characteristic features of odor processing. This preparation will allow the use of highly invasive experimental procedures and the application of techniques such as patch-clamp recording, high-resolution imaging, and optogenetics within the entire olfactory bulb.

  4. Longitudinal Cerebral Perfusion Change in Transient Global Amnesia Related to Left Posterior Medial Network Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, Young Ho; Park, So Young; Wang, Min Jeong; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Chun, In KooK; Yang, Youngsoon; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of transient global amnesia (TGA) is not fully understood. Previous studies using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have reported inconclusive results regarding cerebral perfusion. This study was conducted to identify the patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in TGA patients via longitudinal SPECT analysis. An association between the observed SPECT patterns and a pathophysiological mechanism was considered. Methods Based on the TGA registry database of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 22 TGA patients were retrospectively identified. The subjects underwent initial Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT within 4 days of an amnestic event and underwent follow-up scans approximately 6 months later. The difference in ECD uptake between the two scans was measured via voxel-based whole brain analysis, and the quantified ECD uptake was tested using a paired t-test. Results The TGA patients had significantly decreased cerebral perfusion at the left precuneus (P<0.001, uncorrected) and at the left superior parietal and inferior temporal gyrus according to the voxel-based whole brain analysis (P<0.005, uncorrected). A difference in the quantified ECD uptake between the 2 scans was also found at the left precuneus among the 62 cortical volumes of interest (P = 0.018, Cohen’s d = -0.25). Conclusion We identified left hemispheric lateralized hypoperfusion that may be related to posterior medial network disruption. These findings may be a contributing factor to the pathophysiology of TGA. PMID:26690067

  5. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  6. Transport of benzo[alpha]pyrene in the dually perfused human placenta perfusion model: effect of albumin in the perfusion medium.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Line; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2009-09-01

    Transport of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BaP) across the placenta was examined because it is a ubiquitous and highly carcinogenic substance found in tobacco smoke, polluted air and certain foods. Foetal exposure to this substance is highly relevant but is difficult to estimate. The human placenta is unique compared to other species; since it is available without major ethical obstacles, we have used the human placenta perfusion model to study transport from mother to foetus. Placentas were donated after births at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen from pregnant mothers who signed an informed consent. BaP is lipophilic and studies using cell culture medium in 6-hr placenta perfusions showed minimal transport through the placenta. To increase the solubility of BaP in perfusion medium and to increase physiological relevance, perfusions were also performed with albumin added to the perfusion medium [2 and 30 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 30 mg/ml human serum albumin (HSA)]. The addition of albumin resulted in increased transfer of BaP from maternal to foetal reservoirs. The transfer was even higher in the presence of an HSA formulation containing acetyltryptophanate and caprylate, resulting in a foetal-maternal concentration (FM) ratio of 0.71 +/- 0.10 after 3 hr and 0.78 +/- 0.11 after 6 hr, whereas the FM ratio in perfusions without albumin was only 0.05 +/- 0.03 after 6 hr of perfusion. Less BaP accumulated in placental tissue in perfusions with added albumin. This shows that transplacental transport of the pro-carcinogenic substance BaP occurs, and emphasizes the importance of adding physiological concentrations of albumin when studying the transport of lipophilic substances.

  7. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  8. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Alexander, Matthew D.; McCoy, David B.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R.; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Higashida, Randall T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Methods Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. Results 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion. PMID:27802268

  9. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, a new biomarker candidate in perfusate of machine-perfused kidneys: a porcine pilot experiment.

    PubMed

    Jochmans, I; Monbaliu, D; Pirenne, J

    2011-11-01

    The enduring kidney graft shortage has led to the increasing use of expanded-criteria donors as well as kidneys donated after cardiac death, triggering the revival of machine perfusion preservation. Indeed, machine perfusion not only preserves these kidneys better than static cold storage, but also has the potential to evaluate them. The presence of certain biomarkers, among them aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), has been demonstrated in the perfusate of human kidneys, making them potentially useful as biomarkers of graft quality. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) which is believed to be released upon renal tubular cell injury is another biomarker candidate. However, because it is also released from neutrophils, it is currently unclear whether NGAL is a direct or indirect, inflammatory-mediated marker of kidney injury. To resolve this issue we established a pilot experiment to study the concentrations of AST, H-FABP, and NGAL in the perfusates of 6 porcine kidneys that were exposed to incremental periods of warm ischemia before machine perfusion for 22 hours. An ex vivo porcine model was chosen because preclinical large animal work remains necessary to refine machine perfusion technology and because the presence of these markers in perfusates of porcine kidneys had not been shown previously. All 3 biomarkers were detectable in the cold acellular perfusate; their release seemed to be proportionate to the degree of warm injury, albeit that this must be confirmed in a larger sample. In conclusion, NGAL is directly released by ischemically damaged kidneys, independent of neutrophil activation. In addition to NGAL, the determination of AST and H-FABP in perfusates of machine-perfused porcine kidneys is also feasible. Determination of these markers may be added to the arsenal of research tools for preclinical preservation research.

  10. [ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution for cerebrospinal surgery: pharmacological assessment using human astrocytes exposed to test solutions].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Kazuhisa; Enomoto, Riyo; Lee, Eibai; Naito, Shinsaku; Yamauchi, Aiko

    2009-09-01

    ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution (Artcereb) is a preparation intended for the irrigation and perfusion of the cerebral ventricles, and it is therefore important to evaluate the effects of Artcereb on brain cells. In vitro assessment of the effects of Artcereb in cell cultures of human fetal astrocytes was conducted in comparison with normal saline and lactated Ringer's solution. The effects of exposure to Artcereb were evaluated based on microscopic images of the mitochondria stained with rhodamine 123. The effects of exposure to Artcereb on cell function were also evaluated by quantitative analysis of mitochondrial activity based on rhodamine 123 and (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Morphological changes in nuclear structure were also evaluated. The results of the present study showed that cell function in cell cultures of human astrocytes was relatively unaffected by exposure to Artcereb as compared with normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution, suggesting that Artcereb has less effect on brain cells than normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution when used for the irrigation or perfusion of the cerebral ventricles.

  11. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Detre, John A.; Farah, Martha J.; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of mood as a function of weather conditions. The model results were used to calculate the mood-relevant weather index which served as the covariate in the regression analysis of the resting CBF (N = 42) measured by ASL perfusion fMRI under various weather conditions. The resting CBF activities in the left insula-prefrontal cortex and left superior parietal lobe were negatively correlated (corrected p<0.05) with the weather index, indicating that better mood-relevant weather conditions were associated with lower CBF in these regions within the brain’s emotional network. The present study represents a first step toward the investigation of the effect of natural environment on baseline human brain function, and suggests the feasibility of ASL perfusion fMRI for such study. PMID:24834022

  12. Reversal of focal "misery-perfusion syndrome" by extra-intracranial arterial bypass in hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A case study with 15O positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Baron, J C; Bousser, M G; Rey, A; Guillard, A; Comar, D; Castaigne, P

    1981-01-01

    Tomographic images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) using the 15O continuous inhalation technique, and positron emission tomography, were obtained from a patient with cerebral ischemia distal to an occluded left internal carotid artery. There was a focal mismatch between CBF and oxygen metabolism in the brain supplied by the middle cerebral artery where CBF was decreased and OEF increased ("misery-perfusion syndrome" as opposed to "luxury-perfusion syndrome"). These abnormalities were most marked in the parieto-occipital watershed area. After left superficial temporal to middle cerebral artery anastomosis, the clinical attacks ceased and a repeat study did not demonstrate the previous CBF and OEF abnormalities. This suggests that this pattern of abnormalities indicates potential viable tissue. The concept of "misery-perfusion" may be of some importance in the pathophysiological mechanisms of hemodynamic cerebral ischemia and serve as a rational basis for revascularization procedures.

  13. Evaluation of Perfusion Quantification Methods with Ultrasound Contrast Agents in a Machine-Perfused Pig Liver.

    PubMed

    Averkiou, M; Keravnou, C P; Izamis, M L; Leen, E

    2016-05-03

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) as a tool for measuring blood flow in the macro- and microcirculation of an ex-vivo machine-perfused pig liver and to confirm the ability of DCEUS to accurately detect induced flow rate changes so that it could then be used clinically for monitoring flow changes in liver tumors. Materials and Methods: Bolus injections of contrast agents in the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) were administered to 3 machine-perfused pig livers. Flow changes were induced by the pump of the machine perfusion system. The induced flow rates were of clinical relevance (150 - 400 ml/min for HA and 400 - 1400 ml/min for PV). Quantification parameters from time-intensity curves [rise time (RT), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI)] were extracted in order to evaluate whether the induced flow changes were reflected in these parameters. Results: A linear relationship between the image intensity and the microbubble concentration was confirmed first, while time parameters (RT and MMT) were found to be independent of concentration. The induced flow changes which propagated from the larger vessels to the parenchyma were reflected in the quantification parameters. Specifically, RT, MTT and AUC correlated with flow rate changes. Conclusion Machine-perfused pig liver is an excellent test bed for DCEUS quantification approaches for the study of the hepatic vascular networks. DCEUS quantification parameters (RT, MTT, and AUC) can measure relative flow changes of about 20 % and above in the liver vasculature. DCEUS quantification is a promising tool for real-time monitoring of the vascular network of tumors.

  14. Quantitative assessment of brain microvascular and tissue oxygenation during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Ramadeen, A; Tsui, A K Y; Hu, X; Zou, L; Wilson, D F; Esipova, T V; Vinogradov, S A; Leong-Poi, H; Zamiri, N; Mazer, C D; Dorian, P; Hare, G M T

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a very high rate of mortality, in part due to inadequate tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Parameters such as mean arterial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac resuscitation. We hypothesised that quantitative measurements of tissue oxygen tension would more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during experimental cardiac arrest. Using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence, we made measurements of oxygen in the microcirculation and in the interstitial space of the brain and muscle in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Measurements were performed at baseline, during untreated ventricular fibrillation, during resuscitation and after return of spontaneous circulation. After achieving stable baseline brain tissue oxygen tension, as measured using an Oxyphor G4-based phosphorescent microsensor, ventricular fibrillation resulted in an immediate reduction in all measured parameters. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, brain oxygen tension remained unchanged. After the return of spontaneous circulation, all measured parameters including brain oxygen tension recovered to baseline levels. Muscle tissue oxygen tension followed a similar trend as the brain, but with slower response times. We conclude that measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension, which more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac arrest and resuscitation, may contribute to the development of new strategies to optimise perfusion during cardiac resuscitation and improve patient outcomes after cardiac arrest.

  15. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  16. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  17. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  18. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  19. Pericytes control key neurovascular functions and neuronal phenotype in the adult brain and during brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Robert D.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Sagare, Abhay P.; Singh, Itender; LaRue, Barb; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Pericytes play a key role in the development of cerebral microcirculation. The exact role of pericytes in the neurovascular unit in the adult brain and during brain aging remains, however, elusive. Using adult viable pericyte-deficient mice, we show that pericyte loss leads to brain vascular damage by two parallel pathways: (1) reduction in brain microcirculation causing diminished brain capillary perfusion, cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood flow responses to brain activation which ultimately mediates chronic perfusion stress and hypoxia, and (2) blood-brain barrier breakdown associated with brain accumulation of serum proteins and several vasculotoxic and/or neurotoxic macromolecules ultimately leading to secondary neuronal degenerative changes. We show that age-dependent vascular damage in pericyte-deficient mice precedes neuronal degenerative changes, learning and memory impairment and the neuroinflammatory response. Thus, pericytes control key neurovascular functions that are necessary for proper neuronal structure and function, and pericytes loss results in a progressive age-dependent vascular-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21040844

  20. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging of cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry in drug-naïve patients with first-episode major depression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangdong; Bian, Haiman; Jiang, Deguo; Cui, Mingwei; Ji, Shengzhang; Liu, Mei; Lang, Xu; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Many previous studies have reported that regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) aberrations may be one of the pathological characteristics of depression and rCBF has demonstrated a certain degree of asymmetry. However, studies investigating the cerebral blood perfusion asymmetry changes of drug-naïve patients experiencing their first episode of major depression using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) are rare. Ten drug-naïve patients experiencing their first major depression episode and 15 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the current study. A novel pCASL method was applied to whole brain MRI scans of all of the samples. The Statistics Parameter Mapping and Relative Expression Software Tool software packages were used for the pre-processing and statistical analysis of the two sets of images, and the differences in the cerebral blood perfusion at the whole brain level were compared between the two groups. Compared with the healthy control group, the cerebral perfusion of the depression patients showed an asymmetric pattern. Decreased cerebral blood perfusion regions were primarily located in the left hemisphere, specifically in the left temporal lobe, frontal lobe and cingulate cortex [P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30 with false discovery rate (FDR) correction]. Simultaneously, increased perfusion regions were predominantly located in the right hemisphere, specifically in the right cerebellum, thalamus, frontal lobe and anterior cingulate cortex (P<0.05 and cluster size ≥30, with FDR correction). Thus, pCASL may characterize the alterations in cerebral blood perfusion of patients with depression. PMID:28101340

  1. Optical micro-angiography images structural and functional cerebral blood perfusion in mice with cranium left intact.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yali; Wang, Ruikang K

    2011-01-01

    Alteration in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) is the direct result of changes in neuronal activity. It is crucial to monitor the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebro-vascular blood perfusion in the studies of cerebral diseases. Optical micro-angiography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging technique capable of resolving 3D distribution of dynamic blood perfusion at a capillary level resolution within microcirculatory beds in vivo. The authors report the applications of OMAG in mouse ischemic stroke model. The study demonstrates that OMAG is a useful method capable of providing in vivo serial assessment of 3D cerebro-vascular pathophysiology with high sensitivity, and therefore, has the potential for use in the study of brain disorders and repairs.

  2. Luxury perfusion phenomenon in acute herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Uesugi, M; Igeta, Y; Kondo, S; Sun, X; Hirai, S

    1995-02-01

    In a patient with acute herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased cerebral blood flow in the affected temporal lobe accompanied by reduction in the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, i.e., luxury perfusion. Follow-up PET studies showed reduction in cerebral perfusion until it was more closely coupled with oxygen metabolism after the resolution of the acute inflammation. These findings support previous single photon emission computed tomographic data and provide a pathophysiological background for the occurrence of hyperperfusion in HSV encephalitis. This is an interesting example of the luxury perfusion phenomenon occurring in a disease other than cerebral ischemia.

  3. Contactless mapping of rhythmical phenomena in tissue perfusion using PPGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelsbusch, Markus; Blazek, Vladimir

    2002-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental setup and preliminary results of a near infrared CCD camera based Photoplethysmography Imaging (PPGI) system, which has been shown to be suitable for contactless and spatially resolved assessment of rhythmical blood volume changes in the skin. To visualize the complex rhythmical patterns in the dermal perfusion the Wavelet Transform is utilized. It is able to jointly assess time and frequency behavior of signals and thus allows to analyze instationary oscillations and variabilities in the different human rhythmics. The presented system is expected to provide new insights into the functional sequences of physiological tissue perfusion as well as of the perfusion status in ulcer formation and wound healing.

  4. Aβ degradation or cerebral perfusion? Divergent effects of multifunctional enzymes.

    PubMed

    Miners, J Scott; Palmer, Jennifer C; Tayler, Hannah; Palmer, Laura E; Ashby, Emma; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that deficient clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) contributes to its accumulation in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Several Aβ-degrading enzymes, including neprilysin (NEP), endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) reduce Aβ levels and protect against cognitive impairment in mouse models of AD. In post-mortem human brain tissue we have found that the activity of these Aβ-degrading enzymes rise with age and increases still further in AD, perhaps as a physiological response that helps to minimize the build-up of Aβ. ECE-1/-2 and ACE are also rate-limiting enzymes in the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II), two potent vasoconstrictors, increases in the levels of which are likely to contribute to reduced blood flow in AD. This review considers the possible interdependence between Aβ-degrading enzymes, ischemia and Aβ in AD: ischemia has been shown to increase Aβ production both in vitro and in vivo, whereas increased Aβ probably enhances ischemia by vasoconstriction, mediated at least in part by increased ECE and ACE activity. In contrast, NEP activity may help to maintain cerebral perfusion, by reducing the accumulation of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels and lessening its toxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. In assessing the role of Aβ-degrading proteases in the pathogenesis of AD and, particularly, their potential as therapeutic agents, it is important to bear in mind the multifunctional nature of these enzymes and to consider their effects on other substrates and pathways.

  5. Aβ degradation or cerebral perfusion? Divergent effects of multifunctional enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, J. Scott; Palmer, Jennifer C.; Tayler, Hannah; Palmer, Laura E.; Ashby, Emma; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Love, Seth

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that deficient clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) contributes to its accumulation in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Several Aβ-degrading enzymes, including neprilysin (NEP), endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) reduce Aβ levels and protect against cognitive impairment in mouse models of AD. In post-mortem human brain tissue we have found that the activity of these Aβ-degrading enzymes rise with age and increases still further in AD, perhaps as a physiological response that helps to minimize the build-up of Aβ. ECE-1/-2 and ACE are also rate-limiting enzymes in the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II), two potent vasoconstrictors, increases in the levels of which are likely to contribute to reduced blood flow in AD. This review considers the possible interdependence between Aβ-degrading enzymes, ischemia and Aβ in AD: ischemia has been shown to increase Aβ production both in vitro and in vivo, whereas increased Aβ probably enhances ischemia by vasoconstriction, mediated at least in part by increased ECE and ACE activity. In contrast, NEP activity may help to maintain cerebral perfusion, by reducing the accumulation of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels and lessening its toxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. In assessing the role of Aβ-degrading proteases in the pathogenesis of AD and, particularly, their potential as therapeutic agents, it is important to bear in mind the multifunctional nature of these enzymes and to consider their effects on other substrates and pathways. PMID:25309424

  6. Distinct cerebral perfusion patterns in FTLD and AD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, W.T.; Wang, Z.; Lee, V.M.-Y.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Detre, J.A.; Grossman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the utility of distinguishing between patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) using quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging with arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI. Methods: Forty-two patients with FTLD and 18 patients with AD, defined by autopsy or CSF-derived biomarkers for AD, and 23 matched controls were imaged with a continuous ASL method to quantify CBF maps covering the entire brain. Results: Patients with FTLD and AD showed distinct patterns of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Compared with controls, patients with FTLD showed significant hypoperfusion in regions of the frontal lobe bilaterally, and hyperperfusion in posterior cingulate and medial parietal/precuneus regions. Compared with controls, patients with AD showed significant hypoperfusion in the medial parietal/precuneus and lateral parietal cortex, and hyperperfusion in regions of the frontal lobe. Direct comparison of patient groups showed significant inferior, medial, and dorsolateral frontal hypoperfusion in FTLD, and significant hypoperfusion in bilateral lateral temporal-parietal and medial parietal/precuneus regions in AD. Conclusions: Doubly dissociated areas of hypoperfusion in FTLD and AD are consistent with areas of significant histopathologic burden in these groups. ASL is a potentially useful biomarker for distinguishing patients with these neurodegenerative diseases. GLOSSARY Aβ42 = β-amyloid1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; ASL = arterial spin labeling; bvFTD = behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia; cASL = continuous arterial spin labeling; CBS = corticobasal syndrome; CBF = cerebral blood flow; dACC = dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; dlPFC = dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; FDR = false detection rate; FTLD = frontotemporal lobar degeneration; GM = gray matter; iFC = inferior frontal cortex; MCI = mild cognitive impairment; MNI = Montreal Neurological Institute; mTC = middle temporal cortex; OFC

  7. Intracranial mechanisms for preserving brain blood flow in health and disease.

    PubMed

    McBryde, F D; Malpas, S C; Paton, J F R

    2017-01-01

    The brain is an exceptionally energetically demanding organ with little metabolic reserve, and multiple systems operate to protect and preserve the brain blood supply. But how does the brain sense its own perfusion? In this review, we discuss how the brain may harness the cardiovascular system to counter threats to cerebral perfusion sensed via intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and ischaemia. Since the work of Cushing over 100 years ago, the existence of brain baroreceptors capable of eliciting increases in sympathetic outflow and blood pressure has been hypothesized. In the clinic, this response has generally been thought to occur only in extremis, to perfuse the severely ischaemic brain as cerebral autoregulation fails. We review evidence that pressor responses may also occur with smaller, physiologically relevant increases in ICP. The incoming brain oxygen supply is closely monitored by the carotid chemoreceptors; however, hypoxia and other markers of ischaemia are also sensed intrinsically by astrocytes or other support cells within brain tissue itself and elicit reactive hyperaemia. Recent studies suggest that astrocytic oxygen signalling within the brainstem may directly affect sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. We speculate that local cerebral oxygen tension is a major determinant of the mean level of arterial pressure and discuss recent evidence that this may be the case. We conclude that intrinsic intra- and extra-cranial mechanisms sense and integrate information about hypoxia/ischaemia and ICP and play a major role in determining the long-term level of sympathetic outflow and arterial pressure, to optimize cerebral perfusion.

  8. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  9. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  10. Brain dead or not? CT angiogram yielding false-negative result on brain death confirmation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Wyse, Gerald; Kaar, George

    2013-01-08

    We describe a case of severe traumatic brain injury with multiple facial and skull fractures where CT angiogram (CTA) failed to yield a definite result of brain death as an ancillary test. A 28-year-old man was admitted following a road traffic accident with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 3/15 and fixed pupils. CT brain revealed uncal herniation and diffuse cerebral oedema with associated multiple facial and skull fractures. 72 h later, his clinical condition remained the same with high intracranial pressure refractory to medical management. Clinical confirmation on brain death was not feasible owing to facial injuries. A CTA, performed to determine brain perfusion, yielded a 'false-negative' result. Skull fractures have possibly led to venous prominence in the cortical and deep venous drainage system. This point needs to be borne in mind while considering CTA as an ancillary test to confirm brain death.

  11. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  12. Altered resting perfusion and functional connectivity of default mode network in youth with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Hernandez, Leanna M; Beck-Pancer, Devora; McCarron, Rosemary; Smith, Robert X; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies can shed light on the neurobiological underpinnings of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies of the resting brain have shown both altered baseline metabolism from PET/SPECT and altered functional connectivity (FC) of intrinsic brain networks based on resting-state fMRI. To date, however, no study has investigated these two physiological parameters of resting brain function jointly, or explored the relationship between these measures and ASD symptom severity. Methods Here, we used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling with 3D background-suppressed GRASE to assess resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and FC in 17 youth with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children. Results A pattern of altered resting perfusion was found in ASD versus TD children including frontotemporal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. We found increased local FC in the anterior module of the default mode network (DMN) accompanied by decreased CBF in the same area. In our cohort, both alterations were associated with greater social impairments as assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-total T scores). While FC was correlated with CBF in TD children, this association between FC and baseline perfusion was disrupted in children with ASD. Furthermore, there was reduced long-range FC between anterior and posterior modules of the DMN in children with ASD. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study – the first to jointly assess resting CBF and FC in ASD – highlight new avenues for identifying novel imaging markers of ASD symptomatology. PMID:26445698

  13. SPETsNAZ: A Soviet Sabotage Threat.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Commissioning Program (AECPF. In 1972 he graduated with honors from Michigan State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science ...on air attac: or oerhaos missile taraetino if warranted. Althouah SFETsNAZ saboteurs ma’ not physicall ,,, destroy or damage the target themselves, the...N BIBLIOGRAPHY A. REFERENCES CITED Books 1. Barnett. Frank R.. Richard H. Shultz, and B. Hugh Tovar (ed). Special Operations in US Strategy. National

  14. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  15. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  16. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  17. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, TCA; Bezerra, BSP; Vianello, MP; Corradi, J; Dorairaj, SK; Prata, TS

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the diurnal variation of the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal, suspects and glaucoma patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-nine subjects were enrolled in a prospective study. The diurnal curve of intraocular pressure (IOP) was performed and blood pressure measurements were obtained. Each participant was grouped into one of the following based upon the clinical evaluation of the optic disk, IOP and standard achromatic perimetry (SAP): 18 eyes were classified as normal (normal SAP, normal optic disk evaluation and IOP < 21 mm Hg in two different measurements), 30 eyes as glaucoma suspect (GS) (normal SAP and mean deviation (MD), C/D ration > 0.5 or asymmetry > 0.2 and/or ocular hypertension), 31 eyes as early glaucoma (MD < -6 dB, glaucomatous optic neuropathy and SAP and MDs on SAP. Standard achromatic perimetry was performed with the Octopus 3.1.1 Dynamic 24-2 program. Intraocular pressure and blood pressure measurements were taken at 6 am, 9 am, 12, 3 and 6 pm. The patients stayed in the seated position for 5 minutes prior to blood pressure measurements. Results: The mean IOP values in all groups did not follow any regular pattern. The peak IOP was found to be greater in suspect [18.70 ± 3.31 (mm Hg ± SD)] and glaucoma (18.77 ± 4.30 mm Hg) patients as compared to normal subjects (16.11 ± 2.27 mm Hg). In studying the diurnal variation of the OPP, we found lower values at 3 pm in normals (34.21 ± 2.07 mm Hg), at 9 am in suspects (54.35 ± 3.32 mm Hg) and at 12 pm in glaucoma patients (34.84 ± 1.44 mm Hg). Conclusion: Each group has a specific OPP variation during the day with the most homogeneous group being the suspect one. It is important to keep studying the IOP and OPP variation for increased comprehension of the pathophysiology of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Kanadani FN, Moreira TCA, Bezerra BSP, Vianello MP, Corradi J, Dorairaj SK, Prata TS. Diurnal Curve of the Ocular Perfusion

  18. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas G; Gunser, John M; Saviello, George M

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience.

  19. Perfusion characteristics of preserved canine kidneys subjected to warm ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Modgill, V K; Wiggins, P A; Giles, G R

    1978-02-01

    Canine kidneys were subjected to 0, 15 or 30 min of warm ischaemia followed by 24 hours preservation by perfusion. Changes in perfusate concentration of acid radicles, lactate, free fatty acid and lactice dehydrogenase were assessed at 1 hour and 24 hours. With the exception of LDH concentration at 1 hour, no single parameter was capable of detecting kidneys which were so damaged as to be non-life supporting.

  20. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  1. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  2. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  3. Cerebral Perfusion Changes in Post-Concussion Syndrome: A Prospective Controlled Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcil, Lorenzo D.; Dewey, Deborah; Carlson, Helen L.; MacMaster, Frank P.; Brooks, Brian L.; Lebel, R. Marc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The biology of post-concussive symptoms is unclear. Symptoms are often increased during activities, and have been linked to decreased cerebrovascular reactivity and perfusion. The aim of this study was to examine cerebral blood flow (CBF) in children with different clinical recovery patterns following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). This was a prospective controlled cohort study of children with mTBI (ages 8 to 18 years) who were symptomatic with post-concussive symptoms at one month post-injury (symptomatic, n = 27) and children who had recovered quickly (asymptomatic, n = 24). Pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify CBF. The mTBI groups were imaged at 40 days post-injury. Global and regional CBF were compared with healthy controls of similar age and sex but without a history of mTBI (n = 21). Seventy-two participants (mean age: 14.1 years) underwent neuroimaging. Significant differences in CBF were found: global CBF was higher in the symptomatic group and lower in the asymptomatic group compared with controls, (F(2,69) 9.734; p < 0.001). Post-injury symptom score could be predicted by pre-injury symptoms and CBF in presence of mTBI (adjusted R2 = 0.424; p < 0.001). Altered patterns of cerebral perfusion are seen following mTBI and are associated with the recovery trajectory. Symptomatic children have higher CBF. Children who “recovered” quickly, have decreased CBF suggesting that clinical recovery precedes the cerebral recovery. Further longitudinal studies are required to determine if these perfusion patterns continue to change over time. PMID:27554429

  4. Robust Low-dose CT Perfusion Deconvolution via Tensor Total-Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain diseases such as acute strokes and transit ischemic attacks are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, responsible for 9% of total death every year. ‘Time is brain’ is a widely accepted concept in acute cerebrovascular disease treatment. Efficient and accurate computational framework for hemodynamic parameters estimation can save critical time for thrombolytic therapy. Meanwhile the high level of accumulated radiation dosage due to continuous image acquisition in CT perfusion (CTP) raised concerns on patient safety and public health. However, low-radiation leads to increased noise and artifacts which require more sophisticated and time-consuming algorithms for robust estimation. In this paper, we focus on developing a robust and efficient framework to accurately estimate the perfusion parameters at low radiation dosage. Specifically, we present a tensor total-variation (TTV) technique which fuses the spatial correlation of the vascular structure and the temporal continuation of the blood signal flow. An efficient algorithm is proposed to find the solution with fast convergence and reduced computational complexity. Extensive evaluations are carried out in terms of sensitivity to noise levels, estimation accuracy, contrast preservation, and performed on digital perfusion phantom estimation, as well as in-vivo clinical subjects. Our framework reduces the necessary radiation dose to only 8% of the original level and outperforms the state-of-art algorithms with peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by 32%. It reduces the oscillation in the residue functions, corrects over-estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and under-estimation of mean transit time (MTT), and maintains the distinction between the deficit and normal regions. PMID:25706579

  5. Clinical Use of CT Perfusion For Diagnosis and Prediction of Lesion Growth in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Huisa, Branko N; Neil, William P; Schrader, Ronald; Maya, Marcel; Pereira, Benedict; Bruce, Nhu T; Lyden, Patrick D

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose CT perfusion (CTP) mapping in research centers correlates well with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) lesions and may accurately differentiate the infarct core from ischemic penumbra. The value of CTP in real-world clinical practice has not been fully established. We investigated the yield of CTP– derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transient time (MTT) for the detection of cerebral ischemia and ischemic penumbra in a sample of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Methods We studied 165 patients with initial clinical symptoms suggestive of AIS. All patients had an initial non-contrast head CT, CT Perfusion (CTP), CT angiogram (CTA) and follow up brain MRI. The obtained perfusion images were used for image processing. CBV, MTT and DWI lesion volumes were visually estimated and manually traced. Statistical analysis was done using R-2.14.and SAS 9.1. Results All normal DWI sequences had normal CBV and MTT studies (N=89). Seventy-three patients had acute DWI lesions. CBV was abnormal in 23.3% and MTT was abnormal in 42.5% of these patients. There was a high specificity (91.8%)but poor sensitivity (40.0%) for MTT maps predicting positive DWI. Spearman correlation was significant between MTT and DWI lesions (ρ=0.66, p>0.0001) only for abnormal MTT and DWI lesions>0cc. CBV lesions did not correlate with final DWI. Conclusions In real-world use, acute imaging with CTP did not predict stroke or DWI lesions with sufficient accuracy. Our findings argue against the use of CTP for screening AIS patients until real-world implementations match the accuracy reported from specialized research centers. PMID:23253533

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Peripheral Tissue Perfusion Using Spatiotemporal Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsul; Koh, Gou Young; Kwon, Kihwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion is challenging but necessary to diagnose peripheral vascular insufficiency. Because near infrared (NIR) radiation can penetrate relatively deep into tissue, significant attention has been given to intravital NIR fluorescence imaging. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new optical imaging-based strategy for quantitative measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion by time-series analysis of local pharmacokinetics of the NIR fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Time-series NIR fluorescence images were obtained after injecting ICG intravenously in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. Mathematical modeling and computational simulations were used for translating time-series ICG images into quantitative pixel perfusion rates and a perfusion map. We could successfully predict the prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs based on the perfusion profiles obtained immediately after surgery, which were dependent on the preexisting collaterals. This method also reflected increases in perfusion and improvements in prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs induced by treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor and COMP-angiopoietin-1. Conclusions/Significance We propose that this novel NIR-imaging-based strategy is a powerful tool for biomedical studies related to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions directed at stimulating angiogenesis. PMID:19169354

  7. Brain microvascular endothelial cell association and distribution of a 5 nm ceria engineered nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Mo; Tseng, Michael T; Wu, Peng; Unrine, Jason M; Grulke, Eric A; Yokel, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ceria engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have current commercial applications and both neuroprotective and toxic effects. Our hypothesis is that ceria ENMs can associate with brain capillary cells and/or cross the blood–brain barrier. Methods: An aqueous dispersion of ∼5 nm ceria ENM was synthesized and characterized in house. Its uptake space in the Sprague Dawley rat brain was determined using the in situ brain perfusion technique at 15 and 20 mL/minute flow rates; 30, 100, and 500 μg/mL ceria perfused for 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute; and 30 μg/mL perfused for 20, 60, and 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute. The capillary depletion method and light and electron microscopy were used to determine its capillary cell and brain parenchymal association and localization. Results: The vascular space was not significantly affected by brain perfusion flow rate or ENM, demonstrating that this ceria ENM did not influence blood–brain barrier integrity. Cerium concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, were significantly higher in the choroid plexus than in eight brain regions in the 100 and 500 μg/mL ceria perfusion groups. Ceria uptake into the eight brain regions was similar after 120-second perfusion of 30, 100, and 500 μg ceria/mL. Ceria uptake space significantly increased in the eight brain regions and choroid plexus after 60 versus 20 seconds, and it was similar after 60 and 120 seconds. The capillary depletion method showed 99.4% ± 1.1% of the ceria ENM associated with the capillary fraction. Electron microscopy showed the ceria ENM located on the endothelial cell luminal surface. Conclusion: Ceria ENM association with brain capillary endothelial cells saturated between 20 and 60 seconds and ceria ENM brain uptake was not diffusion-mediated. During the 120-second ceria ENM perfusion, ceria ENM predominately associated with the surface of the brain capillary cells, providing the opportunity for its cell uptake or redistribution

  8. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  9. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  10. Chemosaturation Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Arndt; Gupta, Sanjay; Zeile, Martin; von Haken, Rebecca; Brüning, Roland; Lotz, Gösta; Vahrmeijer, Alexander; Vogl, Thomas; Wacker, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The Hepatic CHEMOSAT(®) Delivery System is an innovative medical device for the treatment of patients with unresectable primary liver tumors or unresectable hepatic metastases from solid organ malignancies. This system is used to perform chemosaturation percutaneous hepatic perfusion (CS-PHP), a procedure in which a high dose of the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan is delivered directly to the liver while limiting systemic exposure. In a clinical trial program, CS-PHP with melphalan significantly improved hepatic progression-free survival in patients with unresectable hepatic metastases from ocular or cutaneous melanoma. Clinically meaningful hepatic responses were also observed in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors. Furthermore, the results of published studies and case reports demonstrated that CS-PHP with melphalan resulted in favorable tumor response rates in a range of tumor histologies (ocular or cutaneous melanoma, colorectal cancer, and hepatobiliary tumors). Analyses of the safety profile of CS-PHP revealed that the most common adverse effects were hematologic events (thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia), which were clinically manageable. Taken together, these findings indicate that CS-PHP is a promising locoregional therapy for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors and has a acceptable safety profile.

  11. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  12. Myocardial perfusion assessment with contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, Manuel; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Santos, Andres; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Malpica, Norberto; Antoranz, Jose C.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    Assessment of intramyocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography is a promising new technique that allows to obtain quantitative parameters for the assessment of ischemic disease. In this work, a new methodology and a software prototype developed for this task are presented. It has been validated with Coherent Contrast Imaging (CCI) images acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Contrast (Optison microbubbles) is injected continuously during the scan. 150 images are acquired using low mechanical index U/S pulses. A burst of high mechanical index pulses is used to destroy bubbles, thus allowing to detect the contrast wash-in. The stud is performed in two conditions: rest and pharmacologically induced stress. The software developed allows to visualized the study (cine) and to select several ROIs within the heart wall. The position of these ROIs along the cardiac cycle is automatically corrected on the basis of the gradient field, and they can also be manually corrected in case the automatic procedure fails. Time curves are analyzed according to a parametric model that incorporates both contrast inflow rate and cyclic variations. Preliminary clinical results on 80 patients have allowed us to identify normal and pathological patterns and to establish the correlation of quantitative parameters with the real diagnosis.

  13. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  14. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  15. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (p<0.001, paired t-test), which is most likely due to the leakage of contrast agent through the disrupted blood brain barrier. This setup offers advanced MR imaging of small animals without the need for dedicated animal scanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  17. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Scholbach, T. M.; Sachse, C.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the “low grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the “high grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR. PMID:27051133

  18. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  19. Postoperative luxury perfusion syndrome in patients with severe subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by early aneurysmal clipping.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H

    1990-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in 90 patients who underwent early aneurysmal clipping after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Measurements were made by a noninvasive, two-dimensional method involving intravenous injection of 133Xe. Patients of Hunt and Hess grades I and II exhibited normal to slightly subnormal CBF, without significant changes, during the study period. Grades III-V patients had almost normal CBF in the early postoperative period, but their CBF gradually decreased, becoming significantly low after day 31. It is noteworthy that in grades IV and V patients, CBF was abnormally high in the acute stage, relative to their poor neurological condition; these patients were considered to have the "global luxury perfusion syndrome." The syndrome was not uncommon in patients with severe SAH. Possible causative or contributory factors are attempts to surgically reduce intracranial pressure, which leads to increased cerebral perfusion pressure, and concomitant global dysautoregulation. In patients with this syndrome, maneuvers intended to increase CBF should be avoided, as they may aggravate brain swelling or cause hemorrhagic events. Positron emission tomographic studies will provide more accurate and useful information concerning the management of SAH patients.

  20. Comparison of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI perfusion quantification methods in the presence of delay and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Bianca; Simões, Rita Lopes; Meijer, Frederick J. A.; Klaas Jan Renema, W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    The perfusion of the brain is essential to maintain brain function. Stroke is an example of a decrease in blood flow and reduced perfusion. During ischemic stroke the blood flow to tissue is hampered due to a clot inside a vessel. To investigate the recovery of stroke patients, follow up studies are necessary. MRI is the preferred imaging modality for follow up because of the absence of radiation dose concerns, contrary to CT. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI is an imaging technique used for measuring perfusion of the brain, however, is not standard applied in the clinical routine due to lack of immediate patient benefit. Several post processing algorithms are described in the literature to obtain cerebral blood flow (CBF). The quantification of CBF relies on the deconvolution of a tracer concentration-time curve in an arterial and a tissue voxel. There are several methods to obtain this deconvolution based on singular-value decomposition (SVD). This contribution describes a comparison between the different approaches as currently there is no best practice for (all) clinical relevant situations. We investigate the influence of tracer delay, dispersion and recirculation on the performance of the methods. In the presence of negative delays, the truncated SVD approach overestimates the CBF. Block-circulant and reformulated SVD are delay-independent. Due to its delay dependent behavior, the truncated SVD approach performs worse in the presence of dispersion as well. However all SVD approaches are dependent on the amount of dispersion. Moreover, we observe that the optimal truncation parameter varies when recirculation is added to noisy data, suggesting that, in practice, these methods are not immune to tracer recirculation. Finally, applying the methods to clinical data resulted in a large variability of the CBF estimates. Block-circulant SVD will work in all situations and is the method with the highest potential.

  1. Parametric perfusion imaging based on low-cost ultrasound platform.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolin; Zhong, Hui; Wan, Mingxi; Hu, Xiaowen; Lv, Dan; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to implement parametric perfusion imaging to quantify blood perfusion based on modified low-cost ultrasound platform. A novel ultrasound contrast-specific imaging method called pulse-inversion harmonic sum-squared-differences (PIHSSD) was proposed for improving the sensitivity for detecting contrast agents and the accuracy of parametric perfusion imaging, which combined pulse-inversion harmonic (PIH) with pulse-inversion sum-squared-differences (PISSD) threshold-based decision. PIHSSD method just involved simple operations including addition and multiplication and was easy to realize. The sequences of contrast images without logarithmic compression were used to acquire time intensity curves (TICs) from numerous equal-sized regions-of-interest (ROI) covering the entire image plane. Parametric perfusion images were obtained based on the parameters extracted from the TICs, including peak value (PV), area under curve (AUC), mean transit time (MTT), peak value time (PVT), peak width (PW) and climbing rate (CR). Flow phantom was used for validation and the results suggested that PIHSSD method provided 9.6 to 20.3 dB higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) than PIH method. The results of the experiments of rabbit kidney also showed that the CTR of PIHSSD images was higher than that of PIH images, and the parametric perfusion images based on PIHSSD method provided more accurate quantification of blood perfusion compared with those based on PIH and PISSD methods. It demonstrated that the parametric perfusion imaging achieved good performance though implemented on low-cost ultrasound platform. (E-mail: mxwan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn).

  2. Renal disposition of colistin in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng; Wang, Jiping; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Turnidge, John D; Coulthard, Kingsley; Milne, Robert W

    2009-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is an important limitation to the clinical use of colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other gram-negative pathogens. Previous work reported net tubular reabsorption of colistin by the kidney in vivo, but there is no knowledge of its disposition within the kidney. This study investigated the renal disposition and potential transport mechanisms of colistin in the isolated perfused rat kidney (IPK) model by perfusing with colistin sulfate alone (2 microg/ml) or in the presence of potential inhibitors (tetraethylammonium [TEA], glycine-glycine [Gly-Gly], or hydrochloric acid [HCl]) at three different concentrations. When perfused alone, the renal clearances (CL(R)) for colistin A and B (the major components of colistin) in control kidneys were constant and low (mean values < 0.05 ml/min throughout the perfusion). The mean clearance ratios [CR, defined as CL(R)/(f(u) x GFR), where f(u) is the fraction of drug unbound in perfusate and GFR is the glomerular filtration rate] were significantly less than 1. It was concluded that there is net tubular reabsorption of colistin, and this exceeded the reabsorption of water. Less than 10% eliminated from perfusate was recovered in urine, suggesting considerable renal accumulation of colistin. The CR values for colistin were significantly increased when perfused with TEA (500 microM), Gly-Gly (833 microM), and HCl (2,500, 5,000, and 10,000 microM). It is proposed that renal reabsorption of colistin may involve organic cation transporters (inhibited by TEA) and peptide transporters (inhibited by Gly-Gly) and that the process is sensitive to the pH of urine.

  3. An Assessment of Fetal Cerebral and Hepatic Perfusion in Normal Pregnancy and Pre-Eclampsia Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Addley, Susan; Ali, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-eclampsia and placental causes of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are part of the same spectrum of disorders. In IUGR, there is preferential shunting of blood to the fetal brain at the expense of other organs. We wanted to demonstrate that this also occurs in pre-eclampsia using three dimensional (3D) ultrasound. The 3D indices of perfusion are: flow index (FI), vascular index (VI) and vascularisation flow index (VFI) which reflect tissue vascularity and flow intensity. Methods Fourteen normal pregnant women and 14 with diagnosed pre-eclampsia were recruited. Scanning was conducted by 2 observers using a Voluson E8 machine. Perfusion was measured at a pre-defined position within the fetal brain and fetal liver. The power Doppler signals were quantified using the ‘histogram facility’ to generate 3 indices of vascularity: FI, VI and VFI. The unpaired t-test was used to compare differences between groups. The hypothesis was that fetal brain FI, VI and VFI would be similar between women with normal pregnancy and women with pre-eclampsia, but measurements would be reduced in the fetal liver in women with pre-eclampsia. Results Maternal characteristics of age, body mass index and gestation were not different between groups. The depth of insonnation did not differ between groups. Fetal cerebral perfusion was not different between women with a normal pregnancy compared to women with pre-eclampsia. The mean (SD) for FI was 22.4 (5.7) vs. 21.1 (4.3) respectively (p=0.49). For VI, the mean (SD) was as 64.7 (40.4) vs. 79.1 (27.4) respectively (p=0.28). For VFI, the mean (SD) was 14.8 (10.3) vs. 16.1 (5.5) respectively (p = 0.66). Fetal hepatic perfusion was not different between women with a normal pregnancy compared to women with pre-eclampsia. The mean (SD) for FI was 34.4 (19.9) vs. 27.8 (11.0) respectively (p = 0.28). For VI, mean (SD) was 67.6 (36.0) vs. 87.3 (25.8) respectively (p=0.11). For VFI, the mean (SD) was 19.6 (11.6) vs. 23.1 (10

  4. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  5. Fluid absorption in isolated perfused colonic crypts.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S K; Binder, H J; Boron, W F; Geibel, J P

    1995-01-01

    A spatial segregation of ion transport processes between crypt and surface epithelial cells is well-accepted and integrated into physiological and pathophysiological paradigms of small and large intestinal function: Absorptive processes are believed to be located in surface (and villous) cells, whereas secretory processes are believed to be present in crypt cells. Validation of this model requires direct determination of fluid movement in intestinal crypts. This study describes the adaptation of techniques from renal tubule microperfusion to hand-dissect and perfuse single, isolated crypts from rat distal colon to measure directly fluid movement. Morphologic analyses of the isolated crypt preparation revealed no extraepithelial cellular elements derived from the lamina propria, including myofibroblasts. In the basal state, crypts exhibited net fluid absorption (mean net fluid movement = 0.34 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1), which was Na+ and partially HCO3- dependent. Addition of 1 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, 60 nM vasoactive intestinal peptide, or 0.1 mM acetylcholine to the bath (serosal) solution reversibly induced net fluid secretion (net fluid movement approximately -0.35 +/- 0.01 nl.mm-1.min-1). These observations permit speculation that absorption is a constitutive transport function in crypt cells and that secretion by crypt cells is regulated by one or more neurohumoral agonists that are released in situ from lamina propria cells. The functional, intact polarized crypt described here that both absorbs and secretes will permit future studies that dissect the mechanisms that govern fluid and electrolyte movement in the colonic crypt. Images PMID:7593625

  6. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. Method 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. Results MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1% [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. Conclusion The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring. PMID:27909712

  7. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  8. Ventilation-perfusion matching during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    In normal subjects, exercise widens the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (P[A-a]O2) despite a more uniform topographic distribution of ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratios. While part of the increase in P(A-a)O2 (especially during heavy exercise) is due to diffusion limitation, a considerable amount is caused by an increase in VA/Q mismatch as detected by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Why this occurs is unknown, but circumstantial evidence suggests it may be related to interstitial pulmonary edema rather than to factors dependent on ventilation, airway gas mixing, airway muscle tone, or pulmonary vascular tone. In patients with lung disease, the gas exchange consequences of exercise are variable. Thus, arterial PO2 may increase, remain the same, or fall. In general, patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or interstitial fibrosis who exercise show a fall in PO2. This is usually not due to worsening VA/Q relationships but mostly to the well-known fall in mixed venous PO2, which itself results from a relatively smaller increase in cardiac output than VO2. However, in interstitial fibrosis (but not COPD), there is good evidence that a part of the fall in PO2 on exercise is caused by alveolar-capillary diffusion limitation of O2 transport; in COPD (but not interstitial fibrosis), a frequent additional contributing factor to the hypoxemia of exercise is an inadequate ventilatory response, such that minute ventilation does not rise as much as does CO2 production or O2 uptake, causing arterial PCO2 to increase and PO2 to fall.

  9. Postmortem changes in the neuroanatomical characteristics of the primate brain: the hippocampal formation

    PubMed Central

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Amaral, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative studies of the structural organization of the brain are fundamental to our understanding of human brain function. However, whereas brains of experimental animals are fixed by perfusion of a fixative through the vasculature, human or ape brains are fixed by immersion after varying postmortem intervals. Although differential treatments might affect the fundamental characteristics of the tissue, this question has not been evaluated empirically in primate brains. Monkey brains were either perfused, or acquired after varying postmortem intervals before immersion-fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde. We found that the fixation method affected the neuroanatomical characteristics of the monkey hippocampal formation. Soma size was smaller in Nissl-stained, immersion-fixed tissue, although overall brain volume was larger, as compared to perfusion-fixed tissue. Non-phosphorylated high-molecular-weight neurofilament immunoreactivity was lower in CA3 pyramidal neurons, dentate mossy cells and the entorhinal cortex, whereas it was higher in the mossy fiber pathway in immersion-fixed tissue. Serotonin-immunoreactive fibers were well-stained in perfused tissue but were undetectable in immersion-fixed tissue. Although regional immunoreactivity patterns for calcium-binding proteins were not affected, intracellular staining degraded with increasing postmortem intervals. Somatostatin-immunoreactive clusters of large axonal varicosities, previously reported only in humans, were observed in immersion-fixed monkey tissue. In addition, calretinin-immunoreactive multipolar neurons, previously observed only in rodents, were found in the rostral dentate gyrus in both perfused and immersion-fixed brains. In conclusion, comparative studies of the brain must evaluate the effects of fixation on the staining pattern of each marker in every structure of interest before drawing conclusions about species differences. PMID:18972553

  10. Time-course of cerebral perfusion and tissue oxygenation in the first 6 h after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Thomas; Jauss, Alina; Eriskat, Jörg; Kunze, Ekkehard; Roosen, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Present knowledge about hemodynamic and metabolic changes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) originates from neuromonitoring usually starting with aneurysm surgery and animal studies that have been focusing on the first 1 to 3 h after SAH. Most patients, however, are referred to treatment several hours after the insult. We examined the course of hemodynamic parameters, cerebral blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (ptiO2) in the first 6 h after experimental SAH. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to SAH using the endovascular filament model or served as controls (n=8). Bilateral local cortical blood flow, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and ptiO2 were followed for 6 h after SAH. After induction of SAH, local cortical blood flow rapidly declined to 22% of baseline and returned to 80% after 6 h. The decline of local cortical blood flow markedly exceeded the decline of cerebral perfusion pressure. ptiO2 declined to 57%, recovered after 2 h, and reached > or =140% of baseline after 6 h. Acute vasoconstriction after SAH is indicated by the marked discrepancy of cerebral perfusion pressure and local cortical blood flow. The excess tissue oxygenation several hours after SAH suggests disturbed oxygen utilization and cerebral metabolic depression. Aside from the sudden increase of intracranial pressure at the time of hemorrhage and delayed cerebral vasospasm, the occurrence of acute vasoconstriction and disturbed oxygen utilization may be additional factors contributing to secondary brain damage after SAH.

  11. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  12. Advanced MR Imaging in Pediatric Brain Tumors, Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Maarten; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques, such as spectroscopy, perfusion, diffusion, and functional imaging, have improved the diagnosis of brain tumors in children and also play an important role in defining surgical as well as therapeutic responses in these patients. In addition to the anatomic or structural information gained with conventional MR imaging sequences, advanced MR imaging techniques also provide physiologic information about tumor morphology, metabolism, and hemodynamics. This article reviews the physiology, techniques, and clinical applications of diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, perfusion MR imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and functional MR imaging in the setting of neuro-oncology.

  13. In vivo transport of a dynorphin-like analgesic peptide, E-2078, through the blood-brain barrier: an application of brain microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, T; Deguchi, Y; Sato, H; Hirai, K; Tsuji, A

    1991-07-01

    In vivo transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been demonstrated for a dynorphin-like analgesic peptide, CH3-[125I]Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-Arg-CH3Arg-D-Leu-NHC2H5 ( [125I]E-2078). A remarkable time-dependent increase in the distribution volume of [125I]E-2078 in the brain parenchyma separated from blood vessels and capillaries was observed during a brain perfusion. The distribution volume of [125I]E-2078 in the brain parenchyma after 20 min of perfusion was 2.18 +/- 0.09 microliters/g brain (mean +/- SE) and was significantly greater than the distribution volume of [3H]inulin (0.994 +/- 0.138 microliters/g brain), providing in vivo evidence for the penetration of [125I]E-2078 into the brain parenchyma. Brain microdialysis was carried out to collect directly the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) during the brain perfusion of [125I]E-2078. No metabolite of [125I]E-2078 in the brain ISF was found by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the brain dialysate. The concentrations of [125I]E-2078 and [14C]sucrose in the brain ISF were estimated based on an in vitro evaluation of dialysis clearance. The concentration ratio of [125I]E-2078 between the brain ISF and the brain perfusate was determined to be 2.92 x 10(-1) +/- 0.50 x 10(-1) and was approximately 100 times higher than that of [14C]sucrose (2.71 x 10(-3) +/- 1.43 x 10(-3), demonstrating transport of [125I]E-2078 through the BBB in vivo. On the other hand, no remarkable difference in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-perfusate concentration ratios of [125I]E-2078 and [14C]sucrose was observed, indicating little contribution of the blood-CSF barrier (BCSF barrier) transport to the penetration of [125I]E-2078 into the brain.

  14. Multimodal Imaging of Pathophysiological Changes and Their Role in Development of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    time when systemic disease is under good control. In part, this may be du e to the fact that chemotherapeutic agents that show efficacy against...systemic disease , may have p oor penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which means that breast cancer metastasis in the brain may remain untreated...located betw een parenchyma and leptomeninges Metastatic lesions at brain parenchyma sho wed significan tly more perfusion, as compared to those l

  15. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  16. Repeat perfusion imaging may differentiate airways obstruction from pulomonary embolic disease: report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspon, L.W.; LaManna, M.M.; Dhand, S.

    1987-06-01

    Two cases are presented in which patients with obstructive lung disease were considered to have a pulmonary embolism (PE). Emergency lung perfusion scans supported the diagnosis of PE in both cases. However, rapid resolution of the symptoms and perfusion defects by repeat ventilation-perfusion scanning at 24 hr suggested that PE was unlikely. In selected cases of wheezing patients, repeat perfusion scans may obviate the need for pulmonary angiography. The authors report two cases in which repeat perfusion scans almost normalized by 24 hr. Review of the literature indicates that the rate of resolution of perfusion defects would have been much slower had pulmonary embolism occurred.

  17. Schizophrenia patients differentiation based on MR vascular perfusion and volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, A. B.; Joskowicz, L.; Moshel, S.; Israeli, D.

    2015-03-01

    Candecomp/Parafac Decomposition (CPD) has emerged as a framework for modeling N-way arrays (higher-order matrices). CPD is naturally well suited for the analysis of data sets comprised of observations of a function of multiple discrete indices. In this study we evaluate the prospects of using CPD for modeling MRI brain properties (i.e. brain volume and gray-level) for schizophrenia diagnosis. Taking into account that 3D imaging data consists of millions of pixels per patient, the diagnosis of a schizophrenia patient based on pixel analysis constitutes a methodological challenge (e.g. multiple comparison problem). We show that the CPD could potentially be used as a dimensionality redaction method and as a discriminator between schizophrenia patients and match control, using the gradient of pre- and post Gd-T1-weighted MRI data, which is strongly correlated with cerebral blood perfusion. Our approach was tested on 68 MRI scans: 40 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls. The CPD subject's scores exhibit statistically significant result (P < 0.001). In the context of diagnosing schizophrenia with MRI, the results suggest that the CPD could potentially be used to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and matched control. In addition, the CPD model suggests for brain regions that might exhibit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients for future research.

  18. Effects of hyperglycemia and effects of ketosis on cerebral perfusion, cerebral water distribution, and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury.

  19. Noise-induced sensitization of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin

    2002-11-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  20. BOLD-Perfusion Coupling during Monocular and Binocular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Claudine; Hoge, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that during selective activation of a subset of the zones comprising a columnar system in visual cortex, perfusion increases uniformly in all columns of the system, while increases in oxidative metabolism occur predominantly in the activated columns. This could lead to disproportionately large blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal increases for a given flow increase during monocular (relative to binocular) stimulation, due to contributions from columns which undergo large increases in perfusion with little or no change in oxidative metabolism. In the present study, we sought to test this hypothesis by measuring BOLD-perfusion coupling ratios in spatially averaged signals over V1 during monocular and binocular visual stimulation. It was found that, although withholding input to one eye resulted in statistically significant decreases in BOLD and perfusion signals in primary visual cortex, the ratio between BOLD and perfusion increases did not change significantly. These results do not support a gross mismatch between spatial patterns of flow and metabolism response during monocular stimulation. PMID:18350120

  1. Inert gas analysis of ventilation-perfusion matching during hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, D D; Ott, S M; Sherrard, D J; Hlastala, M P

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoxemia during hemodialysis was investigated by the multiple inert gas elimination technique in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated dogs. Profound leukopenia occurred in the first hour of a 2-h hemodialysis with a cuprophan membrane and dialysate that contained acetate. Arterial partial pressure of O2 and CO2 and oxygen consumption remained unchanged during dialysis. Pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination and lung respiratory exchange ratio decreased with the initiation of dialysis, remained depressed throughout the duration of dialysis, and returned to predialysis levels after the cessation of dialysis. Cardiac output diminished during dialysis but did not return to base-line levels after dialysis. Multiple indices calculated from inert gas analysis revealed no ventilation-perfusion mismatching during dialysis. The shunt and perfusion to regions of low alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) were unchanged during dialysis. There was no change in the mean or standard deviation of the profile of the percentage of total perfusion to regions of the lung that had VA/Q near 1.0; nor was there any increase in the directly calculated arterial-alveolar partial pressure differences for the inert gases during dialysis. Dead space became mildly elevated during dialysis. These results show that during dialysis with controlled ventilation there is no ventilation-perfusion mismatching that leads to hypoxemia. During spontaneous ventilation any hypoxemia must occur due to hypoventilation secondary to the CO2 exchange by the dialyzer and subsequent reduction in pulmonary CO2 exchange. PMID:6715542

  2. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling.

    PubMed

    Janssen, F E M; Van Leeuwen, G M J; Van Steenhoven, A A

    2005-09-07

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 degrees C to 18.3 degrees C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 degrees C to 21.8 degrees C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  3. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  4. Validation of Histologic Bone Analysis Following Microfil Vessel Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sarhaddi, D; Poushanchi, B; Merati, M; Tchanque-Fossuo, C; Donneys, A; Baker, J; Buchman, SR

    2015-01-01

    The ability to examine bone vascularity using Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) following vessel perfusion with Microfil® and to subsequently perform histologic bone analysis in the same specimen would provide an efficient method by which the vascular and cellular environment of bone can be examined simultaneously. The purpose of this report is to determine if the administration of Microfil® precludes accurate histologic assessment of bone quality via osteocyte count and empty lacunae count. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6) underwent perfusion with Microfil®. Left hemi-mandibles were harvested, decalcified and underwent vascular analysis via μCT prior to sectioning and staining with Gomori's Trichrome. Quantitative Histomorphometric evaluation was performed. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were used to determine statistical differences from an established set of controls (n=12). Histologic analyses were successfully performed on specimens that had undergone previous perfusion. Quantitative measures of bone cellularity of perfused versus control specimens revealed no statistical difference in osteocyte count per high-power field (95.33 versus 94.66; 95 percent CI,-7.64 to 6.30) or empty lacunae per high-power field (2.73 versus 1.89, 95 percent CI, -1.81 to 0.13). Here we report a statistical validation allowing for histological analysis of cell counts in specimens in which Microfil® perfusion has previously been performed. PMID:26207077

  5. Magnetic resonance cardiac perfusion imaging-a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Schlosser, Thomas; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2006-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) with its clinical appearance of stable or unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in developed countries. In view of increasing costs and the rising number of CAD patients, there has been a major interest in reliable non-invasive imaging techniques to identify CAD in an early (i.e. asymptomatic) stage. Since myocardial perfusion deficits appear very early in the "ischemic cascade", a major breakthrough would be the non-invasive quantification of myocardial perfusion before functional impairment might be detected. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target-organ-specific parameters, such as relative and absolute myocardial perfusion imaging. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been proven to offer attractive concepts in this respect. However, some important difficulties have not been resolved so far, which still causes uncertainty and prevents the broad application of MR perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. This review explores recent technical developments in MR hardware, software and contrast agents, as well as their impact on the current and future clinical status of MR imaging of first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging.

  6. Cyanide-induced injury to the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1988-11-01

    In order to study the events that follow cyanide-induced inhibition of oxidative metabolism and produce cellular injury, isolated, haemoglobin-free perfused rat livers from fasted rats were exposed to KCN (100 mg/l). KCN reduced the oxygen consumption of the livers by about 80%. Hepatotoxicity was evident by a marked release of enzymes (LDH, SDH) and of glutathione (mainly GSSG) into the perfusate, by a depletion of hepatic glutathione and by an accumulation of calcium in the liver. Cyanide-induced hepatotoxicity could be prevented completely by feeding the rats before preparing the liver as well as by addition of fructose to the perfusate of fasted livers. Both treatments resulted in an increased energy supply from anaerobic glycolysis as evidenced by a large release of lactate + pyruvate into the perfusate. The toxic actions of cyanide were markedly attenuated by deferrioxamine as well as by allopurinol. These antitoxic actions occurred without changes in anaerobic glycolysis. Omission of calcium from the perfusate, however, did not influence cyanide toxicity. Thus, energy supply from anaerobic glycolysis seems to be sufficient for the basic functions of the liver to occur, when oxidative metabolism is inhibited by cyanide. The effects of deferrioxamine and allopurinol indicate the involvement of radical intermediates and/or Fe2+ in cyanide-induced cellular toxicity. An influx of calcium from the extracellular to the intracellular space is not involved in cyanide-induced hepatocellular injury.

  7. Perfused multiwell plate for 3D liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, James; Dash, Ajit; Lim, Matthew H M; Griffith, Linda G

    2010-01-07

    In vitro models that capture the complexity of in vivo tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to-use format are desirable for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a bioreactor that fosters maintenance of 3D tissue cultures under constant perfusion and we have integrated multiple bioreactors into an array in a multiwell plate format. All bioreactors are fluidically isolated from each other. Each bioreactor in the array contains a scaffold that supports formation of hundreds of 3D microscale tissue units. The tissue units are perfused with cell culture medium circulated within the bioreactor by integrated pneumatic diaphragm micropumps. Electronic controls for the pumps are kept outside the incubator and connected to the perfused multiwell by pneumatic lines. The docking design and open-well bioreactor layout make handling perfused multiwell plates similar to using standard multiwell tissue culture plates. A model of oxygen consumption and transport in the circulating culture medium was used to predict appropriate operating parameters for primary liver cultures. Oxygen concentrations at key locations in the system were then measured as a function of flow rate and time after initiation of culture to determine oxygen consumption rates. After seven days of culture, tissue formed from cells seeded in the perfused multiwell reactor remained functionally viable as assessed by immunostaining for hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotypic markers.

  8. Perfusion calorimetry in the characterization of solvates forming isomorphic desolvates.

    PubMed

    Baronsky, Julia; Preu, Martina; Traeubel, Michael; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2011-09-18

    In this study, the potential of perfusion calorimetry in the characterization of solvates forming isomorphic desolvates was investigated. Perfusion calorimetry was used to expose different hydrates forming isomorphic desolvates (emodepside hydrates II-IV, erythromycin A dihydrate and spirapril hydrochloride monohydrate) to stepwise increasing relative vapour pressures (RVP) of water and methanol, respectively, while measuring thermal activity. Furthermore, the suitability of perfusion calorimetry to distinguish the transformation of a desolvate into an isomorphic solvate from the adsorption of solvent molecules to crystal surfaces as well as from solvate formation that is accompanied by structural rearrangement was investigated. Changes in the samples were confirmed using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. Perfusion calorimetry indicates the transformation of a desolvate into an isomorphic solvate by a substantial exothermic, peak-shaped heat flow curve at low RVP which reflects the rapid incorporation of solvent molecules by the desolvate to fill the structural voids in the lattice. In contrast, adsorption of solvent molecules to crystal surfaces is associated with distinctly smaller heat changes whereas solvate formation accompanied by structural changes is characterized by an elongated heat flow. Hence, perfusion calorimetry is a valuable tool in the characterization of solvates forming isomorphic desolvates which represents a new field of application for the method.

  9. Real-time vascular mechanosensation through ex vivo artery perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-based perfusion studies have provided great insight into fluid-sensing mechanisms, such as primary cilia in the renal and vascular systems. However, the intrinsic limitations of in vitro cell culture, such as the inability to reflect cellular organization within tissues, has distanced observed paradigms from possible clinical developments. Here we describe a protocol that applies ex vivo artery perfusion and calcium imaging to observe real-time cellular responses to fluid-shear stress. Results Through our ex vivo artery perfusion method, we were able to simulate physiological flow and initiate distinct fluid shear stress mechanosensory responses, as well as induced acetylcholine responses in mouse aortic tissue. The observed calcium profiles confirm results found through previous in vitro cell culture experiments. The overall procedure, including dissection, sample preparation and perfusion, takes around 3 hours to complete. Conclusion Through our unique method, we are able to induce laminar flow within intact mouse aortic tissue and illicit subsequent cellular responses. This method of ex vivo artery perfusion provides the opportunity to bridge the novel findings of in vitro studies with subsequent physiological models of fluid-shear stress mechanosensation in vascular tissues. PMID:24685068

  10. Numerical simulation of blood flow in femoral perfusion: comparison between side-armed femoral artery perfusion and direct femoral artery perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shingo; Shirota, Minori; Fukuda, Wakako; Inamura, Takao; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2016-12-01

    Computational numerical analysis was performed to elucidate the flow dynamics of femoral artery perfusion. Numerical simulation of blood flow was performed from the right femoral artery in an aortic model. An incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and continuity equation were solved using computed flow dynamics software. Three different perfusion models were analyzed: a 4.0-mm cannula (outer diameter 15 French size), a 5.2-mm cannula (18 French size) and an 8-mm prosthetic graft. The cannula was inserted parallel to the femoral artery, while the graft was anastomosed perpendicular to the femoral artery. Shear stress was highest with the 4-mm cannula (172 Pa) followed by the graft (127 Pa) and the 5.2-mm cannula (99 Pa). The cannula exit velocity was high, even when the 5.2-mm cannula was used. Although side-armed perfusion with an 8-mm graft generated a high shear stress area near the point of anastomosis, flow velocity at the external iliac artery was decreased. The jet speed decreased due to the Coanda effect caused by the recirculation behind sudden expansion of diameter, and the flow velocity maintains a constant speed after the reattachment length of the flow. This study showed that iliac artery shear stress was lower with the 5.2-mm cannula than with the 4-mm cannula when used for femoral perfusion. Side-armed graft perfusion generates a high shear stress area around the anastomotic site, but flow velocity in the iliac artery is slower in the graft model than in the 5.2-mm cannula model.

  11. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bosiocic, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate. PMID:27853608

  12. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  13. Adrenomedullin and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kastin, A J; Akerstrom, V; Hackler, L; Pan, W

    2001-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is present both in the periphery and brain. In addition to its peripheral effects, this peptide can exert central effects such as decreasing food ingestion. We used multiple-time regression analysis to determine that labeled ADM can cross from blood to brain with an apparent influx constant (K(I)) of 5.83 +/- 1.44 x 10(-4) ml/g-min, much faster than that of albumin, the vascular control. HPLC showed that almost all of the injected 125I-ADM in the brain was intact, and capillary depletion showed that it could reach the parenchyma of the brain. However, more 125I-ADM was reversibly associated with the brain vasculature than we have seen with any other peptide tested by these methods. After intracerebroventricular injection, 125I-ADM exited the brain with the bulk reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid at an efflux rate comparable to that of albumin. Although there was no blood-to-brain saturation, in situ brain perfusion of 125I-ADM in blood-free physiological buffer showed self-inhibition by excess unlabeled ADM. This, along with evidence of the lack of protein binding shown by capillary zone electrophoresis, indicated competition for the binding site of ADM at the BBB. The low lipophilicity of ADM determined by the octanol/buffer partition coefficient was also consistent with the prominent reversible association of ADM with the vasculature of the BBB. This suggests a function for ADM at the cerebral blood vessels, such as altering cerebral blood flow and perfusion, without disruption of the BBB.

  14. Retinal research using the perfused mammalian eye.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, G

    2001-05-01

    applied transiently. This process is monitored histochemically using FITC-albumin and with electrophysiological parameters. Changes in vitreo-scleral resistance and in the amplitude of the EOG-light peak appear to reflect the open/closed status of the barrier. This overview of the uses of the isolated perfused mammalian eye in retinal research concludes with a discussion of potential implications for clinically relevant topics.

  15. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  16. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  17. Delayed redistribution in thallium 201 SPECT myocardial perfusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ziessman, H.A.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Fox, L.M.; Green, C.E.; Fox, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion studies are useful in differentiating viable, reversibly ischemic from infarcted myocardium. A perfusion defect that shows redistribution 2 to 4 h after {sup 201}Tl injection is diagnostic of ischemia, while a fixed defect suggests infarction. However, occasional patients with a fixed defect at 4 h have redistribution at 24 h. This study evaluates the frequency and significance of this delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl. Patients with either no or incomplete redistribution at 4 h had repeat imaging 18 to 48 h later. Delayed redistribution was seen in 8/26 (31 percent). Four had incomplete and four had no redistribution at 4 h. Delayed redistribution with SPECT {sup 201}Tl is more common than generally appreciated, and we recommend delayed images in patients with fixed perfusion defects or incomplete redistribution at 4-h imaging, particularly in patients with previous infarctions for whom a revascularization procedure is being considered.

  18. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  19. Monitoring tissue perfusion, oxygenation, and metabolism in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ekbal, Nasirul J; Dyson, Alex; Black, Claire; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in oxygen transport and use are integral to the development of multiple organ failure; therefore, the ultimate goal of resuscitation is to restore effective tissue oxygenation and cellular metabolism. Hemodynamic monitoring is the cornerstone of management to promptly identify and appropriately manage (impending) organ dysfunction. Prospective randomized trials have confirmed outcome benefit when preemptive or early treatment is directed toward maintaining or restoring adequate tissue perfusion. However, treatment end points remain controversial, in large part because of current difficulties in determining what constitutes "optimal." Information gained from global whole-body monitoring may not detect regional organ perfusion abnormalities until they are well advanced. Conversely, the ideal "canary" organ that is readily accessible for monitoring, yet offers an early and sensitive indicator of tissue "unwellness," remains to be firmly identified. This review describes techniques available for real-time monitoring of tissue perfusion and metabolism and highlights novel developments that may complement or even supersede current tools.

  20. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition.

  1. A novel extracorporeal kidney perfusion system: a concept model.

    PubMed

    Szajer, Michael; Shah, Gaurang; Kittur, Dilip; Searles, Bruce; Li, Lu; Bruch, David; Darling, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The number of patients awaiting kidney transplantation has more than doubled in the past decade while the number of available donor organs has seen only a modest increase, leading to a critical shortage of organs. In response to this extreme shortage, the criteria for accepting organs have been modified to include marginal donors such as non-heart beating donors (NHBD). In these kidneys, determining viability is important for success of transplantation. Therefore, a study was undertaken to develop a system that would allow the extracorporeal assessment of function and compatibility of the donor organ before the patient is exposed to the risks associated with surgery. Following bilateral nephrectomy, the kidneys of 10 pigs (approximately 30 kg) were connected to a commercially available hypothermic pulsatile kidney perfusion apparatus. This system was modified to allow for normothermic pulsatile renal perfusion using the potential recipient's blood, via vascular access. These kidneys were perfused with the animal's blood for a minimum of two hours while various parameters were monitored. Perfusion pressures were kept between 60 and 90 mmHg, which correlated to flows between 70 and 150 mL/min. A decrease in perfusion pressure with a concomitant rise in flow over the two-hour period served as a good predictor of a viable and compatible graft. The modified kidney preservation system allows the normothermic, pulsatile extracorporeal perfusion of donor kidneys with the ability to monitor resistance to flow and urine production. This model also allows observation of the kidney for signs of hyperacute rejection. Further research needs to be conducted in order to determine if the system represents a methodology to increase the pool of available donor organs.

  2. Diffusion, Perfusion, and Histopathologic Characteristics of Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chang Y; Gener, Melissa; Bonnin, Jose; Kralik, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    We present a case series of a rare tumor, the desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma (DIG) with MRI diffusion and perfusion imaging quantification as well as histopathologic characterization. Four cases with pathologically-proven DIG had diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and two of the four had dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging. All four tumors demonstrate DWI findings compatible with low-grade pediatric tumors. For the two cases with perfusion imaging, a higher relative cerebral blood volume was associated with higher proliferation index on histopathology for one of the cases. Our results are discussed in conjunction with a literature review. PMID:27761184

  3. Estimation of pyruvate decarboxylation in perfused rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, P; Münch, U; Prengel, M; Staib, W

    1983-10-31

    By the determination of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in tissue homogenates only limited information is gained on the actual metabolic flux. We therefore determined pyruvate decarboxylation in isolated rat hindlimbs non recirculating perfused with physiological (1-14C)pyruvate levels. On the basis of perfusate pyruvate specific activity a 14CO2 production of 15.8 +/- 0.5 nmol/min per g muscle was measured. However, by this method the actual pyruvate flux through the enzyme complex is underestimated by a factor of 7 due to the intracellular dilution of label.

  4. Review of laser speckle contrast techniques for visualizing tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2009-07-01

    When a diffuse object is illuminated with coherent laser light, the backscattered light will form an interference pattern on the detector. This pattern of bright and dark areas is called a speckle pattern. When there is movement in the object, the speckle pattern will change over time. Laser speckle contrast techniques use this change in speckle pattern to visualize tissue perfusion. We present and review the contribution of laser speckle contrast techniques to the field of perfusion visualization and discuss the development of the techniques.

  5. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: techniques, interpretation, indications and reporting.

    PubMed

    Fathala, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission-computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the most important and common non-invasive diagnostic cardiac test. Gated MPS provides simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion and function with only one study. With appropriate attention to the MPS techniques, appropriate clinical utilization and effective reporting, gated MPS will remain a useful diagnostic test for many years to come. The aim of this article is to review the basic techniques of MPS, a simplified systematic approach for study interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting. After reading this article the reader should develop an understanding of the techniques, interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting of MPS studies.

  6. Uptake of Free Choline by Isolated Perfused Rat Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeisel, Steven H.; Story, David L.; Wurtman, Richard J.; Brunengraber, Henri

    1980-08-01

    The uptake of free choline by isolated perfused rat liver was characterized. A saturable uptake mechanism [Ka=0.17± 0.07 mM (SD); Vmax=0.84± 0.16\\ μ mol/min × g dry weight] and a nonsaturable mechanism (through which uptake is proportional to choline concentration in the perfusate) were identified. Most of the choline transported into hepatocytes was converted to betaine, phosphorylcholine, or lecithin. Free choline also accumulated within the intracellular space, suggesting that choline oxidase activity does not always limit choline's uptake by the liver.

  7. Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Ian D; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.

  8. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  9. Localized Spatio-Temporal Constraints for Accelerated CMR Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Pflugi, Silvio; Foppa, Murilo; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an image reconstruction technique for cardiac MRI (CMR)perfusion that utilizes localized spatio-temporal constraints. Methods CMR perfusion plays an important role in detecting myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold k-t based image acceleration techniques are typically used in CMR perfusion for superior spatial/temporal resolution, and improved coverage. In this study, we propose a novel compressed sensing based image reconstruction technique for CMR perfusion, with applicability to free-breathing examinations. This technique uses local spatio-temporal constraints by regularizing image patches across a small number of dynamics. The technique is compared to conventional dynamic-by-dynamic reconstruction, and sparsity regularization using a temporal principal-component (pc) basis, as well as zerofilled data in multi-slice 2D and 3D CMR perfusion. Qualitative image scores are used (1=poor, 4=excellent) to evaluate the technique in 3D perfusion in 10 patients and 5 healthy subjects. On 4 healthy subjects, the proposed technique was also compared to a breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging in terms of signal intensity curves. Results The proposed technique results in images that are superior in terms of spatial and temporal blurring compared to the other techniques, even in free-breathing datasets. The image scores indicate a significant improvement compared to other techniques in 3D perfusion (2.8±0.5 vs. 2.3±0.5 for x-pc regularization, 1.7±0.5 for dynamic-by-dynamic, 1.1±0.2 for zerofilled). Signal intensity curves indicate similar dynamics of uptake between the proposed method with a 3D acquisition and the breath-hold multi-slice 2D acquisition with parallel imaging. Conclusion The proposed reconstruction utilizes sparsity regularization based on localized information in both spatial and temporal domains for highly-accelerated CMR perfusion with potential utility in free

  10. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION.

    PubMed

    Mills, J David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-06-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules-or were not available within a reasonable computational time.

  11. Myocardial perfusion as an indicator of graft patency after coronary artery bypass surgery. [Thallium 201

    SciTech Connect

    Kolibash, A.J.; Call, T.D.; Bush, C.A.; Tetalman, M.R.; Lewis, R.P.

    1980-05-01

    Stress and resting myocardial perfusion were assessed in 38 patients who received 96 grafts. Stress perfusion was evaluated with thallium-201 and resting myocardial blood flow distribution with radiolabeled particles. When both stress and rest perfusion were normal, graft patency was 82% (51 of 62 grafts). Graft patency was also high (81%, 13 of 16) in areas where stress perfusion abnormalities resolved or become less apparent at rest. However, when stress perfusion defects remained unchanged at rest, the graf was likely to be occuluded (73%, 11 of 15). Maintenance of normal rest perfusion or improvement of rest perfusion postoperatively was also associated with a high graft patency rate (80%, 35 of 44), whereas the development of new rest perfusion defects postoperatively implied graft occlusion (86%, six of seven).

  12. Effect of carbon dioxide on the utilization of brain capillary reserve and flow

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, H.; Dribben, J.; Kissen, I.; Gerlock, T.; Weiss, H.R. )

    1989-12-01

    This study investigated effects of increased arterial carbon dioxide on the brain capillary perfusion pattern. Conscious rats were exposed to a 0%, 8% or 12% CO{sub 2} in air gas mixture. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases and pH were recorded, and either regional cerebral blood flow or the percent of capillary volume/mm3 or number/mm2 perfused were determined in cortical, hypothalamic, pontine or medullary regions of the brain. Arterial PCO{sub 2} increased from 37 +/- 1 in control to 74 +/- 1 torr in the high CO{sub 2} group. A position linear relationship was found between cerebral blood flow and arterial PCO{sub 2} in all examined regions. Approximately half of the capillaries in the examined regions were perfused under normocapnic conditions. Increasing arterial PCO{sub 2} had no effect on the percent of the capillary bed perfused in the cortex or hypothalamus. However, there was a significant linear relationship between carbon dioxide tension and the percent of the microvasculature perfused in the hindbrain. The percent of capillaries/mm2 perfused increased significantly in the medulla (to 60 +/- 5%) and pons (70 +/- 4%) with 12% CO{sub 2} in air. These data suggest that carbon dioxide may have differential effects on diffusion distances affecting the hindbrain to a greater extent than the forebrain.

  13. Culturing thick brain slices: an interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability.

    PubMed

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M

    2009-06-15

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well-established roller-tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H. Organotypic monolayer cultures of nervous tissue. J Neurosci Methods. 1981; 4: 329-342) or a membrane-insert method (up to 1-4 cell layers, <150 microm) (Stoppini L, Buchs PA, Muller D. A simple method for organotypic cultures of neural tissue. J Neurosci Methods 1991; 37: 173-182), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600 microm thick) (Hass HL, Schaerer B, Vosmansky M. A simple perfusion chamber for study of nervous tissue slices in vitro. J Neurosci Methods 1979; 1: 323-325; Nicoll RA, Alger BE. A simple chamber for recording from submerged brain slices. J Neurosci Methods 1981; 4: 153-156; Passeraub PA, Almeida AC, Thakor NV. Design, microfabrication and characterization of a microfluidic chamber for the perfusion of brain tissue slices. J Biomed Dev 2003; 5: 147-155). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700 microm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made microperfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium

  14. Single photon emission tomography in neurological studies: Instrumentation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkinen, Paivi Helena

    One triple head and two single head gamma camera systems were used for single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of both patients and brain phantoms. Studies with an anatomical brain phantom were performed for evaluation of reconstruction and correction methods in brain perfusion SPET studies. The use of the triple head gamma camera system resulted in a significant increase in image contrast and resolution. This was mainly due to better imaging geometry and the use of a high resolution collimator. The conventional Chang attenuation correction was found suitable for the brain perfusion studies. In the brain perfusion studies region of interest (ROI) based semiquantitation methods were used. A ROI map based on anatomical areas was used in 70 elderly persons (age range 55-85 years) without neurological diseases and in patients suffering from encephalitis or having had a cardiac arrest. Semiquantitative reference values are presented. For the 14 patients with encephalitis the right-to-left side differences were calculated. Defect volume indexes were calculated for 64 patients with brain infarcts. For the 30 cardiac arrest patients the defect percentages and the anteroposterior ratios were used for semiquantitation. It is concluded that different semiquantitation methods are needed for the various patient groups. Age-related reference values will improve the interpretation of SPET data. For validation of the basal ganglia receptor studies measurements were performed using a cylindrical and an anatomical striatal phantom. In these measurements conventional and transmission imaging based non-uniform attenuation corrections were compared. A calibration curve was calculated for the determination of the specific receptor uptake ratio. In the phantom studies using the triple head camera the uptake ratio obtained from simultaneous transmission-emission protocol (STEP) acquisition and iterative reconstruction was closest to the true activity ratio. Conventional

  15. High-frequency Electrocardiogram Analysis in the Ability to Predict Reversible Perfusion Defects during Adenosine Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.; Carlsson, Marcus; Pettersson, Jonas; Nilsson, Klas; Pahlm, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Background: A previous study has shown that analysis of high-frequency QRS components (HF-QRS) is highly sensitive and reasonably specific for detecting reversible perfusion defects on myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) scans during adenosine. The purpose of the present study was to try to reproduce those findings. Methods: 12-lead high-resolution electrocardiogram recordings were obtained from 100 patients before (baseline) and during adenosine Tc-99m-tetrofosmin MPI tests. HF-QRS were analyzed regarding morphology and changes in root mean square (RMS) voltages from before the adenosine infusion to peak infusion. Results: The best area under the curve (AUC) was found in supine patients (AUC=0.736) in a combination of morphology and RMS changes. None of the measurements, however, were statistically better than tossing a coin (AUC=0.5). Conclusion: Analysis of HF-QRS was not significantly better than tossing a coin for determining reversible perfusion defects on MPI scans.

  16. Perfusion of a cerebral protective solution enhances neuroprotection in a rabbit model of occlusion-reperfusion: prolonged cerebral dormancy time.

    PubMed

    Ye, Libin; Hua, Aiyuan; Dai, Bo; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Zhaolin; Ye, Meilin; Weintraub, Michael; Li, Qingdi Quentin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of a cerebral protective solution on prolongation of cerebral dormancy time in a rabbit model of occlusion-reperfusion. In a control group, rabbits were anesthetized and the four cerebral arteries (the left and right common carotid arteries and vertebral arteries) were occluded for 7.5 min followed by reperfusion. All six rabbits in the control group died. In contrast, a second group underwent perfusion of a cerebral protective solution for 15 min between artery occlusion and reperfusion. All six rabbits in this group survived. However, when the perfusion solution was changed to 5% glucose solution or rabbit plasma in two other groups, the rabbits in both the latter two groups also died. Neuroprotection was also observed when the protective solution was administered for 30-60 min after the onset of artery occlusion and before the return of blood flow (reperfusion). To understand the high rate of thrombotic stroke in the clinic, we assessed the influence of different organ tissue infusions on blood coagulation in vitro and found that blood clotting occurred faster in the presence of brain tissue infusion compared to liver, kidney, and heart tissue infusions. These results indicate a higher rate of thrombosis in brain tissue compared to any of the other tissues tested. The current study shows that perfusion of a cerebral protective solution produced a significant neuroprotective benefit in our rabbit model of occlusion-reperfusion, suggesting that administration of a cerebral protective solution may be an effective approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  17. Three-region perfusion strategy for aortic arch reconstruction in the Norwood.

    PubMed

    Karavas, Alexandros N; Deschner, Benjamin W; Scott, John W; Mettler, Bret A; Bichell, David P

    2011-09-01

    We describe a new method of selective regional perfusion during arch reconstruction in the Norwood procedure. The strategy involves direct sequential perfusion of the coronary and splanchnic circulations coupled with continuous cerebral perfusion, while repairing the arch in a distal to proximal fashion. This technique provides the potential for decreased coronary and splanchnic ischemic times, which in combination with continuous selective cerebral perfusion may further allow for warmer operating temperatures and decreased overall bypass times.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  19. The attention network changes in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy: Evidence from an arterial spin labeling perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingui; He, Xiaoxuan; Tao, Longxiang; Cheng, Huaidong; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Jingjie; Qiu, Bensheng; Yu, Yongqiang; Wang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying attention deficits that are related to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with cerebral perfusion. Thirty one patients with breast cancer who were scheduled to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 34 healthy control subjects were included. The patients completed two assessments of the attention network tasks (ANT), neuropsychological background tests, and the arterial spin labeling scan, which were performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after completing chemotherapy. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patients exhibited reduced performance in the alerting and executive control attention networks but not the orienting network (p < 0.05) and showed significant increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left posterior cingulate gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, angular gyrus, precuneus, cuneus, superior occipital gyrus, calcarine cortex, and temporal gyrus (p < 0.01 corrected) when compared with patients before chemotherapy and healthy controls. A significant correlation was found between the decrease performance of ANT and the increase in CBF changes in some brain regions of the patients with breast cancer. The results demonstrated that neoadjuvant chemotherapy influences hemodynamic activity in different brain areas through increasing cerebral perfusion, which reduces the attention abilities in breast cancer patients. PMID:28209975

  20. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  5. Procedure for Decellularization of Rat Livers in an Oscillating-pressure Perfusion Device.

    PubMed

    Hillebrandt, Karl; Polenz, Dietrich; Butter, Antje; Tang, Peter; Reutzel-Selke, Anja; Andreou, Andreas; Napierala, Hendrik; Raschzok, Nathanael; Pratschke, Johann; Sauer, Igor M; Struecker, Benjamin

    2015-08-10

    Decellularization and recellularization of parenchymal organs may enable the generation of functional organs in vitro, and several protocols for rodent liver decellularization have already been published. We aimed to improve the decellularization process by construction of a proprietary perfusion device enabling selective perfusion via the portal vein and/or the hepatic artery. Furthermore, we sought to perform perfusion under oscillating surrounding pressure conditions to improve the homogeneity of decellularization. The homogeneity of perfusion decellularization has been an underestimated factor to date. During decellularization, areas within the organ that are poorly perfused may still contain cells, whereas the extracellular matrix (ECM) in well-perfused areas may already be affected by alkaline detergents. Oscillating pressure changes can mimic the intraabdominal pressure changes that occur during respiration to optimize microperfusion inside the liver. In the study presented here, decellularized rat liver matrices were analyzed by histological staining, DNA content analysis and corrosion casting. Perfusion via the hepatic artery showed more homogenous results than portal venous perfusion did. The application of oscillating pressure conditions improved the effectiveness of perfusion decellularization. Livers perfused via the hepatic artery and under oscillating pressure conditions showed the best results. The presented techniques for liver harvesting, cannulation and perfusion using our proprietary device enable sophisticated perfusion set-ups to improve decellularization and recellularization experiments in rat livers.

  6. Standardized perfusion value: universal CT contrast enhancement scale that correlates with FDG PET in lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Miles, K A; Griffiths, M R; Fuentes, M A

    2001-08-01

    The standardized enhancement value and standardized perfusion value allow comparison between different methods for quantification of contrast enhancement during computed tomography (CT). Standard perfusion values calculated from CT measurements of perfusion within pulmonary nodules compared favorably with those derived from previously reported enhancement data and correlated with standardized uptake values obtained from positron emission tomographic images (r = 0.8, P <.01).

  7. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  8. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests don't provide enough information. Screening for brain aneurysms The use of imaging tests to screen ... and occupational therapy to relearn skills. Treating unruptured brain aneurysms Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling can be ...

  9. Brain Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed the f… Series Healthy Minds: Nurturing Your Child's Development Each of these age-based handouts are based ... report from the National Academy of Sciences on child and brain development. Podcast Nurturing Brain Development From Birth to Three ...

  10. Brain Fog

    MedlinePlus

    ... friendships and relationships. • Take your body to the gym and don’t forget to visit the “BRAIN SPA” – both will improve brain function. • Recent scientific data show that longevity ...

  11. Brain Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  12. Prognostic value of single-photon emission tomography in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Weir, C J; Bolster, A A; Tytler, S; Murray, G D; Corrigall, R S; Adams, F G; Lees, K R

    1997-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in the investigation of acute stroke. We investigated the relationship between SPET data and functional outcome in a large group of acute stroke patients. One hundred and eight patients underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPET after acute ischaemic stroke. We categorised the clinical presentation according to the Oxford classification of acute stroke. Outcome was measured 1 year after stroke using mortality and the Barthel Index for survivors. SPET scans were interpreted without reference to the clinical data using a semi-automatic technique. Three experienced observers determined the presence of luxury perfusion using suitably scaled SPET images in conjunction with the CT scan. Both SPET volume and severity of deficit were significantly negatively correlated with Barthel Index at 1 year (rs=-0.310, P<0.0001, and rs=-0.316, P<0.0001 respectively). In patients scanned with SPET within 16 h of stroke onset, the correlations were more strongly negative (rs=-0.606, P<0. 001, and rs=-0.492, P<0.005 respectively). Luxury perfusion was not associated (chi2=0.073, df=1, P=0.79) with good functional outcome (Barthel score >/=60). Stepwise logistic regression identified Oxford classification, total deficit volume and patient's age as significant predictors of functional outcome. Overall predictive accuracy was 72%. Predictive accuracy was better in patients who received SPET within 16 h of stroke onset. SPET provides useful information about the functional outcome of acute stroke at 1 year. However, the accuracy of prediction decreases the longer SPET is delayed. Prognostication using SPET in combination with clinical assessment and other investigations may also be considered.

  13. Visualization of myocardial perfusion derived from coronary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Termeer, Maurice; Oliván Bescós, Javier; Breeuwer, Marcel; Vilanova, Anna; Gerritsen, Frans; Gröller, M Eduard; Nagel, Eike

    2008-01-01

    Visually assessing the effect of the coronary artery anatomy on the perfusion of the heart muscle in patients with coronary artery disease remains a challenging task. We explore the feasibility of visualizing this effect on perfusion using a numerical approach. We perform a computational simulation of the way blood is perfused throughout the myocardium purely based on information from a three-dimensional anatomical tomographic scan. The results are subsequently visualized using both three-dimensional visualizations and bull's eye plots, partially inspired by approaches currently common in medical practice. Our approach results in a comprehensive visualization of the coronary anatomy that compares well to visualizations commonly used for other scanning technologies. We demonstrate techniques giving detailed insight in blood supply, coronary territories and feeding coronary arteries of a selected region. We demonstrate the advantages of our approach through visualizations that show information which commonly cannot be directly observed in scanning data, such as a separate visualization of the supply from each coronary artery. We thus show that the results of a computational simulation can be effectively visualized and facilitate visually correlating these results to for example perfusion data.

  14. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  15. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  16. Limited myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.A.; Haynie, M. )

    1990-03-01

    Experimental studies in animals have suggested that coronary flow reserve may be limited in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Accordingly, to noninvasively determine the effect of LVH on myocardial perfusion reserve, 25 patients, 9 with LVH and 16 controls, underwent positron imaging with rubidium-82 (82Rb) (30-55 mCi) or nitrogen-13 (13N) ammonia (12-19 mCi) at rest and following intravenous dipyridamole and handgrip stress. LVH was documented by echocardiographic and/or electrocardiographic measurements. LVH patients had either no chest pain (n = 8) and/or a normal coronary angiogram (n = 6). Nine simultaneous transaxial images were acquired, and the mean ratio of stress to rest activity (S:R), based on all regions for each heart, was calculated as an estimate of myocardial perfusion reserve. There were no regional differences in activity (i.e., perfusion defects) in any of the studies. S:R averaged 1.41 +/- 0.10 (s.d.) for controls and 1.06 +/- 0.09 for patients with LVH (p less than 0.0001). These data provide support for an abnormality in perfusion reserve in patients with LVH.

  17. Determination of regional myocardial perfusion by x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.M.; McInerney, J.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Validation studies were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of an x-ray induced fluorescence system in quantitating regional myocardial perfusion in vivo. In a series of 13 open-chested canines, x-ray induced fluorescence was used to simultaneously monitor iodine concentration transients which arose in the left ventricular lumen and in the myocardium after the intravenous injection of an iodinated flow tracer. Deconvolution of the recorded transients produced a transfer function from which the mean transit time for the tracer to travel between the left ventricular lumen and the myocardium was calculated. Measurements of regional myocardial perfusion (Q) made by radioactive microspheres were compared with the reciprocals of the mean transit times (MTT-1) and gave a linear correlation (n = 38): MTT-1 = 0.033 + 0.069 Q, r = 0.71. Comparison of the percent change in perfusion (dQ) relative to a control study for each dog with the percent change in the respective reciprocals of the mean transit times (dMTT-1) produced a linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.88 for the regression line dMTT-1 = 0.46 dQ - 10.7. The x-ray induced fluorescence system may provide a minimally invasive means for monitoring iodine concentration transients and determining relative, if not absolute, measures of regional myocardial perfusion.

  18. Serine synthesis by an isolated perfused rat kidney preparation.

    PubMed Central

    Scaduto, R C; Davis, E J

    1985-01-01

    The isolated perfused rat kidney was shown to synthesize serine from aspartate or glutamate, both of which are also precursors of glucose. The major products of aspartate metabolism were ammonia, serine, glutamate, glucose, glutamine and CO2. Perfusion of kidneys with aspartate in the presence of amino-oxyacetate resulted in a near-complete inhibition of aspartate metabolism, illustrating the essential role of aspartate aminotransferase in the metabolism of this substrate. Radioactivity from 14C-labelled aspartate and from 14C-labelled glycerol was incorporated into serine and glucose. Production of both glucose and serine from aspartate was suppressed in the presence of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. These data provide evidence for the operation of the phosphorylated and/or non-phosphorylated pathway for serine production to the presence of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. This is explained by simultaneous glycolysis. The rate of glucose production, but not that of serine, was greater in kidneys perfused with glutamate or with aspartate plus glycerol than the rates obtained by perfusion with aspartate alone. These data are taken to suggest that serine synthesis occurred at a near-maximal rate, and that the capacity of the kidney for serine synthesis from glucose precursors is lower than that for glucose synthesis. PMID:2864920

  19. Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation of the DCD Kidney: Machine Effects.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Susanne L; Muir, Heather; Brassil, John; Mangino, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Kidneys from DCD donors represent a significant pool, but preservation problems exist. The study objective was to test the importance of machine type for hypothermic preservation of DCD kidneys. Methods. Adult Beagle dog kidneys underwent 45 minutes of warm in situ ischemia followed by hypothermic perfusion for 24 hours (Belzer-MPS Solution) on either an ORS LifePort or a Waters RM3 using standard perfusion protocols. Kidneys were then autotransplanted, and renal function was assessed over 7 days following contralateral nephrectomy. Results. Renal vascular resistance was not different between the two pumps. After 24 hours, the oxygen partial pressure and oxygen delivery in the LifePort perfusate were significantly lower than those in the RM3 but not low enough to change lactate production. TheLifePort ran significantly colder than RM3 (2° versus 5°C). The arterial pressure waveform of the RM3 was qualitatively different from the waveform of the LifePort. Preservation injury after transplantation was not different between the devices. When the LifePort was changed to nonpulsatile flow, kidneys displayed significantly greater preservation injury compared to RM3. Conclusions. Both LifePort and RM3 can be used for hypothermic machine perfusion preservation of DCD kidneys with equal outcomes as long as the duty cycle remains pulsatile.

  20. The Impact of Vasoactive Drugs on Oxygenation and Tissue Perfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    useful in the management of congestive heart failure, cardiogenic pulmonary edema , mitral or aortic regurgitation and persistent chest pain...administration include refractory cardiac failure, cardiogenic shock, septic shock, post cardiac surgery, and acute renal failure (Opie, 1991; Budnv... cardiogenic , anaphylactic, and septic shock, and cardiac arrest (Zaritsky & Eisenberg, 1986). Affect on Oxygenation and Tissue Perfusion Epinephrine, as with

  1. Simultaneous technetium-99m MIBI angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, G.Y.; Mena, I.G.; Kuperus, J.H.; Robertson, J.M.; French, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Resting first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) was performed with the myocardial perfusion agent technetium-99m MIBI. In 27 patients, it was compared with technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid FPRNA. A significant correlation was present in left (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) as well as right (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) ventricular ejection fraction measured with both radiopharmaceuticals. In 13 patients, MIBI derived segmental wall motion was compared with contrast ventriculography. A high correlation was present (p less than 0.001), and qualitative agreement was found in 38/52 segments. In 19 patients with myocardial infarction a significant correlation was present between MIBI segmental wall motion and perfusion scores (p less than 0.001). In ten patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 18 myocardial segments demonstrated diseased coronary vessels and impaired wall motion at contrast angiography. These segments were all identified by the MIBI wall motion and perfusion study. We conclude that MIBI is a promising agent for simultaneous evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at rest.

  2. Teaching Ventilation/Perfusion Relationships in the Lung

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Robb W.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review is meant to serve as a refresher for faculty teaching respiratory physiology to medical students. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion matching are some of the most challenging ideas to learn and teach. Some strategies to consider in teaching these concepts are, first, to build from simple to more complex by starting with a…

  3. Intrahemispheric Perfusion in Chronic Stroke-Induced Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Walenski, Matthew; Chen, YuFen; Caplan, David; Rapp, Brenda; Grunewald, Kristin; Nunez, Mia; Zinbarg, Richard; Parrish, Todd B.

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-induced alterations in cerebral blood flow (perfusion) may contribute to functional language impairments and recovery in chronic aphasia. Using MRI, we examined perfusion in the right and left hemispheres of 35 aphasic and 16 healthy control participants. Across 76 regions (38 per hemisphere), no significant between-subjects differences were found in the left, whereas blood flow in the right was increased in the aphasic compared to the control participants. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses showed a varied pattern of hypo- and hyperperfused regions across hemispheres in the aphasic participants; however, there were no significant correlations between perfusion values and language abilities in these regions. These patterns may reflect autoregulatory changes in blood flow following stroke and/or increases in general cognitive effort, rather than maladaptive language processing. We also examined blood flow in perilesional tissue, finding the greatest hypoperfusion close to the lesion (within 0–6 mm), with greater hypoperfusion in this region compared to more distal regions. In addition, hypoperfusion in this region was significantly correlated with language impairment. These findings underscore the need to consider cerebral perfusion as a factor contributing to language deficits in chronic aphasia as well as recovery of language function. PMID:28357141

  4. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  5. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  6. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  7. The Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  8. Transplacental transfer of nitrosodimethylamine in perfused human placenta.

    PubMed

    Annola, K; Heikkinen, A T; Partanen, H; Woodhouse, H; Segerbäck, D; Vähäkangas, K

    2009-03-01

    Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a carcinogenic compound present in tobacco smoke and food such as cured meat, smoked fish and beer. The O(6)-methylguanine formed in human cord blood in mothers highly exposed to such products implicates NDMA exposure of the fetus. Dual recirculating human placental perfusion was used to get direct evidence of the transplacental transfer of NDMA and DNA adduct formation in perfused human placenta. Eleven placentas from normal full-term pregnancies were collected immediately after delivery and an isolated lobule was perfused with 1 or 5 microM of (14)C-NDMA with a reference substance, antipyrine (0.1mg/ml) added to the maternal circulation. Perfusate samples were collected from both maternal and fetal circulations every half an hour for the first two hours and once per hour from thereon. NDMA was analyzed by scintillation counting and antipyrine by high performance liquid chromatography. The transfer of NDMA was comparable to that of antipyrine and probably occurred through passive diffusion, with the concentrations in maternal and fetal sides equilibrating in 2-3h. No indication of any effect by efflux transporters on NDMA kinetics was noticed in the experiments utilizing Caco-2 or MDCK- MDCKII-MDR1 cell culture monolayer in a transwell system, either. Furthermore, no NDMA-DNA-adducts were found after the perfusions and no DNA-binding of NDMA was seen in in vitro incubations with human placental microsomes from 8 additional placentas. Thus, our study demonstrates that the human fetus can be exposed to NDMA from the maternal circulation. According to this study and the literature, NDMA is not metabolized in full-term human placenta from healthy non-smoking, non-drinking mothers. It remains to be studied whether NDMA concentrations high enough to evoke fetal toxicity can be obtained from dietary sources.

  9. Cardiovascular tissue engineering I. Perfusion bioreactors: a review.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir A; Yost, Michael J; Visconti, Richard; Twal, Waleed; Trusk, Thomas; Wen, Xuejun; Ozolanta, Iveta; Kadishs, Arnolds; Prestwich, Glenn D; Terracio, Louis; Markwald, Roger R

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical science and technology with future promise to manufacture living tissues and organs for replacement, repair, and regeneration of diseased organs. Owing to the specific role of hemodynamics in the development, maintenance, and functioning of the cardiovascular system, bioreactors are a fundamental of cardiovascular tissue engineering. The development of perfusion bioreactor technology for cardiovascular tissue engineering is a direct sequence of previous historic successes in extracorporeal circulation techniques. Bioreactors provide a fluidic environment for tissue engineered tissue and organs, and guarantee their viability, maturation, biomonitoring, testing, storage, and transportation. There are different types of bioreactors and they vary greatly in their size, complexity, and functional capabilities. Although progress in design and functional properties of perfusion bioreactors for tissue engineered blood vessels, heart valves, and myocardial patches is obvious, there are some challenges and insufficiently addressed issues, and room for bioreactor design improvement and performance optimization. These challenges include creating a triple perfusion bioreactor for vascularized tubular tissue engineered cardiac construct; designing and manufacturing fluidics-based perfused minibioreactors; incorporation of systematic mathematical modeling and computer simulation based on computational fluid dynamics into the bioreactor designing process; and development of automatic systems of hydrodynamic regime control. Designing and engineering of built-in noninvasive biomonitoring systems is another important challenge. The optimal and most efficient perfusion and conditioning regime, which accelerates tissue maturation of tissue-engineered constructs also remains to be determined. This is a first article in a series of reviews on critical elements of cardiovascular tissue engineering technology describing the current

  10. Computed tomography perfusion imaging in spectacular shrinking deficit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien H; John, Sayona; Mohammad, Yousef; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Spectacular shrinking deficit (SSD) is characterized by abrupt onset of a major hemispheric stroke syndrome, followed by dramatic and rapid improvement. We retrospectively identified patients with SSD diagnosed at our institution between December 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. We reviewed computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging to determine perfusion defect as a measure of initial ischemic penumbra, and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine the final infarct core. Among the 472 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, 126 (27%) presented with major hemispheric ischemic stroke syndrome, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) ≥8 in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Out of these patients, we identified 8 SSD patients with available CTP data. In these 8 patients, the mean time to dramatic recovery was 3.4 hours (range, 0.75-7 hours), and the mean time from onset to CTP was 12.7 hours (range, 3-30 hours). All 8 patients had perfusion abnormalities in portions of the MCA territory (partial MCA territory in 5 patients and complete MCA territory in 3 patients). The mean time from onset to MRI DWI was 15.5 hours (range, 7.9-34 hours). Restricted diffusion was present in all patients in the corresponding MCA distribution. Vascular imaging revealed MCA occlusion in 2 patients. Cervical vascular imaging revealed carotid occlusion in 2 patients and high-grade carotid stenosis in 2 patients. The stroke mechanisms were cardioembolism in 2 patients, large artery in 4 patients, and unknown in 2 patients. Four patients had repeat CTP imaging available that demonstrated eventual resolution of the perfusion defect. SSD is associated with a "shrinking" clinical syndrome and a "shrinking" perfusion pattern on CTP that lags behind clinical recovery. CTP imaging corroborates that a larger territory is at risk in SSD and contributes to better understanding of SSD.

  11. In vitro perfusion of engineered heart tissue through endothelialized channels.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Ingra; Seiffert, Moritz; Bachmair, Johanna; Sander, Merle; Eder, Alexandra; Conradi, Lenard; Vogelsang, Alexander; Schulze, Thomas; Uebeler, June; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    In engineered heart tissues (EHT), oxygen and nutrient supply via mere diffusion is a likely factor limiting the thickness of cardiac muscle strands. Here, we report on a novel method to in vitro perfuse EHT through tubular channels. Adapting our previously published protocols, we expanded a miniaturized fibrin-based EHT-format to a larger six-well format with six flexible silicone posts holding each EHT (15×25×3 mm³). Thin dry alginate fibers (17×0.04×0.04 mm) were embedded into the cell-fibrin-thrombin mix and, after fibrin polymerization, dissolved by incubation in alginate lyase or sodium citrate. Oxygen concentrations were measured with a microsensor in 14-day-old EHTs (37°C, 21% oxygen) and ranged between 9% at the edges and 2% in the center of the tissue. Perfusion rapidly increased it to 10%-12% in the immediate vicinity of the microchannel. Continuous perfusion (20 μL/h, for 3 weeks) of the tubular lumina (100-500 μm) via hollow posts of the silicone rack increased mean dystrophin-positive cardiomyocyte density (36%±6% vs. 10%±3% of total cell number) and cross sectional area (73±2 vs. 48±1 μm²) in the central part of the tissue compared to nonperfused EHTs. The channels were populated by endothelial cells present in the reconstitution cell mix. In conclusion, we developed a novel approach to generate small tubular structures suitable for perfusion of spontaneously contracting and force-generating EHTs and showed that prolonged perfusion improved cardiac tissue structure.

  12. Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei

    2011-11-15

    Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

  13. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  14. Pyogenic abscess from Providencia stuartii mimicking necrotic tumour at perfusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Carmine Franco; Leonini, Sara; Esposito, Gennaro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this case report is to increase the knowledge about magnetic resonance spectrum of pyogenic abscesses of the brain. A 74-year-old woman presented with a left frontal lobe cystic mass, developed in the site of post-traumatic contusions after surgical evacuation of a subdural hematoma. MR imaging showed an ipsilateral mass lesion with a thin, regular rim of T1 high-intensity signal, T2 low-intensity signal, and gadolinium-enhancement. Diffusion-weighted imaging with measure of apparent diffusion coefficient value showed inhomogenous diffusion restriction in the lesion core. Perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) demonstrated high relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in both the lesion wall and perilesional area, with a maximal rCBV ratio (rCBV of the lesion/rCBV of the normal contralateral white matter) of 5.65 and 0.58, respectively. As a result, surgery and pathology showed a pyogenic abscess. Cultures grew were Providencia stuartii species. In conclusion, a pyogenic brain abscess from P. stuartii may show high rCBV at PWI, thus mimicking a necrotic tumour.

  15. Combination of volume and perfusion parameters reveals different types of grey matter changes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lixue; Qin, Wen; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Liu, Huaigui; Zhu, Jiajia; Yu, Chunshui

    2017-03-27

    Diverse brain structural and functional changes have been reported in schizophrenia. Identifying different types of brain changes may help to understand the neural mechanisms and to develop reliable biomarkers in schizophrenia. We aimed to categorize different grey matter changes in schizophrenia based on grey matter volume (GMV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Structural and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired in 100 schizophrenia patients and 95 healthy comparison subjects. Voxel-based GMV comparison was used to show structural changes, CBF analysis was used to demonstrate functional changes. We identified three types of grey matter changes in schizophrenia: structural and functional impairments in the anterior cingulate cortex and insular cortex, displaying reduction in both GMV and CBF; structural impairment with preserved function in the frontal and temporal cortices, demonstrating decreased GMV with normal CBF; pure functional abnormality in the anterior cingulate cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex and putamen, showing altered CBF with normal GMV. By combination of GMV and CBF, we identified three types of grey matter changes in schizophrenia. These findings may help to understand the complex manifestations and to develop reliable biomarkers in schizophrenia.

  16. Nifedipine improves blood flow and oxygen supply, but not steady-state oxygenation of tumours in perfusion pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Thews, O; Hummel, M; Kelleher, D K; Lecher, B; Vaupel, P

    2002-12-02

    Isolated limb perfusion allows the direct application of therapeutic agents to a tumour-bearing extremity. The present study investigated whether the dihydropyridine-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine could improve blood flow and oxygenation status of experimental tumours during isolated limb perfusion. Perfusion was performed by cannulation of the femoral artery and vein in rats bearing DS-sarcoma on the hind foot dorsum. Perfusion rate was adjusted to maintain a perfusion pressure of 100-140 mmHg throughout the experiment. Following equilibration, nifedipine was continuously infused for 30 min (8.3 microg min(-1) kg(-1) BW). During constant-pressure isolated limb perfusion, nifedipine can significantly increase perfusion rate (+100%) and RBC flux (+60%) through experimental leg tumours. "Steal phenomena" in favour of the surrounding normal tissue and oedema formation were not observed. Despite the increased oxygen availability (+63%) seen upon application of this calcium channel blocker, nifedipine does not result in a substantial reduction of tumour hypoxia, most probably due to an increase in O(2) uptake with rising O(2) supply to the tumour-bearing hind limb. Nifedipine application during isolated limb perfusion can enhance tumour microcirculation and may therefore promote the delivery (pharmacokinetics) of anti-cancer drugs to the tumour and by this improve the efficacy of pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

  17. Study on the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR perfusion weighted imaging in SHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Dong, Yang; Chen, WenLi; Lin, Xueying; Xing, Da; Huang, Li

    2007-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death, and approximately 50% of survivors have a residual neurologic deficit and greater than 25% require chronic care. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) describes how far cerebral perfusion can increase from a baseline value after stimulation. High blood pressure is the most important independent risk factor for stroke and other vascular diseases. The incidence of stroke in the hypertensive is six times higher than in the patient with normal blood pressure. CVRC in the hypertensive was even lower than in control patients. MR perfusion weighted imaging (MR PWI) with the well-established acetazolamide (ACZ) stimulation test has been used for assessing brain function. The aim of this work is to assess the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR PWI with "ACZ" tolerance test in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to identify its value in evaluating the CVRC. Experimental animal including 3 groups: Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) (12-week-old) as control group, SHR (12-week-old and 20-week-old) as experimental group. MR PWI was performed respectively before and after acetazolamide administrated orally in 3 groups on a clinical 1.5 Tesla GE Signa MR fx/i whole-body MR system. The ROI was chosen in the bilateral frontal lobe to measure the value of rCBV, rCBF and MTT. The results showed that before ACZ-test, there was statistic differences between the WKY and SHR(12-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the values of rCBV and rCBF (P>0.05), and after ACZ-test, there were statistic differences between WKY and SHR (20-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the rCBV value (P<0.05). It is concluded that the method of MRI PWI combined with the "ACZ stress test" can provide more qualitative and half-quantitative information on the cerebral perfusion to evaluate the CVRC in SHR.

  18. Poppy seed oil protection of the hippocampus after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik-Demirkan, A; Oztaşan, N; Oguzhan, E O; Cil, N; Coskun, S

    2012-11-01

    The brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia; this is true particularly of parts that are crucial for cognitive function. The effects of hypoxia are especially dramatic in the hippocampus. We evaluated the potential protective effects of poppy seed oil on the number of hippocampus cells and the serum antioxidant/oxidant status after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion (CIR). Eighteen rats were divided into three equal groups. Group 1 served as the control group without CIR. Group 2 received poppy seed oil daily by oral gavage at a dose of 0.4 ml/kg, while group 3 was given 0.4 ml/kg saline solution by oral gavage per day; these treatments were continued for one month. Groups 2 and 3 were subjected to CIR induced by clamps on two points of both of the carotid arteries for 45 min followed by 45 min re-perfusion. There were significant decreases in the number of hippocampus cells between groups 1 and 2, and between groups 1 and 3. The mean cell number in group 2 was not significantly different from that of group 3. The serum nitric oxide levels in CIR groups were elevated significantly compared to controls, and were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 3. The glutathione levels were increased significantly in the poppy seed oil treated group compared to the saline CIR groups. The malondialdehyde levels were markedly increased in group 3 compared to both groups 1 and 2. Our study suggests that poppy seed oil can improve antioxidant defense capacity after CIR, although this treatment did not alter significantly the frequency of cell death.

  19. Cerebral perfusion during canine hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass: effect of arterial carbon dioxide tension.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W E; Vinten-Johansen, J; DeWitt, D S; O'Steen, W K; Stump, D A; Prough, D S

    1991-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow (radioactive microspheres), intracranial pressure (subdural bolt), and retinal histopathology were examined in 20 dogs undergoing 150 minutes of hypothermic (28 degrees C) cardiopulmonary bypass to compare alpha-stat (arterial carbon dioxide tension, 40 +/- 1 mm Hg; n = 10) and pH-stat (arterial carbon dioxide tension, 61 +/- 1 mm Hg; n = 10) techniques of arterial carbon dioxide tension management. Pump flow (80 mL.kg-1.min-1), mean aortic pressure (78 +/- 2 mm Hg), and hemoglobin level (87 +/- 3 g/L [8.7 +/- 0.3 g/dL]) were maintained constant. During bypass, intracranial pressure progressively increased in the alpha-stat group from 6.0 +/- 1.0 to 13.9 +/- 1.8 mm Hg (p less than 0.05) and in the pH-stat group from 7.7 +/- 1.1 to 14.7 +/- 1.4 mm Hg (p less than 0.05), although there was no evidence of loss of intracranial compliance or intracranial edema formation as assessed by brain water content. With cooling, cerebral blood flow decreased by 56% to 62% in the alpha-stat group (p less than 0.05) and by 48% to 56% in the pH-stat group (p less than 0.05). However, 30 minutes after rewarming to 37 degrees C, cerebral blood flow in both groups failed to increase and remained significantly depressed compared with baseline values. Both groups showed similar amounts of ischemic retinal damage, with degeneration of bipolar cells found in the inner nuclear layer in 67% of animals. We conclude that, independent of the arterial carbon dioxide tension management technique, (1) cerebral perfusion decreased comparably during prolonged hypothermic bypass, (2) intracranial pressure increases progressively, (3) ischemic damage to retinal cells occurs despite maintenance of aortic pressure and flow, and (4) a significant reduction in cerebral perfusion persists after rewarming.

  20. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

  1. Brain to music to brain!

    PubMed

    Azizi, S Ausim

    2009-07-31

    It has been implicitly understood that culture and music as collective products of human brain in turn influence the brain itself. Now, imaging and anatomical data add substance to this notion. The impact of playing piano on the brain of musicians and its possible effects on cultural and neurological evolution are briefly discussed.

  2. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone metabolism and extraction by the perfused guinea pig placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Nogimori, T.; Alex, S.; Baker, S.; Emerson, C.H.

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the extraction of synthetic TRH and its metabolic conversion in the perfused guinea pig placenta. These studies were performed to obtain an estimate of fractional fetal TRH losses through the placenta and to determine if some of these losses are due to TRH metabolism. Experiments were performed in which the perfusion buffer contained 0.01, 1, and 10 micrograms/ml or no synthetic TRH. In experiments in which TRH was perfused, the perfusion reservoir contents and placental effluent fractions were counted for TH, and TRH and deamido-TRH were determined by RIA. Similarly, cyclo(His-Pro) was measured when 10 micrograms/ml TRH were perfused. When synthetic TRH was perfused, steady state TRH concentrations were achieved in placental effluent fractions by 20-30 min. The single pass extraction of TRH by the placenta was 11.4 +/- 2.6% (mean +/- SE) compared to 56.9 +/- 7.0% for TH22O. No significant difference was detected regardless of whether 10, 1, or 0.01 micrograms/ml TRH were perfused. A portion of the TRH that perfused the placenta was converted to deamido-TRH at all concentrations of perfused TRH. The conversion of TRH to TRH-OH was 4.2 +/- 0.7% in a single pass. When the perfusion buffer was devoid of synthetic TRH, a small but significant increase in the content of TRH immunoreactivity was noted in the placental effluent compared to that in the perfusion reservoir.

  3. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  4. An analysis of perfusion technology preadmission factors effects on academic success, perfusion certification achievement, and career placement.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David A

    2007-12-01

    This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the contribution of grade point average (GPA) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) practical scores toward predicting perfusion academic success, career placement as a clinical perfusionist, and certification success or failure. The files of 95 students enrolled in the perfusion technology program at Carlow University-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center School of Cardiovascular Perfusion (CARLOW-UPMC) from 1995 through 2005 were reviewed to obtain admission and academic data. The independent variables used were WAIS-R practical results of the picture completion (PC), picture arrangement (PA), block design (BD), object assembly (OA) and digit symbol (DS) tests, undergraduate grade point average (UGPA), science grade point average (SGPA), and anatomy and physiology grade point average (APGPA). The dependent variables used were perfusion grade point average (PGPA), career placement status as a clinical perfusionist (CAREER), and success or failure on the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (ABCP) certification examination. The research plan consisted of logistic and multiple linear regression analyses to determine which of the WAIS-R and GPA independent variables were significantly associated with the dependent variables. UGPA, SGPA, and APGPA all correlate at the 5% level with success achieving high PGPA. WAIS-R measures were not significant indicators of academic success. PGPA, UGPA, SGPA, and APGPA did not significantly correlate with any of the tested WAIS-R scores. PC, BD, and OA scores correlate well with CAREER. OA and DS scores correlate at the p = 0.05 level with ABCP certification success.

  5. Quantitative myocardial perfusion measurement using CT perfusion: a validation study in a porcine model of reperfused acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jian-Ying; Hadway, Jennifer; Kong, Hua-Fu; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2012-06-01

    We validated a CT perfusion technique with beam hardening (BH) correction for quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created in four pigs by occluding the distal LAD for 1 h followed by reperfusion. MBF was measured from dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning of the heart, with correction of cardiac motion and BH, before ischemic insult and on day 7, 10 and 14 post. On day 14 post, radiolabeled microspheres were injected to measure MBF and the results were compared with those measured by CT perfusion. Excised hearts were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) to determine the relationship between MBF measured by CT Perfusion and myocardial viability. MBF measured by CT perfusion was strongly correlated with that by microspheres over a wide range of MBF values (R = 0.81, from 25 to 225 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1)). While MBF in the LAD territory decreased significantly from 98.4 ± 2.5 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1) at baseline to 32.2 ± 9.1 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P < 0.05 at day 7 and to 49.4 ± 9.3 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P < 0.05 at day 14, the decrease in remote myocardium (LCx territory) from baseline (103.9 ± 1.9 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1)) was minimal throughout the study (90.6 ± 5.1 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1) on day 14 post, P > 0.05). TTC staining confirmed incomplete infarction in the LAD territory and no infarction in the LCx territory. Microvascular obstruction in infarcted tissue resulted in no-reflow and hence persistently low MBF in the reperfused LAD territory which contained a mixture of viable and non-viable tissue. CT perfusion measurement of MBF was accurate and correlated well with histology and microspheres measurements.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular ions in perfused from heart

    SciTech Connect

    Burnstein, D.; Fossel, E.T.

    1987-06-01

    Intracellular sodium, potassium, and lithium were observed in a perfused frog heart by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A perfusate buffer containing the shift reagent, dysprosium tripolyphosphate, was used in combination with mathematical filtering or presaturation of the extracellular resonance to separate the intra- and extracellular sodium NMR signals. Addition of 10 ..mu..M ouabain to the perfusate, perfusion with a zero potassium, low-calcium buffer, and replacement of 66% of the perfusate sodium with lithium resulted in changes in the intracellular sodium levels. An increase of 45% in the intracellular sodium was