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Sample records for brain spet perfusion

  1. What is the benefit of CT-based attenuation correction in myocardial perfusion SPET?

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Dimitrios J; Savvopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, CT-derived transmission maps are used for attenuation correction (AC) of SPET or PET data. Regarding SPET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), however, the bene����t of CT-based AC (CT-AC) has been questioned. Although most attenuation-related artifacts are removed by this technique, new false defects may appear while some true perfusion abnormalities may be masked. The merits and the drawbacks of CT-AC in MPI SPET are reviewed and discussed in this editorial. In conclusion, CT-AC is most helpful in men, overweight in particular, and in those with low or low to intermediate pre-test probability of coronary artery disease (CAD). It is also useful for the evaluation of myocardial viability. In high-risk patients though, CT-AC may underestimate the presence or the extent of CAD. In any case, corrected and non-corrected images should be viewed side-by-side and both considered in the interpretation of the study. PMID:27331200

  2. Swine experimental model to evaluate stem cells implant post myocardial infarction by perfusion gated-SPET.

    PubMed

    Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferlan, Giovanni; Crovace, Antonio; Notaristefano, Antonio; Rubini, Domenico; Altini, Corinna; Pisani, Antonio; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) implant after swine experimental myocardial infarct (MI) was investigated by serial technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-tetrofosmin gated single photon emission tomography (G-SPET) and compared with immuno-histochemical findings. The aim was to evaluate if intramyocardial BMSC implant produces any prolonged effect in the left ventricle (LV) perfusion and function. Eleven pigs underwent left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligature; in seven of them BMSC were injected in the border zone of the MI, while in the remaining four saline solution was injected at the same site. After LAD ligature G-SPET scans at 48h and at 5 and 10 weeks (w) after the implant were performed. Uptake defect size and LV function analysis were performed comparing 48h to 5w and 10w studies. Statistical evaluation was performed with Friedman test and unpaired Wilcoxon test. The comparison between a progressive reduction of Perfusion Image Score was observed from 48h to 5w and to 10w in the treated group (Friedman test: χ²= 13.56; P=0.01). No variation was observed in the control group (Friedman test: χ²=3; P= 0.223). Comparison of the absolute variation (Δ) between treated and control group resulted significant (Wilcoxon test W=10; P=0.007). Similar positive results were also observed for the relative extension of the uptake defect, wall motion and LVEF analysis. Histological data of our swine model demonstrated that autologous BMSC implanted in the damaged myocardium area had survived and differentiated into cells with typical features of myocardiocytes. Gated SPET is a reliable tool to evaluate prolonged positive effects of autologous BMSC implant in swine experimental MI model. In conclusion, autologous BMSC implanted can improve perfusion, induce cell regeneration, reduce wall motion abnormalities and prevent severe LV dysfunction in swines.

  3. Comparative study of single-injection, single-acquisition 99mTc-MIBI gated SPET and stress-rest perfusion SPET for the evaluation of myocardial viability after bypass surgery in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S N; Lee, D S; Chung, J K; Lee, M C

    2000-12-01

    In patients without previous myocardial infarction, the single-injection stress perfusion/rest function (SISPRF) approach using stress technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) gated single-photon emission tomography (SPET) can substitute for conventional stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability. This study compared pre-operative single-injection, single-acquisition 99mTc-MIBI gated SPET and conventional stress-rest imaging for the prediction of myocardial viability in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Rest thallium-201 SPET followed by stress 99mTc-MIBI gated SPET was performed in 20 patients [nine with previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 11 without previous MI). The study was performed before and 3 months after CABG, and viability assessment was validated by wall motion improvement after CABG. A four-point scoring system (0-3 for normal to absent tracer uptake) for 17 segments of the left ventricular myocardium was used for the assessment of stress and rest uptake. Wall motion, wall thickening and perfusion status were analysed by semi-quantitative visual assessment. On gated SPET, perfusion defect reversibility was considered present when a definite perfusion defect was observed and wall motion or thickening was normal or showed only a mild decrease. In patients with a previous MI, the left ventricular ejection fraction improved significantly after CABG (46% +/- 7% vs 42% +/- 11% before CABG, P < 0.05). In patients without previous MI, the ejection fraction improved significantly after CABG (50 +/- 12% vs 44% +/- 16% before CABG, P<0.05). In patients with previous MI, positive predictive values using the stress-rest reversibility and SISPRF approaches were 91% and 90%, respectively, and corresponding negative predictive values were 25% and 18%. In patients without previous MI, positive predictive values using the stress-rest and SISPRF approaches were 70% and 61%, respectively, and

  4. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  5. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  6. Dobutamine 99Tcm-MIBI SPET myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the prediction of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients unable to perform an exercise stress test.

    PubMed

    Elhendy, A; Geleijnse, M L; Roelandt, J R; van Domburg, R T; Nierop, P R; Bax, J J; Kasprzak, J D; el-Said, G M; Ibrahim, M M; Fioretti, P M

    1997-02-01

    After successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), restenosis occurs in a relatively high proportion of patients. Exercise thallium scintigraphy is a useful method for the detection of restenosis. In patients unable to exercise, dobutamine perfusion scintigraphy may represent a feasible alternative. However, its diagnostic accuracy in this clinical setting has not been evaluated. We studied 40 patients (29 males, 11 females) aged 57 +/- 9 years, at a mean of 185 +/- 80 days after successful PTCA with a high-dose dobutamine (up to 40 micrograms kg-1 min-1) stress test, in conjunction with 99Tcm-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (99Tcm-MIBI) single photon emission tomography (SPET). Significant restenosis was defined as > or = 50% luminal diameter stenosis of a coronary segment with previous PTCA and was predicted on the basis of the occurrence of reversible perfusion defects in the corresponding territories. Reversible perfusion defects occurred in 20 of 29 arteries with and in 4 of 17 arteries without restenosis. The sensitivity of dobutamine MIBI for the detection of restenosis in arteries with previous PTCA was 69% (CI = 56-82), the specificity 76% (CI = 64-89), the positive predictive value 83% (CI = 73-94), the negative predictive value 59% (CI = 45-73) and accuracy 72% (CI = 59-85). The overall sensitivity of 99Tcm-MIBI SPET for the diagnosis of significant coronary stenosis (including arteries without previous PTCA) on a patient basis was 79% (CI = 67-92), the specificity 82% (CI = 70-94) and accuracy 80% (CI = 68-92). The sensitivity of 99Tcm-MIBI SPET was significantly higher than that of electrocardiography (79 vs 38%, P < 0.005). It is concluded that dobutamine 99Tcm-MIBI SPET is a useful method for the detection of restenosis after PTCA in patients unable to perform an exercise stress test.

  7. Improved tolerance to missing data in myocardial perfusion SPET using OSEM reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hatton, R L; Hutton, B F; Angelides, S; Choong, K K L; Larcos, G

    2004-06-01

    When projection data are incomplete for various technical reasons, artefacts may occur in the reconstructed images. This study examines whether an iterative reconstruction method, the ordered subsets implementation of the EM algorithm (OSEM), can improve reconstruction and minimise the artefacts compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). We varied the number and location of projections removed to investigate when significant artefacts occur, and whether diagnosis is affected. Phantom studies were analysed with sequential orthogonal pairs of projection angles removed (as would typically occur when either data loss or severe motion is detected during acquisition with a right-angled, dual-head cardiac single-photon emission tomography system) and reconstructed with both FBP and OSEM. Twelve normal myocardial perfusion studies were also assessed to study the effect of missing projections on clinical diagnosis. Differences between reconstructions with intact versus missing data were measured. Also, reconstructed images were clinically assessed and scored on a five-point scale based on whether the artefacts would alter clinical interpretation. Although both reconstruction methods showed artefacts, the absolute differences between reconstructed phantom data with intact and missing projection sets were significantly greater (P<0.005) for FBP than for OSEM for all numbers of missing projections. The clinical data showed similar differences between FBP and OSEM reconstructions. The three observers noted superiority of OSEM compared to FBP, with reduced incidence of clinically significant artefacts. However, neither reconstruction method could tolerate six or more missing pairs from 32 projections. There was no significant dependence on the angular location of missing projections. In the absence of any attempt to correct for missing projections, OSEM reduced the influence of artefacts compared to FBP.

  8. A new quantitative method for the analysis of cardiac perfusion tomography (SPET): validation in post-infarct patients treated with thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, L; Nuyts, J; Scheys, I; Wackers, F; Lesaffre, E; Brzostek, T; De Roo, M; De Geest, H; Suetens, P; Verbruggen, A

    1993-12-01

    In this study a new method for assessment of perfusion defects (PDs) derived from myocardial perfusion tomograms was evaluated in patients treated with thrombolytic therapy. Using global constraints and dynamic programming, a model-based delineation algorithm defined myocardial borders, the basal plane and absolute and relative PD size in 49 thallium-201 chloride (201TL CL) and 60 technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) tomograms. Tomographic (single-photon emission tomography: SPET) and planar quantification of PDs was compared to enzymatic infarct size as well as to global (LVEF) and regional ventricular function (RWM) obtained by contrast angiography. The algorithm delineated the myocardium and the valve plane in most cases, even when large PDs were present. Manual correction of the automatic delineation of the basal plane was necessary in less than 20% of the studies. Using 201Tl Cl, LVEF correlated better with tomographic PD (r = -0.67) than with planar PD (r = -0.54). Comparing planar to tomographic imaging using 99mTc-MIBI, a higher correlation with enzymatic infarct size (r = 0.73 vs 0.57) and with global ventricular function (r = 0.64 vs -0.52) was found when tomographic techniques were used. No close correlation between PD and RWM was found. The beneficial effect of thrombolysis was shown by a significant difference of PD in patients with open versus occluded infarct-related vessels. It can be concluded that this new automated algorithm for quantification of SPET perfusion defect size provides a useful tool in evaluating thrombolytic therapy.

  9. A method of two-dimensional mapping of cortical perfusion by cylindrical transformation of HMPAO SPET data.

    PubMed

    Ichise, M; Crisp, S; Ganguli, N; Tsai, S; Gray, B G

    1995-05-01

    In order to synthesize three-dimensional information on relative regional blood flow (rCBF) from the cortical grey matter in 99Tcm-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission tomographic (SPET) images into a single two-dimensional 'cortical peel' (CP) image, we developed a program that performs cylindrical transformation of SPET data. A sub-routine of this program performs measurements of cortex-to-cerebellum rCBF ratios for 54 cortical regions in the CP image. This program was used to establish a normative database derived from 30 young normal control subjects aged 28.7 +/- 6.9 years. The database was then used to express cortex-to-cerebellum rCBF ratios in four colour-coded ranges of normal standard deviation of the mean rCBF ratio across the cortical regions in the CP image. This CP method was implemented for 30 clinical HMPAO SPET studies in patients (n = 30, aged 71.8 +/- 4.2 years) with suspected dementia as well as several studies in aged healthy subjects (n = 8, aged 67 +/- 9.8 years). In 25/30 (83%) patients, all abnormalities seen on the tomographic display were evident on the corresponding CP image. No aged healthy subjects showed abnormalities on either the tomographic display or the corresponding CP image. An advantage of this technique is that the extent and severity of rCBF abnormalities are readily appreciated in one single image. This technique, in conjunction with the conventional multi-slice tomographic display, was a useful tool in identifying various patterns of rCBF abnormalities in the patients with clinically suspected dementia.

  10. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  11. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  13. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  14. The influence of resolution recovery by using collimator detector response during 3D OSEM image reconstruction on (99m)Tc-ECD brain SPET images.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Rajabi, Hossein; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Razavi-Ratki, Sied Kazem; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Beiki, Davood; Eftekhari, Mohammad; Fallahi, Babak; Sadeghian, Leila; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect, due to the poor spatial resolution of single photon emission tomography (SPET), significantly restricts the absolute quantification of the regional brain uptake and limits the accuracy of the absolute measurement of blood flow. In this study the importance of compensation for the collimator-detector response (CDR) in the technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) brain SPET was assessed, by incorporating system response in the ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm. By placing a point source of (99m)Tc at different distances from the face of the collimator, CDR were found and modeled using Gaussian functions. A fillable slice of the brain phantom was designed and filled by (99m)Tc. Projections acquired from the phantom and also 4 patients who underwent the (99m)Tc-ECD brain SPET were used in this study. To reconstruct the images, 3D OSEM algorithm was used. System blurring functions were modeled, during the reconstruction in both projection and backprojection steps. Our results were compared with the conventional resolution recovery using Metz filter in filtered backprojection (FBP). Visual inspection of the images was performed by six nuclear medicine specialists. Quantitative analysis was also studied by calculating the contrast and the count density of the reconstructed images. For the phantom images, background counts and noise were decreased by 3D OSEM compared to the FBP-Metz method. Quantitatively, the ratio of the counts of the occupied hot region to that of the cold region of the reconstructed by FBP-Metz images was 1.14. This value was decreased from 1.12 to 0.86 for 3D OSEM of 2 and 30 iterations respectively. The reference value was 0.85 for the planar image. For clinical images, hot to cold regions (grey to white matter), the count ratio was increased from 1.44 in FBP-Metz to 3.2 and 4 in 3D OSEM with 10 and 20 iterations respectively. Based on the interpretability of images, the best

  15. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors.

  16. Evaluation of the therapeutic response by (99m)Tc-ECD-SPET in a female with non-organic depression, generalized anxiety and heterophobia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiu; Shi, Hongcheng; Li, Beilei; Gu, Yushen; Cai, Liang

    2014-01-01

    This is the case of a 33 years old female patient who was diagnosed with depression and heterophobia, which progressed to generalized anxiety according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10), Version for 2010 diagnostic criteria. The clinical symptoms of the patient were significantly improved after effective treatment. The patient underwent before and after treatment 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimmer ((99m)Tc-ECD) brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET). A great improvement in regional cerebral blood flow was found after treatment. In conclusion, this case highlights the value of brain perfusion SPET scan in providing objective imaging evidence of diagnosis and treatment evaluation in a patient with non-organic mental disorder.

  17. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. PMID:26055434

  18. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain.

  19. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  20. Multislice CT brain image registration for perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong Min; Pohlman, Scott; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-04-01

    During the last several years perfusion CT techniques have been developed as an effective technique for clinically evaluating cerebral hemodynamics. Perfusion CT techniques are capable of measurings functional parameters such as tissue perfusion, blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time and are commonly used to evaluate stroke patients. However, the quality of functional images of the brain frequently suffers from patient head motion. Because the time window for an effective treatment of stroke patient is narrow, a fast motion correction is required. The purpose of the paper is to present a fast and accurate registration technique for motion correction of multi-slice CT and to demonstrate the effects of the registration on perfusion calculation.

  1. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  2. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  3. Simulation model for contrast agent dynamics in brain perfusion scans.

    PubMed

    Bredno, Jörg; Olszewski, Mark E; Wintermark, Max

    2010-07-01

    Standardization efforts are currently under way to reduce the heterogeneity of quantitative brain perfusion methods. A brain perfusion simulation model is proposed to generate test data for an unbiased comparison of these methods. This model provides realistic simulated patient data and is independent of and different from any computational method. The flow of contrast agent solute and blood through cerebral vasculature with disease-specific configurations is simulated. Blood and contrast agent dynamics are modeled as a combination of convection and diffusion in tubular networks. A combination of a cerebral arterial model and a microvascular model provides arterial-input and time-concentration curves for a wide range of flow and perfusion statuses. The model is configured to represent an embolic stroke in one middle cerebral artery territory and provides physiologically plausible vascular dispersion operators for major arteries and tissue contrast agent retention functions. These curves are fit to simpler template curves to allow the use of the simulation results in multiple validation studies. A gamma-variate function with fit parameters is proposed as the vascular dispersion operator, and a combination of a boxcar and exponential decay function is proposed as the retention function. Such physiologically plausible operators should be used to create test data that better assess the strengths and the weaknesses of various analysis methods.

  4. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications. PMID:27100557

  5. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  6. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.; King, M.A.; Kling, A.S.; Fitten, L.J.; O'Rear, J.; Bronca, G.A.; Gan, M.; Servrin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n ({sup 123}I)IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed.

  7. Brain perfusion in polysubstance users: Relationship to substance and tobacco use, cognition, and self-regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain perfusion is altered in both alcohol dependence and stimulant dependence. Although most substance users also abuse/depend on alcohol concurrently (polysubstance users; PSU), rigorous perfusion research in PSU is limited. Also, the relationships of perfusion abnormalities with cognition, impulsivity or decision making are not well known. Methods Arterial spin labeling MRI and neuropsychological measures assessed perfusion levels and neurocognition in 20 alcohol dependent individuals with comorbid stimulant dependence (PSU), 26 individuals dependent on alcohol only (ALC), and 31 light/non-drinking controls (LD). The patient groups included smokers and non-smokers. Results ALC had lower perfusion than LD in subcortical and cortical brain regions including the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). Contrary to our hypothesis, regional perfusion was generally not lower in PSU than ALC. However, smoking PSU had lower perfusion than smoking ALC in several regions, including BREOS. Lower BREOS perfusion related to greater drinking severity in smoking substance users and to greater smoking severity in smoking ALC. Lower regional perfusion in ALC and PSU correlated with worse performance in different cognitive domains; smoking status affected perfusion-cognition relationships in ALC only. Lower BREOS perfusion in both substance using groups related to higher impulsivity. Conclusion Although regional perfusion was not decreased in PSU as a group, the combination of cigarette smoking and polysubstance use is strongly related to hypoperfusion in important cortical and subcortical regions. As lower perfusion relates to greater smoking severity, worse cognition and higher impulsivity, smoking cessation is warranted for treatment-seeking PSU and ALC. PMID:25772434

  8. Fetal Brain during a Binge Drinking Episode: A dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI fetal brain perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Castro, Carlos; Davis, Duff M; Dudley, Donald; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Purdy, David; Fox, Peter T; Simerly, Calvin; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the effects of a single episode of maternal alcohol intoxication on fetal brain blood perfusion in three pregnant dam (baboons) at the 24th week of pregnancy, using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. Following the oral administration of alcohol there was a four-fold increase in the peak contrast concentrations in the fetal brain. Additionally, we observed a two-to-three fold increase in the contrast uptake and washout rates in fetal brain. The underlying mechanisms of these changes are unknown but we hypothesized these could include the alcohol-mediated changes in placental permeability and fetal cerebral blood flow. Our findings indicate that alcohol intoxication produced profound changes, which may detrimentally influence neurodevelopmental processes in the brain. PMID:20505549

  9. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  10. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: Methodological developments in quantitative brain perfusion imaging and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Jean-Francois

    2005-04-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumors in adults. Unfortunately, the management of glioblastomas is still mainly palliative and remains a difficult challenge, despite advances in brain tumor molecular biology and in some emerging therapies. Synchrotron radiation opens fields for medical imaging and radiation therapy by using monochromatic intense x-ray beams. It is now well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the tumor growth process and that brain perfusion is representative of the tumor mitotic activity. Synchrotron radiation quantitative computed tomography (SRCT) is one of the most accurate techniques for measuring in vivo contrast agent concentration and thus computing precise and accurate absolute values of the brain perfusion key parameters. The methodological developments of SRCT absolute brain perfusion measurements as well as their preclinical validation are detailed in this thesis. In particular, absolute cerebral volume and blood brain barrier permeability high-resolution (pixel size <50x50 {mu}m{sup 2}) parametric maps were reported. In conventional radiotherapy, the treatment of these tumors remains a delicate challenge, because the damages to the surrounding normal brain tissue limit the amount of radiation that can be delivered. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to infuse an iodinated contrast agent to the patient during the irradiation. The contrast agent accumulates in the tumor, through the broken blood brain barrier, and the irradiation is performed with kilovoltage x rays, in tomography mode, the tumor being located at the center of rotation and the beam size adjusted to the tumor dimensions. The dose enhancement results from the photoelectric effect on the heavy element and from the irradiation geometry. Synchrotron beams, providing high intensity, tunable monochromatic x rays, are ideal for this treatment. The beam properties allow the selection of monochromatic irradiation, at the optimal

  11. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  12. Correction for partial volume effects in brain perfusion ECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koole, Michel; Staelens, Steven; Van de Walle, Rik; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    2003-05-01

    The accurate quantification of brain perfusion for emission computed tomography data (PET-SPECT) is limited by partial volume effects (PVE). This study presents a new approach to estimate accurately the true tissue tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment. The methodology is based on the availability of additional anatomical side information and on the assumption that activity concentration within the white matter tissue compartment is constant. Starting from an initial estimate for the white matter grey matter activity, the true tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment is estimated by an alternating ML-EM-algorithm. During the updating step the constant activity concentration within the white matter compartment is modelled in the forward projection in order to reconstruct the true activity distribution within the grey matter tissue compartment, hence reducing partial volume averaging. Consequently the estimate for the constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment is updated based on the new estimated activity distribution in the grey matter tissue compartment. We have tested this methodology by means of computer simulations. A T1-weighted MR brainscan of a patient was segmented into white matter, grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid, using the segmentation package of the SPM-software (Statistical Parametric Mapping). The segmented grey and white matter were used to simulate a SPECT acquisition, modelling the noise and the distance dependant detector response. Scatter and attenuation were ignored. Following the above described strategy, simulations have shown it is possible to reconstruct the true activity distribution for the grey matter tissue compartment (activity/tissue volume), assuming constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment.

  13. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  14. Physiological and psychological individual differences influence resting brain function measured by ASL perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kano, M; Coen, S J; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q; Williams, S C R; Alsop, D C; Fukudo, S; O'Gorman, R L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of physiological and/or psychological inter-individual differences on the resting brain state have not been fully established. The present study investigated the effects of individual differences in basal autonomic tone and positive and negative personality dimensions on resting brain activity. Whole-brain resting cerebral perfusion images were acquired from 32 healthy subjects (16 males) using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Neuroticism and extraversion were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised. Resting autonomic activity was assessed using a validated measure of baseline cardiac vagal tone (CVT) in each individual. Potential associations between the perfusion data and individual CVT (27 subjects) and personality score (28 subjects) were tested at the level of voxel clusters by fitting a multiple regression model at each intracerebral voxel. Greater baseline perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and cerebellum was associated with lower CVT. At a corrected significance threshold of p < 0.01, strong positive correlations were observed between extraversion and resting brain perfusion in the right caudate, brain stem, and cingulate gyrus. Significant negative correlations between neuroticism and regional cerebral perfusion were identified in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, ACC, and orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that individual autonomic tone and psychological variability influence resting brain activity in brain regions, previously shown to be associated with autonomic arousal (dorsal ACC) and personality traits (amygdala, caudate, etc.) during active task processing. The resting brain state may therefore need to be taken into account when interpreting the neurobiology of individual differences in structural and functional brain activity.

  15. Fast nonlinear regression method for CT brain perfusion analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Kudo, Kohsuke; Viergever, Max A; Velthuis, Birgitta K; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2016-04-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) imaging enables rapid diagnosis and prognosis of ischemic stroke, current CTP analysis methods have several shortcomings. We propose a fast nonlinear regression method with a box-shaped model (boxNLR) that has important advantages over the current state-of-the-art method, block-circulant singular value decomposition (bSVD). These advantages include improved robustness to attenuation curve truncation, extensibility, and unified estimation of perfusion parameters. The method is compared with bSVD and with a commercial SVD-based method. The three methods were quantitatively evaluated by means of a digital perfusion phantom, described by Kudo et al. and qualitatively with the aid of 50 clinical CTP scans. All three methods yielded high Pearson correlation coefficients ([Formula: see text]) with the ground truth in the phantom. The boxNLR perfusion maps of the clinical scans showed higher correlation with bSVD than the perfusion maps from the commercial method. Furthermore, it was shown that boxNLR estimates are robust to noise, truncation, and tracer delay. The proposed method provides a fast and reliable way of estimating perfusion parameters from CTP scans. This suggests it could be a viable alternative to current commercial and academic methods. PMID:27413770

  16. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  17. Performance comparison of a state-of-the-art neuro-SPET scanner and a dedicated neuro-PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D L; Zito, F; Gilardi, M C; Savi, A R; Fazio, F; Jones, T

    1994-05-01

    The physical performances of two current state-of-the-art scanners dedicated to functional imaging of the brain, one a single-photon emission tomography (SPET) scanner and the other a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, have been compared under identical conditions. The aim of the study was to compare the capabilities of the devices under conditions resembling the routine clinical environment, as well as to consider other issues such as radiation burden for some common investigations. Both systems have slightly less than 11-cm axial fields of view. The PET system can be operated in a septa-less (3D) mode as well as conventionally with septa (2D). The spatial resolution of both devices was less than 8 mm in all dimensions in scattering media. On average, the PET scanner's resolution was approximately 10%-15% better than the SPET system. Energy resolution on the SPET system was superior due the scintillator used [NaI(Tl)]. Sensitivity in air with a line source on the PET system was found to be approximately 150 times greater in 3D and approximately 25 times greater in 2D than with the SPET system. A normal subject was studied on each system in an attempt to obtain the highest quality data possible for a subjective comparison. It is clear that, while PET retains the advantages of more desirable radiopharmaceuticals and higher sensitivity, the quality obtainable from SPET devices has improved markedly. SPET may prove as useful for many clinical investigations. PMID:8062841

  18. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI. PMID:27165871

  19. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI.

  20. Dopamine transporter SPECT/CT and perfusion brain SPECT imaging in idiopathic basal ganglia calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Lakiotis, Velissarios; Messinis, Lambros; Markaki, Elli; Constantoyannis, Constantine; Ellul, John; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2009-07-01

    A case of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification in a 56-year-old woman with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment is described. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and regional cerebral blood flow were evaluated using dopamine transporter (DAT) brain single photon emission tomography combined with a low-dose x-ray computerized tomography transmission (hybrid SPECT/CT) and Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT study, respectively. DAT SPECT/CT imaging revealed a reduction in DAT binding in both striatum regions coinciding with bilateral calcifications in the basal ganglia. Brain perfusion scan showed hypoperfusion in basal ganglia regions, posterior parietal cortex bilaterally, left frontopolar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left temporal lobe. These findings correlated well with the clinical condition of the patient. Mineralization may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration. Cortical perfusion changes in patients may better explain the patient's altered cognitive and motor functions.

  1. Influence of Thin Slice Reconstruction on CT Brain Perfusion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Horsch, Alexander D.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although CT scanners generally allow dynamic acquisition of thin slices (1 mm), thick slice (≥5 mm) reconstruction is commonly used for stroke imaging to reduce data, processing time, and noise level. Thin slice CT perfusion (CTP) reconstruction may suffer less from partial volume effects, and thus yield more accurate quantitative results with increased resolution. Before thin slice protocols are to be introduced clinically, it needs to be ensured that this does not affect overall CTP constancy. We studied the influence of thin slice reconstruction on average perfusion values by comparing it with standard thick slice reconstruction. Materials and Methods From 50 patient studies, absolute and relative hemisphere averaged estimates of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were analyzed using 0.8, 2.4, 4.8, and 9.6 mm slice reconstructions. Specifically, the influence of Gaussian and bilateral filtering, the arterial input function (AIF), and motion correction on the perfusion values was investigated. Results Bilateral filtering gave noise levels comparable to isotropic Gaussian filtering, with less partial volume effects. Absolute CBF, CBV and PS were 22%, 14% and 46% lower with 0.8 mm than with 4.8 mm slices. If the AIF and motion correction were based on thin slices prior to reconstruction of thicker slices, these differences reduced to 3%, 4% and 3%. The effect of slice thickness on relative values was very small. Conclusions This study shows that thin slice reconstruction for CTP with unaltered acquisition protocol gives relative perfusion values without clinically relevant bias. It does however affect absolute perfusion values, of which CBF and CBV are most sensitive. Partial volume effects in large arteries and veins lead to overestimation of these values. The effects of reconstruction slice thickness should be taken into account when absolute perfusion values are

  2. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Murray, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain. PMID:26193290

  3. Comparison of Regional Brain Perfusion Levels in Chronically Smoking and Non-Smoking Adults.

    PubMed

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Murray, Donna E

    2015-07-16

    Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with numerous abnormalities in brain neurobiology, but few studies specifically investigated the chronic effects of smoking (compared to the acute effects of smoking, nicotine administration, or nicotine withdrawal) on cerebral perfusion (i.e., blood flow). Predominately middle-aged male (47 ± 11 years of age) smokers (n = 34) and non-smokers (n = 27) were compared on regional cortical perfusion measured by continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance studies at 4 Tesla. Smokers showed significantly lower perfusion than non-smokers in the bilateral medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral inferior parietal lobules, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left posterior cingulate, right isthmus of cingulate, and right supramarginal gyrus. Greater lifetime duration of smoking (adjusted for age) was related to lower perfusion in multiple brain regions. The results indicated smokers showed significant perfusion deficits in anterior cortical regions implicated in the development, progression, and maintenance of all addictive disorders. Smokers concurrently demonstrated reduced blood flow in posterior brain regions that show morphological and metabolic aberrations as well as elevated beta amyloid deposition demonstrated by those with early stage Alzheimer disease. The findings provide additional novel evidence of the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the human brain.

  4. Brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Alegret, Montserrat; Vinyes-Junqué, Georgina; Boada, Mercè; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Cuberas, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Roca, Isabel; Hernández, Isabel; Valero, Sergi; Rosende-Roca, Maitée; Mauleón, Ana; Becker, James T.; Tárraga, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Background Visuoperceptual processing is impaired early in the clinical course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The 15-Objects Test (15-OT) detects such subtle performance deficits in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and mild AD. Reduced brain perfusion in the temporal, parietal and prefrontal regions have been found in early AD and MCI patients. Objectives To confirm the role of the 15-OT in the diagnosis of MCI and AD, and to investigate the brain perfusion correlates of visuoperceptual dysfunction (15-OT) in subjects with MCI, AD and normal aging. Methods Forty-two AD, 42 MCI and 42 healthy elderly control (EC) subjects underwent a brain Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) and separately completed the 15-OT. An analysis of variance compared 15-OT scores between groups. SPM5 was used to analyse the SPECT data. Results 15-OT performace was impaired in the MCI and AD patients. In terms of the SPECT scans, AD patients showed reduced perfusion in temporal-parietal regions, while the MCI subjects had decreased perfusion in the middle and posterior cingulate. When MCI and AD groups were compared, a significant brain perfusion reduction was found in temporo-parietal regions. In the whole sample, 15-OT performance was significantly correlated with the clinical dementia rating scores, and with the perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole, with no significant correlation in each separate group. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the 15-OT performance provides a useful gradation of impairment from normal aging to AD, and it seems to be related to perfusion in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the right temporal pole. PMID:20555146

  5. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed.

  6. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed. PMID:24059574

  7. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  8. Cerebral abnormalities in cocaine abusers: Demonstration by SPECT perfusion brain scintigraphy. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Moore, M.; Holman, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion brain scans with iodine-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained in 12 subjects who acknowledged using cocaine on a sporadic to a daily basis. The route of cocaine administration varied from nasal to intravenous. Concurrent abuse of other drugs was also reported. None of the patients were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Brain scans demonstrated focal defects in 11 subjects, including seven who were asymptomatic, and no abnormality in one. Among the findings were scattered focal cortical deficits, which were seen in several patients and which ranged in severity from small and few to multiple and large, with a special predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes. No perfusion deficits were seen on I-123 SPECT images in five healthy volunteers. Focal alterations in cerebral perfusion are seen commonly in asymptomatic drug users, and these focal deficits are readily depicted by I-123 IMP SPECT.

  9. Perfused drop microfluidic device for brain slice culture-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Pan, Liping; Cheng, Xuanhong; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-06-01

    Living slices of brain tissue are widely used to model brain processes in vitro. In addition to basic neurophysiology studies, brain slices are also extensively used for pharmacology, toxicology, and drug discovery research. In these experiments, high parallelism and throughput are critical. Capability to conduct long-term electrical recording experiments may also be necessary to address disease processes that require protein synthesis and neural circuit rewiring. We developed a novel perfused drop microfluidic device for use with long term cultures of brain slices (organotypic cultures). Slices of hippocampus were placed into wells cut in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Fluid level in the wells was hydrostatically controlled such that a drop was formed around each slice. The drops were continuously perfused with culture medium through microchannels. We found that viable organotypic hippocampal slice cultures could be maintained for at least 9 days in vitro. PDMS microfluidic network could be readily integrated with substrate-printed microelectrodes for parallel electrical recordings of multiple perfused organotypic cultures on a single MEA chip. We expect that this highly scalable perfused drop microfluidic device will facilitate high-throughput drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:27194028

  10. Whole-Brain CT Perfusion to Quantify Acute Ischemic Penumbra and Core.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To validate the use of perfusion computed tomography (CT) with whole-brain coverage to measure the ischemic penumbra and core and to compare its performance to that of limited-coverage perfusion CT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients (n = 296) who underwent 320-detector CT perfusion within 6 hours of the onset of ischemic stroke were studied. First, the ischemic volume at CT perfusion was compared with the penumbra and core reference values at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to derive CT perfusion penumbra and core thresholds. Second, the thresholds were tested in a different group of patients to predict the final infarction at diffusion-weighted imaging 24 hours after CT perfusion. Third, the change in ischemic volume delineated by the optimal penumbra and core threshold was determined as the brain coverage was gradually reduced from 160 mm to 20 mm. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), and analysis of variance were used for the first, second, and third steps, respectively. Results CT perfusion at penumbra and core thresholds resulted in the least volumetric difference from MR imaging reference values with delay times greater than 3 seconds and delay-corrected cerebral blood flow of less than 30% (P = .34 and .33, respectively). When the thresholds were applied to the new group of patients, prediction of the final infarction was allowed with delay times greater than 3 seconds in patients with no recanalization of the occluded artery (CCC, 0.96 [95% confidence interval: 0.92, 0.98]) and with delay-corrected cerebral blood flow less than 30% in patients with complete recanalization (CCC, 0.91 [95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.95]). However, the ischemic volume with a delay time greater than 3 seconds was underestimated when the brain coverage was reduced to 80 mm (P = .04) and the core volume measured as cerebral blood flow less than 30% was

  11. ASFNR recommendations for clinical performance of MR dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice.

  12. Implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional brain mapping using pulsed arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, E C; Buxton, R B; Frank, L R

    1997-01-01

    We describe here experimental considerations in the implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional MRI using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Three tagging techniques: EPISTAR, PICORE, and FAIR are found to give very similar perfusion results despite large differences in static tissue contrast. Two major sources of systematic error in the perfusion measurement are identified: the transit delay from the tagging region to the imaging slice; and the inclusion of intravascular tagged signal. A modified technique called QUIPSS II is described that decreases sensitivity to these effects by explicitly controlling the time width of the tag bolus and imaging after the bolus is entirely deposited into the slice. With appropriate saturation pulses the pulse sequence can be arranged so as to allow for simultaneous collection of perfusion and BOLD data that can be cleanly separated. Such perfusion and BOLD signals reveal differences in spatial location and dynamics that may be useful both for functional brain mapping and for study of the BOLD contrast mechanism. The implementation of multislice perfusion imaging introduces additional complications, primarily in the elimination of signal from static tissue. In pulsed ASL, this appears to be related to the slice profile of the inversion tag pulse in the presence of relaxation, rather than magnetization transfer effects as in continuous arterial spin labeling, and can be alleviated with careful adjustment of inversion pulse parameters. PMID:9430354

  13. The cerebral imaging using vessel-around method in the perfusion CT of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Choong-Il; Choi, Seung-Wook; Park, Seung-Chul; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chong, Gi-Bong

    2005-04-01

    Perfusion CT has been successfully used as a functional imaging technique for diagnosis of patients with hyperacute stroke. However, the commonly used methods based on curve-fitting are time consuming. Numerous researchers have investigated to what extent Perfusion CT can be used for the quantitative assessment of cerebral ischemia and to rapidly obtain comprehensive information regarding the extent of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative approach to rapidly obtain the brain perfusion mapping and to show the proposed cerebral flow imaging of the vessel and tissue in human brain be reliable and useful. Our main design concern was algorithmic speed, robustness and automation in order to allow its potential use in the emergency situation of acute stroke. To obtain a more effective mapping, we analyzed the signal characteristics of Perfusion CT and defined the vessel-around model which includes the vessel and tissue. We proposed a nonparametric vessel-around approach which automatically discriminates the vessel and tissue around vessel from non-interested brain matter stratifying the level of maximum enhancement of pixel-based TAC. The stratification of pixel-based TAC was executed using the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of each pixel and mapped to the cerebral flow imaging. The defined vessel-around model was used to show the cerebral flow imaging and to specify the area of markedly reduced perfusion with loss of function of still viable neurons. Perfusion CT is a fast and practical technique for routine clinical application. It provides substantial and important additional information for the selection of the optimal treatment strategy for patients with hyperacute stroke. The vessel-around approach reduces the computation time significantly when compared with the perfusion imaging using the GVF. The proposed cerebral imaging shows reliable results which are validated by physicians and

  14. Assessment of drug disposition in the perfused rat brain by statistical moment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sakane, T.; Nakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Hashida, M.; Sezaki, H.; Yamashita, S.; Nadai, T. )

    1991-06-01

    Drug disposition in the brain was investigated by statistical moment analysis using an improved in situ brain perfusion technique. The right cerebral hemisphere of the rat was perfused in situ. The drug and inulin were injected into the right internal carotid artery as a rapid bolus and the venous outflow curve at the posterior facial vein was obtained. The infusion rate was adjusted to minimize the flow of perfusion fluid into the left hemisphere. The obtained disposition parameters were characteristics and considered to reflect the physicochemical properties of each drug. Antipyrine showed a small degree of initial uptake. Therefore, its apparent distribution volume (Vi) and apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint,i) were small. Diazepam showed large degrees of both influx and efflux and, thus, a large Vi. Water showed parameters intermediate between those of antipyrine and those of diazepam. Imipramine, desipramine, and propranolol showed a large CLint,i compared with those of the other drugs. The extraction ratio of propranolol significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of unlabeled propranolol in the perfusion fluid. These findings may be explained partly by the tissue binding of these drugs. In conclusion, the present method is useful for studying drug disposition in the brain.

  15. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  16. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  17. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, Eric; Taïeb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; de Laforte, Catherine; Niboyet, Jean; Mundler, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 ( p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  18. Microvascular perfusion during focal vasogenic brain edema: a scanning laser fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Sirén, A L; Hallenbeck, J M

    1997-01-01

    Controversy exists about the effect of tissue edema on cerebral microcirculation. High spatial resolution is required for observation of extravasation and microcirculation during focal vasogenic edema formation. To study the relationship between tissue edema and perfusion, we developed a technique for simultaneous visualization of extravasation and microvessel perfusion in rats. Focal intracortical microvascular injury was generated with a 1-sec Nd-YAG laser pulse. Evans blue albumin (EBA) was infused 30 min before decapitation to study extravasation and FITC-dextran was injected 30 sec prior to decapitation to examine microvessel perfusion. Computerized scanning laser-excited fluorescence microscopy followed by high resolution image analysis permitted quantitative assessment of both parameters on single fresh-frozen brain sections. Studied at 30 min (3.66 +/- 0.15 mm), 2 hr (4.14 +/- 0.08 mm, P < .05), and 8 hr (4.69 +/- 0.18 mm, P < .01) after injury, the diameter of the circular, sharply demarcated zone of EBA-extravasation increased progressively. At 30 min, microvessels at a zone surrounding the area of EBA-extravasation contained 69 +/- 14% (P < .05) more fluorescent FITC-filling than in the control hemisphere, but the density of perfused microvessels was unchanged. At 2 hr, secondary tissue changes had already occurred in a zone surrounding the initial laser lesion. While severe reduction in the density (-76 +/- 13%, P < .05) of perfused microvessels was observed within 400 to 240 microm inside the border of EBA extravasation, perfusion indexes were normal despite the presence of extravasated plasma constituents within 0-80 microm from the border. In a narrow zone (80 microm) outside the border of extravasation, individual microvessels contained 34 +/- 9% (P < .01) less FITC-fluorescence than those in a homologous area of the uninjured contralateral hemisphere. This report demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous measurement and high-resolution mapping

  19. Cholinergic and perfusion brain networks in Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Wyper, David J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate muscarinic M1/M4 cholinergic networks in Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and their association with changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) after 12 weeks of treatment with donepezil. Methods: Forty-nine participants (25 PDD and 24 elderly controls) underwent 123I-QNB and 99mTc-exametazime SPECT scanning. We implemented voxel principal components (PC) analysis, producing a series of PC images of patterns of interrelated voxels across individuals. Linear regression analyses derived specific M1/M4 and perfusion spatial covariance patterns (SCPs). Results: We found an M1/M4 SCP of relative decreased binding in basal forebrain, temporal, striatum, insula, and anterior cingulate (F1,47 = 31.9, p < 0.001) in cholinesterase inhibitor–naive patients with PDD, implicating limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks. The corresponding regional cerebral blood flow SCP showed relative decreased uptake in temporoparietal and prefrontal areas (F1,47 = 177.5, p < 0.001) and nodes of the frontoparietal and default mode networks (DMN). The M1/M4 pattern that correlated with an improvement in MMSE (r = 0.58, p = 0.005) revealed relatively preserved/increased pre/medial/orbitofrontal, parietal, and posterior cingulate areas coinciding with the DMN and frontoparietal networks. Conclusion: Dysfunctional limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks were associated with PDD. Established cholinergic maintenance of the DMN and frontoparietal networks may be prerequisite for cognitive remediation following cholinergic treatment in this condition. PMID:27306636

  20. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro.

    PubMed

    Killian, Nathaniel J; Vernekar, Varadraj N; Potter, Steve M; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  1. ESR imaging of the rat brain with a nitroxide radical perfused by in vivo microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Y; Yokoyama, H; Ohya-Nishiguchi, H; Kamada, H

    1997-01-01

    We report here our investigation of the spatial distribution of free radicals using an electron spin resonance (ESR)-imaging system combined with an in vivo brain microdialysis method, which was performed in the resonator of the ESR-imaging system. A nonmagnetic cannula, newly developed in this study, was used for the perfusion of the exogenous free radicals agent. A nitroxide, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (carbamoyl PROYXL), was used as the imaging agent in saline solution at a concentration of 0.3 M, which was perfused into the right caudate putamen of the rat at 2 microliters/min by a microinfusion pump. Two-dimensional ESR projection of the Z-X plane, which was clearly distinguished (about phi 10 mm) from the nonperfused brain area, was obtained 6 h after the beginning of perfusion of carbamoyl PROXYL. The present method is considered to be a useful tool to introduce stable free radicals into a specific area of the brain.

  2. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  3. Brain perfusion SPECT and MRI in foetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, R; Salonen, I; Partanen, K; Verho, S

    1999-10-01

    Six boys and five girls with a mean age of 8.6 (range 3 to 13) years with foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) were studied by MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to find specific areas of vulnerability. Morphological anomalies shown in six of 11 patients by MRI were situated both cortically and subcortically: cortical atrophy (N = 2), dilated ventricle (N = 1), corpus callosum hypoplasia (N = 1), cerebellar atrophy (N = 2), one of the latter with Arnold-Chiari malformation (N = 1). Delayed myelination of the white matter was seen in two patients. Volumetric studies of the hippocampus showed morphological left-right asymmetry in five of eight patients. However, SPECT showed mild hypoperfusion of the left hemisphere in all 10 subjects. The negative left-right index was located especially in the left parietooccipital region, i.e. in the brain areas implicated in arithmetical and logical-grammatical functions, which are known to be affected in FAS. Normal left-right dominance was also lacking in the frontal area, i.e. the brain area affected in attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Detection of these abnormalities, although they are not unique to FAS, may be helpful in the diagnosis and any attempts at rehabilitation. Diverse morphological and functional abnormalities are more frequent than has usually been believed even in less impaired children with FAS.

  4. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Zadra, Antonio; Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Petit, Dominique; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD), during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation. Methods Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers. Results During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls. Conclusions Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness. PMID:26241047

  5. [Electrophysiological features (EEG) of ethanol withdrawal syndromes on isolated perfused rat brain].

    PubMed

    Tezikov, E B; Litvicki, P F

    2015-01-01

    On isolated rat brains we studied native EEC and its derivates (mean EEC amplitude and power spectrums - Fourier transformation) during perfusion with ethanol (65 Mm/ L) and after its withdrawal. Previously rats were undergone ethanol burden for 6 days according to Majchrowicz procedures to get alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Duration perfusion without ethanol was 5, 10 and 20 min depending on the experimental schedule. Ethanol infusion between periods of withdrawal comprised 20 min. 55% of isolated brains shown epileptiform activity after 1-2 min of ethanol withdrawal but others manifested only increased mean amplitude and the power spectrums of EEC as well as an appearance of single or batch spikes. Differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions can be explained by the accelerated rate of ethanol elimination. The high positive correlation was obtained between EEC findings at the 5-th min of the first ethanol withdrawal and the same findings at the 5-th min of ethanol withdrawal in the second and the third episodes of ethanol withdrawal. Prolongation of withdrawal period more than 5th min caused brain death showing epileptiform activity. Isolated rat brain is the convenient subject to study pathogenesis of excitability of neurons and examination of drugs to treat alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

  6. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26676386

  7. Whole-brain perfusion imaging with balanced steady-state free precession arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Ye, Jong Chul; Kim, Eung Yeop; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) readout has been proposed for arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging to reduce susceptibility artifacts at a relatively high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the main limitation of bSSFP-ASL is the low spatial coverage. In this work, methods to increase the spatial coverage of bSSFP-ASL are proposed for distortion-free, high-resolution, whole-brain perfusion imaging. Three strategies of (i) segmentation, (ii) compressed sensing (CS) and (iii) a hybrid approach combining the two methods were tested to increase the spatial coverage of pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with three-dimensional bSSFP readout. The spatial coverage was increased by factors of two, four and six using each of the three approaches, whilst maintaining the same total scan time (5.3 min). The number of segments and/or CS acceleration rate (R) correspondingly increased to maintain the same bSSFP readout time (1.2 s). The segmentation approach allowed whole-brain perfusion imaging for pCASL-bSSFP with no penalty in SNR and/or total scan time. The CS approach increased the spatial coverage of pCASL-bSSFP whilst maintaining the temporal resolution, with minimal impact on the image quality. The hybrid approach provided compromised effects between the two methods. Balanced SSFP-based ASL allows the acquisition of perfusion images with wide spatial coverage, high spatial resolution and SNR, and reduced susceptibility artifacts, and thus may become a good choice for clinical and neurological studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. SPECT brain perfusion imaging with Tc-99m ECD: Semi-quantitative regional analysis and database mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Schiepers, C.; Hegge, J.; De Roo, M.

    1994-05-01

    Brain SPECT is a well accepted method for the assessment of brain perfusion in various disorders such as epilepsy, stroke, dementia. A program for handling the tomographic data was developed, using a commercial spreadsheet (Microsoft EXCEL) with a set of macro`s for analysis, graphic display and database management of the final results.

  9. Perfusion MR Imaging: Clinical Utility for the Differential Diagnosis of Various Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ki; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Roh, Hong Gee; Moon, Chan Hong; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the utility of perfusion MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Fifty-seven patients with pathologically proven brain tumors (21 high-grade gliomas, 8 low-grade gliomas, 8 lymphomas, 6 hemangioblastomas, 7 metastases, and 7 various other tumors) were included in this study. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and time-to-peak (TTP) ratios were quantitatively analyzed and the rCBV grade of each tumor was also visually assessed on an rCBV map. Results The highest rCBV ratios were seen in hemangioblastomas, followed by high-grade gliomas, metastases, low-grade gliomas, and lymphomas. There was no significant difference in TTP ratios between each tumor group (p>0.05). At visual assessment, rCBV was high in 17 (81%) of 21 high-grade gliomas and in 4 (50%) of 8 low-grade gliomas. Hemangioblastomas showed the highest rCBV and lymphomas the lowest. Conclusion Perfusion MR imaging may be helpful in the differentiation of thevarious solid tumors found in the brain, and in assessing the grade of the various glial tumors occurring there. PMID:12271162

  10. 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT imaging for the assessment of brain perfusion in cerebral palsy (CP) patients with evaluation of the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asl, Mina Taghizadeh; Yousefi, Farzaneh; Nemati, Reza; Assadi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was carried out to evaluate cerebral perfusion in different types of cerebral palsy (CP) patients. For those patients who underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, brain perfusion before and after the therapy was compared. Methods: A total of 11 CP patients were enrolled in this study, of which 4 patients underwent oxygen therapy. Before oxygen therapy and at the end of 40 sessions of oxygen treatment, 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed , and the results were compared. Results: A total of 11 CP patients, 7 females and 4 males with an age range of 5-27 years participated in the study. In brain SPECT studies, all the patients showed perfusion impairments. The region most significantly involved was the frontal lobe (54.54%), followed by the temporal lobe (27.27%), the occipital lobe (18.18%), the visual cortex (18.18%), the basal ganglia (9.09%), the parietal lobe (9.09%), and the cerebellum (9.09%). Frontal-lobe hypoperfusion was seen in all types of cerebral palsy. Two out of 4 patients (2 males and 2 females) who underwent oxygen therapy revealed certain degree of brain perfusion improvement. Conclusion: This study demonstrated decreased cerebral perfusion in different types of CP patients. The study also showed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved cerebral perfusion in a few CP patients. However, it could keep the physiological discussion open and strenghten a link with other areas of neurology in which this approach may have some value. PMID:25785099

  11. Effect of an additional atropine injection during dobutamine infusion for myocardial SPET.

    PubMed

    Caner, B; Karanfil, A; Uysal, U; Tokgozoglu, L; Aksoyek, S; Ugur, O; Ciftci, I; Atalar, E; Kes, S; Bekdik, C

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the value of an additional atropine injection in patients who do not achieve an adequate heart rate during dobutamine infusion for myocardial perfusion SPET (single photon emission tomography). Patients undergoing dobutamine myocardial SPET who failed to achieve > or = 85% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate at the end of dobutamine infusion (D protocol) had a second dobutamine myocardial SPET study on a separate day with the addition of an atropine injection during the dobutamine infusion (D + A protocol). Twenty-nine patients were studied. 201Tl was used in 27 patients and 99Tc(m)-MIBI in two patients. All patients underwent coronary angiography and significant coronary artery disease was found in 19 of 29 patients. The mean heart rate obtained at the peak of dobutamine infusion in the D + A protocol was significantly higher than that in the D protocol (153.8 +/- 13.8 vs 117.5 +/- 15.3 beats min[-1]). The D + A protocol resulted in a higher diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of stenosed coronaries compared with the D protocol (87 vs 80%, P > 0.05) without changing the specificity (89% for both protocols). On the other hand, the frequency of side-effects and ECG changes during the D + A protocol was higher than that with the D protocol (32 vs 47). In conclusion, the addition of an atropine injection during dobutamine infusion resulted in a higher diagnostic sensitivity for identifying stenosed coronaries compared to dobutamine alone.

  12. Human brain: reliability and reproducibility of pulsed arterial spin-labeling perfusion MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Geon-Ho; Song, Enmin; Zhu, Xiao-Ping; Matson, Gerald B; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2005-03-01

    The Committee of Human Research of the University of California San Francisco approved this study, and all volunteers provided written informed consent. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the global and regional reliability and reproducibility of noninvasive brain perfusion measurements obtained with different pulsed arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and to determine the extent to which within-subject variability and random noise limit reliability and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined twice within 2 hours. The pulsed ASL methods compared in this study differ mainly with regard to magnetization transfer and eddy current effects. There were two main results: (a) Pulsed ASL MR imaging consistently had high measurement reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients greater than 0.75) and reproducibility (coefficients of variation less than 8.5%), and (b) random noise rather than within-subject variability limited reliability and reproducibility. It was concluded that low signal-to-noise ratios substantially limit the reliability and reproducibility of perfusion measurements.

  13. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Study in the Patients with Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Ming; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study uses a MRI technique, three-dimension pulse continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-PCASL), to measure the patient’s cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the subacute stage of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in order to analyze the relationship between cerebral blood flow and neurocognitive deficits. Objective To provide the relationship between cortical CBF and neuropsychological dysfunction for the subacute MTBI patients. Methods After MTBI, perfusion MR imaging technique (3D-PCASL) measures the CBF of MTBI patients (n = 23) within 1 month and that of normal controls (n = 22) to determine the quantity and location of perfusion defect. The correlation between CBF abnormalities and cognitive deficits was elucidated by combining the results of the neuropsychological tests of the patients. Result We observed a substantial reduction in CBF in the bilateral frontal and left occipital cortex as compared with the normal persons. In addition, there were correlation between post concussive symptoms (including dizziness and simulator sickness) and CBF in the hypoperfused areas. The more severe symptom was correlated with higher CBF in bilateral frontal and left occipital lobes. Conclusion First, this study determined that despite no significant abnormality detected on conventional CT and MRI studies, hypoperfusion was observed in MTBI group using 3D-PCASL technique in subacute stage, which suggested that this approach may increase sensitivity to MTBI. Second, the correlation between CBF and the severity of post concussive symptoms suggested that changes in cerebral hemodynamics may play a role in pathophysiology underlies the symptoms. PMID:26871696

  14. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  15. Towards adapting a normal patient database for SPECT brain perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. D.; Holmes, R. B.; Soleimani, M.; Evans, M. J.; Cade, S. C.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2012-06-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) is a tool which can be used to image perfusion in the brain. Clinicians can use such images to help diagnose dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. Due to the intrinsic stochasticity in the photon imaging system, some form of statistical comparison of an individual image with a 'normal' patient database gives a clinician additional confidence in interpreting the image. Due to the variations between SPECT camera systems, ideally a normal patient database is required for each individual system. However, cost or ethical considerations often prohibit the collection of such a database for each new camera system. Some method of adapting existing normal patient databases to new camera systems would be beneficial. This paper introduces a method which may be regarded as a 'first-pass' attempt based on 2-norm regularization and a codebook of discrete spatially stationary convolutional kernels. Some preliminary illustrative results are presented, together with discussion on limitations and possible improvements.

  16. [How can we determine the best cerebral perfusion pressure in pediatric traumatic brain injury?].

    PubMed

    Vuillaume, C; Mrozek, S; Fourcade, O; Geeraerts, T

    2013-12-01

    The management of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is the one of the main preoccupation for the care of paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). The physiology of cerebral autoregulation, CO2 vasoreactivity, cerebral metabolism changes with age as well as the brain compliance. Low CPP leads to high morbidity and mortality in pediatric TBI. The recent guidelines for the management of CPP for the paediatric TBI indicate a CPP threshold 40-50 mmHg (infants for the lower and adolescent for the upper). But we must consider the importance of age-related differences in the arterial pressure and CPP. The best CPP is the one that allows to avoid cerebral ischaemia and oedema. In this way, the adaptation of optimal CPP must be individual. To assess this objective, interesting tools are available. Transcranial Doppler can be used to determine the best level of CPP. Other indicators can predict the impairment of autoregulation like pressure reactivity index (PRx) taking into consideration the respective changes in ICP and CPP. Measurement of brain tissue oxygen partial pressure is an other tool that can be used to determine the optimal CPP.

  17. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  18. Justification of administered dose level in brain perfusion imaging with 99mTc-HMPAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, I.; Geronikola-Trapali, X.; Armeniakos, I.; Prentakis, A.; Soultanis, S.; Chatziioannou, S. N.

    2011-09-01

    Brain perfusion imaging by means of 99mTc-HMPAO is widely used in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The administered dose range recommended by the manufacturer and reported in bibliography is rather wide (~ 9.5 - 27 mCi), necessitating further quantitative analysis. In the framework of this study, a quantitative evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical performance for different values of administered dose was carried out, based on image quality indicators. Evaluation of image quality was based on wavelet-generated contrast, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio indicators, denoted as CI, NI and CNR respectively. Subsequently, a generic image quality index was correlated with the administered dose, to produce an overall performance indicator (denoted as PI). Application of appropriate statistical tests (analysis of variance for normal and Kruskal-Wallis test for non-normal distributions) showed that there is a statistically significant difference in CI (p < 0.01), NI (p < 0.001) and CNR (p < 0.05), but not in PI (p > 0.05) values. Application of Tukey test for CI and NI normal distributions demonstrated that CI (10 mCi) = CI (20 mCi) < CI (15 mCi) and NI (10 mCi) > NI (20 mCi), while NI (15 mCi) could not be characterised. Finally, application of non-parametric multiple comparisons showed that CNR (20 mCi) < CNR (10 mCi), while CNR (15 mCi) could not be characterised. Consequently, brain perfusion imaging, by means of 99mTc-HMPAO utilising an administered dose of 20 mCi, results in improved image quality on the basis of the estimated indicators. Additionally, this image quality improvement is sufficient to justify the increased patient radiation burden.

  19. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  20. Detection of the brain response during a cognitive task using perfusion-based event-related functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Yee, S H; Liu, H L; Hou, J; Pu, Y; Fox, P T; Gao, J H

    2000-08-01

    Event-related (ER) fMRI has evoked great interest due to the ability to depict the dynamic features of human brain function during various cognitive tasks. Thus far, all cognitive ER-fMRI studies have been based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast techniques. Compared with BOLD-based fMRI techniques, perfusion-based fMRI is able to localize the region of neuronal activity more accurately. This report demonstrates, for the first time, the detection of the brain response to a cognitive task using high temporal resolution perfusion-based ER-fMRI. An English verb generation task was used in this study. Results show that perfusion-based ER-fMRI accurately depicts the activation in Broca's area. Average changes in regional relative cerebral blood flow reached a maximum value of 30.7% at approximately 6.5 s after the start of stimulation and returned to 10% of the maximum value at approximately 12.8 s. Our results show that perfusion-based ER-fMRI is a useful tool for cognitive neuroscience studies, providing comparable temporal resolution and better localization of brain function than BOLD ER-fMRI. PMID:10943717

  1. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  2. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Chapter 5 cerebral perfusion pressure and intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Kirkness, Catherine; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 300,000 children and adults are hospitalized annually with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and monitored for many vital signs, including intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Nurses use these monitored values to infer the risk of secondary brain injury. The purpose of this chapter is to review nursing research on the monitoring of ICP and CPP in TBI. In this context, nursing research is defined as the research conducted by nurse investigators or research about the variables ICP and CPP that pertains to the nursing care of the TBI patient, adult or child. A modified systematic review of the literature indicated that, except for sharp head rotation and prone positioning, there are no body positions or nursing activities that uniformly or nearly uniformly result in clinically relevant ICP increase or decrease. In the smaller number of studies in which CPP is also measured, there are few changes in CPP since arterial blood pressure generally increases along with ICP. Considerable individual variation occurs in controlled studies, suggesting that clinicians need to pay close attention to the cerebrodynamic responses of each patient to any care maneuver. We recommend that future research regarding nursing care and ICP/CPP in TBI patients needs to have a more integrated approach, examining comprehensive care in relation to short- and long-term outcomes and incorporating multimodality monitoring. Intervention trials of care aspects within nursing control, such as the reduction of environmental noise, early mobilization, and reduction of complications of immobility, are all sorely needed.

  4. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Stockbower, Grace E.; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Detre, John A.; Wolk, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or “stress test”, may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  5. Development of a realistic, dynamic digital brain phantom for CT perfusion validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divel, Sarah E.; Segars, W. Paul; Christensen, Soren; Wintermark, Max; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Physicians rely on CT Perfusion (CTP) images and quantitative image data, including cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and bolus arrival delay, to diagnose and treat stroke patients. However, the quantification of these metrics may vary depending on the computational method used. Therefore, we have developed a dynamic and realistic digital brain phantom upon which CTP scans can be simulated based on a set of ground truth scenarios. Building upon the previously developed 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom containing a highly detailed brain model, this work consisted of expanding the intricate vasculature by semi-automatically segmenting existing MRA data and fitting nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces to the new vessels. Using time attenuation curves input by the user as reference, the contrast enhancement in the vessels changes dynamically. At each time point, the iodine concentration in the arteries and veins is calculated from the curves and the material composition of the blood changes to reflect the expected values. CatSim, a CT system simulator, generates simulated data sets of this dynamic digital phantom which can be further analyzed to validate CTP studies and post-processing methods. The development of this dynamic and realistic digital phantom provides a valuable resource with which current uncertainties and controversies surrounding the quantitative computations generated from CTP data can be examined and resolved.

  6. Early whole-brain CT perfusion for detection of patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Dolatowski, Karoline; Schramm, Peter; Moerer, Onnen; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This prospective study investigated the role of whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) studies in the identification of patients at risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) and of tissue at risk for delayed cerebral infarction (DCI). METHODS Forty-three patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were included in this study. A CTP study was routinely performed in the early phase (Day 3). The CTP study was repeated in cases of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)-measured blood flow velocity (BFV) increase of > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours and/or on Day 7 in patients who were intubated/sedated. RESULTS Early CTP studies revealed perfusion deficits in 14 patients, of whom 10 patients (72%) developed DIND, and 6 of these 10 patients (60%) had DCI. Three of the 14 patients (21%) with early perfusion deficits developed DCI without having had DIND, and the remaining patient (7%) had neither DIND nor DCI. There was a statistically significant correlation between early perfusion deficits and occurrence of DIND and DCI (p < 0.0001). A repeated CTP was performed in 8 patients with a TCD-measured BFV increase > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours, revealing a perfusion deficit in 3 of them (38%). Two of the 3 patients (67%) developed DCI without preceding DIND and 1 patient (33%) had DIND without DCI. In 4 of the 7 patients (57%) who were sedated and/or comatose, additional CTP studies on Day 7 showed perfusion deficits. All 4 patients developed DCI. CONCLUSIONS Whole-brain CTP on Day 3 after aSAH allows early and reliable identification of patients at risk for DIND and tissue at risk for DCI. Additional CTP investigations, guided by TCD-measured BFV increase or persisting coma, do not contribute to information gain.

  7. Absolute perfusion measurements and associated iodinated contrast agent time course in brain metastasis: a study for contrast-enhanced radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layal; Deman, Pierre; Tessier, Alexandre; Balosso, Jacques; Estève, François; Adam, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment that combines the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using medium energy X-rays. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the absolute amount of iodine reached in the tumor and its time course. Quantitative, postinfusion iodine biodistribution and associated brain perfusion parameters were studied in human brain metastasis as key parameters for treatment feasibility and quality. Twelve patients received an intravenous bolus of iodinated contrast agent (CA) (40 mL, 4 mL/s), followed by a steady-state infusion (160 mL, 0.5 mL/s) to ensure stable intratumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Absolute iodine concentrations and quantitative perfusion maps were derived from 40 multislice dynamic computed tomography (CT) images of the brain. The postinfusion mean intratumoral iodine concentration (over 30 minutes) reached 1.94 ± 0.12 mg/mL. Reasonable correlations were obtained between these concentrations and the permeability surface area product and the cerebral blood volume. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative study of CA biodistribution versus time in brain metastasis. The study shows that suitable and stable amounts of iodine can be reached for contrast-enhanced radiotherapy. Moreover, the associated perfusion measurements provide useful information for the patient recruitment and management processes.

  8. Cerebral perfusion pressure and risk of brain hypoxia in severe head injury: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Caballos, Antonio J; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Cayuela-Domínguez, Aurelio; Domínguez-Roldán, Jose M; Rincón-Ferrari, M Dolores; Valencia-Anguita, Julio; Flores-Cordero, Juan M; Muñoz-Sánchez, M Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Higher and lower cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) thresholds have been proposed to improve brain tissue oxygen pressure (PtiO2) and outcome. We study the distribution of hypoxic PtiO2 samples at different CPP thresholds, using prospective multimodality monitoring in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Methods This is a prospective observational study of 22 severely head injured patients admitted to a neurosurgical critical care unit from whom multimodality data was collected during standard management directed at improving intracranial pressure, CPP and PtiO2. Local PtiO2 was continuously measured in uninjured areas and snapshot samples were collected hourly and analyzed in relation to simultaneous CPP. Other variables that influence tissue oxygen availability, mainly arterial oxygen saturation, end tidal carbon dioxide, body temperature and effective hemoglobin, were also monitored to keep them stable in order to avoid non-ischemic hypoxia. Results Our main results indicate that half of PtiO2 samples were at risk of hypoxia (defined by a PtiO2 equal to or less than 15 mmHg) when CPP was below 60 mmHg, and that this percentage decreased to 25% and 10% when CPP was between 60 and 70 mmHg and above 70 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our study indicates that the risk of brain tissue hypoxia in severely head injured patients could be really high when CPP is below the normally recommended threshold of 60 mmHg, is still elevated when CPP is slightly over it, but decreases at CPP values above it. PMID:16356218

  9. Cerebral perfusion pressure, microdialysis biochemistry and clinical outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. It has been postulated that brain metabolic status, intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) are related to patients' outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CPP, ICP and microdialysis parameters and clinical outcome in TBIs. Results Thirty four individuals with severe brain injury hospitalized in an intensive care unit participated in this study. Microdialysis data were collected, along with ICP and CPP values. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate patient outcome at 6 months after injury. Fifteen patients with a CPP greater than 75 mmHg, L/P ratio lower than 37 and Glycerol concentration lower than 72 mmol/l had an excellent outcome (GOS 4 or 5), as opposed to the remaining 19 patients. No patient with a favorable outcome had a CPP lower than 75 mmHg or Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio greater than 72 mmol/l and 37 respectively. Data regarding L/P ratio and Glycerol concentration were statistically significant at p = 0.05 when patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome were compared. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, a CPP greater than 75 mmHg was marginally statistically significantly related to outcome at 6 months after injury. Conclusions Patients with favorable outcome had certain common features in terms of microdialysis parameters and CPP values. An individualized approach regarding CPP levels and cut -off points for Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio are proposed. PMID:22168902

  10. Simulation of realistic abnormal SPECT brain perfusion images: application in semi-quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T.; Fleming, J. S.; Hoffmann, S. M. A.; Kemp, P. M.

    2005-11-01

    Simulation is useful in the validation of functional image analysis methods, particularly when considering the number of analysis techniques currently available lacking thorough validation. Problems exist with current simulation methods due to long run times or unrealistic results making it problematic to generate complete datasets. A method is presented for simulating known abnormalities within normal brain SPECT images using a measured point spread function (PSF), and incorporating a stereotactic atlas of the brain for anatomical positioning. This allows for the simulation of realistic images through the use of prior information regarding disease progression. SPECT images of cerebral perfusion have been generated consisting of a control database and a group of simulated abnormal subjects that are to be used in a UK audit of analysis methods. The abnormality is defined in the stereotactic space, then transformed to the individual subject space, convolved with a measured PSF and removed from the normal subject image. The dataset was analysed using SPM99 (Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College, London) and the MarsBaR volume of interest (VOI) analysis toolbox. The results were evaluated by comparison with the known ground truth. The analysis showed improvement when using a smoothing kernel equal to system resolution over the slightly larger kernel used routinely. Significant correlation was found between effective volume of a simulated abnormality and the detected size using SPM99. Improvements in VOI analysis sensitivity were found when using the region median over the region mean. The method and dataset provide an efficient methodology for use in the comparison and cross validation of semi-quantitative analysis methods in brain SPECT, and allow the optimization of analysis parameters.

  11. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of oligonucleotides to the blood-brain barrier: in vitro and in situ brain perfusion studies on the uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Tag

    2013-11-01

    Except for the few exceptions where topical administration is feasible, progress towards broad clinical application of nucleic acid therapeutics requires development of effective systemic delivery strategies. The central nervous system represents a particularly difficult organ for systemic delivery due to the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported a nanoparticulate delivery system for targeted brain delivery of oligonucleotides upon systemic administration, i.e. liposome-encapsulated polyethylenimine/oligonucleotides polyplexes. In this study, cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of the nanoparticles were further investigated using in situ brain perfusion technique followed by colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. The brain endothelial uptake and possibly parenchymal accumulation were readily visualized upon administration via internal carotid artery perfusion. The nanoparticles were colocalized with early-endosome antigen, which confirms the brain endothelial uptake through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis also suggested the nanoparticles entered the brain endothelial cells while maintaining their integrity. Together, the enhanced brain uptake, as claimed previously, of the antibody-targeted nanoparticles was clearly confirmed with more convincing evidences. In addition, the experimental techniques described here should be applicable to the studies involving nanoparticle-mediated brain delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics.

  12. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found

  13. Sample collection and amino acids analysis of extracellular fluid of mouse brain slices with low flow push-pull perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Torres, G; Williams, L; Featherstone, D E; Shippy, S A

    2015-10-01

    Brain tissue slices are a common neuroscience model that allows relatively sophisticated analysis of neuronal networks in a simplified preparation. Most experimental methodology utilizes electrophysiological tools to probe these model systems. The work here demonstrates the adaptation of low-flow push-pull perfusion sampling (LFPS) to a brain slice system. LFPS is used to sample from the hippocampus of mouse brain slices. Perfusate amino acid levels are quantified following sampling with capillary electrophoresis. Glutamate was measured from the CA1 region of the hippocampus in slices taken from a cystine-glutamate transporter deletion mutant, xCT(-/-), and the background strain C57BL/6J. Sampling is performed over up to 6.5 h with standard tissue slice preparation and experimentation methods. Four amino acids were quantified to demonstrate the ability to perform LFPS and show good agreement with published literature. Perfusate glutamate levels are found to be significantly lower with xCT(-/-) slices (1.9(±0.5) μM) relative to controls (4.90(±1.1) μM). But, experiments with control slices show a significant decrease in glutamate over the 6 h sampling period that are not seen with xCT(-/-) slices. Increasing the LFPS sample collection rate during the first 90 min of sampling did not show a sampling artifact in perfusate glutamate content. Sampling immediately following slicing did not show an early increasing glutamate level that would be indicative of a significant contribution from blood or tissue damage. The data presented here show a complementarity to electrophysiological studies of tissue slices. The ability to characterize extracellular fluid chemical content with LFPS in these slices provides an alternative data stream for probing neurochemical signaling networks in brain tissue slices. PMID:26299259

  14. SPECT Perfusion Imaging Demonstrates Improvement of Traumatic Brain Injury With Transcranial Near-infrared Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Theodore A; Morries, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing health concern affecting civilians and military personnel. Near-infrared (NIR) light has shown benefits in animal models and human trials for stroke and in animal models for TBI. Diodes emitting low-level NIR often have lacked therapeutic efficacy, perhaps failing to deliver sufficient radiant energy to the necessary depth. In this case report, a patient with moderate TBI documented in anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) received 20 NIR treatments in the course of 2 mo using a high-power NIR laser. Symptoms were monitored by clinical examination and a novel patient diary system specifically designed for this patient population. Clinical application of these levels of infrared energy for this patient with TBI yielded highly favorable outcomes with decreased depression, anxiety, headache, and insomnia, whereas cognition and quality of life improved. Neurological function appeared to improve based on changes in the SPECT by quantitative analysis. NIR in the power range of 10-15 W at 810 and 980 nm can safely and effectively treat chronic symptoms of TBI. PMID:26535475

  15. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  16. Brain perfusion SPECT in the mouse: normal pattern according to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wunder, Andreas; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Michel, Roger; Stemmer, Nina; Lukas, Mathias; Derlin, Thorsten; Gregor-Mamoudou, Betina; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is a useful surrogate marker of neuronal activity and a parameter of primary interest in the diagnosis of many diseases. The increasing use of mouse models spawns the demand for in vivo measurement of rCBF in the mouse. Small animal SPECT provides excellent spatial resolution at adequate sensitivity and is therefore a promising tool for imaging the mouse brain. This study evaluates the feasibility of mouse brain perfusion SPECT and assesses the regional pattern of normal Tc-99m-HMPAO uptake and the impact of age and gender. Whole-brain kinetics was compared between Tc-99m-HMPAO and Tc-99m-ECD using rapid dynamic planar scans in 10 mice. Assessment of the regional uptake pattern was restricted to the more suitable tracer, HMPAO. Two HMPAO SPECTs were performed in 18 juvenile mice aged 7.5 ± 1.5weeks, and in the same animals at young adulthood, 19.1 ± 4.0 weeks (nanoSPECT/CTplus, general purpose mouse apertures: 1.2kcps/MBq, 0.7mm FWHM). The 3-D MRI Digital Atlas Database of an adult C57BL/6J mouse brain was used for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. SPECT images were stereotactically normalized using SPM8 and a custom made, left-right symmetric HMPAO template in atlas space. For testing lateral asymmetry, each SPECT was left-right flipped prior to stereotactical normalization. Flipped and unflipped SPECTs were compared by paired testing. Peak brain uptake was similar for ECD and HMPAO: 1.8 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.6 %ID (p=0.357). Washout after the peak was much faster for ECD than for HMPAO: 24 ± 7min vs. 4.6 ± 1.7h (p=0.001). The general linear model for repeated measures with gender as an intersubject factor revealed an increase in relative HMPAO uptake with age in the neocortex (p=0.018) and the hippocampus (p=0.012). A decrease was detected in the midbrain (p=0.025). Lateral asymmetry, with HMPAO uptake larger in the left hemisphere, was detected primarily in the neocortex, both at juvenile age (asymmetry index AI=2.7 ± 1

  17. Evaluating the feasibility of C-arm CT for brain perfusion imaging: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Fieselmann, A.; Boese, J.; Rohkohl, C.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2010-02-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly being used to supplement 2D real-time data with 3D information. Temporal resolution is currently limited by the mechanical rotation speed of the C-arm which presents challenges for applications such as imaging of contrast flow in brain perfusion CT (PCT). We present a novel scheme where multiple scans are obtained at different start times with respect to the contrast injection. The data is interleaved temporally and interpolated during 3D reconstruction. For evaluation we developed a phantom to generate the range of temporal frequencies relevant for PCT. The highest requirements are for imaging the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function. Fourier transform analysis of the AIF showed that 90% of the spectral energy is contained at frequencies lower than 0.08Hz. We built an acrylic cylinder phantom of diameter 1.9 cm, with 25 sections of 1cm length each. Iodine concentration in each compartment was varied to produce a half-cycle sinusoid variation in HU in version 1, and 2.5 cycles in version 2 of the phantom. The phantom was moved linearly at speeds from 0.5cm/s to 4cm/s (temporal frequencies of 0.02Hz to 0.09Hz) and imaged using a C-arm system. Phantom CT numbers in a slice reconstructed at isocenter were measured and sinusoidal fits to the data were obtained. The fitted sinusoids had frequencies that were within 3+/-2% of the actual temporal frequencies of the sinusoid. This suggests that the imaging and reconstruction scheme is adequate for PCT imaging.

  18. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  19. Application of time sampling in brain CT perfusion imaging for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. G.; Park, S. J.; Im, Jung Gi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine a stable sampling rate not to be affected by sampling shift for reducing radiation exposure with time sampling and interpolation in cerebral perfusion CT examination. Original images were obtained every 1 second for 40 time series from 3 patients, respectively. Time sampling was performed with sampling intervals (SI) from 2 to 10 seconds. Sampling shift was applied from +1 to SI-1 for each sampling rate. For each patient, 30 tissue concentration time-course data were collected, and arterial input curves were fitted by gamma-variate function. The sinc function was introduced for interpolation. Deconvolution analysis based on SVD was performed for quantifying perfusion parameters. The perfusion values through time-varying sampling and interpolation were statistically compared with the original perfusion values. The mean CBF values with increase of sampling interval and shift magnitude from the collected data had a wider fluctuation pattern centering around the original mean CBF. The mean CBV values had a similar tendency to the mean CBF values, but a relatively narrower deviation. The mean MTT values were fluctuated reversely to the trend of the mean CBF values. The stable sampling interval for quantifying perfusion parameters with lower radiation exposure was statistically acceptable up to 4 seconds. These results indicate that sampling shift limits sampling rate for acquiring acceptable perfusion values. This study will help in selecting more reasonable sampling rate for low-radiation-dose CT examination.

  20. Regional Cerebral Blood-Flow with 99mTc-ECD Brain Perfusion SPECT in Landau-Kleffner Syndrome: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Reza; Nabipour, Iraj; Javadi, Hamid; Chabi, Negar; Assadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder characterized by acquired aphasia and epilepsy. 99mTc-ECD SPECT imaging was performed in two right-handed children with LKS. A relative decrease in perfusion was found in the left frontal-temporal cortices of both patients as well as in the left and right parietal cortices of one patient with aphasia, without clinical epilepsy. The degree of regional cerebral perfusion impairment did not correlate with the severity of the clinical and EEG abnormalities, but the area of hypoperfusion was compatible with the speech area of the brain. Overall, although asymmetrical temporoparietal perfusion appears as a common finding in LKS, SPECT findings in LKS alone cannot elucidate the pathogenic features of the disorder in the brain. Here, we present two cases of LKS in which we investigated SPECT perfusion scans.

  1. Use of CT perfusion to discriminate between brain metastases from different primaries.

    PubMed

    Dolgushin, Mikhail B; Pronin, Igor N; Holodny, Elena A; Fadeeva, Liudmila M; Holodny, Andrei I; Kornienko, Valeri N

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-six metastases in 22 patients were studied prospectively using computed tomography perfusion. Regions of interests were drawn around: the enhancing part of the tumor, necrotic central part, periphery, peritumoral edema, and normal white matter. Cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time were calculated for each zone. The enhancing part of the tumor significantly differed from the other zones in 11 of 12. Metastases of different primaries can be differentiated from one another with statistically significance (P<.05) by at least one perfusion parameter in 57% of cases.

  2. Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-07-01

    Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

  3. Defining Core and Penumbra in Ischemic Stroke: A Voxel- and Volume-Based Analysis of Whole Brain CT Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yannan; Han, Quan; Ding, Xinfa; Chen, Qingmeng; Ye, Keqi; Zhang, Sheng; Yan, Shenqiang; Campbell, Bruce C V; Parsons, Mark W; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has the potential to select eligible patients for reperfusion therapy. We aimed to find the optimal thresholds on baseline CTP for ischemic core and penumbra in acute ischemic stroke. We reviewed patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation, who underwent baseline whole brain CTP, followed by intravenous thrombolysis and perfusion imaging at 24 hours. Patients were divided into those with major reperfusion (to define the ischemic core) and minimal reperfusion (to define the extent of penumbra). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and volumetric consistency analysis were performed separately to determine the optimal threshold by Youden's Index and mean magnitude of volume difference, respectively. From a series of 103 patients, 22 patients with minimal-reperfusion and 47 with major reperfusion were included. Analysis revealed delay time ≥ 3 s most accurately defined penumbra (AUC = 0.813; 95% CI, 0.812-0.814, mean magnitude of volume difference = 29.1 ml). The optimal threshold for ischemic core was rCBF ≤ 30% within delay time ≥ 3 s (AUC = 0.758; 95% CI, 0.757-0.760, mean magnitude of volume difference = 10.8 ml). In conclusion, delay time ≥ 3 s and rCBF ≤ 30% within delay time ≥ 3 s are the optimal thresholds for penumbra and core, respectively. These results may allow the application of the mismatch on CTP to reperfusion therapy.

  4. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI.

  5. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI. PMID:27567823

  6. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda Rao, M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing (pranayama) is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relive mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensors mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  7. In vitro and in vivo testing of the dopamine D1 ligand [123I]SCH 23982 with respect to its potential application in SPET investigations.

    PubMed

    Beer, H F; Lin, S; Bläuenstein, P; Hasler, P; Schubiger, P A; Maier, A; Lichtensteiger, W; Oettli, R; Bekier, A; Weder, B

    1993-07-01

    [123I]SCH 23982, a dopamine D1 ligand, was labelled in a large scale process and then tested in vitro for binding to rat brain sections and membranes. Because of the promising values of KD = 1.5 x 10(-10) M and Bmax = 0.7 x 10(-11) mol/g, in vivo evaluation was performed on rats and normal volunteers to test its possible usefulness for SPET imaging. In competition experiments, a higher binding in the presence of sulpiride was found while ketanserin displaced [123I]SCH 23982 only at a 10,000-fold excess. Differences between rats and men were seen with respect to their metabolism. SPET investigations failed because the washout of [123I]SCH 23982 was too rapid.

  8. Optical monitoring of cardiac and respiratory rhythms in the skin perfusion near the brain under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mandavilli M.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1998-04-01

    In this investigation an attempt is made to find the effects of controlled breathing on brain with the help of optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of a subject. It has already been established that the brain activity can be monitored in terms of arterial blood volumetric changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brain recorded with the help of optical sensors. To investigate the influence of controlled breathing, an expert in controlled breathing is chosen as the subject. Pranayama is believed to be the controlled intake and outflow of breath in a firmly established posture. Some types of pranayama are believed to relieve mental stress. While the subject is practicing one such type of breath control, arterial blood volume changes in the brain are recorded using optical sensor mounted on the left and right temples of the subject. From these measurements at the beginning and end of the pranayama exercise, it could be noticed that the subject could induce changes in the cardiac and respiratory rhythms by controlled breathing. Rhythmic phenomena in the skin perfusion in the vicinity of the brian are also studied when the subject is holding his breath. The arterial blood volume changes to the left and right hemispheres of the brian, as monitored by the optical sensors during this period, exhibit asymmetric reaction when the subject is holding his breath. An attempt is made to understand whether these changes induced by stoppage of breathing are 'chaotic' or 'adaptive' in nature.

  9. NeuroGam Software Analysis in Epilepsy Diagnosis Using 99mTc-ECD Brain Perfusion SPECT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peng; Zhang, Fang; Gao, Jianqing; Jing, Jianmin; Pan, Liping; Li, Dongxue; Wei, Lingge

    2015-09-20

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the value of NeuroGam software in diagnosis of epilepsy by 99Tcm-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS NeuroGam was used to analyze 52 cases of clinically proven epilepsy by 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging. The results were compared with EEG and MRI, and the positive rates and localization to epileptic foci were analyzed. RESULTS NeuroGam analysis showed that 42 of 52 epilepsy cases were abnormal. 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging revealed a positive rate of 80.8% (42/52), with 36 out of 42 patients (85.7%) clearly showing an abnormal area. Both were higher than that of brain perfusion SPECT, with a consistency of 64.5% (34/52) using these 2 methods. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was observed in frontal (18), temporal (20), and parietal lobes (2). Decreased rCBF was seen in frontal and temporal lobes in 4 out of 36 patients, and in temporal and parietal lobes of 2 out of 36 patients. NeuroGam further showed that the abnormal area was located in a different functional area of the brain. EEG abnormalities were detected in 29 out of 52 patients (55.8%) with 16 cases (55.2%) clearly showing an abnormal area. MRI abnormalities were detected in 17 out of 43 cases (39.5%), including 9 cases (52.9%) clearly showing an abnormal area. The consistency of NeuroGam software analysis, and EEG and MRI were 48.1% (25/52) and 34.9% (15/43), respectively. CONCLUSIONS NeuroGam software analysis offers a higher sensitivity in detecting epilepsy than EEG or MRI. It is a powerful tool in 99Tcm-ECD brain imaging.

  10. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in major psychiatric disorders: From basics to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Amburanjan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a well-established and reliable method to assess brain function through measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). It can be used to define a patient's pathophysiological status when neurological or psychiatric symptoms cannot be explained by anatomical neuroimaging findings. Though there is ample evidence validating brain SPECT as a technique to track human behavior and correlating psychiatric disorders with dysfunction of specific brain regions, only few psychiatrists have adopted brain SPECT in routine clinical practice. It can be utilized to evaluate the involvement of brain regions in a particular patient, to individualize treatment on basis of SPECT findings, to monitor the treatment response and modify treatment, if necessary. In this article, we have reviewed the available studies in this regard from existing literature and tried to present the evidence for establishing the clinical role of brain SPECT in major psychiatric illnesses. PMID:25400359

  11. Technetium-99m bis (aminoethanethiol) complexes with amine sidechains--potential brain perfusion imaging agents for SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Efange, S.M.; Kung, H.F.; Billings, J.; Guo, Y.Z.; Blau, M.

    1987-06-01

    In an effort to develop new clinically useful technetium-99m bis(aminoethanethiol) ((/sup 99m/Tc)BAT) complexes for the evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion, two new BAT ligands containing amines in the sidechain were synthesized and subsequently complexed with /sup 99m/Tc to yield the target complexes: (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA and (/sup 99m/Tc)TMPDA. Each complex was obtained as mixtures of two isomers, syn and anti, which were separated chromatographically. In biodistribution studies, both isomers of (/sup 99m/Tc)TMPDA showed little uptake in the brain. In contrast, the brain uptake values at 2 and 15 min for (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA-anti were 0.99 and 0.26, whereas, the corresponding values for DEA-syn were 2.27, 0.64% dose/organ, respectively. Autoradiographic studies (in rats) using both isomers of (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA show a fixed regional distribution and a higher concentration of radioactivity in the gray matter relative to the white matter. Planar imaging using (/sup 99m/Tc)DEA-syn clearly demonstrates localization of the complex in the brain with a T 1/2 of 41 min, suggesting some potential for use with single photon emission computed tomography.

  12. Defining Core and Penumbra in Ischemic Stroke: A Voxel- and Volume-Based Analysis of Whole Brain CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yannan; Han, Quan; Ding, Xinfa; Chen, Qingmeng; Ye, Keqi; Zhang, Sheng; Yan, Shenqiang; Campbell, Bruce C. V.; Parsons, Mark W.; Wang, Shaoshi; Lou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has the potential to select eligible patients for reperfusion therapy. We aimed to find the optimal thresholds on baseline CTP for ischemic core and penumbra in acute ischemic stroke. We reviewed patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation, who underwent baseline whole brain CTP, followed by intravenous thrombolysis and perfusion imaging at 24 hours. Patients were divided into those with major reperfusion (to define the ischemic core) and minimal reperfusion (to define the extent of penumbra). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and volumetric consistency analysis were performed separately to determine the optimal threshold by Youden’s Index and mean magnitude of volume difference, respectively. From a series of 103 patients, 22 patients with minimal-reperfusion and 47 with major reperfusion were included. Analysis revealed delay time ≥ 3 s most accurately defined penumbra (AUC = 0.813; 95% CI, 0.812-0.814, mean magnitude of volume difference = 29.1 ml). The optimal threshold for ischemic core was rCBF ≤ 30% within delay time ≥ 3 s (AUC = 0.758; 95% CI, 0.757-0.760, mean magnitude of volume difference = 10.8 ml). In conclusion, delay time ≥ 3 s and rCBF ≤ 30% within delay time ≥ 3 s are the optimal thresholds for penumbra and core, respectively. These results may allow the application of the mismatch on CTP to reperfusion therapy. PMID:26860196

  13. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  14. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  15. Intrathoracic Pressure Regulation Improves Cerebral Perfusion and Cerebral Blood Flow in a Porcine Model of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Anja; Rees, Jennifer; Kwon, Young; Matsuura, Timothy; McKnite, Scott; Lurie, Keith G

    2015-08-01

    Brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability in children and adults in their most productive years. Use of intrathoracic pressure regulation (IPR) to generate negative intrathoracic pressure during the expiratory phase of positive pressure ventilation improves mean arterial pressure and 24-h survival in porcine models of hemorrhagic shock and cardiac arrest and has been demonstrated to decrease intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in these models. Application of IPR for 240 min in a porcine model of intracranial hypertension (ICH) will increase CPP when compared with controls. Twenty-three female pigs were subjected to focal brain injury by insertion of an epidural Foley catheter inflated with 3 mL of saline. Animals were randomized to treatment for 240 min with IPR set to a negative expiratory phase pressure of -12 cmH2O or no IPR therapy. Intracranial pressure, mean arterial pressure, CPP, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were evaluated. Intrathoracic pressure regulation significantly improved mean CPP and CBF. Specifically, mean CPP after 90, 120, 180, and 240 min of IPR use was 43.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 44.0 ± 2.7 mmHg, 44.5 ± 2.8 mmHg, and 43.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively; a significant increase from ICH study baseline (39.5 ± 1.7 mmHg) compared with control animals in which mean CPP was 36.7 ± 1.4 mmHg (ICH study baseline) and then 35.9 ± 2.1 mmHg, 33.7 ± 2.8 mmHg, 33.9 ± 3.0 mmHg, and 36.0 ± 2.7 mmHg at 90, 120, 180, and 240 min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all time points). Cerebral blood flow, as measured by an invasive CBF probe, increased in the IPR group (34 ± 4 mL/100 g-min to 49 ± 7 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) but not in controls (27 ± 1 mL/100 g-min to 25 ± 5 mL/100 g-min at 90 min) (P = 0.01). Arterial pH remained unchanged during the entire period of IPR compared with baseline values and control values. In this anesthetized pig model of ICH, treatment with IPR significantly improved CPP and CBF. This therapy may be

  16. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion.

  17. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion. PMID:26353878

  18. Effects of minocycline add-on treatment on brain morphometry and cerebral perfusion in recent-onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Cristiano; Marque, Cristiane R; Maia-de-Oliveira, João P; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Ferrari, Thiago B; Santos, Antonio C; Araújo, David; Machado-de-Sousa, João P; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Elkis, Helio; Crippa, José A; Guimarães, Francisco S; Zuardi, Antônio W; Baker, Glen B; Dursun, Serdar M; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the tetracycline antibiotic minocycline has neuroprotective effects and is a potential treatment for schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms of action of minocycline in the CNS remain elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of minocycline on brain morphology and cerebral perfusion in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia after 12months of a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of minocycline add-on treatment. This study included 24 outpatients with recent-onset schizophrenia randomized for 12months of adjuvant treatment with minocycline (200mg/d) or placebo. MRI (1.5T) and [(99m)Tc]-ECD SPECT brain scans were performed at the end of the 12-month of trial. Between-condition comparisons of SPECT and MRI brain images were performed using statistical parametric mapping and analyzed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Minocycline adjuvant treatment significantly reduced positive and negative symptoms when compared with placebo. The VBM analysis of MRI scans showed that the patients in the placebo group had significant lower gray matter volumes in the midposterior cingulate cortex and in the precentral gyrus in comparison with the patients in the minocycline group. In addition, a decreased ECD uptake in the minocycline condition was observed in fronto-temporal areas. These results suggest that minocycline may protect against gray matter loss and modulate fronto-temporal areas involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, minocycline add-on treatment may be a potential treatment in the early stages of schizophrenia and may ameliorate clinical deterioration and brain alterations observed in this period.

  19. Brain perfusion monitoring with frequency-domain and continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy: a cross-correlation study in newborn piglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Katz, A.; Alfano, R. R.; Kofinas, A. D.; Kofinas, D. A.; Stubblefield, P. G.; Rosenfeld, W.; Beyer, D.; Maulik, D.; Stankovic, M. R.

    2000-11-01

    The newborn piglet brain model was used to correlate continuous-wave (CW) and frequency-domain (FD) near-infrared spectroscopy. Six ventilated and instrumented newborn piglets were subjected to a series of manipulations in blood oxygenation with the effects on brain perfusion known to be associated with brain hypoxia-ischaemia. An excellent agreement between the CW and FD was demonstrated. This agreement improved when the scattering properties (determined by the FD device) were employed to calculate the differential pathlength factor, an important step in CW data processing.

  20. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics. PMID:27165887

  1. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m(-1), 115  ±  4 dB m(-1) and 175  ±  9 dB m(-1), respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m(-3) and 1545  ±  44 m s(-1), respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m(-1) K(-1). The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  2. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  3. Regional brain perfusion in 12 cats measured with technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

    PubMed

    Waelbers, Tim; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vermeire, Simon; Dobbeleir, André; Boer, Vo; de Leeuw, Hendrik; Vente, Maarten A D; Piron, Koen; Hesta, Myriam; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2013-02-01

    With the use of perfusion tracers, in vivo examination of the regional cerebral blood flow in cats can be performed with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Reliable perfusion data of normal, healthy cats are necessary for future clinical studies or other research use. Therefore, this dataset of the regional perfusion pattern of the normal feline brain was created. Twelve cats were used in this study. Technetium-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) was injected intravenously and the acquisition, using a triple head gamma camera equipped with three multi-pinhole collimators (pinhole SPECT), was started 40 mins after tracer administration under general anaesthesia. Nineteen regions of interest were defined using 7T magnetic resonance images of the feline brain and a topographical atlas. Regional counts were normalised to the counts of two reference regions: the total brain and the cerebellum. The highest tracer uptake was noticed in the subcortical structures, and the lowest in the frontal cortex and the cerebellum. Also left-right asymmetry in the temporal cortex and a rostrocaudal gradient of 5% were observed.

  4. Assessment of brain perfusion using parametric and factor images extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Anne L.; Moody, Alan R.

    1998-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers a minimally invasive method of investigating brain blood flow. This paper describes two different methods of extracting quantitative and qualitative information from this data. The first approach is to generate parametric images showing blood flow, blood volume and time-to-peak activity on a pixel by pixel basis. The second approach uses factor analysis. Principal components are extracted from the data and these orthogonal factors are then rotated to give a set of oblique factors, which satisfy certain simple constraints. In most cases three factors can be identified: a background or non- enhancing factor, an early vascular factor which is strongly correlated to arterial flow, and a late vascular factor which is strongly correlated to venous flow. The parametric and factor images are complimentary in nature: the former provides quantitative information that is readily understood by the clinician, while the latter makes no a priori assumptions about the underlying physiology and also allows more subtle changes in cerebral blood flow to be assessed. The factor images may also be of great value in defining regions of interest over which to carry out a more detailed quantitative analysis. This dual approach can be readily adapted to assess perfusion in other organs such as the heart or kidneys.

  5. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  6. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia.

    PubMed

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer's Disease (n = 38), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n = 29) or healthy normal controls (n = 30), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject's CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used.We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  7. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  8. Assessment of SPM in perfusion brain SPECT studies. A numerical simulation study using bootstrap resampling methods.

    PubMed

    Pareto, Deborah; Aguiar, Pablo; Pavía, Javier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Cot, Albert; Falcón, Carles; Benabarre, Antoni; Lomeña, Francisco; Vieta, Eduard; Ros, Domènec

    2008-07-01

    Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) has become the technique of choice to statistically evaluate positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) functional brain studies. Nevertheless, only a few methodological studies have been carried out to assess the performance of SPM in SPECT. The aim of this paper was to study the performance of SPM in detecting changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in hypo- and hyperperfused areas in brain SPECT studies. The paper seeks to determine the relationship between the group size and the rCBF changes, and the influence of the correction for degradations. The assessment was carried out using simulated brain SPECT studies. Projections were obtained with Monte Carlo techniques, and a fan-beam collimator was considered in the simulation process. Reconstruction was performed by using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with and without compensation for attenuation, scattering, and spatial variant collimator response. Significance probability maps were obtained with SPM2 by using a one-tailed two-sample t-test. A bootstrap resampling approach was used to determine the sample size for SPM to detect the between-group differences. Our findings show that the correction for degradations results in a diminution of the sample size, which is more significant for small regions and low-activation factors. Differences in sample size were found between hypo- and hyperperfusion. These differences were larger for small regions and low-activation factors, and when no corrections were included in the reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Brodmann areas in Frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease using automated 3-D voxel based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotassiou, V.; Papatriantafyllou, J.; Sifakis, N.; Karageorgiou, C.; Tsougos, I.; Tzavara, C.; Zerva, C.; Georgoulias, P.

    2009-05-01

    Introduction. Brain perfusion studies with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have been applied in demented patients to provide better discrimination between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim. To assess the perfusion of specific Brodmann (Br) areas of the brain cortex in FTD and AD patients, using NeuroGam processing program to provide 3D voxel-by-voxel cerebral SPECT analysis. Material and methods. We studied 34 consecutive patients. We used the established criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and the specific established criteria for the diagnosis of FTD and AD. All the patients had a neuropsychological evaluation with a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination (MMSE).Twenty-six patients (16 males, 10 females, mean age 68.76±6.51 years, education 11.81±4.25 years, MMSE 16.69±9.89) received the diagnosis of FTD and 8 patients (all females, mean age 71.25±10.48 years, education 10±4.6 years, MMSE 12.5±3.89) the diagnosis of AD. All the patients underwent a brain SPECT. We applied the NeuroGam Software for the evaluation of brain perfusion in specific Br areas in the left (L) and right (R) hemispheres. Results. Statistically significant hypoperfusion in FTD compared to AD patients, was found in the following Br areas: 11L (p<0.0001), 11R, 20L, 20R, 32L, 38L, 38R, 44L (p<0.001), 32R, 36L, 36R, 45L, 45R, 47R (p<0.01), 9L, 21L, 39R, 44R, 46R, 47L (p<0.05). On the contrary, AD patients presented significant (p<0.05) hypoperfusion in 7R and 39R Br areas. Conclusion. NeuroGam processing program of brain perfusion SPECT could result in enhanced accuracy for the differential diagnosis between AD and FTD patients.

  10. Body contour 180 degrees pinhole SPET with or without tilted detector: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Seret, Alain; Flérès, David; Firket, Olivier; Defrise, Michel

    2003-09-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OS-EM) reconstruction of 180 degrees pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET) acquired in body contour mode (variable distance between the detector and the axis of rotation for each projection) with or without a tilted detector head. Four non-circular orbits were designed bearing in mind the rotation radius and tilt angle values of previous pinhole SPET acquisitions in patients with circular orbits. The reconstructions were performed using a dedicated OS-EM algorithm. Reconstructed images of line and uniformity phantoms showed that the spatial and uniformity characteristics of the radioactive objects were preserved. In comparison with the circular orbits, the non-circular orbits allowed only a moderate gain (maximum 10%) in resolution. However, body contour pinhole SPET would significantly facilitate the camera set-up and in this way should decrease the camera set-up time, which is an important parameter in patient studies.

  11. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  12. Optimising Golgi–Cox staining for use with perfusion-fixed brain tissue validated in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Olsen, Elliott; Harrison, David J.; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Golgi–Cox stain is an established method for characterising neuron cell morphology. The method highlights neurite processes of stained cells allowing the complexity of dendritic branching to be measured. New methods Conventional rapid Golgi and Golgi–Cox methods all require fresh impregnation in unfixed brain blocks. Here, we describe a modified method that gives high quality staining on brain tissue blocks perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) and post-fixed by immersion for 24 h. Results Tissue perfused with 4% PFA and post fixed for 24 h remained viable for the modified Golgi–Cox silver impregnation staining of mouse striatum from perfused wild type and zQ175. It was not found necessary to impregnate tissue blocks with Golgi solutions prior to sectioning, as post-sectioned tissues yielded equally good impregnation. Impregnation for 14 days resulted in optimal visualisation of striatal neuron and dendritic morphology. Although no modifications applied to the rapid Golgi method were reliable, the modified Golgi–Cox method yielded consistently reliable high-quality staining. Comparison with existing methods The current method used fixed tissues to reduce damage and preserve cell morphology. The revised method was found to be fast, reliable and cost effective without the need for expensive staining kits and could be performed in any neuroscience lab with limited specialist equipment. Conclusions The present study introduces a robust reproducible and inexpensive staining method for identifying neuronal morphological changes in the post fixed mouse brain, and is suitable for assessing changes in cell morphology in models of neurodegeneration and in response to experimental treatment. PMID:26459195

  13. Temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic vessels for hybrid repair of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Frederic; Canaud, Ludovic; Hireche, Kheira; Berthet, Jean-Philippe; Marty-Ane, Charles; Alric, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Hybrid repair of ruptured aortic arch repair has been proposed as a valuable approach. However, the presence of an anterior mediastinal hematoma must be carefully detected because of the inherent risk of rupture at sternotomy. We report the case of a patient presenting a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm with anterior rupture who underwent hybrid repair using a temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic trunks. We propose this adjunctive technique as a means of allowing a safe endovascular exclusion of aortic arch lesions and avoiding the risk of acute and total aortic rupture in case of anterior rupture of aortic arch aneurysms.

  14. Modified total variation norm for the maximum a posteriori ordered subsets expectation maximization reconstruction in fan-beam SPECT brain perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Yang, Zhaoxia; Xu, Yuesheng; Wismüller, Axel; Feiglin, David H.

    2011-03-01

    The anisotropic geometry of Fan-Beam Collimator (FBC) Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) is used in brain perfusion imaging with clinical goals to quantify regional cerebral blood flow and to accurately determine the location and extent of the brain perfusion defects. One of the difficult issues that need to be addressed is partial volume effect. The purpose of this study was to minimize the partial volume effect while preserving the optimal tradeoff between noise and bias, and maintaining spatial resolution in the reconstructed images acquired in FBC geometry. We modified conventional isotropic TV (L1) norm, which has only one hyperparameter, and replaced it with two independent TV (L1u) norms (TVxy and TVz) along two orthogonal basis vectors (XY, Z) in 3D reconstruction space. We investigated if the anisotropic norm with two hyperparameters (βxy and βz, where z is parallel to the axis-of-rotation) performed better in FBC-SPECT reconstruction, as compared to the conventional isotropic norm with one hyperparameter (β) only. We found that MAP-OSEM reconstruction with modified TV norm produced images with smaller partial volume effect, as compared to the conventional TV norm at a cost of slight increase in the bias and noise.

  15. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate

  16. Dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in late radiation-induced injury of the brain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y L; Yeung, D K W; Leung, S F; Lee, S F; Ching, A S C

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate radiation-induced cerebral injury on dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSCE) perfusion MR imaging and study its relationship with morphological severity and disease progression. Thirty-one patients with known radiation injury to the temporal lobes where studied. Gradient and spin-echo T2-weighted, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted and DSCE perfusion MR imaging were obtained in the coronal plane through the anterior temporal lobe. Regions of interest where selected in the anterior temporal lobes and the superior frontal lobe as control for analysis of perfusion parameters. The mean transit time (MTT) was prolonged in both the High Dose Zone (HDZ) receiving from two-thirds to the total dose of 66-71.2 Gy, and the Intermediary Dose Zone (IDZ) receiving up to 87% of the total dose. The HDZ but not the IDZ showed a low relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow index (rCBFi). The rCBV and rCBFi were significantly lower in both HDZ and LBZ in temporal lobes with severe lesions compared to the temporal lobes with mild lesions but there was no significant difference in bolus transit parameters. The rCBV and rCBFi were significantly lower in both HDZ and IDZ of the swollen temporal lobes compared to those without swelling. It was concluded that DSCE perfusion MR imaging demonstrated a derangement in perfusion in radiation-induced cerebral injury in rCBV, rCBFi and MTT, which were related to the severity of the radiation-induced injury and the dose of irradiation delivered.

  17. Increased Brain Perfusion Persists over the First Month of Life in Term Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia: Does it Reflect Activated Angiogenesis?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Henna; Lechpammer, Mirna; Jensen, Frances E; Warfield, Simon K; Hansen, Anne H; Kosaras, Bela; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-06-01

    Many asphyxiated newborns still develop brain injury despite hypothermia therapy. The development of brain injury in these newborns has been related partly to brain perfusion abnormalities. The purposes of this study were to assess brain hyperperfusion over the first month of life in term asphyxiated newborns and to search for some histopathological clues indicating whether this hyperperfusion may be related to activated angiogenesis following asphyxia. In this prospective cohort study, regional cerebral blood flow was measured in term asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia around day 10 of life and around 1 month of life using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arterial spin labeling. A total of 32 MRI scans were obtained from 24 term newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia displayed an increased cerebral blood flow in the injured brain areas around day 10 of life and up to 1 month of life. In addition, we looked at the histopathological clues in a human asphyxiated newborn and in a rat model of neonatal encephalopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was expressed in the injured brain of an asphyxiated newborn treated with hypothermia in the first days of life and of rat pups 24-48 h after the hypoxic-ischemic event, and the endothelial cell count increased in the injured cortex of the pups 7 and 11 days after hypoxia-ischemia. Our data showed that the hyperperfusion measured by imaging persisted in the injured areas up to 1 month of life and that angiogenesis was activated in the injured brain of asphyxiated newborns. PMID:25620793

  18. Characterization of technetium-99m-L,L-ECD for brain perfusion imaging, Part 1: Pharmacology of technetium-99m ECD in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Walovitch, R.C.; Hill, T.C.; Garrity, S.T.; Cheesman, E.H.; Burgess, B.A.; O'Leary, D.H.; Watson, A.D.; Ganey, M.V.; Morgan, R.A.; Williams, S.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (({sup 99m}Tc)ECD) is a neutral, lipophilic complex which rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier. Brain retention and tissue metabolism of ({sup 99m}Tc)ECD is dependent upon the stereochemical configuration of the complex. While both L,L and D,D enantiomers are extracted by the brain, only the L,L but not the D,D form, is metabolized and retained in the monkey brain (4.7% injected dose initially, T 1/2 greater than 24 hr). Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography imaging studies in one monkey indicates {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD to be distributed in a pattern consistent with regional cerebral blood flow for up to 16 hr postinjection. Dual-labeled {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD and ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine autoradiography studies performed 1 hr after administration show cortical gray to white matter ratios of both isotopes to be equivalent (approximately 4-5:1). These data suggest that {sup 99m}Tc-L,L-ECD will be useful for the scintigraphic assessment of cerebral perfusion in humans.

  19. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    PubMed

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals.

  20. Optimization of the method for assessment of brain perfusion in humans using contrast-enhanced reflectometry: multidistance time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milej, Daniel; Janusek, Dariusz; Gerega, Anna; Wojtkiewicz, Stanislaw; Sawosz, Piotr; Treszczanowicz, Joanna; Weigl, Wojciech; Liebert, Adam

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine optimal measurement conditions for assessment of brain perfusion with the use of optical contrast agent and time-resolved diffuse reflectometry in the near-infrared wavelength range. The source-detector separation at which the distribution of time of flights (DTOF) of photons provided useful information on the inflow of the contrast agent to the intracerebral brain tissue compartments was determined. Series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed in which the inflow and washout of the dye in extra- and intracerebral tissue compartments was modeled and the DTOFs were obtained at different source-detector separations. Furthermore, tests on diffuse phantoms were carried out using a time-resolved setup allowing the measurement of DTOFs at 16 source-detector separations. Finally, the setup was applied in experiments carried out on the heads of adult volunteers during intravenous injection of indocyanine green. Analysis of statistical moments of the measured DTOFs showed that the source-detector separation of 6 cm is recommended for monitoring of inflow of optical contrast to the intracerebral brain tissue compartments with the use of continuous wave reflectometry, whereas the separation of 4 cm is enough when the higher-order moments of DTOFs are available.

  1. In vivo evaluation of brain damage in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zimny, A; Szmyrka-Kaczmarek, M; Szewczyk, P; Bladowska, J; Pokryszko-Dragan, A; Gruszka, E; Wiland, P; Sasiadek, M

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-two neuropsychiatric (NPSLE) and 13 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with a normal appearing brain on plain magnetic resonance (MR) as well as 20 age-matched healthy controls underwent MR spectroscopy (MRS), perfusion-weighted (PWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). In MRS NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios were calculated from the posterior cingulate cortex and left parietal white matter. In PWI, values of cerebral blood volume (CBV) were assessed from 14 regions, including gray and white matter. In DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) values were obtained from 14 white matter tracts including projection, commissural and association fibers. All MR measurements were correlated with clinical data. SLE and NPSLE patients showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower NAA/Cr ratios within both evaluated regions and FA values within the cingulum, as well as a tendency to cortical hypoperfusion. Compared to SLE, NPSLE subjects revealed lower FA values within a wide range of association fibers and corpus callosum. Advanced MR techniques are capable of in vivo detection of complex microstructural brain damage in SLE and NPSLE subjects regarding neuronal loss, mild hypoperfusion and white matter disintegrity. MRS and DTI seem to show the highest usefulness in depicting early changes in normal appearing gray and white matter in SLE patients. PMID:24192079

  2. A New In Situ Brain Perfusion Flow Correction Method for Lipophilic Drugs Based on the pH-Dependent Crone-Renkin Equation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the flow-corrected luminal permeability, Pc, of lipophilic drugs measured by the in situ brain perfusion method under circumstances where the traditional Crone-Renkin equation (CRE) method, using diazepam as a flow marker, often fails. Methods The pH-dependent rate of brain penetration of five lipophilic drugs (amitriptyline, atomoxetine, imipramine, indomethacin, maprotiline, sertraline), as well as of atenolol and antipyrine, were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats. A new pH-dependent CRE was derived and applied to remove the hydrodynamic component of effective permeability, Pe, to produce Pc values. Results It was shown by the analysis of the in situ data in the pH 6.5–8.5 interval for the lipophilic bases that the average vascular flow Fpf = 0.036 mL·g−1·s−1, centered in a “flow-limit window” (FLW) bounded by Pemin = 170 and Pemax = 776 (10−6 cm·s−1 units). It was shown that the traditional CRE is expected not to work for half of the molecules in the FLW and is expected to underestimate (up to 64-fold) the other half of the molecules. Conclusion The new pH-CRE flow correction method applied to lipophilic ionizable drugs, based on the pH partition hypothesis, can overcome the limitations of the traditional CRE. PMID:21042838

  3. Central Nervous System Lymphoma in a 3-Year-Old Male Suffering from a Severe Juvenile Xanthogranuloma – the Usefulness of Perfusion Weighted Imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging in the Diagnostics of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Zimny, Anna; Kałwak, Krzysztof; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas (PCNSLs) are rare, malignant brain tumors derived from lymphocytes B. Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a non-Langerhans histiocytic cell disorder in children which mostly affects the skin. Rare fatalities have been reported in extracutaneous manifestation. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a method of choice in the diagnostics of all neoplastic CNS lesions. Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) allow for more detailed analysis of brain tumors including the rate of neoangiogenesis and cellularity. We presented a pediatric patient suffering from JXG with CNS involvement and the role of brain MRI including DWI and PWI in the evaluation of brain focal lesions. Case Report A 3-year-old male with severe JXG underwent two stem cell transplantations with a development of neurological complications. The patient underwent emergency CT and MRI which revealed a non-specific enhancing focal brain lesion. In DWI it showed restricted diffusion while PWI revealed low values of rCBV and the signal intensity curve returning above the baseline level. Advanced MRI techniques such as DWI and PWI suggested PCNSL. Stereotactic biopsy confirmed PCNSL due to Ebstein-Barr virus reactivation. Conclusions The use of advanced MRI sequences is important to differentiate brain lesions in pediatric patients. The use of PWI and DWI facilitated the diagnosis of PCNSL. It is important to remember that PCNSLs show a very typical pattern of changes visualized with MRI such as: usually strong homogenous enhancement, restricted diffusion and low perfusion. PMID:25624957

  4. Quality of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission tomography imaging: multicentre evaluation with a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, J; Ahonen, A; Kuikka, J T; Rautio, P

    1999-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate quality of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging in Finnish hospitals. Nineteen nuclear medicine departments participated in the study. A myocardial phantom simulating clinical stress and rest conditions was filled with routinely used isotope solution (technetium-99m or thallium-201). The cardiac insert included three reversible defects (simulating ischaemia): 30x30x14 mm(3) septal (90% recovery at rest), 30x20x14 mm(3) posterobasal (full recovery) and 20x20x14 mm(3) lateral (full recovery). There were two fixed defects (simulating infarct): 30x20x14 mm(3) postero-apical and 10x10x6 mm(3) apical. The phantom was imaged and interpreted as a myocardial perfusion patient. Reconstruction, printout and reporting were performed according to the clinical routine of each centre. Three nuclear medicine specialists anonymously evaluated the quality of the image sets. The visual scores of the experts were ranked from 1 to 5. Additionally, points from 0 to 8 were given to research reports according to how well perfusion defects were detected. Quantitative points were calculated by comparing background-subtracted and -normalized counts from 12 regions of interest between stress and rest images. Results for technetium studies (12 departments) were better than those for thallium (7 departments). The average visual scores of the experts were 3.7+/-0. 9 for all image sets, 3.2+/-0.5 for thallium users and 3.9+/-0.6 for technetium users (P=0.003). Five laboratories received a low score which, according to the specialists, is barely sufficient for limited clinical use. Average points for the reports were 5.6+/-2.1, 4.9+/-1.5 and 6.5+/-1.7 (P=0.051), and for the quantitation 8.2+/-1. 0, 7.9+/-0.4 and 8.4+/-1.1 (P=0.185), respectively. Seven out of 22 interpreters did not detect the lateral 20x20x14 mm(3) defect; five of them used thallium. This study demonstrated the heterogeneity of myocardial perfusion SPET in

  5. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  6. Comparison of ordered subsets expectation maximization and Chang's attenuation correction method in quantitative cardiac SPET: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dey, D; Slomka, P J; Hahn, L J; Kloiber, R

    1998-12-01

    Photon attenuation is one of the primary causes of artifacts in cardiac single photon emission tomography (SPET). Several attenuation correction algorithms have been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of using the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction algorithm and Chang's non-uniform attenuation correction method on quantitative cardiac SPET. We performed SPET scans of an anthropomorphic phantom simulating normal and abnormal myocardial studies. Attenuation maps of the phantom were obtained from computed tomographic images. The SPET projection data were corrected for attenuation using OSEM reconstruction, as well as Chang's method. For each defect scan and attenuation correction method, we calculated three quantitative parameters: average radial maximum (ARM) ratio of the defect-to-normal area, maximum defect contrast (MDC) and defect volume, using automated three-dimensional quantitation. The differences between the two methods were less than 4% for defect-to-normal ARM ratio, 19% for MDC and 13% for defect volume. These differences are within the range of estimated statistical variation of SPET. The calculation times of the two methods were comparable. For all SPET studies, OSEM attenuation correction gave a more correct activity distribution, with respect to both the homogeneity of the radiotracer and the shape of the cardiac insert. The difference in uniformity between OSEM and Chang's method was quantified by segmental analysis and found to be less than 8% for the normal study. In conclusion, OSEM and Chang's attenuation correction are quantitatively equivalent, with comparable calculation times. OSEM reconstruction gives a more correct activity distribution and is therefore preferred.

  7. Evaluation of high-risk melanoma: comparison of [18F]FDG PET and high-dose 67Ga SPET.

    PubMed

    Kalff, Victor; Hicks, Rodney J; Ware, Robert E; Greer, Brett; Binns, David S; Hogg, Annette

    2002-04-01

    Recently the potential of whole-body positron emission tomography scanning using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET) has led to renewed interest in the use of functional imaging for the detection of occult metastatic melanoma. This study compared dedicated FDG PET with high-dose gallium-67 imaging incorporating whole-body scanning and comprehensive single-photon emission tomography (SPET) in 122 cases (121 patients) in which the two scans were performed <6 weeks apart. All patients were at high clinical risk of occult metastatic disease and 49 (40%) had abnormality suggestive of metastatic disease by at least one functional imaging technique. Discrepant scan findings were followed up to determine which technique more accurately reflected disease status. There were 23/122 (19%; 95% CI: 12%-26%) cases with discordant scan results in respect of either the presence of melanoma (11 cases) or the extent of disease (12 cases). PET correctly identified more disease than 67Ga SPET in 14 cases (including three incidental primary tumours) and was true negative in three further patients with abnormal 67Ga SPET. There were six patients with true positive 67Ga SPET in whom FDG PET was false negative (one small cutaneous deposit, one residual axillary node rated equivocal on FDG PET due to postoperative changes, one adrenal metastasis inseparable from renal activity on FDG PET and three cases in which sites missed on FDG PET were seen on 67Ga SPET. Thus, FDG PET provided incremental diagnostic information compared with 67Ga SPET in 17/23 patients, while 67Ga SPET provided incremental information compared with PET in 6/23 cases ( P=0.035). Based on Australian Medicare reimbursement levels, the net cost per patient with clinical management benefit of replacing 67Ga SPET with FDG PET was estimated to be less than EUR 1,750. These results suggest that FDG PET provides incremental and clinically important information in around 10% of patients at a low incremental cost which, combined

  8. Wavelet-based cluster analysis: data-driven grouping of voxel time courses with application to perfusion-weighted and pharmacological MRI of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Whitcher, Brandon; Schwarz, Adam J; Barjat, Hervé; Smart, Sean C; Grundy, Robert I; James, Michael F

    2005-01-15

    MRI time series experiments produce a wealth of information contained in two or three spatial dimensions that evolve over time. Such experiments can, for example, localize brain response to pharmacological stimuli, but frequently the spatiotemporal characteristics of the cerebral response are unknown a priori and variable, and thus difficult to evaluate using hypothesis-based methods alone. Here we used features in the temporal dimension to group voxels with similar time courses based on a nonparametric discrete wavelet transform (DWT) representation of each time course. Applying the DWT to each voxel decomposes its temporal information into coefficients associated with both time and scale. Discarding scales in the DWT that are associated with high-frequency oscillations (noise) provided a straight-forward data reduction step and decreased the computational burden. Optimization-based clustering was then applied to the remaining wavelet coefficients in order to produce a finite number of voxel clusters. This wavelet-based cluster analysis (WCA) was evaluated using two representative classes of MRI neuroimaging experiments. In perfusion-weighted MRI, following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO), WCA differentiated healthy tissue and different regions within the ischemic hemisphere. Following an acute cocaine challenge, WCA localized subtle differences in the pharmacokinetic profile of the cerebral response. We conclude that WCA provides a robust method for blind analysis of time series image data.

  9. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  10. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John; Klaver, Peter; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women.

  11. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  12. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  13. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  14. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  15. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  16. Transient global amnesia: implicit/explicit memory dissociation and PET assessment of brain perfusion and oxygen metabolism in the acute stage

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, F.; Desgranges, B.; Petit-Taboue, M.; de la Sayette, V.; Piot, V.; Sable, C.; Marchal, G.; Baron, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess explicit memory and two components of implicit memory—that is, perceptual-verbal skill learning and lexical-semantic priming effects—as well as resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) during the acute phase of transient global amnesia.
METHODS—In a 59 year old woman, whose amnestic episode fulfilled all current criteria for transient global amnesia, a neuropsychological protocol was administered, including word learning, story recall, categorical fluency, mirror reading, and word stem completion tasks. PET was performed using the 15O steady state inhalation method, while the patient still exhibited severe anterograde amnesia and was interleaved with the cognitive tests.
RESULTS—There was a clear cut dissociation between impaired long term episodic memory and preserved implicit memory for its two components. Categorical fluency was significantly altered, suggesting word retrieval strategy—rather than semantic memory—impairment. The PET study disclosed a reduced CMRO2 with relatively or fully preserved CBF in the left prefrontotemporal cortex and lentiform nucleus, and the reverse pattern over the left occipital cortex.
CONCLUSIONS—The PET alterations with patchy CBF-CMRO2 uncoupling would be compatible with a migraine-like phenomenon and indicate that the isolated assessment of perfusion in transient global amnesia may be misleading. The pattern of metabolic depression, with sparing of the hippocampal area, is one among the distinct patterns of brain dysfunction that underlie the (apparently) uniform clinical presentation of transient global amnesia. The finding of a left prefrontal hypometabolism in the face of impaired episodic memory and altered verbal fluency would fit present day concepts from PET activation studies about the role of this area in episodic and semantic memory encoding/retrieval. Likewise, the changes affecting the lenticular nucleus but sparing the caudate would be consistent

  17. Is it practical and cost effective to detect differentiated thyroid carcinoma metastases by (18)F-FDG PET/CT, by (18)F-FDG SPET/CT or by (131)I SPET/CT?

    PubMed

    He, Xinjia; Wang, Xucai; Yu, Jinming; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) plays an important role in detecting differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) metastases with elevated thyroglobulin (Tg) and negative radioiodine ((131)I) uptake. In conclusion, (18)F-FDG PET/CT may fail to detect all DTC metastases, while (131)I WBS combined with (131)I SPET/CT may be a better cheaper and diagnostic tool as suggested by the case we presented here. Positive metastases in both (131)I and (18)F-FDG SPET/CT may indicate worse prognosis. Future research may add more evidence as to which is the best diagnostic imaging modality and relate it to the molecular mechanism of the uptake of the radionuclide used.

  18. Microfluidic perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic perfusion culture is a novel technique to culture animal cells in a small-scale microchamber with medium perfusion. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most popular material to fabricate a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Photolithography and replica molding techniques are generally used for fabrication of a microfluidic perfusion culture chip. Pressure-driven perfusion culture system is convenient technique to carry out the perfusion culture of animal cells in a microfluidic device. Here, we describe a general theory on microfluid network design, microfabrication technique, and experimental technique for pressure-driven perfusion culture in an 8 × 8 microchamber array on a glass slide-sized microchip made out of PDMS. PMID:24297421

  19. A two-year follow-up of cognitive deficits and brain perfusion in mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alegret, Montserrat; Cuberas-Borrós, Gemma; Vinyes-Junqué, Georgina; Espinosa, Ana; Valero, Sergi; Hernández, Isabel; Roca, Isabel; Ruíz, Agustín; Rosende-Roca, Maitée; Mauleón, Ana; Becker, James T; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    The 15-Objects Test (15-OT) provides useful gradation of visuoperceptual impairment from normal aging through Alzheimer's disease (AD) and correlates with temporo-parietal perfusion. The objectives of this study were to analyze progression of 15-OT performance in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD, and its correlates with cognition and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), as well as to examine neuropsychological and SPECT differences between the MCI patients who developed AD and those who did not. From the initial 126 participants (42/group), 38 AD, 39 MCI, and 38 elderly controls (EC) were reassessed (SPECT: 35 AD, 33 MCI, 35 EC) after two years. The progression of cognitive and SPECT scores during this period was compared between groups, and baseline data between converters and non-converters. The 15-OT was the only measure of progression that differed between the three groups; worsening scores on 15-OT were associated with worsening in verbal and visual retention, and decreased perfusion on left postsubicular area. In the MCI patients, cerebral perfusion fell over the two years in medial-posterior cingulate and fronto-temporo-parietal regions; AD showed extensive changes involving almost all cerebral regions. No SPECT changes were detected in controls. At baseline, the MCI patients who developed AD differed from non-converters in verbal recognition memory, but not in SPECT perfusion. In conclusion, SPECT and 15-OT appear to provide a potential measure to differentiate between normal aging, MCI, and AD. Worsening on 15-OT was related to decreased perfusion in postsubicular area; but further longitudinal studies are needed to determine the contribution of 15-OT as a predictor of AD from MCI.

  20. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health care ...

  1. The “Skull Flap” a new conceived device for decompressive craniectomy experimental study on dogs to evaluate the safety and efficacy in reducing intracranial pressure and subsequent impact on brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Chibbaro; Fabrice, Vallee; Marco, Marsella; Leonardo, Tigan; Thomas, Lilin; Benoit, Lecuelle; Bernard, George; Pierre, Kehrli; Eric, Vicaut; Paolo, Diemidio

    2013-01-01

    Background: Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a procedure performed increasingly often in current neurosurgical practice. Significant perioperative morbidity may be associated to this procedure because of the large skull defect; also, later closure of the skull defect (cranioplasty) may be associated to post-operative morbidity as much as any other reconstructive operation. The authors present a newly conceived/developed device: The “Skull Flap” (SF). This system, placed at the time of the craniectomy, offers the possibility to provide cranial reconstruction sparing patients a second operation. In other words, DC and cranioplasty essentially take place at the same time and in addition, patients retain their own bone flap. The current study conducted on animal models, represents the logical continuation of a prior recent study, realized on cadaver specimens, to assess the efficacy and safety of this recently developed device. Materials and Methods: This is an experimental pilot study on dogs to assess both safety and efficacy of the SF device. Two groups of experimental raised intracranial pressure animal models underwent DC; in the first group of dogs, the bone flap was left in raised position above the skull defect using the SF device; on the second group the flap was discarded. All dogs underwent transcranial Doppler (TCD) to assess brain perfusion. Head computed tomography (CT) scan to determine flap position was also obtained in the group in which the SF device was placed. Results: SF has proved to be a strong fixation device that allows satisfactory brain decompression by keeping the bone flap elevated from the swollen brain; later on, the SF allows cranial reconstruction in a simple way without requiring a second staged operation. In addition, it is relevant to note that brain perfusion was measured and found to be better in the group receiving the SF (while the flap being in a raised as well as in its natural position) comparing to the other group

  2. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  3. Accelerated median root prior reconstruction for pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlberg, Antti; Ruotsalainen, Ulla; Watabe, Hiroshi; Iida, Hidehiro; Kuikka, Jyrki T.

    2003-07-01

    Pinhole collimation can be used to improve spatial resolution in SPET. However, the resolution improvement is achieved at the cost of reduced sensitivity, which leads to projection images with poor statistics. Images reconstructed from these projections using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms, which have been used to reduce the artefacts generated by the filtered backprojection (FBP) based reconstruction, suffer from noise/bias trade-off: noise contaminates the images at high iteration numbers, whereas early abortion of the algorithm produces images that are excessively smooth and biased towards the initial estimate of the algorithm. To limit the noise accumulation we propose the use of the pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP) reconstruction algorithm. MRP is a Bayesian reconstruction method that has already been used in PET imaging and shown to possess good noise reduction and edge preservation properties. In this study the PH-MRP algorithm was accelerated with the ordered subsets (OS) procedure and compared to the FBP, OS-EM and conventional Bayesian reconstruction methods in terms of noise reduction, quantitative accuracy, edge preservation and visual quality. The results showed that the accelerated PH-MRP algorithm was very robust. It provided visually pleasing images with lower noise level than the FBP or OS-EM and with smaller bias and sharper edges than the conventional Bayesian methods.

  4. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  5. Comparison between antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion or profound hypothermia as brain protection strategies during repair of type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Laura A.; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T.; Lobdell, Kevin W.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Murphy, Edward; Hagberg, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare early postoperative outcomes and actuarial-free survival between patients who underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection by the method of cerebral perfusion used. Methods A total of 324 patients from five academic medical centers underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection between January 2000 and December 2010. Of those, antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) was used for 84 patients, retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was used for 55 patients, and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) was used for 184 patients during repair. Major morbidity, operative mortality, and 5-year actuarial survival were compared between groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of operative mortality and Cox Regression hazard ratios were calculated to determine the predictors of long term mortality. Results Operative mortality was not influenced by the type of cerebral protection (19% for ACP, 14.5% for RCP and 19.1% for DHCA, P=0.729). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, hemodynamic instability [odds ratio (OR) =19.6, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.102–0.414, P<0.001] and CPB time >200 min(OR =4.7, 95% CI, 1.962–1.072, P=0.029) emerged as independent predictors of operative mortality. Actuarial 5-year survival was unchanged by cerebral protection modality (48.8% for ACP, 61.8% for RCP and 66.8% for no cerebral protection, log-rank P=0.844). Conclusions During surgical repair of type A aortic dissection, ACP, RCP or DHCA are safe strategies for cerebral protection in selected patients with type A aortic dissection. PMID:27563545

  6. Serotonin transporter binding of [123I]ADAM in bulimic women, their healthy twin sisters, and healthy women: a SPET study

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Anu K; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Sihvola, Elina; Kauppinen, Tomi; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ahonen, Aapo; Rissanen, Aila

    2007-01-01

    Background Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is believed to be caused by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies support the existence of a bulimia-related endophenotype as well as disturbances in serotonin (5-HT) transmission. We studied serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in BN, and to investigate the possibility of a SERT-related endophenotype for BN, did this in a sample of female twins. We hypothesized clearly reduced SERT binding in BN women as opposed to healthy women, and intermediate SERT binding in unaffected co-twins. Methods We studied 13 female twins with BN (9 with purging and 4 with non-purging BN) and 25 healthy women, including 6 healthy twin sisters of BN patients and 19 women from 10 healthy twin pairs. [123I]ADAM, a selective SERT radioligand for single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging, was used to assess SERT availability in the midbrain and the thalamus. Results No differences in SERT binding were evident when comparing the BN women, their unaffected co-twins and the healthy controls (p = 0.14). The healthy sisters of the BN patients and the healthy control women had similar SERT binding in both brain regions. In a post hoc subgroup analysis, the purging bulimics had higher SERT binding than the healthy women in the midbrain (p = 0.03), but not in the thalamus. Conclusion Our finding of increased SERT binding in the midbrain in the purging BN women raises the possibility that this subgroup of bulimics might differ in serotonergic function from the non-purging ones. The similarity of the unaffected co-twins and the healthy controls doesn't support our initial assumption of a SERT-related endophenotype for BN. Due to the small sample size, our results need to be interpreted with caution and verified in a larger sample. PMID:17511889

  7. Brain perfusion and permeability in patients with advanced, refractory glioblastoma treated with lomustine and the transforming growth factor-β receptor I kinase inhibitor LY2157299 monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    SEPULVEDA-SANCHEZ, JUAN; RAMOS, ANA; HILARIO, AMAYA; DE VELASCO, GUILLERMO; CASTELLANO, DANIEL; GARCIA DE LA TORRE, MARTA; RODON, JORDI; LAHN, MICHAEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is associated with tumor progression and vascularization in malignant glioma. In the present study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate changes in the size and vascularity of glioblastomas in 12 patients who were treated with lomustine and the novel inhibitor of TGF-β signaling, LY2157299 monohydrate. A response in tumor size was observed in 2 of the 12 patients; in 1 of these 2 patients, a reduction in vascular permeability and perfusion was also detected. The effect was observed following 4 cycles of treatment (~3 months). Changes in vascularity have not previously been attributed to treatment with lomustine; therefore, the effect may be associated with LY2157299 treatment. LY2157299 does not appear to have an anti-angiogenic effect when combined with lomustine, and hence may have a different mechanism of action profile compared with anti-angiogenic drugs. PMID:26137087

  8. Factors restricting maximal preservation of neuronal glycogen after perfusion fixation with dimethyl sulfoxide and iodoacetic acid in Bouin's solution. Histochemical observations in the brain of the Netherlands dwarf rabbit.

    PubMed

    Cammermeyer, J; Fenton, I M

    1982-01-01

    Thirty seconds after an initial intracardial epinephrine injection, deeply anesthetized animals are perfused consecutively with saline, Bouin's and 100% ethanol solutions, each containing 1% or 5% DMSO (Me2SO) and 0.01 M iodoacetic acid. In the Netherlands dwarf rabbit and the guinea pig, a maximal preservation of dimedone PAS-stainable, saliva-digestible glycogen is achieved, without signs of polarization of glycogen, in many neuronal and neuroglial cells occupying either brain stem nuclei or occasionally narrow perivascular zones. Tentatively, these results are ascribed to a combined effect of (a) the alleged capacity of DMSO to accelerate fixation and to suppress activation of adenylate cyclase and (b) the rapid action of Bouin's solution so that the glycogen particles become instantaneously enclosed in situ in a skeleton of coagulated proteinaceous elements. The paradoxical over-all reduction in preservation of neuronal and astrocytic glycogen may be associated either with a demonstrable loss of the fixative into the peripheral vasculature, because of contrary actions of DMSO and epinephrine, or with a transvascular passage of epinephrine resulting in neuronal glycogenolysis where the blood-brain barrier is absent or affected by DMSO. Other defects are the occurrence of myriad pericapillary foci of inadequate tissue preservation, rare petechial hemorrhages, post mortem fat emboli, and ubiquitous Buscaino plaques. Despite these adverse results preventing utilization of this technique in systematic histochemical investigations on neuronal glycogen, remarkable qualitative characteristics such as the neurons' capacity to store glycogen throughout their perikarya have been revealed. PMID:6187714

  9. Hepatic Perfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion uses the unique vascular supply of hepatic malignancies to deliver cytotoxic chemotherapy. The procedure involves vascular isolation of the liver and delivery of chemotherapy via the hepatic artery and extraction from retrohepatic vena cava. Benefits of hepatic perfusion have been observed in hepatic metastases of ocular melanoma and colorectal cancer and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Percutaneous and prophylactic perfusions are avenues of ongoing research.

  10. Iterative reconstruction with correction of the spatially variant fan-beam collimator response in neurotransmission SPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Pareto, Deborah; Cot, Albert; Pavía, Javier; Falcón, Carles; Juvells, Ignacio; Lomeña, Francisco; Ros, Domènec

    2003-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Although visual inspection is often sufficient to assess DAT imaging, quantification could improve the diagnostic accuracy of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of the dopaminergic system. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of quantification of the striatal/background uptake ratio when correction for attenuation, scatter and spatially variant fan-beam collimator response is performed in technetium-99m and iodine-123 SPET imaging. A numerical striatal phantom was implemented, and simulated projections of low-energy photons were obtained by using the SimSET Monte Carlo code. High-energy contamination in 123I studies was modelled from experimental measurements with 99mTc and 123I. The ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM) algorithm was employed in reconstruction. Mean improvements of 8% and 16% were obtained in the calculated striatal/background uptake ratio in the putamen and the caudate, respectively, when the spatially variant point spread function was included in the transition matrix. Ideal scatter correction resulted in improvements in the putamen and caudate of 9% for 99mTc agents and 19% for 123I agents. Improvements averaged 31% in the putamen and 43% in the caudate when correction for attenuation, scatter and spatially variant collimator response was included in the reconstruction.

  11. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cerebral blood flow in patients with peritoneal dialysis by an easy Z-score imaging system for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Rei; Kobayashi, Shuzo; Iwagami, Masao; Tsutumi, Daimu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Maesato, Kyoko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Ohtake, Takayasu; Hidaka, Sumi

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been recognized as a complication of chronic kidney disease. However, there is little information available regarding regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Therefore, we evaluated rCBF using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We conducted a cross-sectional study in our hospital. Eighteen consecutive PD patients who could visit the hospital by themselves without any history of stroke were examined by Technetium-99 m-labeled ethylcrysteinate dimer brain SPECT. An easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) was used to compare rCBF in PD patients with those in age-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated cognitive dysfunction with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) questionnaire. Only one patient showed an MMSE score of 18 points, and the remaining 14 patients were considered as normal (MMSE ≥ 27), and three patients were considered to have mild cognitive impairment (24 ≤ MMSE ≤ 26). In all patients, rCBF in the posterior cingulated gyri, precunei, and parietal cortices was significantly decreased. The ratio of the reduction of rCBF in each region relative to that of rCBF across the whole brain correlated positively with the PD duration (r = 0.559; P < 0.05). The serum β2-microglobulin level was significantly higher in patients who had a higher ratio of rCBF reduction compared with those with lower ratios. In conclusion, all PD patients in the present study had decreased rCBF irrespective of MMSE scores.

  13. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  14. Higher Brain Perfusion May Not Support Memory Functions in Cognitively Normal Carriers of the ApoE ε4 Allele Compared to Non-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Hays, Chelsea C.; Liu, Thomas T.; Meloy, M. J.; Rissman, Robert A.; Bondi, Mark W.; Wierenga, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), which carries necessary nutrients to the brain, are associated with increased risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Whether the association between CBF and cognition is moderated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 genotype, a known risk factor for AD, remains understudied, with most research focusing on exploring brain regions in which there are diagnostic group differences in CBF (i.e., cognitively normal vs. MCI vs. AD). This study measured resting CBF via arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and verbal memory functions using a composite score in 59 older adults with normal cognition (38 ε3; 21 ε4). Linear mixed effect models were employed to investigate if the voxel-wise relationship between verbal memory performance and resting CBF was modified by ApoE genotype. Results indicated that carriers of the ApoE ε4 allele display negative associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, medial and lateral temporal cortex, parietal regions, insula, and the basal ganglia. Contrarily, ε3 carriers exhibited positive associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, thalamus, insula, and basal ganglia. Findings suggest that higher CBF was associated with worse verbal memory functions in cognitively normal ε4 carriers, perhaps reflecting dysregulation within the neurovascular unit, which is no longer supportive of cognition. Results are discussed within the context of the vascular theory of AD risk. PMID:27445794

  15. Higher Brain Perfusion May Not Support Memory Functions in Cognitively Normal Carriers of the ApoE ε4 Allele Compared to Non-Carriers.

    PubMed

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Hays, Chelsea C; Liu, Thomas T; Meloy, M J; Rissman, Robert A; Bondi, Mark W; Wierenga, Christina E

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), which carries necessary nutrients to the brain, are associated with increased risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether the association between CBF and cognition is moderated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 genotype, a known risk factor for AD, remains understudied, with most research focusing on exploring brain regions in which there are diagnostic group differences in CBF (i.e., cognitively normal vs. MCI vs. AD). This study measured resting CBF via arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and verbal memory functions using a composite score in 59 older adults with normal cognition (38 ε3; 21 ε4). Linear mixed effect models were employed to investigate if the voxel-wise relationship between verbal memory performance and resting CBF was modified by ApoE genotype. Results indicated that carriers of the ApoE ε4 allele display negative associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, medial and lateral temporal cortex, parietal regions, insula, and the basal ganglia. Contrarily, ε3 carriers exhibited positive associations between verbal memory functions and CBF in medial frontal cortex, thalamus, insula, and basal ganglia. Findings suggest that higher CBF was associated with worse verbal memory functions in cognitively normal ε4 carriers, perhaps reflecting dysregulation within the neurovascular unit, which is no longer supportive of cognition. Results are discussed within the context of the vascular theory of AD risk.

  16. See the brain at work: intraoperative laser Doppler functional brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Williams, E. J.; Raabe, A.; Van De Ville, D.; Leutenegger, M.; Szelényi, A.; Hattingen, E.; Gerlach, R.; Seifert, V.; Hauger, C.; Lopez, A.; Leitgeb, R.; Unser, M.; Lasser, T.

    2009-07-01

    During open brain surgery we acquire perfusion images non-invasively using laser Doppler imaging. The regions of brain activity show a distinct signal in response to stimulation providing intraoperative functional brain maps of remarkably strong contrast.

  17. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  18. Perfusion Imaging of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Using Arterial Spin Labeling: Correlation With Histopathological Vascular Density

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Pia; Lechpammer, Mirna; Warfield, Simon K.; Kosaras, Bela; Takeoka, Masanori; Poduri, Annapurna; Madsen, Joseph R.; Bergin, Ann M.; Whalen, Stephen; Jensen, Frances E.

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common malformation of cortical development, causing intractable epilepsy. This study investigated the relationship between brain perfusion and microvessel density in 7 children with focal cortical dysplasia. The authors analyzed brain perfusion measurements obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of 2 of the children and the microvessel density of brain tissue specimens obtained by epilepsy surgery on all of the children. Brain perfusion was approximately 2 times higher in the area of focal cortical dysplasia compared to the contralateral side. The microvessel density was nearly double in the area of focal cortical dysplasia compared to the surrounding cortex that did not have morphological abnormalities. These findings suggest that hyperperfusion can be related to increased microvessel density in focal cortical dysplasia rather than only to seizures. Further investigations are needed to determine the relationship between brain perfusion, microvessel density, and seizure activity. PMID:23696629

  19. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  20. Isolated lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-01-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been historically used as a method to study basic lung physiologic concepts using animal models. More recently, ILP has been applied in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiological integrity of donor lungs after the organ is removed from the donor. This procedure is called Ex vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP), and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. In oncology, ILP is an attractive method to deliver high dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease. Since the lung vasculature is isolated in vivo, this technique is called in vivo lung perfusion (IVLP). This review will focus on the rationale, technical aspects, experimental and clinical experience of EVLP and IVLP. A perspective on the future use of these techniques is described. PMID:22202033

  1. Quantitative SPET 99Tcm-DMSA uptake by the kidneys: age-related decline in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Groshar, D; Gorenberg, M; Osamah, H

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate if 99Tcm-dimercaptosuccinic acid (99Tcm-DMSA) uptake by the kidneys is related to age and creatinine clearance in males with normal renal function, quantitative single photon emission tomography (SPET) of DMSA uptake by the kidneys was performed in 18 volunteers aged 20-79 years. The quantitative uptake of DMSA in the right kidney was 13.9 +/- 2.9% and in the left kidney 14.2 +/- 3.0%. There was no statistically significant difference between left and right kidney uptake (t = 1.2, N.S.). Global kidney uptake (right + left) was 28.1 +/- 5.9%. There was a statistically significant age-related decline in global DMSA uptake. The estimated DMSA uptake (%) was given by -0.27 x age + 42 (r = -0.87, P < 0.001). A good correlation was found between creatinine clearance and global DMSA uptake (r = 0.87, y = 2.8x + 28.3, P < 0.001). The results suggest that normal values of DMSA uptake by the kidneys are age-dependent.

  2. Auditory cortical activation in severe-to-profound hearing-impaired patients monitored by SPET.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, W; Di Giuda, D; Scarano, E; Picciotti, P M; Galla, S; De Rossi, G

    2006-08-01

    Single photon emission tomography was used to map blood flow increase in temporal and parietal cortex after auditory stimulation in 25 subjects: 10 normal-hearing, 10 severe-profound hearing-impaired and 5 totally deaf. After a 500 Hz pure tone stimulation, a marked perfusion increase was observed, particularly at the level of the contralateral auditory temporal cortex. Blood flow increase in temporal and parietal cortical areas of normal subjects was significantly higher than that observed in severe-to-profound hearing-impaired patients. In all cases, following 500 Hz pure tone acoustic stimulation, the most lateral sagittal slice tomograms (48.75 and 56.25 mm) showed the highest blood flow increase. Statistically significant differences were also observed between normal subjects and hearing-impaired patients in the 48.75 mm sagittal tomogram. In 2 hearing-impaired patients, the single photon emission tomography pattern showed activation of the intermediate sagittal tomogram, suggesting a possible new tonotopic cortical arrangement. No significant activation was present in totally deaf patients. In conclusion, Single Photon Emission Tomography appears to be a useful tool in the evaluation of auditory cortical activation and cortical plasticity, in severe-to-profound hearing-impaired patients. Moreover, it could be a useful test for the study of auditory central pathways.

  3. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  4. CT Perfusion Characteristics Identify Metastatic Sites in Liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Hobbs, Brian P; Ng, Chaan S

    2015-01-01

    Tissue perfusion plays a critical role in oncology because growth and migration of cancerous cells require proliferation of new blood vessels through the process of tumor angiogenesis. Computed tomography (CT) perfusion is an emerging functional imaging modality that measures tissue perfusion through dynamic CT scanning following intravenous administration of contrast medium. This noninvasive technique provides a quantitative basis for assessing tumor angiogenesis. CT perfusion has been utilized on a variety of organs including lung, prostate, liver, and brain, with promising results in cancer diagnosis, disease prognostication, prediction, and treatment monitoring. In this paper, we focus on assessing the extent to which CT perfusion characteristics can be used to discriminate liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors from normal liver tissues. The neuroendocrine liver metastases were analyzed by distributed parameter modeling to yield tissue blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability (PS), and hepatic arterial fraction (HAF), for tumor and normal liver. The result reveals the potential of CT perfusion as a tool for constructing biomarkers from features of the hepatic vasculature for guiding cancer detection, prognostication, and treatment selection.

  5. Visuospatial deficits and hemispheric perfusion asymmetries in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Katia; Kas, Aurélie; Samri, Dalila; Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno; Habert, Marie-Odile; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    We studied visuospatial performance and obtained brain perfusion scintigraphy in 27 patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and 24 healthy controls, with two aims: (1) to determine inter-hemispheric perfusion imbalances underlying signs of spatial neglect and (2) to establish the functional substrates of patients' performance on distinct visuospatial tasks (line bisection and target cancellation). Between-groups and correlation analyses were performed on a voxel-wise basis with Statistical Parametric Mapping, and right-to-left hemispheric perfusion ratios were calculated in anatomical regions of interest. Nineteen patients had pathological spatial biases. Compared with controls, patients with signs of left-sided and right-sided neglect presented prominent hypoperfusion in the right and left parietal cortex, respectively. Importantly, hypoperfusion extended to the ipsilateral prefrontal regions. Correlation analyses between task scores and brain perfusion showed that shifts in line bisection correlated with hypoperfusion in parieto-frontal regions, whereas omissions on target cancellation mainly correlated with hypoperfusion in prefrontal structures. Overall, the results indicate that spatial neglect in PCA is related to inter-hemispheric perfusion asymmetries in fronto-parietal networks, with partially different neural correlates for line bisection and target cancellation.

  6. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  7. Perfusion Bioreactor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    Perfusion bioreactor module, self-contained, closed-loop cell-culture system that operates in microgravity or on Earth. Equipment supports growth or long-term maintenance of cultures of human or other fragile cells for experiments in basic cell biology or process technology. Designed to support proliferation (initially at exponential rates of growth) of cells in complex growth medium and to maintain confluent cells in defined medium under conditions optimized to permit or encourage selected functions of cells, including secretion of products of cells into medium.

  8. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  9. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed.

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  11. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  12. [Extracorporeal perfusion of the sheep rumen].

    PubMed

    Leng, L; Bajo, M; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1977-06-01

    We constructed a modified perfusion apparatus and elaborated a method of extracorporal perfusion of the rumen of sheep. As perfusates we used the bovine plasma diluted in a ratio of 1:1 of an isotonic sodium chloride (NaCl) solution and the whole autologous blood. Transaminases GOT and GPT, ammonia and pH were determined in the perfusate. The different perfusions were evaluated according to previously determined perfusion conditions and criteria. A subject for discussion is the question of suitability of the parameters under examination for judging the state of the perfused organ. The described method is suitable for the study of metabolical processes in the rumen wal.

  13. Framework for cognitive analysis of dynamic perfusion computed tomography with visualization of large volumetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R.

    2012-10-01

    The proposed framework for cognitive analysis of perfusion computed tomography images is a fusion of image processing, pattern recognition, and image analysis procedures. The output data of the algorithm consists of: regions of perfusion abnormalities, anatomy atlas description of brain tissues, measures of perfusion parameters, and prognosis for infracted tissues. That information is superimposed onto volumetric computed tomography data and displayed to radiologists. Our rendering algorithm enables rendering large volumes on off-the-shelf hardware. This portability of rendering solution is very important because our framework can be run without using expensive dedicated hardware. The other important factors are theoretically unlimited size of rendered volume and possibility of trading of image quality for rendering speed. Such rendered, high quality visualizations may be further used for intelligent brain perfusion abnormality identification, and computer aided-diagnosis of selected types of pathologies.

  14. Distributed perfusion educational model: a shift in perfusion economic realities.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jon W; Evans, Edward L; Hoerr, Harry R

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a steady decline in the number of perfusion education programs in the United States has been noted. At the same time, there has been a parallel decline in the number of students graduated from perfusion educational programs in the United States. Also, as noted by several authors, there has been an increase in demand for perfusion graduates. The decline in programs and graduates has also been noted in anesthesia and surgical residency programs. The shift is caused by a combination of economic and clinical factors. First, decreased reimbursement has led to reallocation of hospital resources. Second, the original enthusiasm for beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery was grossly overestimated and has led to further reallocation of hospital resources and denigration of cardiopulmonary bypass. This paper describes two models of perfusion education programs: serial perfusion education model (SPEM) and the distributed perfusion education model (DPEM). Arguments are presented that the SPEM has some serious limitations and challenges for long-term economic survival. The authors feel the DPEM along with dependence on tuition funding can survive the current clinical and economic conditions and allow the profession to adapt to changes in scope of practice. PMID:16524152

  15. Cerebral perfusion in children with Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y T; Chiu, N C; Shen, E Y; Ho, C S; Wu, M C

    1998-08-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is characterized by visual hallucinations and bizarre perceptual distortions. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine tomography (SPECT) brain scans were performed in four patients during the acute stage of AIWS. Two patients were demonstrated to have Epstein-Barr virus infections. One had abnormal (EEG) findings. The visual-evoked potential, cranial CT, and MRI findings were negative. The decreased cerebral perfusion areas in all patients were near the visual tract and visual cortex. All involved some regions of the temporal lobe. In most patients with AIWS, the EEG, CT, and MRI are unable to determine the precise pathologic areas. However, a SPECT brain scan may demonstrate abnormal perfusion areas and explain the clinical presentations. PMID:9744628

  16. Ex-vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Neyrinck, Arne; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2015-06-01

    This review outlines the new and promising technique of ex vivo lung perfusion and its clinical potential to increase the number of transplantable lungs and to improve the early and late outcome after transplantation. The rationale, the experimental background, the technique and protocols, and available devices for ex vivo lung perfusion are discussed. The current clinical experience worldwide and ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24629039

  17. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  18. [Traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, K; Unterberg, A

    2016-02-01

    Since traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of long-term disability and death among young adults, it represents an enormous socio-economic and healthcare burden. As a consequence of the primary lesion, a perifocal brain edema develops causing an elevation of the intracranial pressure due to the limited intracranial space. This entails a reduction of the cerebral perfusion pressure and the cerebral blood flow. A cerebral perfusion deficit below the threshold for ischemia leads to further ischemic lesions and to a progression of the contusion. As the irreversible primary lesion can only be inhibited by primary prevention, the therapy of traumatic brain injury focuses on the secondary injuries. The treatment consists of surgical therapy evacuating the space-occupying intracranial lesion and conservative intensive medical care. Due to the complex pathophysiology the therapy of traumatic brain injury should be rapidly performed in a neurosurgical unit. PMID:26810405

  19. Evaluation of CT Perfusion Biomarkers of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Crukley, Cathie; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Yartsev, Slav

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance to cancer therapies. Hypoxia can be investigated by immunohistopathologic methods but such procedure is invasive. A non-invasive method to interrogate tumor hypoxia is an attractive option as such method can provide information before, during, and after treatment for personalized therapies. Our study evaluated the correlations between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and immunohistopathologic measurement of tumor hypoxia. Methods Wistar rats, 18 controls and 19 treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), implanted with the C6 glioma tumor were imaged using CT perfusion on average every five days to monitor tumor growth. A final CT perfusion scan and the brain were obtained on average 14 days (8–22 days) after tumor implantation. Tumor hypoxia was detected immunohistopathologically with pimonidazole. The tumor, necrotic, and pimonidazole-positive areas on histology samples were measured. Percent necrotic area and percent hypoxic areas were calculated. Tumor volume (TV), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained from the CT perfusion studies. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters and histological parameters were assessed by Spearman’s ρ correlation. A Bonferroni-corrected P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results BF and BV showed significant correlations with percent hypoxic area ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.81, P < 0.001, respectively, for control animals and ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.6, P = 0.003, respectively, for all animals, while TV and BV were correlated (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.01 and ρ = -0.43, P = 0.043, respectively) with percent necrotic area. PS was not correlated with either percent necrotic or percent hypoxic areas. Conclusions Percent hypoxic area provided significant correlations with BF and BV, suggesting that CT perfusion parameters are potential non-invasive imaging biomarkers of tumor

  20. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  1. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  2. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. PMID:23623332

  3. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  4. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  5. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: Development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa; Scremin, Oscar; Maarek, Jean-Michel; Holschneider, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex--changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  6. Artificial tissues in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Sittinger, M; Schultz, O; Keyszer, G; Minuth, W W; Burmester, G R

    1997-01-01

    In the stagnant environment of traditional culture dishes it is difficult to generate long term experiments or artificial tissues from human cells. For this reason a perfusion culture system with a stable supply of nutrients was developed. Human chondrocytes were seeded three-dimensionally in resorbable polymer fleeces. The cell-polymer tissues were then mounted in newly developed containers (W.W. Minuth et al, Biotechniques, 1996) and continuously perfused by fresh medium for 40 days. Samples from the effluate were analyzed daily, and the pH of the medium and glucose concentration remained stable during this period. The lactid acid concentration increased from 0.17 mg/ml to 0.35 mg/ml, which was influenced by the degradation of the resorbable polymer fibers used as three dimensional support material for the cells. This perfusion system proved to be reliable especially in long term cultures. Any components in the culture medium of the cells could be monitored without disturbances as caused by manual medium replacement. These results suggest the described perfusion culture system to be a valuable and convenient tool for many applications in tissue engineering, especially in the generation of artificial connective tissue.

  7. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  8. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  9. Does machine perfusion decrease ischemia reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Bon, D; Delpech, P-O; Chatauret, N; Hauet, T; Badet, L; Barrou, B

    2014-06-01

    In 1990's, use of machine perfusion for organ preservation has been abandoned because of improvement of preservation solutions, efficient without perfusion, easy to use and cheaper. Since the last 15 years, a renewed interest for machine perfusion emerged based on studies performed on preclinical model and seems to make consensus in case of expanded criteria donors or deceased after cardiac death donations. We present relevant studies highlighted the efficiency of preservation with hypothermic machine perfusion compared to static cold storage. Machines for organ preservation being in constant evolution, we also summarized recent developments included direct oxygenation of the perfusat. Machine perfusion technology also enables organ reconditioning during the last hours of preservation through a short period of perfusion on hypothermia, subnormothermia or normothermia. We present significant or low advantages for machine perfusion against ischemia reperfusion injuries regarding at least one primary parameter: risk of DFG, organ function or graft survival.

  10. Sodium efflux from perfused giant algal cells.

    PubMed

    Clint, G M; Macrobbie, E A

    1987-06-01

    Internodal cells of the giant alga Chara corallina were perfused internally to replace the native cytoplasm, tonoplast and vacuole with artificial cytoplasm. Sodium efflux from perfused cells, measured by including (22)Na in the perfusion media, was increased by increasing the internal sodium concentration and by decreasing the external pH, and was inhibited by external application of the renal diuretic amiloride. The sodium efflux was markedly ATP-dependent, with a 50-fold decrease in efflux observed after perfusion with media lacking ATP. Efflux in the presence of ATP was reduced by 33% by inclusion of 10 μM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the perfusion medium. The membrane potential of the perfused cells approximated that of intact cells from the same culture. It is suggested that sodium efflux in perfused Chara cells proceeds via a secondary antiporter with protons, regulated by ATP in a catalytic role and with the proton motive force acting as the energy source.

  11. Perfusion and thallium single photon emission computed tomography in herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    De Deyn, P P; Van den Broucke, P W; Pickut, B A; Appel, B; Crols, R; Cras, P; Martin, J J

    1998-04-15

    This is the first report on 201thallium-single photon emission computed tomography (201Tl-SPECT) brain scan of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). The presented 201Tl-SPECT observations are correlated with 99mtechnetium hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) perfusion SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Brain 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT reveals a hyperperfusion in the right temporal lobe with extension to the parietal lobe and a hypoperfusion in the ipsilateral occipital lobe. 201Tl-SPECT shows a fixation in the right temporal lobe coinciding with the gadolinium enhancement on MRI. The right occipital lesion shown by gadolinium captation on MRI and hypoperfusion on 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT was not evident on the 201Tl SPECT. These findings could illustrate that the lesions might be different pathophysiologically.

  12. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  13. Perfusion Neuroimaging Abnormalities Alone Distinguish National Football League Players from a Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G.; Willeumier, Kristen; Omalu, Bennet; Newberg, Andrew; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Raji, Cyrus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: National Football League (NFL) players are exposed to multiple head collisions during their careers. Increasing awareness of the adverse long-term effects of repetitive head trauma has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public. Objective: To determine whether low perfusion in specific brain regions on neuroimaging can accurately separate professional football players from healthy controls. Method: A cohort of retired and current NFL players (n = 161) were recruited in a longitudinal study starting in 2009 with ongoing interval follow up. A healthy control group (n = 124) was separately recruited for comparison. Assessments included medical examinations, neuropsychological tests, and perfusion neuroimaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Perfusion estimates of each scan were quantified using a standard atlas. We hypothesized that hypoperfusion particularly in the orbital frontal, anterior cingulate, anterior temporal, hippocampal, amygdala, insular, caudate, superior/mid occipital, and cerebellar sub-regions alone would reliably separate controls from NFL players. Cerebral perfusion differences were calculated using a one-way ANOVA and diagnostic separation was determined with discriminant and automatic linear regression predictive models. Results: NFL players showed lower cerebral perfusion on average (p < 0.01) in 36 brain regions. The discriminant analysis subsequently distinguished NFL players from controls with 90% sensitivity, 86% specificity, and 94% accuracy (95% CI 95-99). Automatic linear modeling achieved similar results. Inclusion of age and clinical co-morbidities did not improve diagnostic classification. Conclusion: Specific brain regions commonly damaged in traumatic brain injury show abnormally low perfusion on SPECT in professional NFL players. These same regions alone can distinguish this group from healthy subjects with high diagnostic accuracy. This

  14. Central pain mechanisms following combined acid and capsaicin perfusion of the human oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Brock, Christina; Andresen, Trine; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gale, Jeremy; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2010-03-01

    Visceral afferents originating from different gut-segments converge at the spinal level. We hypothesized that chemically-induced hyperalgesia in the oesophagus could provoke widespread visceral hypersensitivity and also influence descending modulatory pain pathways. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied at baseline, 30, 60 and 90 min after randomized perfusion of the distal oesophagus with either saline or 180 ml 0.1M HCl+2mg capsaicin. Electro-stimulation of the oesophagus, 8 cm proximal to the perfusion site, rectosigmoid electrical stimulation and rectal mechanical and heat stimulations were used. Evoked brain potentials were recorded after electrical stimulations before and after oesophageal perfusion. After the perfusion, rectal hyperalgesia to heat (P<0.01, 37%) and mechanical (P=0.01, 11%) stimulations were demonstrated. In contrast, hypoalgesia to electro-stimulation was observed in both the oesophagus (P<0.03, 23%) and the sigmoid colon (P<0.001, 18%). Referred pain areas to electro-stimulation in oesophagus were reduced by 13% after perfusion (P=0.01). Evoked brain potentials to rectosigmoid stimulations showed decreased latencies and amplitudes of P1, N1 and P2 (P<0.05), whereas oesophagus-evoked brain potentials were unaffected after perfusion. In conclusion, modality-specific hyperalgesia was demonstrated in the lower gut following chemical sensitization of the oesophagus, reflecting widespread central hyperexcitability. Conversely, hypoalgesia to electrical stimulation, decreases in referred pain and latencies of evoked brain potentials was seen. This outcome may reflect a counterbalancing activation of descending inhibitory pathways. As these findings are also seen in the clinical setting, the model may be usable for future basic and pharmacological studies.

  15. Analysis of dynamic cerebral contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI time-series based on unsupervised clustering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Oliver; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Wismuller, Axel; Hurdal, Monica

    2005-03-01

    We employ unsupervised clustering techniques for the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI time-series in patients with and without stroke. "Neural gas" network, fuzzy clustering based on deterministic annealing, self-organizing maps, and fuzzy c-means clustering enable self-organized data-driven segmentation w.r.t.fine-grained differences of signal amplitude and dynamics, thus identifying asymmetries and local abnormalities of brain perfusion. We conclude that clustering is a useful extension to conventional perfusion parameter maps.

  16. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  17. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  18. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission.

  19. Cerebral perfusion imaging with bolus harmonic imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kier, Christian; Toth, Daniel; Meyer-Wiethe, Karsten; Schindler, Angela; Cangur, Hakan; Seidel, Gunter; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute stroke. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming, costly and not applicable to every patient. The bolus perfusion harmonic imaging (BHI) method is an ultrasound imaging technique which makes use of the fact, that ultrasound contrast agents unlike biological tissues resonate at harmonic frequencies. Exploiting this effect, the contrast between perfused and non-perfused areas can be improved. Thus, BHI overcomes the low signal-to-noise ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull. By analysing image sequences, visualising the qualitative characteristics of an US contrast agent bolus injection becomes possible. The analysis consists of calculating four perfusion-related parameters, Local Peak Intensity, Time To Peak, Area Under Curve, and Average Rising, from the time/intensity curve and providing them as colour-coded images. For calculating these parameters the fundamental assumption is that image intensity corresponds to contrast agent concentration which in turn shows the perfusion of the corresponding brain region. In a clinical study on patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke it is shown that some of the parameters correlate significantly to the infarction area. Thus, BHI becomes a less time-consuming and inexpensive bedside method for diagnosis of cerebral perfusion deficits.

  20. The beneficial effects of a thromboxane receptor antagonist on spinal cord perfusion following experimental cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tempel, G E; Martin, H F

    1992-06-01

    The eicosanoids thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin have opposing actions causing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. The ratio of these two eicosanoids is thus an important determinant of circulatory homeostasis. An increase in this ratio occurs in certain inflammatory conditions with dramatic consequences in organ perfusion. In spinal cord trauma, in addition to direct physical perturbation of the spinal cord, it is likely that further structural and functional loss occurs as a result of decreased tissue perfusion precipitated by an increase in the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio. This study evaluated hemodynamics and organ perfusion, 3 h following 24 g-cm spinal cord trauma in the rat. The role of thromboxane was investigated with an inhibitor of thromboxane synthesis (Dazoxiben) and with a receptor antagonist (13-APT). Cardiac output and blood pressure were unaffected by Dazoxiben, 13-APT, or spinal cord trauma. Injury effected approximately a 40% decrease in spinal cord perfusion from 0.41 to 0.25 ml/min/g which was not improved by the thromboxane synthase inhibitor, Dazoxiben. 13-ATP completely abrogated the decline in spinal cord blood flow flowing injury. Perfusion of other selected organs demonstrated little change as a result of the spinal trauma. Brain flow remained constant at 0.78 ml/min/g brain. Coronary blood flow, however, declined from 3.2 to 2.0 ml/min/g heart tissue. The data suggest consideration of the importance of thromboxane in therapeutic attempts to reduce secondary injury arising in spinal cord trauma. PMID:1386102

  1. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  2. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  3. Perfusion patterns of ischemic stroke on computed tomography perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Parsons, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) has been applied increasingly in research of ischemic stroke. However, in clinical practice, it is still a relatively new technology. For neurologists and radiologists, the challenge is to interpret CTP results properly in the context of the clinical presentation. In this article, we will illustrate common CTP patterns in acute ischemic stroke using a case-based approach. The aim is to get clinicians more familiar with the information provided by CTP with a view towards inspiring them to incorporate CTP in their routine imaging workup of acute stroke patients.

  4. Automatic detection of CT perfusion datasets unsuitable for analysis due to head movement of acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Marquering, Henk A; Streekstra, Geert J; Beenen, Ludo F M; Janssen, Natasja N Y; Majoie, Charles B L; van Bavel, Ed

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during brain Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) can deteriorate perfusion analysis quality in acute ischemic stroke patients. We developed a method for automatic detection of CTP datasets with excessive head movement, based on 3D image-registration of CTP, with non-contrast CT providing transformation parameters. For parameter values exceeding predefined thresholds, the dataset was classified as 'severely moved'. Threshold values were determined by digital CTP phantom experiments. The automated selection was compared to manual screening by 2 experienced radiologists for 114 brain CTP datasets. Based on receiver operator characteristics, optimal thresholds were found of respectively 1.0°, 2.8° and 6.9° for pitch, roll and yaw, and 2.8 mm for z-axis translation. The proposed method had a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 82.3%. This method allows accurate automated detection of brain CTP datasets that are unsuitable for perfusion analysis. PMID:24691387

  5. Beyond the basics: brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Tim; Krost, William S; Mistovich, Joseph J; Limmer, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    Increased intracranial pressure can be a catastrophic event that may lead to death or permanent disability. Without prompt recognition and reversal of hypoxia, hypotension, hypercarbia, acidosis and increased intracranial pressure, the cerebral blood flow and resultant cerebral perfusion can be inadequate, leading to an exacerbation of secondary brain injury. PMID:17672275

  6. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  7. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed. PMID:23942635

  8. Principles of Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion During Arch Reconstruction in Newborns/Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Charles D.; Andropoulos, Dean B.

    2008-01-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) is a cardiopulmonary bypass technique that uses special cannulation procedures to perfuse only the brain during neonatal and infant aortic arch reconstruction. It is used in lieu of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), and thus has the theoretical advantage of protecting the brain from hypoxic ischemic injury. Despite this, recent comparative studies have demonstrated no difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes with ACP vs. DHCA for neonatal arch repair. This article presents animal and human data demonstrating that ACP flows less than 30 ml/kg/min are inadequate for many patients, and may be the explanation for lack of outcome difference vs. DHCA. A technique for ACP, its physiologic basis, and a neuromonitoring strategy are presented, and then the results of an outcome study are reviewed demonstrating that with ACP technique at higher flows of 50–80 ml/kg/min guided by neuromonitoring, periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is eliminated on postoperative brain MRI after neonatal cardiac surgery. PMID:18396227

  9. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  10. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  11. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  12. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  13. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  14. Personality factors correlate with regional cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, R L; Kumari, V; Williams, S C R; Zelaya, F O; Connor, S E J; Alsop, D C; Gray, J A

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence pointing to a neurobiological basis of personality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological bases of the major dimensions of Eysenck's and Cloninger's models of personality using a noninvasive magnetic resonance perfusion imaging technique in 30 young, healthy subjects. An unbiased voxel-based analysis was used to identify regions where the regional perfusion demonstrated significant correlation with any of the personality dimensions. Highly significant positive correlations emerged between extraversion and perfusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum and between novelty seeking and perfusion in the cerebellum, cuneus and thalamus. Strong negative correlations emerged between psychoticism and perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalamus and between harm avoidance and perfusion in the cerebellar vermis, cuneus and inferior frontal gyrus. These observations suggest that personality traits are strongly associated with resting cerebral perfusion in a variety of cortical and subcortical regions and provide further evidence for the hypothesized neurobiological basis of personality. These results may also have important implications for functional neuroimaging studies, which typically rely on the modulation of cerebral hemodynamics for detection of task-induced activation since personality effects may influence the intersubject variability for both task-related activity and resting cerebral perfusion. This technique also offers a novel approach for the exploration of the neurobiological correlates of human personality.

  15. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  16. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Raja, Waseem K; Wang, Rebecca Y; Stinson, Jordan A; Glettig, Dean L; Burke, Kelly A; Kaplan, David L

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogenesis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight.

  17. [Assessing myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    vom Dahl, J

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to two indications: 1) The detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well-validated perfusion tracers, such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidium chloride, or O-15 labeled water. 2) Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with high specificity, PET is today the best-validated available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows one to use PET perfusion imaging to detect subtle changes in the perfusion reserve for the detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial collaterals and, thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive

  18. Technetium-99m HM-PAO-SPECT study of regional cerebral perfusion in early Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Perani, D.; Di Piero, V.; Vallar, G.; Cappa, S.; Messa, C.; Bottini, G.; Berti, A.; Passafiume, D.; Scarlato, G.; Gerundini, P.

    1988-09-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion was evaluated by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime ((/sup 99m/Tc)HM-PAO) in sixteen patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in early clinical phase and in 16 healthy elderly controls. In all patients transmission computed tomography (TCT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show focal brain abnormalities. Relative to normal subjects, AD patients showed significant reductions in cortical/cerebellar activity ratio: cortical perfusion was globally depressed with the largest reductions in frontal and posterior temporo-parietal cortices. Asymmetries of relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres were also demonstrated when language was affected or visuospatial functions were unevenly impaired. In patients with early AD, SPECT provides functional information to be compared with clinical and psychometric data.

  19. Value of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in the Acute Phase of Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U.; Böhme, Johannes; Mürle, Bettina; Groden, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) in TGA in the acute phase. Methods From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV)) were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN). CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Software Library (FSL). Results Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women). On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus. Conclusions Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in

  20. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  1. Neurovascular Regulation in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The brain has high energetic requirements and is therefore highly dependent on adequate cerebral blood supply. To compensate for dangerous fluctuations in cerebral perfusion, the circulation of the brain has evolved intrinsic safeguarding measures. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The vascular network of the brain incorporates a high degree of redundancy, allowing the redirection and redistribution of blood flow in the event of vascular occlusion. Furthermore, active responses such as cerebral autoregulation, which acts to maintain constant cerebral blood flow in response to changing blood pressure, and functional hyperemia, which couples blood supply with synaptic activity, allow the brain to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion in the face of varying supply or demand. In the presence of stroke risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes, these protective processes are impaired and the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury is increased. One potential mechanism for the increased injury is that collateral flow arising from the normally perfused brain and supplying blood flow to the ischemic region is suppressed, resulting in more severe ischemia. Future Directions: Approaches to support collateral flow may ameliorate the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia by rescuing cerebral perfusion in potentially viable regions of the ischemic territory. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 149–160. PMID:24328757

  2. Correlation of CT perfusion and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna; Zimny, Anna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Both brain atrophy and decrease of perfusion are observed in dementive diseases. The aim of the study was to correlate the results of brain perfusion CT (pCT) and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Material/Methods: Forty-eight patients with AD (mean age of 71.3 years) underwent brain pCT and CT volumetry. The pCT was performed at the level of basal ganglia after the injection of contrast medium (50 ml, 4 ml/sec.) with serial scanning (delay 7 sec, 50 scans, 1 scan/sec). Volumetric measurements were carried out on the basis of source images, with the use of a dedicated CT software combined with manual outlining of the regions of interest in extracerebral and intraventricular CSF spaces. Perfusion parameters of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) from the grey matter of frontal and temporal as well as basal ganglia were compared statistically with the volumetric measurements of frontal and temporal cortical atrophy as well as subcortical atrophy. Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the values of CBF and CBV in the basal ganglia and the volumes of the lateral and third ventricles. The comparison of CBF and CBV results with the volumetric measurements in the areas of the frontal and temporal lobes showed mostly negative correlations, but none of them was of statistical significance. Conclusions: In patients with AD, the degree of cortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the grey matter and subcortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the basal ganglia region. It suggests that functional and structural changes in AD are not related to each other. PMID:22802771

  3. K-Bayes reconstruction for perfusion MRI. I: concepts and application.

    PubMed

    Kornak, John; Young, Karl; Schuff, Norbert; Du, Antao; Maudsley, Andrew A; Weiner, Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Despite the continued spread of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods in scientific studies and clinical diagnosis, MRI applications are mostly restricted to high-resolution modalities, such as structural MRI. While perfusion MRI gives complementary information on blood flow in the brain, its reduced resolution limits its power for detecting specific disease effects on perfusion patterns. This reduced resolution is compounded by artifacts such as partial volume effects, Gibbs ringing, and aliasing, which are caused by necessarily limited k-space sampling and the subsequent use of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) reconstruction. In this study, a Bayesian modeling procedure (K-Bayes) is developed for the reconstruction of perfusion MRI. The K-Bayes approach (described in detail in Part II: Modeling and Technical Development) combines a process model for the MRI signal in k-space with a Markov random field prior distribution that incorporates high-resolution segmented structural MRI information. A simulation study was performed to determine qualitative and quantitative improvements in K-Bayes reconstructed images compared with those obtained via DFT. The improvements were validated using in vivo perfusion MRI data of the human brain. The K-Bayes reconstructed images were demonstrated to provide reduced bias, increased precision, greater effect sizes, and higher resolution than those obtained using DFT.

  4. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  5. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  6. Temperature controlled machine perfusion system for liver.

    PubMed

    Obara, H; Matsuno, N; Shigeta, T; Hirano, T; Enosawa, S; Mizunuma, H

    2013-06-01

    Organ preservation using machine perfusion is an effective method compared with conventional preservation techniques using static cold storage. A newly developed MP preservation system to control perfusate temperatures from hypothermic to subnormothermic conditions is introduced. This system is useful not only for liver preservation, but also for evaluation of graft viability for recovery. This novel method has been proposed for preservation of porcine liver grafts. An innovative preservation system is especially important to obtain viable organs from extended criteria or donation after cardiac death donors. In this study, we introduce a new machine perfusion preservation system (NES-01) to evaluate graft viability for recovery of liver functions, using porcine grafts.

  7. Microcirculation Perfusion Monitor on the Back of the Health Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanqi; Li, Xiaomei; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yangyang; Guo, Yi; Qiu, Shuang; Zhai, Tianchen; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Jingjing; Ming, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To observe the dermal microcirculation blood perfusion characterization of meridians channels (acupoints). Methods. 20 healthy human subjects were monitored using Pericam Perfusion Speckle Imager (PSI) for the changes in dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on governor meridian and other respective dermal regions as a control. Result. The microcirculation blood perfusion on Governor Meridian is higher than its control area. Conclusion. The dermal microcirculation blood perfusion on certain parts of Governor Meridian of healthy human subjects showed specifics. PMID:24371463

  8. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  9. Ex vivo lung perfusion and reconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Massad, Ehab; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2011-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion can act as a platform for the evaluation and repair of donor lungs. An acellular hyperosmolar solution is perfused anterograde through the donor lungs at 40% of the estimated cardiac output. Following oxygenation of the perfusate by the lung, it passes through a hollow fiber oxygenator supplied with a hypoxic gas mixture to remove oxygen and to maintain physiological carbon dioxide levels. Flow through a heat exchanger to maintain normothermia and a leukocyte filter to remove demarginated leukocytes completes the circuit. Lung function can be measured by the difference in PO2 between the perfusate postlung and postmembrane and by physiological parameters. Utilization of this method of ex vivo donor lung evaluation should reduce concerns of primary graft dysfunction and increase utilization rates of donor lungs. PMID:24412979

  10. Noninvasive methods of measuring bone blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, J.P.; Aaron, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of bone blood flow and perfusion characteristics in a noninvasive and serial manner would be advantageous in assessing revascularization after trauma and the possible risk of avascular necrosis. Many disease states, including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and bone neoplasms, result in disturbed bone perfusion. A causal link between bone perfusion and remodeling has shown its importance in sustained healing and regrowth following injury. Measurement of perfusion and permeability within the bone was performed with small and macromolecular contrast media, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in models of osteoarthritis and the femoral head. Bone blood flow and remodeling was estimated using 18F-Fluoride positron emission tomography in fracture healing and osteoarthritis. Multimodality assessment of bone blood flow, permeability, and remodeling by using noninvasive imaging techniques may provide information essential in monitoring subsequent rates of healing and response to treatment as well as identifying candidates for additional therapeutic or surgical interventions. PMID:20392223

  11. Bubble dynamics in perfused tissue undergoing decompression.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S; Nir, A; Kerem, D

    1981-02-01

    A mathematical model describing bubble dynamics in a perfused tissue undergoing decompression is presented, taking into account physical expansion and inward diffusion from surrounding supersaturated tissue as growth promoting factors and tissue gas elimination by perfusion, tissue elasticity, surface tension and inherent unsaturation as resolving driving forces. The expected behavior after a step reduction of pressure of a bubble initially existing in the tissue, displaying both growth and resolution has been demonstrated. A strong perfusion-dependence of bubble resolution time at low perfusion rates is apparent. The model can account for various exposure pressures and saturation fractions of any inert gas-tissue combination for which a set of physical and physiological parameters is available.

  12. Vicarious Audiovisual Learning in Perfusion Education

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Thomas E.; Holt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Perfusion technology is a mechanical and visual science traditionally taught with didactic instruction combined with clinical experience. It is difficult to provide perfusion students the opportunity to experience difficult clinical situations, set up complex perfusion equipment, or observe corrective measures taken during catastrophic events because of patient safety concerns. Although high fidelity simulators offer exciting opportunities for future perfusion training, we explore the use of a less costly low fidelity form of simulation instruction, vicarious audiovisual learning. Two low fidelity modes of instruction; description with text and a vicarious, first person audiovisual production depicting the same content were compared. Students (n = 37) sampled from five North American perfusion schools were prospectively randomized to one of two online learning modules, text or video. These modules described the setup and operation of the MAQUET ROTAFLOW standalone centrifugal console and pump. Using a 10 question multiple-choice test, students were assessed immediately after viewing the module (test #1) and then again 2 weeks later (test #2) to determine cognition and recall of the module content. In addition, students completed a questionnaire assessing the learning preferences of today’s perfusion student. Mean test scores from test #1 for video learners (n = 18) were significantly higher (88.89%) than for text learners (n = 19) (74.74%), (p < .05). The same was true for test #2 where video learners (n = 10) had an average score of 77% while text learners (n = 9) scored 60% (p < .05). Survey results indicated video learners were more satisfied with their learning module than text learners. Vicarious audiovisual learning modules may be an efficacious, low cost means of delivering perfusion training on subjects such as equipment setup and operation. Video learning appears to improve cognition and retention of learned content and may play an important

  13. Pancreas transplants: Evaluation using perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; du Cret, R.P.; Boudreau, R.J.

    1989-07-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphic perfusion studies in evaluating pancreas transplant patients, we reviewed 56 of these studies in 22 patients who had 27 transplants. Seventeen patients underwent two or more studies. The perfusion studies were performed with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc-DTPA injected as a bolus followed by eight to 16 serial 2-sec images and a 500,000-count immediate static image. Images were evaluated for (1) the time and intensity of pancreatic peak radioactivity relative to the time and intensity of the iliac arterial peak; (2) relative pancreatic to iliac arterial intensity on the static image; and (3) size, homogeneity, and definition of the pancreas. Clinical diagnoses at the time of scintigraphy of normal function (n = 36), rejection (n = 13), pancreatitis (n = 6), or arterial thrombosis (n = 1) were based on insulin requirement, urine amylase, serum glucose, serum amylase, response to therapy, cultures, CT, MR, sonography, scintigraphy with 67Ga or 111In-WBCs, percutaneous drainage results, angiography, surgery, and pathologic examination of resected transplants. Three 99mTc-DTPA perfusion studies showed no pancreatic perfusion, four showed decreasing perfusion on serial studies, and five showed progressive loss of definition of the pancreas on serial studies. Of the three patients with no detectable perfusion, one had a normally functioning transplant, one had arterial thrombosis with transplant infarction, and one had severe rejection with minimal function. Decreasing perfusion was associated with rejection in three patients and pancreatitis in one. Decreasing definition was seen in four patients with rejection and one with pancreatitis. We conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful, primarily when performed serially, although nonspecific for evaluating pancreas transplants.

  14. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  15. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  16. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  17. Permissive hypotension does not reduce regional organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation: animal study with fluorescent microspheres

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate regional organ perfusion acutely following uncontrolled hemorrhage in an animal model that simulates a penetrating vascular injury and accounts for prehospital times in urban trauma. We set forth to determine if hypotensive resuscitation (permissive hypotension) would result in equivalent organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation. Methods Twenty four (n=24) male rats randomized to 4 groups: Sham, No Fluid (NF), Permissive Hypotension (PH) (60% of baseline mean arterial pressure - MAP), Normotensive Resuscitation (NBP). Uncontrolled hemorrhage caused by a standardised injury to the abdominal aorta; MAP was monitored continuously and lactated Ringer’s was infused. Fluorimeter readings of regional blood flow of the brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and bowel were obtained at baseline and 85 minutes after hemorrhage, as well as, cardiac output, lactic acid, and laboratory tests; intra-abdominal blood loss was assessed. Analysis of variance was used for comparison. Results Intra-abdominal blood loss was higher in NBP group, as well as, lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. No statistical differences in perfusion of any organ between PH and NBP groups. No statistical difference in cardiac output between PH and NBP groups, as well as, in lactic acid levels between PH and NBP. NF group had significantly higher lactic acidosis and had significantly lower organ perfusion. Conclusions Hypotensive resuscitation causes less intra-abdominal bleeding than normotensive resuscitation and concurrently maintains equivalent organ perfusion. No fluid resuscitation reduces intra-abdominal bleeding but also significantly reduces organ perfusion. PMID:23531188

  18. Brain Development in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Although human brain development continues throughout childhood and adolescence, it is a non-linear process both structurally and functionally. Here we review studies of brain development in healthy children from the viewpoint of structure and the perfusion of gray and white matter. Gray matter volume increases and then decreases with age, with the developmental time of the peak volume differing among brain regions in the first and second decades of life. On the other hand, white matter volume increase is mostly linear during those periods. As regards fractional anisotropy, most regions show an exponential trajectory with aging. In addition, cerebral blood flow and gray matter volume are proportional at similar developmental ages. Moreover, we show that several lifestyle choices, such as sleeping habits and breakfast staple, affect gray matter volume in healthy children. There are a number of uninvestigated important issues that require future study. PMID:23166579

  19. Brain development in childhood.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Although human brain development continues throughout childhood and adolescence, it is a non-linear process both structurally and functionally. Here we review studies of brain development in healthy children from the viewpoint of structure and the perfusion of gray and white matter. Gray matter volume increases and then decreases with age, with the developmental time of the peak volume differing among brain regions in the first and second decades of life. On the other hand, white matter volume increase is mostly linear during those periods. As regards fractional anisotropy, most regions show an exponential trajectory with aging. In addition, cerebral blood flow and gray matter volume are proportional at similar developmental ages. Moreover, we show that several lifestyle choices, such as sleeping habits and breakfast staple, affect gray matter volume in healthy children. There are a number of uninvestigated important issues that require future study.

  20. Technical aspects of MR perfusion.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, Steven

    2010-12-01

    The most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are arterial spin labelling (ASL), dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI), and T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). This review focuses on the latter approach, which is by far the most common in the body and produces measures of capillary permeability as well. The aim is to present a concise but complete overview of the technical issues involved in DCE-MRI data acquisition and analysis. For details the reader is referred to the references. The presentation of the topic is essentially generic and focuses on technical aspects that are common to all DCE-MRI measurements. For organ-specific problems and illustrations, we refer to the other papers in this issue. In Section 1 "Theory" the basic quantities are defined, and the physical mechanisms are presented that provide a relation between the hemodynamic parameters and the DCE-MRI signal. Section 2 "Data acquisition" discusses the issues involved in the design of an optimal measurement protocol. Section 3 "Data analysis" summarizes the steps that need to be taken to determine the hemodynamic parameters from the measured data. PMID:20363574

  1. Reduction in Cerebral Perfusion after Heroin Administration: A Resting State Arterial Spin Labeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Denier, Niklaus; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Klarhöfer, Markus; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A.; Lang, Undine E.; Borgwardt, Stefan; Walter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder, characterized by the compulsion to seek and use heroin. Heroin itself has a strong potential to produce subjective experiences characterized by intense euphoria, relaxation and release from craving. The neurofunctional foundations of these perceived effects are not well known. In this study, we have used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) in 15 heroin-dependent patients from a stable heroin-assisted treatment program to observe the steady state effects of heroin (60 min after administration). Patients were scanned in a cross-over and placebo controlled design. They received an injection of their regular dose of heroin or saline (placebo) before or after the scan. As phMRI method, we used a pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence based on a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) spin labeling scheme combined with a single-shot 3D GRASE (gradient-spin echo) readout on a 3 Tesla scanner. Analysis was performed with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 8), using a general linear model for whole brain comparison between the heroin and placebo conditions. We found that compared to placebo, heroin was associated with reduced perfusion in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the left medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the insula (both hemispheres). Analysis of extracted perfusion values indicate strong effect sizes and no gender related differences. Reduced perfusion in these brain areas may indicate self- and emotional regulation effects of heroin in maintenance treatment. PMID:24039715

  2. Comparison of Two Algorithms for Analysis of Perfusion Computed Tomography Data for Evaluation of Cerebral Microcirculation in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Yuriev, Michail; Agarkova, Darya; Trofimova, Svetlana; Bragin, Denis E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was comparison of two algorithms of perfusion computed tomography (PCT) data analysis for evaluation of cerebral microcirculation in the perifocal zone of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Twenty patients with CSDH after polytrauma were included in the study. The same PCT data were assessed quantitatively in cortical brain region beneath the CSDH (zone 1), and in the corresponding contralateral brain hemisphere (zone 2) without and with the use of perfusion calculation mode excluding vascular pixel 'Remote Vessels' (RV); 1st and 2nd analysis method, respectively. Comparison with normal values for perfusion indices in the zone 1 in the 1st analysis method showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in CBV and CBF, and no significant increase in MTT and TTP. Use of the RV mode (2nd analysis method) showed no statistically reliable change of perfusion parameters in the microcirculatory blood flow of the 2nd zone. Maintenance of microcirculatory blood flow perfusion reflects the preservation of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with CSDH. PMID:27526170

  3. Intravascular Perfusion of Carbon Black Ink Allows Reliable Visualization of Cerebral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes1 (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with2 or without3 carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen3. Maeda et al.2 have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound4. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner5. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion5. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries. PMID:23328838

  4. Model of local temperature changes in brain upon functional activation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christopher M; Smith, Michael B; Turner, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Experimental results for changes in brain temperature during functional activation show large variations. It is, therefore, desirable to develop a careful numerical model for such changes. Here, a three-dimensional model of temperature in the human head using the bioheat equation, which includes effects of metabolism, perfusion, and thermal conduction, is employed to examine potential temperature changes due to functional activation in brain. It is found that, depending on location in brain and corresponding baseline temperature relative to blood temperature, temperature may increase or decrease on activation and concomitant increases in perfusion and rate of metabolism. Changes in perfusion are generally seen to have a greater effect on temperature than are changes in metabolism, and hence active brain is predicted to approach blood temperature from its initial temperature. All calculated changes in temperature for reasonable physiological parameters have magnitudes <0.12 degrees C and are well within the range reported in recent experimental studies involving human subjects.

  5. Altered Brain Response to Drinking Glucose and Fructose in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Sinha, Rajita; Arora, Jagriti; Giannini, Cosimo; Kubat, Jessica; Malik, Saima; Van Name, Michelle A; Santoro, Nicola; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira J; Pierpont, Bridget; Cline, Gary; Constable, R Todd; Sherwin, Robert S; Caprio, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Increased sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been linked to higher rates of obesity. Using functional MRI, we assessed brain perfusion responses to drinking two commonly consumed monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, in obese and lean adolescents. Marked differences were observed. In response to drinking glucose, obese adolescents exhibited decreased brain perfusion in brain regions involved in executive function (prefrontal cortex [PFC]) and increased perfusion in homeostatic appetite regions of the brain (hypothalamus). Conversely, in response to drinking glucose, lean adolescents demonstrated increased PFC brain perfusion and no change in perfusion in the hypothalamus. In addition, obese adolescents demonstrated attenuated suppression of serum acyl-ghrelin and increased circulating insulin level after glucose ingestion; furthermore, the change in acyl-ghrelin and insulin levels after both glucose and fructose ingestion was associated with increased hypothalamic, thalamic, and hippocampal blood flow in obese relative to lean adolescents. Additionally, in all subjects there was greater perfusion in the ventral striatum with fructose relative to glucose ingestion. Finally, reduced connectivity between executive, homeostatic, and hedonic brain regions was observed in obese adolescents. These data demonstrate that obese adolescents have impaired prefrontal executive control responses to drinking glucose and fructose, while their homeostatic and hedonic responses appear to be heightened. Thus, obesity-related brain adaptations to glucose and fructose consumption in obese adolescents may contribute to excessive consumption of glucose and fructose, thereby promoting further weight gain. PMID:27207544

  6. [Absorption of amino acids from the perfused ovine rumen].

    PubMed

    L' Leng; Tomás, J; Várady, J; Szányiová, M

    1978-06-01

    The experiments with extracoroporeal perfusion of sheep rumen were performed [Leng et al., 1977]. Bovine plasma, diluted in a 1:1ratio with an isotonic solution of sodium chloride, was used for four perfusions, and autologous blood was used for two perfusions in the course of 150 minutes. After 60 minutes perfusion 20 g enzymatic casein hydrolyzate were applied to the rumen. The levels of free amino acids in the perfusate were recorded after 60 minutes' perfusion [the first phase of perfusion] and at the end of the experiment [the second phase]. The levels of lysine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid increased after perfusions with bovine plasma during the first phase, the levels of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and in one case of alanine, increased after perfusions with autologus blood. Simultaneously the level of valine decreased after perfusions with bovine plasma, and after perfusions with blood the levels of arginine and valine, and/or lysine, dropped. During the second phase of perfusion, the levels of all the observed amino acids except methionine [bovine plasma], and/or orginine and methionine [blood] rose in the perfusate. The experiments showed that the level of amino acids in the rumen content presented a decisive factor affecting amino acid absorption from the rumen into the blood. Transformation of the amino acids during their passage through the remen wall may be assumed, and glutamic acid is one of the chief products of this process.

  7. The Cadaveric Perfusion and Angiography as a Teaching Tool: Imaging the Intracranial Vasculature in Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  8. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  9. Is the Cerebellum the Optimal Reference Region for Intensity Normalization of Perfusion MR Studies in Early Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization. PMID:24386081

  10. Is the cerebellum the optimal reference region for intensity normalization of perfusion MR studies in early Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan Adán; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Olazarán, Javier; Mateos-Pérez, José María; Martino, María Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum is the region most commonly used as a reference when normalizing the intensity of perfusion images acquired using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. In addition, the cerebellum provides unbiased estimations with nuclear medicine techniques. However, no reports confirm the cerebellum as an optimal reference region in MRI studies or evaluate the consequences of using different normalization regions. In this study, we address the effect of using the cerebellum, whole-brain white matter, and whole-brain cortical gray matter in the normalization of cerebral blood flow (CBF) parametric maps by comparing patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI), patients with AD and healthy controls. According to our results, normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter enables more sensitive detection of perfusion abnormalities in AD patients and reveals a larger number of affected regions than data normalized by the cerebellum or whole-brain white matter. Therefore, the cerebellum is not the most valid reference region in MRI studies for early stages of AD. After normalization by whole-brain cortical gray matter, we found a significant decrease in CBF in both parietal lobes and an increase in CBF in the right medial temporal lobe. We found no differences in perfusion between patients with stable MCI and healthy controls either before or after normalization.

  11. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  12. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  13. Perfusion safety: new initiatives and enduring principles.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, M

    2011-09-01

    Perfusion safety has been studied and discussed extensively for decades. Many initiatives occurred through efforts of professional organizations to achieve recognition, establish accreditation and certification, promote consensus practice guidelines, and develop peer-reviewed journals as sources for dissemination of clinical information. Newer initiatives have their basis in other disciplines and include systems approach, Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement processes, error recognition, evidence-based methodologies, registries, equipment automation, simulation, and the Internet. Use of previously established resources such as written protocols, checklists, safety devices, and enhanced communication skills has persisted to the present in promoting perfusion safety and has reduced current complication rates to negligible levels.

  14. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  15. [Design of the Rolling Type Nasal Feeding Perfusion Apparatus].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Yang, Yonghuan; Hu, Huiqin; Luo, Hongjun; Feng, Yunhao; Hao, Xiali

    2015-09-01

    At present, the existing problem in nasal feeding perfusion apparatus is laborious and instability. Designing the rolling type perfusion apparatus by using a roller pump, the problem is solved. Compared with the traditional perfusion apparatus, the advantage lies in liquid carrying only need once and simulating human swallowing process. Through testing and verification, the apparatus can be used in nasal feeding perfusion for elderly or patients.

  16. Arterial spin labeling-fast imaging with steady-state free precession (ASL-FISP): a rapid and quantitative perfusion technique for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L; Erokwu, Bernadette O; Farr, George W; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2014-08-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either echo-planar imaging (EPI) or true fast imaging with steady-state free precession (true FISP) readouts, which are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high-field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high-field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 s. In this initial implementation, a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 and 9.4 T (249 ± 38 and 241 ± 17 mL/min/100 g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in the detection of significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high-field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts.

  17. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  18. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions.

  19. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-05-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed.

  20. Role of hypothermic machine perfusion in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Andrea; Dutkowski, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Machine liver perfusion has significantly evolved during the last ten years to optimize extended criteria liver grafts and to address the worldwide organ shortage. This review gives an overview on available ex vivo and in vivo data on hypothermic machine liver perfusion. We discuss also possible protective pathways and show most recent clinical applications of hypothermic machine liver perfusion in human.

  1. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  2. N-isopropyl-(/sup 123/I)p-iodoamphetamine: single-pass brain uptake and washout; binding to brain synaptosomes; and localization in dog and monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Winchell, H.S.; Horst, W.D.; Braun, L.; Oldendorf, W.H.; Hattner, R.; Parker, H.

    1980-10-01

    The kinetics of N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine in rat brains were determined by serial measurements of brain uptake index (BUI) after intracarotid injection; also studied were its effects on amine uptake and release in rat's brain cortical synaptosomes; and its in vivo distribution in the dog and monkey. No specific localization in brain nuclei of the dog was seen, but there was progressive accumulation in the eyes. Rapid initial brain uptake in the ketamine-sedated monkey was noted, and further slow brain uptake occurred during the next 20 min but without retinal localization. High levels of brain activity were maintained for several hours. The quantitative initial single-pass clearance of the agent in the brain suggests its use in evaluation of regional brain perfusion. Its interaction with brain amine-binding sites suggests its possible application in studies of cerebral amine metabolism.

  3. SU-E-QI-06: Design and Initial Validation of a Precise Capillary Phantom to Test Perfusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R; Iacobucci, G; Khobragade, P; Ying, L; Snyder, K; Wack, D; Rudin, S; Ionita, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a precise perfusion phantom mimicking capillaries of the brain vasculature which could be used to test various perfusion protocols and algorithms which generate perfusion maps. Methods: A perfusion phantom was designed in Solidworks and built using additive manufacturing. The phantom was an overall cylindrical shape of diameter and height 20mm and containing capillaries of 200μm or 300μm which were parallel and in contact making up the inside volume where flow was allowed. We created a flow loop using a peristaltic pump and contrast agent was injected manually. Digital Subtraction Angiographic images and low contrast images with cone beam CT were acquired after the contrast was injected. These images were analyzed by our own code in LabVIEW software and Time-Density Curve, MTT and TTP was calculated. Results: Perfused area was visible in the cone beam CT images; however, individual capillaries were not distinguishable. The Time-Density Curve acquired was accurate, sensitive and repeatable. The parameters MTT, and TTP offered by the phantom were very sensitive to slight changes in the TDC shape. Conclusion: We have created a robust calibrating model for evaluation of existing perfusion data analysis systems. This approach is extremely sensitive to changes in the flow due to the high temporal resolution and could be used as a golden standard to assist developers in calibrating and testing of imaging perfusion systems and software algorithms. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  4. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  5. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  6. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  7. The impact of age on cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Braz, Igor D; Fisher, James P

    2016-08-15

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for dementia and stroke. Examination of the cerebral circulatory responses to acute exercise in the elderly may help to pinpoint the mechanisms by which exercise training can reduce the risk of brain diseases, inform the optimization of exercise training programmes and assist with the identification of age-related alterations in cerebral vascular function. During low-to-moderate intensity dynamic exercise, enhanced neuronal activity is accompanied by cerebral perfusion increases of ∼10-30%. Beyond ∼60-70% maximal oxygen uptake, cerebral metabolism remains elevated but perfusion in the anterior portion of the circulation returns towards baseline, substantively because of a hyperventilation-mediated reduction in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P aC O2) and cerebral vasoconstriction. Cerebral perfusion is lower in older individuals, both at rest and during incremental dynamic exercise. Nevertheless, the increase in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and the arterial-internal jugular venous differences for glucose and lactate are similar in young and older individuals exercising at the same relative exercise intensities. Correction for the age-related reduction in P aC O2 during exercise by the provision of supplementary CO2 is suggested to remove ∼50% of the difference in cerebral perfusion between young and older individuals. A multitude of candidates could account for the remaining difference, including cerebral atrophy, and enhanced vasoconstrictor and blunted vasodilatory pathways. In summary, age-related reductions in cerebral perfusion during exercise are partly associated with a lower P aC O2 in exercising older individuals; nevertheless the cerebral extraction of glucose, lactate and oxygen appear to be preserved. PMID:26435295

  8. [A case report of mirror writing with low perfusion of bilateral anterior cerebral arteries].

    PubMed

    Shimamura, N; Sekiya, T; Ohkuma, H; Tabata, H; Yagihashi, A; Suzuki, S

    2001-06-01

    A 20-year-old female experienced temporary unintentional mirror writing associated with low perfusion of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries. When she was 17 years old, she had developed multiple idiopathic intracerebral hemorrhages and right hemiparesis. At the age of 20, she had a generalized convulsion for which she was transferred to our department. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images of the brain were obtained, but no fresh abnormal lesion could be detected. The following day, after she had recovered from postictal symptoms, she wrote mirror image words, and her mirror writing then gradually improved within one week. Single photon emission CT showed low perfusion of both anterior cerebral arteries. We concluded that bilateral vascular insufficiency to the supplementary motor areas and corpus callosum caused mirror writing in this case.

  9. Comparing Normothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation With Different Perfusates on Porcine Livers From Donors After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Nassar, A; Farias, K; Buccini, L; Mangino, M J; Baldwin, W; Bennett, A; O'Rourke, C; Iuppa, G; Soliman, B G; Urcuyo-Llanes, D; Okamoto, T; Uso, T D; Fung, J; Abu-Elmagd, K; Miller, C; Quintini, C

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) may be an effective strategy to resuscitate livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD). There is no consensus regarding the efficacy of different perfusates on graft and bile duct viability. The aim of this study was to compare, in an NMP porcine DCD model, the preservation potential of three different perfusates. Twenty porcine livers with 60 min of warm ischemia were separated into four preservation groups: cold storage (CS), NMP with Steen solution (Steen; XVIVO Perfusion Inc., Denver, CO), Steen plus red blood cells (RBCs), or whole blood (WB). All livers were preserved for 10 h and reperfused to simulate transplantation for 24 h. During preservation, the NMP with Steen group presented the highest hepatocellular injury. At reperfusion, the CS group had the lowest bile production and the worst hepatocellular injury compared with all other groups, followed by NMP with Steen; the Steen plus RBC and WB groups presented the best functional and hepatocellular injury outcomes, with WB livers showing lower aspartate aminotransferase release and a trend toward better results for most parameters. Based on our results, a perfusate that contains an oxygen carrier is most effective in a model of NMP porcine DCD livers compared with Steen solution. Specifically, WB-perfused livers showed a trend toward better outcomes compared with Steen plus RBCs. PMID:26663737

  10. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  11. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  12. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  13. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  14. Hyperosmolar opening of the blood-brain barrier in the energy-depleted rat brain. Part 1. Permeability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.; Luthert, P.J.; Pratt, O.E.; Lantos, P.L.

    1988-02-01

    A simple saline perfusion system was used to investigate the effects of hyperosmolar solutions of arabinose and mannitol upon the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. The small, polar molecule (/sup 14/C)mannitol and the larger, visual marker Evans blue were used as indicators of barrier integrity in the perfused energy-depleted brain. One-minute perfusion of hyperosmolar solutions consistently opened the barrier suggesting that the mechanism of osmotic barrier opening is independent of energy-producing metabolism. The accumulation of radiolabel in the brain was expressed as the ratio of tissue to perfusate radioactivity (Rt/Rp) and, for cerebrum, this increased from a control value of 0.0022 +/- 0.0007 (mean +/- SEM; n = 4) to a value of 0.0124 +/- 0.0008 (n = 4) following 0.9 M arabinose and to 0.0495 +/- 0.0072 (n = 4) following 1.8 M arabinose. There was a significant reduction of water content of hyperosmolar perfused brains. These findings support the hypothesis that osmotic barrier opening is the result of the passive shrinkage of endothelial cells and the surrounding tissue.

  15. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  16. Luminal perfusion of isolated gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S J; Geibel, J; Boron, W F; Modlin, I M

    1994-04-01

    We have extended to rabbit gastric glands the technique for perfusing single isolated renal tubules. We isolated glands by hand dissection and used concentric glass pipettes to hold them and perfuse their lumina. Parietal cells (PCs), which tended to be located toward the gland opening, were identified by their pyramidal shape, large size, and autofluorescence. Chief cells (CCs) were identified by their round shape and smaller size. In some experiments, we perfused the lumen with hydroxypyrenetrisulfonate, a pH-sensitive fluorophore, at pH 7.4 and used digital image processing to monitor luminal pH (pH1). Solutions were buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid to pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. With fast perfusion, we found no evidence of decreased pH1, even with stimulation by 10 microM carbachol. With slow perfusion, pH1 often fell below the dye's sensitive range (pH < 5), especially at low perfusate buffering power. In other experiments, we loaded cells with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and monitored intracellular pH (pHi) in multiple individual PCs and CCs in a single gland. Mean pHi was 7.21 +/- 0.02 (n = 136 cells) for PCs and 7.27 +/- 0.03 (n = 103) for CCs. To examine the response to decreased pH1 and basolateral pH (pHb), we lowered pHb to 6.4 or lowered pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4. Lowering pHb to 6.4 for approximately 1 min caused pHi to fall reversibly by 0.39 +/- 0.05 (n = 53) in PCs and 0.58 +/- 0.03 (n = 50) in CCs. Lowering pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4 caused no significant pHi changes in PCs (n = 38 and 82) or in CCs (n = 44 and 77). Carbachol did not affect the response to changes in pH1 or pHb. We conclude that the apical surfaces of PCs and CCs are unusually resistant to extreme pH gradients.

  17. Radioimmunoassay of met-enkephalin in microdissected areas of paraformaldehyde-fixed rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, F.M.A.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1984-02-27

    The effects were studied of various sample preparation procedures on rat brain met-enkephalin content, measured by radioimmunoassay. Whole brain met-enkephalin content of rats killed by decapitation followed by immediate tissue freezing was similar to that of rats killed by microwave irradiation and to those of rats anesthetized with pentobarbital or halothane before killing, whether previously perfused with paraformaldehyde or not. In contrast, a decrease (up to 80%) in met-enkephalin concentrations was observed when brain samples were frozen and thawed to mimic the procedure utilized in the ''punch'' technique for analysis of discrete brain nuclei. This decrease was totally prevented by paraformaldehyde perfusion of the brain prior to sacrifice. Brain perfusion did not alter the amount of immunoassayable met-enkephalin extracted from tissue or its profile after Sephadex chromatography. Paraformaldehyde perfusion results in better morphological tissue preservation and facilitates the ''punch'' dissecting technique. Paraformaldehyde perfusion may be the procedure of choice for the measurement of neuropeptides in specific brain nuclei dissected by the ''punch'' technique.

  18. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and optimization of cerebral oxygenation. In this review, the critical care management of severe TBI will be discussed with focus on monitoring, avoidance and minimization of secondary brain insults, and optimization of cerebral oxygenation and CPP. PMID:22304785

  19. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  20. Cerebral Perfusion Enhancing Interventions: A New Strategy for the Prevention of Alzheimer Dementia.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are major risk factors in the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). These cardio-cerebral disorders promote a variety of vascular risk factors which in the presence of advancing age are prone to markedly reduce cerebral perfusion and create a neuronal energy crisis. Long-term hypoperfusion of the brain evolves mainly from cardiac structural pathology and brain vascular insufficiency. Brain hypoperfusion in the elderly is strongly associated with the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and both conditions are presumed to be precursors of Alzheimer dementia. A therapeutic target to prevent or treat MCI and consequently reduce the incidence of AD aims to elevate cerebral perfusion using novel pharmacological agents. As reviewed here, the experimental pharmaca include the use of Rho kinase inhibitors, neurometabolic energy boosters, sirtuins and vascular growth factors. In addition, a compelling new technique in laser medicine called photobiomodulation is reviewed. Photobiomodulation is based on the use of low level laser therapy to stimulate mitochondrial energy production non-invasively in nerve cells. The use of novel pharmaca and photobiomodulation may become important tools in the treatment or prevention of cognitive decline that can lead to dementia. PMID:27324946

  1. The evolution of perfusion education in America.

    PubMed

    Toomasian, John M; Searles, Bruce; Kurusz, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Clinical cardiopulmonary perfusion has evolved significantly during its 50 years. The science, technology and educational processes related to cardiopulmonary bypass have undergone continual change and metamorphosis. Perfusionists were initially trained on the job or in the laboratory, but with the advent of myocardial revascularization and the explosion in cardiac surgery, the need for formal educational training programs became apparent. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology began the arduous processes of credentialing and developing certification guidelines that have continued under the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. Licensure has also been adopted in many states during the past 10 years where nearly 50% of all perfusionists are covered by some legislative act. One additonal challenge has been developing minimal standards in which perfusionists practice. The initial standards included the use of a checklist and have evolved to monitoring and recording the significant events and parameters of each clinical procedure. The education of perfusionists will continue to be a challenge related primarily to reduced fiscal resources, the applicant pool and the ever-changing demands for extracorporeal circulation services. According to demographic and census information, it is expected the overall number of cardiovascular interventions will increase dramatically towards the latter end of the current decade in the US. The question arises as to what role perfusionists will play, as treatment strategies continue to change. If the number of education programs and new graduates continue to decline, the total number of perfusionists will decline, especially as many senior perfusionists leave the field or retire. It may be difficult to predict the total number of cardiovascular interventions that will be required in the next several years. However, if the total number of cardiovascular interventions that require perfusion services increase as a function

  2. Release of transmitters into the perfused third cerebral ventricle of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, Ruth; Holman, R. B.; Vogt, Marthe

    1973-01-01

    1. The third cerebral ventricle of cats treated with nialamide and anaesthetized with chloralose was perfused, and the effluent was tested for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and also for acetylcholine (ACh) when the perfusion fluid contained neostigmine. 2. Under `resting' conditions a 25 min sample of effluent contained from < 1 to 6 ng 5-HT; the release remained steady during many hours of perfusion. It was necessary to watch out for traces of blood which might contribute to the 5-HT content and which were only visible after centrifugation. 3. A number of regions in the ventral mid-brain and hind-brain were stimulated, including the two most anterior nuclei of the raphe, nucleus linearis rostralis and intermedius. Release of 5-HT (rarely more than 2 ng) was only obtained on stimulation of these two nuclei, whereas ACh was released by stimulating many points, such as the reticular formation or the decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncles, but not the two raphe nuclei. 4. Low frequencies of stimulation were more effective at releasing 5-HT, and high frequencies at releasing ACh. 5. Since the amount of 5-HT released on stimulation was rarely more than 2 ng, a powerful re-uptake process was suspected and confirmed by the use of chlorimipramine. Intravenous, intraperitoneal and intraventricular use of this drug temporarily increased the basal release to values ranging from 20 to 50 ng in 25 min samples, and about trebled the release on stimulation of either of the linear nuclei. 6. Intravenous administration of chlorimipramine (10 mg/kg) caused the disappearance of electrical responses evoked in the brain stem by afferent sensory stimuli. PMID:4759101

  3. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kwang Nam; De Cecco, Carlo N; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  4. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  5. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  6. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  7. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  8. Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging in acute stroke: assessment of cerebral perfusion deficits related to arterial recanalization.

    PubMed

    Bolognese, Manuel; Artemis, Dimitrios; Alonso, Angelika; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephan; Kern, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    We investigated whether real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) is able to detect perfusion changes related to arterial recanalization in the acute phase of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Twenty-four patients with acute territorial MCA stroke were examined with rt-UPI and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound (TCCD). Ultrasound studies were consecutively performed within 24 h and 72-96 h after stroke onset. Real-time UPI parameters of bolus kinetics (time to peak, rt-TTP) and of refill kinetics (plateau A and slope β of the exponential replenishment curve) were calculated from regions of interest of ischemic versus normal brain tissue; these parameters were compared between early and follow-up examinations in patients who recanalized. At the early examination, there was a delay of rt-TTP in patients with MCA occlusion (rt-TTP [s]: 13.09 ± 3.21 vs. 10.16 ± 2.6; p = 0.01) and a lower value of the refill parameter β (β [1/s]: 0.62 ± 0.34 vs. 1.09 ± 0.58; p = 0.01) in ischemic compared with normal brain tissue, whereas there were no differences of the parameters A and Axβ. At follow-up, the delay of rt-TTP was reversible once recanalization of an underlying MCA obstruction was demonstrated: rt-TTP [s], 13.09 ± 3.21 at 24 h versus 10.95 ± 1.5 at 72-96 h (p = 0.03). Correspondingly, β showed a higher slope than at the first examination: β [1/s]: 0.55 ± 0.29 at 24 h versus 0.71 ± 0.27 at 72-96 h (p = 0.04). We conclude that real-time UPI can detect hemodynamic impairment in acute MCA occlusion and subsequent improvement following arterial recanalization. This offers the chance for bedside monitoring of the hemodynamic compromise (e.g. during therapeutic interventions such as systemic thrombolysis).

  9. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler-Weber-Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted.

  10. Use of diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging as a tool in acute stroke clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Warach, Steven

    2001-01-01

    In light of the slow progress in developing effective therapies for ischemic stroke, magnetic resonance imaging techniques have emerged as new tools in stroke clinical trials. Rapid imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion imaging and angiography are being incorporated into phase II and phase III stroke trials to optimize patient selection based on positive imaging diagnosis of the ischemic pathophysiology specifically related to a drug's mechanism of action and as a direct biomarker of the effect of a treatment's effect on the brain. PMID:11806771

  11. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  12. A direct comparison of the sensitivity of CT and MR cardiac perfusion using a myocardial perfusion phantom

    PubMed Central

    Otton, James; Morton, Geraint; Schuster, Andreas; Bigalke, Boris; Marano, Riccardo; Olivotti, Luca; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct comparison of CT and magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion techniques has been limited and in vivo assessment is affected by physiological variability, timing of image acquisition, and parameter selection. Objective We precisely compared high-resolution k-t SENSE MR cardiac perfusion at 3 T with single-phase CT perfusion (CTP) under identical imaging conditions. Methods We used a customized MR imaging and CT compatible dynamic myocardial perfusion phantom to represent the human circulation. CT perfusion studies were performed with a Philips iCT (256 slice) CT, with isotropic resolution of 0.6 mm3. MR perfusion was performed with k-t SENSE acceleration at 3 T and spatial resolution of 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm. The image contrast between normal and underperfused myocardial compartments was quantified at various perfusion and photon energy settings. Noise estimates were based on published clinical data. Results Contrast by CTP highly depends on photon energy and also timing of imaging within the myocardial perfusion upslope. For an identical myocardial perfusion deficit, the native image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) generated by CT and MR are similar. If slice averaging is used, the CNR of a perfusion deficit is expected to be greater for CTP than MR perfusion (MRP). Perfect timing during single time point CTP imaging is difficult to achieve, and CNR by CT decreases by 24%–31% two seconds from the optimal imaging time point. Although single-phase CT perfusion offers higher spatial resolution, MRP allows multiple time point sampling and quantitative analysis. Conclusion The ability of CTP and current optimal MRP techniques to detect simulated myocardial perfusion deficits is similar. PMID:23622506

  13. Multimodal tissue perfusion imaging using multi-spectral and thermographic imaging systems applied on clinical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    Clinical interventions can cause changes in tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature. Real-time imaging of these phenomena could be useful for surgical strategy or understanding of physiological regulation mechanisms. Two noncontact imaging techniques were applied for imaging of large tissue areas: LED based multispectral imaging (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370 nm-880 nm) and thermal imaging (7.5 to 13.5 μm). Oxygenation concentration changes were calculated using different analyzing methods. The advantages of these methods are presented for stationary and dynamic applications. Concentration calculations of chromophores in tissue require right choices of wavelengths The effects of different wavelength choices for hemoglobin concentration calculations were studied in laboratory conditions and consequently applied in clinical studies. Corrections for interferences during the clinical registrations (ambient light fluctuations, tissue movements) were performed. The wavelength dependency of the algorithms were studied and wavelength sets with the best results will be presented. The multispectral and thermal imaging systems were applied during clinical intervention studies: reperfusion of tissue flap transplantation (ENT), effectiveness of local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery in patients with epileptic seizures. The LED multispectral imaging system successfully imaged the perfusion and oxygenation changes during clinical interventions. The thermal images show local heat distributions over tissue areas as a result of changes in tissue perfusion. Multispectral imaging and thermal imaging provide complementary information and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics of physiological processes in medicine.

  14. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  15. Developing a benchmarking process in perfusion: a report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert A; Newland, Richard F; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W; Merry, Alan F

    2012-03-01

    Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCOz management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose > or =4 mmol/L and < or =10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature < or = 37 degrees C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 > or =35 and < or =45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37-96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16-98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21-91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice.

  16. Effect of vasodilators on pulmonary perfusion defects in asthma using sequential Kr-81m perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ertle, A.R.; Tashkin, D.P.; Webber, M.M.; Soffer, M.J.; Frank, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to determine if vasodilator agents may enhance the diagnostic utility of perfusion lung imaging (Q) by normalizing regional perfusion abnormalities in bronchospastic patients. The effect of oxygen (02), nitroglycerine (NTG), hydralazine (H), and nifedipine (N) on regional lung perfusion defects was studied in 6 mild to severe asthmatics (ages defects was studied in 6 mild to severe asthmatics (ages 31-72yrs) using sequential Kr-81m imaging which permits repetitive imaging due to very low radiation dose and 13 sec T-1/2. Each patient was studied once weekly for 3 wks. Baseline Q scans were obtained using 10mCi of I.V. Kr-81m. the best view showing perfusion defects was used for subsequent images. At each visits, 30% 02 by ventimask was given for 20 min followed by a repeat Q scan. Subsequently, on separate visits, subjects were given either 1 dose of sublingual (sl)N 20 mg or 2 doses (1 hr between) of s1 NTG 1/150gr or po H 25mg according to a random-order crossover design. Q scans were obtained 2 min after NTG, 60 min after H, and 30 and 60 min after N. 30% 02 was given again for 20 min, and a final scan was obtained. Scan were reviewed by 2 observers and showed relatively fixed defects in 4 pts improvement in defects in 3 pts with NTG, 1 with N, 1 with H, and 2 with 02 alone. Additive effects of 02 and N or NTG were seen in 2 pts. These preliminary results suggest that vasodilators and 02 may improve regional perfusion in patients with bronchospastic disease and that this effect may be additive. These medications may thus improve the specificity of perfusion lung scanning in the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary embolism.

  17. Aquaporin-4 and traumatic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Su, Wei; Xu, Qiu-ping

    2010-04-01

    Brain edema leading to an expansion of brain volume has a crucial impact on morbidity and mortality following traumatic brain injury as it increases intracranial pressure, impairs cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, and contributes to additional ischemic injuries. Classically, two major types of traumatic brain edema exist: "vasogenic" and "cytotoxic/cellular". However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to the development/resolution of traumatic brain edema are poorly understood and no effective drugs can be used now. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is a water-channel protein expressed strongly in the brain, predominantly in astrocyte foot processes at the borders between the brain parenchyma and major fluid compartments, including cerebrospinal fluid and blood. This distribution suggests that AQP4 controls water fluxes into and out of the brain parenchyma. In cytotoxic edema, AQP4 deletion slows the rate of water entry into brain, whereas in vasogenic edema, AQP4 deletion reduces the rate of water outflow from brain parenchyma. AQP4 has been proposed as a novel drug target in brain edema. These findings suggest that modulation of AQP4 expression or function may be beneficial in traumatic brain edema.

  18. A method of thymic perfusion and its evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, O.

    1973-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a method of isolated ex vivo perfusion of the rabbit thymus using diluted autologous blood is described. The data indicate that the viability of the preparation is maintained at a satisfactory level during the period of perfusion. These results suggest that the isolated perfused thymus would be a useful new approach to studies of thymus function. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4747584

  19. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  20. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  1. Measurement of continuous distributions of ventilation-perfusion ratios - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; Saltzman, H. A.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    The resolution of the technique considered is sufficient to describe smooth distributions containing blood flow to unventilated regions (shunt), ventilation to unperfused regions (dead space), and up to three additional modes over the range of finite ventilation-perfusion ratios. In particular, areas whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are low can be separated from unventilated regions and those whose ventilation-perfusion ratios are high can similarly be distinguished from unperfused areas.

  2. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time

    PubMed Central

    Präbst, K.; Beier, J. P.; Meyer, A.; Horch, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery. PMID:27200244

  3. Effect of Defocused CO2 Laser on Equine Tissue Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, A; Nyman, G; Lundeberg, T; Drevemo, S

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with defocused CO2 laser can have a therapeutic effect on equine injuries, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. A recent study has shown that laser causes an increase in equine superficial tissue temperature, which may result in an increase in blood perfusion and a stimulating effect on tissue regeneration. However, no studies have described the effects on equine tissue perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of defocused CO2 laser on blood perfusion and to correlate it with temperature in skin and underlying muscle in anaesthetized horses. Differences between clipped and unclipped haircoat were also assessed. Eight horses and two controls received CO2 laser treatment (91 J/cm2) in a randomised order, on a clipped and unclipped area of the hamstring muscles, respectively. The significant increase in clipped skin perfusion and temperature was on average 146.3 ± 33.4 perfusion units (334%) and 5.5 ± 1.5°C, respectively. The significant increase in perfusion and temperature in unclipped skin were 80.6 ± 20.4 perfusion units (264%) and 4.8 ± 1.4°C. No significant changes were seen in muscle perfusion or temperature. In conclusion, treatment with defocused CO2 laser causes a significant increase in skin perfusion, which is correlated to an increase in skin temperature. PMID:16722304

  4. Radionuclide Tracers for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Blood Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is performed most commonly using Tc-99m-sestamibi or tetrofosmin SPECT as well as Rb-82-rubidium or N-13-ammonia PET. Diseased-to-normal tissue contrast is determined by the tracer retention fraction, which decreases nonlinearly with flow. Reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced tracer retention, but the severity of perfusion defects is typically underestimated by 20% to 40%. Compared to SPECT, retention of the PET tracers is more linearly related to flow, and therefore, the perfusion defects are measured more accurately using N-13-ammonia or Rb-82. PMID:26590778

  5. Ex Situ Normothermic Machine Perfusion of Donor Livers.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Negin; Matton, Alix P M; Westerkamp, Andrie C; Burlage, Laura C; Op den Dries, Sanna; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Lisman, Ton; Uygun, Korkut; Markmann, James F; Porte, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to conventional static cold preservation (0-4 °C), ex situ machine perfusion may provide better preservation of donor livers. Continuous perfusion of organs provides the opportunity to improve organ quality and allows ex situ viability assessment of donor livers prior to transplantation. This video article provides a step by step protocol for ex situ normothermic machine perfusion (37 °C) of human donor livers using a device that provides a pressure and temperature controlled pulsatile perfusion of the hepatic artery and continuous perfusion of the portal vein. The perfusion fluid is oxygenated by two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators and the temperature can be regulated between 10 °C and 37 °C. During perfusion, the metabolic activity of the liver as well as the degree of injury can be assessed by biochemical analysis of samples taken from the perfusion fluid. Machine perfusion is a very promising tool to increase the number of livers that are suitable for transplantation.

  6. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  7. Pericytes control key neurovascular functions and neuronal phenotype in the adult brain and during brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Robert D.; Winkler, Ethan A.; Sagare, Abhay P.; Singh, Itender; LaRue, Barb; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Pericytes play a key role in the development of cerebral microcirculation. The exact role of pericytes in the neurovascular unit in the adult brain and during brain aging remains, however, elusive. Using adult viable pericyte-deficient mice, we show that pericyte loss leads to brain vascular damage by two parallel pathways: (1) reduction in brain microcirculation causing diminished brain capillary perfusion, cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood flow responses to brain activation which ultimately mediates chronic perfusion stress and hypoxia, and (2) blood-brain barrier breakdown associated with brain accumulation of serum proteins and several vasculotoxic and/or neurotoxic macromolecules ultimately leading to secondary neuronal degenerative changes. We show that age-dependent vascular damage in pericyte-deficient mice precedes neuronal degenerative changes, learning and memory impairment and the neuroinflammatory response. Thus, pericytes control key neurovascular functions that are necessary for proper neuronal structure and function, and pericytes loss results in a progressive age-dependent vascular-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:21040844

  8. Applications of arterial spin labeled MRI in the brain.

    PubMed

    Detre, John A; Rao, Hengyi; Wang, Danny J J; Chen, Yu Fen; Wang, Ze

    2012-05-01

    Perfusion provides oxygen and nutrients to tissues and is closely tied to tissue function while disorders of perfusion are major sources of medical morbidity and mortality. It has been almost two decades since the use of arterial spin labeling (ASL) for noninvasive perfusion imaging was first reported. While initial ASL magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies focused primarily on technological development and validation, a number of robust ASL implementations have emerged, and ASL MRI is now also available commercially on several platforms. As a result, basic science and clinical applications of ASL MRI have begun to proliferate. Although ASL MRI can be carried out in any organ, most studies to date have focused on the brain. This review covers selected research and clinical applications of ASL MRI in the brain to illustrate its potential in both neuroscience research and clinical care.

  9. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  10. Facing contrast-enhancing gliomas: perfusion MRI in grade III and grade IV gliomas according to tumor area.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Bergsland, Niels; Berzero, Giulia; Farina, Lisa; Rognone, Elisa; Gastaldi, Matteo; Aquino, Domenico; Frati, Alessandro; Tomasello, Francesco; Ceroni, Mauro; Marchioni, Enrico; Bastianello, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Tumoral neoangiogenesis characterizes high grade gliomas. Relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV), calculated with Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) Perfusion-Weighted Imaging (PWI), allows for the estimation of vascular density over the tumor bed. The aim of the study was to characterize putative tumoral neoangiogenesis via the study of maximal rCBV with a Region of Interest (ROI) approach in three tumor areas-the contrast-enhancing area, the nonenhancing tumor, and the high perfusion area on CBV map-in patients affected by contrast-enhancing glioma (grades III and IV). Twenty-one patients were included: 15 were affected by grade IV and 6 by grade III glioma. Maximal rCBV values for each patient were averaged according to glioma grade. Although rCBV from contrast-enhancement and from nonenhancing tumor areas was higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (5.58 and 2.68; 3.01 and 2.2, resp.), the differences were not significant. Instead, rCBV recorded in the high perfusion area on CBV map, independently of tumor compartment, was significantly higher in grade IV glioma than in grade III (7.51 versus 3.78, P = 0.036). In conclusion, neoangiogenesis encompasses different tumor compartments and CBV maps appear capable of best characterizing the degree of neovascularization. Facing contrast-enhancing brain tumors, areas of high perfusion on CBV maps should be considered as the reference areas to be targeted for glioma grading.

  11. A mismatch between the abnormalities in diffusion- and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may represent an acute ischemic penumbra with misery perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Masayuki; Okuchi, Kazuo; Iwamura, Asami; Taoka, Toshiaki; Siesjö, Bo K

    2013-11-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has recently attracted attention for its ability to investigate acute stroke pathophysiology. SWI detects an increased ratio of deoxyhemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin in cerebral venous compartments, which can illustrate cerebral misery perfusion with a compensatory increase of oxygen extraction fraction in the hypoperfused brain. In this study we make the first case report of blunt cervical trauma leading to a stroke, demonstrating the disparity between diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and SWI changes, or DWI-SWI mismatch, in the acute ischemic brain. The area of mismatch between a smaller DWI cytotoxic edema and a larger SWI misery perfusion in our patient matured into a complete infarction with time. The DWI-SWI mismatch may signify the presence of an ischemic penumbra, and provide information about viability of the brain tissue at risk of potential infarction if without early reperfusion.

  12. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  13. Feasibility of Using Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion in a Geriatric Population at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Forsberg, Lars; Aspelund, Thor; van der Geest, Rob J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Osch, Matthias J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) perfusion in a geriatric population at 1.5-Tesla. Materials and Methods In 17 participants (mean age 78.8±1.63 years) we assessed; 1) inter-session repeatability and reliability of resting state perfusion in 27 brain regions; 2) brain activation using finger-tapping as a means to evaluate the ability to detect flow differences; 3) reliability by comparing cerebral blood flow (CBF) with pCASL to CBF with phase contrast (PC-MR). Results The CBF (mean±standard deviation (SD)) for the whole brain grey matter (GM) was 40.6±8.4 and 41.4±8.7 ml/100g/min for the first and second scan respectively. The within-subject standard deviation (SDw), the repeatability index (RI) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) across the 27 regions ranged from 1.1 to 7.9, 2.2 to 15.5 and 0.35 to 0.98 respectively. For whole brain GM the SDw, RI and ICC were 1.6, 3.2 and 0.96 respectively. The between-subject standard deviation (SDB) was larger than the SDw for all regions. Comparison of CBF at rest and activation on a voxel level showed significantly higher perfusion during finger tapping in the motor- and somatosensory regions. The mean CBF for whole brain GM was 40.6±8.4 ml/100g/min at rest and 42.6±8.6 ml/100g/min during activation. Finally the reliability of pCASL against the reference standard of PC-MR was high (ICC = 0.80). The mean CBF for whole brain measured with PC-MRI was 54.3±10.1 ml/100g/min and 38.3±7.8 ml/100g/min with pCASL. Conclusions The results demonstrate moderate to high levels of repeatability and reliability for most brain regions, comparable to what has been reported for younger populations. The performance of pCASL at 1.5-Tesla shows that region-specific perfusion measurements with this technique are feasible in studies of a geriatric population. PMID:26659363

  14. Longitudinal Cerebral Perfusion Change in Transient Global Amnesia Related to Left Posterior Medial Network Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, Young Ho; Park, So Young; Wang, Min Jeong; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Chun, In KooK; Yang, Youngsoon; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of transient global amnesia (TGA) is not fully understood. Previous studies using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have reported inconclusive results regarding cerebral perfusion. This study was conducted to identify the patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in TGA patients via longitudinal SPECT analysis. An association between the observed SPECT patterns and a pathophysiological mechanism was considered. Methods Based on the TGA registry database of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 22 TGA patients were retrospectively identified. The subjects underwent initial Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT within 4 days of an amnestic event and underwent follow-up scans approximately 6 months later. The difference in ECD uptake between the two scans was measured via voxel-based whole brain analysis, and the quantified ECD uptake was tested using a paired t-test. Results The TGA patients had significantly decreased cerebral perfusion at the left precuneus (P<0.001, uncorrected) and at the left superior parietal and inferior temporal gyrus according to the voxel-based whole brain analysis (P<0.005, uncorrected). A difference in the quantified ECD uptake between the 2 scans was also found at the left precuneus among the 62 cortical volumes of interest (P = 0.018, Cohen’s d = -0.25). Conclusion We identified left hemispheric lateralized hypoperfusion that may be related to posterior medial network disruption. These findings may be a contributing factor to the pathophysiology of TGA. PMID:26690067

  15. An arterially perfused nose-olfactory bulb preparation of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Stanić, Davor; Farmer, David; Dutschmann, Mathias; Egger, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    A main feature of the mammalian olfactory bulb network is the presence of various rhythmic activities, in particular, gamma, beta, and theta oscillations, with the latter coupled to the respiratory rhythm. Interactions between those oscillations as well as the spatial distribution of network activation are likely to determine olfactory coding. Here, we describe a novel semi-intact perfused nose-olfactory bulb-brain stem preparation in rats with both a preserved olfactory epithelium and brain stem, which could be particularly suitable for the study of oscillatory activity and spatial odor mapping within the olfactory bulb, in particular, in hitherto inaccessible locations. In the perfused olfactory bulb, we observed robust spontaneous oscillations, mostly in the theta range. Odor application resulted in an increase in oscillatory power in higher frequency ranges, stimulus-locked local field potentials, and excitation or inhibition of individual bulbar neurons, similar to odor responses reported from in vivo recordings. Thus our method constitutes the first viable in situ preparation of a mammalian system that uses airborne odor stimuli and preserves these characteristic features of odor processing. This preparation will allow the use of highly invasive experimental procedures and the application of techniques such as patch-clamp recording, high-resolution imaging, and optogenetics within the entire olfactory bulb. PMID:26108959

  16. An arterially perfused nose-olfactory bulb preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Pérez de los Cobos Pallarés, Fernando; Stanić, Davor; Farmer, David; Dutschmann, Mathias; Egger, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    A main feature of the mammalian olfactory bulb network is the presence of various rhythmic activities, in particular, gamma, beta, and theta oscillations, with the latter coupled to the respiratory rhythm. Interactions between those oscillations as well as the spatial distribution of network activation are likely to determine olfactory coding. Here, we describe a novel semi-intact perfused nose-olfactory bulb-brain stem preparation in rats with both a preserved olfactory epithelium and brain stem, which could be particularly suitable for the study of oscillatory activity and spatial odor mapping within the olfactory bulb, in particular, in hitherto inaccessible locations. In the perfused olfactory bulb, we observed robust spontaneous oscillations, mostly in the theta range. Odor application resulted in an increase in oscillatory power in higher frequency ranges, stimulus-locked local field potentials, and excitation or inhibition of individual bulbar neurons, similar to odor responses reported from in vivo recordings. Thus our method constitutes the first viable in situ preparation of a mammalian system that uses airborne odor stimuli and preserves these characteristic features of odor processing. This preparation will allow the use of highly invasive experimental procedures and the application of techniques such as patch-clamp recording, high-resolution imaging, and optogenetics within the entire olfactory bulb.

  17. Cerebral Perfusion is Associated with White Matter Hyperintensities in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Garcia, Sarah L.; Narkhede, Atul; Griffith, Erica Y; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF) and believed to be the result of cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent brain changes including white matter hyperintensities (WMH). The current study examined the association between cerebral blood flow and WMH in HF patients and the relationship of WMH to cognitive impairment. Sixty-nine patients with HF completed the mini mental state examination (MMSE), echocardiogram, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multivariable hierarchical regression analyses controlling for medical and demographic characteristics as well as intracranial volume showed reduced cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery was associated with greater WMH (β = −.34, p = .02). Follow up regression analyses adjusting for the same medical and demographic factors in addition to cerebral perfusion also revealed marginal significance between increased WMH and poorer performance on the MMSE (β = −.26, p = .05). This study suggests that reduced cerebral perfusion is associated with greater WMH in older adults with HF. Our findings support the widely proposed mechanism of cognitive impairment in HF patients and prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:23517434

  18. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides.

  19. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  20. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  1. Motion compensation of ultrasonic perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Nylund, Kim; Gilja, Odd H.; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2012-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a rapid and inexpensive medical imaging technique to assess tissue perfusion with a high temporal resolution. It is composed of a sequence with ultrasound brightness values and a contrast sequence acquired simultaneously. However, the image acquisition is disturbed by various motion influences. Registration is needed to obtain reliable information of spatial correspondence and to analyze perfusion characteristics over time. We present an approach to register an ultrasonography sequence by using a feature label map. This label map is generated from the b-mode data sequence by a Markov-Random-Field (MRF) based analysis, where each location is assigned to one of the user-defined regions according to its statistical parameters. The MRF reduces the chance that outliers are represented in the label map and provides stable feature labels over the time frames. A registration consisting of rigid and non-rigid transformations is determined consecutively using the generated label map of the respective frames for similarity calculation. For evaluation, the standard deviation within specific regions in intestinal CEUS images has been measured before and after registration resulting in an average decrease of 8.6 %. Additionally, this technique has proven to be more robust against noise influence compared to similarity calculation based on image intensities only. The latter leads only to 7.6 % decrease of the standard deviation.

  2. A constant temperature perfusion system for myocardial energetics.

    PubMed

    Niesler, R A; Axon, D W; Eggert, M A

    1981-11-01

    A constant temperature perfusion system employing four heat exchangers has been developed in which perfusion fluid is heated from room temperature to 37 +/- 10 -4 degrees C for precision heat flow measurements on isolated working rat hearts. The temperature characteristics have been established and mathematical expressions developed to identify and quantify spurious thermal events. The system is a refinement of existing perfusion systems for metabolic and mechanical investigations which meets the complete requirements of myocardial energetics. It can also be used for experiments which include high precision temperature measurements on isolated working hearts or for thermal investigations on other isolated perfused organs where a highly stabilised temperature base line is required over perfusion flows from 0-100 cm3 min -1. PMID:7323145

  3. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  4. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  5. Predicting radiotherapy-induced cardiac perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Shiva K.; Baydush, Alan H.; Zhou Sumin; Miften, Moyed; Yu Xiaoli; Craciunescu, Oana; Oldham, Mark; Light, Kim; Wong, Terence; Blazing, Michael; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare the efficacy of mathematical models in predicting the occurrence of radiotherapy-induced left ventricular perfusion defects assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The basis of this study is data from 73 left-sided breast/chestwall patients treated with tangential photon fields. The mathematical models compared were three commonly used parametric models [Lyman normal tissue complication probability (LNTCP), relative serialty (RS), generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)] and a nonparametric model (Linear discriminant analysis--LDA). Data used by the models were the left ventricular dose--volume histograms, or SPECT-based dose-function histograms, and the presence/absence of SPECT perfusion defects 6 months postradiation therapy (21 patients developed defects). For the parametric models, maximum likelihood estimation and F-tests were used to fit the model parameters. The nonparametric LDA model step-wise selected features (volumes/function above dose levels) using a method based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to best separate the groups with and without defects. Optimistic (upper bound) and pessimistic (lower bound) estimates of each model's predictive capability were generated using ROC curves. A higher area under the ROC curve indicates a more accurate model (a model that is always accurate has area=1). The areas under these curves for different models were used to statistically test for differences between them. Pessimistic estimates of areas under the ROC curve using dose-volume histogram/dose-function histogram inputs, in order of increasing prediction accuracy, were LNTCP (0.79/0.75), RS (0.80/0.77), gEUD (0.81/0.78), and LDA (0.84/0.86). Only the LDA model benefited from SPECT-based regional functional information. In general, the LDA model was statistically superior to the parametric models. The LDA model selected as features the left ventricular volumes above

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues’ temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990’s. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. Applications to peripheral perfusion DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Review outline The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and

  7. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  8. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs. PMID:19166591

  9. Perfused human organs versus Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence

    2009-01-23

    Novel drugs have to go through mandatory pre-clinical testing before they can be approved for use in clinical trials. In essence, it is a form of bench-to-bedside (N2B) translational medicine, but the wastage rate of target candidates is immensely high. Effects seen in vitro often do not translate to in vivo human settings. The search is on for better models closer to human physiology to be used in pre-clinical drug screening. The Ex Vivo Metrics system has been introduced where a human organ is harvested and revitalized in a controlled environment suitable for testing of both drug efficacy and potential toxicity. This commentary expresses the author's views regarding this technology of perfused human organs.

  10. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  11. Measuring perfusion with light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    There is no gold standard test for perfusion evaluation in surgery. Optical Imaging techniques are able to image tissue at high resolution and in real-time. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield and Incident Darkfield all use the interaction of light with tissue to create an image. To test their feasibility and explore validity in a controlled setting, we created a phantom with the optical properties of tissue and microvascular channels of 30-400 micrometer. With a Hamilton Syringe Pump we mimicked blood flow velocities of 0-20 mm/sec. Images of all different modalities at different blood flow velocities were compared in terms of imaging depth, resoluation and hemodynamic parameters.

  12. Distal coronary artery perfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H V; Leimgruber, P P; Roubin, G S; Nelson, D L; Gruentzig, A R

    1985-10-01

    Perfusion of the coronary artery distal to an occluding angioplasty balloon was performed in 34 patients undergoing coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A randomized crossover study was employed using two exogenous substances as perfusates: lactated Ringer's solution (LR) and a fluorocarbon emulsion (FL), Fluosol-DA 20%. Both substances are electrolyte solutions, but the FL will dissolve more oxygen than the LR. During two attempted coronary artery occlusions of 90 seconds each, we perfused through the central lumen (guidewire channel) of the PTCA catheter at 60 ml/min. With FL perfusion the mean time to onset of angina after occlusion was delayed (41 +/- 21 vs 33 +/- 16 seconds, mean +/- SD; p less than 0.05), the mean duration of angina was shortened (77 +/- 58 vs 92 +/- 70 seconds, p less than 0.05), and the rise in the ST segment of the ECG was reduced (0.15 +/- 0.24 vs 0.2 +/- 0.23 mV, p less than 0.001) when compared to LR perfusion. Balloon occlusion time was able to be extended with FL perfusion (71 +/- 22 vs 59 +/- 22 seconds p less than 0.001). These results indicate that perfusion of the distal coronary artery is possible during PTCA and can reduce ischemia during a prolonged balloon occlusion time. PMID:2931968

  13. Ex vivo lung perfusion in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Braga, Karina Andrighetti de Oliveira; Nepomuceno, Natalia Aparecida; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) clinically to prepare donor lungs for transplantation. Methods: A prospective study involving EVLP for the reconditioning of extended-criteria donor lungs, the criteria for which include aspects such as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mmHg. Between February of 2013 and February of 2014, the lungs of five donors were submitted to EVLP for up to 4 h each. During EVLP, respiratory mechanics were continuously evaluated. Once every hour during the procedure, samples of the perfusate were collected and the function of the lungs was evaluated. Results: The mean PaO2 of the recovered lungs was 262.9 ± 119.7 mmHg at baseline, compared with 357.0 ± 108.5 mmHg after 3 h of EVLP. The mean oxygenation capacity of the lungs improved slightly over the first 3 h of EVLP-246.1 ± 35.1, 257.9 ± 48.9, and 288.8 ± 120.5 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively-without significant differences among the time points (p = 0.508). The mean static compliance was 63.0 ± 18.7 mmHg, 75.6 ± 25.4 mmHg, and 70.4 ± 28.0 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively, with a significant improvement from hour 1 to hour 2 (p = 0.029) but not from hour 2 to hour 3 (p = 0.059). Pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable during EVLP, with no differences among time points (p = 0.284). Conclusions: Although the lungs evaluated remained under physiological conditions, the EVLP protocol did not effectively improve lung function, thus precluding transplantation. PMID:27167429

  14. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  15. Perfusion-related stimuli for compensatory lung growth following pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Dane, D Merrill; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Gyawali, Dipendra; Iyer, Roshni; Ravikumar, Priya; Estrera, Aaron S; Hsia, Connie C W

    2016-07-01

    Following pneumonectomy (PNX), two separate mechanical forces act on the remaining lung: parenchymal stress caused by lung expansion, and microvascular distension and shear caused by increased perfusion. We previously showed that parenchymal stress and strain explain approximately one-half of overall compensation; the remainder was presumptively attributed to perfusion-related factors. In this study, we directly tested the hypothesis that perturbation of regional pulmonary perfusion modulates post-PNX lung growth. Adult canines underwent banding of the pulmonary artery (PAB) to the left caudal (LCa) lobe, which caused a reduction in basal perfusion to LCa lobe without preventing the subsequent increase in its perfusion following right PNX while simultaneously exaggerating the post-PNX increase in perfusion to the unbanded lobes, thereby creating differential perfusion changes between banded and unbanded lobes. Control animals underwent sham pulmonary artery banding followed by right PNX. Pulmonary function, regional pulmonary perfusion, and high-resolution computed tomography of the chest were analyzed pre-PNX and 3-mo post-PNX. Terminally, the remaining lobes were fixed for detailed morphometric analysis. Results were compared with corresponding lobes in two control (Sham banding and normal unoperated) groups. PAB impaired the indices of post-PNX extravascular alveolar tissue growth by up to 50% in all remaining lobes. PAB enhanced the expected post-PNX increase in alveolar capillary formation, measured by the prevalence of double-capillary profiles, in both unbanded and banded lobes. We conclude that perfusion distribution provides major stimuli for post-PNX compensatory lung growth independent of the stimuli provided by lung expansion and parenchymal stress and strain.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis Presenting on Pulmonary Ventilation and Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Itani, Malak; Fair, Joanna; Hillman, Zachary; Behnia, Fatemeh; Elojeimy, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    A 52-year-old woman presenting with dyspnea was referred for a ventilation and perfusion scan (VQ). VQ images (with Tc-DTPA [diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid aerosol] and Tc-MAA [macroaggregated albumin]) initially appeared normal; however, count rates on perfusion images were similar to ventilation images, implying little Tc-MAA had reached the lungs. Spot images of the injected extremity demonstrated focal Tc-MAA accumulation worrisome for a venous thrombus, subsequently confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. Careful attention to relative radiotracer count rates on VQ scans is crucial to ensure diagnostic utility. In addition, abnormal low perfusion radiotracer counts may unveil other pathology with important clinical implications. PMID:27556796

  17. Colour perfusion imaging: a new application of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miles, K A; Hayball, M; Dixon, A K

    1991-03-16

    We describe a new application for imaging with computed tomography (CT) in which a quantifiable map of tissue perfusion is created and displayed by means of a colour scale. A rapid sequence of images is acquired without table movement immediately after a bolus intravenous injection of radiographic contrast medium. The rate of enhancement in each pixel within the chosen slice can then be used to determine perfusion. The technique provides a quantifiable display of regional perfusion combined with the high spatial resolution afforded by CT.

  18. Noise-induced sensitization of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin

    2002-11-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  19. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  20. Altered resting perfusion and functional connectivity of default mode network in youth with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Hernandez, Leanna M; Beck-Pancer, Devora; McCarron, Rosemary; Smith, Robert X; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies can shed light on the neurobiological underpinnings of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies of the resting brain have shown both altered baseline metabolism from PET/SPECT and altered functional connectivity (FC) of intrinsic brain networks based on resting-state fMRI. To date, however, no study has investigated these two physiological parameters of resting brain function jointly, or explored the relationship between these measures and ASD symptom severity. Methods Here, we used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling with 3D background-suppressed GRASE to assess resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and FC in 17 youth with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children. Results A pattern of altered resting perfusion was found in ASD versus TD children including frontotemporal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. We found increased local FC in the anterior module of the default mode network (DMN) accompanied by decreased CBF in the same area. In our cohort, both alterations were associated with greater social impairments as assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-total T scores). While FC was correlated with CBF in TD children, this association between FC and baseline perfusion was disrupted in children with ASD. Furthermore, there was reduced long-range FC between anterior and posterior modules of the DMN in children with ASD. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study – the first to jointly assess resting CBF and FC in ASD – highlight new avenues for identifying novel imaging markers of ASD symptomatology. PMID:26445698

  1. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  2. In-vivo quantitative evaluation of perfusion zones and perfusion gradient in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Cyr, Michel; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Mangum, Michael; Liang, Jinyang; Teotia, Sumeet; Livingston, Edward H.; Zuzak, Karel J.

    2013-03-01

    The selection of well-vascularized tissue during DIEP flap harvest remains controversial. While several studies have elucidated cross-midline perfusion, further characterization of perfusion to the ipsilateral hemiabdomen is necessary for minimizing rates of fat necrosis or partial fat necrosis in bilateral DIEP flaps. Eighteen patients (29 flaps) underwent DIEP flap harvest using a prospectively designed protocol. Perforators were marked and imaged with a novel system for quantitatively measuring tissue oxygenation, the Digital Light Hyperspectral Imager. Images were then analyzed to determine if perforator selection influenced ipsilateral flap perfusion. Flaps based on a single lateral row perforator (SLRP) were found to have a higher level of hemoglobin oxygenation in Zone I (mean %HbO2 = 76.1) compared to single medial row perforator (SMRP) flaps (%HbO2 = 71.6). Perfusion of Zone III relative to Zone I was similar between SLRP and SMRP flaps (97.4% vs. 97.9%, respectively). These differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Perfusion to the lateral edge of the flap was slightly greater for SLRP flaps compared SMRP flaps (92.1% vs. 89.5%, respectively). SMRP flaps had superior perfusion travelling inferiorly compared to SLRP flaps (88.8% vs. 83.9%, respectively). Overall, it was observed that flaps were better perfused in the lateral direction than inferiorly. Significant differences in perfusion gradients directed inferiorly or laterally were observed, and perforator selection influenced perfusion in the most distal or inferior aspects of the flap. This suggests broader clinical implications for flap design that merit further investigation.

  3. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  4. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  5. Effect of propofol and remifentanil on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in pigs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Miles, James Edward; Poulsen, Helle Harding; Moltke, Finn Borgbjerg; Eriksen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the existing literature with regard to the influence of propofol and remifentanil total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in healthy pigs. Anaesthesia has influence on cerebral haemodynamics and it is important not only in human but also in veterinary anaesthesia to preserve optimal regulation of cerebral haemodynamics. Propofol and remifentanil are widely used in neuroanaesthesia and are increasingly used in experimental animal studies. In translational models, the pig has advantages compared to small laboratory animals because of brain anatomy, metabolism, neurophysiological maturation, and cerebral haemodynamics. However, reported effects of propofol and remifentanil on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in pigs have not been reviewed. An electronic search identified 99 articles in English. Title and abstract screening selected 29 articles for full-text evaluation of which 19 were excluded with reasons. Of the 10 peer-reviewed articles included for review, only three had propofol or remifentanil anaesthesia as the primary study objective and only two directly investigated the effect of anaesthesia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation (CPO). The evidence evaluated in this systematic review is limited, not focused on propofol and remifentanil and possibly influenced by factors of potential importance for CPO assessment. In one study of healthy pigs, CPO measures were within normal ranges following propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia, and addition of a single remifentanil bolus did not affect regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2). Even though the pool of evidence suggests that propofol and remifentanil alone or in combination have limited effects on CPO in healthy pigs, confirmative evidence is lacking. PMID:27334375

  6. Robust Low-dose CT Perfusion Deconvolution via Tensor Total-Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain diseases such as acute strokes and transit ischemic attacks are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, responsible for 9% of total death every year. ‘Time is brain’ is a widely accepted concept in acute cerebrovascular disease treatment. Efficient and accurate computational framework for hemodynamic parameters estimation can save critical time for thrombolytic therapy. Meanwhile the high level of accumulated radiation dosage due to continuous image acquisition in CT perfusion (CTP) raised concerns on patient safety and public health. However, low-radiation leads to increased noise and artifacts which require more sophisticated and time-consuming algorithms for robust estimation. In this paper, we focus on developing a robust and efficient framework to accurately estimate the perfusion parameters at low radiation dosage. Specifically, we present a tensor total-variation (TTV) technique which fuses the spatial correlation of the vascular structure and the temporal continuation of the blood signal flow. An efficient algorithm is proposed to find the solution with fast convergence and reduced computational complexity. Extensive evaluations are carried out in terms of sensitivity to noise levels, estimation accuracy, contrast preservation, and performed on digital perfusion phantom estimation, as well as in-vivo clinical subjects. Our framework reduces the necessary radiation dose to only 8% of the original level and outperforms the state-of-art algorithms with peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by 32%. It reduces the oscillation in the residue functions, corrects over-estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and under-estimation of mean transit time (MTT), and maintains the distinction between the deficit and normal regions. PMID:25706579

  7. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  8. Perfusion computed tomography to assist decision making for stroke thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bivard, Andrew; Levi, Christopher; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; McElduff, Patrick; Miteff, Ferdi; Spratt, Neil J; Bateman, Grant; Donnan, Geoffrey; Davis, Stephen; Parsons, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The use of perfusion imaging to guide selection of patients for stroke thrombolysis remains controversial because of lack of supportive phase three clinical trial evidence. We aimed to measure the outcomes for patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) at a comprehensive stroke care facility where perfusion computed tomography was routinely used for thrombolysis eligibility decision assistance. Our overall hypothesis was that patients with 'target' mismatch on perfusion computed tomography would have improved outcomes with rtPA. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive ischaemic stroke patients who fulfilled standard clinical/non-contrast computed tomography eligibility criteria for treatment with intravenous rtPA, but for whom perfusion computed tomography was used to guide the final treatment decision. The 'real-time' perfusion computed tomography assessments were qualitative; a large perfusion computed tomography ischaemic core, or lack of significant perfusion lesion-core mismatch were considered relative exclusion criteria for thrombolysis. Specific volumetric perfusion computed tomography criteria were not used for the treatment decision. The primary analysis compared 3-month modified Rankin Scale in treated versus untreated patients after 'off-line' (post-treatment) quantitative volumetric perfusion computed tomography eligibility assessment based on presence or absence of 'target' perfusion lesion-core mismatch (mismatch ratio >1.8 and volume >15 ml, core <70 ml). In a second analysis, we compared outcomes of the perfusion computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients to an Australian historical cohort of non-contrast computed tomography-selected rtPA-treated patients. Of 635 patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for rtPA by standard criteria, thrombolysis was given to 366 patients, with 269 excluded based on visual real-time perfusion computed tomography assessment. After off-line quantitative

  9. Metabolism of 7-ethyoxycoumarin by Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated trout livers were perfused using methods designed to preserve tissue viability and function. Liver performance was evaluated by measuring O2 consumption, vascular resistance, K+ leakage, glucose flux, lactate flux, alanine aminotransferase leakage, and metabolic clearanc...

  10. Automatic Characterization of Myocardial Perfusion in Contrast Enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Positano, Vincenzo; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Landini, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    The use of contrast medium in cardiac MRI allows joining the high-resolution anatomical information provided by standard magnetic resonance with functional information obtained by means of the perfusion of contrast agent in myocardial tissues. The current approach to perfusion MRI characterization is the qualitative one, based on visual inspection of images. Moving to quantitative analysis requires extraction of numerical indices of myocardium perfusion by analysis of time/intensity curves related to the area of interest. The main problem in quantitative image sequence analysis is the heart movement, mainly due to patient respiration. We propose an automatic procedure based on image registration, segmentation of the myocardium, and extraction and analysis of time/intensity curves. The procedure requires a minimal user interaction, is robust with respect to the user input, and allows effective characterization of myocardial perfusion. The algorithm was tested on cardiac MR images acquired from voluntaries and in clinical routine.

  11. Arterial Perfusion Imaging–Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression after RT. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective, institutional review board–approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was performed before RT (pre-RT), after delivering ∼60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and 1 month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results: Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5 to 21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors compared with the responsive tumors (P=.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median, −14%; range, −75% to 65%), whereas the progressive tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median, 57%; range, −7% to 165%) (P=.003). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve of 0.90. Conclusion: The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation

  12. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  13. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas G; Gunser, John M; Saviello, George M

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience.

  14. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  15. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  16. Can arterial spin labeling detect white matter perfusion signal?

    PubMed

    van Osch, Matthias J P; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Kies, Dennis A; van Buchem, Mark A

    2009-07-01

    Since the invention of arterial spin labeling (ASL) it has been acknowledged that ASL does not allow reliable detection of a white matter (WM) perfusion signal. However, recent developments such as pseudo-continuous labeling and background suppression have improved the quality. The goal of this research was to study the ability of these newer ASL sequences to detect WM perfusion signal. Background suppressed pseudo-continuous ASL was implemented at 3T with multislice 2D readout after 1525 ms. In five volunteers it was shown that 10 min scanning resulted in significant perfusion signal in 70% of WM voxels. Increasing the labeling and delay time did not lead to a higher percentage. In 27 normal volunteers it was found that 35 averages are necessary to detect significant WM signal, but 150 averages are needed to detect signal in the deep WM. Finally, it was shown in a patient with a cerebral arteriovenous malformation that pseudo-continuous ASL enabled the depiction of hypointense WM perfusion signal, although dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI showed that this region was merely showing delayed arrival of contrast agent than hypoperfusion. It can be concluded that, except within the deep WM, ASL is sensitive enough to detect WM perfusion signal and perfusion deficits. PMID:19365865

  17. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  18. A pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Tran, Elizabeth; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform for passive fluid pumping for pump-free perfusion cell culture, cell-based assay, and chemical applications. By adapting the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle from the previously developed perfusion microplate, which utilizes a combination of hydrostatic pressure generated by different liquid levels in the wells and fluid wicking through narrow strips of a porous membrane connecting the wells to generate fluid flow, a series of pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic devices was developed and their use for pump-free perfusion cell culture and cell-based assays was demonstrated. Each pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic device comprises at least three basic components: an open well for generating fluid flow, a micron-sized deep chamber/channel for cell culture or for fluid connection, and a wettable porous membrane for controlling the fluid flow. Each component is fluidically connected either by the porous membrane or by the micron-sized deep chamber/channel. By adapting and incorporating the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle into microfluidic devices, all the benefits of microfluidic technologies, such as small sample volumes, fast and efficient fluid exchanges, and fluid properties at the micro-scale, can be fully taken advantage of with this pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

  19. Comparison of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI perfusion quantification methods in the presence of delay and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Bianca; Simões, Rita Lopes; Meijer, Frederick J. A.; Klaas Jan Renema, W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    The perfusion of the brain is essential to maintain brain function. Stroke is an example of a decrease in blood flow and reduced perfusion. During ischemic stroke the blood flow to tissue is hampered due to a clot inside a vessel. To investigate the recovery of stroke patients, follow up studies are necessary. MRI is the preferred imaging modality for follow up because of the absence of radiation dose concerns, contrary to CT. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI is an imaging technique used for measuring perfusion of the brain, however, is not standard applied in the clinical routine due to lack of immediate patient benefit. Several post processing algorithms are described in the literature to obtain cerebral blood flow (CBF). The quantification of CBF relies on the deconvolution of a tracer concentration-time curve in an arterial and a tissue voxel. There are several methods to obtain this deconvolution based on singular-value decomposition (SVD). This contribution describes a comparison between the different approaches as currently there is no best practice for (all) clinical relevant situations. We investigate the influence of tracer delay, dispersion and recirculation on the performance of the methods. In the presence of negative delays, the truncated SVD approach overestimates the CBF. Block-circulant and reformulated SVD are delay-independent. Due to its delay dependent behavior, the truncated SVD approach performs worse in the presence of dispersion as well. However all SVD approaches are dependent on the amount of dispersion. Moreover, we observe that the optimal truncation parameter varies when recirculation is added to noisy data, suggesting that, in practice, these methods are not immune to tracer recirculation. Finally, applying the methods to clinical data resulted in a large variability of the CBF estimates. Block-circulant SVD will work in all situations and is the method with the highest potential.

  20. Tiliqua scincoides: temperature-sensitive units in lizard brain.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M; Hammel, T; Hardy, J D

    1967-11-01

    Extracellular action potentials were recorded from units in the preoptic area of the brain of the Australian blue-tongued skink (Tiliqua scincoides) during periods of local heating and cooling of the brain (20 degrees to 36 degrees C) with water-perfused thermodes. In this temperature range most spontaneously firing neurons were temperature-insensitive, but eight showed sensitivity to the thermal stimulus. Five warm neurons increased their activity when the brain temperature was raised, and three cold neurons showed increased activity with fall in temperature.

  1. Comparison of 2 techniques for regional antibiotic delivery to the equine forelimb: intraosseous perfusion vs. intravenous perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; Bailey, J V; Dowling, P M; Fretz, P B

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the synovial fluid concentrations and pharmacokinetics of amikacin in the equine limb distal to the carpus following intraosseous and intravenous regional perfusion. The front limbs of 6 horses were randomly assigned to either intraosseous or intravenous perfusion. A tourniquet was placed distal to each carpus and the limb perfused with 500 mg of amikacin. Systemic blood samples and synovial fluid samples were collected over 70 min from the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint, metacarpophalangeal joint, and digital flexor sheath. The tourniquet was removed following the 30 min sample collection. The mean peak amikacin concentration for the DIP joint was significantly higher with intravenous perfusion. There were no significant differences in time to peak concentration or elimination half-life between methods at each synovial structure. Each technique produced mean peak concentrations ranging from 5 to 50 times that of recommended peak serum concentrations for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:11519271

  2. Brain Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Reviews significant findings of recent brain research, including the concept of five minds: automatic, subconscious, practical, creative, and spiritual. Suggests approaches to training the brain that are related to this hierarchy of thinking. (JOW)

  3. Brain Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  4. Brain components

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The cerebrum is divided into left and right hemispheres, each ... gray matter) is the outside portion of the cerebrum and provides us with functions associated with conscious ...

  5. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  6. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Tunkel AR. Brain abscess. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 92. Tunkel AR, Scheld WM. Brain abscess. In: Winn HR, ed. ...

  7. From monster to twin reversed arterial perfusion: a history of acardiac twins.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2010-05-01

    A human being born without heart and head, i.e., the acardius/acranius malformation, has been described since antiquity. Superstition and fear made it a mystical disorder, a sign of God's wrath. The inquisition ruled that acranic infants should not be baptized and located the soul in the brain. Acardia was not associated with twin gestation until the reports of Mery in 1720 and Winslow in 1740. In 1850, Meckel identified the pathogenetic mechanism as reversed perfusion due to large arterio-arterial and veno-venous anastomoses; he believed the heart would fail to develop or arrest during development, and the acardiac fetus would be maintained by arterial perfusion from the pump twin. In 1859, Claudius articulated that after normal initial development, the heart degenerates when reversed flow in the aorta leads to thrombosis. Today, it is assumed that both mechanisms may exist. With the advent of prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and radiofrequency ablation of the acardiac twin's circulation, it became possible to save the pump twin.

  8. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  9. Integrating evidence-based perfusion into practices: the International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Likosky, Donald S

    2006-12-01

    There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. "Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the past"- Daniel Mintz, MD "Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist.... It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil."-John Maynard Keynes.

  10. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  11. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  12. Myocardial perfusion assessment with contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, Manuel; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Santos, Andres; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Malpica, Norberto; Antoranz, Jose C.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    Assessment of intramyocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography is a promising new technique that allows to obtain quantitative parameters for the assessment of ischemic disease. In this work, a new methodology and a software prototype developed for this task are presented. It has been validated with Coherent Contrast Imaging (CCI) images acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Contrast (Optison microbubbles) is injected continuously during the scan. 150 images are acquired using low mechanical index U/S pulses. A burst of high mechanical index pulses is used to destroy bubbles, thus allowing to detect the contrast wash-in. The stud is performed in two conditions: rest and pharmacologically induced stress. The software developed allows to visualized the study (cine) and to select several ROIs within the heart wall. The position of these ROIs along the cardiac cycle is automatically corrected on the basis of the gradient field, and they can also be manually corrected in case the automatic procedure fails. Time curves are analyzed according to a parametric model that incorporates both contrast inflow rate and cyclic variations. Preliminary clinical results on 80 patients have allowed us to identify normal and pathological patterns and to establish the correlation of quantitative parameters with the real diagnosis.

  13. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  14. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  15. Effect of carbon dioxide on the utilization of brain capillary reserve and flow

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, H.; Dribben, J.; Kissen, I.; Gerlock, T.; Weiss, H.R. )

    1989-12-01

    This study investigated effects of increased arterial carbon dioxide on the brain capillary perfusion pattern. Conscious rats were exposed to a 0%, 8% or 12% CO{sub 2} in air gas mixture. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases and pH were recorded, and either regional cerebral blood flow or the percent of capillary volume/mm3 or number/mm2 perfused were determined in cortical, hypothalamic, pontine or medullary regions of the brain. Arterial PCO{sub 2} increased from 37 +/- 1 in control to 74 +/- 1 torr in the high CO{sub 2} group. A position linear relationship was found between cerebral blood flow and arterial PCO{sub 2} in all examined regions. Approximately half of the capillaries in the examined regions were perfused under normocapnic conditions. Increasing arterial PCO{sub 2} had no effect on the percent of the capillary bed perfused in the cortex or hypothalamus. However, there was a significant linear relationship between carbon dioxide tension and the percent of the microvasculature perfused in the hindbrain. The percent of capillaries/mm2 perfused increased significantly in the medulla (to 60 +/- 5%) and pons (70 +/- 4%) with 12% CO{sub 2} in air. These data suggest that carbon dioxide may have differential effects on diffusion distances affecting the hindbrain to a greater extent than the forebrain.

  16. Serotonin in the regulation of brain microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bonvento, G; Lacombe, P; Hamel, E

    1996-11-01

    Manipulation of brainstem serotonin (5-HT) raphe neurons induces significant alterations in local cerebral metabolism and perfusion. The vascular consequences of intracerebrally released 5-HT point to a major vasoconstrictor role, resulting in cerebral blood flow (CBF) decreases in several brain regions such as the neocortex. However, vasodilatations, as well as changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which are blocked by 5-HT receptor antagonists also can be observed. A lack of relationship between the changes in flow and metabolism indicates uncoupling between the two variables and is suggestive of a direct neurogenic control by brain intrinsic 5-HT neurons on the microvascular bed. In line with these functional data are the close associations that exist between 5-HT neurons and the microarterioles, capillaries and perivascular astrocytes of various regions but more intimately and/or more frequently so in those where CBF is altered significantly following manipulation of 5-HT neurons. The ability of the microvascular bed to respond directly to intracerebrally released 5-HT is underscored by the expression of distinct 5-HT receptors in the various cellular compartments of the microvascular bed. Thus, it appears that while some 5-HT-mediated microvascular functions involve directly the blood vessel wall, others would be relayed through the perivascular astrocyte. The strategic localization of perivascular astrocytes and the different 5-HT receptors that they harbor strongly emphasize their putative pivotal role in transmitting information between 5-HT neurons and microvessels. It is concluded that the cerebral circulation has full capacity to adequately and locally adapt brain perfusion to changes in central 5-HT neurotransmission either directly or indirectly via the neuronal-astrocytic-vascular tripartite functional unit. Dysfunctions in these neurovascular interactions might result in perfusion deficits and might be involved in specific pathological

  17. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Scholbach, T M; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the "low grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the "high grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR.

  18. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  19. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  20. Optical bedside monitoring of cerebral perfusion: technological and methodological advances applied in a study on acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Gruber, Clemens; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Jelzow, Alexander; Steinbrink, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B.; MacDonald, Rainer; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2010-11-01

    We present results of a clinical study on bedside perfusion monitoring of the human brain by optical bolus tracking. We measure the kinetics of the contrast agent indocyanine green using time-domain near-IR spectroscopy (tdNIRS) in 10 patients suffering from acute unilateral ischemic stroke. In all patients, a delay of the bolus over the affected when compared to the unaffected hemisphere is found (mean: 1.5 s, range: 0.2 s to 5.2 s). A portable time-domain near-IR reflectometer is optimized and approved for clinical studies. Data analysis based on statistical moments of time-of-flight distributions of diffusely reflected photons enables high sensitivity to intracerebral changes in bolus kinetics. Since the second centralized moment, variance, is preferentially sensitive to deep absorption changes, it provides a suitable representation of the cerebral signals relevant for perfusion monitoring in stroke. We show that variance-based bolus tracking is also less susceptible to motion artifacts, which often occur in severely affected patients. We present data that clearly manifest the applicability of the tdNIRS approach to assess cerebral perfusion in acute stroke patients at the bedside. This may be of high relevance to its introduction as a monitoring tool on stroke units.

  1. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact sheet is a basic introduction to the human brain. It may help you understand how the healthy ... largest and most highly developed part of the human brain: it consists primarily of the cerebrum ( 2 ) and ...

  2. Incidentally detected diaphragmatic hernia mimicking angina pectoris with Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cınar, Alev; Sadıc, Murat; Demırel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In recent years 99mTechnetium methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (99mTc MIBI) is widely used in the evaluation of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). In this imaging protocol besides the cardiac evaluation, numerous other organs are included in the field of view. 99mTechnetium MIBI is taken up in all metabolically active tissue in the body except for the brain. Extracardiac uptake patterns as benign or serious conditions can be revealed during the MPI. In the imaging protocol, we should be aware of distribution of this radiotracer in order to recognize the abnormal uptake. Here in, we present a large diaphragmatic hernia, seemed as a mirror vision of myocardium that was determined incidentally during the MPI with 99mTc MIBI. PMID:24379540

  3. Hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance of the lung and the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind Krishnamachari

    2001-04-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a new diagnostic modality that has been used successfully for lung imaging. Xenon is soluble in blood and inhaled xenon is transported to the brain via circulating blood. Xenon also accumulates in the lipid rich white matter of the brain. Hyperpolarized xenon can hence be used as a tissue- sensitive probe of brain function. The goals of this study were to identify the NMR resonances of xenon in the rat brain and evaluate the role of hyperpolarized xenon for brain MRI. We have developed systems to produce sufficient volumes of hyperpolarized xenon for in vivo brain experiments. The specialized instrumentation developed include an apparatus for optical pump-cell manufacture and high purity gas manifolds for filling cells. A hyperpolarized gas delivery system was designed to ventilate small animals with hyperpolarized xenon for transport to the brain. The T1 of xenon dissolved in blood indicates that the lifetime of xenon in the blood is sufficient for significant magnetization to be transferred to distal tissues. A variety of carrier agents for intravenous delivery of hyperpolarized xenon were tested for transport to distal tissues. Using our new gas delivery system, high SNR 129Xe images of rat lungs were obtained. Spectroscopy with hyperpolarized xenon indicated that xenon was transported from the lungs to the blood and tissues with intact magnetization. After preliminary studies that indicated the feasibility for in vivo rat brain studies, experiments were performed with adult rats and young rats with different stages of white matter development. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed the prominence of one peak from xenon in the rat brain, which was assigned to brain lipids. Cerebral brain perfusion was calculated from the wash-out of the hyperpolarized xenon signal in the brain. An increase in brain perfusion during maturation was observed. These experiments showed that hyperpolarized xenon MRI

  4. Schizophrenia patients differentiation based on MR vascular perfusion and volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, A. B.; Joskowicz, L.; Moshel, S.; Israeli, D.

    2015-03-01

    Candecomp/Parafac Decomposition (CPD) has emerged as a framework for modeling N-way arrays (higher-order matrices). CPD is naturally well suited for the analysis of data sets comprised of observations of a function of multiple discrete indices. In this study we evaluate the prospects of using CPD for modeling MRI brain properties (i.e. brain volume and gray-level) for schizophrenia diagnosis. Taking into account that 3D imaging data consists of millions of pixels per patient, the diagnosis of a schizophrenia patient based on pixel analysis constitutes a methodological challenge (e.g. multiple comparison problem). We show that the CPD could potentially be used as a dimensionality redaction method and as a discriminator between schizophrenia patients and match control, using the gradient of pre- and post Gd-T1-weighted MRI data, which is strongly correlated with cerebral blood perfusion. Our approach was tested on 68 MRI scans: 40 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls. The CPD subject's scores exhibit statistically significant result (P < 0.001). In the context of diagnosing schizophrenia with MRI, the results suggest that the CPD could potentially be used to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and matched control. In addition, the CPD model suggests for brain regions that might exhibit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients for future research.

  5. Iofetamine hydrochloride I 123: a new radiopharmaceutical for cerebral perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Druckenbrod, R.W.; Williams, C.C.; Gelfand, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Iofetamine hydrochloride I-123 permits cerebral blood perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT is more widely available than positron emission tomography, and complements anatomic visualization with X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. Iofetamine is an amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs, then redistributed principally to the liver and brain. The precise mechanism of localization has not been determined, but is believed to result from nonspecific receptor binding. Brain uptake peaks at 30 minutes postinjection and remains relatively constant through 60 minutes. The drug is metabolized and excreted in the urine, with negligible activity remaining at 48 hours. When compared with CT in stroke patients, visualization may be performed sooner after symptom onset and a larger zone of involvement may be evident with iofetamine. Localization of seizure foci and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease may also be possible. As CT has revolutionized noninvasive imaging of brain anatomy, SPECT with iofetamine permits routine cerebral blood flow imaging. 36 references.

  6. The Brains Behind the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcangelo, Marcia

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with five neuroscientists--Martin Diamond, Pat Wolfe, Robert Sylwester, Geoffrey Caine, and Eric Jensen--disclose brain-research findings of practical interest to educators. Topics include brain physiology, environmental enrichment, memorization, windows of learning opportunity, brain learning capacity, attention span, student interest,…

  7. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  8. Pulmonary artery perfusion versus no pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with COPD: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Buggeskov, Katrine B; Sundskard, Martin M; Jonassen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars W; Secher, Niels H; Ravn, Hanne B; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Absence of pulmonary perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be associated with reduced postoperative oxygenation. Effects of active pulmonary artery perfusion were explored in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods 90 patients were randomised to receive pulmonary artery perfusion during CPB with either oxygenated blood (n=30) or histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution (n=29) compared with no pulmonary perfusion (n=31). The coprimary outcomes were the inverse oxygenation index compared at 21 hours after starting CPB and longitudinally in a mixed-effects model (MEM). Secondary outcomes were tracheal intubation time, serious adverse events, mortality, days alive outside the intensive care unit (ICU) and outside the hospital. Results 21 hours after starting CPB patients receiving pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood had a higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (mean difference (MD) 0.94; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.83; p=0.04). The blood group had also a higher oxygenation index both longitudinally (MEM, p=0.009) and at 21 hours (MD 0.99; CI 0.29 to 1.69; p=0.007) compared with the HTK group. The latest result corresponds to a difference in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen of 23 mm Hg with a median fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.32. Yet the blood or HTK groups did not demonstrate a longitudinally higher oxygenation index compared with no pulmonary perfusion (MEM, p=0.57 and 0.17). Similarly, at 21 hours there was no difference in the oxygenation index between the HTK group and those no pulmonary perfusion (MD 0.06; 95% CI −0.73 to 0.86; p=0.87). There were no statistical significant differences between the groups for the secondary outcomes. Discussion Pulmonary artery perfusion with normothermic oxygenated blood during cardiopulmonary bypass appears to improve postoperative oxygenation in patients with COPD undergoing

  9. Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei

    2011-11-15

    Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

  10. Brain edema and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier during methamphetamine intoxication: critical role of brain hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon; Sharma, Hari S

    2007-09-01

    To clarify the role of brain temperature in permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), rats were injected with methamphetamine (METH 9 mg/kg) at normal (23 degrees C) and warm (29 degrees C) environmental conditions and internal temperatures were monitored both centrally (nucleus accumbens, NAcc) and peripherally (skin and nonlocomotor muscle). Once NAcc temperatures peaked or reached 41.5 degrees C (a level suggesting possible lethality), animals were administered Evans blue dye (protein tracer that does not normally cross the BBB), rapidly anaesthetized, perfused and had their brains removed. All METH-treated animals showed brain and body hyperthermia associated with relative skin hypothermia, suggesting metabolic activation coupled with peripheral vasoconstriction. While METH-induced NAcc temperature elevation varied from 37.60 to 42.46 degrees C (or 1.2-5.1 degrees C above baseline), it was stronger at 29 degrees C (+4.13 degrees C) than 23 degrees C (+2.31 degrees C). Relative to control, METH-treated animals had significantly higher brain levels of water, Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-), suggesting brain edema, and intense immunostaining for albumin, indicating breakdown of the BBB. METH-treated animals also showed strong immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), possibly suggesting acute abnormality or damage of astrocytes. METH-induced changes in brain water, albumin and GFAP correlated linearly with NAcc temperature (r = 0.93, 0.98 and 0.98, respectively), suggesting a key role of brain hyperthermia in BBB permeability, development of brain edema and subsequent functional and structural neural abnormalities. Therefore, along with a direct destructive action on neural cells and functions, brain hyperthermia, via breakdown of the BBB, may be crucial for both decompensation of brain functions and cell injury following acute METH intoxication, possibly contributing to neurodegeneration resulting from chronic drug use.

  11. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  12. Ventilation-perfusion matching during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    In normal subjects, exercise widens the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (P[A-a]O2) despite a more uniform topographic distribution of ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratios. While part of the increase in P(A-a)O2 (especially during heavy exercise) is due to diffusion limitation, a considerable amount is caused by an increase in VA/Q mismatch as detected by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Why this occurs is unknown, but circumstantial evidence suggests it may be related to interstitial pulmonary edema rather than to factors dependent on ventilation, airway gas mixing, airway muscle tone, or pulmonary vascular tone. In patients with lung disease, the gas exchange consequences of exercise are variable. Thus, arterial PO2 may increase, remain the same, or fall. In general, patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or interstitial fibrosis who exercise show a fall in PO2. This is usually not due to worsening VA/Q relationships but mostly to the well-known fall in mixed venous PO2, which itself results from a relatively smaller increase in cardiac output than VO2. However, in interstitial fibrosis (but not COPD), there is good evidence that a part of the fall in PO2 on exercise is caused by alveolar-capillary diffusion limitation of O2 transport; in COPD (but not interstitial fibrosis), a frequent additional contributing factor to the hypoxemia of exercise is an inadequate ventilatory response, such that minute ventilation does not rise as much as does CO2 production or O2 uptake, causing arterial PCO2 to increase and PO2 to fall.

  13. Specialized brain cooling in humans?

    PubMed

    Brengelmann, G L

    1993-09-01

    Humans, compared to other species, have exceptional capability for dissipation of heat from the entire skin surface. We can secrete more than two liters per hour of sweat, indefinitely. The corresponding potential for evaporative cooling is near a thousand watts, sufficient to compensate for the extreme high levels of heat production during exercise. Also, the blood vessels of our skin have exceptional capability to dilate and deliver heat to the body surface. These are our special adaptations for thermal stress. They allow prolonged heavy exercise with modest elevations in the temperature of the fluid that cools all the internal organs, not just the brain-arterial blood. The vascular architecture of the human head is radically different from that of animals that exhibit SBC. These species have special adaptations that reflect their dependence on respiratory evaporation, particularly the limitation imposed on capability to dispose of heat produced during exercise. The increase in blood temperature in an intense sprint would heat the well-perfused brain rapidly. But the heat exchange over the large surface area of contact between a venous plexus cooled by respiratory evaporation and the meshwork of arterial vessels in the carotid rete precools blood bound for the brain. Specialized cooling of the brain (SBC) has not been demonstrated by direct measurements in humans. Changes in tympanic temperature (Tty) are taken as evidence for SBC. This continues an unfortunate tradition of exaggeration of the significance of Tty. In the only direct measurements available, brain temperature was unaffected by fanning the face although Tty did fall. What may appear to be a remnant of the carotid rete heat exchanger in humans is the intimate association between a short segment of the internal carotid artery and the plexus of veins in the cavernous sinus. Fortunately, the brain need not rely for its cooling on countercurrent heat exchange across this small surface area of contact. In

  14. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Satoshi, Ii; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation × 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  15. Tissue perfusion inhomogeneity during early tumor growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Endrich, B; Reinhold, H S; Gross, J F; Intaglietta, M

    1979-02-01

    Tissue perfusion in BA 1112 sarcomas of WAG inbred Rijswijk rats was determined from in vivo measurements of capillary density, length, and erythrocyte velocity in modified Algire chamber preparations. Studies were done with the use of television techniques in situ during a period of 26 days, both in control chambers and after implantation of a 0.1-mm3 piece of tumor tissue. Perfusion in control areas void of tumor tissue. Perfusion in control areas void of tumor was approximately 8-10 ml/minute/100 g of tissue. Flow in active tumor growth regions on the outward side of the tumor edge was through undifferentiated channels and had characteristics of flow through a porous medium. Despite enhanced arterial supply, the stabilized tumor microcirculation at the inward side of the growing tumor retained its perfusion rate constant (15-18 ml/min/100 g). Perfusion in central portions of the tumor was about 2-4 ml/minute/100 g during 12 days, whereas the tumor doubled in diameter. Our findings support the concept of temporal and functional blood flow inhomogeneity in the microcirculation of spreading tumors. PMID:283271

  16. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  17. Tomographic digital subtraction angiography for lung perfusion estimation in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Badea, Cristian T.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; De Lin, Ming; Boslego Mackel, Julie S.; Samei, Ehsan; Allan Johnson, G.

    2007-05-15

    In vivo measurements of perfusion present a challenge to existing small animal imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance microscopy, micro computed tomography, micro positron emission tomography, and microSPECT, due to combined requirements for high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the use of tomographic digital subtraction angiography (TDSA) for estimation of perfusion in small animals. TDSA augments conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by providing three-dimensional spatial information using tomosynthesis algorithms. TDSA is based on the novel paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive injections of {mu}L volumes of contrast at a series of different angles of rotation. The capabilities of TDSA are established in studies on lung perfusion in rats. Using an imaging system developed in-house, we acquired data for four-dimensional (4D) imaging with temporal resolution of 140 ms, in-plane spatial resolution of 100 {mu}m, and slice thickness on the order of millimeters. Based on a structured experimental approach, we optimized TDSA imaging providing a good trade-off between slice thickness, the number of injections, contrast to noise, and immunity to artifacts. Both DSA and TDSA images were used to create parametric maps of perfusion. TDSA imaging has potential application in a number of areas where functional perfusion measurements in 4D can provide valuable insight into animal models of disease and response to therapeutics.

  18. Perfused Multiwell Plate for 3D Liver Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, James; Dash, Ajit; Lim, Matthew H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models that capture the complexity of in vivo tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to-use format are desirable for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a bioreactor that fosters maintenance of 3D tissue cultures under constant perfusion and we have integrated multiple bioreactors into an array in a multiwell plate format. All bioreactors are fluidically isolated from each other. Each bioreactor in the array contains a scaffold that supports formation of hundreds of 3D microscale tissue units. The tissue units are perfused with cell culture medium circulated within the bioreactor by integrated pneumatic diaphragm micropumps. Electronic controls for the pumps are kept outside the incubator and connected to the perfused multiwell by pneumatic lines. The docking design and open-well bioreactor layout make handling perfused multiwell plates similar to using standard multiwell tissue culture plates. A model of oxygen consumption and transport in the circulating culture medium was used to predict appropriate operating parameters for primary liver cultures. Oxygen concentrations at key locations in the system were then measured as a function of flow rate and time after initiation of culture to determine oxygen consumption rates. After seven days in culture, tissue formed from cells seeded in the perfused multiwell reactor remained functionally viable as assessed by immunostaining for hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotypic markers. PMID:20024050

  19. Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring and imaging of blood microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Wardell, Karin

    1994-07-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitoring is a method of assessing tissue perfusion based on measurements performed using Doppler broadening of monochromatic light scattered in moving blood cells. Ever since laser Doppler perfusion monitors became available about 15 years ago they have been used in numerous applications in both clinical and laboratory settings. The high spatial resolution has in practice manifested itself as one of the main limitations of the method. The reason for this is the difficulty in attaining reproducible values at successive measurement sites because most skin tissue possesses a substantial variation in blood flow even at adjacent measurement sites. In order to overcome this difficulty the laser Doppler perfusion imager was developed. In this camera-like device, the laser beam successively scans the tissue and the Doppler components of the backscattered light are detected by a remote photodiode. After a scanning procedure is complete, a color-coded perfusion map showing the spatial variation of skin blood flow is displayed on a monitor. The operating principle and early applications of this emerging technology are addressed in further detail.

  20. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  1. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  2. A New Method of Selective, Rapid Cooling of the Brain: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allers, Mats; Boris-Moeller, Fredrik; Lunderquist, Anders; Wieloch, Tadeusz

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To determine whether retrograde perfusion of cooled blood into one internal jugular vein (IJV) in the pig can selectively reduce the brain temperature without affecting the core body temperature (CBT). Methods. In 7 domestic pigs, the left IJV was catheterized on one side and a catheter placed with the tip immediately below the rete mirabile. Thermistors were placed in both brain hemispheres and the brain temperature continuously registered. Thermistors placed in the rectum registered the CBT. From a catheter in the right femoral vein blood was aspirated with the aid of a roller pump, passed through a cooling device, and infused into the catheter in the left IJV at an initial rate of 200 ml/min. Results. Immediately after the start of the infusion of cooled blood (13.8 deg. C) into the IJV, the right brain temperature started to drop from its initial 37.9 deg. C and reached 32 deg. C within 5 min. By increasing the temperature of the perfusate a further drop in the brain temperature was avoided and the brain temperature could be kept around 32 deg. C during the experiment. In 4 of the animals a heating blanket was sufficient to compensate for the slight drop in CBT during the cooling period. Conclusions. We conclude that brain temperature can be reduced in the pig by retrograde perfusion of the internal jugular vein with cooled blood and that the core body temperature can be maintained with the aid of a heating blanket.

  3. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition.

  4. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  5. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  6. Novel Technologies for Isolated Lung Perfusion: Beyond Lung Transplant.

    PubMed

    Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2016-05-01

    Isolated lung perfusion (ILP) has been examined and developed in lung transplantation and thoracic oncology research. In lung transplantation, ILP has been used to assess physiologic integrity of donor lungs after removal from the donor, and it has also been proposed as a method for active treatment and repair of injured unsuitable donor organs ex vivo. ILP is attractive as a concept to deliver high-dose chemotherapy to treat pulmonary metastatic disease, referred to as in vivo lung perfusion. This article focuses on the rationale, technical aspects, and experimental and clinical experience of in vivo lung perfusion. A perspective on the future application of these techniques is described. PMID:27112253

  7. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  8. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  9. Brain uptake of ketoprofen-lysine prodrug in rats.

    PubMed

    Gynther, Mikko; Jalkanen, Aaro; Lehtonen, Marko; Forsberg, Markus; Laine, Krista; Ropponen, Jarmo; Leppänen, Jukka; Knuuti, Johanna; Rautio, Jarkko

    2010-10-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. Often the development of central nervous system drugs needs to be terminated because of their poor brain uptake. We describe a way to achieve large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1)-mediated drug transport into the rat brain. We conjugated ketoprofen to an amino acid l-lysine so that the prodrug could access LAT1. The LAT1-mediated brain uptake of the prodrug was demonstrated with in situ rat brain perfusion technique. The ability of the prodrug to deliver ketoprofen into the site of action, the brain intracellular fluid, was determined combining in vivo and in vitro experiments. A rapid brain uptake from blood and cell uptake was seen both in in situ and in vivo experiments. Therefore, our results show that a prodrug approach can achieve uptake of drugs via LAT1 into the brain intracellular fluid. The distribution of the prodrug in the brain parenchyma and the site of parent drug release in the brain were shown with in vivo and in vitro studies. In addition, our results show that although lysine or ketoprofen are not LAT1-substrates themselves, by combining these molecules, the formed prodrug has affinity for LAT1. PMID:20727958

  10. Aortic arch replacement with a beating heart: a simple method using continuous 3-way perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abu-Omar, Y; Ali, J M; Colah, S; Dunning, J J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simplified 3-way perfusion strategy that could be used in complex aortic procedures, which ensures continuous end-organ perfusion and minimizes the potential risks of cardiac, cerebral and peripheral ischaemic complications.

  11. [Ischemic heart disease (myocardial perfusion and viability): techniques and results].

    PubMed

    Croisille, P

    2004-10-01

    Over the last two decades, the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease have made tremendous progress, in particular with the help of the development of non-invasive methodologies for assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Clinically, nuclear medicine techniques (particularly SPECT imaging) have predominated. With the recent technical developments allowing for a combined assessment of perfusion and irreversible damage with late enhancement imaging, MRI will now play a major role in the assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15507837

  12. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Thomas G.; Gunser, John M.; Saviello, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience. PMID:26834288

  13. Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy: Techniques, Interpretation, Indications and Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Fathala, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission-computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the most important and common non-invasive diagnostic cardiac test. Gated MPS provides simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion and function with only one study. With appropriate attention to the MPS techniques, appropriate clinical utilization and effective reporting, gated MPS will remain a useful diagnostic test for many years to come. The aim of this article is to review the basic techniques of MPS, a simplified systematic approach for study interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting. After reading this article the reader should develop an understanding of the techniques, interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting of MPS studies. PMID:22048510

  14. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  15. USE OF A PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR IN CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J. David; Tallent, Jerome H.

    1978-01-01

    This study describes a hand-held, battery-powered, programmable instrument (Calculator Model SR-52) that can be taken directly into the operating room by cardiopulmonary perfusionists. Three programs are described in detail: 1) Cardiopulmonary perfusion parameters and estimated blood volume; 2) blood gas parameters and saturations, with temperature corrections; and 3) cardiopulmonary oxygen transfer and oxygenator efficiency. This inexpensive calculator allows perfusion personnel to manipulate easily-derived data into values which heretofore have required elaborate nomograms or special slide rules—or were not available within a reasonable computational time. PMID:15216068

  16. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  17. [The Application of Machine Perfusion on Clinical Liver Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ren, Fenggang; Zhu, Haoyang; Yan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Lv, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Liver transplantation is the only way to treat end-stage liver disease. In order to overcome the shortage of donor, marginal donors have been used widely, which bring about a series of problems. Machine perfusion can stimulate the circulation in vivo and is beneficial for the protection of liver. It could also improve the graft function and reduce postoperative complications, which makes it a hot spot in recent years. The aim of this study is to summarize the current status and prospects of application of machine perfusion on clinical liver transplantation.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  19. High-frequency Electrocardiogram Analysis in the Ability to Predict Reversible Perfusion Defects during Adenosine Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.; Carlsson, Marcus; Pettersson, Jonas; Nilsson, Klas; Pahlm, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Background: A previous study has shown that analysis of high-frequency QRS components (HF-QRS) is highly sensitive and reasonably specific for detecting reversible perfusion defects on myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) scans during adenosine. The purpose of the present study was to try to reproduce those findings. Methods: 12-lead high-resolution electrocardiogram recordings were obtained from 100 patients before (baseline) and during adenosine Tc-99m-tetrofosmin MPI tests. HF-QRS were analyzed regarding morphology and changes in root mean square (RMS) voltages from before the adenosine infusion to peak infusion. Results: The best area under the curve (AUC) was found in supine patients (AUC=0.736) in a combination of morphology and RMS changes. None of the measurements, however, were statistically better than tossing a coin (AUC=0.5). Conclusion: Analysis of HF-QRS was not significantly better than tossing a coin for determining reversible perfusion defects on MPI scans.

  20. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  1. Comparison of various methods for delivering radiolabeled monoclonal antibody to normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, D.E.; Bourdon, M.; Bigner, D.D.

    1984-11-01

    Different methods were evaluated for delivering iodine-125 monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) to the central nervous system in 40- to 99-gm Fischer rats. By evaluating interhemispheric, interregional, and brain:blood ratios of Mab's, the efficacy of intracarotid (IC) or intravenous (IV) administration of Mab's with and without prior IC perfusion with 0.9% NaCl (normal saline, NS), 1.4 M mannitol, or 1.6 M arabinose, or of femoral artery perfusion with 1.4 M mannitol was evaluated. No difference was seen between IC and IV administration of Mab's with or without prior perfusion. Intracarotid perfusion with hyperosmolar agents was required to disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to significantly elevate brain levels of Mab's. Temporally, following hyperosmolar BBB disruption, brain:blood Mab ratios remained elevated bilaterally at 7 days after Mab delivery, with the ipsilateral hemispheric levels remaining significantly elevated compared with the contralateral hemispheric levels until Day 5, when the ratio returned to the nonperfused range. Catheterization was required in the small animals and was performed under magnification in 10 to 20 minutes, with less than an 8% overall morbidity and mortality.

  2. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  6. Procedure for Decellularization of Rat Livers in an Oscillating-pressure Perfusion Device.

    PubMed

    Hillebrandt, Karl; Polenz, Dietrich; Butter, Antje; Tang, Peter; Reutzel-Selke, Anja; Andreou, Andreas; Napierala, Hendrik; Raschzok, Nathanael; Pratschke, Johann; Sauer, Igor M; Struecker, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Decellularization and recellularization of parenchymal organs may enable the generation of functional organs in vitro, and several protocols for rodent liver decellularization have already been published. We aimed to improve the decellularization process by construction of a proprietary perfusion device enabling selective perfusion via the portal vein and/or the hepatic artery. Furthermore, we sought to perform perfusion under oscillating surrounding pressure conditions to improve the homogeneity of decellularization. The homogeneity of perfusion decellularization has been an underestimated factor to date. During decellularization, areas within the organ that are poorly perfused may still contain cells, whereas the extracellular matrix (ECM) in well-perfused areas may already be affected by alkaline detergents. Oscillating pressure changes can mimic the intraabdominal pressure changes that occur during respiration to optimize microperfusion inside the liver. In the study presented here, decellularized rat liver matrices were analyzed by histological staining, DNA content analysis and corrosion casting. Perfusion via the hepatic artery showed more homogenous results than portal venous perfusion did. The application of oscillating pressure conditions improved the effectiveness of perfusion decellularization. Livers perfused via the hepatic artery and under oscillating pressure conditions showed the best results. The presented techniques for liver harvesting, cannulation and perfusion using our proprietary device enable sophisticated perfusion set-ups to improve decellularization and recellularization experiments in rat livers.

  7. [Multimodal neuromonitoring in traumatic brain injury: contribution of PTiO2].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Berrot, A M; González-Vaquero, M; Díaz-Domínguez, F J; Robla-Costales, J

    2014-11-01

    The main goal of exhaustively monitoring neurocritical patients is to avoid secondary injury. In the last few years we have witnessed an increase in brain monitoring tools, beyond the checking of intracranial and brain perfusion pressures. These widely used systems offer valuable but possibly insufficient information. Awareness and correction of brain hypoxia is a useful and interesting measure, not only for diagnostic purposes but also when deciding treatment, and to predict an outcome. In this context, it would be of great interest to use all the information gathered from brain oxygenation monitoring systems in conjunction with other available multimodal monitoring devices, in order to offer individualized treatment for each patient. PMID:24793091

  8. The Role of Multimodal Invasive Monitoring in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Robertson, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews the role of modalities that directly monitor brain parenchyma in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The physiology monitored involves compartmental and perfusion pressures, tissue oxygenation and metabolism, quantitative blood flow, pressure autoregulation, and electrophysiology. There are several proposed roles for this multimodality monitoring, such as to track, prevent, and treat the cascade of secondary brain injury; monitor the neurologically injured patient; integrate various data into a composite, patient-specific, and dynamic picture; apply protocolized, pathophysiology-driven intensive care; use as a prognostic marker; and understand pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in secondary brain injury to develop preventive and abortive therapies, and to inform future clinical trials. PMID:27637400

  9. [Brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Brennum, Jannick; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Roed, Henrik Michael H

    2002-07-01

    The incidence of symptomatic brain metastases in Denmark is about 3500. In the present review, the aetiology, symptomatology, and diagnostic procedures are described. The main topic is a review of current treatments and the evidence for their efficacy. Treatment of brain metastases rarely cures the patient, the goal is rather to improve the quality of life and prolong survival. Without treatment, the median survival following diagnosis of brain metastases is about one month, with steroid treatment two months, with whole brain irradiation four to six months, and after surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery 10-12 months. A relatively simple treatment scheme based on the number of brain metastases and the overall condition of the patient is provided.

  10. Brain peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  11. SPECT study of low intensity He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation therapy for brain infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xue-Chang; Dong, Jia-Zheng; Chu, Xiao-Fan; Jia, Shao-Wei; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Zheng, Xi-Yuan; Zhou, Ci-Xiong

    2003-12-01

    We used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain perfusion imaging to study the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral function in brain infarction patients treated with intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). 17 of 35 patients with brain infarction were admitted to be treated by ILIB on the base of standard drug therapy, and SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after ILIB therapy with self-comparison. The results were analyzed in quantity with brain blood flow function change rate (BFCR%) model. Effect of ILIB during the therapy process in the other 18 patients were also observed. In the 18 patients, SPECT indicated an improvement of rCBF (both in focus and in total brain) and cerebral function after a 30 min-ILIB therapy. And the 17 patients showed an enhancement of total brain rCBF and cerebral function after ILIB therapy in comparison with that before, especially for the focus side of the brain. The enhancement for focus itself was extremely obvious with a higher significant difference (P<0.0001). The mirror regions had no significant change (P>0.05). BFCR% of foci was prominently higher than that of mirror regions (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the ILIB therapy can improve rCBF and cerebral function and activate brain cells of patients with brain infarction. The results denote new evidence of ILIB therapy for those patients with cerebral ischemia.

  12. Evaluation of Vascular Supply with Angio-Computed Tomography During Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2005-04-15

    We report the utility of a combined angiography and computed tomography (angio-CT) system in assessing drug distribution to the tumor during intra-arterial chemotherapy for metastatic brain tumors in a 65-year-old man. Although digital subtraction angiography did not clearly show tumor perfusion in two cerebellar tumors, angio-CT provided definite tumor perfusion in the complicated vascular territory, and anticancer agents were infused based on its findings. To our knowledge, however, this application for intra-arterial chemotherapy of brain tumors has not been previously described.

  13. Role of Extracranial Carotid Duplex and Computed Tomography Perfusion Scanning in Evaluating Perfusion Status of Pericarotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenting is an effective treatment of choice in terms of treating ischemic stroke patients with concomitant carotid stenosis. Though computed tomography perfusion scan has been recognized as a standard tool to monitor/follow up this group of patients, not everyone could endure due to underlying medical illness. In contrast, carotid duplex is a noninvasive assessment tool and could track patient clinical condition in real time. In this study we found that “resistance index” of the carotid ultrasound could detect flow changes before and after the stenting procedure, thus having great capacity to replace the role of computed tomography perfusion exam. PMID:27051669

  14. Improvements in the Quantitative Assessment of Cerebral Blood Volume and Flow with the Removal of Vessel Voxels from MR Perfusion Images

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Michael Mu Huo; Cho, I-Chieh; Kao, Yi-Hsuan; Chuang, Chi-Shuo; Chiu, Fang-Ying; Chang, Feng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To improve the quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) in the brain voxels from MR perfusion images. Materials and Methods. Normal brain parenchyma was automatically segmented with the time-to-peak criteria after cerebrospinal fluid removal and preliminary vessel voxel removal. Two scaling factors were calculated by comparing the relative CBV and CBF of the segmented normal brain parenchyma with the absolute values in the literature. Using the scaling factors, the relative values were converted to the absolute CBV and CBF. Voxels with either CBV > 8 mL/100 g or CBF > 100 mL/100 g/min were characterized as vessel voxels and were excluded from the quantitative measurements. Results. The segmented brain parenchyma with normal perfusion was consistent with the angiographic findings for each patient. We confirmed the necessity of dual thresholds including CBF and CBV for proper removal of vessel voxels. The scaling factors were 0.208 ± 0.041 for CBV, and 0.168 ± 0.037, 0.172 ± 0.037 for CBF calculated using standard and circulant singular value decomposition techniques, respectively. Conclusion. The automatic scaling and vessel removal techniques provide an alternative method for obtaining improved quantitative assessment of CBV and CBF in patients with thromboembolic cerebral arterial disease. PMID:23586033

  15. Intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure monitoring in non-TBI patients: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Helbok, Raimund; Olson, DaiWai M; Le Roux, Peter D; Vespa, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intracranial pressure (ICP) and the role of ICP monitoring are best studied in traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, a variety of acute neurologic illnesses e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, meningitis/encephalitis, and select metabolic disorders, e.g., liver failure and malignant, brain tumors can affect ICP. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature about ICP monitoring in conditions other than TBI and to provide recommendations how the technique may be used in patient management. A PubMed search between 1980 and September 2013 identified 989 articles; 225 of which were reviewed in detail. The technique used to monitor ICP in non-TBI conditions is similar to that used in TBI; however, indications for ICP monitoring often are intertwined with the presence of obstructive hydrocephalus and hence the use of ventricular catheters is more frequent. Increased ICP can adversely affect outcome, particularly when it fails to respond to treatment. However, patients with elevated ICP can still have favorable outcomes. Although the influence of ICP-based care on outcome in non-TBI conditions appears less robust than in TBI, monitoring ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure can play a role in guiding therapy in select patients.

  16. Landau-Kleffner syndrome: relation of clinical, EEG and Tc-99m-HMPAO brain SPECT findings and improvement in EEG after treatment.

    PubMed

    Sayit, E; Dirik, E; Durak, H; Uzuner, N; Anal, O; Cevik, N T

    1999-12-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder characterized by acquired aphasia with seizures and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT was performed in three right handed children with LKS. A relative decrease in perfusion was found in the left temporal cortex of all three patients and also in the left frontoparietal cortex of one patient with hyperkinetic behavior. Degree of regional cerebral perfusion impairment did not correlate with the severity of clinical and EEG abnormalities. Asymmetrical temporoparietal perfusion appears characteristic of LKS. SPECT findings in LKS were evaluated as useful in elucidating the pathogenic features of the disorder in the brain.

  17. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  18. Gated technetium-99m methoxy-isobutylisonitrile perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Avery, P G; Hudson, N M; Hubner, P J

    1992-05-01

    Technetium-99m methoxy-isobutylisonitrile, has been shown to be a useful perfusion agent for detecting coronary artery disease. Gated acquisition of perfusion images may remove motion artefact and improve detection. We compared the results of sensitivity and specificity for detecting coronary artery disease using perfusion images from the whole cardiac cycle (ungated) or from end-diastolic (gated) frames in 46 subjects, 31 with significant coronary disease and 15 with normal coronary arteries. There was no significant difference in detection of patients with coronary disease between the ungated and end-diastolic images: 25/31 with the ungated image and 28/31 with the end-diastolic. An improvement was made in detecting defects in the left anterior descending artery territory: 17/20 with the end-diastolic vs 11/20 with the ungated image (P less than 0.05) and in the right coronary artery region: 16/21 vs 10/21 (P less than 0.05), with an overall improvement in detecting regions supplied by stenosed coronary arteries: 45/55 end-diastolic vs 31/55 ungated (P less than 0.01). These results suggest use of the end-diastolic frame can significantly enhance the diagnostic capacity of methoxy-isobutylisonitrile perfusion imaging.

  19. Degradation of bradykinin by isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.; Orawski, A.T.; AchutaMurthy, P.N.; Simmons, W.H.

    1986-03-01

    Several studies have suggested that the essentially complete degradation of circulating bradykinin (BK) in lung is mediated in part by peptidase(s) other than the well-characterized angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The authors report here that the isolated perfused rat lung can inactivate BK by sequential N-terminal cleavage. (/sup 3/H-2, 3-Pro) BK was perfused through the lung and the products in the perfusate identified by HPLC. In the absence of inhibitors, BK was 89-100% degraded with /sup 3/H-Pro/sup 2/-Pro/sup 3/ and /sup 3/H-Pro as the major products. The dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV (DAP IV) inhibitor, diprotein A (Ile-Pro-Ile), greatly reduced the Pro-Pro and Pro peaks and produced a prominent BK/sub 2-7/ peak (or BK/sub 2-9/ peak if the ACE inhibitor, captopril, was also present). 2-Mercapto-ethanol, a rather specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase P (AP-P), prevented the release of Arg/sup 1/, producing major BK and/or BK/sub 1-7/ peaks. The neutral metalloendopeptidase inhibitor, phosphoramidon, had no effect on the pattern of degradation of BK by the perfused rat lung by the release of Arg/sup 1/ by AP-P followed by release of Pro/sup 2/-Pro/sup 3/ by DAP IV.

  20. Vascularized organoid engineered by modular assembly enables blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Alison P.; Sefton, Michael V.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is one approach to address the donor-organ shortage, but to attain clinically significant viable cell densities in thick tissues, laboratory-constructed tissues must have an internal vascular supply. We have adopted a biomimetic approach and assembled microscale modular components, consisting of submillimeter-sized collagen gel rods seeded with endothelial cells (ECs) into a (micro)vascularized tissue; in some prototypes the gel contained HepG2 cells to illustrate the possibilities. The EC-covered modules then were assembled into a larger tube and perfused with medium or whole blood. The interstitial spaces among the modules formed interconnected channels that enabled this perfusion. Viable cell densities were high, within an order of magnitude of cell densities within tissues, and the percolating nature of the flow through the construct was evident in microcomputed tomography and Doppler ultrasound measurements. Most importantly, the ECs retained their nonthrombogenic phenotype and delayed clotting times and inhibited the loss of platelets associated with perfusion of whole blood through the construct. Unlike the conventional scaffold and cell-seeding paradigm of other tissue-engineering approaches, this modular construct has the potential to be scalable, uniform, and perfusable with whole blood, circumventing the limitations of other approaches. PMID:16864785

  1. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  2. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. PMID:26730551

  3. Ventilation and perfusion alterations after smoke inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N B; Hudson, L D; Robertson, H T; Thorning, D R; Carrico, C J; Heimbach, D M

    1981-08-01

    Previous studies of human victims of smoke inhalation injury have demonstrated retention of intravenously infused 133xenon2, 6 suggesting either: (1) true intrapulmonary shunting (Qs) secondary to alveolar collapse, flooding, or obliteration, or (2) perfusion of low ventilation/perfusion compartments (low VA/Q) secondary to bronchospasm, bronchial constriction, or partial bronchial occlusion by cellular debris. To differentiate between and quantitate the relative contribution of intrapulmonary shunt versus low VA/Q compartments, multiple inert gas analysis, as described by Wagner et al.,12 was applied to human victims of smoke inhalation. Studies of an animal model of injury were subsequently performed to confirm these observations. These experiments suggest that early alterations of ventilation and perfusion resulted from increased high VA/Q and dead-space ventilation. Late alterations included significantly increased perfusion of low VA/Q compartments and return of high VA/Q ventilation to baseline levels. True intrapulmonary shunting was notably absent. This physiologic sequence may represent early regional pulmonary vasospasm followed by regional bronchial obstruction and gradual alveolar secondary to bronchospasm, bronchial edema, or partial occlusion by cellular debris.

  4. Myocardial perfusion imaging during chest pain: a useful clinical tool.

    PubMed

    Shehata, A R; LaSala, A F; Heller, G V

    1996-04-01

    A 72-year old man was injected with Tc 99m tetrofosmin during acute chest pain, in the presence of a nondiagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG). Myocardial perfusion imaging revealed a large anteroseptal defect. Subsequent catheterization confirmed left anterior descending artery disease. Acute imaging may be useful in the identification of critical disease in patients with chest pain and nondiagnostic ECG.

  5. Perfusion from angiogram and a priori (PAP) with temporal regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.

    2009-02-01

    Perfusion imaging is often used for diagnosis and for assessment of the response to the treatment. If perfusion can be measured during interventional procedures, it could lead to quantitative, more efficient and accurate treatment; however, imaging modalities that allow continuous dynamic scanning are not available in most of procedure rooms. Thus, we developed a method to measure the perfusion-time attenuation curves (TACs)-of regions-of-interest (ROIs) using xray C-arm angiography system with no gantry rotation but with a priori. The previous study revealed a problem of large oscillations in the estimated TACs and the lack of comparison with CT-based approaches. Thus the purposes of this study were (1) to reduce the variance of TDCs; and (2) to compare the performance of the improved PAP with that of the CT-based perfusion method. Our computer simulation study showed that the standard deviation of PAP method was decreased by 10.7-59.0% and that it outperformed (20× or 200× times) higher dose CT methods in terms of the accuracy, variance, and the temporal resolution.

  6. Current techniques of hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, R; Kohno, H; Mayumi, H; Shiraishi, K; Nagae, S; Nakayama, J; Yasui, H

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted examining 25 patients with malignant melanoma who were treated by our new protocol for hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion. The characteristics of our techniques include: a lower priming volume of the extracorporeal circuit; a therapeutic temperature range of 40-41 degrees C with 60 min hyperthermic perfusion; a nominal perfusion flow rate of 500 ml/min in the lower limb and 200 ml/min in the upper limb; and combined carboplatin with interferon-beta as the adjuvant chemotherapy drug. In the lower extremity group, the arterial cannula size ranged from 8 to 14 F, while the venous cannula size ranged from 14 to 16 F. In the upper limb group, the arterial cannula size ranged from 6 to 8F and the venous cannula size ranged from 10 to 12F. No patient required any homologous blood transfusion postoperatively. No operative death or major complications occurred during the early postoperative period, confirming the safety of this treatment. Both optimal cannula size selection and maintaining perfusion temperature below 41 degrees C were judged to be important in elimination of vascular and deep tissue injury.

  7. A review on electrical impedance tomography for pulmonary perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Jin, C; Thiagalingam, A; McEwan, A L

    2012-05-01

    Although electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for ventilation monitoring is on the verge of clinical trials, pulmonary perfusion imaging with EIT remains a challenge, especially in spontaneously breathing subjects. In anticipation of more research on this subject, we believe a thorough review is called for. In this paper, findings related to the physiological origins and electrical characteristics of this signal are summarized, highlighting properties that are particularly relevant to EIT. The perfusion impedance change signal is significantly smaller in amplitude compared with the changes due to ventilation. Therefore, the hardware used for this purpose must be more sensitive and more resilient to noise. In previous works, some signal- or image-processing methods have been required to separate these two signals. Three different techniques are reviewed in this paper, including the ECG-gating method, frequency-domain-filtering-based methods and a principal-component-analysis-based method. In addition, we review a number of experimental studies on both human and animal subjects that employed EIT for perfusion imaging, with promising results in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and pulmonary arterial hypertension as well as other potential applications. In our opinion, PE is most likely to become the main focus for perfusion EIT in the future, especially for heavily instrumented patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

  8. Simultaneous technetium-99m MIBI angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, G.Y.; Mena, I.G.; Kuperus, J.H.; Robertson, J.M.; French, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Resting first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) was performed with the myocardial perfusion agent technetium-99m MIBI. In 27 patients, it was compared with technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid FPRNA. A significant correlation was present in left (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) as well as right (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) ventricular ejection fraction measured with both radiopharmaceuticals. In 13 patients, MIBI derived segmental wall motion was compared with contrast ventriculography. A high correlation was present (p less than 0.001), and qualitative agreement was found in 38/52 segments. In 19 patients with myocardial infarction a significant correlation was present between MIBI segmental wall motion and perfusion scores (p less than 0.001). In ten patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 18 myocardial segments demonstrated diseased coronary vessels and impaired wall motion at contrast angiography. These segments were all identified by the MIBI wall motion and perfusion study. We conclude that MIBI is a promising agent for simultaneous evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at rest.

  9. Teaching Ventilation/Perfusion Relationships in the Lung

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Robb W.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review is meant to serve as a refresher for faculty teaching respiratory physiology to medical students. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion matching are some of the most challenging ideas to learn and teach. Some strategies to consider in teaching these concepts are, first, to build from simple to more complex by starting with a…

  10. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols to obtain patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics, whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained within. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the study of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models. PMID:24039540

  11. Disposition kinetics of diclofenac in the dual perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Selma; Rowland, Malcolm

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the hepatic disposition of diclofenac as a function of route of input: portal vein (PV) versus hepatic artery (HA) in the presence of its binding protein, albumin. The in situ dual perfused rat liver was performed using Krebs bicarbonate buffer containing human serum albumin (HSA, 0.25%-1%) at constant PV (12 mL/min) and HA (3 mL/min) flow rates. Bolus doses of [(14) C]-diclofenac and (125) I-labeled HSA were injected randomly into the HA or PV and then, after an appropriate interval, into the alternate vessel. Regardless of route of input and perfusion medium protein concentration, the hepatic outflow profile of diclofenac displayed a characteristic sharp peak followed by a slower eluting tail, indicating that its radial distribution is not instantaneous. Based on the estimated effective permeability-surface area product/blood flow ratio, hepatic uptake of diclofenac is governed by both perfusion and permeability. Fractional effluent recovery (F) increased as unbound diclofenac fraction in the perfusate decreased. Although no significant difference in hepatic clearance of diclofenac as a function of route of delivery at 0.5% and 1% HSA, it was demonstrable at 0.25% HSA (p < 0.001), when the extraction ratio is higher.

  12. Parallel imaging for first-pass myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Irwan, Roy; Lubbers, Daniël D; van der Vleuten, Pieter A; Kappert, Peter; Götte, Marco J W; Sijens, Paul E

    2007-06-01

    Two parallel imaging methods used for first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging were compared in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image artifacts. One used adaptive Time-adaptive SENSitivity Encoding (TSENSE) and the other used GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisition (GRAPPA), which are both applied to a gradient-echo sequence. Both methods were tested on 12 patients with coronary artery disease. The order of perfusion sequences was inverted in every other patient. Image acquisition was started during the administration of a contrast bolus followed by a 20-ml saline flush (3 ml/s), and the next perfusion was started at least 15 min thereafter using an identical bolus. An acceleration rate of 2 was used in both methods, and acquisition was performed during breath-holding. Significantly higher SNR, CNR and image quality were obtained with GRAPPA images than with TSENSE images. GRAPPA, however, did not yield a higher CNR when applied after the second bolus. GRAPPA perfusion imaging produced larger differences between subjects than did TSENSE. Compared to TSENSE, GRAPPA produced significantly better CNR on the first bolus. More consistent SNR and CNR were obtained from TSENSE images than from GRAPPA images, indicating that the diagnostic value of TSENSE may be better.

  13. Limited myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.A.; Haynie, M. )

    1990-03-01

    Experimental studies in animals have suggested that coronary flow reserve may be limited in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Accordingly, to noninvasively determine the effect of LVH on myocardial perfusion reserve, 25 patients, 9 with LVH and 16 controls, underwent positron imaging with rubidium-82 (82Rb) (30-55 mCi) or nitrogen-13 (13N) ammonia (12-19 mCi) at rest and following intravenous dipyridamole and handgrip stress. LVH was documented by echocardiographic and/or electrocardiographic measurements. LVH patients had either no chest pain (n = 8) and/or a normal coronary angiogram (n = 6). Nine simultaneous transaxial images were acquired, and the mean ratio of stress to rest activity (S:R), based on all regions for each heart, was calculated as an estimate of myocardial perfusion reserve. There were no regional differences in activity (i.e., perfusion defects) in any of the studies. S:R averaged 1.41 +/- 0.10 (s.d.) for controls and 1.06 +/- 0.09 for patients with LVH (p less than 0.0001). These data provide support for an abnormality in perfusion reserve in patients with LVH.

  14. Clinical Application and Research Advances of CT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Computed tomography (CT)-based myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP)has been widely recognized as a one-station solution for the imaging of myocardial ischemia-related diseases. This article reviews the clinical scanning protocols,analytical methods,and research advances of CTP in recent years and briefly discusses its limitations and future development. PMID:27469926

  15. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  16. Efficiency of U.S. Tissue Perfusion Estimators.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K; Insana, Michael F

    2016-08-01

    We measure the detection and discrimination efficiencies of conventional power-Doppler estimation of perfusion without contrast enhancement. The measurements are made in a phantom with known blood-mimicking fluid flow rates in the presence of clutter and noise. Efficiency is measured by comparing functions of the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for Doppler estimators with those of the ideal discriminator, for which we estimate the temporal covariance matrix from echo data. Principal-component analysis is examined as a technique for increasing the accuracy of covariance matrices estimated from echo data. We find that Doppler estimators are <50% efficient at directed perfusion detection between 0.1 and 2.0 mL/min per 2 cm(2) flow area. The efficiency was 20%-40% for the task of discriminating between two perfusion rates in the same range. We conclude that there are reasons to search for more efficient perfusion estimators, one that incorporates covariance matrix information that could significantly enhance the utility of Doppler ultrasound without contrast enhancement. PMID:27244733

  17. Reversing brain damage in former NFL players: implications for traumatic brain injury and substance abuse rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Amen, Daniel G; Wu, Joseph C; Taylor, Derek; Willeumier, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Brain injuries are common in professional American football players. Finding effective rehabilitation strategies can have widespread implications not only for retired players but also for patients with traumatic brain injury and substance abuse problems. An open label pragmatic clinical intervention was conducted in an outpatient neuropsychiatric clinic with 30 retired NFL players who demonstrated brain damage and cognitive impairment. The study included weight loss (if appropriate); fish oil (5.6 grams a day); a high-potency multiple vitamin; and a formulated brain enhancement supplement that included nutrients to enhance blood flow (ginkgo and vinpocetine), acetylcholine (acetyl-l-carnitine and huperzine A), and antioxidant activity (alpha-lipoic acid and n-acetyl-cysteine). The trial average was six months. Outcome measures were Microcog Assessment of Cognitive Functioning and brain SPECT imaging. In the retest situation, corrected for practice effect, there were statistically significant increases in scores of attention, memory, reasoning, information processing speed and accuracy on the Microcog. The brain SPECT scans, as a group, showed increased brain perfusion, especially in the prefrontal cortex, parietal lobes, occipital lobes, anterior cingulate gyrus and cerebellum. This study demonstrates that cognitive and cerebral blood flow improvements are possible in this group with multiple interventions.

  18. [Brain concussion].

    PubMed

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  19. Photoacoustic perfusion measurements: a comparison with power Doppler in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, H. M.; Arabul, M. Ü.; Tchang, B. C.; van de Vosse, F. N.; Rutten, M. C.; Lopata, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-based measurements using Doppler, contrast, and more recently photoacoustics (PA), have emerged as techniques for tissue perfusion measurements. In this study, the feasibility of in vitro perfusion measurements with a fully integrated, hand-held, photoacoustic probe was investigated and compared to Power Doppler (PD). Three cylindrical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were made (diameter = 15 mm) containing 100, 200 and 400 parallel polysulfone tubes (diameter = 0.2 mm), resulting in a perfused cross-sectional area of 1.8, 3.6 and 7.1% respectively. Each phantom was perfused with porcine blood (15 mL/min). Cross-sectional PA images (λ = 805nm, frame rate = 10Hz) and PD images (PRF = 750Hz) were acquired with a MyLab One and MyLab 70 scanner (Esaote, NL), respectively. Data were averaged over 70 frames. The average PA signal intensity was calculated in a region-of-interest of 4 mm by 6 mm. The percentage of colored PD pixels was measured in the entire phantom region. The average signal intensity of the PA images increased linearly with perfusion density, being 0.54 (+/- 0.01), 0.56 (+/- 0.01), 0.58 (+/- 0.01) with an average background signal of 0.53 in the three phantoms, respectively. For PD, the percentage of colored pixels in the phantom area (1.5% (+/- 0.2%), 4.4% (+/- 0.2%), 13.7% (+/- 0.8%)) also increased linearly. The preliminary results suggest that PA, like PD, is capable of detecting an increase of blood volume in tissue. In the future, in vivo measurements will be explored, although validation will be more complex.

  20. Vascular effects of acetylcholine in the perfused rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, P.D.; Gillis, C.N.

    1986-03-05

    Acetylcholine (ACh) relaxes large, isolated arteries by releasing an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). The authors decided to determine if ACh releases EDRF in rabbit lungs (RL) perfused in situ and if chemical injury with tetradecanoyl phorbol myristate acetate (TPA) could modify EDRF release in RL and in rabbit pulmonary arteries (RPA) in vitro. RL were perfused at 15 ml/min with Krebs-dextran solution. 1 ..mu..M ACh infusion raised perfusion pressure (P) in RL that was blocked by 30 ..mu..M indomethacin (IND) in the perfusate. However, when IND-treated RL were perfused with the stable endoperoxide analog, U46619 (2-6nM) to increase P, ACh infusion (0.01-1.0 ..mu..M) consistently decreased elevated P. The vasodilator response to infusion of 1 ..mu..M ACh was acutely antagonized by infusion of either 20 ..mu..M quinacrine (Q) or 10 ..mu..M Fe/sup + +/-hemoglobin (Hb). ACh did not decrease P in IND-treated RL pre-equilibrated with Q or Hb. TPA (10 nM) antagonized ACh-reduction of P and the ACh-induced relaxation of isolated RPA. The TPA antagonism of ACh-relaxation of RPA was prevented by catalase (300 U/ml). From these results they conclude that: 1) ACh-induced vasoconstriction in RL depends on cyclooxygenase product(s). 2) IND unmasks ACh-induced vasodilatation in RL that is inhibited by Q and by Hb suggesting that the effect is mediated by EDRF. 3) TPA inhibits ACh-induced vasodilatation and relaxation of RPA via the release of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or a related oxidant that injures the endothelium.

  1. Cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in young and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Hartwich, Doreen; Seifert, Thomas; Olesen, Niels D; McNulty, Clare L; Nielsen, Henning B; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Secher, Niels H

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism in 11 young (22 ± 1 years) and nine older (66 ± 2 years) individuals at rest and during cycling exercise at low (25% W(max)), moderate (50% Wmax), high (75% W(max)) and exhaustive (100% W(max)) workloads. Mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCA V(mean)), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO) and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P(aCO2)) were measured. Blood samples were obtained from the right internal jugular vein and brachial artery to determine concentration differences for oxygen (O2), glucose and lactate across the brain. The molar ratio between cerebral uptake of O2 versus carbohydrate (O2-carbohydrate index; O2/[glucose + 1/2 lactate]; OCI), the cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (CMRO2) and changes in mitochondrial O2 tension ( P(mitoO2)) were calculated. 100% W(max) was ~33% lower in the older group. Exercise increased MAP and CO in both groups (P < 0.05 vs. rest), but at each intensity MAP was higher and CO lower in the older group (P < 0.05). MCA V(mean), P(aCO2) and cerebral vascular conductance index (MCA V(mean)/MAP) were lower in the older group at each exercise intensity (P < 0.05). In contrast, young and older individuals exhibited similar increases in CMRO2 (by ~30 μmol (100 g(-1)) min(-1)), and decreases in OCI (by ~1.5) and (by ~10 mmHg) during exercise at 75% W(max). Thus, despite the older group having reduced cerebral perfusion and maximal exercise capacity, cerebral oxygenation and uptake of lactate and glucose are similar during exercise in young and older individuals.

  2. Poppy seed oil protection of the hippocampus after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik-Demirkan, A; Oztaşan, N; Oguzhan, E O; Cil, N; Coskun, S

    2012-11-01

    The brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia; this is true particularly of parts that are crucial for cognitive function. The effects of hypoxia are especially dramatic in the hippocampus. We evaluated the potential protective effects of poppy seed oil on the number of hippocampus cells and the serum antioxidant/oxidant status after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion (CIR). Eighteen rats were divided into three equal groups. Group 1 served as the control group without CIR. Group 2 received poppy seed oil daily by oral gavage at a dose of 0.4 ml/kg, while group 3 was given 0.4 ml/kg saline solution by oral gavage per day; these treatments were continued for one month. Groups 2 and 3 were subjected to CIR induced by clamps on two points of both of the carotid arteries for 45 min followed by 45 min re-perfusion. There were significant decreases in the number of hippocampus cells between groups 1 and 2, and between groups 1 and 3. The mean cell number in group 2 was not significantly different from that of group 3. The serum nitric oxide levels in CIR groups were elevated significantly compared to controls, and were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 3. The glutathione levels were increased significantly in the poppy seed oil treated group compared to the saline CIR groups. The malondialdehyde levels were markedly increased in group 3 compared to both groups 1 and 2. Our study suggests that poppy seed oil can improve antioxidant defense capacity after CIR, although this treatment did not alter significantly the frequency of cell death.

  3. Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Executive, Affective, and Motor Networks During Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Wu, Jing; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Tapert, Susan F.; Yang, Guang; Connolly, Colm G.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Wolkowitz, Owen; Eisendrath, Stuart; Hoeft, Fumiko; Banerjee, Dipavo; Hood, Korey; Hendren, Robert L.; Paulus, Martin P.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While substantial literature has reported regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in adults with depression, these studies commonly necessitated the injection of radioisotopes into subjects. The recent development of arterial spin labeling (ASL), however, allows for noninvasive measurements of rCBF. Currently, no published ASL studies have examined cerebral perfusion in adolescents with depression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine baseline cerebral perfusion in adolescent depression using a newly developed ASL technique: pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). Method 25 medication-naive adolescents (ages 13–17 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 26 well-matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Baseline rCBF was measured via a novel PCASL method that optimizes tagging efficiency. Results Voxel-based whole brain analyses revealed significant frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and cingulate hypoperfusion in the group with depression (p<0.05, corrected). Hyperperfusion was also observed within the subcallosal cingulate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Similarly, region-of-interest analyses revealed amygdalar and insular hypoperfusion in the group with depression, as well as hyperperfusion in the putamen and superior insula (p<0.05, corrected). Conclusions Adolescents with depression and healthy adolescents appear to differ on rCBF in executive, affective, and motor networks. Dysfunction in these regions may contribute to the cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor symptoms commonly present in adolescent depression. These findings point to possible biomarkers for adolescent depression that could inform early interventions and treatments and establishes a methodology for using PCASL to noninvasively measure rCBF in clinical and healthy adolescent populations. PMID:24074474

  4. Study on the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR perfusion weighted imaging in SHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Dong, Yang; Chen, WenLi; Lin, Xueying; Xing, Da; Huang, Li

    2007-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death, and approximately 50% of survivors have a residual neurologic deficit and greater than 25% require chronic care. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) describes how far cerebral perfusion can increase from a baseline value after stimulation. High blood pressure is the most important independent risk factor for stroke and other vascular diseases. The incidence of stroke in the hypertensive is six times higher than in the patient with normal blood pressure. CVRC in the hypertensive was even lower than in control patients. MR perfusion weighted imaging (MR PWI) with the well-established acetazolamide (ACZ) stimulation test has been used for assessing brain function. The aim of this work is to assess the cerebrovascular reserve capacity by MR PWI with "ACZ" tolerance test in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to identify its value in evaluating the CVRC. Experimental animal including 3 groups: Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) (12-week-old) as control group, SHR (12-week-old and 20-week-old) as experimental group. MR PWI was performed respectively before and after acetazolamide administrated orally in 3 groups on a clinical 1.5 Tesla GE Signa MR fx/i whole-body MR system. The ROI was chosen in the bilateral frontal lobe to measure the value of rCBV, rCBF and MTT. The results showed that before ACZ-test, there was statistic differences between the WKY and SHR(12-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the values of rCBV and rCBF (P>0.05), and after ACZ-test, there were statistic differences between WKY and SHR (20-week-old), and between SHR(12-week-old) and SHR(20-week-old) in the rCBV value (P<0.05). It is concluded that the method of MRI PWI combined with the "ACZ stress test" can provide more qualitative and half-quantitative information on the cerebral perfusion to evaluate the CVRC in SHR.

  5. Normothermic blood perfusion of isolated rabbit kidneys. III. In vitro physiology of kidneys after perfusion with Euro-Collins solution or 7.5 M cryoprotectant (VS4).

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Françoise G; Khirabadi, Bijan S; Fahy, Gregory M

    2002-06-01

    Cryopreservation of solid organs might be possible using a mixture of cell-permeable agents, cryoprotectants (CPA), which are designed to completely preclude ice crystal formation during cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The effects of a specific prototype solution (VS4) were evaluated by normothermic blood perfusion in vitro. Rabbit kidneys were divided into three groups: untreated controls ( n=7), Euro-Collins (EC)-perfused controls ( n=6) and VS4 (49%, w/v) CPA-perfused kidneys ( n=7). After a 2-h blood perfusion, five of the seven CPA-perfused kidneys developed polyuria (0.21 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)) relative to untreated controls (0.07 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)) or EC-perfused kidneys (0.06 mlxmin(-1)xg(-1)), owing to the lower reabsorption of water (34.3%), Na(+) (34.2%) and glucose (35.6%). Furthermore, two kidneys were non-functional with virtually no urine production. Reduced tubular function was associated with reduced oxygen consumption (3.6 versus 2.3 versus 2.0 micromolexmin(-1)xg(-1) for controls, EC- and CPA-perfused kidneys, respectively) and increased weight gain (17% versus 20% versus 30%, respectively) after blood perfusion. Therefore, the current results provide insight into both the physiological effects of VS4 and the limits of reversibility of renal pathophysiological states. Our results also indicate that in vitro monitoring of oxygen consumption and weight gain of perfused organs could be used as predictors of renal function.

  6. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  7. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  8. Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Measurements of an Isolated Rat Liver and an Anesthetized Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Lee, Charles Y.; Diller, Thomas E.; Scott, Elaine P.

    2008-01-01

    A simple, cost effective, and noninvasive blood perfusion system is tested in animal models. The system uses a small sensor to measure the heat transfer response to a thermal event (convective cooling) imposed on the tissue surface. Heat flux data are compared with a mathematical model of the tissue to estimate both blood perfusion and thermal contact resistance between the tissue and the probe. The perfusion system was evaluated for repeatability and sensitivity using isolated rat liver and exposed rat kidney tests. Perfusion in the isolated liver tests was varied by controlling the flow of the perfusate into the liver, and the perfusion in the exposed kidney tests was varied by temporarily occluding blood flow through the renal artery and vein. The perfusion estimated by the convective perfusion probe was in good agreement with that of the metered flow of the perfusate into the liver model. The liver tests indicated that the probe can be used to detect small changes in perfusion (0.005 ml/ml/s). The probe qualitatively tracked the changes in the perfusion in the kidney model due to occlusion of the renal artery and vein. PMID:19045542

  9. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  10. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone metabolism and extraction by the perfused guinea pig placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Nogimori, T.; Alex, S.; Baker, S.; Emerson, C.H.

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the extraction of synthetic TRH and its metabolic conversion in the perfu