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Sample records for brasilianum apicomplexa plasmodidae

  1. First Full Draft Genome Sequence of Plasmodium brasilianum

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Shashidhar; Nayak, Vishal; Patel, Dhruviben S.; Olsen, Christian; Sheth, Mili; Batra, Dhwani; Loparev, Vladimir; Vannberg, Fredrik O.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Barnwell, John W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasmodium malariae is a protozoan parasite that can cause human malaria. The simian parasite Plasmodium brasilianum infects New World monkeys from Latin America and is morphologically indistinguishable from P. malariae. Here, we report the first full draft genome sequence for P. brasilianum. PMID:28183758

  2. On the identity and typification of Solanum brasilianum Dunal (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Silva, Suelma; Knapp, Sandra; Proença, Carolyn E B

    2017-01-01

    Solanum brasilianum Dunal was described by Dunal in 1813 with reference only to an illustration in an 18(th) century work by Leonard Plukenet. The plate is difficult to interpret and no explicitly related specimens were available so the name Solanum brasilianum has long been regarded as "unresolved" and has never been used. Material matching the Plukenet plate was discovered in the herbarium of the University of Oxford (OXF) by Stephen Harris during his study of the English privateer William Dampier's Brazilian collection. The specimen is referable to a common Brazilian Solanum that is a member of the Torva clade, Solanum paniculatum L., making Solanum brasilianum Dunal a heterotypic synonym. We lectotypify Solanum brasilianum here, and designate an epitype using the Dampier material from OXF.

  3. On the identity and typification of Solanum brasilianum Dunal (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Silva, Suelma; Knapp, Sandra; Proença, Carolyn E.B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Solanum brasilianum Dunal was described by Dunal in 1813 with reference only to an illustration in an 18th century work by Leonard Plukenet. The plate is difficult to interpret and no explicitly related specimens were available so the name Solanum brasilianum has long been regarded as “unresolved” and has never been used. Material matching the Plukenet plate was discovered in the herbarium of the University of Oxford (OXF) by Stephen Harris during his study of the English privateer William Dampier’s Brazilian collection. The specimen is referable to a common Brazilian Solanum that is a member of the Torva clade, Solanum paniculatum L., making Solanum brasilianum Dunal a heterotypic synonym. We lectotypify Solanum brasilianum here, and designate an epitype using the Dampier material from OXF. PMID:28228684

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fungus Penicillium brasilianum MG11

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Jörg; Mattern, Derek J.; Walther, Grit; Guthke, Reinhard; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Penicillium belongs to the phylum Ascomycota and includes a variety of fungal species important for food and drug production. We report the draft genome sequence of Penicillium brasilianum MG11. This strain was isolated from soil, and it was reported to produce different secondary metabolites. PMID:26337871

  5. Taxon-specific oligonucleotide primers for detection of two ancient endomycorrhizal fungi, Glomus occultum and Glomus brasilianum.

    PubMed

    Millner, P D; Mulbry, W W; Reynolds, S L

    2001-03-15

    A unique oligonucleotide pair, GOCC56:GOCC427, was designed that correctly primed specific amplification of a approximately 370-bp sequence spanning the ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions of Glomus occultum and Glomus brasilianum. In addition, this primer pair successfully detected G. occultum and G. brasilianum DNA in nested PCR using a primary PCR product amplified from highly diluted extracts of colonized corn (Zea mays) roots using modified ITS1:ITS4 primers. A second primer pair, GBRAS86:GBRAS388, primed specific amplification of a approximately 200-bp sequence spanning the ITS and 5.8S rDNA regions present only in G. brasilianum and Glomus strain GR582. Combined use of both primer pairs provides the means to detect and differentiate two ancient endomycorrhizal species, G. occultum and G. brasilianum, undetectable by standard root staining procedures. Sequence analysis showed that the purported G. occultum strain GR582 is likely a strain of G. brasilianum.

  6. Characterization of novel thermostable polygalacturonases from Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Jamile; Pili, Jonaina; Cence, Karine; Toniazzo, Geciane; Treichel, Helen; Valduga, Eunice

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was the partial characterization of polygalacturonase (PG) extracts produced by a newly isolated Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation. The partial characterization of the crude enzymatic extracts showed optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 37 °C for both extracts. The results of temperature stability showed that PG from both microorganisms were more stable at 55 °C. However, the enzyme obtained by P. brasilianum presents a half-life time (t 1/2 = 693.10 h), about one order of magnitude higher than those observed in for A. niger at 55 °C. In terms of pH stability, the PG produced by P. brasilianum presented higher stability at pH 4.0 and 5.0, while the PG from A. niger showed higher stability at pH 5.0.

  7. New potential Plasmodium brasilianum hosts: tamarin and marmoset monkeys (family Callitrichidae).

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Denise A M; Pina-Costa, Anielle; Bianco, Cesare; Moreira, Silvia B; Brasil, Patricia; Pissinatti, Alcides; Daniel-Ribeiro, Claudio T; Brito, Cristiana F A

    2017-02-10

    Non-human primates (NHPs) as a source for Plasmodium infections in humans are a challenge for malaria elimination. In Brazil, two species of Plasmodium have been described infecting NHPs, Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. Both species are infective to man. Plasmodium brasilianum resembles morphologically, genetically and immunologically the human quartan Plasmodium malariae. Plasmodium brasilianum naturally infects species of non-human primates from all New World monkey families from a large geographic area. In the family Callitrichidae only the genus Saguinus has been described infected so far. The present study describes the natural infection of P. brasilianum in tamarins and marmosets of the genera Callithrix, Mico and Leontopithecus in the Atlantic forest. One hundred and twenty-two NHPs of the family Callitrichidae housed in the Primate Centre of Rio de Janeiro (CPRJ) were sampled in June 2015, and January and July 2016. The CPRJ is located in the Atlantic forest in the Guapimirim municipality, in the Rio de Janeiro state, where human autochthonous cases of malaria have been reported. The samples were screened for the presence of Plasmodium using optical microscopy and nested PCR for detection of 18S small subunit rRNA gene. The amplicon was sequenced to confirm the molecular diagnosis. The frequency of Plasmodium infections detected by nested PCR in New World monkeys of the family Callitrichidae was 6.6%. For the first time, Callitrichidae primates of genera Callithrix, Mico and Leontopithecus were found naturally infected with P. brasilianum. Infection was confirmed by sequencing a small fragment of 18S rRNA gene, although no parasites were detected in blood smears. The reported P. brasilianum infection in NHP species maintained in captivity suggests that infection can be favoured by the presence of vectors and the proximity between known (and unknown) hosts of malaria. Thus, the list of potential malaria reservoirs needs to be further explored.

  8. Time course production of indole alkaloids by an endophytic strain of Penicillium brasilianum cultivated in rice.

    PubMed

    Fill, Taicia Pacheco; Asenha, Heloísa Briganti Rodrigues; Marques, Anna Silvia; Ferreira, Antônio Gilberto; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2013-01-01

    During our studies concerning endophytic fungi, two indole alkaloids were co-produced with verruculogen by Penicillium brasilianum isolated from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae). The compounds were isolated by the use of combined chromatographic procedures and identified by physical methods, mainly 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. This article also describes the production of verruculogen TR-2, first described for this species of Penicillium, and a verruculogen TR-2C-11 epimer, that is a novel fungal natural product. The kinetic production of verruculogen and verruculogen TR-2 produced by P. brasilianum were evaluated in order to understand the involvement of verruculogen TR-2 in verruculogen biosynthesis.

  9. Microbial diversification of Diels-Alder cycloadducts by whole cells of Penicillium brasilianum.

    PubMed

    Din, Zia Ud; Fill, Taicia P; Donatoni, M Carolina; Dos Santos, Carolina A A; Brocksom, Timothy J; Rodrigues-Filho, E

    2016-11-01

    Functionalizations of cycloadducts are important steps for the use of Diels-Alder reactions in the construction of complex cyclic or polycyclic molecules from relatively simple starting materials. In the present work, we studied the ability of Penicillium brasilianum to perform microbial transformations of racemic Diels-Alder endo-cycloadducts. Thus, Diels-Alder products, obtained from reacting cyclopentadiene or 2,3-dimethylbutadiene with alkylated para-benzoquinones, were transformed by the resting cells of P. brasilianum producing new functionalized polycyclic compounds. These biotransformations yielded novel products of oxidation and ring closure, reduction of the C=C or C=O in [Formula: see text]-unsaturated system, and allylic hydroxylations. The reduction products (conjugated double bond and carbonyl group) were also synthesized, and the enantioselectivity of both in vitro and in vivo processes was evaluated. In all cases, the microbiological transformations were enantioselective. In silico docking studies of the Diels-Alder cycloadducts with P. brasilianum oxidoreductase "old yellow enzymes" shed more light on these transformations.

  10. Merozoite surface protein-1 genetic diversity in Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium brasilianum from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Lilian O; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Alves, João M P; Bueno, Marina G; Röhe, Fabio; Catão-Dias, José L; Neves, Amanda; Malafronte, Rosely S; Curado, Izilda; Domingues, Wilson; Kirchgatter, Karin

    2015-11-16

    The merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) gene encodes the major surface antigen of invasive forms of the Plasmodium erythrocytic stages and is considered a candidate vaccine antigen against malaria. Due to its polymorphisms, MSP1 is also useful for strain discrimination and consists of a good genetic marker. Sequence diversity in MSP1 has been analyzed in field isolates of three human parasites: P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. ovale. However, the extent of variation in another human parasite, P. malariae, remains unknown. This parasite shows widespread, uneven distribution in tropical and subtropical regions throughout South America, Asia, and Africa. Interestingly, it is genetically indistinguishable from P. brasilianum, a parasite known to infect New World monkeys in Central and South America. Specific fragments (1 to 5) covering 60 % of the MSP1 gene (mainly the putatively polymorphic regions), were amplified by PCR in isolates of P. malariae and P. brasilianum from different geographic origin and hosts. Sequencing of the PCR-amplified products or cloned PCR fragments was performed and the sequences were used to construct a phylogenetic tree by the maximum likelihood method. Data were computed to give insights into the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships of these parasites. Except for fragment 4, sequences from all other fragments consisted of unpublished sequences. The most polymorphic gene region was fragment 2, and in samples where this region lacks polymorphism, all other regions are also identical. The low variability of the P. malariae msp1 sequences of these isolates and the identification of the same haplotype in those collected many years apart at different locations is compatible with a low transmission rate. We also found greater diversity among P. brasilianum isolates compared with P. malariae ones. Lastly, the sequences were segregated according to their geographic origins and hosts, showing a strong genetic and geographic structure. Our data

  11. Natural infection of Plasmodium brasilianum in humans: Man and monkey share quartan malaria parasites in the Venezuelan Amazon.

    PubMed

    Lalremruata, Albert; Magris, Magda; Vivas-Martínez, Sarai; Koehler, Maike; Esen, Meral; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Perkins, Douglas Jay; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Metzger, Wolfram G

    2015-09-01

    The quartan malaria parasite Plasmodium malariae is the widest spread and best adapted human malaria parasite. The simian Plasmodium brasilianum causes quartan fever in New World monkeys and resembles P. malariae morphologically. Since the genetics of the two parasites are nearly identical, differing only in a range of mutations expected within a species, it has long been speculated that the two are the same. However, no naturally acquired infection with parasites termed as P. brasilianum has been found in humans until now. We investigated malaria cases from remote Yanomami indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon and analyzed the genes coding for the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the small subunit of ribosomes (18S) by species-specific PCR and capillary based-DNA sequencing. Based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing, we identified 12 patients harboring malaria parasites which were 100% identical with P. brasilianum isolated from the monkey, Alouatta seniculus. Translated amino acid sequences of the CS protein gene showed identical immunodominant repeat units between quartan malaria parasites isolated from both humans and monkeys. This study reports, for the first time, naturally acquired infections in humans with parasites termed as P. brasilianum. We conclude that quartan malaria parasites are easily exchanged between humans and monkeys in Latin America. We hypothesize a lack of host specificity in mammalian hosts and consider quartan malaria to be a true anthropozoonosis. Since the name P. brasilianum suggests a malaria species distinct from P. malariae, we propose that P. brasilianum should have a nomenclatorial revision in case further research confirms our findings. The expansive reservoir of mammalian hosts discriminates quartan malaria from other Plasmodium spp. and requires particular research efforts.

  12. Natural infection of Plasmodium brasilianum in humans: Man and monkey share quartan malaria parasites in the Venezuelan Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Lalremruata, Albert; Magris, Magda; Vivas-Martínez, Sarai; Koehler, Maike; Esen, Meral; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Perkins, Douglas Jay; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Metzger, Wolfram G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The quartan malaria parasite Plasmodium malariae is the widest spread and best adapted human malaria parasite. The simian Plasmodium brasilianum causes quartan fever in New World monkeys and resembles P. malariae morphologically. Since the genetics of the two parasites are nearly identical, differing only in a range of mutations expected within a species, it has long been speculated that the two are the same. However, no naturally acquired infection with parasites termed as P. brasilianum has been found in humans until now. Methods We investigated malaria cases from remote Yanomami indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon and analyzed the genes coding for the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the small subunit of ribosomes (18S) by species-specific PCR and capillary based-DNA sequencing. Findings Based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing, we identified 12 patients harboring malaria parasites which were 100% identical with P. brasilianum isolated from the monkey, Alouatta seniculus. Translated amino acid sequences of the CS protein gene showed identical immunodominant repeat units between quartan malaria parasites isolated from both humans and monkeys. Interpretation This study reports, for the first time, naturally acquired infections in humans with parasites termed as P. brasilianum. We conclude that quartan malaria parasites are easily exchanged between humans and monkeys in Latin America. We hypothesize a lack of host specificity in mammalian hosts and consider quartan malaria to be a true anthropozoonosis. Since the name P. brasilianum suggests a malaria species distinct from P. malariae, we propose that P. brasilianum should have a nomenclatorial revision in case further research confirms our findings. The expansive reservoir of mammalian hosts discriminates quartan malaria from other Plasmodium spp. and requires particular research efforts. PMID:26501116

  13. Effectiveness of broadcast surveys in determining habitat use of Ferruginous Pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in southern Texas

    Treesearch

    Glenn A. Proudfoot; Jody L. Mays; Sam L. Beasom; Ralph Bingham

    1997-01-01

    We compared habitat information obtained from tracking 12 radio-tagged Ferruginous Pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) (hereafter referred to as pygmy-owls) in southern Texas during 1995 and similar information from pygmy-owl response points to evaluate the effectiveness of broadcast surveys in determining pygmy-owl habitat use.

  14. Metabolic pathways in the apicoplast of apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Frank; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa harbor a plastid-like organelle called apicoplast that is the most reduced organelle of this type known. Due to the medical importance of some members of Apicomplexa, a number of fully sequenced genomes are available that have allowed to assemble metabolic pathways also from the apicoplast and have revealed initial clues to its essential nature for parasite survival in the host. We provide a compilation of Internet resources useful to access, reconstruct, verify, or annotate metabolic pathways. Then we show detailed and updated metabolic maps and discuss the three major biosynthetic pathways leading to the generation of isoprenoids, fatty acids, and heme, and compare these routes in the different species. Moreover, several auxiliary pathways, like iron-sulfur cluster assembly, are covered and put into context with the major metabolic routes. Finally, we highlight some aspects that emerged from recent publications and were not discussed previously with regard to Apicomplexa.

  15. Molecular Detection of Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum in Non-Human Primates in Captivity in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Ramírez, Alicia; Jiménez-Soto, Mauricio; Castro, Ruth; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Dolz, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-two blood samples of non-human primates of thirteen rescue centers in Costa Rica were analyzed to determine the presence of species of Plasmodium using thick blood smears, semi-nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (SnM-PCR) for species differentiation, cloning and sequencing for confirmation. Using thick blood smears, two samples were determined to contain the Plasmodium malariae parasite, with SnM-PCR, a total of five (3.3%) samples were positive to P. malariae, cloning and sequencing confirmed both smear samples as P. malariae. One sample amplified a larger and conserved region of 18S rDNA for the genus Plasmodium and sequencing confirmed the results obtained microscopically and through SnM-PCR tests. Sequencing and construction of a phylogenetic tree of this sample revealed that the P. malariae/P. brasilianum parasite (GenBank KU999995) found in a howler monkey (Alouatta palliata) is identical to that recently reported in humans in Costa Rica. The SnM-PCR detected P. malariae/P. brasilianum parasite in different non-human primate species in captivity and in various regions of the southern Atlantic and Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The similarity of the sequences of parasites found in humans and a monkey suggests that monkeys may be acting as reservoirs of P.malariae/P. brasilianum, for which reason it is important, to include them in control and eradication programs.

  16. Molecular Detection of Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum in Non-Human Primates in Captivity in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Ramírez, Alicia; Jiménez-Soto, Mauricio; Castro, Ruth; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-two blood samples of non-human primates of thirteen rescue centers in Costa Rica were analyzed to determine the presence of species of Plasmodium using thick blood smears, semi-nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (SnM-PCR) for species differentiation, cloning and sequencing for confirmation. Using thick blood smears, two samples were determined to contain the Plasmodium malariae parasite, with SnM-PCR, a total of five (3.3%) samples were positive to P. malariae, cloning and sequencing confirmed both smear samples as P. malariae. One sample amplified a larger and conserved region of 18S rDNA for the genus Plasmodium and sequencing confirmed the results obtained microscopically and through SnM-PCR tests. Sequencing and construction of a phylogenetic tree of this sample revealed that the P. malariae/P. brasilianum parasite (GenBank KU999995) found in a howler monkey (Alouatta palliata) is identical to that recently reported in humans in Costa Rica. The SnM-PCR detected P. malariae/P. brasilianum parasite in different non-human primate species in captivity and in various regions of the southern Atlantic and Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The similarity of the sequences of parasites found in humans and a monkey suggests that monkeys may be acting as reservoirs of P.malariae/P. brasilianum, for which reason it is important, to include them in control and eradication programs. PMID:28125696

  17. Characterization and kinetic analysis of a thermostable GH3 beta-glucosidase from Penicillium brasilianum.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Kristian B R M; Harris, Paul V; Olsen, Carsten L; Johansen, Katja S; Hojer-Pedersen, Jesper; Borjesson, Johan; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2010-03-01

    A GH3 beta-glucosidase (BGL) from Penicillium brasilianum was purified to homogeneity after cultivation on a cellulose and xylan rich medium. The BGL was identified in a genomic library, and it was successfully expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The BGL had excellent stability at elevated temperatures with no loss in activity after 24 h of incubation at 60 degrees C at pH 4-6, and the BGL was shown to have significantly higher stability at these conditions in comparison to Novozym 188 and to other fungal GH3 BGLs reported in the literature. The BGL had significant lower affinity for cellobiose compared with the artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (pNP-Glc) and further, pronounced substrate inhibition using pNP-Glc. Kinetic studies demonstrated the high importance of using cellobiose as substrate and glucose as inhibitor to describe the inhibition kinetics of BGL taking place during cellulose hydrolysis. A novel assay was developed to characterize this glucose inhibition on cellobiose hydrolysis. The assay uses labelled glucose-13C6 as inhibitor and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis to quantify the hydrolysis rates.

  18. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Ferruginous Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arrona-Rivera, Alicia E; Enríquez, Paula L; García-Feria, Luis M; Orellana, Sergio Alvarado; von Osten, Jaime Rendón

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides were quantified in samples of feathers (n = 17) and blood (n = 15) of the ferruginous pygmy owl (Glaucidium brasilianum). The individuals were captured near the Protected Natural Area Cerro Sonsonate, Chiapas, Mexico, between February and June 2014. In both tissues, pesticides belonging to seven organochlorine chemical families were detected. However, the organochlorine pesticide concentrations differed between feathers and blood. The highest concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes were found in feathers (0.63 ± 0.89 μg/g), whereas the highest concentrations of ΣDrines were found in blood (0.31 ± 0.47 μg/mL). By using the summed concentrations for each of the seven families of pesticides found in feathers, we did not find any significant correlation between the pesticides and pectoral muscle or body weight (p > 0.15). The ΣDDT group was the only pesticide family that showed a positive correlation with owl body weight (r = 0.60, p = 0.05); the concentrations of these pesticides were also high in feather and blood tissues (r = 0.87, p = 0.02). Our results confirm that ferruginous pygmy owls in the study area are exposed to these pesticides.

  19. Three austin family compounds from Penicillium brasilianum exhibit selective blocking action on cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Saori; Furutani, Shogo; Hirata, Koichi; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Austin (AT) and its derivatives (dehydroaustin (DAT) and acetoxydehydroaustin (ADAT)) produced by Penicillium brasilianum MG-11 exhibit toxicity to insects, yet their targets are unknown. Here, we used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to investigate the action of AT family compounds on cockroach acetylcholine (ACh), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and l-glutamate receptors expressed in the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) neuron. U-tube application of AT or its derivatives did not induce any current amplitudes, suggesting that they did not act as agonist of these three receptors. In the second step of experiments, they were bath-applied for 1min before co-application with the corresponding ligand. We found that AT and its derivatives had no effect on GABA and l-glutamate-induced currents, whereas they significantly reduced ACh- and epibatidine-induced currents, showing that these compounds acted as selective antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in the cockroach neuron. Of the compounds, DAT showed the highest blocking potency for nAChRs, differentially attenuating the peak and slowly desensitizing current amplitude of ACh-induced responses with pIC(50) (=-logIC(50) (M)) values of 6.11 and 5.91, respectively. DAT reduced the maximum normalized response to ACh without a significant shift in EC(50), suggesting that the blocking action is not competitive with ACh.

  20. Genome microsatellite diversity within the Apicomplexa phylum.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan Pablo; Alzate, Juan Fernando

    2016-12-01

    The Apicomplexa phylum groups include unicellular and obligate intracellular protozoan parasites with an apical complex used for attachment and invasion to host cells. In this study, we analyze single sequence repeats (SSRs) in the whole genome of 20 apicomplexan organisms that represent four different lineages within the phylum. Only perfect SSRs with at least 12 nucleotides and composed of 2-6 mers were included. To better understand the association of SSR types with the genomic regions, the SSRs were classified accordingly with the genomic location into exon, intron and intergenic categories. Our results showed heterogeneous SSRs density within the studied genomes. However, the most frequent SSRs types were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. The former was associated with intergenic regions, while the latter was associated with exon regions.

  1. Ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) and eastern screech-owl (Megascopes asio): new hosts for Philornis mimicola (Diptera: Muscidae) and Ornithodoros concanensis (Acari: Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Glenn A; Teel, Pete D; Mohr, Rachel M

    2006-10-01

    While banding ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) and Eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio) in south Texas during 2004, we recorded Philornis mimicola (Diptera: Muscidae) and Ornithodoros concanensis (Acari: Argasidae) parasitizing nestlings. Inspection of nestlings revealed 54 P. mimicola and one O. concanensis. Inspection of nest material revealed 111 P. mimicola, including 57 puparia. The effect (e.g., blood loss, anemia) of these hematophagous parasites might have contributed to the demise of at least one Eastern screech-owl nestling. This is the first record of P. mimicola and O. concanensis parasitizing ferruginous pygmy-owls and Eastern screech-owls.

  2. Particularities of mitochondrial structure in parasitic protists (Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida).

    PubMed

    de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Márcia; Rodrigues, Juliany C F

    2009-10-01

    Without mitochondria, eukaryotic cells would depend entirely on anaerobic glycolysis for ATP generation. This also holds true for protists, both free-living and parasitic. Parasitic protists include agents of human and animal diseases that have a huge impact on world populations. In the phylum Apicomplexa, several species of Plasmodium cause malaria, whereas Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolite parasite found on all continents. Flagellates of the order Kinetoplastida include the genera Leishmania and Trypanosoma causative agents of human leishmaniasis and (depending on the species) African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease. Although clearly distinct in many aspects, the members of these two groups bear a single and usually well developed mitochondrion. The single mitochondrion of Apicomplexa has a dense matrix and many cristae with a circular profile. The organelle is even more peculiar in the order Kinetoplastida, exhibiting a condensed network of DNA at a specific position, always close to the flagellar basal body. This arrangement is known as Kinetoplast and the name of the order derived from it. Kinetoplastids also bear glycosomes, peroxisomes that concentrate enzymes of the glycolytic cycle. Mitochondrial volume and activity is maximum when glycosomal is low and vice versa. In both Apicomplexa and trypanosomatids, mitochondria show particularities that are absent in other eukaryotic organisms. These peculiar features make them an attractive target for therapeutic drugs for the diseases they cause.

  3. Drug inhibition of HDAC3 and epigenetic control of differentiation in Apicomplexa parasites.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Maubon, Danièle; Baldacci, Patricia; Ortet, Philippe; Bastien, Olivier; Bouillon, Anthony; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Pelloux, Hervé; Ménard, Robert; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2009-04-13

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are parasites of major medical importance that belong to the Apicomplexa phylum of protozoa. These parasites transform into various stages during their life cycle and express a specific set of proteins at each stage. Although little is yet known of how gene expression is controlled in Apicomplexa, histone modifications, particularly acetylation, are emerging as key regulators of parasite differentiation and stage conversion. We investigated the anti-Apicomplexa effect of FR235222, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). We show that FR235222 is active against a variety of Apicomplexa genera, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, and is more potent than other HDACi's such as trichostatin A and the clinically relevant compound pyrimethamine. We identify T. gondii HDAC3 (TgHDAC3) as the target of FR235222 in Toxoplasma tachyzoites and demonstrate the crucial role of the conserved and Apicomplexa HDAC-specific residue TgHDAC3 T99 in the inhibitory activity of the drug. We also show that FR235222 induces differentiation of the tachyzoite (replicative) into the bradyzoite (nonreplicative) stage. Additionally, via its anti-TgHDAC3 activity, FR235222 influences the expression of approximately 370 genes, a third of which are stage-specifically expressed. These results identify FR235222 as a potent HDACi of Apicomplexa, and establish HDAC3 as a central regulator of gene expression and stage conversion in Toxoplasma and, likely, other Apicomplexa.

  4. Drug inhibition of HDAC3 and epigenetic control of differentiation in Apicomplexa parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Maubon, Danièle; Baldacci, Patricia; Ortet, Philippe; Bastien, Olivier; Bouillon, Anthony; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Pelloux, Hervé; Ménard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are parasites of major medical importance that belong to the Apicomplexa phylum of protozoa. These parasites transform into various stages during their life cycle and express a specific set of proteins at each stage. Although little is yet known of how gene expression is controlled in Apicomplexa, histone modifications, particularly acetylation, are emerging as key regulators of parasite differentiation and stage conversion. We investigated the anti-Apicomplexa effect of FR235222, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). We show that FR235222 is active against a variety of Apicomplexa genera, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, and is more potent than other HDACi's such as trichostatin A and the clinically relevant compound pyrimethamine. We identify T. gondii HDAC3 (TgHDAC3) as the target of FR235222 in Toxoplasma tachyzoites and demonstrate the crucial role of the conserved and Apicomplexa HDAC-specific residue TgHDAC3 T99 in the inhibitory activity of the drug. We also show that FR235222 induces differentiation of the tachyzoite (replicative) into the bradyzoite (nonreplicative) stage. Additionally, via its anti-TgHDAC3 activity, FR235222 influences the expression of ∼370 genes, a third of which are stage-specifically expressed. These results identify FR235222 as a potent HDACi of Apicomplexa, and establish HDAC3 as a central regulator of gene expression and stage conversion in Toxoplasma and, likely, other Apicomplexa. PMID:19349466

  5. [Research progress on mitochondrial genome structure in the phylum apicomplexa].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-mei; Li, Xiao-bing; Huang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are ubiquitous organelles in all eukaryotic cells which are essential for a series of cellular processes and signal transduction. The phylum Apicomplexa includes series of unicellular eukaryotes and some of them are clinically or economically important parasites. Recent studies have demonstrated that apicomplexan parasites' mitochondrial genomes exhibit remarkably diverse structures and they are ideal biological models to comprehend the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. This paper summarizes the mitochondrial genome structure of some representative apicomplexan, highlights their structure characteristics along with evolution process, and briefly describes their nuclear mitochondrial DNA and nuclear plastid DNA.

  6. First record of gregarines (Apicomplexa) in seminal vesicle of insect.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glenda; Dallai, Romano; Carapelli, Antonio; Almeida, João P P; Campos, Lucio A O; Faroni, Leda R A; Lino-Neto, José

    2017-12-01

    Gregarines (Apicomplexa) are a diverse group of protozoan parasites, which infects gut and other body cavities of invertebrate hosts. In reproductive system of insects, gregarine has been reported only in the accessory glands and spermathecae of females; therefore, this is the first report of a gregarine species in seminal vesicles of insects. Different developmental stages, including sporozoytes, oocysts and trophozoites were described from morphological descriptions using light and electron transmission microscopy. The parasites were described in seminal vesicles of the beetle Tribolium castaneum a model organism and an important insect pest. DNA sequence analysis suggests that the protozoan parasite was an Ascogregarina sp.

  7. Efficacy of eleven antimicrobials against a gregarine parasite (Apicomplexa: Protozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Johny, Shajahan; Merisko, Amber; Whitman, Douglas W

    2007-01-01

    Background The Apicomplexa are a diverse group of obligate protozoan parasites infesting a wide range of invertebrate and vertebrate hosts including humans. These parasites are notoriously difficult to control and many species continue to evolve resistance to commercial antibiotics. In this study, we sought to find an effective chemotherapeutic treatment against arthropod gregarines (Apicomplexa), and to identify candidate compounds for testing against other groups of protozoan parasites. Methods We tested eleven commercial antibiotics against a gregarine parasite of Romalea microptera grasshoppers. Infected insects were fed daily, lettuce containing known amounts of specific antibiotics. On Days 15 or 20, we measured the number of gregarines remaining in the digestive tract of each grasshopper. Results Treatment with metronidazole and griseofulvin in host insects significantly reduced gregarine counts, whereas, gregarine counts of insects fed, albendazole, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, fumagillin, quinine, streptomycin, sulfadimethoxine, thiabendazole or tetracycline, were not significantly different from the controls. However, albendazole produced a strong, but non-significant reduction in gregarine count, and streptomycin exhibited a non-significant antagonistic trend. Conclusion Our results confirm that gregarine infections are difficult to control and suggest the possibility that streptomycin might aggravate gregarine infection. In addition, the insect system described here, provides a simple, inexpensive, and effective method for screening antibiotics. PMID:17997852

  8. Gliding motility powers invasion and egress in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Frénal, Karine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Lebrun, Maryse; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2017-09-04

    Protozoan parasites have developed elaborate motility systems that facilitate infection and dissemination. For example, amoebae use actin-rich membrane extensions called pseudopodia, whereas Kinetoplastida are propelled by microtubule-containing flagella. By contrast, the motile and invasive stages of the Apicomplexa - a phylum that contains the important human pathogens Plasmodium falciparum (which causes malaria) and Toxoplasma gondii (which causes toxoplasmosis) - have a unique machinery called the glideosome, which is composed of an actomyosin system that underlies the plasma membrane. The glideosome promotes substrate-dependent gliding motility, which powers migration across biological barriers, as well as active host cell entry and egress from infected cells. In this Review, we discuss the discovery of the principles that govern gliding motility, the characterization of the molecular machinery involved, and its impact on parasite invasion and egress from infected cells.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Apicomplexa and Genomic Diversity in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Thomas J.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Abrahante, Juan E.; Subramanian, G.M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Abrahamsen, Mitchell S.; Aravind, L.

    2004-01-01

    The apicomplexans Plasmodium and Cryptosporidium have developed distinctive adaptations via lineage-specific gene loss and gene innovation in the process of diverging from a common parasitic ancestor. The two lineages have acquired distinct but overlapping sets of surface protein adhesion domains typical of animal proteins, but in no case do they share multidomain architectures identical to animals. Cryptosporidium, but not Plasmodium, possesses an animal-type O-linked glycosylation pathway, along with >30 predicted surface proteins having mucin-like segments. The two parasites have notable qualitative differences in conserved protein architectures associated with chromatin dynamics and transcription. Cryptosporidium shows considerable reduction in the number of introns and a concomitant loss of spliceosomal machinery components. We also describe additional molecular characteristics distinguishing Apicomplexa from other eukaryotes for which complete genome sequences are available. PMID:15342554

  10. Autophagy in Apicomplexa: a life sustaining death mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Sinai, Anthony P.; Roepe, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways remain understudied in parasitic protozoa in spite of the fact that they provide potential targets for the development of new therapy. The best understood PCD pathway in higher eukaryotes is apoptosis although emerging evidence also points to autophagy as a mediator of death in certain physiological contexts. Bioinformatic analyses coupled with biochemical and cell biologic studies suggest that parasitic protozoa possess the capacity for PCD including a primordial form of apoptosis. Recent work in Toxoplasma and emerging data from Plasmodium suggest that autophagy-related processes may serve as an additional death promoting pathway in Apicomplexa. Detailed mechanistic studies into the molecular basis for PCD in parasitic protozoa represent a fertile area for investigation and drug development. PMID:22819059

  11. Structural and evolutionary divergence of eukaryotic protein kinases in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Talevich, Eric; Mirza, Amar; Kannan, Natarajan

    2011-11-02

    The Apicomplexa constitute an evolutionarily divergent phylum of protozoan pathogens responsible for widespread parasitic diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Many cellular functions in these medically important organisms are controlled by protein kinases, which have emerged as promising drug targets for parasitic diseases. However, an incomplete understanding of how apicomplexan kinases structurally and mechanistically differ from their host counterparts has hindered drug development efforts to target parasite kinases. We used the wealth of sequence data recently made available for 15 apicomplexan species to identify the kinome of each species and quantify the evolutionary constraints imposed on each family of apicomplexan kinases. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific adaptations in selected families, namely cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CLK/LAMMER, which have been identified as important in the pathogenesis of these organisms. Bayesian analysis of selective constraints imposed on these families identified the sequence and structural features that most distinguish apicomplexan protein kinases from their homologs in model organisms and other eukaryotes. In particular, in a subfamily of CDKs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum crk-5, the activation loop contains a novel PTxC motif which is absent from all CDKs outside Apicomplexa. Our analysis also suggests a convergent mode of regulation in a subset of apicomplexan CDPKs and mammalian MAPKs involving a commonly conserved arginine in the αC helix. In all recognized apicomplexan CLKs, we find a set of co-conserved residues involved in substrate recognition and docking that are distinct from metazoan CLKs. We pinpoint key conserved residues that can be predicted to mediate functional differences from eukaryotic homologs in three identified kinase families. We discuss the structural, functional and evolutionary implications of these lineage-specific variations and

  12. Structural and evolutionary divergence of eukaryotic protein kinases in Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Apicomplexa constitute an evolutionarily divergent phylum of protozoan pathogens responsible for widespread parasitic diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Many cellular functions in these medically important organisms are controlled by protein kinases, which have emerged as promising drug targets for parasitic diseases. However, an incomplete understanding of how apicomplexan kinases structurally and mechanistically differ from their host counterparts has hindered drug development efforts to target parasite kinases. Results We used the wealth of sequence data recently made available for 15 apicomplexan species to identify the kinome of each species and quantify the evolutionary constraints imposed on each family of apicomplexan kinases. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific adaptations in selected families, namely cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CLK/LAMMER, which have been identified as important in the pathogenesis of these organisms. Bayesian analysis of selective constraints imposed on these families identified the sequence and structural features that most distinguish apicomplexan protein kinases from their homologs in model organisms and other eukaryotes. In particular, in a subfamily of CDKs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum crk-5, the activation loop contains a novel PTxC motif which is absent from all CDKs outside Apicomplexa. Our analysis also suggests a convergent mode of regulation in a subset of apicomplexan CDPKs and mammalian MAPKs involving a commonly conserved arginine in the αC helix. In all recognized apicomplexan CLKs, we find a set of co-conserved residues involved in substrate recognition and docking that are distinct from metazoan CLKs. Conclusions We pinpoint key conserved residues that can be predicted to mediate functional differences from eukaryotic homologs in three identified kinase families. We discuss the structural, functional and evolutionary implications of these

  13. Repeated secondary loss of adaptin complex genes in the Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Nevin, William D; Dacks, Joel B

    2009-03-01

    The Apicomplexa include parasites of devastating medical and economic consequence. While obviously essential for their parasitic mechanism, the molecular machinery underpinning membrane-trafficking in many apicomplexans is poorly understood. One potentially key set of players, the adaptins, selects cargo for incorporation into trafficking vesicles. Four distinct adaptin (AP) complexes exist in eukaryotes; AP1 and AP3 are involved in transport between the trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and endosomes, AP4 in TGN to cell surface transport, and AP2 in endocytosis from the cell surface. Of particular interest is the involvement of AP1 in Toxoplasma rhoptry biogenesis. The recent completion of several apicomplexan genomes should jump-start molecular parasitological studies and provide systems-level insight into the apicomplexan adaptin machinery. However, many of the encoded adaptin proteins are annotated conservatively and not to the necessary complex or subunit level. Prompted by previous evidence suggesting the lack of AP3 in Plasmodium falciparum, we undertook homology-searching and phylogenetic analysis to produce a rigorously annotated set of adaptin subunits encoded in diverse apicomplexan genomes. We found multiple losses of adaptins across the phylum; in particular Theileria, Babesia, and Cryptosporidium, but surprisingly not Plasmodium, appear to have lost the entirety of the AP3 complex. The losses correlate with a degenerate Golgi body structure and are reminiscent of recently reported secondary losses of additional endocytic components (i.e. the ESCRTs) in several Apicomplexa. These data may indicate a relaxation of the selective pressure on the apicomplexan endocytic system and, regardless, should greatly facilitate future molecular cell biological investigation of the role of adaptins in these important parasites.

  14. Migration of Apicomplexa Across Biological Barriers: The Toxoplasma and Plasmodium Rides

    PubMed Central

    Tardieux, Isabelle; Ménard, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The invasive stages of Apicomplexa parasites, called zoites, have been largely studied in in vitro systems, with a special emphasis on their unique gliding and host cell invasive capacities. In contrast, the means by which these parasites reach their destination in their hosts are still poorly understood. We summarize here our current understanding of the cellular basis of in vivo parasitism by two well-studied Apicomplexa zoites, the Toxoplasma tachyzoite and the Plasmodium sporozoite. Despite being close relatives, these two zoites use different strategies to reach their goal and establish infection. PMID:18194412

  15. Flexible synthesis and evaluation of diverse anti-Apicomplexa cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Traoré, Mariam; Mietton, Flore; Maubon, Danièle; Peuchmaur, Marine; Hilário, Flaviane Francisco; Pereira de Freitas, Rossimiriam; Bougdour, Alexandre; Curt, Aurélie; Maynadier, Marjorie; Vial, Henri; Pelloux, Hervé; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Wong, Yung-Sing

    2013-04-19

    A modular approach to synthesize anti-Apicomplexa parasite inhibitors was developed that takes advantage of a pluripotent cyclic tetrapeptide scaffold capable of adjusting appendage and skeletal diversities in only a few steps (one to three steps). The diversification processes make use of selective radical coupling reactions and involve a new example of a reductive carbon-nitrogen cleavage reaction with SmI2. The resulting bioactive cyclic peptides have revealed new insights into structural factors that govern selectivity between Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium and human cells.

  16. New eukaryotic systematics: a phylogenetic perspective of developmental gene expression in the Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kim, Kami; Schaap, Dick; Ajioka, James W

    2009-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa consists of obligate intracellular protistan parasites, some of which are responsible for global disease causing serious morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. Understanding the mechanisms of gene expression that drive the cellular changes required to complete their life cycles will be critical in combating infection and disease. Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii have served as good models for growth and development in the Apicomplexa. Elucidating developmental gene expression relies on comparisons with known mechanisms and their DNA, RNA and protein components. Transcriptional profiling across asexual development suggests a model where a cascade of gene expression results in a "just-in-time" production process that makes products only when needed. Some mechanisms that control transcription such as chromatin/histone modification are highly conserved in the phylum compared with the traditional model organisms, yeast, worms, flies and mammals. Studies exploiting this phenomenon show great potential for both investigating the effects of chromatin structure on developmental gene expression, and helping to identify genes that are expressed in a stage-specific manner. Transcription factors and their cognate cis-acting binding sites have been difficult to identify. This may be because the DNA binding motifs that have evolved to act as transcription factors in the Apicomplexa, e.g. the AP2 family, may be more like plants than the traditional model organisms. A new eukaryotic phylogenetic model comprised of six super-groups divides the traditional model organisms, plants and the Apicomplexa into separate super-groups. This phylogenetic model helps explain why basic functions such as transcriptional regulation appear be a composite of mechanisms in the Apicomplexa compared with what is known from other eukaryotes.

  17. New Eukaryotic Systematics: A Phylogenetic Perspective of Developmental Gene Expression in the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kim, Kami; Schaap, Dick; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa consists of obligate intracellular protistan parasites, some of which are responsible for global disease causing serious morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. Understanding the mechanisms of gene expression that drive the cellular changes required to complete their life cycles will be critical in combating infection and disease. Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii have served as good models for growth and development in the Apicomplexa. Elucidating developmental gene expression relies on comparisons to known mechanisms and their DNA, RNA and protein components. Transcriptional profiling across asexual development suggests a model where a cascade of gene expression results in a “just in time” production process that makes products only when needed. Some mechanisms that control transcription such as chromatin/histone modification are highly conserved in the phylum compared to the traditional model organisms, yeast, worms, flies and mammals. Studies exploiting this phenomenon show great potential for both investigating the effects of chromatin structure on developmental gene expression, and helping to identify genes that are expressed in stage-specific manner. Transcription factors and their cognate cis-acting binding sites have been difficult to identify. This may be because the DNA binding motifs that have evolved to act as transcription factors in the Apicomplexa, e.g. the AP2 family, may be more like plants than the traditional model organisms. A new eukaryotic phylogenetic model comprised of six supergroups divides the traditional model organisms, plants and the Apicomplexa into separate supergroups. This phylogenetic model helps explain why basic functions such as transcriptional regulation appear be a composite of mechanisms in the Apicomplexa compared to what is known from other eukaryotes. PMID:18983845

  18. Lateral Gene Transfer of Family A DNA Polymerases between Thermophilic Viruses, Aquificae, and Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Thomas W.; Murugapiran, Senthil K.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Floyd, Sally; Lodes, Michael; Mead, David A.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Bioinformatics and functional screens identified a group of Family A-type DNA Polymerase (polA) genes encoded by viruses inhabiting circumneutral and alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and the US Great Basin. The proteins encoded by these viral polA genes (PolAs) shared no significant sequence similarity with any known viral proteins but were remarkably similar to PolAs encoded by two of three families of the bacterial phylum Aquificae and by several apicoplast-targeted PolA-like proteins found in the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, which includes the obligate parasites Plasmodium, Babesia, and Toxoplasma. The viral gene products share signature elements previously associated only with Aquificae and Apicomplexa PolA-like proteins and were similar to proteins encoded by prophage elements of a variety of otherwise unrelated Bacteria, each of which additionally encoded a prototypical bacterial PolA. Unique among known viral DNA polymerases, the viral PolA proteins of this study share with the Apicomplexa proteins large amino-terminal domains with putative helicase/primase elements but low primary sequence similarity. The genomic context and distribution, phylogeny, and biochemistry of these PolA proteins suggest that thermophilic viruses transferred polA genes to the Apicomplexa, likely through secondary endosymbiosis of a virus-infected proto-apicoplast, and to the common ancestor of two of three Aquificae families, where they displaced the orthologous cellular polA gene. On the basis of biochemical activity, gene structure, and sequence similarity, we speculate that the xenologous viral-type polA genes may have functions associated with diversity-generating recombination in both Bacteria and Apicomplexa. PMID:23608703

  19. Revealing parasite influence in metabolic pathways in Apicomplexa infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As an obligate intracellular parasite, Apicomplexa interacts with the host in the special living environment, competing for energy and nutrients from the host cells by manipulating the host metabolism. Previous studies of host-parasite interaction mainly focused on using cellular and biochemical methods to investigate molecular functions in metabolic pathways of parasite infected hosts. Computational approaches taking advantage of high-throughput biological data and topology of metabolic pathways have a great potential in revealing the details and mechanism of parasites-to-host interactions. A new analytical method was designed in this work to study host-parasite interactions in human cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Cryptosporidium parvum. Results We introduced a new method that analyzes the host metabolic pathways in divided parts: host specific subpathways and host-parasite common subpathways. Upon analysis on gene expression data from cells infected by Plasmodium falciparum or Cryptosporidium parvum, we found: (i) six host-parasite common subpathways and four host specific subpathways were significantly altered in plasmodium infected human cells; (ii) plasmodium utilized fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation, and Pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis to obtain nutrients from host environment; (iii) in Cryptosporidium parvum infected cells, most of the host-parasite common enzymes were down-regulated, whereas the host specific enzymes up-regulated; (iv) the down-regulation of common subpathways in host cells might be caused by competition for the substrates and up-regulation of host specific subpathways may be stimulated by parasite infection. Conclusion Results demonstrated a significantly coordinated expression pattern between the two groups of subpathways. The method helped expose the impact of parasite infection on host cell metabolism, which was previously concealed in the pathway enrichment analysis. Our approach revealed detailed

  20. Evolutionary origin of Plasmodium and other Apicomplexa based on rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, A A; Ayala, F J

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the evolutionary history of the Apicomplexa and two related protistan phyla, Dinozoa and Ciliophora, by comparing the nucleotide sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. We conclude that the Plasmodium lineage, to which the malarial parasites belong, diverged from other apicomplexan lineages (piroplasmids and coccidians) several hundred million years ago, perhaps even before the Cambrian. The Plasmodium radiation, which gave rise to several species parasitic to humans, occurred approximately 129 million years ago; Plasmodium parasitism of humans has independently arisen several times. The origin of apicomplexans (Plasmodium), dinoflagellates, and ciliates may be > 1 billion years old, perhaps older than the three multicellular kingdoms of animals, plants, and fungi. Digenetic parasitism independently evolved several times in the Apicomplexa. PMID:7597031

  1. Apicomplexa-specific tRip facilitates import of exogenous tRNAs into malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Bour, Tania; Mahmoudi, Nassira; Kapps, Delphine; Thiberge, Sabine; Bargieri, Daniel; Ménard, Robert; Frugier, Magali

    2016-04-26

    The malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites are transmitted to vertebrates by mosquitoes. To support their growth and replication, these intracellular parasites, which belong to the phylum Apicomplexa, have developed mechanisms to exploit their hosts. These mechanisms include expropriation of small metabolites from infected host cells, such as purine nucleotides and amino acids. Heretofore, no evidence suggested that transfer RNAs (tRNAs) could also be exploited. We identified an unusual gene in Apicomplexa with a coding sequence for membrane-docking and structure-specific tRNA binding. This Apicomplexa protein-designated tRip (tRNA import protein)-is anchored to the parasite plasma membrane and directs import of exogenous tRNAs. In the absence of tRip, the fitness of the parasite stage that multiplies in the blood is significantly reduced, indicating that the parasite may need host tRNAs to sustain its own translation and/or as regulatory RNAs. Plasmodium is thus the first example, to our knowledge, of a cell importing exogenous tRNAs, suggesting a remarkable adaptation of this parasite to extend its reach into host cell biology.

  2. Apicomplexa-specific tRip facilitates import of exogenous tRNAs into malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bour, Tania; Mahmoudi, Nassira; Kapps, Delphine; Thiberge, Sabine; Bargieri, Daniel; Ménard, Robert; Frugier, Magali

    2016-01-01

    The malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites are transmitted to vertebrates by mosquitoes. To support their growth and replication, these intracellular parasites, which belong to the phylum Apicomplexa, have developed mechanisms to exploit their hosts. These mechanisms include expropriation of small metabolites from infected host cells, such as purine nucleotides and amino acids. Heretofore, no evidence suggested that transfer RNAs (tRNAs) could also be exploited. We identified an unusual gene in Apicomplexa with a coding sequence for membrane-docking and structure-specific tRNA binding. This Apicomplexa protein—designated tRip (tRNA import protein)—is anchored to the parasite plasma membrane and directs import of exogenous tRNAs. In the absence of tRip, the fitness of the parasite stage that multiplies in the blood is significantly reduced, indicating that the parasite may need host tRNAs to sustain its own translation and/or as regulatory RNAs. Plasmodium is thus the first example, to our knowledge, of a cell importing exogenous tRNAs, suggesting a remarkable adaptation of this parasite to extend its reach into host cell biology. PMID:27071116

  3. ApicoAMP: the first computational model for identifying apicoplast-targeted transmembrane proteins in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Cilingir, Gokcen; Lau, Audrey O T; Broschat, Shira L

    2013-12-01

    Computational identification of apicoplast-targeted proteins is important in drug target determination for diseases such as malaria. While there are established methods for identifying proteins with a bipartite signal in multiple species of Apicomplexa, not all apicoplast-targeted proteins possess this bipartite signature. The publication of recent experimental findings of apicoplast membrane proteins, called transmembrane proteins, that do not possess a bipartite signal has made it feasible to devise a machine learning approach for identifying this new class of apicoplast-targeted proteins computationally. In this work, we develop a method for predicting apicoplast-targeted transmembrane proteins for multiple species of Apicomplexa, whereby several classifiers trained on different feature sets and based on different algorithms are evaluated and combined in an ensemble classification model to obtain the best expected performance. The feature sets considered are the hydrophobicity and composition characteristics of amino acids over transmembrane domains, the existence of short sequence motifs over cytosolically disposed regions, and Gene Ontology (GO) terms associated with given proteins. Our model, ApicoAMP, is an ensemble classification model that combines decisions of classifiers following the majority vote principle. ApicoAMP is trained on a set of proteins from 11 apicomplexan species and achieves 91% overall expected accuracy. ApicoAMP is the first computational model capable of identifying apicoplast-targeted transmembrane proteins in Apicomplexa. The ApicoAMP prediction software is available at http://code.google.com/p/apicoamp/ and http://bcb.eecs.wsu.edu. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Record of a gregarine (Apicomplexa: Neogregarinida) in the abdomen of the termite Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera, Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Casarin, Fabiana E; Constantini, Joice P

    2008-02-01

    Coptotermes gestroi is an exotic species of termite that is a pest of great economical importance in Brazil. This paper relates the occurrence of a coelomic gregarine (Apicomplexa: Neogregarinida) in the abdomen of the foraging workers recently collected from field colonies of this termite. The termite hosts presented large, white abdomens because they carried 1 up to 3 cysts of gregarines filled with numerous lemon-shaped spores. Earlier developmental stages of this gregarine were not observed in the scanning microscope preparations nor in the histological slides of the infected termites. However, the lemon-shaped spores suggest a parasite gregarine of Mattesia genus, family Lipotrophidae.

  5. Does protein phosphorylation govern host cell entry and egress by the Apicomplexa?

    PubMed

    Jacot, Damien; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2012-10-01

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for a wide range of diseases in humans and animals. The absence of an effective vaccine or safe curing drugs and the continuous emergence of resistant parasites to available treatments impose a high demand on the identification of novel targets for intervention against the apicomplexans. Protein kinases are considered attractive potential therapeutic targets not only against cancers but also to combat infectious diseases. The scope and aim of this review is to report on the recent progress in dissecting the impact of protein phosphorylation in regulating motility and invasion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Multi-Subunit Tethering Complexes Demonstrates an Ancient Pan-Eukaryotic Complement and Sculpting in Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Christen M.; Klute, Mary J.; Dacks, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during, and possibly pre

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of multi-subunit tethering complexes demonstrates an ancient pan-eukaryotic complement and sculpting in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Christen M; Klute, Mary J; Dacks, Joel B

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular parasites that cause tremendous disease burden world-wide. They utilize a set of specialized secretory organelles in their invasive process that require delivery of components for their biogenesis and function, yet the precise mechanisms underpinning such processes remain unclear. One set of potentially important components is the multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), factors increasingly implicated in all aspects of vesicle-target interactions. Prompted by the results of previous studies indicating a loss of membrane trafficking factors in Apicomplexa, we undertook a bioinformatic analysis of MTC conservation. Building on knowledge of the ancient presence of most MTC proteins, we demonstrate the near complete retention of MTCs in the newly available genomes for Guillardiatheta and Bigelowiellanatans. The latter is a key taxonomic sampling point as a basal sister taxa to the group including Apicomplexa. We also demonstrate an ancient origin of the CORVET complex subunits Vps8 and Vps3, as well as the TRAPPII subunit Tca17. Having established that the lineage leading to Apicomplexa did at one point possess the complete eukaryotic complement of MTC components, we undertook a deeper taxonomic investigation in twelve apicomplexan genomes. We observed excellent conservation of the VpsC core of the HOPS and CORVET complexes, as well as the core TRAPP subunits, but sparse conservation of TRAPPII, COG, Dsl1, and HOPS/CORVET-specific subunits. However, those subunits that we did identify appear to be expressed with similar patterns to the fully conserved MTC proteins, suggesting that they may function as minimal complexes or with analogous partners. Strikingly, we failed to identify any subunits of the exocyst complex in all twelve apicomplexan genomes, as well as the dinoflagellate Perkinsus marinus. Overall, we demonstrate reduction of MTCs in Apicomplexa and their ancestors, consistent with modification during, and possibly pre

  8. Ultrastructure of Selenidium pendula, the Type Species of Archigregarines, and Phylogenetic Relations to Other Marine Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Schrével, Joseph; Valigurová, Andrea; Prensier, Gérard; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Florent, Isabelle; Guillou, Laure

    2016-08-01

    Archigregarines, an early branching lineage within Apicomplexa, are a poorly-known group of invertebrate parasites. By their phylogenetic position, archigregarines are an important lineage to understand the functional transition that occurred between free-living flagellated predators to obligatory parasites in Apicomplexa. In this study, we provide new ultrastructural data and phylogenies based on SSU rDNA sequences using the type species of archigregarines, the Selenidiidae Selenidium pendulaGiard, 1884. We describe for the first time the syzygy and early gamogony at the ultrastructural level, revealing a characteristic nuclear multiplication with centrocones, cryptomitosis, filamentous network of chromatin, a cyst wall secretion and a 9+0 flagellar axoneme of the male gamete. S. pendula belongs to a monophyletic lineage that includes several other related species, all infecting Sedentaria Polychaeta (Spionidae, Sabellaridae, Sabellidae and Cirratulidae). All of these Selenidium species exhibit similar biological characters: a cell cortex with the plasma membrane - inner membrane complex - subpellicular microtubule sets, an apical complex with the conoid, numerous rhoptries and micronemes, a myzocytosis with large food vacuoles, a nuclear multiplication during syzygy and young gamonts. Two other distantly related Selenidium-like lineages infect Terebellidae and Sipunculida, underlying the ability of archigregarines to parasite a wide range of marine hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Attenuated reproduction of Strombus gigas by an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like parasite in the digestive gland.

    PubMed

    Baqueiro Cardenas, Erick; Montero, Jorge; Frenkiel, Liliane; Aldana Aranda, Dalila

    2012-07-01

    An intense and generalized sporozoan infection was detected in every population of the queen conch, Strombus gigas through the Caribbean. In this contribution we establish the relationship between occurrences of an Apicomplexa: Emeriidae-like organism and reproductive activity at San Andres archipelago, Colombia. Occurrence of the parasites was estimated counting the feeding stage Merozoites and cysts Sporozoites at 40× magnification. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis (NMDS) was made to correlate the parasites stages abundance with frequency of the reproductive stages. Gametogenesis and spawning were always low coinciding with high numbers of Merozoites, a positive correlation was established between parasite abundance with reabsorption and undifferentiated stages, and negative correlation was observed between parasite abundance with maturity and spawning stages. The nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) shows that gametogenesis, maturity and spawning increase as the number of parasites decrease, factor that could be threatening reproduction of S. gigas through the Caribbean. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Novel Cell Cycle Proteins in Apicomplexa Parasites through Co-Expression Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Carrie L.; Lucas, Olivier; Wuchty, Stefan; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.; White, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hypothetical proteins comprise roughly half of the predicted gene complement of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and represent the largest class of uniquely functioning proteins in these parasites. Following the idea that functional relationships can be informed by the timing of gene expression, we devised a strategy to identify the core set of apicomplexan cell division cycling genes with important roles in parasite division, which includes many uncharacterized proteins. We assembled an expanded list of orthologs from the T. gondii and P. falciparum genome sequences (2781 putative orthologs), compared their mRNA profiles during synchronous replication, and sorted the resulting set of dual cell cycle regulated orthologs (744 total) into protein pairs conserved across many eukaryotic families versus those unique to the Apicomplexa. The analysis identified more than 100 ortholog gene pairs with unknown function in T. gondii and P. falciparum that displayed co-conserved mRNA abundance, dynamics of cyclical expression and similar peak timing that spanned the complete division cycle in each parasite. The unknown cyclical mRNAs encoded a diverse set of proteins with a wide range of mass and showed a remarkable conservation in the internal organization of ordered versus disordered structural domains. A representative sample of cyclical unknown genes (16 total) was epitope tagged in T. gondii tachyzoites yielding the discovery of new protein constituents of the parasite inner membrane complex, key mitotic structures and invasion organelles. These results demonstrate the utility of using gene expression timing and dynamic profile to identify proteins with unique roles in Apicomplexa biology. PMID:24841368

  11. Calcium signaling in closely related protozoan groups (Alveolata): non-parasitic ciliates (Paramecium, Tetrahymena) vs. parasitic Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Toxoplasma).

    PubMed

    Plattner, H; Sehring, I M; Mohamed, I K; Miranda, K; De Souza, W; Billington, R; Genazzani, A; Ladenburger, E-M

    2012-05-01

    The importance of Ca2+-signaling for many subcellular processes is well established in higher eukaryotes, whereas information about protozoa is restricted. Recent genome analyses have stimulated such work also with Alveolates, such as ciliates (Paramecium, Tetrahymena) and their pathogenic close relatives, the Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Toxoplasma). Here we compare Ca2+ signaling in the two closely related groups. Acidic Ca2+ stores have been characterized in detail in Apicomplexa, but hardly in ciliates. Two-pore channels engaged in Ca2+-release from acidic stores in higher eukaryotes have not been stingently characterized in either group. Both groups are endowed with plasma membrane- and endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca2+-ATPases (PMCA, SERCA), respectively. Only recently was it possible to identify in Paramecium a number of homologs of ryanodine and inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate receptors (RyR, IP3R) and to localize them to widely different organelles participating in vesicle trafficking. For Apicomplexa, physiological experiments suggest the presence of related channels although their identity remains elusive. In Paramecium, IP3Rs are constitutively active in the contractile vacuole complex; RyR-related channels in alveolar sacs are activated during exocytosis stimulation, whereas in the parasites the homologous structure (inner membrane complex) may no longer function as a Ca2+ store. Scrutinized comparison of the two closely related protozoan phyla may stimulate further work and elucidate adaptation to parasitic life. See also "Conclusions" section. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Occurrence of Apicomplexa-like structures in the digestive gland of Strombus gigas throughout the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Dalila Aldana; Frenkiel, Liliane; Brulé, Thierry; Montero, Jorge; Cárdenas, Erick Baqueiro

    2011-02-01

    The queen conch, Strombus gigas, is a marine resource of ecological and economical importance in the Caribbean region. Given its importance in this region, and the critical status of most populations, the reproductive biology of this species has been studied to support management decisions. It was from these studies that a generalized sporozoan infection was detected. This study describes the geographic distribution of a coccidian (Apicomplexa) parasite infecting the digestive gland of S. gigas throughout the Caribbean. The parasite was present in every location sampled. Based on histological analysis, the parasites from all locations are similar and appear to complete their life cycle within the digestive gland. The highest occurrence of the parasites was registered in samples from Puerto Rico (54 parasites per field) and Martinique (45 parasites per field). The lowest incidence was registered on the Mexican coast of Yucatan peninsula, at Alacranes and Chinchorro with 17 parasites per field. Data showed significant differences among sites (Kruskal Wallis H=106.957; p ≤ 0.05). The abundance of parasites found in the digestive ducts and in the faeces suggests the liberation of parasites to the environment. A gradual decrease in abundance was found from East to West of the Caribbean sea.

  13. Two new species of Caryospora Léger, 1904 (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) from accipitrid raptors.

    PubMed

    Volf, J; Koudela, B; Modrý, D

    2000-05-01

    Two new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) are described from European accipitrid raptors (Falconiformes: Accipitridae). Oöcysts of Carvospora aquilae n. sp. found in faeces of the gold eagle Aquila chrysaetos are subspherical to broad ellipsoidal and measure 43 (40-49) x 37.5 (34-39) microm. Polar granule, oöcyst residuum and micropyle are absent. Each oöcyst contains one spherical to subspherical slightly polygonal sporocyst measuring 23.8 (23-25) x 23.3 (22-25) microm. Stieda and substieda bodies are absent. The sporocyst residuum is composed of numerous small granules less than 0.5 microm in diameter dispersed randomly among the sporozoites. Sporulated oöcysts of Carvospora circi n. sp. from faeces of the marsh harrier Circus aeruginosus are widely oval, measuring 24.5 (23-25) x 21.8 (21-24) microm. A polar granule, oöcyst residuum and micropyle are absent. Each oöcyst contains one spherical to subspherical sporocyst measuring 16.2 (15-17) x 15.6 (15-17) microm. A compact granular, spherical to subspherical sporocyst residuum, 10.4 (10-11) x 8.5 (7-9), was present in 76% of measured sporocysts. In 24% of sporocysts the granules of sporocyst residuum were scattered among the sporozoites.

  14. A central role for phosphatidic acid as a lipid mediator of regulated exocytosis in apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Hayley E; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are commonly known for the structural roles they play, however, the specific contribution of different lipid classes to wide-ranging signalling pathways is progressively being unravelled. Signalling lipids and their associated effector proteins are emerging as significant contributors to a vast array of effector functions within cells, including essential processes such as membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis. Many phospholipids have signalling capacity, however, this review will focus on phosphatidic acid (PA) and the enzymes implicated in its production from diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC): DGK and PLD respectively. PA is a negatively charged, cone-shaped lipid identified as a key mediator in specific membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis events in a variety of mammalian cells, and has recently been implicated in specialised secretory organelle exocytosis in apicomplexan parasites. This review summarises the recent work implicating a role for PA regulation in exocytosis in various cell types. We will discuss how these signalling events are linked to pathogenesis in the phylum Apicomplexa. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Large, rapidly evolving gene families are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J

    2015-02-01

    The Apicomplexa is a phylum of parasitic protozoa, which includes the malaria parasite Plasmodium, amongst other species that can devastate human and animal health. The past decade has seen the release of genome sequences for many of the most important apicomplexan species, providing an excellent basis for improving our understanding of their biology. One of the key features of each genome is a unique set of large, variant gene families. Although closely related species share the same families, even different types of malaria parasite have distinct families. In some species they tend to be found at the ends of chromosomes, which may facilitate aspects of gene expression regulation and generation of sequence diversity. In others they are scattered apparently randomly across chromosomes. For some families there is evidence they are involved in antigenic variation, immune regulation and immune evasion. For others there are no known functions. Even where function is unknown these families are most often predicted to be exposed to the host, contain much sequence diversity and evolve rapidly. Based on these properties it is clear that they are at the forefront of host-parasite interactions. In this review I compare and contrast the genomic context, gene structure, gene expression, protein localization and function of these families across different species.

  16. Apoptosis of Ascogregarina taiwanensis (Apicomplexa: Lecudinidae), which failed to migrate within its natural host.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-June; Huang, Ching-Gi; Fan-Chiang, Mei-Huei; Liu, Yu-Han; Lee, Yi-Feng

    2013-01-15

    Sexual reproduction of Ascogregarina taiwanensis (Apicomplexa: Lecudinidae), a parasite specific to the mosquito Aedes albopictus, in Malpighian tubules is initiated by the entry of the trophotozoites developed in the midgut shortly after pupation (usually <5 h). However, only a low proportion of trophozoites are able to migrate; others end up dying. In this study, we demonstrated that those trophozoites that failed to migrate eventually died of apoptosis. Morphological changes such as shrinkage, chromatin aggregations and formation of blunt ridges on the surface were seen in moribund trophozoites. In addition, DNA fragmentation of trophozoites isolated from the midgut of pupae was demonstrated by the presence of DNA ladders, Annexin V staining and TUNEL assays. Detection of caspase-like activity suggests that apoptosis of those trophozoites may have occurred through a mechanism of an intrinsic or mitochondrial-mediated pathway. Although apoptosis has been observed in various protozoan species, it is not clear how apoptosis in single-celled organisms might result from evolution by natural selection. However, we speculate that apoptosis may regulate the parasite load of A. taiwanensis within its natural mosquito host, leading to an optimized state of the survival rate for both parasite and host.

  17. Gregarines (Apicomplexa) and microsporidians (Microsporidia) of native and invasive gammarids (Amphipoda, Gammaroidea), occurring in Poland.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Mykola; Codreanu-Bălcescu, Doina; Grabowski, Michal; Konopacka, Alicja; Wita, Irena; Czaplińska, Urszula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of our study was to recognize microparasites of alien gammarids inhabiting Polish inland and coastal waters versus those infecting local species. Twenty two localities including the Vistula, Oder and Bug Rivers, Vistula Lagoon, Gosławskie Lake, littoral of the Baltic Sea, as well as small rivers draining directly to the sea were investigated. In total, over 5000 individuals of 14 species of gammarids were collected and analyzed using light and electron microscopy. The studies have revealed five named and seven unnamed species of gregarines (Apicomplexa, Gregarinidae) as well as three named and seven unnamed species of microsporidians (Microsporidia, Nosematidae, Thelohaniidae) infecting six native and four invasive gammarid host species. All the above microparasites were new to Poland. Four species of gregarines (Uradiophora ramosa, U. longissima, Cephaloidophora similis, C. mucronata) and four microsporidians (Nosema dikerogammari, N. pontogammari, Thelohania sp. 2, Thelohania sp. 5) were associated with hosts of Ponto-Caspian origins. Evidently, these microparasites were transported to the area through the range expansion of their invasive hosts. Gregarines Cephaloidophora sp. 1 and Uradiophora sp. 1 were registered only in North American Gammarus tigrinus. Uradiophoera ramosa infects Ponto-Caspian (P. robustoides, D. villosus) and North-Americah hosts (G. tigrinus).

  18. Afternoon shedding of a new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa) in the endangered Regent Honeyeater (Xanthomyza phrygia).

    PubMed

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Vogelnest, Larry; Dhand, Navneet K; Shiels, Michael; Angus, Warrick; Šlapeta, Jan

    2011-05-01

    The Regent Honeyeater (Xanthomyza phyrigia) is an endangered Australian bird species. Breeding populations have been established at Australian zoos in support of re-introduction programmes. This species is the host of a new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa). Oocysts are spherical, 25·8 (22·5-28·75) by 23·8 (20-26·25) μm with a colourless to pale yellow smooth wall undergoing rapid exogenous sporulation, 90% sporulated oocysts in 8 h at 20°C. Each oocyst contains 1 polar granule. Sporocysts are ovoid, 18·67 (17-19) by 9·49 (9-10) μm with a flat Stieda body and spherical substieda body devoid of a hyaline body. The asexual stages and sexual phase is within the enterocytes of the duodenum and jejunum. Faeces collected in the morning (AM, n=84) and in the afternoon (PM, n=90) revealed significant diurnal periodicity in oocyst shedding; 21% (18 of 84) of the AM were positive with the mean of 499 oocysts.g-1 compared to the PM with 91% (82 of 90) bird faeces positive with the mean of 129 723 oocysts.g-1. Therefore, parasite checks for these birds should be carried out in the afternoon to obtain an accurate result. The ecological significance of the high parasite burden in captive birds requires further investigation and comparison to the wild counterparts.

  19. The red-tailed hawk, Buteo jamaicensis, a native definitive host of Frenkelia microti (Apicomplexa) in North America.

    PubMed

    Upton, S J; McKown, R D

    1992-01-01

    Oral inoculation of prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, with coccidian sporocysts isolated from the feces of a red-tailed hawk, Buteo jamaicensis, in Kansas, USA, resulted in formation of Frenkelia microti (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) tissue cysts in the brains of the voles. Five additional isolates of morphologically similar sporocysts collected from red-tailed hawks or other Buteo spp. in Kansas failed to result in detectable infections in rodents. These results are the first to verify that red-tailed hawks are natural definitive host in North America for F. microti.

  20. Nematopsis gigas n. sp. (Apicomplexa), a parasite of Nerita ascencionis (Gastropoda, Neritidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Carlos; Padovan, Isaíras

    2004-01-01

    A new species of Nematopsis (Apicomplexa, Porosporidae) is described from the mantle tissues of the seawater gastropod, Nerita ascencionis (Neritidae), collected in the Atlantic North off the coast of "Fernando de Noronha" Island (3 degrees 47' 57'' S, 32 degrees 25' 12'' W) situated about 350 km from the northeast coast of Brazil. Numerous oocysts, each contained in a parasitophorous vacuole, were found in the cytoplasm of phagocytes in the mantle tissue of the host. The phagocytes were surrounded by a thin wall composed of lucent material. The phagocyte cytoplasm contained a nucleus surrounded by numerous vesicles and some dense masses. The oocysts were 21.9 +/- 0.5 microm long, and 11.5 +/- 0.6 microm wide. The oocyst wall was 0.18-0.25 microm thick, and the apical zone contained a micropyle, 1.0-1.2 microm in diameter, covered by a canopy-like operculum about 0.25 microm thick. Externally, the oocyst wall was surrounded by numerous anastomosing microfibrils attached to the wall and extending towards the periphery of the parasitophorous vacuole. Some microfibrils formed a dense complex network that surrounded the oocyst in the middle of the parasitophorous vacuole, which opened only at the apical zone near the external region of the opercular system. On the basis of the data obtained by light and transmission electron microscopy and host specificity, the gregarine Nematopsis gigas is distinguished from the nearest species as a new species. The taxonomic affinities and morphological comparisons with other similar species of the same genus are discussed.

  1. Sophisticated adaptations of Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa) feeding stages for epicellular parasitism.

    PubMed

    Valigurová, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Gregarines represent a very diverse group of early emerging apicomplexans, parasitising numerous invertebrates and urochordates, and are considered of little practical significance. Recently, they have gained more attention since some analyses showed that cryptosporidia are more closely related to the gregarines than to coccidia. Using a combined microscopic approach, this study points out the spectacular strategy of Gregarina cuneata for attachment to host tissue and nutrient acquisition while parasitising the intestine of yellow mealworm larvae, and reveals the unusual dynamics of cellular interactions between the host epithelium and parasite feeding stages. Trophozoites of G. cuneata develop epicellularly, attached to the luminal side of the host epithelial cell by an epimerite exhibiting a high degree of morphological variability. The presence of contractile elements in the apical region of feeding stages indicates that trophozoite detachment from host tissue is an active process self-regulated by the parasite. A detailed discussion is provided on the possibility of reversible retraction and protraction of the eugregarine apical end, facilitating eventual reattachment to another host cell in better physiological conditions. The gamonts, found in contact with host tissue via a modified protomerite top, indicate further adaptation of parasite for nutrient acquisition via epicellular parasitism while keeping their host healthy. The presence of eugregarines in mealworm larvae even seems to increase the host growth rate and to reduce the death rate despite often heavy parasitisation. Improved knowledge about the formation of host-parasite interactions in deep-branching apicomplexans, including gregarines, would offer significant insights into the fascinating biology and evolutionary strategy of Apicomplexa. Gregarines exhibit an enormous diversity in cell architecture and dimensions, depending on their parasitic strategy and the surrounding environment. They seem to

  2. Sophisticated Adaptations of Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa) Feeding Stages for Epicellular Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Valigurová, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Background Gregarines represent a very diverse group of early emerging apicomplexans, parasitising numerous invertebrates and urochordates, and are considered of little practical significance. Recently, they have gained more attention since some analyses showed that cryptosporidia are more closely related to the gregarines than to coccidia. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combined microscopic approach, this study points out the spectacular strategy of Gregarina cuneata for attachment to host tissue and nutrient acquisition while parasitising the intestine of yellow mealworm larvae, and reveals the unusual dynamics of cellular interactions between the host epithelium and parasite feeding stages. Trophozoites of G. cuneata develop epicellularly, attached to the luminal side of the host epithelial cell by an epimerite exhibiting a high degree of morphological variability. The presence of contractile elements in the apical region of feeding stages indicates that trophozoite detachment from host tissue is an active process self-regulated by the parasite. A detailed discussion is provided on the possibility of reversible retraction and protraction of the eugregarine apical end, facilitating eventual reattachment to another host cell in better physiological conditions. The gamonts, found in contact with host tissue via a modified protomerite top, indicate further adaptation of parasite for nutrient acquisition via epicellular parasitism while keeping their host healthy. The presence of eugregarines in mealworm larvae even seems to increase the host growth rate and to reduce the death rate despite often heavy parasitisation. Conclusions/Significance Improved knowledge about the formation of host-parasite interactions in deep-branching apicomplexans, including gregarines, would offer significant insights into the fascinating biology and evolutionary strategy of Apicomplexa. Gregarines exhibit an enormous diversity in cell architecture and dimensions, depending on

  3. Blabericola rhyparobiae n. comb. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae), parasitizing the Madeira cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E

    2014-02-01

    Blabericola rhyparobiae n. comb. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) is redescribed from the Madeira cockroach, Rhyparobia maderae (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae: Oxyhaloinae: Nauphoetini). Oocysts within the genus are typically dolioform with nonprojecting polar plates. Those of B. rhyparobiae differ from all other species of Blabericola in being oblong rather than dolioform. Morphometrically, the oocysts of B. rhyparobiae are significantly narrower than those of any other known species in the genus; they are significantly longer than those of Blabericola haasi, Blabericola migrator, and Blabericola princisi, but they are significantly shorter than those of Blabericola cubensis (oocyst width 4.47 μm vs. 4.74 μm, 4.70 μm, 5.06 μm, 5.21 μm, respectively; oocyst length 8.98 μm vs. 7.94 μm, 7.93 μm, 8.85 μm, 9.26 μm, respectively). All 5 species are also distinguished by unique sporozoite-bearing cavity sizes and morphometric ratios. Gametocysts of Blabericola species are either orbicular (B. cubensis, B. princisi) or elliptoid (B. haasi , B. migrator, B. rhyparobiae). Among Blabericola species with elliptoid gametocysts, the gametocysts of B. rhyparobiae are intermediate in size relative to the much larger gametocysts of B. migrator and the much smaller gametocysts of B. haasi (gametocyst length 462.06 μm vs. 728.11 μm, 272.02 μm; gametocyst width 297.12 μm vs. 461.31 μm, 178.36 μm, respectively). No structurally unique feature of the gamont distinguishes among species of Blabericola, but gamonts of all 5 species differ morphometrically. Gamonts of B. rhyparobiae differ significantly from all other species in the genus in the primite's protomerite and deutomerite lengths, the satellite' deutomerite lengths, and the total length of both primite and satellite in association. The gamonts of B. rhyparobiae are significantly smaller than those of B. cubensis, B. migrator, and B. princisi but significantly larger than those of B. haasi and can be readily

  4. Biosynthetic pathways of plastid-derived organelles as potential drug targets against parasitic apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Frank

    2003-06-01

    currently known inhibitors. Furthermore, based on the recent findings potentially new targets will be discussed. A short overview of the presently available high-throughput methods for Apicomplexa to evaluate the potency of new inhibitory substances will also be given.

  5. Isospora cardellinae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the red warbler Cardellina rubra (Swainson) (Passeriformes: Parulidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Medina, Juan Pablo; Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; García-Conejo, Michele; Galindo-Sánchez, Karla Patricia; Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2016-10-01

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) collected from the red warbler Cardellina rubra (Swainson) is reported from the Nevado de Toluca National Park, Mexico. Isospora cardellinae n. sp. has subspherical oöcysts, measuring on average 26.6 × 25.4 μm, with smooth, bi-layered wall, c.1.3 μm thick. Micropyle, oöcyst residuum, and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal, measuring on average 19.0 × 12.0 µm, with a knob-like Stieda body, a trapezoidal sub-Stieda body and sporocyst residuum composed of scattered spherules of different sizes. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fourth description of an isosporoid coccidian infecting a New World warbler.

  6. Isospora celata n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the orange-crowned warbler Oreothlypis celata (Say) (Passeriformes: Parulidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Berto, Bruno Pereira; Medina, Juan Pablo; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; García-Conejo, Michele; Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2014-11-01

    A new coccidian species (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from the orange-crowned warbler Oreothlypis celata (Say) collected in the Nevado de Toluca National Park, Mexico at 3,000 metres above sea level. Isospora celata n. sp. has subspheroidal oöcysts, measuring 28.4 × 26.4 μm, with smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.2 μm thick. Micropyle and polar granule are absent, but oöcyst residuum is present as a compact mass. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 18.2 × 12.8 µm. Stieda body knob-like and sub-Stieda body irregular and barely discernible. Sporocyst residuum is composed of granules of different sizes. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the third description of an isosporoid coccidian infecting a New World warbler.

  7. Eimeria pileata n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the rufous-capped brush finch Atlapetes pileatus Wagler (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Medina, Juan Pablo; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; García-Conejo, Michele; Galindo-Sánchez, Karla Patrícia; Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2015-11-01

    A new coccidian species (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) collected from the rufous-capped brush finch Atlapetes pileatus Wagler in the Nevado de Toluca Natural Protected Area, Mexico. Oöcysts of Eimeria pileata n. sp. are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 16.5 × 14.1 μm, with a smooth, bi-layered wall. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 9.0 × 5.4 μm. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies are both present. A sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. This is the third description of an eimeriid coccidian infecting passerines.

  8. A new coccidian, Isospora rheae sp. nov. (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae), from Rhea americana (Aves, Rheidae) from South America

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Samira S.M.; Ederli, Nicole B.; Berto, Bruno P.; de Oliveira, Francisco C.R.

    2014-01-01

    A new species of coccidian (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from rheas, Rhea americana, is reported in Brazil. Oocysts of Isospora rheae sp. nov. are spherical to subspheroidal, measuring 22.6 × 21.0 µm, and have a double and smooth wall that is approximately 1.7 µm thick. The micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are slightly ovoid, measuring 13.9 × 9.6 µm. The Stieda body is flattened, the substieda body is pointed, irregular and wavy and the sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered granules of varying sizes. Sporozoites have an oblong refractile body and one nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporid coccidian infecting birds of the family Rheidae. PMID:25426418

  9. Isospora massardi sp. nov. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the white-necked thrush Turdus albicollis (Passeriformes: Turdidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Berto, Bruno P; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Galvão, Gideão da Silva; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2014-06-01

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) are reported from the white-necked thrush Turdus albicollis Vieillot, 1818, a very common species in South America. Isospora massardi sp. nov. oocysts are subspherical, 18.6 × 17.7 μm, with smooth, bilayered wall, ~0.9 μm. Micropyle, oocyst residuum are absent, but two polar granules are frequently present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 14.8 × 9.3 μm. Stieda body is knob-like to rounded and substieda body is rounded. Sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered spherules of different sizes. Sporozoites are vermiform with posterior and anterior refractile bodies and a nucleus. This is the sixth description of an isosporoid coccidium infecting a New World turdid bird.

  10. On the occurrence of a Haemogregarinae (Apicomplexa) parasite from freshwater turtles of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Molla Sabir; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Gürelli, Gözde

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Haemogregarine parasites (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae) of freshwater turtles (Lissemys punctata andersoni, Geoclemys hamiltonii) of India. Turtles were collected by net from two ponds of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India. A small amount of blood was taken from the subcarapacial vein puncture site. The blood smears were prepared and air dried and fixed in absolute methyl alcohol. The slides were stained with Giemsa. Haemogregarine parasites were recorded from the erythrocytes of turtles. Multiple stages of intraerythrocytic gametocytes (microgametocytes, macrogametocytes, early schizonts and mature schizonts) were observed in blood films. It was found that only twenty out of the twenty five turtles (80%) were infected with the parasite. The prevalence rate was higher in larger turtles in comparison to smaller ones. It was also found that female turtles had a higher prevalence of infection than males.

  11. A new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Morafka's desert tortoise Gopherus morafkai (Testudines: Testudinidae).

    PubMed

    Hnida, John A

    2015-11-01

    Isospora gopheri n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from 5 of 28 (18%) Morafka's desert tortoise Gopherus morafkai Murphy, Berry, Edwards, Leviton, Lathrop & Readle, housed by the Phoenix Herpetological Society, Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. Sporulated oöcysts of this new species were spheroidal to subspheroidal, 20-27 × 19-27 (23.0 × 21.7) µm, with a smooth, bi-layered wall and 1-3 polar granules; an oöcyst residuum was absent. Sporocysts were elongate-ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 13-18 × 9-12 (15.9 × 10.2) µm, with a Stieda body, sub-Stieda body and sporocyst residuum; sporozoites were banana-shaped with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is both the first coccidian to be described from this host species and only the second reported from the host genus.

  12. Gene Discovery in the Apicomplexa as Revealed by EST Sequencing and Assembly of a Comparative Gene Database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Brunk, Brian P.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Pape, Deana; Tang, Keliang; Cole, Robert H.; Martin, John; Wylie, Todd; Dante, Mike; Fogarty, Steven J.; Howe, Daniel K.; Liberator, Paul; Diaz, Carmen; Anderson, Jennifer; White, Michael; Jerome, Maria E.; Johnson, Emily A.; Radke, Jay A.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Waterston, Robert H.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Roos, David S.; Sibley, L. David

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale EST sequencing projects for several important parasites within the phylum Apicomplexa were undertaken for the purpose of gene discovery. Included were several parasites of medical importance (Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii) and others of veterinary importance (Eimeria tenella, Sarcocystis neurona, and Neospora caninum). A total of 55,192 ESTs, deposited into dbEST/GenBank, were included in the analyses. The resulting sequences have been clustered into nonredundant gene assemblies and deposited into a relational database that supports a variety of sequence and text searches. This database has been used to compare the gene assemblies using BLAST similarity comparisons to the public protein databases to identify putative genes. Of these new entries, ∼15%–20% represent putative homologs with a conservative cutoff of p < 10−9, thus identifying many conserved genes that are likely to share common functions with other well-studied organisms. Gene assemblies were also used to identify strain polymorphisms, examine stage-specific expression, and identify gene families. An interesting class of genes that are confined to members of this phylum and not shared by plants, animals, or fungi, was identified. These genes likely mediate the novel biological features of members of the Apicomplexa and hence offer great potential for biological investigation and as possible therapeutic targets. [The sequence data from this study have been submitted to dbEST division of GenBank under accession nos.: Toxoplasma gondii: –, –, –, –, – , –, –, –, –. Plasmodium falciparum: –, –, –, –. Sarcocystis neurona: , , , , , , , , , , , , , –, –, –, –, –. Eimeria tenella: –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, – , –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –. Neospora caninum: –, –, , – , –, –.] PMID:12618375

  13. Gregarines infecting Ischnura spp. in Texas, U.S.A., including description of Septemlaterospora rasberryi n. gen. n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Actinocephalidae: Acanthosporinae) and revision of Steganorhynchus dunwoodyi (Apicomplexa: Actinocephalidae: Menosporinae).

    PubMed

    Cook, Tamara J; Smith-Herron, Autumn J

    2014-02-01

    Septemlaterospora rasberryi n. gen. n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Actinocephalidae: Acanthosporinae) is described from adults of Ischnura ramburii (Odonata: Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae). Septemlaterospora n. gen is distinguished by the form of the oocysts: terminally truncated heptagonal bipyramids bearing 7 equatorial spines, 1 at each equatorial vertex, 7 terminal spines obliquely inserted at each pole, 1 at each vertex created by polar truncation; 21 spines total. The holdfast is compound, comprising a terminal epimerite and intercalating diamerite; epimerite is a thick disk or linearly crateriform sucker; diamerite is short (less than half of the total holdfast length) and very broadly obdeltoid. Association occurs immediately before syzygy and is cephalolateral and biassociative. Gametocysts are spherical with a conspicuous hyaline coat. Lacking conspicuous sporoducts, they dehisce by simple rupture. Steganorhynchus dunwoodyi is redescribed utilizing a new complete taxonomic data set, consisting of a larger set of metric characters and based on uniformly prepared, permanent specimens. New host and geographic records are reported for Calyxocephalus karyopera, Domadracunculus janovyi, Nubenocephalus secundus, and Steganorhynchus dunwoodyi, and the type host of D. janovyi is amended.

  14. Detection of antibodies against Brucella abortus, Leptospira spp., and Apicomplexa protozoa in water buffaloes in the Northeast of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Konrad, José L; Campero, Lucía M; Caspe, Gastón S; Brihuega, Bibiana; Draghi, Graciela; Moore, Dadin P; Crudeli, Gustavo A; Venturini, María C; Campero, Carlos M

    2013-11-01

    Water buffalo industry has become a profitable activity worldwide, including the Northeast of Argentina (NEA). However, research on diseases affecting this species is scarce. The aim of the present study was to detect antibodies against Brucella abortus, Leptospira spp., Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Sarcocystis spp. in 500 water buffalo cows from five ranches (100 animals each) in the NEA. Serum samples were tested for B. abortus by fluorescence polarization assay, Leptospira spp. by microagglutination test, and N. caninum, T. gondii, and Sarcocystis spp. by indirect fluorescent antibody tests. Overall, the proportion of seropositive animals was 6.4, 22.2, 42.2, 25.4, and 50.8 % for brucellosis, leptospirosis, neosporosis, toxoplasmosis, and sarcocystosis, respectively. The proportion of seropositive animals for all diseases was statistically different among herds (p < 0.05). Statistical differences were also detected among age groups for brucellosis and neosporosis (p < 0.05). The detection of specific antibodies to B. abortus, Leptospira spp., and several Apicomplexa protozoans in water buffaloes in the NEA is reported in this study.

  15. Evidence of Intraflagellar Transport and Apical Complex Formation in a Free-Living Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Portman, Neil; Foster, Christie; Walker, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Since its first description, Chromera velia has attracted keen interest as the closest free-living relative of parasitic Apicomplexa. The life cycle of this unicellular alga is complex and involves a motile biflagellate form. Flagella are thought to be formed in the cytoplasm, a rare phenomenon shared with Plasmodium in which the canonical mode of flagellar assembly, intraflagellar transport, is dispensed with. Here we demonstrate the expression of intraflagellar transport components in C. velia, answering the question of whether this organism has the potential to assemble flagella via the canonical route. We have developed and characterized a culturing protocol that favors the generation of flagellate forms. From this, we have determined a marked shift in the mode of daughter cell production from two to four daughter cells per division as a function of time after passage. We conduct an ultrastructural examination of the C. velia flagellate form by using serial TEM and show that flagellar biogenesis in C. velia occurs prior to cytokinesis. We demonstrate a close association of the flagellar apparatus with a complex system of apical structures, including a micropore, a conoid, and a complex endomembrane system reminiscent of the apical complex of parasitic apicomplexans. Recent work has begun to elucidate the possible flagellar origins of the apical complex, and we show that in C. velia these structures are contemporaneous within a single cell and share multiple connections. We propose that C. velia therefore represents a vital piece in the puzzle of the origins of the apical complex. PMID:24058169

  16. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), from midland brown snake, Storeria dekayi wrightorum (Ophidia: Colubridae) from Arkansas, USA

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Connior, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A new species of coccidian (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) collected from a midland brown snake, Storeria dekayi wrightorum from Arkansas, USA, is described. Oőcysts of Isospora holbrooki n. sp. are subspherical to ovoidal with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 27.1 × 24.0 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 14.8 × 10.0 μm, L/W 1.5; the Stieda body is nipple-like, the sub-Stieda body is ellipsoidal and the sporocyst residuum is composed of coarse granules in a cluster. Sporozoites have a spheroidal anterior refractile body, a subspheroidal posterior refractile body, and one centrally-located nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporan from the snake genus Storeria as well as the largest oőcysts and sporocysts of any previous snake isosporan to date. PMID:26739289

  17. Characterization and distribution of Isospora sabiai n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from thrushes Turdus spp. (Passeriformes: Turdidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Irlane Fde; Rodrigues, Mariana B; Silva, Lidiane M; Lopes, Brunodo B; Oliveira, Mariana S; Ferreira, Matheus A; Cardozo, Sergian V; Luz, Hermes R; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G; Berto, Bruno Pereira

    2017-03-20

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Isospora) is described parasitizing white-necked thrushes Turdus albicollis Vieillot, 1818, rufous-bellied thrushes Turdus rufiventris Vieillot, 1818, pale-breasted thrushes Turdus leucomelas Vieillot, 1818 and yellow-legged thrushes Turdus flavipes Vieillot, 1818 from 3 different localities in Brazil. Isospora sabiai n. sp. has oocysts that are sub-spherical to ellipsoidal, 20.9 × 18.6 µm, with smooth, delicate, bilayered wall, ~1.1 μm thick. Micropyle inconspicuous or imperceptible. Oocyst residuum absent, but small polar granules rounded or comma-shaped are present. Sporocysts are elongate ellipsoidal to reniform, 16.5 × 9.2 µm. The Stieda body is knob-like. Sub-Stieda body rounded to conical, sometimes homogeneous with the Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum is present, usually as a cluster of numerous granules. Sporozoites are vermiform with 2 refractile bodies. The oocysts and sporocysts of I. sabiai n. sp. are uniform in the proportionality of width on length, but exhibited different patterns of size associated with each host species; therefore, an ecological discussion is introduced aimed at associating these morphometrical patterns of the oocysts with the habits of the different species of thrushes. This is the seventh isosporoid coccidian reported from New World turdids.

  18. Evidence of intraflagellar transport and apical complex formation in a free-living relative of the apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Portman, Neil; Foster, Christie; Walker, Giselle; Šlapeta, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Since its first description, Chromera velia has attracted keen interest as the closest free-living relative of parasitic Apicomplexa. The life cycle of this unicellular alga is complex and involves a motile biflagellate form. Flagella are thought to be formed in the cytoplasm, a rare phenomenon shared with Plasmodium in which the canonical mode of flagellar assembly, intraflagellar transport, is dispensed with. Here we demonstrate the expression of intraflagellar transport components in C. velia, answering the question of whether this organism has the potential to assemble flagella via the canonical route. We have developed and characterized a culturing protocol that favors the generation of flagellate forms. From this, we have determined a marked shift in the mode of daughter cell production from two to four daughter cells per division as a function of time after passage. We conduct an ultrastructural examination of the C. velia flagellate form by using serial TEM and show that flagellar biogenesis in C. velia occurs prior to cytokinesis. We demonstrate a close association of the flagellar apparatus with a complex system of apical structures, including a micropore, a conoid, and a complex endomembrane system reminiscent of the apical complex of parasitic apicomplexans. Recent work has begun to elucidate the possible flagellar origins of the apical complex, and we show that in C. velia these structures are contemporaneous within a single cell and share multiple connections. We propose that C. velia therefore represents a vital piece in the puzzle of the origins of the apical complex.

  19. Molecular survey and microscopic examination of Hepatozoon Miller, 1908 (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) in lacertid lizards from the western Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P M C; Perera, Ana; Harris, D James

    2012-12-01

    The genus Hepatozoon Miller, 1908 (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) is composed of intracellular haemogregarine parasites that are widely distributed among all tetrapod groups. The present study combines microscopic and molecular data on haemogregarine parasites from lizards in the western Mediterranean. We screened tissue samples and examined blood smears for the presence of species of Hepatozoon from four lizards, namely Algyroides marchi Valverde, endemic to Southeast Spain, Podarcis bocagei Seoane from Spain and Portugal, P hispanica Steindachner from Spain, and P lilfordi Günther from Cabrera, Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon parasites vary between and within lizard species from different regions. Algyroides marchi and P bocagei from Spain had the lowest values, whereas P hispanica had the highest. Phylogeny based on 18S rRNA gene sequences indicates that most of the new Hepatozoon sequences are part of a clade exclusive from North African and Iberian lizards, except for a single P bocagei isolate that is found related to another clade including isolates from other reptile host species and rodents. Interestingly, isolates from Algyroides form a distinct monophyletic subgroup, which could be a signal of strict host-specificity within this host genus.

  20. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Alectoris barbara (Aves: Phasianidae) from the Canary Islands (Spain).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alvarez, A; Modry, D; Foronda, P

    2016-05-01

    The present study was conducted with the objective of identifying the species of Eimeria present in a cynegetic farm. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) species is described from Barbary partridge, Alectoris barbara, from the Canary Islands. Experimental infections were carried out in order to determine the prepatent period, sporulation time, site of infection, and morphology of endogenous stages. One species is described as new. Eimeria barbarae n. sp. has ellipsoidal oocysts, 20.0 × 14.4 (16-23 × 13-16) μm, with a shape-index (SI) of 1.39. Sporocysts are almond-shaped, 9.0 × 5.4 (6.5-11 × 4.5-6) μm, SI = 1.56. The endogenous development takes place along the intestine. The present study showed that E. barbarae causes severe pathologies in A. barbara chickens, with impact on their health condition. Control strategies needs to be implemented to reduce the loss due to coccidiosis at studied farm.

  1. Characterisation of Isospora lusitanensis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula Linnaeus (Passeriformes: Turdidae) in mainland Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Sergian Vianna; Berto, Bruno Pereira; da Fonseca, Isabel Pereira; Tomás, André; Thode, Fátima Regina P B; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2015-10-01

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from a specimen of the Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula Linnaeus held for rehabilitation and reintroduction into the wild in a centre for research and recovery of wild animals in Quinta de Marim, Olhão, Portugal. Isospora lusitanensis n. sp. has subspherical to ovoidal oöcysts, measuring on average 26.4 × 23.4 μm, with smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 μm thick. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 16.0 × 10.9 µm. Stieda body is knob-like and sub-Stieda body is prominent and rounded. Sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered spherules. Sporozoites are vermiform, with one refractile body and a nucleus. The morphological and morphometric data for the new species were compared with those for species parasitising birds of the Muscicapidae, Turdidae, Timaliidae, Troglodytidae and Cinclidae, which are considered phylogenetically close. The original histograms of Isospora turdi Schwalbach, 1959 were redrawn for comparison with I. lusitanensis n. sp. and a linear regression of width against length of the oöcysts is presented for characterisation. This is the first isosporoid coccidian described from T. merula in mainland Portugal.

  2. First report of Calyptospora sp. (Apicomplexa, Calyptosporidae) in forage characid fish from the Três Marias Reservoir, São Francisco Basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Marcia Cavalcanti; de Carvalho Brasil-Sato, Marilia

    2010-05-01

    Coccidians are parasitic protozoans, and Calyptospora is an important genus of coccidia found in freshwater and marine fish of the Americas. This paper describes Calyptospora sp. that were found parasitizing the liver and intestine of Triportheus guentheri and the intestine of Tetragonopterus chalceus, two forage fish species from the Três Marias Reservoir, Upper São Francisco River, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Apicomplexa found in the São Francisco Basin are reported here for the first time. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Protomagalhaensia richardsoni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae): a new gregarine parasitizing the giant lobster cockroach, Henschoutedenia flexivitta (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Fauver, Joseph R; Clopton, Richard E; Clopton, Debra T

    2013-10-01

    Protomagalhaensia richardsoni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) is described from the giant lobster cockroach, Henschoutedenia flexivitta (Dictyoptera: Blattaria: Blaberidae: Oxyhaloinae: Nauphoetini). Oocysts within the genus are dolioform with polar plates. Those of Protomagalhaensia granulosae, Protomagalhaensia wolfi, and Protomagalhaensia blaberae possess distinct apical spines and a sagittal depression that are absent or reduced in P. richardsoni and Protomagalhaensia cerastes. Oocysts of P. richardsoni are significantly longer with larger sporozoite-bearing cavities than those of P. blaberae, P. cerastes, P. granulosae, and P. wolfi (external oocyst length 8.07 μm vs. 7.42 μm, 7.50 μm, 6.87 μm, 7.56 μm, respectively; internal oocyst length 6.94 μm vs. 6.44 μm, 6.77 μm, 6.09 μm, 6.72 μm, respectively). All 5 species are also distinguished by unique oocyst length/width ratios. No unique morphological structure distinguishes among the gametocysts of Protomagalhaensia species, but gametocysts of P. richardsoni are significantly shorter than those of P. blaberae, P. cerastes, P. granulosae, and P. wolfi (gametocyst length 184.3 μm vs. 325.15 μm, 253.27 μm, 273.63 μm, 218.3 μm, respectively). No structurally unique morphological gamont feature distinguishes among species of Protomagalhaensia. Rather, species distinctions are morphometric in nature. In general, gamonts of P. richardsoni are readily distinguished from those of P. cerastes and P. wolfi based on size alone: the latter species being roughly half the size of P. richardsoni. Gamonts of P. richardsoni are most similar to those of P. granulosae and P. blaberae but with relatively smaller primites and more slender satellites.

  4. Isospora streperae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a grey currawong (Strepera versicolour plumbea) (Passeriformes: Artamidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Habsi, Khalid Al; Elliot, Aileen; Ryan, Una

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Isospora streperae n. sp., (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from a single grey currawong bird (Strepera versicolour) (subspecies S. v. plumbea) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts (n = 32) are spherical to subspherical, with smooth colourless bilayered oocyst wall, 1.0 µm thick (outer layer 0⋅8 µm, inner 0.2 µm thick). Oocyst with a polar granule, an oocyst residuum and two spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocysts. Oocyst length, 23.8 (20.4-25.0) µm; oocyst width, 22.5 (20.0-24.6) µm; a shape index of 1.06, with Stieda, substieda bodies. Micropyle is absent. Sporocysts with compressed sporocyst residuum and four sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 14.4 (12.5-15.2) µm; sporocyst width, 11.2 (10.6-14.0) µm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.29. Necropsy of the bird identified haemorrhaging along the ileum and jejunum, which is where Isospora oocysts were also mostly detected. Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci; the 18S, 28S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene. At the 18S locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 99.5% and 99.4% similarity respectively to an Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a Southern cape sparrow (Passer melanurus melanurus) and Isospora dovati from a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica). At the 28S locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 96.9% similarity to an Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a grosbeak starling (Scissirostrum dubium) and 95.8% similarity with the Isospora sp. (MS-2003) from a Southern cape sparrow. At the COI locus, I. streperae n. sp. exhibited 95.0% similarity to Isospora sp. from a yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) from the Czech Republic. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of Isospora, which is named Isospora streperae n. sp. after its host, the grey currawong (Strepera versicolour plumbea). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Isospora serinuse n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a domestic canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica) (Passeriformes: Fringillidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elliot, Aileen; Ryan, Una

    2015-12-01

    A new species, Isospora serinuse n. sp., (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) is described from a single domestic canary (Serinus canaria forma domestica) (subspecies S. c. domestica) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts of Isospora serinuse n. sp. are spherical or subspherical, 25.5 (24.4-27.0) × 23.5 (22.0-24.8) μm, with a shape index (length/width) of 1.09; and a smooth bilayered oocyst wall, 1.2 μm thick (outer layer 0.9 μm, inner 0.3 μm). A polar granule is present, but a micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. The sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 18.9 (17.8-20.2) × 11.8 (10.6-13.0) μm, with a shape index of 1.6. Stieda and substieda bodies are present, the Stieda body being a small crescent shape and the substieda being indistinct. Each sporocyst with four vermiform sporozoites arranged head to tail. A sporocyst residuum is present and composed of numerous granules of different sizes that are scattered among the sporozoites. Morphologically, the oocysts of Isospora serinuse n. sp. were different from those of all known valid Isospora spp. Molecular analysis was conducted at 3 loci: the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and two separate regions of subunit I of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene (designated COIa and COIb). At the 18S locus, Isospora serinuse n. sp. exhibited 97.5% similarity to Isospora sp. Tokyo from a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica) in Japan. At the 28S locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 94.9% similarity to Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. from a red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) in Australia. At the COIa locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 95.7% similarity to Isospora sospora sp. ex Apodemus flavicollis from a yellow-necked mouse and Isospora gryphoni from an American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) respectively. At the COIb locus, I. serinuse n. sp. exhibited 96.7% similarity to an Isospora (iSAT4) from a European pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca). Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new

  6. Isospora pitiguari n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the rufous-browed peppershrike (Aves: Passeriformes: Vireonidae) Cyclarhis gujanensis Gmelin, 1789.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Galvão, Gideão da Silva; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-01-30

    In the current study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), collected from the rufous-browed peppershrike Cyclarhis gujanensis Gmelin, 1789, is reported from Brazil. Isospora pitiguari n. sp. has oocysts, which are spherical to sub-spherical, 26.8 × 25.7 μm, with smooth, bilayered wall ~1.5 μm thick. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are rounded to slightly ovoidal, 14.4 × 11.6 µm. Stieda body flattened and substieda body prominent and rounded. Sporocyst residuum is composed of granules of different sizes. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporoid coccidium infecting a New World vireo.

  7. A new coccidian, Isospora parnaitatiaiensis n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae), from the white-shouldered fire-eye Pyriglena leucoptera (Passeriformes, Thamnophilidae) from South America.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lidiane Maria; Rodrigues, Mariana Borges; Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2016-02-01

    A new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Isospora) parasitizing the white-shouldered fire-eye Pyriglena leucoptera (Vieillot, 1818) is described in the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia. This park is a protected area in southeastern Brazil with a high degree of vulnerability, representing a "conservation island" of biodiversity. Isospora parnaitatiaiensis n. sp. has oocysts that are ellipsoidal, 23.8 × 19.4 μm, with smooth, bilayered wall, ~1.1 μm thick. Micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent, but one or two polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 14.6 × 9.3 μm. The Stieda body is nipple- to knob-like and sub-Stieda body rounded to rectangular. Sporocyst residuum is present, usually as a cluster of numerous granules. Sporozoites are vermiform with two refractile bodies and a nucleus. This is the second isosporoid coccidian described from antbirds (Thamnophilidae).

  8. Aggregata (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) infection in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris from the West Mediterranean Sea: The infection rates and possible effect of faunistic, environmental and ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo-Hernández, E.; Barcala, E.; Berriatua, E.; García-Ayala, A.; Muñoz, P.

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence and distribution of the coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the Mediterranean Spanish coasts were studied. A total of 114 octopuses were sampled from 30 geographic sectors by trawl fleet, and whitish macroscopic oocysts typical of A. octopiana infection were recorded in 96% of octopuses in the digestive tract and mainly in intestine and spiral caecum. The univariate analysis showed that lesion extension varied according to specific octopus, environmental and faunistic variables. A subsequent multivariable analysis indicated that the risk of macroscopic lesions in the caecum was greater in males compared to females, in octopuses living in deeper compared to shallower waters and in hauls where the crustacean Pagurus excavatus was present. The study provides further evidence of the abundance of A. octopiana in octopus ecosystems urging for further studies to evaluate its health impact. The combined abundance of infected octopuses and P. excavatus merits attention.

  9. First identification of Sarcocystis tenella (Railliet, 1886) Moulé, 1886 (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) by PCR in naturally infected sheep from Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rodrigo Costa; Su, Chunlei; Langoni, Helio

    2009-11-12

    Sarcocystis tenella is a dog-sheep protozoan parasite, causing a widespread enzootic muscle parasitosis and neurological disease mainly in lambs. This parasite is pathogenic to sheep and important to the economical production of sheep. The present study was initially aimed to determine Toxoplasma gondii infection and the occurrence of co-infection with other Apicomplexa parasites in 602 Brazilian sheep. Twenty of these sheep were positive with antibodies to T. gondii by MAT and IFAT-IgG tests, positive with PCR-RFLP genotyping at multiple loci, and parasites were isolated from mice infected with sheep tissue samples. Two additional sheep born in Brazil, a 2-year-old female Polwarth (Ideal) sheep, a breed originated from Australia (#1), and a 1-year-old male Corriedale sheep, a breed originated from New Zealand and Australia (#2) were positive to T. gondii antibodies by serum tests, and PCR, but negative for bioassay in mice. In genotyping at 12 loci, sheep #1 sample and #2 presented positive results only for some markers. PCR-RFLP of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) was performed in all 22 animals to identify the possibility of co-infection of T. gondii with other Apicomplexa parasites, such as S. tenella, Neospora caninum and Hammondia hammondi, resulting in a T. gondii profile for the first 20 animals and a unique genotyping profile for sheep #1 and #2, identical to S. tenella. The 18S rRNA PCR products (approximately 310 bp) were sequenced and blasted to GenBank database at NCBI. Both samples were identical to S. tenella 18S rRNA gene (GenBank accession number L24383-1). These results suggest the existence of co-infection of S. tenella with T. gondii in ewes from Brazil.

  10. Coccidia of New World psittaciform birds (Aves: Psittaciformes): Eimeria ararae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Berto, Bruno Pereira; de Carvalho Balthazar, Lianna Maria; Coelho, Cleide Domingues; Neves, Daniel Medeiros; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In the New World, the avian order Psittaciformes comprises 142 species, yet to date only 3 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only four species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 have been described. In this study, a new coccidian species (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) obtained from the blue-and-yellow macaw Ara ararauna (Linnaeus) is reported from Brazil. Oöcysts of Eimeria ararae n. sp. are ovoidal, measure 28.7 × 20.2 μm and have a smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.1 μm thick. Both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal and measure 17.0 × 8.3 µm, with knob-like, prominent Stieda body and sporocyst residuum is composed of granules; sub-Stieda body is absent. Sporozoites are vermiform with one refractile body and a nucleus. This is the fifth description of an eimerid coccidian infecting a New World psittaciform bird.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of Pacific Archigregarines (Apicomplexa), including descriptions of Veloxidium leptosynaptae n. gen., n. sp., from the sea cucumber Leptosynapta clarki (Echinodermata), and two new species of Selenidium.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kevin C; Leander, Brian S

    2012-01-01

    Although archigregarines are poorly understood intestinal parasites of marine invertebrates, they are critical for understanding the earliest stages in the evolution of the Apicomplexa. Previous studies suggest that archigregarines are a paraphyletic stem group from which other lineages of gregarines, and possibly all other groups of apicomplexans, evolved. However, substantiating this inference is difficult because molecular phylogenetic data from archigregarines, in particular, and other gregarines, in general, are severely limited. In an attempt to help fill gaps in our knowledge of archigregarine diversity and phylogeny, we set out to discover and characterize novel lineages of archigregarines with high-resolution light and scanning electron microscopy and analyses of small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences derived from single-cell (SC) PCR techniques. Here, we describe two novel species of Selenidium, namely Selenidium idanthyrsae n. sp. and S. boccardiellae n. sp., and demonstrate the surface morphology and molecular phylogenetic position of the previously reported species S. cf. mesnili. We also describe a novel genus of archigregarine, Veloxidium leptosynaptae n. gen., n. sp., which branches with an environmental sequence and, together, forms the nearest sister lineage to a diverse clade of marine eugregarines (i.e. lecudinids and urosporids). This molecular phylogenetic result is consistent with the hypothesis that archigregarines are deeply paraphyletic within apicomplexans, and suggests that convergent evolution played an important role in shaping the diversity of eugregarine trophozoites. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. Morphology and Molecular Phylogeny of Coelomic Gregarines (Apicomplexa) with Different Types of Motility: Urospora ovalis and U. travisiae from the Polychaete Travisia forbesii.

    PubMed

    Diakin, Andrei; Paskerova, Gita G; Simdyanov, Timur G; Aleoshin, Vladimir V; Valigurová, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Urosporids (Apicomplexa: Urosporidae) are eugregarines that parasitise marine invertebrates, such as annelids, molluscs, nemerteans and echinoderms, inhabiting their coelom and intestine. Urosporids exhibit considerable morphological plasticity, which correlates with their different modes of motility and variations in structure of their cortical zone, according to the localisation within the host. The gregarines Urospora ovalis and U. travisiae from the marine polychaete Travisia forbesii were investigated with an emphasis on their general morphology and phylogenetic position. Solitary ovoid trophozoites and syzygies of U. ovalis were located free in the host coelom and showed metabolic activity, a non-progressive movement with periodic changes of the cell shape. Solitary trophozoites of U. travisiae, attached to the host tissue or free floating in the coelom, were V-shaped. Detached trophozoites demonstrated gliding motility, a progressive movement without observable cell body changes. In both gregarines, the cortex formed numerous epicytic folds, but superfolds appeared exclusively on the surface of U. ovalis during metabolic activity. SSU rDNA sequences obtained from U. ovalis and U. travisiae revealed that they belong to the Lecudinoidea clade; however, they are not affiliated with other coelomic urosporids (Pterospora spp. and Lithocystis spp.), but surprisingly with intestinal lecudinids (Difficilina spp.) parasitising nemerteans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Binding and activation of human and mouse complement by Cryptosporidium parvum (Apicomplexa) and susceptibility of C1q- and MBL-deficient mice to infection.

    PubMed

    Petry, Franz; Jakobi, Vera; Wagner, Swen; Tessema, Tesfaye Sisay; Thiel, Steffen; Loos, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite (Apicomplexa) that causes gastrointestinal disease in animals and humans. Whereas immunocompetent hosts can limit the infection within 1 or 2 weeks, immunocompromised individuals develop a chronic, life-threatening disease. The importance of the adaptive cellular immune response, with CD4+ T-lymphocytes being the major players, has been clearly demonstrated. Several non-adaptive immune mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to the host defence, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) from NK cells, certain chemokines, beta-defensins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, but the influence of the complement systems has been less well studied. We analysed the in vitro binding and activation of the human and mouse complement systems and tested the susceptibility to infection in complement-deficient mouse strains. We found that C. parvum can activate both the classical and lectin pathways, leading to the deposition of C3b on the parasite. Using real-time PCR, parasite development could be demonstrated in adult mice lacking mannan-binding lectin (MBL-A/C-/-) but not in mice lacking complement factor C1q (C1qA-/-) or in wild type C57BL/6 mice. The contribution of the complement system and the lectin pathway in particular to the host defence against cryptosporidiosis may become apparent in situations of immunodeficiency such as HIV infections or in early childhood.

  14. Ditrypanocystis sp. (Apicomplexa, Gregarinia, Selenidiidae): the mode of survival in the gut of Enchytraeus albidus (Annelida, Oligochaeta, Enchytraeidae) is close to that of the coccidian genus Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Butaeva, F; Paskerova, G; Entzeroth, R

    2006-01-01

    A selenid gregarine Ditrypanocystis sp. (Apicomplexa, Gregarinia, Selenidiidae), harboring the gut lumen of the oligochaete Enchytraeus albidus, was studied by light and electron microscopy. The trophozoite of Ditrypanocystis sp. is attached to the gut wall with its apical end to be anchored eventually between enterocytes in the crypts. Simultaneously, between the surfaces of the parasite and the host cell a peculiar contact is formed made of membranous channels and vesicles of unknown origin, the host cell surface in the contact area lacking cilia. The trophozoite becomes progressively enclosed within a parasitophorous vacuole made of layers of fused ciliar membranes of enterocytes. The fused cilia may be a source of membranes lining channels and vesicles of the contact area. Such a mode of parasitophorous arrangements has never been described before for gregarines, however, it bears a some likeness with that of the coccidian genus Cryptosporidium (similarity and differences being discussed). With regard to some molecular phylogeny constructions, claiming the "sister" relationship between gregarines and the coccidian genus Cryptosporidium (Carreno et al., 1999; Leander et al., 2003), this common feature in host-parasite relationships enabled us to put forward an idea of a possible evolutionary route from extracellularity of gregarines to intracellularity of coccidia, as exemplified by species of Cryptosporidium.

  15. Gregarines on a diet: the effects of host starvation on Gregarina confusa Janovy et al., 2007 (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) in Tribolium destructor Uyttenboogaart, 1933 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Jodi; Janovy, John

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to explore the nutritional relationship between Gregarina confusa (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) parasites and its coleopteran host, Tribolium destructor, by measuring the cytoplasmic density of gregarines in continuously fed larvae, starved larvae, and larvae refed after starvation. Cultures were maintained in a standard media (whole wheat flour:commercial wheat germ:yeast [30:10:1]). Larvae from control and experimental groups were dissected daily for 3 days then allowed to feed or starve for an additional 3 days. On day 6, the remaining experimental larvae were divided and placed into 2 groups; 1 group remained starved while larvae from the second group were fed a Wheaties flake. Photographs were taken of the parasites daily and analyzed using ScionImage. Gregarines from starved larvae were significantly longer and skinnier than those from fed controls, and there was also a significant difference between gregarine deutomerite cytoplasmic densities. Parasites from refed larvae regained cytoplasmic density within 24 hr and showed morphological similarities to those from fed larvae. This study shows that the Tribolium destructor-Gregarina confusa relationship can be manipulated easily through alterations of host diet and thus is an excellent model for use in the study of chemical relationships between parasites and their hosts.

  16. A new eimerian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from southern short-tailed shrews, Blarina carolinensis (Bachman) (Soricimorpha: Soricidae: Soricinae) from southeastern Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott

    2017-07-01

    A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) is described from faecal samples of two of three southern short-tailed shrews, Blarina carolinensis (Bachman) (Soricidae) from southeastern Oklahoma, USA. Oöcysts of Eimeria tkachi n. sp. are subspheroidal to ovoidal with a rough-pitted, tan colored, bi-layered wall, measure 16.5 × 15.2 µm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but polar granule(s) are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 9.5 × 6.5 µm, L/W 1.4; a distinct button-like Stieda body is present, but the sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies are absent and the sporocyst residuum is composed of large globules distributed throughout the sporocyst. Sporozoites have a spheroidal anterior refractile body, a subspheroidal posterior refractile body, and one centrally-located nucleus. This is the smallest eimerian described thus far from the Soricidae, the initial description of a coccidian from B. carolinensis, and the first from any shrew from Oklahoma.

  17. Circadian variation in shedding of the oocysts of Isospora turdi (Apicomplexa) in blackbirds (Turdusmerula): an adaptative trait against desiccation and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Martinaud, G; Billaudelle, M; Moreau, J

    2009-05-01

    Many parasite species spend part of their life cycle in the external environment waiting for a new host. Emergence of parasites often occurs once a day, which may help to minimise mortality in an inhospitable environment and increase transition rates. Many intestinal parasites in birds are released in faeces only in the late afternoon. However, the adaptative significance of this pattern is unclear. One hypothesis is that a particular time of emergence may prevent parasite desiccation and therefore increase the parasite's life expectancy in the external environment. We tested this hypothesis experimentally using the blackbird (Turdus merula) infected with Isospora turdi (Protozoa: Apicomplexa). We found that short exposure of faeces to natural sunlight has a dramatic effect on oocyst survival. This appears to be due to the effect of warmth and ultraviolet (UV) radiation with UVB waves being more damaging than UVA. Oocysts contained in faeces shed in water are protected from the effect of sunlight. Together, these results suggest that the release of oocysts in the late afternoon is an adaptative trait to avoid desiccation and UV radiation, thus reducing mortality of the oocysts in the external environment.

  18. Molecular assessment of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) infections in wild canids and rodents from north Africa, with implications for transmission dynamics across taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P; Alvares, Francisco; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Brito, José C; Leite, João V; Harris, D James

    2014-10-01

    Parasites play a major role in ecosystems, and understanding of host-parasite interactions is important for predicting parasite transmission dynamics and epidemiology. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about the distribution, diversity, and impact of parasites in wildlife, especially from remote areas. Hepatozoon is a genus of apicomplexan parasites that is transmitted by ingestion of infected arthropod vectors. However, alternative modes of transmission have been identified such as trophic transmission. Using the 18S rRNA gene as a marker, we provide an assessment of Hepatozoon prevalence in six wild canid and two rodent species collected between 2003 and 2012 from remote areas in North Africa. By combining this with other predator-prey systems in a phylogenetic framework, we investigate Hepatozoon transmission dynamics in distinct host taxa. Prevalence was high overall among host species (African jerboa Jaculus jaculus [17/47, 36%], greater Egyptian jerboa Jaculus orientalis [5/7, 71%], side-striped jackal Canis adustus [1/2, 50%], golden jackal Canis aureus [6/32, 18%], pale fox Vulpes pallida [14/28, 50%], Rüppell's fox Vulpes rueppellii [6/11, 55%], red fox Vulpes vulpes [8/16, 50%], and fennec fox Vulpes zerda [7/11, 42%]). Phylogenetic analysis showed further evidence of occasional transmission of Hepatozoon lineages from prey to canid predators, which seems to occur less frequently than in other predator-prey systems such as between snakes and lizards. Due to the complex nature of the Hepatozoon lifecycle (heteroxenous and vector-borne), future studies on these wild host species need to clarify the dynamics of alternative modes of Hepatozoon transmission and identify reservoir and definitive hosts in natural populations. We also detected putative Babesia spp. (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) infections in two canid species from this region, V. pallida (1/28) and V. zerda (1/11).

  19. Eimeria spp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Plateau pika, Ochotona curzoniae, from Haibei Area, Qinghai Province, China, with the description of two new species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Fan; Ye, Run-Roung; Wu, Jian-Hua; Bian, Jiang-Hui; Duszynski, Donald W

    2009-10-01

    Fifty-two fecal samples from the Plateau pika, Ochotona curzoniae, collected in the Haibei Area, Qinghai Province, China, were examined for the presence of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae). Five distinct morphotypes, all Eimeria species, were distinguished based on the structure of their sporulated oocysts. Three of these included Eimeria banffensis, Eimeria calentinei, and Eimeria cryptobarretti, all of which have been described previously from other Ochotona species. We also studied 2 morphotypes that we feel have sufficient qualitative and quantitative characters to distinguish them from all previously described species; herein, we identify them as putative new species. Eimeria qinghaiensis n.sp. was found in 18/52 (35%) O. curzoniae. It has ovoidal oocysts with a 3-layered wall, with a rough outermost layer and a micropyle, approximately 9 microm wide. Sporulated oocysts are 37.2 x 27.2 (34-41 x 24-32) microm; 1 polar granule is present, but an oocyst residuum is absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 16.6 x 9.8 (14-19 x 9-11) microm with a Stieda body; sporocyst residuum and sporozoites have 2 refractile bodies. Eimeria haibeiensis n. sp. was found in 21/52 (40%) pikas. It has ellipsoidal to ovoidal oocysts, with a 2-layered smooth wall and a micropyle, 3.9 microm wide. Oocysts are 22.2 x 16.2 (20-24 x 15-18) microm; polar granule and oocyst residuum are both absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 11.6 x 6.6 (10-13 x 5-7) microm, with a Stieda body; sporocyst residuum and sporozoites each have 2 refractile bodies, 1 at each end. The 5 eimerian species we discovered in O. curzoniae in China all represent new host and locality records.

  20. Ultrastructural characteristics of Nematopsis sp. oocysts (Apicomplexa: Porosporidae), a parasite of the clam Meretrix meretrix (Veneridae) from the Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Al Nasr, Ibraheem; Oliveira, Elsa; Casal, Graça; Azevedo, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the fine structure of oocysts of Nematopsis sp. (Apicomplexa, Porosporidae) found in the abductor muscles of seawater clams, Meretrix meretrix (Linnaeus, 1758) (Veneridae), collected near the city of Dammam (6 degrees 17'0"N, 50 degrees 12'0"E) in the Arabian Gulf off the coast of Saudi Arabia. Oocysts of an ellipsoidal shape were found among myofibrils of the abductor muscles of infected clams. Each oocyst is composed of an oocyst wall surrounding a single uninucleate vermiform sporozoite located in the lumen of the oocyst wall. The thin oocyst wall (0.70-0.85 microm thick) is composed of homogenous electron-lucent material formed by three layers of equal-thickness. The oocyst wall contains a plano-convex opercular-like structure about 2.5 microm in diameter and 0.75-0.90 microm thick, composed of a homogenous material with moderate electron density. The oocyst is of an ellipsoidal shape and is 15.6 +/- 0.6 microm long and 11.1 +/- 0.7 microm wide. Externally, the oocyst wall is surrounded by a complex dense network of numerous anastomosed microfibrils, which are attached to the oocyst wall, forming 2-3 layers and extending towards the periphery, at some points penetrating amongst the host cells. The myofibrils in some cases show evident aspects of lysis as a consequence of the appearance of lysosome-like vesicles. Lacking knowledge of a complete life cycle and/or molecular data precluded the conclusive identification of this species.

  1. Ycf93 (Orf105), a Small Apicoplast-Encoded Membrane Protein in the Relict Plastid of the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum That Is Conserved in Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Christopher D.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites retain a relict plastid (apicoplast) from a photosynthetic ancestor shared with dinoflagellate algae. The apicoplast is a useful drug target; blocking housekeeping pathways such as genome replication and translation in the organelle kills parasites and protects against malaria. The apicoplast of Plasmodium falciparum encodes 30 proteins and a suite of rRNAs and tRNAs that facilitate their expression. orf105 is a hypothetical apicoplast gene that would encode a small protein (PfOrf105) with a predicted C-terminal transmembrane domain. We produced antisera to a predicted peptide within PfOrf105. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of orf105 and immunofluorescence localised the gene product to the apicoplast. Pforf105 encodes a membrane protein that has an apparent mass of 17.5 kDa and undergoes substantial turnover during the 48-hour asexual life cycle of the parasite in blood stages. The effect of actinonin, an antimalarial with a putative impact on post-translational modification of apicoplast proteins like PfOrf105, was examined. Unlike other drugs perturbing apicoplast housekeeping that induce delayed death, actinonin kills parasites immediately and has an identical drug exposure phenotype to the isopentenyl diphosphate synthesis blocker fosmidomycin. Open reading frames of similar size to PfOrf105, which also have predicted C-terminal trans membrane domains, occur in syntenic positions in all sequenced apicoplast genomes from Phylum Apicomplexa. We therefore propose to name these genes ycf93 (hypothetical chloroplast reading frame 93) according to plastid gene nomenclature convention for conserved proteins of unknown function. PMID:24705170

  2. Species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in shrews from Alaska, U.S.A., and northeastern Siberia, Russia, with description of two new species.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A J; Duszynski, D W

    2008-08-01

    Fecal samples (n = 636) from 10 species of shrews collected in Alaska (n = 540) and northeastern Siberia (n = 96) were examined for the presence of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae). Five distinct oocyst morphotypes were observed. Three types were consistent with oocysts of previously recognized coccidia species from other shrew hosts. These were Eimeria inyoni, E. vagrantis, and Isospora brevicauda, originally described from the inyo shrew (Sorex tenellus), dusky shrew (S. monticolus), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda), respectively. We found 5 new host records for E. inyoni, 3 for E. vagrantis, and 3 for I. brevicauda. The 2 additional oocyst morphotypes, both from the tundra shrew (Sorex tundrensis), are putative new species. Sporulated oocysts of Eimeria beringiacea n. sp. are subspheroidal, 17.7 x 15.6 microm (14-24 x 13-20 microm) with a length (L)/width (W) ratio of 1.1 (1.0-1.4); these lack a micropyle (M), an oocyst residuum (OR), and a polar granule (PG). Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 10.3 x 6.1 microm (7-14 x 4-8 microm), with a L/W ratio of 1.7 (1.3-2.3) and have a Stieda body (SB), Substieda body (SSB), and sporocyst residuum (SR). Oocysts of Eimeria tundraensis n. sp. are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 24.8 x 23.5 microm (23-26 x 22-25 microm), with a L/W ratio of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); these lack a M and OR, but a single PG is present. Sporocysts are elongate ellipsoidal, 15.4 x 8.3 microm (13-17 x 7-9 microm), with a L/W ratio of 1.9 (1.4-2.1) and have a SB, SSB, and SR.

  3. A new view on the morphology and phylogeny of eugregarines suggested by the evidence from the gregarine Ancora sagittata (Leuckart, 1860) Labbé, 1899 (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida)

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Laure; Diakin, Andrei Y.; Mikhailov, Kirill V.; Schrével, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Background Gregarines are a group of early branching Apicomplexa parasitizing invertebrate animals. Despite their wide distribution and relevance to the understanding the phylogenesis of apicomplexans, gregarines remain understudied: light microscopy data are insufficient for classification, and electron microscopy and molecular data are fragmentary and overlap only partially. Methods Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, PCR, DNA cloning and sequencing (Sanger and NGS), molecular phylogenetic analyses using ribosomal RNA genes (18S (SSU), 5.8S, and 28S (LSU) ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs)). Results and Discussion We present the results of an ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic study on the marine gregarine Ancora sagittata from the polychaete Capitella capitata followed by evolutionary and taxonomic synthesis of the morphological and molecular phylogenetic evidence on eugregarines. The ultrastructure of Ancora sagittata generally corresponds to that of other eugregarines, but reveals some differences in epicytic folds (crests) and attachment apparatus to gregarines in the family Lecudinidae, where Ancora sagittata has been classified. Molecular phylogenetic trees based on SSU (18S) rDNA reveal several robust clades (superfamilies) of eugregarines, including Ancoroidea superfam. nov., which comprises two families (Ancoridae fam. nov. and Polyplicariidae) and branches separately from the Lecudinidae; thus, all representatives of Ancoroidea are here officially removed from the Lecudinidae. Analysis of sequence data also points to possible cryptic species within Ancora sagittata and the inclusion of numerous environmental sequences from anoxic habitats within the Ancoroidea. LSU (28S) rDNA phylogenies, unlike the analysis of SSU rDNA alone, recover a well-supported monophyly of the gregarines involved (eugregarines), although this conclusion is currently limited by sparse taxon sampling and the presence of fast-evolving sequences in some species. Comparative

  4. Four new coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Plateau zokor, Myospalax baileyi Thomas (Rodentia: Myospalacinae), a subterranean rodent from Haibei area, Qinghai Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Fan; Nie, Xu-Heng; Zhang, Tong-Zuo; Du, Shou-Yang; Duszynski, Donald W; Bian, Jiang-Hui

    2014-02-01

    Thirty-eight faecal samples from the Plateau zokor, Myospalax baileyi Thomas, collected in the Haibei Area, Qinghai Province, China, were examined for the presence of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae). Seventeen of 38 faecal samples (44.7%) were found to contain coccidian oöcysts representing four new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, and four of 17 (23.5%) infected zokors were concurrently infected with two or three of these eimerian species. The sporulated oöcysts of Eimeria myospalacensis n. sp. are ovoidal, 9.5-17.0 × 8.0-13.0 (mean 13.0 × 10.4) μm; a polar granule is present, oöcyst residuum is absent; sporocysts are ovoidal, 4.5-7.5 × 3.0-5.0 (mean 6.3 × 4.2) μm and have both a Stieda body and residuum. Oöcysts of Eimeria fani n. sp. are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, 12.5-16.0 × 8.0-11.0 (mean 14.6 × 9.9) μm; a polar granule is present, but micropyle and residuum are lacking; sporocysts are ovoidal, 4.5-7.5 × 3.0-5.3 (mean 6.7 × 4.4) μm; a residuum and a Steida body are present. Oöcysts of Eimeria baileyii n. sp. are ellipsoidal, 15.0-23.0 × 12.0-18.0 (mean 18.2 × 13.7) μm; a polar granule is present but oöcyst residuum is absent; sporocysts are ovoidal, 8.0-11.0 × 5.0-7.0 (mean 9.5 × 5.9) μm and have both a Stieda body and residuum. Oöcysts of Eimeria menyuanensis n. sp. are ovoidal, 12.5-21.0 × 11.0-18.0 (mean 17.1 × 14.6) μm, with a distinct micropyle c.2.5 μm wide; a polar granule is present but a residuum is absent; sporocysts are ovoidal, 8.0-12.0 × 5.0-7.0 (mean 10.2 × 6.4) μm, and have both a Stieda body and residuum.

  5. Morpho-functional characterization and esterase patterns of the midgut of Tribolium castaneum Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) parasitized by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, Adriana A Sinópolis; Lapenta, Ana Silva; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, Maria Claudia Colla; Abrahão, Josielle; Conte, Hélio

    2015-09-01

    Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) is a common pest of stored grains and byproducts and is normally infected by Gregarina cuneata (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinidae). The life cycle of this parasite includes the sporozoite, trophozoite, gamont, gametocyte, and oocyst stages, which occur between the epithelium and lumen of the host's midgut. This study aims to describe the morphofunctional alterations in the midgut and determine the esterase patterns in T. castaneum when parasitized by gregarines. To achieve this purpose, midguts of adult insects were isolated, processed, and analysed using light and electron microscopy. We determined total protein content, amylase activity, and the expression and related activities of the esterases by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The midgut of T. castaneum is formed by digestive, regenerative, and endocrine cells. The effects of parasitism on the digestive cells are severe, because the gregarines remain attached to these cells to absorb all the nutrients they need throughout their development. In these cells, the most common alterations observed include expansion and fragmentation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, changes in mitochondrial cristae, cytoplasmic vacuolization, formation of myelin structures, spherites, large intercellular spaces, autophagic vesicles, expansion of the basal labyrinth, and cytoplasmic protrusions. Deposits of glycogen granules were also observed. Amylase activity was reduced in parasitized insects. Regenerative cells were found in disorganized crypts and did not differentiate into new cells, thus, compromising the restoration of the damaged epithelium. Though few morphological alterations were observed in the endocrine cells, results suggest that the synthesis and/or release of hormones might be impaired. Nine esterases (EST-1 to 9) were identified in the midgut of T. castaneum and were expressed in varying levels in response

  6. Tomaculocystis corpulenta n. gen., n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida) parasitizing the little yellow cockroach, Cariblatta lutea (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), in Alabama and Florida with recognition of Tomaculocystis cylindrosa n. comb. and Tomaculocystis mukundai n. comb. parasitizing ectobiid cockroaches in India.

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E

    2015-02-01

    Tomaculocystis corpulenta n. gen., n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida: Septatorina: Gregarinidae) is described from populations of the little yellow cockroach, Cariblatta lutea (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), established in laboratory culture from samples collected in Alabama and Florida. Tomaculocystis n. gen. are differentiated from other members of Gregarina by a markedly elliptoid gametocyst inside a persistent, lomentiform hyaline epicyst; developmental organization and growth of the spore tubes from gametocyst surface tumidi; and dehiscence by extrusion of non-chain forming oocysts through spore tubes that barely extend beyond the epicyst wall. Gregarina cylindrosa, Gregarina discocephala, and Gregarina mukundai are recognized as members of Tomaculocystis, and G. cylindrosa is recognized as the senior synonym of G. discocephala. Thus, Tomaculocystis cylindrosa n. comb. and Tomaculocystis mukundai n. comb. are formed. Species of Tomaculocystis are distinguished based on gamont deutomerite and oocyst shape and size. The oocysts of T. corpulenta are broadly dolioform, lack 4 polar knobs, and possess distinct, unique polar plates. Oocysts of all other known species in the genus are more oblong in shape, possess 4 polar knobs, and lack the distinct polar plates observed in the oocysts of T. corpulenta. Host utilization and geographic distribution among gregarine genera parasitizing the cockroach family Ectobiidae reveal a pattern of host-parasite specificity linking gregarine genera with ectobiidid subfamilies. Overall patterns suggest a hypothesis of European endemicy for Gamocystis, but hypotheses for the origin and radiation of Tomaculocystis or species of Gregarina infecting cockroaches are confounded by the cosmopolitan spread of pest cockroach species among humans.

  7. A new species of Caryospora Léger, 1904 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the endangered Round Island boa Casarea dussumieri (Schlegel) (Serpentes: Bolyeridae) of Round Island, Mauritius: an endangered parasite?

    PubMed

    Daszak, Peter; Ball, Stanley J; Streicker, Daniel G; Jones, Carl G; Snow, Keith R

    2011-02-01

    A new species of Caryospora Léger, 1904 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), C. durelli n. sp., is described from the endangered Round Island boa Casarea dussumieri (Schlegel) (Serpentes: Bolyeridae) from Round Island, Mauritius. Six of 11 hosts were infected. Oöcysts are spherical to subspherical, 19.2 × 18.2 (17.5-21 × 16-21) μm, n = 20, and have a shape index (mean length/mean width) of 1.05 (1.02-1.09). The bi-layered wall is composed of an outer layer of c.0.6 μm thick and an inner layer of c.0.4 μm thick. A micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 14.7 × 11.0 (13-16 × 9.5-11.5) μm, n = 20, and have a shape index of 1.33. Both Stieda and substieda bodies are present. The sporocyst residuum measures c.12 × 4.5 μm, is surrounded by sporozoites and composed of numerous granules. Refractile bodies are present but not clearly visible. This is the first coccidian parasite reported from the family Bolyeridae and the first species of Caryospora durrelli [corrected] reported from the Mascarenes. Conservation issues concerning parasites of endangered host species are discussed.

  8. Haemoproteus (Apicomplexa: Haemoproteidae) of tortoises and turtles.

    PubMed Central

    Lainson, R; Naiff, R D

    1998-01-01

    It is the general opinion that the haemoproteid blood parasites of chelonians belong to the genus Haemoproteus. Different specific names have long been assigned to this parasite in birds, but some past authorities have accepted only a single species, H. metchnikovi, for all those haemoproteids recorded in a wide range of chelonian genera throughout the world. In the present study, a comparison of one such organism in the tortoise Geochelone denticulata with another in the river turtle Peltocephalus dumerilianus, from Amazonian Brazil, has revealed clear morphological differences. These distinguish the parasites from each other, H. metchnikovi and the other named species of chelonian Haemoproteus for which adequate descriptions are available. We have assigned to them the names Haemoproteus geochelonis n.sp. and Haemoproteus peltocephali n.sp. PMID:9675908

  9. CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA): LIFE CYCLE AND TAXONOMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). Grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected with sporulated...

  10. CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA): LIFE CYCLE AND TAXONOMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). Grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected with sporulated...

  11. LIFE CYCLE OF CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA: CALYPTOSPORIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). In this study, grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected ...

  12. LIFE CYCLE OF CALYPTOSPORA FUNDULI (APICOMPLEXA: CALYPTOSPORIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The taxonomic status of the extraintestinal piscine coccidium Calyptospora funduli is based in part on its requirement of an intermediate host (the daggerblade grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio). In this study, grass shrimp fed livers of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) infected ...

  13. Profiles of low complexity regions in Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzi, Fabia U; Schneider, Kristan A; Spencer, Matthew K; Fisher, David; Chaudhry, Sophia; Escalante, Ananias A

    2016-02-29

    Low complexity regions (LCRs) are a ubiquitous feature in genomes and yet their evolutionary history and functional roles are unclear. Previous studies have shown contrasting evidence in favor of both neutral and selective mechanisms of evolution for different sets of LCRs suggesting that modes of identification of these regions may play a role in our ability to discern their evolutionary history. To further investigate this issue, we used a multiple threshold approach to identify species-specific profiles of proteome complexity and, by comparing properties of these sets, determine the influence that starting parameters have on evolutionary inferences. We find that, although qualitatively similar, quantitatively each species has a unique LCR profile which represents the frequency of these regions within each genome. Inferences based on these profiles are more accurate in comparative analyses of genome complexity as they allow to determine the relative complexity of multiple genomes as well as the type of repetitiveness that is most common in each. Based on the multiple threshold LCR sets obtained, we identified predominant evolutionary mechanisms at different complexity levels, which show neutral mechanisms acting on highly repetitive LCRs (e.g., homopolymers) and selective forces becoming more important as heterogeneity of the LCRs increases. Our results show how inferences based on LCRs are influenced by the parameters used to identify these regions. Sets of LCRs are heterogeneous aggregates of regions that include homo- and heteropolymers and, as such, evolve according to different mechanisms. LCR profiles provide a new way to investigate genome complexity across species and to determine the driving mechanism of their evolution.

  14. Some remarks on the distribution and dispersion of Coccidia from icterid birds in South America: Isospora guaxi n. sp. and Isospora bellicosa Upton, Stamper & Whitaker, 1995 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the red-rumped cacique Cacicus haemorrhous (L.) (Passeriformes: Icteridae) in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lidiane Maria; Rodrigues, Mariana Borges; de Pinho, Irlane Faria; do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes; Berto, Bruno Pereira

    2017-01-01

    A new species of coccidian, Isospora guaxi n. sp., and Isospora bellicosa Upton, Stamper & Whitaker, 1995 (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) are recorded from red-rumped caciques Cacicus haemorrhous (L.) in the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia, Brazil. Isospora guaxi n. sp. has sub-spheroidal oöcysts, measuring on average 30.9 × 29.0 μm, with smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.9 μm thick. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 19.3 × 13.8 μm. Stieda body is knob-like and sub-Stieda body is prominent and compartmentalized. Sporocyst residuum is composed of scattered granules. Sporozoites are vermiform, with one refractile body and a nucleus. Isospora bellicosa has sub-spheroidal to ovoidal oöcysts, measuring on average 27.1 × 25.0 μm, with smooth, bi-layered wall c.1.5 μm thick. Micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one or two polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, measuring on average 18.1 × 10.9 μm. Stieda body is knob-like and sub-Stieda body is rounded to rectangular. Sporocyst residuum is composed of a cluster of compact or diffuse granules. Sporozoites are vermiform, with one refractile body and a nucleus. Isospora bellicosa was originally described from the Peruvian meadowlark Sturnella bellicosa deFilippi, a trans-Andean icterid which is allopatric with the cis-Andean C. haemorrhous. Therefore, in conclusion, this current study reveals the dispersion of coccidia from Icteridae across the Andes Mountains, besides describing the sixth isosporoid coccidium infecting an icterid bird.

  15. A survey of hemoparasite infections in free-ranging mammals and reptiles in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    de Thoisy, B; Michel, J C; Vogel, I; Vié, J C

    2000-10-01

    Blood smears of 1,353 free-ranging mammals (35 species) and 112 reptiles (31 species) from French Guiana were examined for hemoparasites. Parasites from 3 major groups were recorded: Apicomplexa (including hemogregarines, piroplasms, and Plasmodium spp.), Trypanosomatidae, and Filaroidea. Fifty percent of the individuals (86% of the species) were infected by parasites from at least 1 group. Hemogregarines, identified as Hepatozoon sp., infected numerous snakes with high prevalences (30-100%); infection is reported for the first time in 5 host genera of snakes: Clelia, Oxybelis, Pseustes, Rhinobotryum, and Bothriopsis. Infections were also observed in 4 marsupial species and 1 rodent. Hepatozoon spp. recorded in Didelphis albiventris (Marsupialia) and Coendou prehensilis (Rodentia) may be new species. Plasmodium sp. were observed in 2 snake species, Dipsas indica (Colubridae) and Bothrops atrox (Viperidae). Plasmodium brasilianum was recorded in all 5 primate species examined. Piroplasms were observed in all mammal orders except primates. Large terrestrial rodents were the main hosts of members of the Babesidae; 42% of Myoprocta acouchy, 36% of Dasyprocta agouti, and 44% of Agouti paca were infected. Trypanosomes were common in mammals and were recorded in 70% of the examined genera. Trypanosoma cruzi-like infections were reported in 21 mammal species, including sloths, rodents, carnivores, and primates. Microfilariae were also widespread, with higher prevalences in sloths, anteaters, and porcupines (>40% of the individuals infected) and in tamarins (95% infected). This survey highlights some potential anthropozoonotic risks due to the recent further evidence of Plasmodium brasilianum and P. malariae as a single species and to the increased diversity of hosts for Trypanosoma cruzi.

  16. Cryptosporidium xiaoi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in sheep (Ovis aries)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species, Cryptosporidium xiaoi, is described from sheep. Oocysts of C. xiaoi, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium bovis-like genotype and as the ovine genotype from sheep in Australia and the United States are recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ...

  17. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Vítovec, Jiří; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-03-17

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. is proposed to reflect its specificity for hedgehogs under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. erinacei are morphologically indistinguishable from Cryptosporidium parvum, measuring 4.5-5.8 μm (mean=4.9 μm) × 4.0-4.8 μm (mean=4.4 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.13 (1.02-1.35) (n=100). Oocysts of C. erinacei obtained from a naturally infected European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) were infectious for naïve 8-week-old four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris); the prepatent period was 4-5 days post infection (DPI) and the patent period was longer than 20 days. C. erinacei was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), or golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, 60 kDa glycoprotein, actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. erinacei is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species.

  18. Cryptosporidium avium n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in birds

    PubMed Central

    Holubová, Nikola; Sak, Bohumil; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Menchaca, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium avium is proposed to reflect its specificity for birds under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. avium measured 5.30–6.90 μm (mean = 6.26 μm) × 4.30–5.50 μm (mean = 4.86 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.29 (1.14–1.47). Oocysts of C. avium obtained from four naturally infected red-crowned parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezealandiae) were infectious for 6-month-old budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and hens (Gallus gallus f. domestica). The prepatent periods in both susceptible bird species was 11 days post infection (DPI). The infection intensity of C. avium in budgerigars and hens was low, with a maximum intensity of 5,000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Oocysts of C. avium were microscopically detected at only 12–16 DPI in hens and 12 DPI in budgerigars, while PCR analyses revealed the presence of specific DNA in faecal samples from 11 to 30 DPI (the conclusion of the experiment). Cryptosporidium avium was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus). Naturally or experimentally infected birds showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Developmental stages of C. avium were detected in the ileum and caecum using scanning electron microscopy. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. avium is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:26905074

  19. Natural infection of Cryptosporidium muris (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporiidae) in Siberian chipmunks.

    PubMed

    Hůrková, Lada; Hajdusek, Ondrej; Modrý, David

    2003-04-01

    Coprologic examination of nine Siberian chipmunks (Eutamias sibiricus) imported from Southeast Asia revealed infection with Cryptosporidium sp. Experimental inoculation of BALB/c mice proved their susceptibility to the infection. Infected mice shed oocysts 14-35 days postinfection. Oocyst morphology was similar to that reported for C. muris in previous studies, oocysts were 8.1 (7.0-9.0) x 5.9 (5.0-6.5) microns. Clinical signs were absent in naturally infected chipmunks and experimental mice. Histologic examinations of mice revealed numerous developmental stages of C. muris in the glandular stomach. Analysis of partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences confirmed identity of these isolates as C. muris. Our results represent the first report of C. muris in members of the family Sciuridae.

  20. Two new eimerians (Apicomplexa) from insectivorous mammals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Couch, Lee; Laakkonen, Juha; Goodman, Steven; Duszynski, Donald W

    2011-04-01

    Fecal samples from 126 insectivorous mammals in Madagascar were collected between spring 1999 and fall 2001. In the Afrosoricida, 21 species in 5 genera were sampled, including 17 species of Microgale (31/96, 32% infected), Hemicentetes semispinosus (1/2, 50%), Oryzorictes hova (1/5, 20%), Setifer setosus (8/13, 61.5%), and Tenrec ecaudatus (5/8, 62.5%); in the Soricomorpha, only Suncus murinus was examined and 1/2 (50%) were infected. Two morphotypes of eimeriid oocysts, representing 2 presumptive new species, were found in 47 (37%) infected animals; only 2 afrosoricid hosts (2% of all hosts, 4% of infected hosts) had both oocyst morphotypes. Sporulated oocysts of the first morphotype, Eimeria tenrececaudata n. sp., are subspheroidal, 18.8 × 17.4 (17-22 × 15-20), with a length∶width ratio (L/W) of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack a micropyle but may contain 0-2 polar granules and a single, small round oocyst residuum, 3 × 2.3. Sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 9.9 × 6.6 (9-11 × 5-8), with a L/W of 1.5 (1.2-2.0); they have a prominent, slightly flattened Stieda body and a substieda body but lack a parastieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of only a few granules between the sporozoites, which are sausage-shaped and have a large posterior refractile body. Oocysts of the second morphotype, Eimeria setifersetosa n. sp. are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 30.1 × 28.6 (27-34 × 25-34), with a L/W of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack both micropyle and oocyst residuum, but 1-2 polar granules are usually present. Sporocysts are subspheroidal to broadly ellipsoidal, 9.6 × 7.3 (9-11 × 6-8), with a L/W of 1.3 (1.1-1.7); they have a broad Stieda body, lack sub- and parastieda bodies, and have a residuum of a few granules scattered throughout the sporocyst. Sporozoites were not clearly defined, but what seemed to be a single large refractile body is seen, presumably in each sporozoite.

  1. Cryptosporidium hominis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Ryan, Una M; Fall, Abbie; Ward, Lucy A; Hijjawi, Nawal; Sulaiman, Irshad; Fayer, Ronald; Thompson, R C Andrew; Olson, M; Lal, Altaf; Xiao, Lihua

    2002-01-01

    The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts. and measure 4.4-5.4 microm (mean = 4.86) x 4.4-5.9 microm (mean = 5.2 microm) with a length to width ratio 1.0-1.09 (mean 1.07) (n = 100). Oocysts were not infectious for ARC Swiss mice, nude mice. Wistar rat pups, puppies, kittens or calves, but were infectious to neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. Pathogenicity studies in the gnotobiotic pig model revealed significant differences in parasite-associated lesion distribution (P = 0.005 to P = 0.02) and intensity of infection (P = 0.04) between C. parvum and this newly described species from humans. In vitro cultivation studies have also revealed growth differences between the two species. Multi-locus analysis of numerous unlinked loci, including a preliminary sequence scan of the entire genome demonstrated this species to be distinct from C. parvum and also demonstrated a lack of recombination, providing further support for its species status. Based on biological and molecular data, this Cryptosporidium infecting the intestine of humans is proposed to be a new species Cryptosporidium hominis n. sp.

  2. Developmental biology of Cystoisospora (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) monozoic tissue cysts.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, David S; Houk, Alice E; Mitchell, Sheila M; Dubey, J P

    2014-08-01

    Tissue cyst stages are an intriguing aspect of the developmental cycle and transmission of species of Sarcocystidae. Tissue-cyst stages of Toxoplasma, Hammondia, Neospora, Besnoitia, and Sarcocystis contain many infectious stages (bradyzoites). The tissue cyst stage of Cystoisospora (syn. Isospora) possesses only 1 infectious stage (zoite), and is therefore referred to as a monozoic tissue cyst (MZTC). No tissue cyst stages are presently known for members of Nephroisospora. The present report examines the developmental biology of MZTC stages of Cystoisospora Frenkel, 1977 . These parasites cause intestinal coccidiosis in cats, dogs, pigs, and humans. The MZTC stages of C. belli are believed to be associated with reoccurrence of clinical disease in humans.

  3. Targeting Protein Translation in Organelles of the Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Christopher D; Pasaje, Charisse Flerida A; Kennedy, Kit; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ralph, Stuart A

    2016-12-01

    Antibiotics inhibiting protein translation have long been used to treat and prevent infections by apicomplexan parasites. These compounds kill parasites by inhibiting organellar translation, and most act specifically against the apicoplast, a relict plastid in apicomplexans. Drug resistance in Plasmodium and other apicomplexans dictates a need for development of novel targets. Some apicoplast inhibitors have a delayed onset of action, so they cannot replace fast-acting drugs, although they still fulfil important roles in treating and preventing infections. The plethora of bacterial-like actors in the translation machinery of parasite mitochondria and plastids presents validated targets with strong potential for selectivity. Here we discuss existing drugs that inhibit organellar translation, and explore targets that may be further exploited in antiparasitic drug design. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogeny of Fish-Infecting Calyptospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous species of apicomplexans that infect poikilothermic vertebrates such as fishes, and possess unique morphological features that provide insight into the evolution of this important phylum of parasites. Here the relationship of the fish-infecting Calyptospora spe...

  5. Besnoitia oryctofelisi n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from domestic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Sreekumar, C; Lindsay, D S; Hill, D; Rosenthal, B M; Venturini, L; Venturini, M C; Greiner, E C

    2003-06-01

    A species of Besnoitia from naturally infected rabbits from Argentina was propagated experimentally in mice, gerbils, rabbits, cats, and cell cultures. Cats fed tissue cysts from rabbits shed oocysts with a prepatent period of nine to 13 days. Sporulated oocysts were infective to gerbils, rabbits, outbred Swiss Webster and interferon gamma gene knockout mice. Bradyzoites were infective orally to gerbils and cats. Tachyzoites were successfully cultivated and maintained in vitro in bovine monocytes and African green monkey kidney cells. Schizonts were seen in the lamina propria of the small intestine of cats fed tissue cysts; the largest ones measured 52 x 45 microm. Schizonts were also present in mesenteric lymph nodes, livers, and other extra-intestinal organs of cats fed tissue cysts. Oocysts were 10-14 x 10-13 microm in size. This rabbit-derived species of Besnoitia resembled B. darlingi of the North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana with an opossum-cat cycle, but it was not transmissible to D. virginiana, and B. darlingi of opossums was not transmissible to rabbits. Based on biological, serological, antigenic, and molecular differences between the rabbit and the opossum Besnoitia, a new name, B. oryctofelisi is proposed for the parasite from domestic rabbits from Argentina.

  6. Phylogeny of Fish-Infecting Calyptospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriorina)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous species of apicomplexans that infect poikilothermic vertebrates such as fishes, and possess unique morphological features that provide insight into the evolution of this important phylum of parasites. Here the relationship of the fish-infecting Calyptospora spe...

  7. Intraerythrocytic merogony in Haemogregarina koppiensis (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina: Haemogregarinidae).

    PubMed

    Smit, Nico J; Davies, Angela J

    2005-09-01

    During October 2003, a specimen of Amblyrhynchotes honckenii (Bloch, 1795) was captured at low tide, with a hand net, in a rock pool at Koppie Alleen, De Hoop Nature Reserve, South Africa. This fish was heavily parasitized by unidentified gnathiid praniza larvae, caligid copepods identified as Caligus tetrodontis Barnard, 1948, cymothoid isopods identified as Cinusa tetrodontis (Schioedte et Meinert, 1884), and the blood protozoan Haemogregarina koppiensis Smit et Davies, 2001. Giemsa-stained blood smears from this fish revealed new and unusual stages of merogony for H. koppiensis that included small, rounded, likely intraerythrocytic merozoites arranged in circles of eight around the host nucleus. Host cells appeared ghost-like and enlarged compared with normal erythrocytes. Identical merozoites, usually in clusters of up to 16, were also observed free of host cells. The pattern of merogony seen in H. koppiensis is unusual for a fish haemogregarine.

  8. Developmental biology of Cystoisospora (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) monozoic tissue cysts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tissue cyst stages are an intriguing aspect of the developmental cycle and transmission of members of the Family Sarcocystidae. Tissue cyst stages of the genera Toxoplasma, Hammondia, Neospora, Besnoitia, and Sarcocystis contain many infectious stages (bradyzoites).The tissue cyst stage of Cystoisos...

  9. Cryptosporidium ryanae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Mónica; Trout, James M

    2008-10-01

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are similar to those of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis but smaller. This genotype has been reported to be prevalent in cattle worldwide. Oocysts obtained from a calf for the present study are the smallest Cryptosporidium oocysts reported in mammals, measuring 2.94-4.41micromx2.94-3.68microm (mean=3.16micromx3.73microm) with a length/width shape index of 1.18 (n=40). The pre-patent period for two Cryptosporidium-naïve calves fed C. ryanae oocysts was 11 days and the patent period was 15-17 days. Oocysts were not infectious for BALB/c mice or lambs. Fragments of the SSU-rDNA, HSP-70, and actin genes amplified by PCR were purified and PCR products were sequenced. Multi-locus analysis of the three unlinked loci demonstrated the new species to be distinct from all other species and also demonstrated a lack of recombination, providing further evidence of species status. Based on morphological, molecular and biological data, this geographically widespread parasite found only in Bos taurus calves is recognized as a new species and is named C. ryanae.

  10. Proteases as regulators of pathogenesis: examples from the Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Child, Matthew A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The diverse functional roles that proteases play in basic biological processes make them essential for virtually all organisms. Not surprisingly, proteolysis is also a critical process required for many aspects of pathogenesis. In particular, obligate intracellular parasites must precisely coordinate proteolytic events during their highly regulated life cycle inside multiple host cell environments. Advances in chemical, proteomic and genetic tools that can be applied to parasite biology have led to an increased understanding of the complex events centrally regulated by proteases. In this review, we outline recent advances in our knowledge of specific proteolytic enzymes in two medically relevant apicomplexan parasites: Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Efforts over the last decade have begun to provide a map of key proteotolyic events that are essential for both parasite survival and propagation inside host cells. These advances in our molecular understanding of proteolytic events involved in parasite pathogenesis provide a foundation for the validation of new networks and enzyme targets that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A survey for gregarines (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in arthropods in Spain.

    PubMed

    Criado-Fornelio, A; Verdú-Expósito, C; Martin-Pérez, T; Heredero-Bermejo, I; Pérez-Serrano, J; Guàrdia-Valle, L; Panisello-Panisello, M

    2017-01-01

    Gregarines thrive in the digestive tract of arthropods and may be deleterious to their hosts, especially when present in high densities. The impact of parasites on these invertebrates may affect both the ecosystem equilibrium and human economic activities. However, information available on gregarines in Spain is limited. Therefore, a microscopic study on prevalence of gregarine infection in 560 insects and crustaceans was undertaken in Madrid and Tarragona.Gregarina ormierei (78 % prevalence), Stylocephalus gigas (56 %), Oocephalus hispanus (13 %) and Actinocephalus permagnus (only one infected out of six beetles examined) were found in coleopteran hosts. Gregarina ovata and G. chelidurellae showed moderate frequency of infection (35 %) in dermapterans. An undescribed Gregarina sp. (76 % prevalence) was observed for the first time in freshwater decapod crustaceans. Interestingly, G. ormierei showed a noticeable phenotypic dimorphism, which justifies its redescription based on modern taxonomic criteria. Sequences of the 18S rRNA gene could be obtained only in the presence of highly prevalent gregarines. G. ormierei and Gregarina sp. were related (85 and 94 % identity by BLASTN, respectively) to G. basiconstrictonea and G. cloptoni, respectively, whereas S. gigas was closely related to both Xiphocephalus ellisi and S. giganteus (>97 % identity). Phylogenetic trees based on ribosomal sequences unequivocally grouped these new isolates either with the Gregarinidae (G. ormierei and Gregarina sp.) or the Stylocephalidae (S. gigas).

  12. Analysis of gene expression during development: lessons from the Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jon P; Saeij, Jeroen P J; Cleary, Michael D; Boothroyd, John C

    2006-05-01

    Apicomplexans are responsible for significant human and animal disease worldwide, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. Herein we summarize recent advances in gene expression analysis in these eukaryotic pathogens, especially with respect to their developmental biology, and discuss the impact this work may have on the development of new vaccines and chemotherapeutics.

  13. Proteases as Regulators of Pathogenesis: Examples from the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Child, Matthew A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The diverse functional roles that proteases play in basic biological processes make them essential for virtually all organisms. Not surprisingly, proteolysis is also a critical process required for many aspects of pathogenesis. In particular, obligate intracellular parasites must precisely coordinate proteolytic events during their highly regulated life cycle inside multiple host cell environments. Advances in chemical, proteomic and genetic tools that can be applied to parasite biology have led to an increased understanding of the complex events centrally regulated by proteases. In this review, we outline recent advances in our knowledge of specific proteolytic enzymes in two medically relevant apicomplexan parasites: Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Efforts over the last decade have begun to provide a map of key proteotolyic events that are essential for both parasite survival and propagation inside host cells. These advances in our molecular understanding of proteolytic events involved in parasite pathogenesis provide a foundation for the validation of new networks and enzyme targets that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:21683169

  14. Transmission of Hepatozoon americanum (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) by ixodids (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ewing, S A; Mathew, J S; Panciera, R J

    2002-07-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis (ACH) caused by Hepatozoon americanum Vincent-Johnson, Macintire, Lindsay, Lenz, Baneth, and Shkap is an emerging, often fatal, tick-borne protozoal disease of dogs in the United States of America. Dogs acquire infection by ingesting ticks that contain oocysts. To understand the invertebrate (definitive) host range of H. americanum, experiments were carried out using four ixodids, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille), Dermacentor variabilis Say, Amblyomma americanum (L.), and Amblyomma maculatum Koch. Laboratory-reared nymphal ticks were fed on dogs that were either naturally or experimentally infected with H. americanum; when these ticks molted to the adult stage they were either fed to susceptible dogs or were dissected and examined for the presence of oocysts. Mature H. americanum oocysts were found in >90% of A. maculatum (both males and females), whereas oocysts were not found in any of the other three species. These results confirm that A. maculatum is an excellent host and vector for H. americanum and also suggest that this apicomplexan may have a narrow invertebrate host range, at least among ixodid ticks that are likely candidate vectors in the United States.

  15. Life cycle of Hammondia hammondi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in cats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hammondia hammondi and Toxoplasma gondii are feline coccidian that are morphologically, antigenically, and phylogenitically related. Both parasites multiply asexually and sexually in feline intestinal enterocytes but H. hammondi remains confined to enterocytes whereas T. gondii also parasitizes extr...

  16. Cryptosporidium xiaoi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Mónica

    2009-10-14

    A new species, Cryptosporidium xiaoi, is described from sheep. Oocysts of C. xiaoi, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium bovis-like genotype or as C. bovis from sheep in Spain, Tunisia, United Kingdom, and the United States are recorded as such in GenBank (EU408314-EU408317, EU327318-EU327320, EF362478, EF514234, DQ991389, and EF158461). Oocysts obtained from naturally infected sheep were infectious for a lamb and oocysts from that lamb were infectious for three other lambs. The prepatent period for C. xiaoi in these four Cryptosporidium-naive lambs was 7-8 days and the patent period was 13-15 days. Oocysts are similar to those of C. bovis but slightly smaller, measuring 2.94-4.41 microm x 2.94-4.41 microm (mean=3.94 microm x 3.44 microm) with a length/width shape index of 1.15 (n=25). Oocysts of C. xioai were not infectious for BALB/c mice, Bos taurus calves, or Capra aegagrus hircus kids. Fragments of the SSU-rDNA, HSP-70, and actin genes were amplified by PCR, purified, and PCR products were sequenced. The new species was distinct from all other Cryptosporidium species as demonstrated by multi-locus analysis of the 3 unlinked loci. Based on morphological, molecular and biological data, this geographically widespread parasite found in Ovis aries is recognized as a new species and is named C. xiaoi.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eimeria magna (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    PubMed

    Tian, Si-Qin; Cui, Ping; Fang, Su-Fang; Liu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Eimeria magna from rabbits for the first time, and compared its gene contents and genome organizations with that of seven Eimeria spp. from domestic chickens. The size of the complete mt genome sequence of E. magna is 6249 bp, which consists of 3 protein-coding genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3), 12 gene fragments for the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, and 7 gene fragments for the small subunit (SSU) rRNA, without transfer RNA genes, in accordance with that of Eimeria spp. from chickens. The putative direction of translation for three genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3) was the same as those of Eimeria species from domestic chickens. The content of A + T is 65.16% for E. magna mt genome (29.73% A, 35.43% T, 17.09 G and 17.75% C). The E. magna mt genome sequence provides novel mtDNA markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Eimeria spp. and has implications for the molecular diagnosis and control of rabbit coccidiosis.

  18. First molecular identification of Sarcocystis miescheriana (Protozoa, Apicomplexa) from wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Mirhendi, Hossein; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sharbatkhori, Mitra

    2011-03-01

    Sarcocystis isolate obtained from the thigh muscle of a wild boar (Sus scrofa), captured from Gilan Province, northern Iran, was subjected to molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was obtained using a DNA extraction tissue kit and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for amplification of the 18S ribosomal DNA region yielded an 842 bp DNA band on agarose gel. Analysis of DNA sequencing by BLAST confirmed the isolate as Sarcocystis miescheriana and the sequence was deposited in GenBank by Accession No. GU395554. This is the first molecular identification of an isolate of S. miescheriana in Iran.

  19. Cryptosporidium ryanae n.sp. (Apicomplexa:Cryptosporidiidae)in cattle (Bos Taurus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are morphologically similar to those of C. parvum and C. bovi...

  20. Prevalence of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in reintroduced Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni)

    Treesearch

    M. M. Ryan; K. H. Decker; D. W. Duszynski

    2001-01-01

    Fecal samples from 54 Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) from Albuquerque, NM were analyzed for the presence of coccidia and all were positive. They were then relocated to an abandoned prairiedog town on the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Six Eimeria species, E. callospermophili, E. cynomysis, E. pseudospermophili (new host record),...

  1. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANDERSONI N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM CATTLE, BOS TAURUS. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Isospora lunaris n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the domestic Java sparrow in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Kojima, Atsushi; Sasaki, Shun; Kubota, Rie; Ike, Kazunori

    2017-04-01

    Five individuals of the domestic Java sparrows, Lonchura oryzivora (Aves: Estrildidae), were examined for coccidian parasites. Sporulated oocysts had two sporocysts containing four sporozoites each. Sporulated oocysts (n=30) were spherical, with a two splinter-like polar granules. Oocyst size was 22.1×20.7 (20.0-25.0×20.0-22.5)μm. They had a thick wall that consisted of a pale yellow outer layer and a dark yellow inner layer, and lacked micropyle and residuum. Sporocysts (n=60) were elongated ovoid 14.1×9.8 (12.5-15.0×7.5-10.0)μm, smooth walled, and colorless, with crescent-shaped Stieda and indistinct substieda bodies. Sporocyst residuum was interspersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were oriented transverse to the sporocyst longitudinal axis. On the basis of morphological data, the species isolated in the present study is a new species of Isospora and propose the name Isospora lunaris n. sp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Californian rabbits in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ping; Liu, Hongbin; Fang, Sufang; Gu, Xiaolong; Wang, Peng; Liu, Chunling; Tao, Geru; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2017-10-01

    Rabbit coccidiosis is caused by infection with one or usually several Eimeria species, parasitizing in hepatobiliary ducts or intestinal epithelium of rabbits. To date, 11 species of rabbit coccidia have been well documented. Here we report a new species of Eimeria from rabbits. Sporulated oocysts were ellipsoidal to slightly ovoidal, 37.4 (32.6-41.2) μm in length, 23.5 (20.9-25.5) μm in width, with a shape index (length/width) 1.6 (1.43-1.91) and smooth, bilayered, homogeneously thick wall. The micropyle was obvious and with an inner diameter of 6.2 (5.0-7.5) μm. Both oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal to elongate, 17.2 (13.2-20.0) μm long and 8.4 (7.5-9.1) μm wide, with a shape index (length/width) of 2.1 (1.74-2.21) and the presence of Stieda body and sporocyst residuum. The prepatent period was 132h. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 18S rDNA sequence of the new species clustered together with the 11 rabbit Eimeria species into a clade. However, ITS-1 sequence of the new species shared low similarities (27.1%-30%) with those of 11 rabbit Eimeria species. As the data above supported the erection of a new species, we named it as Eimeria kongi n. sp., in honor of Fanyao Kong, a Chinese parasitologist. The finding of the new species has important implications for the diagnosis and prevention of rabbit coccidiosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Has Sarcocystis neurona Dubey et al., 1991 (Sporozoa: Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) cospeciated with its intermediate hosts?

    PubMed

    Elsheikha, Hany M

    2009-08-26

    The question of how Sarcocystis neurona is able to overcome species barrier and adapt to new hosts is central to the understanding of both the evolutionary origin of S. neurona and the prediction of its field host range. Therefore, it is worth reviewing current knowledge on S. neurona host specificity. The available host range data for S. neurona are discussed in relation to a subject of evolutionary importance-specialist or generalist and its implications to understand the strategies of host adaptation. Current evidences demonstrate that a wide range of hosts exists for S. neurona. This parasite tends to be highly specific for its definitive host but much less so for its intermediate host (I.H.). The unique specificity of S. neurona for its definitive host may be mediated by a probable long coevolutionary relationship of the parasite and carnivores in a restricted ecological niche 'New World'. This might be taken as evidence that carnivores are the 'original' host group for S. neurona. Rather, the capacity of S. neurona to exploit an unusually large number of I.H. species probably indicates that S. neurona maintains non-specificity to its I.H. as an adaptive response to insure the survival of the parasite in areas in which the 'preferred' host is not available. This review concludes with the view that adaptation of S. neurona to a new host is a complex interplay that involves a large number of determinants.

  5. [Sarcocystis phoeniconaii n. sp. Murata, 1986 (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) of the lesser flamingo (Phoeniconaias mirror: Ciconiiformes)].

    PubMed

    Göbel, E; Erber, M; Grimm, F

    1996-01-01

    The tiny rice-grain like sarcocysts measure 3-5 x 1 mm, they are situated subfascially or in the depth of the muscles. The 50 nm thick irregular primary cyst wall forms towards the inside, small, bubble-like, less osmiophilic invaginations, which partly are concentrated in such a way, that a spongious like structure develops. The so surrounded protrusions are vertically or slightly inclined; they measure 4.25 x 1.7 microns and they are filled with compact fibrils. The cyst wall is underlaid by an average of 7.0 microns thick tape consisting of ground substance, from which an extensive septation runs to the center of the cyst. The so formed chambers are filled with lancet-like merozoites, which measure 15-20 x 1.8-2.5 microns. Their fine structure is identical with merozoites of all other sarcosporidia. A round vacuole, which is placed at the rear end of the merozoite near the nucleus seems to be a characteristic. Metrocytes are found rarely in the periphery and they are usually degenerated. In some cysts cystozoites, ground substance and protrusions show signs of lysis, the septation, however, remains usually unchanged.

  6. A description of Isospora amphiboluri (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the inland bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Sauria: Agamidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J; Jacobson, E R; Kopit, W

    1995-04-01

    Fecal samples from 50 captive inland bearded dragons, Pogona vitticeps (Ahl, 1926), bred in California, were examined for coccidian parasites. Sixteen (32%) of the lizards were found to be passing oocysts of Isospora amphiboluri Cannon, 1967, previously described from bearded dragons Pogona barbata (Cuvier, 1829) from Australia. Sporulated oocytes were spherical to subspherical, 25.3 x 25.1 (23-26 x 23-26) microns, with a shape index (length/width) of 1.0 (1.0-1.1). A micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocyts were ovoidal, 17.0 x 11.4 (16-18 x 11-12) microns, with a shape index of 1.5 (1.4-1.7). A sporocyst residuum, Stieda, and substieda bodies were present, but parastieda bodies were absent. Sporozoites were elongated, 13.9 x 3.5 (12-15 x 3-4) microns in situ, containing spherical anterior and posterior refractile bodies. The occurrence of I. amphiboluri in P. vitticeps is a new host and geographic record for the parasite. Photomicrographs of the oocysts and endogenous life cycle stages of I. amphiboluri are presented for the first time.

  7. Sarcocystis oreamni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Van Wilpe, Erna; White, Kevin; Verma, Shiv K; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-11-01

    Numerous species of Sarcocystis have been reported from wild ruminants, but none has been named from the Rocky Mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Mature sarcocysts were found in frozen muscle samples of three of seven mountain goats from Alaska, USA. Two morphological types of sarcocysts were found; one had Sarcocystis cornagliai-like sarcocysts, previously named from the Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) from Europe. Two other goats were infected with a new species, Sarcocystis oreamni. Sarcocystis oreamni sarcocysts were microscopic with 2 μm-thick sarcocyst wall. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had 1.7 μm-thick with unusual molar tooth-like villar protrusions (vp), type 29. The vp had an electron dense core and two disc-shaped plaques at the tip with fine microtubules. Bradyzoites were 8.6-9.1 μm long. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identified in 18S rRNA, and 28S rRNA loci of rDNA regions that suggested S. oreamni molecularly apart from related species. The phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA sequences suggested S. oreamni is related with Sarcocystis species that employ members of the Canidae family as their definitive host.

  8. Sarcocystis tuagulusi, n.sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from Williamson's mouse deer (Tuagulus williamsoni) (Artiodactyla:Tragulidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun Jie; Huang, Si; Chen, Ming Yong; Wen, Tao; Esch, Gerald Wisler; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Ting Ting

    2016-03-01

    Numerous species of Sarcocystis have been reported from wild ruminants, but none has been from Williamson's mouse deer (Tuagulus williamsoni). Here, we describe a new species, Sarcocystis tuagulusi, infecting five of 12 Williamson's mouse deer from southwest China. Mature sarcocysts are microscopic, up to 2280-μm long. The sarcocyst wall had 8.2-μm long villar protrusions, type 24. Using transmission electron microscopy, the protrusions on sarcocysts appeared as elongated, lancet- or leaf-like shapes in longitudinal sections; in contrast, the cross-sections revealed mushroom-shaped protrusions. In the core of the protrusion, a bundle of microtubules penetrated diagonally into a ground substance along the longitudinal axis. A phyogenetic analysis based on 18S rRNA and cox1 sequences suggested S. tuagulusi is closely related to Sarcocystis species from ruminants that employ felids as definitive hosts.

  9. Sarcocystis menglaensis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from Williamson's mouse deer Tuagulus williamsoni (Kloss) (Artiodactyla: Tragulidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Jie; Li, Hong-Liang; Huang, Si; Chen, Ming-Yong; Esch, Gerald W; Yang, Zhao-Qing; Song, Jing-Ling

    2017-02-01

    Williamson's mouse deer, Tuagulus williamsoni (Kloss), is one of the smallest ungulates among tragulid species found in northern Thailand, and Yunnan Province, China. Here we describe Sarcocystis menglaensis n. sp., infecting two of 14 (14.3%) Williamson's mouse deer from south-western China. By light microscopy, sarcocysts of S. menglaensis are microscopic, up to 2,170 μm in length, and have a striated sarcocyst wall with 1.5-3.6 μm long palisade-like protrusions. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that sarcocyst wall is of "type 10f", and has numerous villar protrusions folded over the cyst wall. The villar protrusions contained microtubules dispersed throughout the protrusions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rDNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences indicated that S. menglaensis shared a close affinity with species of Sarcocystis Lankester, 1982 from ruminants, which utilise felids as definitive hosts.

  10. Hepatozoon ursi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) in Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Kubo, Masahito; Uni, Shigehiko; Agatsuma, Takeshi; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Panciera, Roger J; Tsubota, Toshio; Nakamura, Sachiko; Sakai, Hiroki; Masegi, Toshiaki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2008-09-01

    Morphological and genetic features of a new Hepatozoon species, Hepatozoon ursi n. sp., in Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) were studied. Schizogonic developmental stages were observed in the lungs of Japanese black bears. The schizonts were sub-spherical in shape and 45.7+/-4.6 x 42.7+/-4.5 microm in size. Each mature schizont contained approximately 80-130 merozoites and 0-5 residual bodies. The merozoites were 7.0+/-0.7 x 1.8+/-0.3 microm in size. Intraleukocytic gametocytes were slightly curved, cigar-like in shape and had a beak-like protrusion at one end. The size of the gametocytes was 10.9+/-0.3 x 3.3+/-0.2 microm. The analyses of the18S rRNA gene sequences supported the hypothesis that H. ursi n. sp. is different from other Hepatozoon species. Mature Hepatozoon oocysts were detected in two species of ticks (Haemaphysalis japonica and Haemaphysalis flava) collected on the bears infected with H. ursi n. sp. Two measured oocysts were 263.2 x 234.0 microm and 331.8 x 231.7 microm, respectively. The oocysts contained approximately 40 and 50 sporocysts, respectively. The sporocysts were sub-spherical in shape and 31.2+/-2.5 x 27.0+/-2.9 microm in size. Each sporocyst contained at least 8-16 sporozoites, with the sporozoites being 12.2+/-1.4 x 3.5+/-0.5 microm in size. H. ursi n. sp. is the first Hepatozoon species recorded from the family Ursidae.

  11. Sarcocystis rommeli, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from cattle (Bos taurus) and its differentiation from Sarcocystis hominis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for three named species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, and S. hominis. Recently, a fourth species was identified and named S. sinensis. However, S. sinensis originally named a species of Sarcocystis in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in China. Based ...

  12. Sarcocystis mehlhorni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection with Sarcocystis is common in many species of wild cervids but none is reported from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). Here, we report Sarcocystis infection in two black-tailed deer from northwest USA for the first time. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 556 µm long...

  13. Sarcocystis mehlhorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv K; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Schafer, Laurence M; Van Wilpe, Erna; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-12-01

    Infection with Sarcocystis is common in many species of wild cervids but none is reported from the black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). Here, we report Sarcocystis infection in two black-tailed deer from northwest USA for the first time. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 556 μm long and mature. The sarcocyst wall was up to 1.39 μm thick and had rectangular 1.17-μm-long villar protrusions, type 17, with thin (230 nm) electron dense ground substance layer. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sarcocystis in the black-tailed deer is related to structurally distinct Sarcocystis species in cervids. A new name, Sarcocystis mehlhorni, is proposed for the Sarcocystis species in black-tailed deer.

  14. Parasites and malignancies, a review, with emphasis on digestive cancer induced by Cryptosporidium parvum (Alveolata: Apicomplexa)

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, S.; Conseil, V.; Creusy, C.; Calderon, E.; Dei-Cas, E.; Certad, G.

    2012-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) identifies ten infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites) able to induce cancer disease in humans. Among parasites, a carcinogenic role is currently recognized to the digenetic trematodes Schistosoma haematobium, leading to bladder cancer, and to Clonorchis sinensis or Opisthorchis viverrini, which cause cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, several reports suspected the potential association of other parasitic infections (due to Protozoan or Metazoan parasites) with the development of neoplastic changes in the host tissues. The present work shortly reviewed available data on the involvement of parasites in neoplastic processes in humans or animals, and especially focused on the carcinogenic power of Cryptosporidium parvum infection. On the whole, infection seems to play a crucial role in the etiology of cancer. PMID:22348213

  15. A new species of Choleoeimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Meller's chameleon, Trioceros melleri (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-10-01

    A captive specimen of Meller's chameleon, Trioceros melleri (Gray), originally from Tanzania and housed at the Oklahoma City Zoological Park Herpetarium, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, was found to be passing an undescribed species of Choleoeimeria in its feces. Oocysts of Choleoeimeria steveuptoni n. sp. were cylindroidal, 38.5 × 17.8 (36-42 × 17-19) µm with a bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 2.2. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was often present. Ovoidal sporocysts were composed of 2 valves joined by a suture and measured 11.3 × 9.1 (11-12 × 9-10) µm; shape index of 1.3. Stieda, sub-Stieda, and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consists of multiple globules dispersed along the perimeter of the sporocyst and between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate, 13.1 × 2.9 (12-15 × 2.6-3.2) µm with an elongate posterior refractile body. The new species represents the second coccidian documented from this lizard.

  16. A new species of Choleoeimeria (apicomplexa: eimeriidae) from oustalet's chameleon, Furcifer oustaleti (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae).

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-02-01

    One of three (33%) captive specimens of Oustalet's chameleon, Furcifer oustaleti (Mocquard) originally from Madagascar and housed at the Oklahoma City Zoological Park Herpetarium, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, USA, was found to be passing an undescribed species of Choleoeimeria in its faeces. Oocysts of Choleoeimeria fischeri sp. n. were cylindroidal, 30.3 x 16.8 (28-34 x 15-18) microm, with a smooth, bilayered wall and a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.8. A micropyle and oocyst residuum was absent but a fragmented polar granule was often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 9.6 x 8.0 (9-10 x 7-9) jm, with an L/W of 1.2. Stieda, sub-Stieda, and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consists of large globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate, 8.6 x 2.9 (8-10 x 2-3) microm, with an elongate posterior refractile body. The new species represents the second coccidian described from this lizard.

  17. Molecular survey of Apicomplexa in Podarcis wall lizards detects Hepatozoon, Sarcocystis, and Eimeria species.

    PubMed

    Harris, D James; Maia, João P M C; Perera, Ana

    2012-06-01

    The occurrence of apicomplexan parasites in Podarcis sp. wall lizards from the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic islands was studied by amplification and sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene. Species from 3 genera, Hepatozoon , Sarcocystis , and Eimeria , were found. The phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene provides unexpected insights into the evolutionary history of these parasites. All Hepatozoon spp. specimens were recovered as part of a clade already identified in lizards from North Africa. The Sarcocystis species, detected in Podarcis lilfordi from Cabrera Island in the Balearic Islands, appears related to Sarcocystis gallotiae , known only from endemic Gallotia sp. lizards from the Canary Islands. Based on the lack of snake predators on this island, this parasite presumably presents an atypical transmission cycle that uses the same host species as both intermediate and final host through cannibalism, like S. gallotiae . Eimeria sp. is reported for the first time from Podarcis spp. lizards. This study shows the power of detecting multiple different apicomplexan parasites through screening of tail tissue samples and blood drops that are often collected in reptiles for other purposes.

  18. Five new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from colubrid snakes of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Asmundsson, I M; Upton, S J; Freed, P S

    2001-10-01

    Fecal samples from 11 colubrid snakes, representing 10 species, collected in Ecuador during October 1994 were examined for coccidian parasites. Feces of 4 individuals, representing 4 host species, contained coccidian oocysts. Three species of Eimeria and 2 species of Isospora were observed and are described here as new. Oocysts of both Eimeria and Isospora were found in the feces of a slug-eating snake, Dipsas vermiculata. Sporulated oocysts of the Eimeria sp. are spheroid to subspheroid, 16.7 by 16.6 microm (14-18 by 14-18 microm) and those of the Isospora sp. are spheroid and 15.0 microm (13-18 microm) in diameter. Imantodes cenchoa, the common bluntheaded treesnake, was infected with a species of Eimeria. These sporulated oocysts are ellipsoid, 23.3 by 16.2 microm (25-21 by 15-17 microm). Sporulated eimerian oocysts from Leptodeira annulata, the southern cat-eyed snake, are subspheroid, 22.5 by 18.8 microm (19-26 by 17-21 microm). Feces of a juvenile Imantodes lentiferus, the bluntheaded vine snake, contained ovoid to ellipsoid isosporan oocysts, which measured 21.6 by 15.0 microm (20-23 by 14-16 microm) when sporulated.

  19. Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from the Red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una M; Power, Michelle; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the faeces of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts, and measure 4.5-5.1 microm (mean=4.9) x 3.8-5.0 microm (mean=4.3 microm) with a length to width ratio 1.02:1.18 (mean 1.14) (n=50). Oocysts were not infectious for neonate ARC Swiss mice. Multi-locus analysis of numerous unlinked loci demonstrated this species to be distinct (90.64%-97.88% similarity) from C. parvum. Based on biological and molecular data, this Cryptosporidium infecting marsupials is proposed to be a new species Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp.

  20. Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alyousif, M S; Alfaleh, F A; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2011-04-01

    The oocysts of Caryospora biarmicusis sp.n. is described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 40.2 x 34.7 (37.5-42.4 x 32.9-35.7) microm; shape index (L/W) is 1.16 (1.08-1.31) microm. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and polar granule are absent, but an oocyst residuum is present. Sporocysts are spheroid, 20.1 (18.6-21.3) microm; with a smooth single-layered wall, lacking Stieda body. Sporocyst residuum is present as numerous small granules. Sporozoites are stout with a large single refractile body.

  1. Eimeria biarmicus sp.n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting falcons from the genus Falco in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alfaleh, F A; Alyousif, M S; Al-Quraishy, S; Al-Shawa, Y R

    2012-05-01

    The oocysts of Eimeria biarmicus sp. n. were described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, collected from the falcon market in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. The prevalence of infection was 5% (2/40). The majority of the oocysts examined had completed sporulation within 84 h at 24 ± 2°C. Sporulated oocysts are ovoid in shape, measuring 22.4 × 17.9 (20.5-24.7 × 15.8-18.5) μm; shape index (L/W) is 1.25 (1.14-1.36) μm. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. A polar granule is present, consisting of 2-4 globules. Sporocysts are ovoid, 10.1 × 6.1 (9.4-11.2 × 5.4-6.8) μm; with a smooth single-layered wall and a minute Stieda body, but there is no substieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of numerous small granules. Sporozoites are comma shaped, each contains two refractile bodies. E. biarmicus sp. n. is the second eimerian species described from F. biarmicus.

  2. Molecular and morphologic characterization of Sarcocystis felis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in South American wild felids from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cañón-Franco, William Alberto; López-Orozco, Natalia; Christoff, Alexandre Uarth; de Castilho, Camila Schlieper; de Araújo, Flavio Antônio Pacheco; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Dubey, J P; Soares, Rodrigo Martins; Gennari, Solange Maria

    2016-02-15

    Wild felids are thought to share parasites with domestic cats. However, little is known of the coccidian parasites of wild felids. We investigated the presence of Sarcocystis spp. in tissues of 6 species of 90 Neotropical small felids killed in road accidents in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil by using microscopic and molecular techniques. Formalin-fixed tissues from 28 felids were examined, and Sarcocystis felis-like sarcocysts were detected in 4 wild cats (2 Puma yagouaroundi and 2 Leopardus guttulus). By transmission electron microscopy, sarcocysts from a P. yagouaroundi were identical to S. felis from domestic cats in the USA. Direct sequencing of PCR amplicons resulted the unambiguous sequences of the ITS-1 region from 18 of the 31 PCR positive wild cats; 5 sequences from each P. yagouaroundi, and Leopardus geoffroyi, 4 sequences from L. guttulus, and 2 sequences from each Leopardus wiedii, and Leopardus colocolo. Sequences analysis of ITS-1 region revealed the highest identiy (97-99%) with that of previously describe isolates of S. felis from domestic cats in the USA and identified them as S. felis. Tissues of 1 Leopardus pardalis tested by PCR and histology were negative. The phylogenetic relationship indicated that S. felis is quite different to species which employ opossums as their definitive host. This is the first report of S. felis infection in small wild felids from Brazil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Life cycle of Cystoisospora felis (Coccidia: Apicomplexa) in cats and mice.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2014-01-01

    Cystoisospora felis is a ubiquitous apicomplexan protozoon of cats. The endogenous development of C. felis was studied in cats after feeding them infected mice. For this, five newborn cats were killed at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h after having been fed mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens of mice that were inoculated with C. felis sporulated sporocysts. Asexual and sexual development occurred in enterocytes throughout the villi of the small intestine. The number of asexual generations was not determined with certainty, but there were different sized merozoites. At 24 h, merogony was seen only in the duodenum and the jejunum. Beginning at 48 h, the entire small intestine was parasitized. At 24 h, meronts contained 1-4 zoites, and at 48 h up to 12 zoites. Beginning with 72 h, the ileum was more heavily parasitized than the jejunum. At 96 and 120 h, meronts contained many zoites in various stages of development; some divided by endodyogeny. The multiplication was asynchronous, thus both immature multinucleated meronts and mature merozoites were seen in the same parasitophorous vacuole. Gametogony occurred between 96 and 120 h, and oocysts were present at 120 h. For the study of the development of C. felis in murine tissues, mice were killed from day 1 to 720 d after having been fed 10(5) sporocysts, and their tissues were examined for the parasites microscopically, and by bioassay in cats. The following conclusions were drawn. (1) Cystoisospora felis most frequently invaded the mesenteric lymph nodes of mice and remained there for at least 23 mo. (2) It also invaded the spleen, liver, brain, lung, and skeletal muscle of mice, but division was not seen based on microscopical examination. (3) This species could not be passed from mouse to mouse.

  4. Apicomplexa primers amplify Proteromonas (Stramenopiles, Slopalinida, Proteromonadidae) in tissue and blood samples from lizards.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P M C; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Harris, D James

    2012-12-01

    Microscopy has traditionally been the most common method in parasitological studies, but in recent years molecular screening has become increasingly frequent to detect protozoan parasites in a wide range of vertebrate hosts and vectors. During routine molecular screening of apicomplexan parasites in reptiles using the 18S rRNA gene, we have amplified and sequenced Proteromonas parasites from three lizard hosts (less than 1% prevalence). We conducted phylogenetic analysis to confirm the taxonomic position and infer their relationships with other stramenopiles. Although our phylogeny is limited due to scarcity of molecular data on these protists, our results confirm they are closely related to Proteromonas lacertae. Our findings show that unexpected parasites can be amplified from host samples (blood and tissue) using general procedures to detect hemoparasites, and stress that positive PCR amplifications alone should not be considered as definitive proof of infection by particular parasites. Further validation by sequence confirmation and thorough phylogenetic assessment will not only avoid false positives and biased prevalence estimates but also provide valuable information on the biodiversity and phylogenetic relationships of other parasitic organisms. More generally, our results illustrate the perils of general diagnosis protocols in parasitological studies and the need of cross-validation procedures.

  5. Redescription of Eimeria zarudnyi Alyousif & Al-Shawa, 2003 as Choleoeimeria zarudnyi n. comb. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Abdel-Haleem, Heba M; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2013-06-01

    Coprological examination of the worm lizard Diplometopon zarudnyi Nikolskii revealed the presence of oöcysts of Choleoeimeria zarudnyi (Alyousif & Al-Shawa, 2003) n. comb. in five (17%) of the 30 lizards examined. Sporulated oöcysts were found in the faeces and the gallbladder contents. These are tetrasporocystic, ellipsoidal, 25-32 × 18-25 (mean 27 × 22) μm, with a smooth bi-layered wall. The dizoic sporocysts are ovoidal, 10-13 × 6-9 (mean 11 × 7) μm, with a granulated sporocyst residuum. Sporozoites are banana-shaped with an average size of 13 × 3 μm. Endogenous stages (meronts, gamonts and gametes) are confined to the gallbladder epithelium and the infected cells were hypertrophied. Based on the morphological features of the exogenous stages and the endogenous development of the present parasite, its generic affiliation is revised and Eimeria zarudnyi Alyousif & Al-Shawa, 2003 is transferred to the genus Choleoeimeria.

  6. Cryptosporidium parvum (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) oocyst and sporozoite antigens recognized by bovine colostral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tilley, M; Fayer, R; Guidry, A; Upton, S J; Blagburn, B L

    1990-09-01

    Colostral whey from seven hyperimmunized and two control cows (hyperimmune bovine colostrum) was examined by Western immunoblotting for the presence of antibody against oocysts and sporozoites of Cryptosporidium parvum, using rabbit anti-bovine immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG1, IgG2, and IgM antibodies, followed by a horseradish peroxidase goat anti-rabbit polyvalent antibody. Although considerable variation was found in binding activity between cows on different immunization protocols, IgA and IgG1 in whey recognized a greater variety of C. parvum antigens than did IgG2 and IgM. A band at 9 to 10 kilodaltons appeared unique in that it was recognized only by IgA.

  7. KLOSSIELLA DULCIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: KLOSSIELLIDAE) IN THE KIDNEYS OF PETAURUS BREVICEPS (MARSUPIALIA: PETAURIDAE).

    PubMed

    Ardiaca, Maria; Bennett, Mark D; Montesinos, Andres; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Soriano-Navarro, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Two cases of renal klossiellosis were diagnosed by histopathology in pet sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps). In both cases, parasites were associated with tubular dilation and mild interstitial nephritis. Rare schizonts were seen in the proximal convoluted renal tubular epithelium, whereas all other life cycle stages were found within distal convoluted tubule cells or the urinary space of the structures distal to the loop of Henle. Conventional optical and transmission electron microscopies were used to assess the life stages of the parasite. The morphologic characteristics and measurements observed differ from those of previously described species of Klossiella infecting marsupial hosts, and the name Klossiella dulcis n. sp. is hereby proposed. This is the first report of a Klossiella sp. infection in Petaurus breviceps .

  8. Parasites and malignancies, a review, with emphasis on digestive cancer induced by Cryptosporidium parvum (Alveolata: Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Benamrouz, S; Conseil, V; Creusy, C; Calderon, E; Dei-Cas, E; Certad, G

    2012-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) identifies ten infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites) able to induce cancer disease in humans. Among parasites, a carcinogenic role is currently recognized to the digenetic trematodes Schistosoma haematobium, leading to bladder cancer, and to Clonorchis sinensis or Opisthorchis viverrini, which cause cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, several reports suspected the potential association of other parasitic infections (due to Protozoan or Metazoan parasites) with the development of neoplastic changes in the host tissues. The present work shortly reviewed available data on the involvement of parasites in neoplastic processes in humans or animals, and especially focused on the carcinogenic power of Cryptosporidium parvum infection. On the whole, infection seems to play a crucial role in the etiology of cancer.

  9. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in muscle of an Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from tongue of the wolf were up to 900 µm long, slender, and appeared to h...

  10. Diversity and host specificity of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in native and introduced squirrel species.

    PubMed

    Hofmannová, Lada; Romeo, Claudia; Štohanzlová, Lucie; Jirsová, Dagmar; Mazzamuto, Maria Vittoria; Wauters, Lucas Armand; Ferrari, Nicola; Modrý, David

    2016-10-01

    Introduction of alien species into new areas can have detrimental effects on native ecosystems and impact the native species. The present study aims to identify coccidia infecting native and introduced squirrels in Italy, to gain insight into possible transmission patterns and role of monoxenous coccidia in mediating the competition between alien and native hosts. We collected 540 faecal samples of native red squirrels, Sciurus vulgaris, invasive alien grey squirrels, S. carolinensis, and introduced Pallas's squirrels, Callosciurus erythraeus. Total prevalence of Eimeria spp. was 95.6% in S. vulgaris, 95.7% in S. carolinensis and only 4.1% in C. erythraeus. Morphological examination revealed 3 Eimeria morphotypes. Phylogenetic analyses of Eimeria DNA based on 18S, ITS, cox I markers displayed fairly distinct monophyletic clades in the microscopically indistinguishable E2 morphotype, proving indisputable distinction between the isolates from red and grey squirrels. Grey squirrels successfully introduced E. lancasterensis from their native range, but this species does not spill over to native red squirrels. Similarly, there is no evidence for the transmission of E. sciurorum from red to grey squirrels. The possible transmission and the potential role of monoxenous coccidia in mediating the competition between native and invasive squirrels in Italy were not confirmed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANDERSONI N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM CATTLE, BOS TAURUS. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Leucocytozoon (Apicomplexa: Leucocytozoidae) from West African birds, with descriptions of two species.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh I; Sehgal, Ravinder N M; Smith, Thomas B

    2005-04-01

    Five species of Leucocytozoon were recovered from 35/828 birds of 95 species examined from 6 sites in West Africa between May 1995 and June 2001. Leucocytozoon pogoniuli n. sp. is described from the tinker barbets Pogoniulus subsulphureus and Pogoniulus atroflavus. Leucocytozoon trachyphoni n. sp. is described from the barbet Trachyphonus purpureus. No leucocytozoids have been reported previously in species of Pogoniulus. Leucocytozoon nectariniae was identified from the sunbird Nectarinia olivacea, and Leucocytozoon brimonti was recovered from 4 species of Pycnonotidae (bulbuls), all of which are new host records. We also report the first Leucocytozoon to be recovered from the phylogenetically isolated bird, Picathartes sp. (Picathartidae). This parasite is similar in appearance to Leucocytozoon sakharoffi, and probably represents a previously undescribed species. In view of the intraspecific variability and, frequently, relatively minor interspecific differences within Leucocytozoidae, we suggest that the development and application of molecular techniques would greatly advance understanding of speciation and relationships within this family.

  13. Host Specificity of Gregarina blattarum von Siebold, 1839 (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) among Five Species of Domiciliary Cockroaches

    PubMed

    Clopton; Gold

    1996-05-01

    The host specificity of Gregarina blattarum was evaluated among five species of domiciliary cockroaches: Blatella germanica, Supella longipalpa, Blatta orientalis, Periplaneta americana, and Periplaneta fuliginosa. Third- and fourth-instar nymphs were allowed to feed on crushed dog kibble contaminated with G. blattarum oocysts. Cockroaches were killed 8 days postinfection and examined for parasites. Gregarina blattarum infections were observed in all experimentally infected replications of B. germanica. No infection was observed in an experimentally infected replication of S. longipalpa, B. orientalis, P. americana, or P. fuliginosa, nor was an infection observed in a time zero or ending time control group. In vitro excystation assays using extracts of host gut homogenates demonstrate that G. blattarum sporozoites successfully excyst and begin the life cycle in all five cockroach species tested. No excystation was observed in neutral buffered saline controls. These data suggest that G. blattarum comprises a complex of cryptic species marked by narrow host utilization rather than a single species parasitizing a broad array of cockroach taxa.

  14. A new coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the scimitar-horned oryx, Oryx dammah.

    PubMed

    Alyousif, Mohamed S; Al-Shawa, Yaser R

    2002-04-01

    Oocysts of Eimeria oryxae sp. n. are described from the faeces of the scimitar-horned oryx, Oryx dammah (Cretzschmar, 1826), from Zoo Garden, Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts were ellipsoid in shape measuring 20.9 x 17.1 (16.7-24.2 x 15.5-20.2) microm, with smooth brownish-yellow double layered wall. Micropyle and ellipsoidal polar granules are present, but micropylar cap and oocyst residuum are absent. Sporocysts are ovoid, reaching 10.0 x 5.7 (9.2-11.0 x 5.2-6.5) microm with Stieda body and sporocyst residuum. Sporozoites are elongated, each with large and small refractile body.

  15. SARCOCYSTIS URSUSI, N. SP (APICOMPLEXA; SARCOCYSTIDAE) FROM THE BLACK BEAR (URSUS AMERICANUS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection with Sarcocystis species is common in hervibores but is rare in bears. Histological sections of 374 black bears (Ursus americanus) from Pennsylvania were examined for sarcocysts. A total of 3 sarcocysts were found in 3 bears, 1 sarcocyst per section. Sarcocysts from 2 bears were considered...

  16. Sarcocystis canis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae), the etiologic agent of generalized coccidiosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Speer, C A

    1991-08-01

    Sarcocystis canis n. sp. is proposed for the protozoon associated with encephalitis, hepatitis, and generalized coccidiosis in dogs. Only asexual stages are known in macrophages, neurons, dermal, and other cells of the body. The parasite is located free in the host cell cytoplasm without a parasitophorous vacuole; schizonts divide by endopolygeny. Schizonts are 5-25 x 4-20 microns and contain 6-40 merozoites. Merozoites are approximately 5-7 microns x 1 micron and do not contain rhoptries. The parasite is PAS-negative and reacts with Sarcocystis cruzi antiserum but not with Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, or Caryospora bigenetica antisera in an immunohistochemical test.

  17. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Mowery, Joseph; Carmena, David; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Dubey, Jitender P

    2016-07-01

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in the muscles of a gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA, for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from the tongue of the wolf were up to 900 μm long and slender and appeared to have a relatively thin wall by light microscope. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall most closely resembled "type 9c," and had a wavy parasitophorous vacuolar membrane folded as pleomorphic villar protrusions (vp), with anastomoses of tips. The vp and the ground substance (gs) layer were smooth without tubules or granules. The gs was up to 2.0 μm thick. The total width of the wall including vp and the gs was 3.5 μm. The vp were up to 1.5 μm long. Mature sarcocysts contained numerous bradyzoites and few metrocytes. The bradyzoites were 9.5 μm long and 1.5 μm wide, and contained all organelles found in Sarcocystis bradyzoites with at least two rhoptries. Molecular characterization showed the highest identity for 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, ITS-1, and cox1 sequences of Sarcocystis arctica of the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) from Norway. The ultrastructure of S. arctica from the fox is unknown. Here, we provide ultrastructure of S. arctica from the Alaskan wolf for the first time. The definitive host of S. arctica remains unknown.

  18. Effects of sulfadiazine and amprolium on Neospora caninum (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P

    1990-04-01

    An immunosuppressed mouse model was used to determine the effects of amprolium and sulfadiazine on experimental Neospora caninum infections. Both drugs were given in the drinking water. Neither drug was effective in treating infections when given 7 days after inoculation of tachyzoites, when clinical signs of disease had developed. Amprolium did not prevent deaths or development of clinical signs when given in the drinking water at 1 mg/ml or 5 mg/ml 3 days after inoculation of tachyzoites. Sulfadiazine in drinking water was not effective when given at 0.5 mg/ml but was effective in preventing deaths and clinical disease when given at 1 mg/ml 3 days after inoculation with tachyzoites. Most mice (6 of 10) treated for 3 days with 1 mg/ml sulfadiazine in drinking water developed encephalitis after drug treatment was stopped. Treatment for 14 days with 1 mg/ml sulfadiazine in drinking water was needed to protect 90% of inoculated mice.

  19. Identification of sporozoite surface proteins and antigens of Eimeria nieschulzi (Apicomplexa)

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, M.; Upton, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, lectin binding, and {sup 125}I surface labeling of sporozoites were used to probe sporozoites of the rat coccidian, Eimeria nieschulzi. Analysis of silver stained gels revealed greater than 50 bands. Surface iodination revealed about 14 well labeled, and about 10 weakly labeled but potential, surface proteins. The most heavily labeled surface proteins had molecular masses of 60, 53-54, 45, 28, 23-24, 17, 15, 14, 13, and 12 kD. Following electrophoresis and Western blotting, 2 of the 12 125I labeled lectin probes bound to two bands on the blots, which collectively indicated that two bands were glycosylated. Concanavalin A (ConA) specifically recognized a band at 53 kD, which may represent a surface glycoprotein, and a lectin derived from Osage orange (MPA) bound to a single band at 82-88 kD, that may also be a surface molecule. Immunoblotting using sera collected from rats inoculated orally with oocysts, as well as sera from mice hyperimmunized with sporozoites, revealed that many surface molecules appear to be immunogenic.

  20. Sarcocystis cafferi n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lane, Emily P; van Wilpe, Erna; Suleman, Essa; Reininghaus, Bjorn; Verma, S K; Rosenthal, B M; Mtshali, Moses S

    2014-12-01

    Sarcocystis infections have been reported from the African buffalo ( Syncerus caffer ), but the species have not been named. Here we propose a new name Sarcocystis cafferi from the African buffalo. Histological examination of heart (92), skeletal muscle (36), and tongue (2) sections from 94 buffalos from the Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa, and a review of the literature revealed only 1 species of Sarcocystis in the African buffalo. Macrocysts were up to 12 mm long and 6 mm wide and were located in the neck muscles and overlying connective tissue. They were pale yellow; shaped like a lychee fruit stone or cashew nut; turgid or flaccid and oval to round (not fusiform). By light microscopy (LM) the sarcocyst wall was relatively thin. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the sarcocyst wall had a mesh-like structure with irregularly shaped villar protrusions (vp) that were of different sizes and folded over the sarcocyst wall. The entire surfaces of vp were covered with papillomatous structures. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the sarcocyst wall was up to 3.6 μm thick and had highly branched villar protrusions that were up to 3 μm long. The villar projections contained filamentous tubular structures, most of which were parallel to the long axis of the projections, but some tubules criss-crossed, especially at the base. Granules were absent from these tubules. Longitudinally cut bradyzoites were 12.1 × 2.7 μm in size, had a long convoluted mitochondrion, and only 2 rhoptries. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences indicated that this Sarcocystis species is very closely related to, but distinct from, Sarcocystis fusiformis and Sarcocystis hirsuta. Thus, morphological findings by LM, SEM, and TEM together with molecular phylogenetic data (from 18S rRNA and cox1) confirm that the Sarcocystis species in the African buffalo is distinct from S. fusiformis and has therefore been named Sarcocystis cafferi.

  1. Experimental Infection with Sporulated Oocysts of Eimeria maxima (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in Broiler

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Luciana da S.; Pereira, Elder N.; da Silva, Augusta A.; Bentivóglio Costa Silva, Vinícius; Freitas, Fagner L. da C.

    2014-01-01

    Through this study we assessed the metabolic and pathological changes in broilers experimentally infected with oocysts of Eimeria maxima. To perform the experiment, we used 150 broiler strain cooB males, with ten days of age, were randomized according to weight and randomly assigned to two experimental groups: the control group was inoculated with 0.5 mL of distilled water; the infected group inoculated with 0.5 mL of solution containing 5 × 104 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima. The live performance was evaluated on day 0 (day of inoculation), 5°, 10°, 15°, 25°, and 35° dpi, being slaughtered by cervical dislocation, fifteen birds/group. Although the sum in meat production was higher in the control group, the weight of the heart and gizzard of the experimental animals showed no significant difference, while the liver had difference on day 5°, 15°, and 35° dpi. The pathologic evaluation showed congested mucosa and presence of large amounts of mucus at 6 dpi. Therefore, it is concluded that the dose of 5 × 104 E. maxima inoculated in the experimental group was enough to cause harm to the animal organism. PMID:26464925

  2. Monocystis apporectodae sp. nov. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida), from an Indian earthworm Apporectodea trapezoides Duges.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mallik, Partha; Göçmen, Bayram; Mitra, Amlan Kumar

    2006-01-01

    A survey aimed at exploring the endoparasitic acephaline gregarine diversity in South-western Bengal, detected a new species of the genus Monocystis Stein, 1848, that resides in the seminal vesicles of the earthworm, Apporectodea trapezoides Duges collected in the district of Bankura from alluvial soil. Monocystis apporectodae sp. nov. is a ribbon-like organism with one or more prominent constric-tions especially in some mature forms and measures 178.0-224.0 (203.0+/-5.0) microm x 37.0-58.0 (46.0+/-1.5) microm. The extreme ends are pointed. Its gametocysts are ovoid and measure 108.0-118.0 microm (113.0+/-1.1) x 79.0-89.0 (83.0+/-1.1) microm. Oocysts are navicular in shape. The length of the oocysts ranges from 10.0-14.6 and the width, from 5.5-8.1 microm.

  3. Caryospora uptoni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis borealis).

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Blagburn, B L

    1986-10-01

    Oocysts of Caryospora uptoni n. sp. were described from the feces of red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis borealis. Sporulated oocysts were spherical or subspherical and measured 28.1 by 26.4 micron. The oocyst wall was composed of a yellowish outer layer and brownish inner layer and was about 1.5 micron thick. Neither micropyle, polar granules, nor oocyst residuum were present. A single, spherical sporocyst 18.2 by 17.9 micron was present; a Stieda body was absent. A spherical eccentrically located sporocyst residuum was present in many sporocysts, but it degenerated to form a dispersed granular residuum in other sporocysts. Eight randomly arranged sporozoites, 12.6 by 4.2 micron, were present in each sporocyst; they contained a centrally or slightly posteriorly located nucleus.

  4. Isospora albicollis (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in thrushes Turdus spp. (Passeriformes: Turdidae), in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Irlane Faria de; Silva, Lidiane Maria da; Rodrigues, Mariana Borges; Oliveira, Mariana de Souza; Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Ildemar; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes; Berto, Bruno Pereira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to report and describe Isospora albicollis Lainson and Shaw, 1989 parasitizing a white-necked thrush Turdus albicollis Vieillot, 1818 and a pale-breasted thrush Turdus leucomelas Vieillot, 1818 in two different localities: the Itatiaia National Park and Cacaria, in southeastern Brazil. The oocysts identified were ovoidal, 24.4 × 19.7 μm, with a smooth, bilayered wall, around 1.4 μm thick. Oocyst residuum was absent, but a micropyle and a polar granule were present. The sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 15.4 × 10.1 μm. The Stieda body was knob-like to rounded and the sub-Stieda body was prominent and wide. Sporocyst residuum was present, usually as a cluster of granules that appear to be membrane-bounded. The sporozoites were vermiform with one posterior refractile body and a centrally located nucleus. Besides recording the new host T. leucomelas, the identification of I. albicollis in the Itatiaia National Park and Cacaria, in southeastern Brazil, provide records of new localities for its parasitism, and reveals the wide distribution and dispersion of this coccidium in Brazil.

  5. Enteric coccidia (Apicomplexa) in the small intestine of the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina).

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P; Cawthorn, R J; Hedstrom, O R

    1993-07-01

    Sporulated oocysts (mean dimensions = 13.0 x 10.8 microns) and sporocysts (11.3 x 5.5 microns) of a coccidian resembling Frenkelia sp. or Sarcocystis sp. were present in the lamina propria of the small intestine of a naturally-infected northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) collected near Medford, Oregon (USA). Dimensions of these oocytes and sporocysts appear to be considerably smaller than those from other sarcocystid species with avian definitive hosts. Additionally, numerous developmental stages and unsporulated oocysts (mean dimensions 22.8 x 17.8 microns) of a possible species of Isospora also were observed in the intestinal epithelium. This constitutes the first report of enteric coccidia from spotted owls. Neither parasite appeared to cause the death of the bird.

  6. [Species of the genus Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758) in captivity].

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fagner Luiz da C; Almeida, Katyane de S; Zanetti, André S; do Nascimento, Adjair A; Machado, Cé Lio R; Machado, Rosangela Z

    2006-01-01

    The parasitism of the two giant anteaters adults (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), one male and one female, infected naturally with Eimeria escomeli, E. tamanduae e E. marajoensis was related in the present research. In E. escomeli oocysts were 23.9 +/- 1.89 by 19.7 +/- 1.60 microm and its sporocysts were 11.47 +/- 1.25 by 6.48 +/- 0.80 microm. In E. tamanduae oocysts were 23.52 +/- 0.95 by 20.59 +/- 0.92 microm and its sporocysts were 12.19 +/- 0.65 by 7.15 +/- 0.55 microm. In E. marajoensis oocysts were 13.5 +/- 1.7 by 13.1 +/- 1.8 microm and its sporocysts were 7.4 +/- 0.58 by 5.4 +/- 0.8 microm. Eimeria escomeli was described before parasitizing giants anteater from Bolivia, and it was point out as the first time in Brazil. The presence of E. tamanduae and E. marajoensis parasitizing giant anteaters indicate the possibility of having co-infection of them among animals of the family Myrmecophagidae.

  7. Phylogenetic position of the genus Perkinsus (Protista, Apicomplexa) based on small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Goggin, C L; Barker, S C

    1993-07-01

    Parasites of the genus Perkinsus destroy marine molluscs worldwide. Their phylogenetic position within the kingdom Protista is controversial. Nucleotide sequence data (1792 bp) from the small subunit rRNA gene of Perkinsus sp. from Anadara trapezia (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from Moreton Bay, Queensland, was used to examine the phylogenetic affinities of this enigmatic genus. These data were aligned with nucleotide sequences from 6 apicomplexans, 3 ciliates, 3 flagellates, a dinoflagellate, 3 fungi, maize and human. Phylogenetic trees were constructed after analysis with maximum parsimony and distance matrix methods. Our analyses indicate that Perkinsus is phylogenetically closer to dinoflagellates and to coccidean and piroplasm apicomplexans than to fungi or flagellates.

  8. Monocystis metaphirae sp. nov. (Protista: Apicomplexa: Monocystidae) from the earthworm Metaphire houlleti (Perrier).

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mallik, Partha; Göçmen, Bayram; Mitra, Amlan Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Biodiversity studies in search of endoparasitic acephaline gregarines revealed a new species of the genus Monocystis Stein, 1848 in the seminal vesicles of the earthworm Metaphire houlleti (Perrier) residing in alluvial soil of the district of North 24 Parganas. The new species is characterized by having bean-shaped gamonts measuring 94.0-151.0 (119.0+/-16.0) microm x 53.0-81.0(66.0+/-8.0) microm. The anterior end of the gamont is always wider than the posterior end. The mucron is always present at the wider end. The occurrence of syzygy (end to end, cauda-frontal) is a very rare feature which has been observed in the life cycle of the new species. The gametocyst is ovoid consisting of two unequal gamonts, measuring 85.0-102.0 microm (93.0+/-6.0). Oocysts are navicular in shape, measuring 6.5-11.0 (9.0+/-1.1) microm x 4.0-7.5 (5.5+/-1.9) microm.

  9. Observations on associated histopathology with Aggregata octopiana infection (Protista: Apicomplexa) in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gestal, C; Abollo, E; Pascual, S

    2002-06-21

    Gamogony and sporogony of Aggregata octopiana were commonly observed during histological examination of the digestive tract of wild Octopus vulgaris from Ria de Vigo (NW Spain). A. octopiana infected noncuticularized caecum and intestine, and cuticularized oesophagus and crop. Infection was also observed in the gills and in covering mesenterium, mainly of the digestive gland and gonad. Histological and ultrastructural lesions associated with A. octopiana included host cell hypertrophy with nuclear displacement, inflammation, phagocytosis, ulceration and destruction of organ architecture. The possible existence of a malabsorption syndrome in the host is deduced.

  10. Iron superoxide dismutases in eukaryotic pathogens: new insights from Apicomplexa and Trypanosoma structures.

    PubMed

    Phan, Isabelle Q H; Davies, Douglas R; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Cestari, Igor; Anupama, Atashi; Fairman, James W; Edwards, Thomas E; Stuart, Kenneth; Schenkman, Sergio; Myler, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Prior studies have highlighted the potential of superoxide dismutases as drug targets in eukaryotic pathogens. This report presents the structures of three iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (FeSODs) from Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major and Babesia bovis. Comparison with existing structures from Plasmodium and other trypanosome isoforms shows a very conserved overall fold with subtle differences. In particular, structural data suggest that B. bovis FeSOD may display similar resistance to peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation via an intramolecular electron-transfer pathway as previously described in T. cruzi FeSOD isoform B, thus providing valuable information for structure-based drug design. Furthermore, lysine-acetylation results in T. cruzi indicate that acetylation occurs at a position close to that responsible for the regulation of acetylation-mediated activity in the human enzyme.

  11. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HOMINIS N. SP (APICOMPLEXA : CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM HOMO SAPIENS. (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Structures related to attachment and motility in the marine eugregarine Cephaloidophora cf. communis (Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Kováčiková, Magdaléna; Simdyanov, Timur G; Diakin, Andrei; Valigurová, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    Gregarines represent a highly diversified group of ancestral apicomplexans, with various modes of locomotion and host-parasite interactions. The eugregarine parasite of the barnacle Balanus balanus, Cephaloidophora cf. communis, exhibits interesting organisation of its attachment apparatus along with unique motility modes. The pellicle covered gregarine is arranged into longitudinal epicytic folds. The epimerite is separated from the protomerite by a septum consisting of tubulin-rich filamentous structures and both are packed with microneme-like structures suggestive of their function in the production of adhesives important for attachment and secreted through the abundant epimerite pores. Detached trophozoites and gamonts are capable of gliding motility, enriched by jumping and rotational movements with rapid changes in gliding direction and cell flexions. Actin in its polymerised form (F-actin) is distributed throughout the entire gregarine, while myosin, detected in the cortical region of the cell, follows the pattern of the epicytic folds. Various motility modes exhibited by individuals of C. cf. communis, together with significant changes in their cell shape during locomotion, are not concordant with the gliding mechanisms generally described in apicomplexan zoites and indicate that additional structures must be involved (e.g. two 12-nm filaments; the specific dentate appearance of internal lamina inside the epicytic folds). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Parasitization by Sauroplasma sp. (Apicomplexa: Haemohormidiidae) in Chelonian Podocnemis expansa (Testudines: Podocnemididae) in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Picelli, Amanda M; Carvalho, Aluísio V; Viana, Lúcio A; Malvasio, Adriana

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence and parasitemia of the piroplasm Sauroplasma sp. were evaluated in the Amazon chelonian Podocnemis expansa in Brazil. Samples were collected from 75 chelonians from 3 locations, including a commercial breeding facility, an indigenous subsistence breeding facility, and a wild population. Sauroplasma were found in 72% (54/75) of the chelonians, and the prevalence varied among the sampling sites. No significant correlations were found between the prevalence and the sex and body condition index of the chelonians. The mean parasitemia rate was 44.14/2,000 erythrocytes (2.2%), and no significant correlation was found between the parasitemia and sex and body condition index of the chelonians. These results suggest that the parasite is not pathogenic to P. expansa. No ectoparasites were found in the animals evaluated in the present study; however, due to the aquatic habit of the chelonian, it is likely that the piroplasm is transmitted by leeches and not by ticks, as would be expected for piroplasms.

  14. Role of the ER and Golgi in protein export by Apicomplexa.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Michael J; Jennison, Charlie; Tonkin, Christopher J; Boddey, Justin A

    2016-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause diseases of medical and agricultural importance linked to dramatic changes they impart upon infected host cells. Following invasion, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum renovates the host erythrocyte using mechanisms previously believed to be malaria-specific. This involves proteolytic cleavage of effectors in the endoplasmic reticulum that licences proteins for translocation into the host cell. Recently, it was demonstrated that the related parasite Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for disease in immunocompromised individuals and congenital birth defects, has an analogous pathway with some differences, including proteolytic processing in the Golgi. Here we review the similarities and distinctions in export mechanisms between these and other Apicomplexan parasites to reconcile how this group of pathogens modify their host cells to survive and proliferate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetics in Apicomplexa: control of gene expression during cell cycle progression, differentiation and antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Deitsch, Kirk W

    2007-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are important disease causing organisms that infect both animals and humans, causing extensive health and economic damage to human populations, particularly those in the developing world. The ability to perform genetic crosses, to engineer transgenic parasites lines, and the wealth of information made available through recent genome sequencing projects have made the laboratory study of these parasites important not only for understanding the diseases that they cause, but also for gaining insights into basic biological processes. The control of gene expression and cellular differentiation are particularly interesting in these organisms, as the apparent lack of large families of recognizable transcription factors typically found in other eukaryotic organisms suggests that they may be unusually reliant on epigenetic mechanisms. Here we review recent advances in the study of epigenetic gene regulation in the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

  16. Ultrastructure of Babesia WA1 (Apicomplexa: Piroplasma) during infection of erythrocytes in a hamster model.

    PubMed

    Braga, W; Venasco, J; Willard, L; Moro, M H

    2006-10-01

    Babesia Washington-1 (WA1) is a newly identified intraerythrocyte infectious agent of human babesiosis in the western United States. The purpose of the present study is to describe the ultrastructural changes in affected erythrocytes during the infectious process in a susceptible animal model, the golden Syrian hamster. Two, 1-mo-old female hamsters were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 1.8 x 10(9) Babesia WA1-infected erythrocytes originally isolated from a human case and serially passaged in hamsters. Saphenous vein blood samples (20 microl) were collected at 0, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, and 96 hr postinoculation (PI). Parasitemia was determined at each time interval by quick staining of blood smears showing 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 12.5, 22.5, 70, and almost 100% parasitemic erythrocytes at the corresponding PI time interval, respectively. Animals showed weakness and dehydration 72 hr PI inoculation, and were killed by 96 hr PI. Selected blood samples from 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr were fixed in cacodylate buffer, dehydrated in ethanol gradients, resin embedded, and then thin sectioned and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate for transmission electron microscopy or gold-coated for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Shape and surface membrane changes in erythrocytes were demonstrated by SEM and were more evident at 72 and 96 hr PI. Infected erythrocytes underwent changes in shape 24 hr PI, from few protrusions to several perforations, some of them resembling a "swiss cheese" appearance 96 hr PI. Several erythrocytes had irregular surface membranes and Babesia WA1 organisms were seen at different stages of development within erythrocytes, from single trophozoites to several merozoites (young trophozoites), some of them dividing to form typical tetrads. In general, Babesia WAI induced severe morphological changes in the erythrocytes, and these changes were more evident in almost all infected cells 96 hr PI.

  17. Cryptosporidium huwi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una; Paparini, Andrea; Tong, Kaising; Yang, Rongchang; Gibson-Kueh, Susan; O'Hara, Amanda; Lymbery, Alan; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium piscine genotype 1 from the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium huwi n. sp. is proposed to reflect its genetic and biological differences from gastric and intestinal Cryptosporidium species. Oocysts of C.huwi n. sp. over-lap in size with Cryptosporidium molnari, measuring approximately 4.4-4.9 µm (mean 4.6) by 4.0-4.8 µm (mean 4.4 µm) with a length to width ratio of 1.04 (0.92-1.35) (n = 50). Similar to C.molnari, C.huwi n. sp. was identified in the stomach only and clusters of oogonial and sporogonial stages were identified deep within the epithelium. However, phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences indicated that C. huwi n. sp. exhibited 8.5-9.2% and 3.5% genetic distance from C.molnari isolates and piscine genotype 7 respectively. At the actin locus, the genetic distance between C.huwi n. sp. and C.molnari was 16.6%. The genetic distance between C.huwi n. sp. and other Cryptosporidium species at the 18S locus was 13.2%-17% and at the actin locus was 18.9%-26.3%. Therefore C. huwi n. sp. is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel Isospora species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from warblers (Passeriformes: Parulidae) of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Shamus P; Yabsley, Michael J; Adams, Henry C; Hernandez, Sonia M

    2014-06-01

    Five of 16 (31%) rufous-capped warblers (Basileuterus rufifrons) and 2 of 5 (40%) ovenbirds ( Seiurus aurocapilla ) sampled from Costa Rica were positive for a novel species of Isospora. Oocysts have a thin, smooth, double-layered, colorless wall and measure 22.3 μm ± 1.6 μm × 24.3 μm ± 1.5 μm (19-25 μm × 21-28 μm) with an average length-width (L/W) ratio of 1.0 (1-1.3). Oocyst residuum and micropyle are absent, but 0-4 spherical to cigar-shaped polar granules (1-2.5 μm) are present. Sporocysts are ovoid and measure 11.8 μm ± 0.9 μm × 16 μm ± 1.7 μm (10-14 μm × 12-19 μm) with an average L/W ratio of 1.6 (1.0-1.9). A knob-like Stieda body continuous with the sporocyst wall and a trapezoidal compartmentalized substieda body are present. Each sporocyst contained 4 sporozoites and a diffuse sporocyst residuum consisting of many variable-sized granules, some as large as 2 μm. This is the second description of an Isospora species in New World warblers (Passeriformes: Parulidae) and the first report of Isospora from both the rufous-capped warbler and ovenbird.

  19. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium (Apicomplexa) in children and cattle in Romania.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Patricia Manuela; Mederle, Narcisa; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Imre, Kalman; Mederle, Ovidiu; Xiao, Lihua; Darabus, Gheorghe; Matos, Olga

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transmission of species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1907 in Timis County, Romania, 48 isolates of Cryptosporidium coccidia from 11 children, 29 calves and eight pigs were characterised by molecular analysis of two loci (SSU rRNA and 60-kDa glycoprotein gene). Overall, 22 isolates were amplified and sequence analyses revealed that all isolates were Cryptosporidium parvum Tyzzer, 1912. Two subtype families were identified, IIa and IId. Subtype IIdA22G1 (n = 4) was the single C. parvum subtype found in children. Subtypes found in calves included IIdA27G1 (n = 8), a novel subtype, IIdA25G1 (n = 5), IIdA22G1 (n = 2), IIdA21G1a (n = 1), and IIaA16G1R1 (n = 1). Subtype IIdA26G1 was found in a pig. These results were significantly different from previous Romanian reports, as the five subtypes of family IId identified in this study were never identified previously in this country. Thus, cattle may be a source of Cryptosporidium infections for humans and the transmission dynamics of C. parvum in Romania is more complex than previously believed.

  20. Isospora troglodytes n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a new coccidian species from wrens of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Shamus P; Yabsley, Michael J; Fox, Julie M; McGraw, Sabrina N; Hernandez, Sonia M

    2012-05-01

    Nineteen (91%) of 21 rufous-and-white wrens (Thryothorus rufalbus) and five (71%) of seven plain wrens (Cantorchilus modestus) sampled from Costa Rica were positive for a new species of Isospora. Oocysts have a thin, smooth, double, colorless wall and measure 20.1 ± 1.4 × 23.4 ± 1.5 μm (18-24 × 20-26 μm) with an average length-width ratio of 1.2 μm. Sporocysts are ovoid, measure 9.5 ± 0.9 × 15.5 ± 1.1 μm (7-12 × 12-18 μm) with an average length-width ratio of 1.6 μm. A nipple-like steida body continuous with the sporocyst wall and a prominent oval-shaped substeida body are present. In addition to the four sporozoites, a single compact sporocyst residuum was present in each sporocyst. This is the first description of an Isospora species from the family Troglodytidae and the first report of Isospora from the rufous-and-white wren and plain wren.

  1. Sarcocystis dehongensis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinwen; Wen, Tao; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Tingting; Esch, Gerald W; Liang, Yu; Li, Hongliang; Huang, Si

    2017-08-01

    Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is the intermediate host for at least four species of Sarcocystis: S. fusiformis, S. buffalonis, S. levinei, and S. sinensis/S. dubeyi. Here, a new species, Sarcocystis dehongensis, is reported in 51 of 756 (6.7%) water buffaloes in China. By light microscopy, the cysts of S. dehongensis were macroscopic, up to 18.5 mm long and 95 μm in diameter; 4.9-11.9 μm villous protrusions extended beyond the sarcocyst wall. Using transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had lancet- or leaf-like protrusions in longitudinal section, but the cross section showed that the protrusions appeared as mushroom-like in shape with a core of tightly packed microtubules, similar to "type 24." BLAST searches revealed that S. dehongensis shared the most similarities with the 18S rDNA sequence of S. hardangeri (92.4%) and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequence of S. ovalis (81.0%), whereas no sequences in GenBank were found to be significantly similar to the ITS-1 region of S. dehongensis. A phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rDNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences suggested that S. dehongensis was closely related to Sarcocystis species from cervids that employ corvids as definitive hosts.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences from five Eimeria species (Apicomplexa; Coccidia; Eimeriidae) infecting domestic turkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Barta, John R

    2014-07-17

    Clinical and subclinical coccidiosis is cosmopolitan and inflicts significant losses to the poultry industry globally. Seven named Eimeria species are responsible for coccidiosis in turkeys: Eimeria dispersa; Eimeria meleagrimitis; Eimeria gallopavonis; Eimeria meleagridis; Eimeria adenoeides; Eimeria innocua; and, Eimeria subrotunda. Although attempts have been made to characterize these parasites molecularly at the nuclear 18S rDNA and ITS loci, the maternally-derived and mitotically replicating mitochondrial genome may be more suited for species level molecular work; however, only limited sequence data are available for Eimeria spp. infecting turkeys. The purpose of this study was to sequence and annotate the complete mitochondrial genomes from 5 Eimeria species that commonly infect the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Six single-oocyst derived cultures of five Eimeria species infecting turkeys were PCR-amplified and sequenced completely prior to detailed annotation. Resulting sequences were aligned and used in phylogenetic analyses (BI, ML, and MP) that included complete mitochondrial genomes from 16 Eimeria species or concatenated CDS sequences from each genome. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences were obtained for Eimeria adenoeides Guelph, 6211 bp; Eimeria dispersa Briston, 6238 bp; Eimeria meleagridis USAR97-01, 6212 bp; Eimeria meleagrimitis USMN08-01, 6165 bp; Eimeria gallopavonis Weybridge, 6215 bp; and Eimeria gallopavonis USKS06-01, 6215 bp). The order, orientation and CDS lengths of the three protein coding genes (COI, COIII and CytB) as well as rDNA fragments encoding ribosomal large and small subunit rRNA were conserved among all sequences. Pairwise sequence identities between species ranged from 88.1% to 98.2%; sequence variability was concentrated within CDS or between rDNA fragments (where indels were common). No phylogenetic reconstruction supported monophyly of Eimeria species infecting turkeys; Eimeria dispersa may have arisen via host switching from another avian host. Phylogenetic analyses suggest E. necatrix and E. tenella are related distantly to other Eimeria of chickens. Mitochondrial genomes of Eimeria species sequenced to date are highly conserved with regard to gene content and structure. Nonetheless, complete mitochondrial genome sequences and, particularly the three CDS, possess sufficient sequence variability for differentiating Eimeria species of poultry. The mitochondrial genome sequences are highly suited for molecular diagnostics and phylogenetics of coccidia and, potentially, genetic markers for molecular epidemiology.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences from five Eimeria species (Apicomplexa; Coccidia; Eimeriidae) infecting domestic turkeys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical and subclinical coccidiosis is cosmopolitan and inflicts significant losses to the poultry industry globally. Seven named Eimeria species are responsible for coccidiosis in turkeys: Eimeria dispersa; Eimeria meleagrimitis; Eimeria gallopavonis; Eimeria meleagridis; Eimeria adenoeides; Eimeria innocua; and, Eimeria subrotunda. Although attempts have been made to characterize these parasites molecularly at the nuclear 18S rDNA and ITS loci, the maternally-derived and mitotically replicating mitochondrial genome may be more suited for species level molecular work; however, only limited sequence data are available for Eimeria spp. infecting turkeys. The purpose of this study was to sequence and annotate the complete mitochondrial genomes from 5 Eimeria species that commonly infect the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Methods Six single-oocyst derived cultures of five Eimeria species infecting turkeys were PCR-amplified and sequenced completely prior to detailed annotation. Resulting sequences were aligned and used in phylogenetic analyses (BI, ML, and MP) that included complete mitochondrial genomes from 16 Eimeria species or concatenated CDS sequences from each genome. Results Complete mitochondrial genome sequences were obtained for Eimeria adenoeides Guelph, 6211 bp; Eimeria dispersa Briston, 6238 bp; Eimeria meleagridis USAR97-01, 6212 bp; Eimeria meleagrimitis USMN08-01, 6165 bp; Eimeria gallopavonis Weybridge, 6215 bp; and Eimeria gallopavonis USKS06-01, 6215 bp). The order, orientation and CDS lengths of the three protein coding genes (COI, COIII and CytB) as well as rDNA fragments encoding ribosomal large and small subunit rRNA were conserved among all sequences. Pairwise sequence identities between species ranged from 88.1% to 98.2%; sequence variability was concentrated within CDS or between rDNA fragments (where indels were common). No phylogenetic reconstruction supported monophyly of Eimeria species infecting turkeys; Eimeria dispersa may have arisen via host switching from another avian host. Phylogenetic analyses suggest E. necatrix and E. tenella are related distantly to other Eimeria of chickens. Conclusions Mitochondrial genomes of Eimeria species sequenced to date are highly conserved with regard to gene content and structure. Nonetheless, complete mitochondrial genome sequences and, particularly the three CDS, possess sufficient sequence variability for differentiating Eimeria species of poultry. The mitochondrial genome sequences are highly suited for molecular diagnostics and phylogenetics of coccidia and, potentially, genetic markers for molecular epidemiology. PMID:25034633

  4. Cytology of Leidyana canadensis (apicomplexa: eugregarinida) in Lambdina fiscellaria fiscellaria larvae (lepidoptera: geometridae).

    PubMed

    Lucarotti, C J

    2000-02-01

    The eugregarine Leidyana canadensis infects the larval gut of the eastern hemlock looper, Lambdina fiscellaria fiscellaria. Guts of infected larvae were chemically fixed, embedded in epoxy resin, and sectioned for light and electron microscopy to describe the cytology of L. canadensis and its pathology in the larval host. Oocysts of L. canadensis are ingested by larval hemlock looper. Trophozoites emerge from the oocysts, pass through the peritrophic membrane into the ectoperitrophic space, and attach to the epithelium of the midgut by means of an apical epimerite. The epimerite does not actually penetrate the affected epithelial cell; instead, it causes an invagination of the plasma membrane of the cell. The center of the epimerite contains membrane cisternae, and mitochondria line its periphery. Microtubules and mitochondria in the host cell cytoplasm surround the epimerite. At the light microscopic level, there appeared to be septa between the epimerite and the protomerite and between the protomerite and the deutomerite; however, in the electron microscope, no septa were evident. Only differences in the concentrations and nature of the inclusions in the cytoplasms of these three regions were apparent. The deutomerite contains a single nucleus in the central-posterior area. After an undetermined period, the epimerite detaches from the host gut epithelium and is withdrawn into the protomerite, and the trophozoites float freely in the ectoperitrophic space before differentiating into gamonts. Division of the single, large nucleus into numerous small nuclei appears to occur prior to syzygy. Gamonts pair and a cyst wall is laid down around them, forming a gametocyst. Oocysts are extruded from mature gametocysts, in chains, through sporoducts.

  5. Effect of gregarines (Apicomplexa: Sporozoa) on survival and weight loss of Victorwithius similis (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones).

    PubMed

    Bollatti, Fedra; Ceballos, Alejandra

    2014-03-01

    Gregarines are common intestinal parasites of numerous invertebrate groups. Their effects on host viability and development have been a matter of debate. Although they may not be lethal to the host, they can be harmless commensals, by affecting adaptive traits, or have a beneficial relationship with the host. This study focused on determining prevalence, intensity, and change in infection intensity over time by septate gregarines, and monitoring the effects on survival and weight loss in the pseudoscorpion Victorwithius similis. Individuals (n=24 females, n=55 males and n=41 tritonymphs) were captured in the field, transported to the vivarium and bred under laboratory conditions. A high prevalence of infection was found, with 77.27% of females, 62.50% of males and 73.53% of tritonymphs harboring intense infections. Of the infected pseudoscorpions, 62% of females, 58% of males and 71% of tritonymphs did not show changes in infection intensity over time. The group that maintained intense infections survived longer than those with less intense infections (χ(2)=8.642; p=0.035). Most of the results obtained indicate that relationship studied between gregarines and the pseudoscorpion V. similis might be a case of commensalism. This would explain why the infection level and prevalence was very high, as well as the apparent lack of direct costs to highly infected individuals those with infections.

  6. Comparative surface morphology of marine coelomic gregarines (Apicomplexa, Urosporidae): Pterospora floridiensis and Pterospora schizosoma.

    PubMed

    Landers, Stephen C; Leander, Brian S

    2005-01-01

    Two species in the aseptate gregarine genus Pterospora from the Pacific and Gulf coasts were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, which revealed characteristics not reported in other gregarines. The gamonts of these species had branching trunks that ended in terminal digits, and both species moved by cytoplasmic streaming and peristalsis. Pterospora floridiensis had surface pits and tracts of parallel ridges that bended and connected with one another. Pterospora schizosoma had irregular-shaped surface swellings that were usually arranged in rosette patterns. These unique surface features have not been reported for other gregarines, and are strikingly different from the surface features of many septate and aseptate gregarines that inhabit the intestinal lumena of their hosts and move by gliding. The correlation of Pterospora's unique pellicular features to the habitat and cytoplasmic streaming characteristic of the genus may be significant, and may reflect an adaptation for development in coelomic environments.

  7. Molecular phylogeny and surface morphology of marine aseptate gregarines (Apicomplexa): Selenidium spp. and Lecudina spp.

    PubMed

    Leander, B S; Harper, J T; Keeling, P J

    2003-12-01

    Many aseptate gregarines from marine invertebrate hosts are thought to have retained several plesiomorphic characteristics and are instrumental in understanding the early evolution of intracellular parasitism in apicomplexans and the phylogenetic position of cryptosporidians. We sequenced the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA genes from 2 archigregarines, Selenidium terebellae and Selenidium vivax, and 2 morphotypes of the marine eugregarine Lecudina polymorpha. We also used scanning electron microscopy to investigate the surface morphology of trophozoites from Lecudina tuzetae, Monocystis agilis, the 2 species of Selenidium, and the 2 morphotypes of L. polymorpha. The SSU ribosomal DNA sequences from S. vivax and L. polymorpha had long branch lengths characteristic of other gregarine sequences. However, the sequence from S. terebellae was not exceptionally divergent and consistently emerged as 1 of the earliest 'true' gregarines in phylogenetic analyses. Statistical support for the sister relationship between Cryptosporidium spp. and gregarines was significantly bolstered in analyses including the sequence from S. terebellae but excluding the longest branches in the alignment. Eugregarines formed a monophyletic group with the neogregarine Ophryocystis, suggesting that trophozoites with elaborate cortex folds and gliding motility evolved only once. The trophozoites from the 2 species of Selenidium shared novel transverse striations but differed from one another in overall cell morphologies and writhing behavior.

  8. Effects of Psychodiella sergenti (Apicomplexa, Eugregarinorida) on its natural host Phlebotomus sergenti (Diptera, Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Lantova, Lucie; Svobodova, Milena; Volf, Petr

    2011-09-01

    Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera, Psychodidae) are important vectors of human pathogens. Moreover, they possess monoxenous parasites, including gregarines of the genus Psychodiella Votypka, Lantova, and Volf, which can negatively affect laboratory-reared colonies, and have been considered as potential candidates in biological control. In this study, effects of the gregarine Psychodiella sergenti Lantova, Volf, and Votypka on its natural host Phlebotomus sergenti Parrot were evaluated. The gregarines increased the mortality of immature sand fly stages, and this effect was even more apparent when the infected larvae were reared in more dense conditions. Similarly, the gregarines negatively affected the survival of adult males and females. However, no impact was observed on the mortality of blood-fed females, the proportion of females that laid eggs, and the number of eggs oviposited. The 10-times higher infection dose (50 versus five gregarine oocysts per one sand fly egg) led to -10 times more gamonts in fourth-instar larvae and two or three times more gamonts in females and males, respectively. Our study clearly shows that Ps. sergenti is harmful to its natural host under laboratory conditions. However, its potential for use in biological control is questionable as a result of several factors, including this parasite's strict host specificity.

  9. The development of Psychodiella sergenti (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida) in Phlebotomus sergenti (Diptera: Psychodidae)

    PubMed Central

    LANTOVA, LUCIE; VOLF, PETR

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Psychodiella sergenti is a recently described specific pathogen of the sand fly Phlebotomus sergenti, the main vector of Leishmania tropica. The aim of this study was to examine the life cycle of Ps. sergenti in various developmental stages of the sand fly host. The microscopical methods used include scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy of native preparations and histological sections stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction. Psychodiella sergenti oocysts were observed on the chorion of sand fly eggs. In 1st instar larvae, sporozoites were located in the ectoperitrophic space of the intestine. No intracellular stages were found. In 4th instar larvae, Ps. sergenti was mostly located in the ectoperitrophic space of the intestine of the larvae before defecation and in the intestinal lumen of the larvae after defecation. In adults, the parasite was recorded in the body cavity, where the sexual development was triggered by a bloodmeal intake. Psychodiella sergenti has several unique features. It develops sexually exclusively in sand fly females that took a bloodmeal, and its sporozoites bear a distinctive conoid (about 700 nm long), which is more than 4 times longer than conoids of the mosquito gregarines. PMID:22313575

  10. Sarcocystis cafferi, n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four species of Sarcocystis are currently recognized in the Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): Sarcocystis fusiformis with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. buffalonis also with macrocysts and cats as definitive hosts, S. levinei with microcysts and dogs as definitive hosts, and S. dub...

  11. Life cycle of Cystoisospora felis (Coccidia: Apicomplexa) in cats and mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cystoisospora felis is a ubiquitous apicomplexan protozoon of cats. The endogenous development of C. felis was studied in cats after feeding them infected mice. For this, 5 newborn cats were killed at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h after having been fed mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens of mice that wer...

  12. Two new species of Sarcocystis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) infecting the wolverine (Gulo gulo) from Nunavut, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Reichard, Mason V; Torretti, Luigi; Garvon, Jason M; Sundar, N; Grigg, M E

    2010-10-01

    Infection with Sarcocystis species is common in many species of animals, but it has not yet been reported in wolverines (Gulo gulo). Histological sections of tongues from 41 wolverines in the Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut, Canada, were examined for sarcocysts. Sarcocysts were found in 33 (80.4%) wolverines. Two structurally distinct types of sarcocysts were found. Type A sarcocysts were thin (<1 µm thick) walled. Ultrastructurally, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (Pvm) had minute undulations, but it lacked villar protrusions and was not invaginated into the granular layer. The bradyzoites were slender, about 5 × 1 µm in size. Structurally, these sarcocysts were distinct from known species of Sarcocystis and possessed a novel 18S and ITS-1 sequence, sharing 98% and 78% sequence similarity with Sarcocystis canis . A new species name, Sarcocystis kalvikus, is proposed for type A sarcocysts. In contrast, type B sarcocysts had relatively thicker (about 2 µm) cyst walls and larger bradyzoites, each about 10 × 2-3 µm. Ultrastructurally, the Pvm on the sarcocyst wall had villar protrusions that were either mushroom-like or sloping. Molecular analysis identified a unique 18S and ITS-1 sequence that placed them in a clade within the Sarcocystidae. Based on histology, TEM, and genetic data, the new name, Sarcocystis kitikmeotensis, is proposed. Sarcocystis kalvikus was found in 14 (34.1%), S. kitikmeotensis was found in 7 (17%), and both species were found in 12 (29.2%) of 41 wolverines.

  13. Pampas fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus) new intermediate host of Sarcocystis svanai (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae).

    PubMed

    Scioscia, Nathalia P; Olmos, Leandro; Gorosábel, Antonella; Bernad, Lucía; Pedrana, Julieta; Hecker, Yanina P; Gual, Ignacio; Laura Gos, M; Denegri, Guillermo M; Moore, Dadín P; Moré, Gastón

    2017-06-01

    Several Sarcocystis spp. have carnivores as definitive host and sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores (intermediate host). However, sarcocysts have been found in muscles of wild and domestic carnivores suggesting they are intermediate host for some Sarcocystis spp. Here, we report mature sarcocysts in the muscles of Pampas fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus). A total of 36 free-living foxes were analyzed. Different skeletal muscles were assessed by microscopic and molecular methods. Cysts and/or DNA of Sarcocystis sp. were detected in 61.1% (22/36) foxes. Histopathology revealed the presence of sarcocysts in 52.8% (19/36) foxes. The tongue and masseter were the muscles more frequently infected. Of all the samples processed by homogenization of pooled muscles of each animal, 45.4% (10/22) evidenced muscle cysts and 68.2% (15/22) resulted positives by PCR. Individual cysts obtained from the ten positive samples in direct microscopic examination were all positive by PCR. Five amplicons from individual cysts from different samples were selected for sequencing together with four PCR products obtained from the pooled muscles. All nine sequences shared a high identity among them (99.8-100%) and showed the highest identity by BLAST (99%) with a S. svanai sequence (KM362428) from a North American dog. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was thin (<1μm), had minute undulations, with tiny evaginations and without evident villar protrusions. The cyst wall type is referred as "type 1". Sarcocystis svanai infects L. gymnocercus with a high prevalence and the presence of mature sarcocysts suggests the role of the Pampas fox as natural intermediate host. The definitive host of S. svanai remains unknown.

  14. Eimeria collieie n. sp. (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) from the western long-necked turtle (Chelodina colliei).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elloit, Aileen; Lee, Elvina; Ryan, Una

    2015-07-01

    A new species, Eimeria collieie n. sp., is described from the western long-necked turtle (Chelodina colliei). Sporulated oocysts (n = 35) are spherical to subspherical, with colourless single layer oocyst wall, 0.6 ± 0.2 (0.4-0.7) µm thick. Oocyst with elongated ellipsoid sporocysts. Oocyst length, 29.8 ± 0.4 (28.2-31.0) µm; oocyst width, 29.4 ± 0.3 (28.0-30.8) µm; oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.0 ± 0.03 (1.0-1.05). Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts with sporocyst residuum and 2 sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 21.6 ± 0.4 (21.2-22.0) µm; sporocyst width, 6.0 ± 0.3 (5.7-6.3) µm; sporocyst L/W ratio, 3.6 ± 0.2 (3.4-3.8). Stieda, parastieda and substieda bodies were absent. Sporozoite length, 14.0 ± 0.2 (13.8-14.2) µm; sporozoite width, 2.6 ± 0.2 (2.4-2.8) µm; sporozoite L/W ratio, 5.46 ± 0.10 (5.4-5.6). Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci: the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the 18S rRNA locus, E. collieie n. sp. shared 96.4% and 98.3% genetic similarity to E. ranae (GenBank accession number: EU717219) and E. arnyi (AY613853) respectively. At the 28S rRNA locus, E. collieie n. sp. shared 91.6% genetic similarity to E. papillata (GenBank accession number: GU593706) and phylogenetic analysis at this locus placed E. collieie n. sp. in aseparateclade. At the COI locus, E. collieie n. sp. shared 92.7% genetic similarity to Eimeria setonicis (GenBankaccession number: KF225638) from a quokka (Setonix brachyurus) in Western Australia. Reptile-derived sequences were not available for the 28S rRNA and the COI loci. Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite that, to date, has only been found in western long-necked turtles.

  15. Reclassification of Eimeria pogonae Walden (2009) as Choleoeimeria pogonae comb. nov. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Klaudiusz Oktawian; Tomczuk, Krzysztof; Lojszczyk-Szczepaniak, Anna; Lopuszynski, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    The presented paper provides a reclassification of Eimeria pogonae from Pogona vitticeps into the correct genus Choleoeimeria. A description of exogenous and endogenous stages of biliary coccidium is given. Sporulation of the oocysts was endogenous. The mature oocysts contained four sporocysts each with two sporozoites. Oocysts were ellipsoidal in shape, with average length/width ratio 1.7 and measured 28.4 (SD1.5) × 16.8 (SD 1.5). The micropyle, residuum, and polar granules were absent from the sporulated oocysts. Ovoidal in shape, sporosysts without Steida bodies contained residuum and two elongated and boat-shaped sporozoites. The endogenous stages of the coccidia were located mainly in the epithelium of bile ducts; however, single-epithelium cells of the gallbladder were also infected.

  16. Phylogeny, Diversity, Distribution, and Host Specificity of Haemoproteus spp. (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae) of Palaearctic Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Hossein; Kvičerová, Jana; Dvořáková, Nela; Mikulíček, Peter; Sharifi, Mozafar; Kautman, Matej; Maršíková, Aneta; Široký, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    A complex wide-range study on the haemoproteid parasites of chelonians was carried out for the first time. Altogether, 811 samples from four tortoise species from an extensive area between western Morocco and eastern Afghanistan and between Romania and southern Syria were studied by a combination of microscopic and molecular-genetic methods. Altogether 160 Haemoproteus-positive samples were gathered in the area between central Anatolia and eastern Afghanistan. According to variability in the cytochrome b gene, two monophyletic evolutionary lineages were distinguished; by means of microscopic analysis it was revealed that they corresponded to two previously described species-Haemoproteus anatolicum and Haemoproteus caucasica. Their distribution areas overlap only in a narrow strip along the Zagros Mts. range in Iran. This fact suggests the involvement of two different vector species with separated distribution. Nevertheless, no vectors were confirmed. According to phylogenetic analyses, H. caucasica represented a sister group to H. anatolicum, and both of them were most closely related to H. pacayae and H. peltocephali, described from South American river turtles. Four unique haplotypes were revealed in the population of H. caucasica, compared with seven haplotypes in H. anatolicum. Furthermore, H. caucasica was detected in two tortoise species, Testudo graeca and Testudo horsfieldii, providing evidence that Haemoproteus is not strictly host-specific to the tortoise host species.

  17. Sarcocystis heydorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Protozoa) with cattle (Bos taurus) and human (Homo sapiens) cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for four species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli. Of these four species, mature sarcocysts of S. cruzi are thin-walled (< 1µm) whereas S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli have thick walls (4 µm or more). Here we describe ...

  18. Besnoitia neotomofelis n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) from the southern plains woodrat ( Neotoma micropus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Yabsley, M J

    2010-10-01

    Certain species of the protozoan genus Besnoitia cause clinical disease in livestock and wildlife. In the present paper a new species, Besnoitia neotomofelis is described from the southern planes woodrat (Neotoma micropus). The parasite was detected by bioassay of woodrat tissues in outbred Swiss Webster mice in an attempt to isolate Toxoplasma gondii. Initially, the organism was misdiagnosed as T. gondii because it was highly pathogenic for mice and its tachyzoites resembled T. gondii tachyzoites. Further studies revealed that it differed structurally and biologically from T. gondii. Tachyzoites were successfully cultivated and maintained in vitro in bovine monocytes and African green monkey kidney cells, and in vivo in mice. Non-dividing, uninucleate tachyzoites were approximately 1 x 5 μm in size. Longitudinally-cut bradyzoites in tissue sections measured 1.5-1.6 x 7.7-9.3 μm. Tissue cysts were microscopic, up to 210 μm long, and were infective orally to mice. Cats fed tissue cysts shed unsporulated 13 x 14 μm sized oocysts. All mice inoculated with B. neotomofelis died of acute besnoitiosis, irrespective of the dose, and Norwegian rats became infected but remained asymptomatic. Entero-epithelial stages (schizonts, gamonts) were found in cats fed tissue cysts. Large (up to 40 x 50 μm) first-generation schizonts developed in the lamina propria of the small intestine of cats. A second generation of small sized (8 μm) schizonts containing 4-8 merozoites was detected in enterocytes of the small intestine. Gamonts and oocysts were seen in goblet cells of the small intestinal epithelium. Tachyzoites were present in mesenteric lymph nodes of cats. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that B. neotomofelis was related to other Besnoitia species from rodents, rabbits, and opossums. Besnoitia neotomofelis is distinct from the 3 other species of Besnoitia, B. wallacei, B. darlingi and B. oryctofelisi that utilize cats as a definitive host.

  19. First report of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) in caecilians, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Harris, D James; Damas-Moreira, Isabel; Maia, João P M C; Perera, Ana

    2014-02-01

    Hepatozoon spp. are identified for the first time in the amphibian order Gymnophiona, or caecilians, from the Seychelles island of Silhouette. Estimate of relationships derived from partial 18S rRNA gene sequences indicate these are not related to Hepatozoon spp. from frogs or to other Hepatozoon spp. from reptiles in the Seychelles. Assessment of mature gamonts from blood smears indicate that these can be recognized as a new species, Hepatozoon seychellensis n. sp.

  20. Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) of the lowland European bison Bison bonasus bonasus (L.).

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M; Jóźwikowski, Michał; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W

    2014-05-28

    Coprological studies conducted between 2007 and 2011 in free-roaming and captive European bison Bison bonasus (Linnaeus, 1758) from Poland revealed 11 species of Eimeria infecting the host, i.e., Eimeria alabamensis, Eimeria auburnensis, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria brasiliensis, Eimeria bukidnonensis, Eimeria canadensis, Eimeria cylindrica, Eimeria ellipsoidalis, Eimeria pellita, Eimeria subspherica, and Eimeria zuernii. The typical host for all isolated species is cattle. The most prevalent species was E. bovis (29.7%), while E. brasiliensis was the rarest (0.5%). Five of the species (E. bovis, E. bukidnonensis, E. canadensis, E. ellipsoidalis, E. zuernii) have been observed previously in bison by other authors, 3 species were noticed by us in bison previously (E. alabamensis, E. cylindrica, E. pellita), while for 3 species (E. auburnensis, E. brasiliensis, and E. subspherica) these are new host and locality records. Oocysts of two species (E. brasiliensis, E. bukidnonensis) were noted only in the feces of bison kept in captivity. Moreover, the prevalence of positive samples was higher in the group of captive animals (55.4%) in comparison with the free-roaming herds (29.5%); although, oocysts per gram (OPG), counted with the conventional McMaster technique, was comparable in both groups, reaching maximally 6550 and 6400 in free-roaming and captive individuals, respectively. Overall, 142 fecal samples from 424 samples examined were positive for Eimeria (prevalence=33.5%). Age-related analysis revealed a higher percentage of Eimeria spp. positive samples and higher OPG values in bison under 1 year old as compared to older individuals (93.3% and 50-4050; 37.3% and 50-550, respectively). Additionally, greater eimerian species diversity was present among calves in comparison with older bison. In most cases single-species infections were observed (59.8%) with a predominance of E. bovis (85.9%). Multiple-species infections consisted of 2-7 species, usually including E. bovis. The observation was made that E. bovis infection appears conducive to the host acquiring more eimerian species. No symptoms of clinical coccidiosis occurred during the study.

  1. Three new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Skinks, Lipinia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Oceania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September 1991 and March 1993, 25 moth skinks (Lipinia noctua) were collected from various localities on the Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and Vanuatu and examined for coccidians. In addition, a single Roux's lipinia skink (Lipinia rouxi) was collected from PNG and examined for coccidia. Sixteen (64%) L. noctua were found to harbor 2 new eimerians, and L. rouxi harbored another new Eimeria sp. Oocysts of Eimeria lipinia n. sp. from 9 (36%) L. noctua from the Cook Islands, Fiji, and PNG were subspherical with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 18.6 × 16.9 μm, with a L/W ratio of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria melanesia n. sp. from 6 (24%) L. noctua from Fiji and Vanuatu and a single L. rouxi from PNG were subspherical to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 19.8 × 17.5 μm, and L/W was 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria lessoni n. sp. from 1 (4%) L. noctua from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall and measured 28.1 × 15.7 μm, and L/W was 1.8. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single polar granule was present. These represent the third report of Eimeria spp. reported from any host on PNG and the only coccidians, to our knowledge, ever described from L. noctua and L. rouxi and from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu.

  2. Malabsorption syndrome observed in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana (Protista: Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Gestal, C; Páez de la Cadena, M; Pascual, S

    2002-08-15

    Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana were collected from an open-water culture system in the Ría of Aldán (NW Spain). Digestive tract infection values were determined with the use of a Neubauer chamber by counting the number of A. octopiana sporocysts. After determining enzyme activity values by the colorimetric Api-Zym system Biomerieux, one representative enzyme of glycosidases, peptid hydrolases and phosphoric hydrolases showing high activity was spectrophotometrically analysed. The enzymes were maltase and leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP) involved in the absorption process, and acid phosphatase, a lysosomic enzyme, respectively. Enzymatic activity of maltase and LAP decreased significantly, with increased sporocyst counts. However, acid phosphatase activity increased with severity of infection, indicating the presence of degradative enzymes from phagocytic cells in the infected area. A detrimental effect on gastrointestinal function may result from a decrease or malfunction of absorption enzymes. The results suggest a malabsorption syndrome resulting from parasitic infection.

  3. Effects of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on chickens highly infected with Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensive poultry production systems depend on chemoprophylaxis with anticoccidial drugs to combat infection. A floor-pen study was conducted to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on Eimeria tenella infection. Five experimental groups were established: negative control (untreated, unchallenged); positive control (untreated, challenged); a group medicated with 125 ppm lasalocid and challenged; a group medicated with A. annua leaf powder at 1.5% in feed and challenged; and a group treated with the mixed oils of A. annua and Foeniculum vulgare in equal parts, 7.5% in water and challenged. The effects of A. annua and oil extract of A. annua + F. vulgare on E. tenella infection were assessed by clinical signs, mortality, fecal oocyst output, faeces, lesion score, weight gain, and feed conversion. Results Clinical signs were noticed only in three chickens from the lasalocid group, six from the A. annua group, and nine from the A. annua + F. vulgare group, but were present in 19 infected chickens from the positive control group. Bloody diarrhea was registered in only two chickens from A. annua group, but in 17 chickens from the positive control group. Mortality also occurred in the positive control group (7/20). Chickens treated with A. annua had a significant reduction in faecal oocysts (95.6%; P = 0.027) and in lesion score (56.3%; P = 0.005) when compared to the positive control. At the end of experiment, chickens treated with A. annua leaf powder had the highest body weight gain (68.2 g/day), after the negative control group, and the best feed conversion (1.85) among all experimental groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that A. annua leaf powder (Aa-p), at 1.5% of the daily diet post-infection, can be a valuable alternative for synthetic coccidiostats, such as lasalocid. PMID:24731599

  4. Effects of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on chickens highly infected with Eimeria tenella (phylum Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Drăgan, Liviu; Györke, Adriana; Ferreira, Jorge F S; Pop, Ioan A; Dunca, Ioan; Drăgan, Maria; Mircean, Viorica; Dan, Iosif; Cozma, Vasile

    2014-04-15

    Intensive poultry production systems depend on chemoprophylaxis with anticoccidial drugs to combat infection. A floor-pen study was conducted to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on Eimeria tenella infection. Five experimental groups were established: negative control (untreated, unchallenged); positive control (untreated, challenged); a group medicated with 125 ppm lasalocid and challenged; a group medicated with A. annua leaf powder at 1.5% in feed and challenged; and a group treated with the mixed oils of A. annua and Foeniculum vulgare in equal parts, 7.5% in water and challenged. The effects of A. annua and oil extract of A. annua + F. vulgare on E. tenella infection were assessed by clinical signs, mortality, fecal oocyst output, faeces, lesion score, weight gain, and feed conversion. Clinical signs were noticed only in three chickens from the lasalocid group, six from the A. annua group, and nine from the A. annua + F. vulgare group, but were present in 19 infected chickens from the positive control group. Bloody diarrhea was registered in only two chickens from A. annua group, but in 17 chickens from the positive control group. Mortality also occurred in the positive control group (7/20). Chickens treated with A. annua had a significant reduction in faecal oocysts (95.6%; P = 0.027) and in lesion score (56.3%; P = 0.005) when compared to the positive control. At the end of experiment, chickens treated with A. annua leaf powder had the highest body weight gain (68.2 g/day), after the negative control group, and the best feed conversion (1.85) among all experimental groups. Our results suggest that A. annua leaf powder (Aa-p), at 1.5% of the daily diet post-infection, can be a valuable alternative for synthetic coccidiostats, such as lasalocid.

  5. A new Caryospora coccidian species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2014-10-01

    A new Caryospora coccidian species is described from the laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae). Sporulated oocysts (n=30) are ovoid in shape with a smooth, colourless, bilayered oocyst wall and measure 31.4×29.3 (30.0-32.0×28.0-31.0) μm with a shape index of 1.1. Oocysts contain one spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocyst, 21.2×20.6 (20.0-24.0×20.0-21.0) μm. A spheroidal shaped sporocyst residuum is present; micropyle, Stieda, substieda and parastieda bodies are absent. Vermiform sporozoites (n=8) are arranged either parallel or randomly in the sporocyst, measuring 17.0×4.8 (16.0-18.0×4.0-6.0) μm, with a L/W ratio of 3.5. There is a large spheroidal, posterior refractile body in the middle of the sporozoite. Morphologically, this new species is most similar to Caryospora. The prevalence of this parasite was 6.7% in birds sampled in the morning and 33.3% from those sampled after midday. Further molecular characterisation was conducted at two loci; the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). At the 18S locus, the new species of Caryospora was most closely related to Besnoitia besnoiti (99.2% similarity) and Hammondia triffittae (98.8% similarity). Although, no 28S partial sequences from Caryospora were available in GenBank, the highest similarity was with B.besnoiti (91.3%). Based on morphological and molecular data, this coccidian parasite is a new species that to date has not been reported. The new coccidian parasite is named Caryospora daceloe n. sp. after its host D. novaeguineae (the laughing kookaburra). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from skinks Emoia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Fiji and Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September and October 1991 and again during September 1992, skinks (Emoia spp.) were collected from various localities on Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and examined for coccidians. One of 4 (25%) De Vis' emo skinks (Emoia pallidiceps) from PNG harbored an undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora grinbikpelapalai n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal, 18.1 × 14.9 (17–20 × 14–16) μm, with a bilayered wall and a length/width index (L/W) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a prominent polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.7 × 7.6 (10–11 × 7–8) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of large scattered globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora grinbikpelapalai was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Pope's emo skinks (Emoia popei) from PNG. One of 13 (8%) white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), from Fiji, was passing another undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora casei n. sp. were elongate, 31.8 × 21.3 (28–35 × 18–24) μm, with a bilayered wall and a L/W index of 1.5. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were all absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 15.3 × 10.6 (14–16 × 10–12) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of scattered globules among sporozoites or as a cluster surrounding sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora casei was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor) from Fiji. This represents the first report of coccidia from Emoia spp. and, to our knowledge, the initial documentation of reptilian coccidia from herpetofauna from Papua New Guinea.

  7. Description of four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from brown kiwi, Apteryx mantelli, in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Morgan, K J; Pomroy, W E; Howe, L; Alley, M R; Castro, I

    2017-04-03

    This study used morphological techniques to describe and name four new species of coccidia from the brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli). Four distinct eimerian oocyst species were recovered that we describe as new species. The largest of these, Eimeria paraurii n. sp. measured 32.2 × 19.8 μm and is morphologically similar to gametocytes previously described histologically in colorectal polyps (Morgan et al. in Parasitol Res 111(4):1689-1699, 2012). Eimeria apteryxii n. sp. measured 23.9 × 14.9 μm and is similar to renal oocysts described histologically in brown, rowi (A. rowii) and Haast tokoeka kiwi (A. australis "Haast") (Morgan et al. in Avian Pathol 42(2):137-146, 2013). Eimeria kiwii n. sp. measured 14.8 × 13.9 μm and resembled gametocytes described previously in kiwi intestinal epithelial cells in brown kiwi (Morgan et al. in Parasitol Res 111(4):1689-1699, 2012). Eimeria mantellii n. sp. measured 17.8 × 10.7 μm and did not appear similar to any coccidia previously described in histological studies in kiwi. These are the first species of Eimeria to be described and named from brown kiwi. Because the morphological descriptions in the present study were determined from a limited number of kiwi droppings from two geographical locations, it is likely that these represent only a portion of Eimeria species present in other populations of both brown kiwi and other Apteryx species from around New Zealand.

  8. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp. (Testudines: Testudinidae), from the Dallas Zoo.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Roberts, David T

    2014-02-01

    During January 1994, feces from a captive juvenile Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp., from the Dallas Zoo, Dallas County, Texas was examined for coccidia. The tortoise was found to harbor an eimerian which is described as new. Sporulated oocysts of Eimeria iversoni n. sp. were ovoidal with a smooth, single-layered wall (∼ 0.5-0.8) that measured (L × W) 13.5 × 10.3 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule(s) were all absent; 2 conical projections were present on 1 end of oocyst and measured 1.0-1.5. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal and measured 8.3 × 4.5 μm, with L/W of 1.8; a Stieda body (∼ 0.5 high) was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent; a sporocyst residuum was composed of 2-5 granules in a compact mass between sporozoites; sporozoites were banana-shaped and measured 9.5 × 2.5 in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is only the second time an eimerian has been reported from Galápagos tortoises.

  9. A new species of Hepatozoon Miller, 1908 (Apicomplexa: Adelerina) from the snake Philodryas nattereri Steindachner (Squamata: Dipsadidae) in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges-Nojosa, Diva M; Borges-Leite, M Juliana; Maia, João P; Zanchi-Silva, Djan; da Rocha Braga, Roberta; Harris, D James

    2017-01-01

    Based on both unique morphological characteristics of the gamont, distinct changes caused to the host erythrocyte and analysis of partial 18S rRNA gene sequences, a new parasite of the genus Hepatozoon Miller, 1908 is described from the snake Philodryas nattereri Steindachner (Squamata: Dipsadidae) in northeastern Brazil. The new species, Hepatozoon musa n. sp., is characterized by large and curved mature gamonts (18.9 ± 0.9 μm in length and 3.8 ± 0.3 μm in width) that considerably engorge infected host erythrocytes and displace the nucleus laterally, which become longer and thinner. Phylogenetic estimates indicate the new species is more closely related to the recently described Hepatozoon cuestensis O'Dwyer, Moço, Paduan, Spenassatto, Silva & Ribolla, 2013, from Brazilian rattlesnakes. These recent findings highlight the need for further studies of Hepatozoon to better determine the biodiversity of this common but poorly-studied parasite group.

  10. The role of gamont entry into erythrocytes in the specificity of Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Adeleida) for their frog hosts.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Cory M; Ogbuah, Christopher T; Smith, Todd G

    2013-12-01

    Hepatozoon species are apicomplexan parasites that infect blood cells and viscera of terrestrial vertebrates. One species, Hepatozoon clamatae, primarily infects green frogs, Rana clamitans , whereas another, Hepatozoon catesbianae, primarily infects bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana , although both species of parasite are capable of infecting either species of frog. The aim of this study was to determine whether the basis for this partial host specificity is manifested at the gamont, or intraerythrocytic, stage of the parasite's life cycle. Blood was drawn from infected frogs and treated in vitro with a saline solution to induce intracellular gamonts to emerge from host erythrocytes. This treated blood was added to in vitro samples of uninfected blood of green frogs and bullfrogs. After 1 hr, samples were analyzed to determine the level of re-entry of the parasites into uninfected erythrocytes. Results obtained using multiple combinations of donor and recipient frogs indicate that extracellular gamonts of both parasite species do not exhibit preference for erythrocytes of 1 frog species over those of another. These results suggest that the basis for the observed host specificity is not determined at the gamont stage and is more likely dependent on another stage in the parasite life cycle.

  11. Eimeria lancasterensis (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the eastern fox squirrel, Sciurus niger (Rodentia: Sciuridae), in north-central Texas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J

    1989-08-01

    Eimeria lancasterensis Joseph, 1969, is reported for the first time from the feces of 10 of 11 (91%) eastern fox squirrels, Sciurus niger ludovicianus, in Dallas and Johnson counties, Texas. Oocyst measurements were similar to those reported previously from the eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis carolinensis, in Massachusetts. Except for our observation of a substieda body, oocyst morphology was identical to the original description of E. lancasterensis.

  12. New species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Thrichomys fosteri and Clyomys laticeps (Rodentia: Echimyidae) of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Wanessa Teixeira Gomes; Viana, Lúcio André; Santos, Filipe Martins; de Oliveira Porfírio, Grasiela Edith; Perdomo, Alessandra Cabral; da Silva, Alanderson Rodrigues; de Sousa, Keyla Carstens Marques; de Oliveira, Michel Angelo Constantino; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; de Andrade, Gisele Braziliano

    2017-09-05

    The echimyid rodents Thrichomys fosteri and Clyomys laticeps are among the most commonly recorded small mammals in the Pantanal wetland of Brazil. These species play important ecological roles since they are the basis of the food chain of some predators and are parasitized by some pathogens. Knowledge of the eimerians that parasitize echimyid rodents in Brazil is absent, and only one report is available for South America. We therefore investigated parasitism by coccidians in the echimyids T. fosteri and C. laticeps in the Pantanal. Using morphological and morphometric features and associated statistical analyses, we describe five new eimerian species parasitizing T. fosteri (Eimeria nhecolandensis n. sp., Eimeria jansenae n. sp., and Eimeria fosteri n. sp.) and C. laticeps (E. nhecolandensis n. sp., Eimeria corumbaensis n. sp., and Eimeria laticeps n. sp.) in different types of infection associations. We document the developmental forms in the tissues, and describe lesions in the enteric tract of some infected animals. We also discuss some approaches regarding epidemiological and ecological data. Our results demonstrate that echimyid rodents in the Brazilian Pantanal are important hosts for the maintenance of enteric coccidia. Moreover, in some circumstances, this parasitism may threaten the health of the hosts.

  13. Coccidian parasites (Apicomplexa) from snakes in the southcentral and southwestern United States: new host and geographic records.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Upton, S J; Trauth, S E; Dixon, J R

    1995-02-01

    Four hundred thirty-five leptotyphlopid, colubrid, elapid, and viperid snakes were collected from various localities in Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, and their feces were examined for coccidian parasites. Of these, 131 (30%) were passing oocysts or sporocysts of at least 1 coccidian; 88 (67%) of the infected snakes had only 1 species of coccidian when they were examined. Aquatic and semiaquatic snakes accounted for 48% of the infections, whereas strictly terrestrial snakes comprised the other 52%. There was more than a 2-fold difference in prevalence among these 2 groups as 63 of 129 (49%) of the aquatic and semiaquatic snakes versus 68 of 306 (22%) of the terrestrial snakes harbored coccidia. Most terrestrial snakes were infected by species of Caryospora and Sarcocystis that are either facultatively or obligatorily heteroxenous. The aquatic and semiaquatic species most often harbored eimerians. Attempts to transmit some of the Sarcocystis spp. experimentally from Crotalus atrox to Mus musculus, Peromyscus leucopus, Peromyscus maniculatus, or Microtus ochrogaster were unsuccessful. This report documents 27 new host and several distributional records for coccidians from snakes in the southcentral and southwestern United States.

  14. Coccidia of New World passerine birds (Aves: Passeriformes): a review of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 and Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Berto, Bruno P; Flausino, Walter; McIntosh, Douglas; Teixeira-Filho, Walter L; Lopes, Carlos W G

    2011-11-01

    In the New World, the avian order Passeriformes comprises 47 families and 2,453 species, yet to date only 21 (45%) of the families and 58 (2%) of the species have been examined for coccidia, and from these only two species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 and 81 species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 have been described. This review contributes to our understanding of the morphology and systematics of coccidian parasites of passeriforms, providing a scientific basis for the identification of sporulated oöcysts recovered from the faeces of passerine birds from North, Central and South America. To this end, the coccidia were organised and grouped according to the family of the host, following the widely recognised concept of family-specificity and the updated systematics of the class Aves. Details of 83 eimeriid species are presented along with an illustration and tabulated data.

  15. The good, the bad and the ugly: Emys trinacris, Placobdella costata and Haemogregarina stepanowi in Sicily (Testudines, Annelida and Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Arizza, Vincenzo; Sacco, Francesco; Russo, Debora; Scardino, Rita; Arculeo, Marco; Vamberger, Melita; Marrone, Federico

    2016-08-18

    Endemic Sicilian pond turtles Emys trinacris Fritz, Fattizzo, Guicking, Tripepi, Pennisi, Lenk, Joger et Wink were examined for the presence of haemogregarine parasites. The presence of haemogregarines, occurring mainly in the microgametocyte stage (13.2 ± 0.12 μm in length and 6.4 ± 0.52 μm in width), was observed in approximately 9% of the sampled E. trinacris. Based on the observed morphology and on the sequencing of nuclear 18S rDNA, we identified the parasite as Haemogregarina stepanowi Danilewsky, 1885. Morphometric study of uninfected and infected red blood cells has shown that H. stepanowi induces different changes in erythrocyte shape depending on the infective stage. The differential count of leukocytes in specimens infected with H. stepanowi showed no significant difference compared with healthy specimens. However, considering the health problems which might be induced by H. stepanowi in the closely related European pond turtle Emys orbicularis (Linneaus), monitoring of the health status of the infected Sicilian populations of E. trinacris is desirable. The restricted distribution of populations of Emys infected with haemogregarines in Sicily is quite puzzling and the possible human-mediated introduction of the parasite in Sicily is briefly discussed.

  16. Microscopic and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon domerguei (Apicomplexa) and Foleyella furcata (Nematoda) in wild endemic reptiles from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P; Crottini, Angelica; Harris, David James

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world's top twelve "megadiversity" hot spots hosting unique and threatened flora and fauna. Parasites are a major component of biodiversity but remain largely uncharacterized in wildlife. In this study we combine microscopic and molecular assessment of hemoparasites in endemic reptile species from Madagascar. We detected three distinct parasites: the apicomplexans Hepatozoon and Sarcocystis, and filarial nematodes. The prevalence and intensity of these apicomplexans were low overall, while microfilarial infections in chameleons were relatively high. We detected mixed infections of two Hepatozoon haplotypes in Madagascarophis colubrinus, and of Hepatozoon and microfilariae in a Furcifer sp. Phylogenetic analyses of Hepatozoon showed evidence of prey-predator transmission, with identical sequences found in the snakes M. colubrinus and Ithycyphus oursi, and their prey Furcifer sp. Based on previous studies regarding the life cycle of Hepatozoon domerguei Landau, Chabaud, Michel, and Brygoo, 1970 in these hosts and due to their morphological similarity, we propose that this Hepatozoon haplotype is Hepatozoon domerguei. Future studies, including the examination of invertebrate hosts, are needed to verify this preliminary taxonomic identification. A distinct hemogregarine haplotype was found in Oplurus sp., which displayed morphologically different gametocytes, some of which were apparently inside leukocytes. The Sarcocystis identified from Tracheloptychus petersi was identical to that reported in a North African snake, indicating that the same lineage is found in geographically distinct regions. By combining morphological and genetic information, Foleyella furcata (Linstow, 1899) filarial nematodes were identified in several Furcifer chameleons. This study provides insights into the distribution, diversity and host-parasite interactions of hemoparasites in wild reptile populations from Madagascar.

  17. Host and environmental risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium scophthalmi (Apicomplexa) infection in cultured turbot, Psetta maxima (L.) (Pisces, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pellitero, Pilar; Perez, Andrés; Quiroga, M Isabel; Redondo, M José; Vázquez, Sonia; Riaza, Ana; Palenzuela, Oswaldo; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Nieto, José M

    2009-11-12

    An epidemiological cohort study of Cryptosporidium scophthalmi in cultured turbot Psetta maxima L. of Northwestern Spain was conducted along a four-year period. Four different ongrowing cohorts were monitored monthly from introduction into the ongrowing tanks (10-50 g) until reaching market size (400-1400 g). The association of host and environmental factors with five categories of parasite abundance was assessed using a multivariable regression framework. Epidemiological factors assessed here were water temperature, weight, length, month of collection, season, age, origin, condition factor, water filtration, and status to the myxozoan Enteromyxum scophthalmi infection. E. scophthalmi was included into the analysis because it targets the same organ than C. scophthalmi and it was prevalent in the studied population. The multivariable analysis demonstrated the statistically significant association between several factors and parasite abundance. C. scophthalmi abundance was associated (P<0.05) with age, condition factor, season, and status to E. scophthalmi infection. Young animals, with poor condition factor, during spring or summer, and not infected with the myxozoan were most likely to be highly infected by C. scophthalmi. Inclusion of these four variables significantly (P<0.05) improved the model, compared to the model that did not include any of these epidemiological factors. Increasing levels of C. scophthalmi abundance were associated (P<0.01) with higher severity of C. scophthalmi-compatible lesions. The frequency of distribution of C. scophthalmi abundance was clearly right-skewed and fitted a negative binomial distribution, whereas the intensity of infection fitted a Poisson distribution. The quantification of the variance-to-mean ratio stratified by age demonstrated overdispersion for 8-16 months old fish, although this bivariate association is likely affected by several other factors, as suggested by the results of the multivariable analysis. The negative relation between C. scophthalmi abundance and status to E. scophthalmi infection suggests differences in the transmission, onset, and course of both infections. The coarse filtration used in some cohorts did not significantly affect the levels of infection. C. scophthalmi was probably introduced into the ongrowing tanks mainly with carrier fish, though the involvement of infective oocysts from the water supply cannot be disregarded. Infection prevalence and mean intensity decreased with fish age and a seasonal distribution was found. Results presented here will help to understand the epidemiology of C. scophthalmi in turbot, to estimate the expected levels of infection associated with presence or absence of epidemiological factors, and to quantify the impact that the disease may have on susceptible turbot populations. The multivariable model used here is more powerful than the visual inspection of graphics for exploring associations in cooperative processes and can be easily extended to the assessment of epidemiological associations in other population and parasitic diseases.

  18. Hypnozoites of Cystoisospora Frankel, 1977 (Apicomplexa: Cystoisosporinae) in Mongolian gerbil lymph nodes and their transmission to cats free of coccidia.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos R; Stabenow, Cristiane da S; Massad, Fabiana V; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2007-01-01

    Nine Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) were fed with 5.6 x 10(5) Cystoisospora sporulated oocysts orally. After 28 days post inoculation (DPI) four animals were euthanized, and their mesenteric lymph nodes were removed and they were submitted to peptic digestion technique and samples of them were submitted to transmission electron microscopy for hypnozoites identification. From lymph nodes digestion 4 x 10(2) hypnozoites/mL were obtained. Morphologically they were banana or stick form in shape, and measured 18.17 (15.09-20.02) in length by 6.21 (5.48-7.06) microm in width. In the same experiment, at 6 DAI, five gerbils were posted and liver, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen were removed from each animal and were homogenized before given to three cats free of coccidia. All visceras used individually in each cat were capable to induce infection of species, C. felis and C. rivolta.

  19. [Clinical findings observed in rabbits, meat type, infected experimentally by Cystoisospora felis (Wenyon, 1923) Frenkel, 1977 (Apicomplexa: Cystoisosporinae)].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Paulo S; Munhoz, Alexandre D; Flausino, Walter; Lopes, Carlos Wilson G

    2006-01-01

    Twenty four rabbits type meat, cross-breed of White New Zealand and California, of both sexes, with age of 58 days old, and average weight of 1,586 g were used. Than, they were divided in three groups of eight rabbits each. The first group was inoculated orally, in two serial days, with 10(6) sporulated oocysts of Cystoisospora felis per animal, second group was considered per feed, and thirty group was left as control. Clinical signs as body weight, feed consumption, rectal temperature, and breathing frequency were taken daily. Carcasses weights were taking at 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 16, 22 and 29 days after infection (DAI) when they were posted. In the first DAI, anorexia, slow movements, low percent of food consumption (85.76%), and of alimentary conversion were observed. Difference of 3.52% in the food consumption was observed between control and infected animals. The inoculated rabbits had high temperatures in the first DAI in comparison to controls and per fed animals (p<0.01) at 2nd and at 4th DAI. In relationship to the weight gain in the 1st week the carcasses of the infected rabbits had minimal difference in comparison to control animals. As conclusion, cystoisosporosis, beside clinical signs, can be interfered in the development of the rabbit.

  20. Choleoeimeria ghaffari n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the gallbladder of Eryx jayakari Boulenger (Serpentes: Boidae) in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Duszynski, Donald W

    2014-02-01

    Choleoeimeria ghaffari n. sp. is described from the gallbladder of Eryx jayakari Boulenger in Saudi Arabia. Oöcysts are tetrasporocystic, cylindroidal, 23 × 14 μm, with a smooth bi-layered wall and length/width ratio of 1.5, without micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule. Sporocysts are subspheroidal to ellipsoidal, 8 × 6 μm, with length/width ratio of 1.4, without Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies but with sporocyst residuum. Sporozoites are banana-shaped measuring 10 × 1.5 μm. The endogenous development was found to occur in the gallbladder epithelium and the extrahepatic bile ducts. Mature meronts are spheroidal, c.10 μm wide, and suspected to produce 12-16 merozoites. Microgamonts are irregular in shape, 13 × 10 μm, whereas macrogamonts are mostly subspheroidal, c.12 μm wide, with a prominent centrally-located nucleus. Based on oöcyst morphology and the site of endogenous development (epithelium of the gallbladder and bile ducts) the new eimeriid coccidian was placed in the genus Choleoeimeria Paperna & Landsberg, 1989.

  1. A New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Green Frog, Lithobates clamitans (Anura: Ranidae) from Arkansas, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Mcallister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Bursey, Charles R; Trauth, Stanley E; Connior, Matthew B; Robison, Henry W

    2014-07-01

    Between April and October 2012, 20 juvenile and adult green frogs (Lithobates clamitans) were collected by hand or dipnet from 3 counties of Arkansas and examined for coccidial parasites. A single frog (5%) was found to be passing oocysts of a new eimerian species. Oocysts of Eimeria menaensis n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 25.4 × 15.6 (23-27 × 13-17) µm, with a L/W ratio of 1.6. A micropyle was absent but an oocyst residuum and polar granule were present. Sporocysts were spheroidal to subspheroidal and measured 5.0 × 5.0 (4-6) µm with L/W of 1.1. An indistinct Stieda body was present, but sub-and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of condensed granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate and attenuated at both ends with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the second report of coccidia from L. clamitans and the first time a coccidian has been reported from a green frog from Arkansas.

  2. A New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Green Frog, Lithobates clamitans (Anura: Ranidae) from Arkansas, U.S.A

    PubMed Central

    Seville, R. Scott; Bursey, Charles R.; Trauth, Stanley E.; Connior, Matthew B.; Robison, Henry W.

    2014-01-01

    Between April and October 2012, 20 juvenile and adult green frogs (Lithobates clamitans) were collected by hand or dipnet from 3 counties of Arkansas and examined for coccidial parasites. A single frog (5%) was found to be passing oocysts of a new eimerian species. Oocysts of Eimeria menaensis n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 25.4 × 15.6 (23–27 × 13–17) µm, with a L/W ratio of 1.6. A micropyle was absent but an oocyst residuum and polar granule were present. Sporocysts were spheroidal to subspheroidal and measured 5.0 × 5.0 (4–6) µm with L/W of 1.1. An indistinct Stieda body was present, but sub–and para–Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of condensed granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate and attenuated at both ends with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the second report of coccidia from L. clamitans and the first time a coccidian has been reported from a green frog from Arkansas. PMID:25580093

  3. Redescription of Hepatozoon felis (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) based on phylogenetic analysis, tissue and blood form morphology, and possible transplacental transmission

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A Hepatozoon parasite was initially reported from a cat in India in 1908 and named Leucocytozoon felis domestici. Although domestic feline hepatozoonosis has since been recorded from Europe, Africa, Asia and America, its description, classification and pathogenesis have remained vague and the distinction between different species of Hepatozoon infecting domestic and wild carnivores has been unclear. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey on domestic feline hepatozoonosis and characterize it morphologically and genetically. Methods Hepatozoon sp. DNA was amplified by PCR from the blood of 55 of 152 (36%) surveyed cats in Israel and from all blood samples of an additional 19 cats detected as parasitemic by microscopy during routine hematologic examinations. Hepatozoon sp. forms were also characterized from tissues of naturally infected cats. Results DNA sequencing determined that all cats were infected with Hepatozoon felis except for two infected by Hepatozoon canis. A significant association (p = 0.00001) was found between outdoor access and H. felis infection. H. felis meronts containing merozoites were characterized morphologically from skeletal muscles, myocardium and lungs of H. felis PCR-positive cat tissues and development from early to mature meront was described. Distinctly-shaped gamonts were observed and measured from the blood of these H. felis infected cats. Two fetuses from H. felis PCR-positive queens were positive by PCR from fetal tissue including the lung and amniotic fluid, suggesting possible transplacental transmission. Genetic analysis indicated that H. felis DNA sequences from Israeli cats clustered together with the H. felis Spain 1 and Spain 2 sequences. These cat H. felis sequences clustered separately from the feline H. canis sequences, which grouped with Israeli and foreign dog H. canis sequences. H. felis clustered distinctly from Hepatozoon spp. of other mammals. Feline hepatozoonosis caused by H. felis is mostly sub-clinical as a high proportion of the population is infected with no apparent overt clinical manifestations. Conclusions This study aimed to integrate new histopathologic, hematologic, clinical, epidemiological and genetic findings on feline hepatozoonosis and promote the understanding of this infection. The results indicate that feline infection is primarily caused by a morphologically and genetically distinct species, H. felis, which has predilection to infecting muscular tissues, and is highly prevalent in the cat population studied. The lack of previous comprehensively integrated data merits the redescription of this parasite elucidating its parasitological characteristics. PMID:23587213

  4. A New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the marbled salamander, Ambystoma opacum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae), from northern Louisiana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Upton, Steve J

    2008-06-01

    Between December 2002 and June 2004, 10 marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum, were examined for coccidian parasites. Salamanders were collected in Bradley (n = 2), Little River (n = 1), Miller (n = 1), and Sevier (n = 1) Counties, Arkansas; Webster Parish, Louisiana (n = 2); and Bowie (n = 1) and Nacogdoches (n = 2) Counties, Texas. Two of 10 (20%) A. opacum from Louisiana harbored an undescribed species of Eimeria. Oocysts of Eimeria trauthi n. sp. were ellipsoidal, 36.6 x 33.1 (33-40 x 29-37) microm, with a thin, single-layered wall; shape index 1.1. Polar granule(s) and micropyle were absent. Oocyst residuum was composed of hundreds of loosely packed homogenous granules of various sizes enclosing a vacuole. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal, 20.8 x 8.1 (19-22 x 7-9) microm; shape index 2.6. Sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the first time a coccidium has been reported from an amphibian species in Louisiana and the second time a coccidium has been described from this salamander host. In addition, the following 26 salamanders from various counties in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas were surveyed during the study period and were negative for coccidia: Ambystomatidae, 4 spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) and 7 mole salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum); Cryptobranchidae, 4 Ozark hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi); Plethodontidae, 6 spotted dusky salamanders (Desmognathus conanti) and 3 many-ribbed salamanders (Eurycea multiplicata multiplicata); and Salamandridae, 2 central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis).

  5. Microscopic and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon domerguei (Apicomplexa) and Foleyella furcata (Nematoda) in wild endemic reptiles from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Maia, João P.; Crottini, Angelica; Harris, David James

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world’s top twelve “megadiversity” hot spots hosting unique and threatened flora and fauna. Parasites are a major component of biodiversity but remain largely uncharacterized in wildlife. In this study we combine microscopic and molecular assessment of hemoparasites in endemic reptile species from Madagascar. We detected three distinct parasites: the apicomplexans Hepatozoon and Sarcocystis, and filarial nematodes. The prevalence and intensity of these apicomplexans were low overall, while microfilarial infections in chameleons were relatively high. We detected mixed infections of two Hepatozoon haplotypes in Madagascarophis colubrinus, and of Hepatozoon and microfilariae in a Furcifer sp. Phylogenetic analyses of Hepatozoon showed evidence of prey-predator transmission, with identical sequences found in the snakes M. colubrinus and Ithycyphus oursi, and their prey Furcifer sp. Based on previous studies regarding the life cycle of Hepatozoon domerguei Landau, Chabaud, Michel, and Brygoo, 1970 in these hosts and due to their morphological similarity, we propose that this Hepatozoon haplotype is Hepatozoon domerguei. Future studies, including the examination of invertebrate hosts, are needed to verify this preliminary taxonomic identification. A distinct hemogregarine haplotype was found in Oplurus sp., which displayed morphologically different gametocytes, some of which were apparently inside leukocytes. The Sarcocystis identified from Tracheloptychus petersi was identical to that reported in a North African snake, indicating that the same lineage is found in geographically distinct regions. By combining morphological and genetic information, Foleyella furcata (Linstow, 1899) filarial nematodes were identified in several Furcifer chameleons. This study provides insights into the distribution, diversity and host-parasite interactions of hemoparasites in wild reptile populations from Madagascar. PMID:25224723

  6. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8–8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8–6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18–21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6–8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, heat shock protein 70, actin, heat shock protein 90 (MS2), MS1, MS3, and M16 gene sequences revealed that C. proliferans is genetically distinct from C. muris and other previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:26771460

  7. Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) of Three-toed Box Turtles, Terrapene carolina triunguis (Reptilia: Testudines), from Arkansas and Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    McAllister, C T; Motriuk-Smith, D; Seville, R S; Hudson, C; Connior, M B; Robison, H W

    We collected 50 three-toed box turtles (Terrapene carolina triunguis) from 9 counties of Arkansas and 4 counties of Oklahoma, and examined their feces for coccidial parasites. Nine of 24 (38%) turtles from Arkansas and 8 of 26 (31%) from Oklahoma were found to be passing oocysts of Eimeria ornata. This represents two new geographic distributional records for this coccidian. Measurements of individual isolates of E. ornata as well as morphological characteristics are provided with comparison to its original description and to another Terrapene coccidian, Eimeria carri. In addition, we noted an adelid pseudoparasite being passed by a single T. c. triunguis from Oklahoma that likely represents a parasite of arthropods.

  8. Experimental infection of adult and juvenile coyotes with domestic dog and wild coyote isolates of Hepatozoon americanum (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina).

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jennifer Jane; Kocan, A Alan; Reichard, Mason V; Panciera, Roger J; Bahr, Robert J; Ewing, Sidney A

    2005-07-01

    Each of five adult and four juvenile coyotes (Canis latrans) was exposed to an oral dose of 50 Hepatozoon americanum oocysts recovered from Amblyomma maculatum ticks that previously fed on either naturally infected domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) or naturally infected wild coyotes. All coyotes exposed to H. americanum became infected, regardless of isolate source, and all exhibited mild to moderate clinical disease that simulated American canine hepatozoonosis in naturally infected dogs. At 100 days postexposure, parasitemia was greater in juvenile than adult coyotes (0.9% and 0.3%, respectively); radiographic imaging of femurs revealed moderate exostosis in all juveniles and mild to moderate new bone growth in four of five (80%) adult coyotes. Gross postmortem analysis of bone lesions demonstrated variation between age groups of coyotes but not between isolates of H. americanum. Microscopic evaluation of skeletal muscle revealed that parasite-induced lesions were significantly more numerous (t = 5.0, df = 7, P = 0.001) in juvenile than adult coyotes. Results of this study indicate that juvenile and adult coyotes are equally susceptible to experimental infection with H. americanum isolated from domestic dog and wild coyote sources. The age of coyotes at the time of exposure, and possibly the number of H. americanum oocysts ingested, might influence morbidity and mortality, but it appears that both adult and juvenile coyotes could be reservoirs of H. americanum.

  9. Redescription of Haemoproteus mesnili (Apicomplexa: Plasmodiidae) and its meronts, with description of a second haemosporidian parasite of African cobras.

    PubMed

    Telford, Sam R

    2007-06-01

    Haemoproteus mesnili (Bouet 1909) Wenyon 1926 is redescribed from the spitting cobra, Naja nigricollis nigricollis, of Tanzania. Mature gametocytes in the acute phase of infection averaged 17.7 X 7.3 jim, with LW 128.1 jim-, and L:W ratio 2.52. Nuclei were visible in both sexes. Both sexes were heavily pigmented, with 31-62 black granules dispersed in macrogametocytes; 20-46 granules were often clumped or concentrated near ends of microgametocytes. The halteridial form was present in 28% of active-phase gametocytes, but in only 8% of those in chronic phase. A few large, possibly first generation, meronts were present in cardiac muscle; uninucleate parasites within parasitophorous vacuoles in splenic cells produced small rounded or ovoid meronts, 12.2 x 9.6 microm, with 12-16 deeply basophilic, square-to-rectangular cytomeres. Meronts with 17-32 cytomeres were 16.9 x 11.9 microm. Meronts, 20 x 16 to 26 x 22 microm, contained 51-57 cytomeres. Mature meronts were ovoid, 13.7 x 11.5 microm, with many rounded merozoites. Haemoproteus balli n. sp, found in an Egyptian cobra, Naja haje haje of Kenya, differs from H. mesnili in average gametocyte dimensions, 10.8 x 7.7 microm; LW, 83.2 microm2; L/W ratio, 1.42; absence of halteridial forms; sparse pigmentation (3-10 granules); and presence of a broad peripheral band, apparently chromatin, along one side of microgametocytes.

  10. A new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Accipitriformes: Accipitridae), from Kansas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; McKown, Richard D

    2013-04-01

    Between March 1989 and February 1994, 4 bald eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) from various localities in Kansas were examined for coccidia. One (25%) of the bald eagles was found to be passing an undescribed species of Caryospora in its feces. Oocysts of Caryospora hanebrinki n. sp. are ellipsoidal to ovoidal with a bilayered wall and measure 48.1 × 42.1 μm with a shape index of 1.2. A micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts are spheroidal, 24.8 μm wide. Stieda, substieda, and parastieda bodies were absent; a spheroidal sporocyst residuum is present; it measures 17.5 μm and is composed of many intact homogenous globules with a few dispersed in a loose spiral around the sporocysts. This is the first caryosporan documented from the bald eagle and is the largest known Caryospora from raptors.

  11. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the mountain beaver, Aplodontia rufa (Rodentia: Aplodontiidae), from Oregon.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; McKown, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    Two mountain beavers, Aplodontia rufa , were collected in Lincoln County, Oregon, and examined for coccidia. Both were infected with 2 new species of Eimeria. Oocysts of Eimeria chitkoae n. sp. were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 24.5 × 20.2 μm, with a shape index (SI) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule of several fragments was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 12.5 × 7.9 μm, SI was 1.6. Stieda and substieda bodies were present, but a parastieda body was absent; a sporocyst residuum was present, composed of a cluster of moderately coarse granules with many scattered fine granules. Stout sporozoites were 14.7 × 2.9 μm in situ, with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Oocysts of Eimeria lewisi n. sp. were ovoidal, with a smooth single-layered wall, and measured 13.7 × 7.8 μm, SI was 1.7. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but 1-2 polar granule(s) were present. Sporocysts were 6.6 × 4.2 μm, with SI of 1.6. A Stieda body was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent; a sporocyst residuum was present, composed of a small cluster of several granules. Sporozoites were granular, 8.2 × 1.8 μm in situ, with a posterior refractile body. These are the first coccidians reported from the mountain beaver.

  12. A new eimerian species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the blue-fronted Amazon parrot Amazona aestiva L. (Aves: Psittacidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hofstatter, P G; Guaraldo, A M A

    2011-12-01

    The Neotropical psittacine species Amazona aestiva, commonly known as the blue-fronted Amazon, is one of the most common and best-known psittacine birds kept as a pet worldwide. However, very little is known about the diseases or parasites of these birds. In this study, we describe a new species, Eimeria aestivae, associated with these parrots. The new species is characterized by: ovoid smooth oocysts (n  =  60), 36.8 (33.2-41.5) × 23.7 (21.7-25.7) µm, length/width ratio  =  1.55; polar granule present; ellipsoidal sporocysts (n  =  25), 19.8 (17.5-21.6) × 9.3 (8.3-9.9) µm; Stieda, sub-Stieda body, and sporocyst residuum present. Sporozoites (n  =  20), 2 per sporocyst, elongate and curved, 17.6 (15.8-19.2) × 3.8 (3.2-4.8) µm; each with 2 refractile bodies. The oocysts of the other 2 eimerian species described for Amazona are larger than those of the presented species, but they all seem to be closely related because of some similarities among them.

  13. Two new Eimeria species (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the yellow-crowned Amazon Amazona ochrocephala (Aves: Psittacidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hofstatter, P G; Kawazoe, U

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we describe 2 new species of Eimeria associated with the yellow-crowned Amazon Amazona ochrocephala. Eimeria amazonae n. sp. has bilayered, ellipsoidal, and smooth oocysts that measure 48.9 × 36.2 µm; the length/width ratio is 1.35. The micropyle and oocyst residuum are both absent, but the polar granule is present. Ovoidal sporocysts are 22.2 × 11.9 µm. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies and sporocyst residuum are present. The 2 elongate sporozoites are curved and measure 18.1 × 3.4 µm; both have 2 refractile bodies. Eimeria ochrocephalae n. sp. has bilayered, ellipsoidal, and smooth oocysts that measure 43.8 × 27.7 µm; the length/width ratio is 1.58. The micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent, but the polar granule is present; ovoidal sporocysts are 20.6 × 10.1 µm. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies and sporocyst residuum are present; 2 elongate and curved sporozoites are 15.8 × 3.4 µm, each of which has 2 refractile bodies.

  14. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8-8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8-6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18-21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6-8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, heat shock protein 70, actin, heat shock protein 90 (MS2), MS1, MS3, and M16 gene sequences revealed that C. proliferans is genetically distinct from C. muris and other previously described Cryptosporidium species.

  15. Haemoproteus ilanpapernai n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Haemoproteidae) in Strix seloputo from Singapore: morphological description and reassignment of molecular data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Haemoproteus ilanpapernai Karadjian and Landau n. sp. from the Spotted Wood Owl, Strix seloputo, in Singapore is described from material from Ilan Paperna’s collection of slides. The species was previously identified as Haemoproteus syrnii (Mayer, 1910). However, comparisons between the material from Strix seloputo and our own material from Strix aluco, the type host of H. syrnii, revealed morphological and molecular differences. H. ilanpapernai n. sp. differs morphologically from H. syrnii by the much smaller size of the gametocytes, the different position of the mature gametocytes in the erythrocyte (apical, subapical, or lateral in H. ilanpapernai vs. always lateral in H. syrnii), the effect on the erythrocyte nucleus (frequently tilted in H. ilanpapernai but not displaced laterally vs. straight and displaced laterally in H. syrnii) and characters of the pigment (aggregated in the gametocytes of H. ilanpapernai vs. dispersed in H. syrnii). A molecular analysis showed that the two species differ by 2.9% at the cyt b and 3.1% at the COI genes. PMID:24759652

  16. Cryptosporidium testudinis sp. n., Cryptosporidium ducismarci Traversa, 2010 and Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype III (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in tortoises.

    PubMed

    Jezkova, Jana; Horcickova, Michaela; Hlaskova, Lenka; Sak, Bohumil; Kvetonova, Dana; Novak, Jan; Hofmannova, Lada; McEvoy, John; Kvac, Martin

    2016-10-14

    Understanding of the diversity of species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1910 in tortoises remains incomplete due to the limited number of studies on these hosts. The aim of the present study was to characterise the genetic diversity and biology of cryptosporidia in tortoises of the family Testudinidae Batsch. Faecal samples were individually collected immediately after defecation and were screened for presence of cryptosporidia by microscopy using aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining, and by PCR amplification and sequence analysis targeting the small subunit rRNA (SSU), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Out of 387 faecal samples from 16 tortoise species belonging to 11 genera, 10 and 46 were positive for cryptosporidia by microscopy and PCR, respectively. All samples positive by microscopy were also PCR positive. Sequence analysis of amplified genes revealed the presence of the Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I (n = 22), C. ducismarci Traversa, 2010 (n = 23) and tortoise genotype III (n = 1). Phylogenetic analyses of SSU, COWP and actin gene sequences revealed that Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci are genetically distinct from previously described species of Cryptosporidium. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I, measuring 5.8-6.9 µm × 5.3-6.5 µm, are morphologically distinguishable from C. ducismarci, measuring 4.4-5.4 µm × 4.3-5.3 µm. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci obtained from naturally infected Russian tortoises (Testudo horsfieldii Gray) were infectious for the same tortoise but not for Reeve's turtles (Mauremys reevesii [Gray]), common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis [Linnaeus]), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata [Vieillot]) and SCID mice (Mus musculus Linnaeus). The prepatent period was 11 and 6 days post infection (DPI) for Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci, respectively; the patent period was longer than 200 days for both cryptosporidia. Naturally or experimentally infected tortoises showed no clinical signs of disease. Our morphological, genetic, and biological data support the establishment of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I as a new species, Cryptosporidium testudinis sp. n., and confirm the validity of C. ducismarci as a separate species of the genus Cryptosporidium.

  17. Isospora lutrae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a new coccidium from the European otter Lutra lutra (L.) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) from Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Modrý, D; Fernández, J; Slapeta, J R; Koudela, B

    2000-09-01

    Parasitological examination of European otter originating from Extremadura, Spain revealed the presence of a new isosporan species. Oöcysts of Isospora lutrae n. sp. are spherical to subspherical, 31.2 (27.5-32) x 29.6 (28-31) microm and have a smooth wall c. 1 microm thick. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 18.2 (17-19) x 14.4 (14-16) microm and lack Stieda and substieda bodies. A spherical sporocyst residuum is present, consisting of granules scattered among the sporozoites. Sporozoites are spindle-shaped, 12.4 x 2.5 microm and have anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Based on its unique morphologic structure and host, I. lutrae is considered to be new.

  18. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  19. Observation on Monocystis kuidongae sp. nov. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) from an Indian earthworm Perionyx excavatus Perrier (Annelida: Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Mallik, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K

    2017-06-01

    A survey to know the diversity of endoparasitic protozoan parasites of the earthworms of West Bengal, revealed a new species of the genus Monocystis Stein, 1848, that resides in the seminal vesicle of the earthworm Perionyx excavatus Perrier. Monocystis kuidongae sp. nov. is characterized by ovoidal gamonts (trophozoites) with inconspicuous mucron and measure 69.53-102.25 (86.29 ± 11.48) μm × 24.54-61.35 (35.17 ± 12.82) μm. Shape of the gametocysts are almost rounded and measure 81.80-110.43 (96.11 ± 8.85) μm in diameter. Oocysts are navicular with pointed ends and measure 11.55-12.32 (11.78 ± 0.36) µm × 5.00-5.77 (5.39 ± 0.25) µm.

  20. Observation on Nematocystis kailashi sp. nov. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) from an Indian earthworm Glyphidrilus tuberosus Stephenson (Annelida: Oligochaeta)

    PubMed

    Mallik, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Prabir K

    Surveys on aseptate gregarines in earthworm hosts in different districts of West Bengal state of India revealed the existence of one new species of aseptate gregarine of the genus Nematocystis Hesse, 1909 have been identified from the seminal vesicles of the earthworm, Glyphidrilus tuberosus Stephenson, 1916 in the district of Purba Midnapur, West Bengal of India. Gamonts of the organism are very much elongated, cylindrical, nematoid and without mucron. The terminal end adjacent to the nucleus rounded and the distal end pointed. The gamonts measure 846.45-1031.13 (931.86±70.48) μm in length and 18.40-20.45 (19.43±1.05) μm in width. Nucleus elongated or depressed elliptoid, measures 53.17-63.39 (60.33±3.28) μm in length and 13.29-16.36 (14.15±0.89) μm in width. The gametocysts are slightly ovoid, measuring 110.43-120.65 (114.31±3.44) μm in diameter. Oocysts navicular and measure 9.24-10.39 (9.78±0.40) μm×5.77-6.16 (6.04±0.18) μm. Based on critical analysis and comparison with earlier reported species, the species under discussion established as new one.

  1. Identification of a Divergent Environmental DNA Sequence Clade Using the Phylogeny of Gregarine Parasites (Apicomplexa) from Crustacean Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Rueckert, Sonja; Simdyanov, Timur G.; Aleoshin, Vladimir V.; Leander, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental SSU rDNA surveys have significantly improved our understanding of microeukaryotic diversity. Many of the sequences acquired using this approach are closely related to lineages previously characterized at both morphological and molecular levels, making interpretation of these data relatively straightforward. Some sequences, by contrast, appear to be phylogenetic orphans and are sometimes inferred to represent “novel lineages” of unknown cellular identity. Consequently, interpretation of environmental DNA surveys of cellular diversity rely on an adequately comprehensive database of DNA sequences derived from identified species. Several major taxa of microeukaryotes, however, are still very poorly represented in these databases, and this is especially true for diverse groups of single-celled parasites, such as gregarine apicomplexans. Methodology/Principal Findings This study attempts to address this paucity of DNA sequence data by characterizing four different gregarine species, isolated from the intestines of crustaceans, at both morphological and molecular levels: Thiriotia pugettiae sp. n. from the graceful kelp crab (Pugettia gracilis), Cephaloidophora cf. communis from two different species of barnacles (Balanus glandula and B. balanus), Heliospora cf. longissima from two different species of freshwater amphipods (Eulimnogammarus verrucosus and E. vittatus), and Heliospora caprellae comb. n. from a skeleton shrimp (Caprella alaskana). SSU rDNA sequences were acquired from isolates of these gregarine species and added to a global apicomplexan alignment containing all major groups of gregarines characterized so far. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of these data demonstrated that all of the gregarines collected from crustacean hosts formed a very strongly supported clade with 48 previously unidentified environmental DNA sequences. Conclusions/Significance This expanded molecular phylogenetic context enabled us to establish a major clade of intestinal gregarine parasites and infer the cellular identities of several previously unidentified environmental SSU rDNA sequences, including several sequences that have formerly been discussed broadly in the literature as a suspected “novel” lineage of eukaryotes. PMID:21483868

  2. Caryospora peneireiroi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in the common kestrel, Falco tinnunculus (Falconiformes: Falconidae), in mainland Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Sergian Vianna; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Caetano, Inês; Maniero, Viviane Camara; Fonseca, Isabel Pereira da; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2016-06-07

    The common kestrel Falco tinnunculus Linnaeus, 1758, is a widespread raptor, native in Europe, Asia and Africa, and vagrant in the Americas. In the current work, 27 fecal samples were collected from common kestrels kept in the Lisbon Center for Wild Animal Recovery, located at Monsanto Forest Park, Lisbon, Portugal. Five (19%) of them were found to be passing an undescribed species of Caryospora in their feces. The oocysts of Caryospora peneireiroi n. sp. were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 47.1 × 37.6 µm with a shape index of 1.25. No micropyle, oocyst residuum or polar granule was present. The sporocysts were subspherical, measuring 25.1 × 24.3 µm. Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many homogenous globules scattered throughout the periphery of the sporocyst. This is the fourth caryosporan species reported from F. tinnunculus.

  3. Identification of a Novel Renal Coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Great-Horned Owl ( Bubo virginianus ), USA.

    PubMed

    Jankovsky, Jennie M; Brand, Mabre; Gerhold, Richard W

    2017-04-01

    We diagnosed renal coccidiosis in two of five Great-horned Owls ( Bubo virginianus ) examined in eastern Tennessee, US, 2007-13. Histopathologic examination of the kidneys revealed multifocal mild-to-moderate dilation and epithelial hyperplasia of collecting ducts. Renal collecting duct epithelial cells contained intracytoplasmic microgametocytes, macrogametocytes, and sporulating and sporulated oocysts. Renal coccidiosis in affected birds did not result in significant inflammation. Sequence analysis of the amplified partial 18S short subunit ribosomal RNA coding region from examination of formalin fixed tissue by using PCR disclosed a 93% identity to Eimeria reichenowi in GenBank, suggesting a novel Eimeria sp.

  4. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from brown anole, Anolis sagrei (Sauria: Dactyloidae) from Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Connior, Matthew B.; Trauth, Stanley E.

    2016-01-01

    During July 2014, 14 brown anoles, Anolis sagrei Duméril and Bibron were collected from Orange County, Florida, U.S.A., and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. One (7%) harboured an eimerian that we describe here as new. Oöcysts of Eimeria garmani sp. n. were ellipsoidal with a uni-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 19.3 × 12.5 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.5. A micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were subspheroidal, 6.8 × 6.3 μm, L/W 1.1. Stieda, substieda and parastieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. Endogenous stages were observed within the small intestine. This is the first coccidian reported from the brown anole and the third eimerian reported from anoles in the United States. PMID:25962466

  5. A NEW SPECIES OF CARYOSPORA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE FLATHEAD SNAKE, TANTILLA GRACILIS (OPHIDIA: COLUBRIDAE), IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Roehrs, Zachary P.; Seville, R. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A single flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis, collected in early October 2010 from Choctaw County, Oklahoma, was found to harbor an undescribed species of Caryospora. Oocysts of Caryospora choctawensis n. sp. were spherical to subspherical, 15.8 × 15.0 (14–18 × 14–16) μm with a thick bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 1.1. A micropyle and an oocyst residuum are absent but prominent Stieda and bubble-like sub-Stieda bodies were present as well as a bilobed polar granule near the oocyst wall. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.8 × 9.0 (10–12 × 8–9) μm with a shape index of 1.3. The sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the second time a caryosporan species has been reported from T. gracilis, but the first coccidian ever described from a reptilian host in Oklahoma. Additional T. gracilis from Arkansas (n = 6), Oklahoma (n = 1), and Texas (n = 7) were examined and a single specimen from Newton County, Arkansas, harbored Caryospora gracilis Upton, McAllister, Trauth, and Bibb, 1992, previously reported from T. gracilis collected in Arkansas and Texas. PMID:22191621

  6. [Three species of gregarines (apicomplexa: eugregarinorida) observed in the annelid polychaete Marphysa sangunea (montagu, 1815) in the lake of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Elbarhoumi, M; Zghal, F

    2010-03-01

    Three species of gregarines were found in specimens of the annelid polychaete Marphysa sanguinea collected in the Lake of Tunis: Bhatiella marphysae Setna, 1931, described from Marphysa sanguinea (India); Ferraria cornucephala iwamusi H. Hoshide, 1956, found in Marphysa iwamusi (Japan); and Viviera sp. a species sharing characteristics with Viviera marphysae Schrével, 1963, described in France from Marphysa sanguinea. These gregarines are reported for the first time from this host in Tunisia. Bhatiella marphysae and Viviera sp. belong to the family Lecudinidae (Aseptatorina). Our observations confirm the occurrence of a true septum in Ferraria cornucephala which must be maintained in Polyrhabdinae (Septatorina).

  7. Biochemical characterization of enoyl reductase involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis in the intestinal coccidium Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaomin; Lorraine Fuller, A; McDougald, Larry R; Tan, Xiangshi; Cai, Jianping; Wang, Feng; Sacchettini, James C; Zhu, Guan

    2007-07-01

    An enoyl reductase (EtENR) closely related to those of green algae and involved in Type II fatty acid synthesis was characterized and localized to the apicoplast in the coccidium Eimeria tenella. Biochemical analysis using native EtENR protein extracted from parasites confirmed its function as an enoyl reductase using NADH as a cofactor. However, the recombinant form (rEtENR) expressed in bacteria was only able to oxidize NADH, but unable to transfer the electron to enoyl-CoA, possibly due to the inappropriate folding of rEtENR expressed in bacteria. The functions of both native and recombinant EtENR could be inhibited by triclosan (IC(50)=1.45 microM), suggesting that this enzyme may be explored as a drug target against coccidiosis.

  8. Haemoproteus ilanpapernai n. sp. (Apicomplexa, Haemoproteidae) in Strix seloputo from Singapore: morphological description and reassignment of molecular data.

    PubMed

    Karadjian, Grégory; Martinsen, Ellen; Duval, Linda; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Landau, Irène

    2014-01-01

    Haemoproteus ilanpapernai Karadjian and Landau n. sp. from the Spotted Wood Owl, Strix seloputo, in Singapore is described from material from Ilan Paperna's collection of slides. The species was previously identified as Haemoproteus syrnii (Mayer, 1910). However, comparisons between the material from Strix seloputo and our own material from Strix aluco, the type host of H. syrnii, revealed morphological and molecular differences. H. ilanpapernai n. sp. differs morphologically from H. syrnii by the much smaller size of the gametocytes, the different position of the mature gametocytes in the erythrocyte (apical, subapical, or lateral in H. ilanpapernai vs. always lateral in H. syrnii), the effect on the erythrocyte nucleus (frequently tilted in H. ilanpapernai but not displaced laterally vs. straight and displaced laterally in H. syrnii) and characters of the pigment (aggregated in the gametocytes of H. ilanpapernai vs. dispersed in H. syrnii). A molecular analysis showed that the two species differ by 2.9% at the cyt b and 3.1% at the COI genes. © G. Karadjian et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  9. Eimeria falconensis sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus (Falconiformes: Falconidae) in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alyousif, Mohamed S; Alfaleh, Faleh A; Al-Shawa, Yaser R

    2010-08-01

    The oocysts of Eimeria falconensis sp.n. is described from the feces of the lanner falcon, Falco biarmicus, from the falcon market in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts are ellipsoid in shape, measuring 27.2x18.1 (25.4-29.5x 16.3-20.4) JLm; shape index (length/width ratio) is 1.5 (1.35-1.68microm. The oocyst wall is smooth and bi-layered. Mmicropyle and polar granule are present, but an oocyst residuum is absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoid, 11.0 x6.9 (10.1-12.6 x 5.8-7.9) microm; with shape index of 1.59 (1.43-1.68) microm, with a smooth single-layered wall and a prominent Stieda body, but there is no subs-tieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of numerous small granules. Sporozoites are comma-shaped, each contains two refractile bodies.

  10. Redescription and molecular diagnosis of Hepatozoon theileri (Laveran, 1905) (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae), infecting Amietia quecketti (Anura: Pyxicephalidae).

    PubMed

    Netherlands, Edward C; Cook, Courtney A; Smit, Nico J; du Preez, Louis H

    2014-08-01

    Blood smears prepared from the peripheral blood of 20 wild caught Amietia quecketti (Boulenger) from the North-West University Botanical Gardens, North West Province, South Africa, were examined for the presence of haemogregarines. A haemogregarine species comparative in morphology, host and geographical locality to that of Haemogregarina theileri Laveran, 1905 was detected. The original description of H. theileri was based solely on frog peripheral blood gamont stages. Later, further parasite stages, including trophozoites and merogonic liver stages, were recorded in a related Amietia sp. from equatorial Africa. This species was originally classified as a member of the genus Haemogregarina Danilewsky, 1885, but due to the close life cycle and morphological resemblance to those of Hepatozoon species, H. theileri was later transferred from Haemogregarina to Hepatozoon Miller, 1908. In the present study, meront and merozoite stages not described before, along with previously observed trophozoite, immature and mature gamont stages, are described from the peripheral blood of hosts. In addition, comparative phylogenetic analysis of the partial 18S rDNA sequence of Hepatozoon theileri to those of other haemogregarine species, including those of species of Hepatozoon and a Haemogregarina, support the taxonomic transfer of H. theileri to Hepatozoon, nesting H. theileri within a clade comprising species parasitising other amphibians. This is the first molecular and phylogenetic analysis of an African anuran species of Hepatozoon.

  11. Gregarines (Apicomplexa, Gregarinasina) in psocids (Insecta, Psocoptera) including a new species description and their potential use as pest control agents.

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Devetak, Dušan

    2017-08-01

    Gregarine apicomplexans are unicellular organisms that infect invertebrate hosts in marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The largest group of invertebrates infested on land is the insects. The insect order Psocoptera (booklice) has recently gained wider interest due to specimens occurring in stored food products and therefore being considered pest organisms. Biological control agents are often used to eliminate pest organisms. In this study we examined the psocid Dorypteryx domestica, an invasive psocid species that is spreading all over the world. We were able to isolate and describe a new gregarine species (Enterocystis dorypterygis sp. n.) infecting D. domestica. The trophozoites are panduri- or pyriform and their association/syzygy is caudo-frontal. The surface is inscribed by longitudinal epicytic folds covering the complete cell. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rDNA gene revealed an only weakly supported relationship with two Gregarina species G. ormieri and G. basiconstrictonea, both from tenebrionid beetles. Gregarines have been proposed to have some potential as biological control agents for several insects. Identifying the gregarine species infecting pest organisms like psocids is a first step and prerequisite for the probable utilization of these parasites as biological control agents in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The gatekeeper residue and beyond: homologous calcium-dependent protein kinases as drug development targets for veterinarian Apicomplexa parasites.

    PubMed

    Keyloun, Katelyn R; Reid, Molly C; Choi, Ryan; Song, Yifan; Fox, Anna M W; Hillesland, Heidi K; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Vidadala, RamaSubbaRao; Merritt, Ethan A; Lau, Audrey O T; Maly, Dustin J; Fan, Erkang; Barrett, Lynn K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Ojo, Kayode K

    2014-09-01

    Specific roles of individual CDPKs vary, but in general they mediate essential biological functions necessary for parasite survival. A comparative analysis of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of Neospora caninum, Eimeria tenella and Babesia bovis calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) together with those of Plasmodium falciparum, Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii was performed by screening against 333 bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs). Structural modelling and experimental data revealed that residues other than the gatekeeper influence compound-protein interactions resulting in distinct sensitivity profiles. We subsequently defined potential amino-acid structural influences within the ATP-binding cavity for each orthologue necessary for consideration in the development of broad-spectrum apicomplexan CDPK inhibitors. Although the BKI library was developed for specific inhibition of glycine gatekeeper CDPKs combined with low inhibition of threonine gatekeeper human SRC kinase, some library compounds exhibit activity against serine- or threonine-containing CDPKs. Divergent BKI sensitivity of CDPK homologues could be explained on the basis of differences in the size and orientation of the hydrophobic pocket and specific variation at other amino-acid positions within the ATP-binding cavity. In particular, BbCDPK4 and PfCDPK1 are sensitive to a larger fraction of compounds than EtCDPK1 despite the presence of a threonine gatekeeper in all three CDPKs.

  13. [An outbreak of coccidiosis in partridge (Rhynchotus rufescens), reared in captivity, by Eimeria rhynchoti Reis and Nobrega, 1936 (Apicomplexa: Emeriidae)].

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fagner Luiz da C; Almeida, Katyane de S; do Nascimento, Adjair A; Machado, Celio R; Machado, Rosangela Z

    2006-01-01

    Eimeria rhynchoti is redescribed parasitizing partridge (Rhynchotus rufescens), reared in captivity, from Jaboticabal City, São Paulo State, Brazil. Sporulation takes place in 48 hours, the shape of oocysts found vary from spherical to elliptic with 23.01 micro +/- 1.57 of length by 21.0 micro +/- 1.78 of width. The microple, polar cap and residuum of the oocysts were absent. The oocyst wall, measures 2.2 micro +/- 0.31 of thickness, is composed by two smooth layers; the polar granule is present. The sporocysts length was 15.03 mm +/- 2.12 by 8.08 mm +/- 0.84 of width vary from elliptic to elongate. Sporocyst wall slender with is fine and Stieda body; the residue found in form of several smaller granules spherical compacts. The sporozoites are contrary extending along the sporocysts wall possessing refracts body of easy visualization.

  14. Influence of Rangelia vitalii (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmorida) on copper, iron, and zinc bloodstream levels in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; França, Raqueli T; Costa, Marcio M; Paim, Carlos B V; Paim, Francine C; Santos, Clarissa M M; Flores, Erico M M; Eilers, Tiago L; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Monteiro, Silvia G; do Amaral, Carlos H; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of copper, iron, and zinc in blood serum of dogs experimentally infected with Rangelia vitalii (n  =  7) compared with uninfected controls (n  =  5). Serum metal levels were determined in blood samples collected at days 0, 10, 15, and 20 post-infection (PI). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was used to measure the levels of copper, iron, and zinc. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed among groups PI. Increased levels of copper and decreased levels of iron and zinc were observed in the infected animals. The infection by R. vitalii may, therefore, alter the serum metal levels, resulting in metabolic disorders in dogs. These metals are directly involved in many enzymatic systems; accordingly, alterations in their blood concentrations may also influence the pathogenesis of disease.

  15. Molecular and parasitological survey of Hepatozoon canis (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) in dogs from rural area of Sao Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Adriano Stefani; dos Santos Paduan, Karina; Von Ah Lopes, Viviane; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2008-04-01

    Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan that infects dogs and is transmitted by the ingestion of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Two distinct species of Hepatozoon genus can infect dogs, H. canis and H. americanum. Routine tests to detect the disease are based on direct examination of gametocytes on Giemsa-stained blood smears. The objectives of this study were the investigation of infection prevalence in rural area dogs, the comparison of diagnostics by blood smear examination and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the association of infection with tick infestation. Blood smears, collected by puncture of the cephalic vein and ear margin capillary bed from 150 dogs, were examined. This technique detected 17 positive animals (11.3%), with 14 (9.3%) in peripheral blood and seven (4.7%) in cephalic vein blood. PCR tests detected 80 (53.3%) positive animals. R. sanguineus and Amblyomma spp. were found in 36 of the dogs (24%), in equal proportions. The identified species for Amblyomma genus were A. cajennense and A. ovale. Data analysis showed that PCR was much more sensitive when compared to blood smear examination. Hepatozoon species was previously identified as closely related to H. canis.

  16. Role of gregarine parasite Ascogregarina culicis (Apicomplexa: Lecudinidae) in the maintenance of Chikungunya virus in vector mosquito.

    PubMed

    Moury, D T; Singh, D K; Yadav, P; Gokhale, M D; Barde, P V; Narayan, N B; Thakare, J P; Mishra, A C; Shouche, Y S

    2003-01-01

    Ascogregarina culicis and Ascogregarina taiwanensis are common gregarine parasites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, respectively. These mosquito species are also known to transmit dengue and Chikungunya viruses. The sporozoites of these parasites invade the midgut epithelial cells and develop intracellularly and extracellularly in the gut to complete their life cycles. The midgut is also the primary site for virus replication in the vector mosquitoes. Therefore, studies were carried out with a view to determine the possible role of these gregarines in the vertical transmission of dengue and Chikungunya viruses from larval to adult stage. Experiments were performed by exposing first instar mosquito larvae to suspensions containing parasite oocysts and viruses. Since Ascogregarina sporozoites invade the midgut of first instar larvae, the vertical transmission was determined by feeding the uninfected first instar larvae on the freshly prepared homogenates from mosquitoes, which were dually infected with viruses and the parasite oocysts. Similarly, the role of protozoan parasites in the vertical transmission of viruses was determined by exposing fresh first instar larvae to the dried pellets of homogenates prepared from the mosquitoes dually infected with viruses and the parasite oocysts. Direct vertical transmission and the vertical transmission of CHIK virus through the oocyst of the parasites were observed in the case of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. It is suggested that As. culicis may have an important role in the maintenance of CHIK virus during the inter-epidemic period.

  17. A NEW SPECIES OF EIMERIA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE NORTHERN MYOTIS, MYOTIS SEPTENTRIONALIS (CHIROPTERA: VESPERTILIONIDAE), IN OKLAHOMA

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Roehrs, Zachary P.

    2012-01-01

    During September 2004, 4 adult northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis, were collected from LeFlore County, Oklahoma (n = 2), and Logan (n = 1) and Yell (n = 1) counties, Arkansas, and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Three of 4 bats (75%) were passing oocysts of Eimeria spp. Oocysts of Eimeria tumlisoni n. sp. were ovoidal, 17.6 × 16.8 (16–19 × 14–18) μm with a shape index of 1.0 (1.0–1.1). A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, although 1–2 bilobed polar granules were often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.5 × 5.9 (9–12 × 5–7) μm with a shape index of 1.8 (1.6–2.0). A Stieda body was present, but sub–Stieda and para–Stieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present consisting of compact to dispersed granules between the sporozoites. The sporozoites were elongate, with subspherical anterior refractile body and spherical posterior refractile body; a nucleus was not discernable. This is the second coccidian reported from this host and the first instance of a bat coccidian reported from Oklahoma. We also document a new geographic record for Eimeria catronensis in Oklahoma, and provide an emended description. PMID:22509940

  18. Caryospora peneireiroi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in the common kestrel, Falco tinnunculus (Falconiformes: Falconidae), in mainland Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Sergian Vianna; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Caetano, Inês; Maniero, Viviane Camara; Fonseca, Isabel Pereira da; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2016-06-07

    The common kestrel Falco tinnunculus Linnaeus, 1758, is a widespread raptor, native in Europe, Asia and Africa, and vagrant in the Americas. In the current work, 27 fecal samples were collected from common kestrels kept in the Lisbon Center for Wild Animal Recovery, located at Monsanto Forest Park, Lisbon, Portugal. Five (19%) of them were found to be passing an undescribed species of Caryospora in their feces. The oocysts of Caryospora peneireiroi n. sp. were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 47.1 × 37.6 µm with a shape index of 1.25. No micropyle, oocyst residuum or polar granule was present. The sporocysts were subspherical, measuring 25.1 × 24.3 µm. Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many homogenous globules scattered throughout the periphery of the sporocyst. This is the fourth caryosporan species reported from F. tinnunculus.

  19. The development and fine structure of Lankesterella cf. dicroglossi (Apicomplexa: Lankesterellidae) infecting frogs in Niger, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Paperna, I; Martin, C

    2001-01-01

    One of four Hoplobatrachus occipitalis (Günther, 1859) frogs received from Niger, West Africa was heavily infected with Lankesterella blood and pre-erythrocytic stages. Infected blood and tissues from this frog were force-fed to the remaining three frogs. Two survived to necropsy on days 14 and 27 post-feeding and were found to be infected with gamogonic and oogonic stages, respectively. The source of infection is inconclusive, as a natural origin cannot be excluded. Microgamont, macrogamont, oocyst and sporozoite structure and fine structure are described and found to conform in general, but not in detail, to previous descriptions. Gamonts and oocysts occurred predominantly in the liver and spleen. Walled sporulating oocysts were situated within macrophage centres. Oocysts yielded a progeny of 32 sporozoites. Pre-erythrocytic sporozoites developed within expanded inclusions, within their host cell, from which they massively invaded the liver and spleen, and to a lesser extent the lungs and kidneys. Sporozoites occurred in a parasitophorous vacuole in the erythrocytes. Conspecificity with Lankesterella dicroglossi Paperna et Ogara, 1996 reported from the same host species in Kenya remains uncertain due to several structural and developmental differences.

  20. First record of a parasitic septate gregarines (Apicomplexa: Sporozoea) in the shrimp Peneaus monodon in Sundarbans of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, J; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    2010-04-01

    Investigations on the incidence of septate gregarines in shrimp have immense importance because of severe pathogenicity of the parasite. The septate gregarines infect the midgut of shrimp Peneaus monodon and severe infection disturbs the intestinal tissues. Mostly gregarines of the genus Nematopsis have been identified from cultured peneaid shrimp. It has worldwide in distribution. In India, gregarine parasites have so far been reported from penaeid shrimps of Bombay and Kerala. The species which was isolated from the midgut of shrimp Peneaus monodon collected from Kharibari area of Sunderbans. 9 out of 20 i.e. 45% of the randomly sampled hosts were found to be infected with a species of the genus Nematopsis. Different developmental stages including trophozoites, sporadins, and gametocysts of the Nematopsis sp. infecting the shrimp have been isolated. No correlations have been established between incidence of infection and environmental parameters.

  1. Phylogeny of marine Gregarines (Apicomplexa)--Pterospora, Lithocystis and Lankesteria--and the origin(s) of coelomic parasitism.

    PubMed

    Leander, Brian S; Lloyd, Shane A J; Marshall, Wyth; Landers, Stephen C

    2006-02-01

    Gregarines constitute a large group of apicomplexans with diverse modes of nutrition and locomotion that are associated with different host compartments (e.g. intestinal lumena and coelomic cavities). A broad molecular phylogenetic framework for gregarines is needed to infer the early evolutionary history of apicomplexans as a whole and the evolutionary relationships between the diverse ultrastructural and behavioral characteristics found in intestinal and coelomic gregarines. To this end, we sequenced the SSU rRNA gene from (1) Lankesteria abbotti from the intestines of two Pacific appendicularians, (2) Pterospora schizosoma from the coelom of a Pacific maldanid polychaete, (3) Pterospora floridiensis from the coelom of a Gulf Atlantic maldanid polychaete and (4) Lithocystis sp. from the coelom of a Pacific heart urchin. Molecular phylogenetic analyses including the new sequences demonstrated that several environmental and misattributed sequences are derived from gregarines. The analyses also demonstrated a clade of environmental sequences that was affiliated with gregarines, but as yet none of the constituent organisms have been described at the ultrastructural level (apicomplexan clade I). Lankesteria spp. (intestinal parasites of appendicularians) grouped closely with other marine intestinal eugregarines, particularly Lecudina tuzetae, from polychaetes. The sequences from all three coelomic gregarines branched within a larger clade of intestinal eugregarines and were similarly highly divergent. A close relationship between Pterospora schizosoma (Pacific) and Pterospora floridiensis (Gulf Atlantic) was strongly supported by the data. Lithocystis sp. was more closely related to a clade of marine intestinal gregarines consisting of Lankesteria spp. and Lecudina spp. than it was to the Pterospora clade. These data suggested that coelomic parasitism evolved more than once from different marine intestinal eugregarines, although a larger taxon sample is needed to further explore this inference.

  2. Phylogeny of gregarines (Apicomplexa) as inferred from small-subunit rDNA and beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Leander, Brian S; Clopton, Richard E; Keeling, Patrick J

    2003-01-01

    Gregarines are thought to be deep-branching apicomplexans. Accordingly, a robust inference of gregarine phylogeny is crucial to any interpretation of apicomplexan evolution, but molecular sequences from gregarines are restricted to a small number of small-subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from derived taxa. This work examines the usefulness of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin sequences for inferring gregarine phylogeny. SSU rRNA genes from Lecudina (Mingazzini) sp., Monocystis agilis Stein, Leidyana migrator Clopton and Gregarina polymorpha Dufour, as well as the beta-tubulin gene from Leidyana migrator, were sequenced. The results of phylogenetic analyses of alveolate taxa using both genes were consistent with an early origin of gregarines and the putative 'sister' relationship between gregarines and Cryptosporidium, but neither phylogeny was strongly supported. In addition, two SSU rDNA sequences from unidentified marine eukaryotes were found to branch among the gregarines: one was a sequence derived from the haemolymph parasite of the giant clam, Tridacna crocea, and the other was a sequence misattributed to the foraminiferan Ammonium beccarii. In all of our analyses, the SSU rDNA sequence from Colpodella sp. clustered weakly with the apicomplexans, which is consistent with ultrastructural data. Altogether, the exact position of gregarines with respect to Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans remains to be confirmed, but the congruence of SSU rDNA and beta-tubulin trees with one another and with morphological data does suggest that further sampling of molecular data will eventually put gregarine diversity into a phylogenetic context.

  3. Observation on Monocystis constricta n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa: Monocystidae) from an Indian earthworm, Eutyphoeus quaripapillatus Michelsen, 1907.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mitra, Amlan Kumar; Göçmen, Bayram

    2009-01-01

    A biodiversity survey of aseptate gregarines in earthworm hosts in the Calcutta district of West Bengal State revealed the existence of a new species of aseptate gregarine under the genus Monocystis Stein, 1848. The monocystid gregarines obtained from the earthworm host, Eutyphoeus quaripapillatus Michelsen, 1907 have been identified as a new species. The mucron was indistinct. The gamonts are elongated, ovoid, have a hood like structure at the anterior end and measure 150.1-212.4 (188.1+/-2.1) micromx66.1-112.1 (72.3+/-1.1) microm. The gametocysts are ellipsoid and measure 92.3-136.3 microm (111.2+/-2.1)x78.3-114.4 microm (82.6+/-3.6) microm. Prominent syzygy was apparent. Oocysts are navicular, measuring 14.1-22.3 (18.1+/-3.2) micromx9.1-15.2 (11.9+/-1.1) microm.

  4. Molecular characterization of gregarines from sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and description of Psychodiella n. g. (Apicomplexa: Gregarinida).

    PubMed

    Votýpka, Jan; Lantová, Lucie; Ghosh, Kashinath; Braig, Henk; Volf, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Sand fly and mosquito gregarines have been lumped for a long time in the single genus Ascogregarina and on the basis of their morphological characters and the lack of merogony been placed into the eugregarine family Lecudinidae. Phylogenetic analyses performed in this study clearly demonstrated paraphyly of the current genus Ascogregarina and revealed disparate phylogenetic positions of gregarines parasitizing mosquitoes and gregarines retrieved from sand flies. Therefore, we reclassified the genus Ascogregarina and created a new genus Psychodiella to accommodate gregarines from sand flies. The genus Psychodiella is distinguished from all other related gregarine genera by the characteristic localization of oocysts in accessory glands of female hosts, distinctive nucleotide sequences of the small subunit rDNA, and host specificity to flies belonging to the subfamily Phlebotominae. The genus comprises three described species: the type species for the new genus--Psychodiella chagasi (Adler and Mayrink 1961) n. comb., Psychodiella mackiei (Shortt and Swaminath 1927) n. comb., and Psychodiella saraviae (Ostrovska, Warburg, and Montoya-Lerma 1990) n. comb. Its creation is additionally supported by sequencing data from other gregarine species originating from the sand fly Phlebotomus sergenti. In the evolutionary context, both genera of gregarines from mosquitoes (Ascogregarina) and sand flies (Psychodiella) have a close relationship to neogregarines; the genera represent clades distinct from the other previously sequenced gregarines.

  5. Immunodetection of the microvillous cytoskeleton molecules villin and ezrin in the parasitophorous vacuole wall of Cryptosporidium parvum (Protozoa: Apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Bonnin, A; Lapillonne, A; Petrella, T; Lopez, J; Chaponnier, C; Gabbiani, G; Robine, S; Dubremetz, J F

    1999-11-01

    Microvilli - actin - villin - ezrin - Cryptosporidium parvum The sporozoites and merozoites of the Apicomplexan protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) invade the apical side of enterocytes and induce the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole which stays in the brush border area and disturbs the distribution of microvilli. The vacuole is separated from the apical cytoplasm of the cell by an electron-dense layer of undetermined composition. In order to characterize the enterocyte cytoskeleton changes that occur during C. parvum invasion and development, we used both confocal immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy to examine at the C.parvum-enterocyte interface the distribution of three components of the microvillous skeleton, actin, villin and ezrin. In infected cells, rhodamine-phalloidin and anti-villin and anti-ezrin antibodies recognized ring-like structures surrounding the developing parasites. By immunoelectron microscopy, both villin and ezrin were detected in the parasitophorous vacuole wall surrounding the luminal and lateral sides of the intracellular parasite. In contrast, anti-beta and anti-gamma actin antibodies showed no significant labelling of the vacuolar wall. These observations indicate that the parasitophorous vacuole wall contains at least two microvillus-derived components, villin and ezrin, as well as a low amount of F-actin. These data suggest that C.parvum infection induces a rearrangement of cytoskeleton molecules at the apical pole of the host cell that are used to build the parasitophorous vacuole.

  6. Two new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from skinks, Emoia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Fiji and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Fisher, Robert N

    2013-08-01

    Between September and October 1991 and again during September 1992, skinks (Emoia spp.) were collected from various localities on Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and examined for coccidians. One of 4 (25%) De Vis' emo skinks (Emoia pallidiceps) from PNG harbored an undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora grinbikpelapalai n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal, 18.1 × 14.9 (17-20 × 14-16) μm, with a bilayered wall and a length/width index (L/W) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a prominent polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.7 × 7.6 (10-11 × 7-8) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of large scattered globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora grinbikpelapalai was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Pope's emo skinks (Emoia popei) from PNG. One of 13 (8%) white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), from Fiji, was passing another undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora casei n. sp. were elongate, 31.8 × 21.3 (28-35 × 18-24) μm, with a bilayered wall and a L/W index of 1.5. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were all absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 15.3 × 10.6 (14-16 × 10-12) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of scattered globules among sporozoites or as a cluster surrounding sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora casei was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor) from Fiji. This represents the first report of coccidia from Emoia spp. and, to our knowledge, the initial documentation of reptilian coccidia from herpetofauna from Papua New Guinea.

  7. Synoptic revision of Blabericola (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) parasitizing blaberid cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae), with comments on delineating gregarine species boundaries.

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E

    2012-06-01

    Complete synoptic redescriptions, including complete morphometric data for all life cycle stages, species recognition characters, and differential comparisons are presented for the 4 gregarine species comprising Blabericola . Blabericola cubensis ( Peregrine, 1970 ), Blabericola haasi (Geus, 1969), Blabericola migrator ( Clopton, 1995 ), and Blabericola princisi ( Peregrine, 1970 ) are redescribed from their type hosts, i.e., the discoid cockroach Blaberus discoidalis , the lobster cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea , the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa , and the Bolivian cockroach Blaberus boliviensis , respectively. These gregarine species descriptions are stabilized through deposition of extensive new voucher collections. Species of Blabericola are distinguished by differences in relative metric ratios, morphology of oocysts, and by relative metric ratios of mature gamonts in association. This work is discussed as a model for morphological species descriptions in the Eugregarinorida including the 6 principles for morphological gregarine species descriptions, i.e., a centroid and population variation approach, adequate sample size, partitioning developmental variation and sexual dimorphism, recognition and minimization of fixation and physiological artifacts to eliminate false morphotypes, and comparative data sets across multiple life cycle stages.

  8. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Carlia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 from rainbow skinks, Carlia ailanpalai Zug and Carlia eothen Zug is described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Oöcysts of Eimeria zugi n. sp. from one of one (100%) C. eothen are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 25.1 × 15.5 μm and have a length/width ratio of 1.6. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. The sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 10.3 × 7.1 μm in size and do not contain Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites are elongate, 12.8 × 2.9 μm in size, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. This is the ninth species of coccidium described from skinks from PNG, and the new species described herein is apparently endemic to the skink genus Carlia (Gray).

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria haematodi, coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in a rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2015-06-01

    Eimeria haematodi was first described in 1977 from the rainbow lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) in Papua New Guinea. In the present study, we re-describe this coccidian species morphologically and molecularly from a rainbow lorikeet bird in Western Australia (WA). The oocysts were ovoid to slightly piriform and measured 28.5-37.8 by 25.8-33.0 µm (33.3 by 28.1 µm). Oocyst wall was approximately 1.5 µm thick and bilayered. Micropyle (5-7 µm) and oocyst residuum (8.0-10.0 µm) present; polar granule was absent. Sporocysts ellipsoidal, 11.8-13.6 by 8.0-9.6 µm (12.2 by 8.3 µm), with thin convex Stieda body and granular sporocyst residuum (4.0-5.0 µm). Molecular characterization of E. haematodi was conducted at 18S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI) loci. At the 18S ribosomal RNA locus, E. haematodi shared 98.1% genetic similarity to E. alabamensis from cattle in New South Wales, Australia. At COI locus, E. haematodi was closest (92.3% similarity) to E. praecox from domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) from Canada and China.

  10. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) from tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1991 and June 1992, feces from 4 species of tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. from Papua New Guinea, were collected and examined for coccidia. Two species, P. flavipes and P. prehensicauda were found to harbor eimerians which are described as new. Oocysts of Eimeria krausi sp. nov. from P. flavipes were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a smooth bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 19.2 × 16.9 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 6.7 μm, L/W of 1.5. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many small granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, 11.7 × 2.7 μm, in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. Oocysts of Eimeria greeri sp. nov. from P. prehensicauda were ellipsoidal with a smooth bilayered wall, (L × W) 23.0 × 18.3 μm, with a L/W of 1.3. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 8.4 μm, with a L/W of 1.2. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many large granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. We document here the first report of coccidia from skinks of the genus Prasinohaema.

  11. Endogenous Life Cycle of Eimeria marmosopos (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Opossum, Didelphis marsupialis (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Duszynski, Donald

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous life cycle of Eimeria marmosopos was studied in experimentally infected young opossums, Didelphis marsupialis . All the endogenous stages were located in the epithelial cells of villi in the small intestine. Giemsa-stained mucosal scrapings and histological sections were studied for the diagnosis of all the life cycle stages. Eimeria marmosopos has 3 generations of meronts (M) that differ by size, shape, and number of merozoites (m), which also differ in their size, shape, and location of their nuclei within the cytoplasm of the meronts. The 3 meront types, M(1)-M(3), respectively, had 8-15 (m(1)), 4-9 (m(2)), and 22-30 (m(3)) merozoites. Macrogametocytes and microgametocytes, as well as macrogametes and microgametes, completed the sexual cycle, finishing with the formation of unsporulated oocysts. This parasite's endogenous development produced severe intestinal lesions in experimentally infected opossums. There are 56 Eimeria species known from all marsupials worldwide, but this is the first complete life cycle in which both the asexual and sexual stages have been documented.

  12. Four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Owen Stanley Skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 12 Owen Stanley skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Booulenger) were collected from various localities on Papua New Guinea and examined for coccidians. Six (50%) were found to harbour four eimerians that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria burseyi sp. n. were elongate to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (length x width, L x W) 36.0 x 24.0 microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.5. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria goldbergi sp. n. were ellipsoidal, with a bilayered wall, and measured 21.4 x 16.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.3. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria boulengeri sp. n. were spheroidal to slightly subspheroidal, with a thin, single-layered wall that readily collapses, and measured 16.0 microm, L/W ratio was 1.0. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but usually one (sometimes two) polar granule(s) were present. Oocysts of Eimeria niuginiensis sp. n. were oblong to tapered with a bilayered wall, and measured 20.0 x 13.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.5. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. To our knowledge, these represent the only coccidians ever described from P. stanleyanus.

  13. Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from a Red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) (Passeriformes: Meliphagidae) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2014-05-01

    A new species, Isospora anthochaerae n. sp. is described from a Red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata). Sporulated oocysts (n=37) are subspherical, with smooth colourless to pale brown bilayered oocyst wall, 0.8 μm thick (outer layer 0·6 μm, inner 0.2 μm thick). Oocyst with 2 spheroidal to subspheroidal sporocysts. Oocyst length, 23.4 μm (20.0-26.0); oocyst width, 20.7 μm (19.0-22.0); oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.1. Micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts with compact sporocyst residuum and 4 sporozoites. Sporocyst length, 14.5 μm; sporocyst width, 10.1 μm sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.4. Molecular analysis was conducted at four loci; the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the COI locus, I. anthochaerae n. sp. exhibited 98.5% similarity to Isospora lesouefi from a Regent honeyeater (Xanthomyza phrygia) and 98% similarity with an Isospora sp. (iSAT5) from a blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla). Based on morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite that to date has only been found in Red wattlebirds.

  14. A new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from eastern coachwhip, Coluber flagellum flagellum (Reptilia: Ophidia) from Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Connior, Matthew B

    2015-09-01

    Between June 2013 and August 2014, four eastern coachwhips, Coluber flagellum flagellum were collected from Arkansas (n = 2) and Oklahoma (n = 2) and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. One (25%) harboured an isosporan that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Isospora kiamichiensis sp. n. were spheroidal to subspheroidal with a uni-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 25.0 × 22.2 μm, with an L/W ratio of 1.1. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 13.9 × 9.4 μm, with an L/W ratio of 1.5. A pronounced, button-like Stieda body was present as well as a substieda body. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. This is the first isosporan and fourth coccidian reported from eastern coachwhip snakes. In addition, a single oocyst of an unknown choleoeimerian was recovered from this host.

  15. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Roehrs, Zachary P

    2012-10-01

    During September 2004, 4 adult northern myotis, Myotis septentrionalis, were collected from LeFlore County, Oklahoma (n  =  2), and Logan (n  =  1) and Yell (n  =  1) counties, Arkansas, and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Three of 4 bats (75%) were passing oocysts of Eimeria spp. Oocysts of Eimeria tumlisoni n. sp. were subspherical, 17.6 × 16.8 (16-19 × 14-18) µm with a shape index of 1.0 (1.0-1.1). A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, although 1-2 bilobed polar granules were often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.5 × 5.9 (9-12 × 5-7) µm with a shape index of 1.8 (1.6-2.0). A Stieda body was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum was present consisting of compact to dispersed granules between the sporozoites. The sporozoites were elongate, with subspherical anterior refractile body and spherical posterior refractile body; a nucleus was not discernable. This is the second coccidian reported from this host and the first instance of a bat coccidian reported from Oklahoma. We also document a new geographic record for Eimeria catronensis in Oklahoma and provide an emended description.

  16. A new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis (Ophidia: Colubridae), in southeastern Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Roehrs, Zachary P; Seville, R Scott

    2012-06-01

    A single flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis , collected in early October 2010 from Choctaw County, Oklahoma, was found to harbor an undescribed species of Caryospora . Oocysts of Caryospora choctawensis n. sp. were spherical to subspherical, 15.8 × 15.0 (14-18 × 14-16) µm, with a thick, bilayered wall and a shape index (length∶width) of 1.1. A micropyle and an oocyst residuum were absent, but prominent Stieda and bubble-like sub-Stieda bodies were present as well as a bilobed polar granule near the oocyst wall. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.8 × 9.0 (10-12 × 8-9) µm, with a shape index of 1.2. The sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the second time a caryosporan species has been reported from T. gracilis but the first coccidian ever described from a reptilian host in Oklahoma. Additional T. gracilis from Arkansas (n  =  6), Oklahoma (n  =  1), and Texas (n  =  7) were examined, and a single specimen from Newton County, Arkansas harbored Caryospora gracilis Upton, McAllister, Trauth, and Bibb, 1992 , previously reported from T. gracilis collected in Arkansas and Texas.

  17. A new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from eastern coachwhip, Coluber flagellum flagellum (Reptilia: Ophidia) from Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Connior, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Between June 2013 and August 2014, four eastern coachwhips, Coluber flagellum flagellum were collected from Arkansas (n = 2) and Oklahoma (n = 2) and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. One (25%) harboured an isosporan that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Isospora kiamichiensis sp. n. were spheroidal to subspheroidal with a uni-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 25.0 × 22.2 µm, with an L/W ratio of 1.1. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 14.2 × 9.8 µm, with an L/W ratio of 1.5. A pronounced, button-like Stieda body was present as well as a substieda body. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. This is the first isosporan and fourth coccidian reported from eastern coachwhip snakes. In addition, a single oocyst of an unknown choleoeimerian was recovered from this host. PMID:26204185

  18. Comparison of the ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA in Emeria callospermophili (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Sciurid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Motriuk-Smith, Dagmara; Seville, R Scott; Quealy, Leah; Oliver, Clinton E.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomy of the coccidia has historically been morphologically based. The purpose of this study was to establish if conspecificity of isolates of Eimeria callospermophili from 4 ground-dwelling squirrel hosts (Rodentia: Sciuridae) is supported by comparison of rDNA sequence data and to examine how this species relates to eimerian species from other sciurid hosts. Eimeria callospermophili was isolated from 4 wild caught hosts, i.e., Urocitellus elegans, Cynomys leucurus, Marmota flaviventris, and Cynomys ludovicianus. The ITS1 and ITS2 genomic rDNA sequences were PCR generated, sequenced, and analyzed. The highest intraspecific pairwise distance values of 6.0% in ITS1 and 7.1% in ITS2 were observed in C. leucurus. Interspecific pairwise distance values greater than 5% do not support E. callospermophili conspecificity. Generated E. callospermophili sequences were compared to Eimeria lancasterensis from Sciuris niger and Sciurus niger cinereus, and Eimeria ontarioensis from S. niger. A single well-supported clade was formed by E. callospermophili amplicons in Neighbor Joining and Maximum Parsimony analyses. However, within the clade there was little evidence of host or geographic structuring of the species. PMID:21506777

  19. Eimeria pavoaegyptica sp. nov. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in faeces of Indian peacocks, Pavo cristatus Linnaeus, 1758 (Galliformes: Phasianidae) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shahawy, Ismail Saad

    2010-12-01

    Coprological examination of 15 Indian peacocks, Pavo cristatus, revealed the presence of a coccidium species of the genus Eimeria, which apparently represents a previously undescribed species. Sporulation is exogenous and fully developed oocysts of Eimeria pavoaegyptica sp. nov. are ellipsoidal, with a dimension of 15 (13-16) × 12 (10-12.9) microm and with a shape index of 1.25 (1-1.3). The sporulated oocysts have no micropyle but enclose one large rectangular-shaped polar granule and an oocyst residuum. The oocysts have a distinct two-layered wall, which is ~approximately1.7 microm thick. The outer layer has a smooth texture; it fills ~¾ of the total thickness and appears bicolored. The sporocysts are boat-shaped, of about 10 (9-11) × 4 (4-4.7) microm; their average shape-index is 2.5 microm with a small pointed Stieda body and a smooth, thin single-layered wall. No substieda body is detected. The sporocysts contain numerous, nearly uniform granular residua. The sporozoites are banana-shaped, 6 × 3 microm and each has two different-sized refractile bodies.

  20. A NEW SPECIES OF EIMERIA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE EASTERN PIPISTRELLE, PERIMYOTIS SUBFLAVUS (CHIROPTERA: VESPERTILIONIDAE), IN ARKANSAS

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Burt, Scott; Seville, R. Scott; Robison, Henry W.

    2011-01-01

    During November 2009 and March 2010, 20 adult eastern pipistrelles, Perimyotis (=Pipistrellus) subflavus were collected from Polk County, Arkansas, and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Two (10%) of the bats were found to be passing oocysts of an undescribed species of Eimeria. Oocysts of Eimeria heidti n. sp. were ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 26.1 × 20.5 (23-31 × 18-23) μm, with a bilayered wall, externally rough, internally smooth, and with a shape index of 1.3. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a subspherical polar granule was often present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 13.0 × 8.8 (11-15 × 7-13) μm, the shape index was 1.6, a Stieda body was present and sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. A sporocyst residuum consisting of multiple globules dispersed along the perimeter of the sporocyst and between the sporozoites were present, sporozoites were elongate, with a subspherical anterior refractile body and elongate posterior refractile body; a nucleus not discernable. This is the second coccidian reported from this host and the fourth instance of a coccidian species reported from an Arkansas bat. PMID:21506799

  1. Effects of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on on chickens highly infected with Eimeria tenella (Phylum Apicomplexa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Intensive poultry production systems depend on chemoprophylaxis with anticoccidial drugs to combat infection. A floor-pen study was conducted to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of Artemisia annua and Foeniculum vulgare on Eimeria tenella infection. Five experimental groups were establi...

  2. A new species of Monocystis stein, 1848 (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) from the Indian earthworm, Amynthas Hawayanus Rosa, 1891 (Annelida: Oligochaeta).

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Göçmen, Bayram; Bhowmik, Biplab; Mitra, Amlan Kumar

    2006-01-01

    As a part of an ongoing biodiversity survey of aseptate gregarine fauna of oligochaete hosts of West Bengal, an expedition was carried out in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal and most of the earthworms collected were found to be infested with a species of Monocystis Stein, 1848. The monocystid species was collected from the seminal vesicles of the earthworm and was identified as a new species, Monocystis amynthae sp. nov. The gamont of the new species is characterized by having an elongated body with broad anterior end, separated from the narrow posterior end by a prominent constriction measuring 49.0-77.0 (66.0+/-1.3) microm x 32.0-41.0 (37.0+/-2.8) microm. The gametocysts are oval-shaped, measuring 40.0-65.0 (58.0+/-2.1) microm. The oocysts are navicular, measuring 8.0-12.0 (10.5+/-1.1) microm x 4.0-6.0 (5.5+/-1.1) microm.

  3. Rodents as intermediate hosts of Hepatozoon ayorgbor (Apicomplexa: Adeleina: Hepatozoidae) from the African ball python, Python regius?

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Michal; Kamler, Martin; Bulantová, Jana; Votýpka, Jan; Modrý, David

    2008-03-01

    Two experimental trials were performed to elucidate the role of rodents in the life cycle of Hepatozoon species using snakes as intermediate hosts. In one trial, two ball pythons, Python regius Shaw, 1802 were force fed livers of laboratory mice previously inoculated with sporocysts of Hepatozoon ayorgbor Sloboda, Kamler, Bulantová, Votýpka et Modrý, 2007. Transmission was successful in these experimentally infected snakes as evidenced by the appearance of intraerythrocytic gamonts, which persisted until the end of trial, 12 months after inoculation. Developmental stages of haemogregarines were not observed in histological sections from mice. In another experimental trial, a presence of haemogregarine DNA in mice inoculated with H. ayorgbor was demonstrated by PCR in the liver, lungs and spleen.

  4. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from eastern red bats, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in Arkansas and North Carolina.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Upton, Steve J

    2009-08-01

    During August 2003 and August 2004, 11 adult eastern red bats, Lasiurus borealis, were collected and their feces examined for coccidian parasites. Bats were obtained in August 2003 from Garland, Montgomery, and Yell counties, Arkansas (n=6) and in August 2004 from Anson and Montgomery counties, North Carolina (n=5). Seven (63.6%) of the bats were passing oocysts of 2 undescribed species of Eimeria. Oocysts of Eimeria dowleri n. sp. were subspherical to ellipsoidal, 24.7 x 22.0 (23-26 x 20-23) microm, with a bilayered wall, externally moderately pitted, internally smooth, and with a shape index of 1.1. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 13.4 x 9.2 (12-14 x 8-9) pm; shape index was 1.5; Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present. A sporocyst residuum consisting of homogeneous granules was scattered among the sporozoites; sporozoites were elongate, with a subspherical anterior refractile body and an elongate posterior refractile body; a nucleus was not discernable. Oocysts of Eimeria sealanderi n. sp. were subspherical to ellipsoidal, 16.7 x 14.4 (15-18 x 13-16) microm, with a bilayered wall, externally lightly pitted, internally smooth, and with a shape index of 1.2. A micropyle was absent, but the oocyst residuum and polar granule were present. Oocyst residuum consisted of a single, membrane-bound homogenous granule. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 8.9 x 5.7 (8-10 x 5-6) microm, with a shape index of 1.6; Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present. The sporocyst residuum consisted of 10, to several dozen, homogeneous granules of various sizes loosely clustered among the sporozoites, which were elongate and without obvious refractile bodies and nucleus. This is the first time any coccidian has been reported from this host and the first instance of a bat coccidian reported from North Carolina.

  5. Mattesia weiseri sp. nov., a new neogregarine (Apicomplexa: Lipotrophidae) pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Yaman, Mustafa; Radek, Renate

    2015-08-01

    A new neogregarine pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is described based on light microscopy and ultrastructural characteristics. The pathogen infects the fat body and the hemolymph of the beetle. The infection was nonsynchronous so that different developmental stages could be observed simultaneously in the hemolymph. All life stages from sporozoite to oocyst of the pathogen including micronuclear and macronuclear merozoites were detected. The sporozoites measured about 8.7 × 1.9 μm and trophozoites, 11.9 × 3.3 μm. Micronuclear merozoites seen in the hemolymph were motile, elongate, slightly broader at the anterior pole, and measured 18.4 × 2.0 μm. Macronuclear merozoites had a size of ca. 16.4 × 2.3 μm. Gametogamy results in the formation of two paired oocysts within a gametocyst. The lemon-shaped oocyst measured 10.9 × 6.1 μm and had a very thick wall (375-450 nm). All morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of the life cycle stages indicate that the described neogregarine in D. micans is clearly different from known Mattesia species infecting bark beetles, and from any other described Mattesia spp. Therefore, we create a new species, Mattesia weiseri sp. nov.

  6. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from tri-colored bats, Perimyotis subflavus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), from the Ouachitas of Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Arlen, Robert; Connior, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Between February 2013 and October 2013, eleven tri-colored bats, Perimyotis subflavus were collected from Marion, Polk, and Searcy counties, Arkansas, and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. Two of eleven (18%) harboured an eimerian that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria mcdanieli sp. n. were ellipsoidal to elongate with a bi-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 28.3 × 17.9 µm, with an L/W ratio of 1.6. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a single polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 12.6 × 8.3 µm, with an L/W ratio of 1.5. A pronounced, nipple-like Stieda body was present as well as a substieda body. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed bubble-like granules. This is the third coccidian described from tri-colored bats and the sixth species reported from Arkansas chiropterans. In addition, both infected bats harbored a concurrent infection of Eimeria heidti McAllister, Burt, Seville, and Robison, 2011. PMID:25236281

  7. A new lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium intabazwe n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Haemospororida: Plasmodiidae) in the Afromontane Pseudocordylus melanotus (Sauria: Cordylidae) with a review of African saurian malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    van As, Johann; Cook, Courtney A; Netherlands, Edward C; Smit, Nico J

    2016-08-08

    Saurian malaria parasites are diverse apicomplexan blood parasites including the family Plasmodiidae Mesnil, 1903, and have been studied since the early 1900s. Currently, at least 27 species of Plasmodium are recorded in African lizards, and to date only two species, Plasmodium zonuriae (Pienaar, 1962) and Plasmodium cordyli Telford, 1987, have been reported from the African endemic family Cordylidae. This paper presents a description of a new malaria parasite in a cordylid lizard and provides a phylogenetic hypothesis for saurian Plasmodium species from South Africa. Furthermore, it provides a tabular review of the Plasmodium species that to date have been formally described infecting species of African lizards. Blood samples were collected from 77 specimens of Pseudocordylus melanotus (A. Smith, 1838) from Platberg reserve in the Eastern Free State, and two specimens of Cordylus vittifer (Reichenow, 1887) from the Roodewalshoek conservancy in Mpumalanga (South Africa). Blood smears were Giemsa-stained, screened for haematozoa, specifically saurian malaria parasites, parasite stages were photographed and measured. A small volume was also preserved for TEM studies. Plasmodium and Haemoproteus primer sets, with a nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol, were employed to target a fragment of the cytochrome-b (cyt-b) gene region. Resulting sequences of the saurian Plasmodium species' isolates were compared with each other and to other known Plasmodium spp. sequences in the GenBank database. The presence of P. zonuriae in both specimens of the type lizard host C. vittifer was confirmed using morphological characteristics, which subsequently allowed for the species' molecular characterisation. Of the 77 P. melanotus, 44 were parasitised by a Plasmodium species, which when compared morphologically to other African saurian Plasmodium spp. and molecularly to P. zonuriae, supported its description as a new species Plasmodium intabazwe n. sp. This is the first morphological and molecular account of Plasmodium species within the African endemic family Cordylidae from South Africa. The study highlights the need for molecular analysis of other cordylid Plasmodium species within Africa. Future studies should also include elucidating of the life-cycles of these species, thus promoting the use of both morphological and molecular characteristics in species descriptions of saurian malaria parasites.

  8. Four New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Austin, Christopher C; Fisher, Robert N

    2017-02-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. impar from the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidiceps from PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicauda were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 μm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp. and they add to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

  9. New host and distributional records for Cryptosporidium sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from lizards (Sauria: Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu, South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 295 lizards, comprising 21 species in 2 families (Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Takapoto, and Vanuatu in the South Pacific, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Only 6 lizards (2%) were found to be passing Cryptosporidium oocysts in their feces, including 2 of 30 (7%) Oceania geckos, Gehyra oceanica, from Rarotonga, Cook Islands, and 4 of 26 (15%) Pacific blue-tailed skinks, Emoia caeruleocauda, from Efate Island, Vanuatu. This represents the largest survey for Cryptosporidium in Pacific island lizards, and we document 2 new host and 2 new locality records for this parasite genus.

  10. Two new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus spp. (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Madagascar, including a new host of Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Scott Seville, R; Hartdegen, Ruston

    2016-10-01

    During May and June 2015, four common leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus fimbriatus (Schneider), five satanic leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus phantasticus (Boulenger), and four mossy leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus sikorae Boettger originally collected from Madagascar and housed at the Dallas Zoo, USA, had their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. Eight (62%) geckos were found to be passing oöcysts, including a new eimerian, a new isosporan and a previously described eimerian. Three of four (75%) U. fimbratus (type-host) and one of five (20%) U. phantasticus were infected with Eimeria schneideri n. sp.; oöcysts were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured (mean length × width, L × W) 15.1 × 13.5 µm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but one to many polar granules were present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 6.9 × 5.3 µm, L/W = 1.3. Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. Four of five (80%) U. phantasticus harboured Isospora boulengeri n. sp.; oöcysts were subpheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured 17.3 × 16.0 µm, L/W = 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but a polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.5 × 6.9 µm, L/W = 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present but a para-Stieda body was absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present with dispersed granules. In addition, one of four (25%) U. sikorae was infected with an eimerian indistinguishable from Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987, previously reported from Madagascar day gecko, Phelsuma grandis Gray and golddust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda (Boettger) from Madagascar. These are the first coccidians described from Uroplatus spp.

  11. New data on Eimeria dicentrarchi (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a common parasite of farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) from the mid-eastern Adriatic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study extends the original description of Eimeria dicentrarchi Daoudi and Marquès, 1987, a common coccidian parasite of European sea bass from the mid-eastern Adriatic, by providing insights into the parasite’s site of infection, development and pathogenicity. E. dicentrarchi was found in vario...

  12. Phylogenetic congruence of Sarcocystis neurona Dubey et al., 1991 (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in the United States based on sequence analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    PubMed

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Murphy, Alice J; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the genetic diversity, phylogeny and phylogeographical relationships of available Sarcocystis neurona isolates from different localities in the United States. All 13 Sarcocystis isolates from different hosts were subjected to polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analyses using two published DNA markers (25/396 and 33/54). The 334 bp sequence of the 25/396 marker of these isolates and Besnoitia darlingi, B. bennetti, Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum were sequenced and compared. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using neighbour-joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP) and minimum evolution (ME) methods based on the sequences of the 25/396 marker of the 13 Sarcocystis isolates obtained in this study and sequences of 10 related isolates from GenBank. Phylogenetic trees revealed a close relatedness among S. neurona isolates in the US (nucleotide sequence diversity <5.0%). US isolates formed a monophyletic group and appeared more closely related to each other than to the South American isolates, which formed a separate lineage. NJ and ME trees with Kimura 2-parameter model separated S. neurona into two separate groups: a northern US group and a Southern US group. These findings suggest a correlation between grouping of the isolates and geographical segregation and were consistent with a genetic bottleneck hypothesis during opossum colonisation of North America. These data do not support either the view of S. neurona as a single super-species or its division into multiple subspecies.

  13. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai n. spp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) Associated with Severe Myositis and Hepatitis in the Domestic Dog (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, J. P.; Sykes, J. E.; Shelton, G. D.; Sharp, N.; Verma, S. K.; Calero-Bernal, R.; Viviano, J.; Sundar, N.; Khan, A.; Grigg, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    There are several reports of Sarcocystis sarcocysts in muscles of dogs but these species have not been named. Additionally, there are 2 reports of Sarcocystis neurona in dogs. Here, we propose 2 new names, Sarcocystis caninum, and Sarcocystis svanai for sarcocysts associated with clinical muscular sarcocystosis in 4 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), 1 each from Montana and Colorado in the USA, and 2 from British Columbia, Canada. Only the sarcocyst stage was identified. Most of the sarcocysts identified were S. caninum. Sarcocysts were studied using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and PCR. Based on collective results 2 new species, Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai were designated. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai were structurally distinct. Sarcocystis caninum sarcocysts were up to 1.2 mm long and up to 75 μm wide. By light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was relatively thin and smooth. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the sarcocyst wall “type 9”, 1–2 μm thick, and contained villar protrusions that lacked microtubules. Bradyzoites in sections were 7–9 μm long. Sarcocysts of S. svanai were few and were identified by TEM. Sarcocystis svanai sarcocysts were “type 1”, thin walled (< 0.5 μm), and the wall lacked villar protrusions but had tiny blebs that did not invaginate. DNA was extracted either from infected frozen muscle biopsies or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Dogs were either singly infected with S. caninum or multiply co-infected with S. caninum and S. svanai (the result of a mixed infection) based on multi-locus DNA sequencing and morphology. BLASTn analysis established that the sarcocysts identified in these dogs were similar to, but not identical to S. canis or S. arctosi, parasites found to infect polar bears (Ursus maritimus) or brown bears (Ursus arctosi), respectively. However, the S. caninum sequence showed 100% identify over the 18S rRNA region sequenced to that of S. arctica, a parasite known to infect Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus). PMID:25256157

  14. Morphological and molecular characterization of Choleoeimeria pogonae n. sp. coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae, 1989, Paperna and Landsberg) in a western bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor).

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2016-01-01

    A new species, Choleoeimeria pogonae n. sp. is described from a Western bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor) in Western Australia. Sporulated oocysts (n = 48) were cylindroidal in shape. Oocyst length, 27.0 (26.0-28.3) μm, oocyst width, 15.2 (14.0-16.5) μm, oocyst length/width ratio (L/W) 1.8 (1.6-1.9), each with 4 sporocysts (Eimeria-like) and a polar granule, but lacking a micropyle and oocyst residuum. Sporocysts are ovoidal in shape, sporocyst length, 10.0 (9.0-11.0) μm, sporocyst width 8.5 (7.0-9.5) μm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.2 (1.1-1.3). Stieda, substieda and parasubstieda bodies were all absent. Molecular analysis was conducted at the 18S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) loci. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S sequences revealed that C. pogonae n. sp. grouped together with another four Choleoeimeria spp. and exhibited 99.1%-99.4% genetic similarity. At the COI locus, C. pogonae n. sp. was in an independent clade and had the highest similarity (80.4%) to Eimeria cf. mivati from a chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). According to the morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite. This study further supports the taxonomy of Choleoeimeria spp. as a new genus based on molecular phylogenetic analysis.

  15. Description of the oocysts of three new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from iguanid lizards (Sauria: Iguanidae) of Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Daszak, P; Ball, S J

    1998-01-01

    Three new species of Eimeria are described from iguanid lizards of Central and South America. The oocysts of each species have no micropyles or residua and the sporocysts lack Stieda bodies, but all have a sporocyst residuum. Eimeria sanctaluciae n.sp. was found in the St. Lucia tree lizard, Anolis luciae, collected from the Maria Islands, Lesser Antilles. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, averaging 17.3 x 16.5 microns, with a single layered colourless wall; about 60% contain polar granules. The sporocysts are ellipsoidal and average 7.7 x 5.5 microns. Eimeria liolaemi n.sp. was recovered from the blue-gold swift, Liolaemus taenius, from Chile. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, measuring 21 x 20.1 microns with a single-layered colourless wall. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 7.4 x 6.8 microns. Eimeria caesicia n.sp. is described from the Brazilian collared iguanid, Tropidurus torquatus. The oocysts measure 27.4 x 23.7 microns, are spherical to subspherical, with a bilayered wall, the outer surface of which appears pale blue in colour, the thin, inner wall appearing brown, when viewed by direct light under the optical microscope. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 9.4 x 7.2 microns. Unnamed polysporocystid oocysts with dizoic sporocysts are reported from the faeces of the lesser St. Vincent tree lizard, Anolis trinitatis and the possibility of spurious parasitism briefly discussed. In addition, oocysts of an unnamed Isospora sp. with a smooth oocyst wall which closely resembles I. reui were recovered from A. trinitatis.

  16. Effects of Developmental Temperature on Gametocysts and Oocysts of Two Species of Gregarines Blabericola migrator and Blabericola cubensis (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae) Parasitizing Blaberid Cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Kolman, Jon A; Clopton, Richard E; Clopton, Debra T

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic environmental conditions, especially temperature and humidity, have profound effects on the growth and development of gregarines, but these effects remain largely undocumented. Quantifying the effects of environmental conditions on the growth and development of exogenous gregarine ontogenetic stages is an important first step in understanding the transmission, population dynamics, and environmental persistence of gregarine infection. In this study, we examined the effect of 6 environmental temperatures (10, 18, 22, 27, 35, and 40 C) at constant humidity (0 mmHg vapor pressure deficit) on gametocyst development and oocyst viability in 2 gregarine species: Blabericola migrator and Blabericola cubensis parasitizing the Tiger-striped Hissing Cockroach, Princisia vanwaerebecki, and the Discoid Cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis, respectively. Temperature has a significant effect on gametocyst development and oocyst viability for both gregarine species. Gametocyst development for both gregarine species displays a similar threshold response to environmental temperature: 10 and 40 C represent extremes outside their developmental range, but within these extremes, the relationship between gametocyst development and temperature is weakly direct. Dehiscence increased with temperature from 68% at 18 C to 93% at 22 C and remained at that level through 35 C. Developmental temperature also has a meaningful but inverse effect on oocyst viability of both B. migrator and B. cubensis. For both species, oocyst viability is highest at 18 and 22 C and is significantly reduced at 27 and 35 C. Thus oocyst production and sporozoite viability are linked but environmentally independent phenomena. Overall, there is an acceptable developmental temperature zone for B. migrator and B. cubensis that ranges from 18 to 27 C, but production of viable sporozoites is greatest in a relatively narrow zone around 22 C. Prior studies have postulated that mechanisms that concentrate oocysts and hosts, such as host behavior or host microhabitat preference, increase the host-oocyst encounter rate and thus transmission. This study indicates that abiotic influences on gametocyst development may also lead to heterogeneous oocyst distributions in the environment and increase the likelihood of host-oocyst encounters.

  17. Two new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the flap-necked chameleon Chamaeleo dilepis (Sauria: Chamaeleonidae) in the Republic of Namibia.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T

    2012-09-01

    Two new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 from flap-necked chameleons Chamaeleo dilepis Leach are described from the faeces of specimens collected in the Republic of Namibia. Oöcysts of Isospora freedi n. sp. from one of four (25%) C. dilepis collected in the East Caprivi District are spherical to subspherical, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 23.7 × 21.2 μm and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent but a polar granule is sometimes present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 13.9 × 10.3 μm in size with prominent Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Isopora mandelai n. sp. from three of seven (43%) C. dilepis collected in the Outjo District are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 36.9 × 31.0 μm and have an L/W ratio of 1.2. The micropyle, oöcyst residuum and polar granule are absent. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 15.3 × 11.1 μm in size and contain Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies; and the non-membranous sporocyst residuum is composed of granules of various sizes. The sporozoites contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. These two new taxa represent the third and fourth coccidian species reported from C. dilepis.

  18. Seven new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from colubrid snakes of Guatemala and a discussion of what to call ellipsoid tetrasporocystic, dizoic coccidia of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Asmundsson, I M; Duszynski, D W; Campbell, J A

    2006-06-01

    During a survey of Guatemalan herpetofauna in the summers of 1998-2000, 29 presumed new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 were found, seven of which have a distinct elongate-ellipsoidal shape (L/W ratio >or= 1.7) and are described herein. Six of the seven new species are similar in oöcyst length, width and L/W ratio and sporocyst length, width and L/W ratio, lack a micropyle, oöcyst residuum, Stieda body, sub-- and parastieda bodies, have a polar granule and sporocyst residuum, and their sporocysts appear to have dehiscence sutures. The seventh is slightly smaller and has sporocysts with a Stieda body. The new species are: E. coniophanes n. sp - whose sporulated oöcysts from Coniophanes fissidens are 29.2x14.9 (27-31x13-16) microm, with sporocysts 10.0 x 7.8 microm; E. coniophis n. sp. -from Conophis lineatus are 32.0x16.5 (30-34x14-18) microm, with sporocysts 10.2 x 8.9microm; E. dryomarchoni n. sp. - from Drymarchon corais are 32.2x17.7 (31-34x17-19) microm, with sporocysts 10.7 x 8.6 microm; E. leptophis n. sp. - from Leptophis mexicanus are 29.5x17.0 (28-31x16-18) microm, with sporocysts 10.0 x 9.1 microm; E. oxybelis n. sp. - from Oxybelis aeneus are 31.8x16.5 (29-33x15-18) microm, with sporocysts 10.3 x 8.8 microm; and E. scaphiodontophis n. sp. - from Scaphiodontophis annulatus are 30.0x15.3 (28-33x14-16) microm, with sporocysts 9.9 x 7.9 microm. Sporulated oöcysts of E. siboni n. sp. from Sibon nebulata are 24.3x14.2 (21-27x13-16) microm, with sporocysts 10.0 x 7.1 microm and with a Stieda body. We conclude that until all aspects of each life-cycle are known, it is prudent at this time to name all tetrasporocystic dizoic coccidia from snakes as members of Eimeria rather than place some of them in Choleoeimeria Paperna & Landsberg, 1989.

  19. First molecular characterization of a Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infecting birds and description of a new species infecting storm petrels (Aves: Hydrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Masello, Juan F; Bedolla, Yuliana; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2014-06-01

    During a survey of blood parasites in a population of Leach's and black storm petrels ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa and Oceanodroma melania) in Mexico, infection by a Hepatozoon species in erythrocytes of several birds was noted. Here we describe the species as Hepatozoon peircei sp. nov. Some species of Hepatozoon described from birds have been identified as lankesterellids when DNA molecular analyses were conducted. However, a sequence of 1,774 bp of the parasite found infecting storm petrels in this study clearly show the parasite is a species of the genus Hepatozoon. This is the first Hepatozoon species infecting birds to be characterized at the molecular level and the first found infecting erythrocytes and not leucocytes.

  20. Chlamydotis macqueenii and C. undulata (Aves: Otididae) are new hosts for Caryospora megafalconis (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) and proposal of the genus Avispora gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Rolf K; Woo, Patrick C Y; Poon, Rosana W S; Lau, Susanna K P; Sivakumar, Saritha; Kinne, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    Oocysts of a coccidian morphologically matching features of Caryospora megafalconis Klüh, 1994 were found in fecal samples and contents of the large intestines in five wild caught Clamydotis macqueenii (Gray) and 19 captive bred C. undulata (Jaquin). Scrapings of the intestinal mucosa of necropsied birds revealed macrogamonts and unsporulated oocysts. Sporulation in a potassium dichromate solution at 26 °C was completed in 48 h. Intestinal contents and sporulated oocysts obtained from feces of infected bustards as well as sporulated oocysts of C. megafalconis and C. neofalconis Böer, 1982 from two Falco rusticolis Linnaeus and one F. peregrinus Tunstall were used for DNA sequencing of the cox1, 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA), and 28S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic trees for all three genes showed that sequences of the material from bustards were identical with C. megafalconis from falcons. C. neofalconis and C. daceloe Yang et al., 2014 were situated in the neighboring clades. Contrary to this, subsequent sequences of C. bigenetica Wacha and Christiansen, 1982 from rattlesakes are at a distinct distance suggesting that despite morphological similarities of the oocysts, there are differences between Caryospora species of birds and reptiles. For this reason, it might be reasonable to transfer avian Caryospora species into a new genus Avispora.

  1. Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infection and selected hematological values of the neotropical rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Serpentes: Viperidae), from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Motta, Rafael Otávio Cançado; Cunha, Lucas Maciel; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; da Silva, Israel José; Pinto, Ana Cristina Araújo; Braga, Erika Martins; da Cunha, Arildo Pinto; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to establish the hematological values of Crotalus durissus collilineatus snakes captured in Brazil as well as to verify the effects of hematozoan infection on these snakes. Eighty-three blood samples were drawn from C. d. collilineatus specimens for analysis. The sample set was composed of 30 males and 30 females, recently caught from the wild, and 11 males and 12 females bred in captivity. Blood samples were used to determine red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, thrombocyte counts, hematocrit values, hemoglobin concentration, and total plasma protein. Blood smears were used to diagnose Hepatozoon spp. infection and to calculate the parasitic load in the sample as well as the percentage of immature red cells. Results obtained for the wild-caught animals, with and without parasites, were compared among themselves and with the values obtained for the captive-bred animals. Hematological values for C. durissus were established. Wild-caught snakes had an infection rate of 38.3%, while no Hepatozoon sp. infection was detected in the captive-bred animals. The snakes which were not infected by the Hepatozoon sp. exhibited average weight, length, and weight-length ratios higher than those of the infected animals. An increase in immature red cells was noted in the Hepatozoon-infected snakes.

  2. Chromatin supraorganization, DNA fragmentation, and cell death in erythrocytes of the rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae), infected with the protozoan, Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae).

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Maristela; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2007-05-01

    Forms of the protozoan of the Hepatozoon genus are detected free in the circulation and also within some of the erythrocytes of infected snakes. In healthy snakes, DNA fragmentation and cell death usually affect a few circulating erythrocytes in agreement with the long life span expected for these cells. In the present study we investigated whether infection by Hepatozoon spp. affected the incidence of DNA fragmentation and cell death in erythrocytes from the rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus. Methods such as the kinetics of Feulgen-DNA hydrolysis, and the TUNEL and comet assays, previously used for the study of chromatin organization and DNA fragmentation in erythrocytes of healthy snakes, were used. The results indicated that Hepatozoon spp. increased the DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation typical of cell death in circulating erythrocytes of C. d. terrificus, including cells that do not harbour the parasite. The Hepatozoon infection is thus suggested to accelerate destruction of erythrocytes in the rattlesnake, not only affecting cells harbouring the parasite, but also in those without it.

  3. Life cycle of Hepatozoon affluomaloti sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae) in crag lizards (Sauria: Cordylidae) and in culicine mosquitoes from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Van As, Johann; Davies, Angela J; Smit, Nico J

    2015-01-01

    A new haemogregarine species Hepatozoon affluomaloti sp. n. is described from erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of crag lizards Pseudocordylus melanotus (Smith) and Pseudocordylus subviridis (Smith) (Sauria: Cordylidae) from mountainous regions in the Eastern Free State, South Africa. This species can be distinguished from all other congeners based on its large size, staining properties and life cycle development in its vector, Culex (Afroculex) lineata (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae). Mature gamonts stain mostly uniformly pinkish-purple with Giemsa, sometimes containing darker azurophilic granules anterior and posterior to the nucleus. The reflexed posterior extremity of the gamont stage sometimes stains slightly deeper purple and the nucleus is dense and placed in the posterior third of the parasite body. Merogonic stages of this haemogregarine occur in the liver tissues of P. melanotus with dizoic meronts. Macromeronts contains 2-7 macromerozoites and micromeronts contains 9-24 micromerozoites. Sporogonic developmental stages found in the proposed final host and vector, C. lineata, include large oocysts, measuring 54 × 48 µm on average. Sporulating oocysts with 8 nuclei are present in mosquitoes 6-7 days post-feeding on infected lizards. Sporocysts with mature sporozoites measure 31.0 × 21.8 µm on average and each contains 2-8 large sporozoites. It is suggested that transmission of infective sporozoites is achieved through predation of lizards on mosquitoes.

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the coccidian cephalopod parasites Aggregata octopiana and Aggregata eberthi (Apicomplexa: Aggregatidae) from the NE Atlantic coast using 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Martínez, Sheila; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Gestal, Camino

    2013-08-01

    The coccidia genus Aggregata is responsible for intestinal coccidiosis in wild and cultivated cephalopods. Two coccidia species, Aggregata octopiana, (infecting the common octopus Octopus vulgaris), and A. eberthi, (infecting the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis), are identified in European waters. Extensive investigation of their morphology resulted in a redescription of A. octopiana in octopuses from the NE Atlantic Coast (NW Spain) thus clarifying confusing descriptions recorded in the past. The present study sequenced the 18S rRNA gene in A. octopiana and A. eberthi from the NE Atlantic coast in order to assess their taxonomic and phylogenetic status. Phylogenetic analyses revealed conspecific genetic differences (2.5%) in 18S rRNA sequences between A. eberthi from the Ria of Vigo (NW Spain) and the Adriatic Sea. Larger congeneric differences (15.9%) were observed between A. octopiana samples from the same two areas, which suggest the existence of two species. Based on previous morphological evidence, host specificity data, and new molecular phylogenetic analyses, we suggest that A. octopiana from the Ria of Vigo is the valid type species. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Sarcocystis masoni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae), and redescription of Sarcocystis aucheniae from llama (Lama glama), guanaco (Lama guanicoe) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is considerable confusion concerning the species of Sarcocystis in South American camelids (SAC). Several species names have been used, however, proper descriptions are lacking. In the present paper we redescribe the macroscopic sarcocyst forming Sarcocystis aucheniae and describe and name the...

  6. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria purpureicephali n. sp. (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) in a red-capped parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius, Kuhl, 1820) in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Ryan, Una

    2016-01-01

    A new Eimeria species is described from a red-capped parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius). Sporulated oocysts (n = 31) were spherical to subspherical, with a rough bilayered oocyst wall 0.8 μm thick. Oocysts measured 24.0 × 22.8 (20.4–26.4 × 18.3–25.9) μm, oocyst length/width ratio, 1.10. Oocyst residuum, polar granule and micropyle were absent. Sporocysts are elongate-ovoid, 11.0 × 7.3 (12.7–9.2 × 7.9–6.6) μm, sporocyst length/width ratio, 1.51 (1.33–1.71). The thin convex Stieda body and indistinct substieda bodies were present and the sporocyst residuum was composed of numerous small granules less than 1.0 μm in diameter dispersed randomly. Each sporocyst contained 2 sausage-shaped sporozoites in head-to-tail arrangement. The sporozoite nuclei were located centrally surrounded by refractile bodies. Molecular analysis was conducted at two loci; the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. At the18S locus, the new isolate shared 99.0% genetic similarity with Eimeria dispersa and Eimeria innocua from the turkey. At the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene locus, this new isolate was most closely related to E. dispersa and E. innocua, presented 99.0% and 98.0% genetic similarity, respectively. This new isolate and E. dispersa grouped together in the same clade. Based on the morphological and molecular data, this isolate is a new species of coccidian parasite, which is named Eimeria purpureicephali n. sp. after its host, the red-capped parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius). PMID:26977403

  7. Description of Sarcocystis lari sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the great black-backed gull, Larus marinus (Charadriiformes: Laridae), on the basis of cyst morphology and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Prakas, Petras; Kutkiené, Liuda; Butkauskas, Dalius; Sruoga, Aniolas; Zalakevicius, Mecislovas

    2014-02-01

    A morphological type of Sarcocystis cysts found in one of two examined great black-backed gull, Larus marinus (Linnaeus) (Laridae), is considered to represent a new species for which the name Sarcocystis lari sp. n. is proposed and its description is provided. The cysts are ribbon-shaped, very long (the largest fragment found was 6 mm long) and relatively narrow (up to 75 microm). Under a light microscope the cyst wall reaches up to 1 microm and seems to be smooth. Using a computerized image analysis system, knolls, which resemble protrusions on the wall surface, are visible. Lancet-shaped cystozoites measure in average 6.9 x 1.4 microm (range 6.3-7.9 microm x 1.2-1.5 microm) in length. Observed using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the cyst wall is wavy and measures up to 1.2 microm in thickness. The parasitophorous vacuolar membrane has regularly arranged small invaginations. Cyst content is divided into large chambers by septa. Sarcocystis lari sp. n. has type-1 tissue cyst wall and is morphologically indistinguishable from other bird Sarcocystis species characterized by the same type of the wall. On the basis of 18S rRNA gene, 28S rRNA gene and ITS-1 region sequences, S. lari is a genetically distinct species, being most closely related to avian Sarcocystis species whose definitive hosts are predatory birds.

  8. Experimental transmission of Sarcocystis muris (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from the feces of a naturally infected feral cat (Felis catus) to immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cats serve as definitive hosts for zoonotic toxoplasmosis, a prevalent infection that threatens human reproductive health, but they also excrete sporocysts of related parasites that pose no known human health risk. Here, we provide the first definitive evidence for natural infection with Sarcocystis...

  9. Description of a new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the western Derby eland Taurotragus derbianus derbianus Gray (Artiodactyla: Bovidae) in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Máca, Ondřej

    2012-06-01

    Examination of faecal samples from semi-captive western Derby elands Taurotragus derbianus derbianus Gray, in the Bandia and Fathala Reserves of Senegal, revealed the presence of oöcysts of the genus Eimeria Schneider, 1875 that we considered to represent a new species, Eimeria derbiani n. sp. The new species possesses nearly ellipsoidal oöcysts (length/width ratio 1.3) with a bi-layered wall and an average size of 27.6 × 21.5 μm. E. derbiani possesses a micropyle covered by a micropylar cap and ovoidal, single-layered sporocysts with an average size of 14.9 × 7.7 μm, each with a Stieda body. Sporozoites of E. derbiani possess a large refractile body and a nucleus. Sporulation lasted for 2 days at 23°C. The new species is differentiated from the two species parasitising Taurotragus oryx Pallas, E. canna Triffitt, 1924 and E. triffittae Yakimoff, 1934.

  10. A comparison of multiple methods for estimating parasitemia of hemogregarine hemoparasites (apicomplexa: adeleorina) and its application for studying infection in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Maia, João P; Harris, D James; Carranza, Salvador; Gómez-Díaz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing infection patterns among hosts is critical for our understanding of the evolution and impact of parasitism in natural populations. However, the correct estimation of infection parameters depends on the performance of detection and quantification methods. In this study, we designed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the 18 S rRNA gene to estimate prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon infection and compared its performance with microscopy and PCR. Using qPCR, we also compared various protocols that differ in the biological source and the extraction methods. Our results show that the qPCR approach on DNA extracted from blood samples, regardless of the extraction protocol, provided the most sensitive estimates of Hepatozoon infection parameters; while allowed us to differentiate between mixed infections of Adeleorinid (Hepatozoon) and Eimeriorinid (Schellackia and Lankesterella), based on the analysis of melting curves. We also show that tissue and saline methods can be used as low-cost alternatives in parasitological studies. The next step was to test our qPCR assay in a biological context, and for this purpose we investigated infection patterns between two sympatric lacertid species, which are naturally infected with apicomplexan hemoparasites, such as the genera Schellackia (Eimeriorina) and Hepatozoon (Adeleorina). From a biological standpoint, we found a positive correlation between Hepatozoon intensity of infection and host body size within each host species, being significantly higher in males, and higher in the smaller sized host species. These variations can be associated with a number of host intrinsic factors, like hormonal and immunological traits, that require further investigation. Our findings are relevant as they pinpoint the importance of accounting for methodological issues to better estimate infection in parasitological studies, and illustrate how between-host factors can influence parasite distributions in sympatric natural populations.

  11. A Comparison of Multiple Methods for Estimating Parasitemia of Hemogregarine Hemoparasites (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) and Its Application for Studying Infection in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, João P.; Harris, D. James; Carranza, Salvador; Gómez-Díaz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors influencing infection patterns among hosts is critical for our understanding of the evolution and impact of parasitism in natural populations. However, the correct estimation of infection parameters depends on the performance of detection and quantification methods. In this study, we designed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the 18 S rRNA gene to estimate prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon infection and compared its performance with microscopy and PCR. Using qPCR, we also compared various protocols that differ in the biological source and the extraction methods. Our results show that the qPCR approach on DNA extracted from blood samples, regardless of the extraction protocol, provided the most sensitive estimates of Hepatozoon infection parameters; while allowed us to differentiate between mixed infections of Adeleorinid (Hepatozoon) and Eimeriorinid (Schellackia and Lankesterella), based on the analysis of melting curves. We also show that tissue and saline methods can be used as low-cost alternatives in parasitological studies. The next step was to test our qPCR assay in a biological context, and for this purpose we investigated infection patterns between two sympatric lacertid species, which are naturally infected with apicomplexan hemoparasites, such as the genera Schellackia (Eimeriorina) and Hepatozoon (Adeleorina). From a biological standpoint, we found a positive correlation between Hepatozoon intensity of infection and host body size within each host species, being significantly higher in males, and higher in the smaller sized host species. These variations can be associated with a number of host intrinsic factors, like hormonal and immunological traits, that require further investigation. Our findings are relevant as they pinpoint the importance of accounting for methodological issues to better estimate infection in parasitological studies, and illustrate how between-host factors can influence parasite distributions in sympatric natural populations. PMID:24743340

  12. Experimental modes of Caryospora bigenetica (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infection in swine and the effects of temperature and salinity on parasite infectivity in porcine tissue.

    PubMed

    Douglas, R J; Sundermann, C A; Perry, L D; Douglas, T S; Lindsay, D S

    1993-10-01

    Four crossbred pigs (Sus scrofa) were inoculated orally with Caryospora bigenetica oocysts derived from snake and mouse feces, and with C. bigenetica infected mouse tissue. One pig also was given i.m. injections of methylprednisolone acetate. All four pigs displayed clinical signs including erythema, edema, and lethargy. Caryocysts were observed histologically in numerous tissues including ear, tongue, jowl, shoulder, loin, intercostal, ham, hock, and feet. The four pigs each were butchered into six commercial cuts: shoulder, loin, side, ham, hock, and feet. Raw 10 g samples from each cut were bioassayed by pepsin digestion and s.c. inoculation into 12 Swiss-Webster mice (Mus musculus) and 12 cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). Seventeen of 24 mice and cotton rats exhibited clinical signs and C. bigenetica tissue infections. Remaining portions of the six commercial cuts were temperature or saline treated, and 10 g samples were bioassayed in 16 mice and 12 cotton rats. No clinical sign or tissue infection was observed in these animals. Our study presents evidence that swine can be infected with C. bigenetica by ingesting oocysts present in snake feces or mouse feces (following inoculation of mice with snake-derived oocysts) or by ingesting C. bigenetica infected rodent tissue, that endogenously produced C. bigenetica oocysts are not excreted in the feces of swine, and that C. bigenetica in pork can be rendered noninfective by freezing at -20 degrees C (-4 degrees F) for 21 days, frying at 84 degrees C (183 degrees F) for 17 min, microwaving at 88 degrees C (190 degrees F) for 17 min, grilling at 82 degrees C (180 degrees F) for 48 min, baking at 95 degrees C (203 degrees F) for 230 min, boiling at 100 degrees C (212 degrees F) for 60 min, or by curing at 4 degrees C (39 degrees F) for 20 days.

  13. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Haemogregarina sp. (Apicomplexa: Adeleina: Haemogregarinidae) from the blood of the Caspian freshwater turtle Mauremys caspica (Gmelin) (Geoemydidae) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Ehsan; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Ahmadi, Amin

    2016-06-01

    To date, a number of species of Haemogregarina have been described from different turtle hosts, mainly based on the morphology of the developmental stages detected in the host erythrocytes. The diversity and overlapping morphological features in the old and recent descriptions has led to considerable complications in the taxonomy of Haemogregarina spp. In this study, different stages of maturity and developing gamonts of a putative new species of Haemogregarina were detected in erythrocytes of the Caspian turtle Mauremys caspica (Gmelin) (Geoemydidae) originating from a southern province in Iran. Although some of the morphological characteristics were consistent with Haemogregarina stepanowi Danilewsky, 1885, some new observations were made, particularly in the gamont stage. The phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rDNA sequences revealed that the present isolate appears as basal to a large clade of Haemogregarina spp. with sequences available in the GenBank database. In accordance with the phylogenetic results, the present Iranian isolate showed a higher degree of interspecific divergence (up to 3.3%) compared to the data for the taxa available in the GenBank database. Thus, molecular data indicate that this isolate may represent a new species. However, further genetic analyses are needed as a complementary tool to the morphological characterisation in order to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships of Haemogregarina spp.

  14. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai n. spp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) Associated with Severe Myositis and Hepatitis in the Domestic Dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Jitender P; Sykes, Jane E; Shelton, G Diane; Sharp, Nick; Verma, Shiv K; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Viviano, Jenifer; Sundar, Natarajan; Khan, Asis; Grigg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    There are several reports of Sarcocystis sarcocysts in muscles of dogs, but these species have not been named. Additionally, there are two reports of Sarcocystis neurona in dogs. Here, we propose two new names, Sarcocystis caninum, and Sarcocystis svanai for sarcocysts associated with clinical muscular sarcocystosis in four domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), one each from Montana and Colorado in the USA, and two from British Columbia, Canada. Only the sarcocyst stage was identified. Most of the sarcocysts identified were S. caninum. Sarcocysts were studied using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and polymerase chain reaction. Based on collective results two new species, S. caninum and S. svanai were designated. Sarcocystis caninum and S. svanai were structurally distinct. Sarcocystis caninum sarcocysts were up to 1.2 mm long and up to 75 μm wide. By light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was relatively thin and smooth. By TEM, the sarcocyst wall was "type 9", 1-2 μm thick, and contained villar protrusions that lacked microtubules. Bradyzoites in sections were 7-9 μm long. Sarcocysts of S. svanai were few and were identified by TEM. Sarcocystis svanai sarcocysts were "type 1", thin walled (< 0.5 μm), and the wall lacked villar protrusions but had tiny blebs that did not invaginate. DNA was extracted either from infected frozen muscle biopsies or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Dogs were either singly infected with S. caninum or multiply co-infected with S. caninum and S. svanai (the result of a mixed infection) based on multilocus DNA sequencing and morphology. BLASTn analysis established that the sarcocysts identified in these dogs were similar to, but not identical to Sarcocystis canis or Sarcocystis arctosi, parasites found to infect polar bears (Ursus maritimus) or brown bears (Ursus arctosi), respectively. However, the S. caninum sequence showed 100% identify over the 18S rRNA region sequenced to that of S. arctica, a parasite known to infect Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

  15. Molecular phylogeny of marine gregarine parasites (Apicomplexa) from tube-forming polychaetes (Sabellariidae, Cirratulidae and Serpulidae), including descriptions of two new species of Selenidium.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kevin C; Leander, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Selenidium is a genus of gregarine parasites that infect the intestines of marine invertebrates and have morphological, ecological, and motility traits inferred to reflect the early evolutionary history of apicomplexans. Because the overall diversity and phylogenetic position(s) of these species remain poorly understood, we performed a species discovery survey of Selenidium from tube-forming polychaetes. This survey uncovered five different morphotypes of trophozoites (feeding stages) living within the intestines of three different polychaete hosts. We acquired small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from single-cell (trophozoite) isolates, representing all five morphotypes that were also imaged with light and scanning electron microscopy. The combination of molecular, ecological, and morphological data provided evidence for four novel species of Selenidium, two of which were established in this study: Selenidium neosabellariae n. sp. and Selenidium sensimae n. sp. The trophozoites of these species differed from one another in the overall shape of the cell, the specific shape of the posterior end, the number and form of longitudinal striations, the presence/absence of transverse striations, and the position and shape of the nucleus. A fifth morphotype of Selenidium, isolated from the tube worm Dodecaceria concharum, was inferred to have been previously described as Selenidium cf. echinatum, based on general trophozoite morphology and host association. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rDNA sequences resulted in a robust clade of Selenidium species collected from tube-forming polychaetes, consisting of the two new species, the two additional morphotypes, S. cf. echinatum, and four previously described species (Selenidium serpulae, Selenidium boccardiellae, Selenidium idanthyrsae, and Selenidium cf. mesnili). Genetic distances between the SSU rDNA sequences in this clade distinguished closely related and potential cryptic species of Selenidium that were otherwise very similar in trophozoite morphology.

  16. Four new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. imparfrom the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidicepsfrom PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicaudawere subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 μm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp. and they add to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

  17. Six new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from endangered Phelsuma spp. geckoes (Sauria: Gekkonidae) of the Black River Gorges National Park, Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Daszak, Peter; Ball, Stanley J; Jones, Carl G; Streicker, Daniel G; Snow, Keith R

    2009-12-01

    Six new species of coccidia are described from endangered Phelsuma spp. geckoes (Sauria: Gekkonidae) endemic to Mauritius, Indian Ocean. Five new species (3 Eimeria and 2 Isospora species) are described from Phelsuma rosagularis Vinson et Vinson; all lack a micropyle and an oocyst residuum, and all have a sporocyst residuum. Oocysts of Eimeria swinnertonae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 22.2 x 17.8 (20.8-24.8 x 16.8-18.4) microm; SI 1.25; polar granule absent. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 8.8 x 7.0 (8.0-9.6 x 6.4-8.0) microm; SI 1.3; Stieda body absent. Oocysts of Eimeria stebbinsi sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 17.4 x 11.7 (16.0-19.2 x 11.2-12.8) microm; SI 1.5; polar granules present. Sporocysts are elongate-ellipsoidal, 7.7 x 4.0 (7.2-8.0 x 3.2-5.6) microm; SI 1.9; Stieda body present. Oocysts of Eimeria raleighi sp. n. are spheroidal to sub-spheroidal, 17.0 x 15.5 (16.0-19.2 x 14.4-16.8) microm; SI 1.1; polar granule present. Sporocysts are sub-spheroidal, 7.8 x 6.6 (7.2-8.0 x 6.4-7.2) microm; SI 1.2; Stieda body absent. Oocysts of Isospora cottinghamae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 19.8 x 15.5 (17.6-21.6 x 14.4-17.6) microm; SI 1.3; polar granules present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 10.8 x 6.9 (9.6-12.8 x 6.4-8.0) microm; SI 1.6; Stieda body present. Oocysts of Isosporapearlae sp. n. are ellipsoidal, 16.0 x 11.5 (15.2-17.6 x 9.6-12.8) microm; SI 1.4; polar granule present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 8.8 x 5.4 (8.0-9.6 x 4.8-6.4) microm; SI 1.6; Stieda and substieda bodies present. One new Eimeria species is described from the blue-tailed day gecko, Phelsuma cepediana Merrem. Oocysts of Eimeria hartleyi sp. n. are sub-spheroidal to ellipsoidal, 18.2 x 14.5 (16.0-20.8 x 13.6-16.0) microm; SI 1.26; polar granules present. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, 7.5 x 5.3 (6.4-8.0 x 4.8-6.4) microm; SI 1.4; Stieda body present. We report the presence of tetrazoic spheroidal to sub-spheroidal oocysts or sporocysts 10.2 x 8.5 (9.9-10.4 x 8.3-8.8) microm; SI 1.2 from an individual of P. cepediana. These oocysts or sporocysts are significantly larger than the Cryptosporidium species so far described from reptiles, and likely represent excretion of spuriously ingested sporocysts of a Sarcocystis or Adelina coccidian.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny and Ultrastructure of Caliculium glossobalani n. gen. et sp. (Apicomplexa) from a Pacific Glossobalanus minutus (Hemichordata) Confounds the Relationships Between Marine and Terrestrial Gregarines.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kevin C; Reimer, James D; Jenke-Kodama, Holger; Leander, Brian S

    2014-01-01

    Gregarines are a diverse group of apicomplexan parasites with a conspicuous extracellular feeding stage, called a "trophozoite", that infects the intestines and other body cavities of invertebrate hosts. Although the morphology of trophozoites is very diverse in gregarines as a whole, high degrees of intraspecific variation combined with relatively low degrees of interspecific variation make the delimitation of different species based on trophozoite morphology observed with light microscopy difficult. The coupling of molecular phylogenetic data with comparative morphology has shed considerable light onto the boundaries and interrelationships of different gregarine species. In this study, we isolated a novel marine gregarine from the hepatic region of a Pacific representative of the hemichordate Glossobalanus minutus, and report the first ultrastructural and molecular data from any gregarine infecting this distinctive group of hosts. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of an SSU rDNA sequence derived from two single-cell isolates of this marine gregarine demonstrated a strong and unexpected affiliation with a clade of terrestrial gregarines (e.g. Gregarina). This molecular phylogenetic data combined with a comparison of the morphological features in previous reports of gregarines collected from Atlantic representatives of G. minutus justified the establishment of a new binomial for the new isolate, namely Caliculium glossobalani n. gen. et sp. The molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated a clade of terrestrial gregarines associated with a sequence acquired from a marine species, which suggest that different groups of terrestrial/freshwater gregarines evolved independently from marine ancestors.

  19. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Duszynski, Donald W; Bush, Sarah E; Fisher, Robert N; Austin, Christopher C

    2013-10-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  20. Environmental Persistence and Infectivity of Oocysts of Two Species of Gregarines, Blabericola migrator and Blabericola cubensis (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida: Blabericolidae), Parasitizing Blaberid Cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Clopton, Richard E; Steele, Shelby M; Clopton, Debra T

    2016-04-01

    For apicomplexan parasites using an oral-fecal transmission route with significant environmental exposure, the environmental persistence and infectivity of the oocyst has a direct impact on local infection dynamics, including the ability to withstand extended periods without readily available hosts. Herein we quantify the environmental persistence and infectivity of the oocysts of 2 septate gregarine species at controlled temperature and humidity and demonstrate that they can persist over multiple generational time spans. Species of Blabericola generally complete their endogenous life cycles from oocyst to oocyst within 10 days. The median residual environmental oocyst lifetime for Blabericola oocysts in this study is 21-28 days, but a significant number of oocysts of Blabericola migrator persisted and remained infective in the environment for up to 39 days while those of Blabericola cubensis persisted and remained infective for up to 92 days. Although long-lived relative to their own generational time, the oocysts of Blabericola species infecting cockroaches are short-lived relative to gregarines infecting tenebrionid beetles. For these gregarines, oocysts can persist in the environment and remain infective for up to 787 days. Mechanistically, environmental persistence and infectivity are probably energy-limited phenomena related to the amount of stored amylopectin and the basal metabolic rate of quiescent oocysts.

  1. The 3D Structure of the Apical Complex and Association with the Flagellar Apparatus Revealed by Serial TEM Tomography in Psammosa pacifica, a Distant Relative of the Apicomplexa

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The apical complex is one of the defining features of apicomplexan parasites, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium, where it mediates host penetration and invasion. The apical complex is also known in a few related lineages, including several non-parasitic heterotrophs, where it mediates feeding behaviour. The origin of the apical complex is unclear, and one reason for this is that in apicomplexans it exists in only part of the life cycle, and never simultaneously with other major cytoskeletal structures like flagella and basal bodies. Here, we used conventional TEM and serial TEM tomography to reconstruct the three dimensional structure of the apical complex in Psammosa pacifica, a predatory relative of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates that retains the archetype apical complex and the flagellar apparatus simultaneously. The P. pacifica apical complex is associated with the gullet and consists of the pseudoconoid, micronemes, and electron dense vesicles. The pseudoconoid is a convex sheet consisting of eight short microtubules, plus a band made up of microtubules that originate from the flagellar apparatus. The flagellar apparatus consists of three microtubular roots. One of the microtubular roots attached to the posterior basal body is connected to bypassing microtubular strands, which are themselves connected to the extension of the pseudoconoid. These complex connections where the apical complex is an extension of the flagellar apparatus, reflect the ancestral state of both, dating back to the common ancestor of apicaomplexans and dinoflagellates. PMID:24392150

  2. Coccidial dispersion across New World marsupials: Klossiella tejerai Scorza, Torrealba & Dagert, 1957 (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina) from the Brazilian common opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied) (Mammalia: Didelphimorphia).

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Caroline Spitz; Berto, Bruno Pereira; do Bomfim Lopes, Bruno; Cordeiro, Matheus Dias; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; Filho, Walter Leira Teixeira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2014-09-01

    Klossiella tejerai Scorza, Torrealba & Dagert, 1957 is a primitive coccidian parasite reported from the New World marsupials Didelphis marsupialis (Linnaeus) and Marmosa demerarae (Thomas). The current work describes K. tejerai from the Brazilian common opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied) in Southeastern Brazil, evidencing the coccidial dispersion across opossums of the same family. The sporocysts recovered from urine samples were ellipsoidal, 20.4 × 12.7 µm, with sporocyst residuum composed of scattered spherules and c.13 sporozoites per sporocyst, with refractile bodies and nucleus. Macrogametes, microgametes, sporonts, sporoblasts/sporocysts were identified within parasitophorous vacuoles of epithelial cells located near the renal corticomedullary junction. Didelphis marsupialis should not have transmitted K. tejerai to D. aurita because they are not sympatric; however M. demerarae is sympatric with D. marsupialis and D. aurita. Therefore, D. aurita becomes the third host species for K. tejerai in South America.

  3. Molecular and Parasitological Survey of Ovine Piroplasmosis, Including the First Report of Theileria annulata (Apicomplexa: Theileridae) in Sheep and Goats from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozubek, S; Aktas, M

    2017-01-01

    Blood and tick samples were collected from 333 apparently healthy sheep and 257 goats as well as 10 sheep exhibiting clinical signs of babesiosis in Adana, Gaziantep, and Adiyaman Provinces in southern Turkey. Fully engorged female ticks were selected and maintained in an incubator until they oviposited. The tick carcasses and their egg masses were examined. Piroplasms compatible with Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. were observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic small ruminants. Genomic DNA isolates from blood of ovine, tick samples, and egg masses were screened for piroplasms by utilizing 18S rRNA polymerase chain reaction and reverse line blotting (RLB) assays. Parasitemia ranged from 0.01% to 5.6% of erythrocytes in clinical cases. RLB showed positivity in 239 (40.5%) of the sampled apparently healthy sheep and goats and revealed the presence of three Theileria and one Babesia species. Theileria ovis was the most prevalent (35.4%), followed by Babesia ovis (5.4%), Theileria annulata (3.9%), and Theileria sp. MK (0.3%). Thirty-two small ruminants infected with T. ovis were also infected with B. ovis One animal infected with T. ovis was also infected with Theileria sp. MK. Ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus bursa, Rhipicephalus turanicus, Hyalomma excavatum, Haemaphysalis parva, and Hyalomma anatolicum Egg masses of two female R. bursa carcasses were infected with B. ovis This is the first report of theileriosis caused by T. annulata in sheep and goats in Turkey. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Numerical and functional responses to the presence of a competitor--the case of Aggregata sp. (Apicomplexa: Aggregatidae) and Octopicola superba (Copepoda: Octopicolidae).

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, F I; Santos, M J

    2014-02-01

    Evidence of interference competition between the eimeriorin coccidian Aggregata sp. and the octopicolid copepod Octopicola superba at the level of the gills of naturally infected Octopus vulgaris is evaluated. Numerical and functional responses are considered for analysis, and the fundamental and realized spatial niches (FSNs and RSNs) are measured as part of the study. While it was not possible to measure the FSN of Aggregata sp., the analysis of the infection levels of O. superba recorded for non-concomitantly and concomitantly infected hosts suggests that the gills and body skin constitute, respectively, the main and accessory sites of infection of the parasite. According to the evidence found, the gills function mainly as an accessory site of infection of Aggregata sp., in specimens in which the caecum and intestine are massively infected. Evidence for a negative interaction between Aggregata sp. and O. superba has been found while controlling for a potential confounding effect of host size. Furthermore, the presence of O. superba on gill lamellae appears to have been negatively affected by the presence of Aggregata sp., while this latter remained mostly undisturbed. The mean number of oocysts of Aggregata sp. in the gills was higher in spring and summer, which were also the seasons presenting the broadest RSN for O. superba.

  5. A linear mitochondrial genome of Cyclospora cayetanensis (Eimeriidae, Eucoccidiorida, Coccidiasina, Apicomplexa) suggests the ancestral start position within mitochondrial genomes of eimeriid coccidia.

    PubMed

    Ogedengbe, Mosun E; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; da Silva, Alexandre J; Arrowood, Michael J; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    The near complete mitochondrial genome for Cyclospora cayetanensis is 6184 bp in length with three protein-coding genes (Cox1, Cox3, CytB) and numerous lsrDNA and ssrDNA fragments. Gene arrangements were conserved with other coccidia in the Eimeriidae, but the C. cayetanensis mitochondrial genome is not circular-mapping. Terminal transferase tailing and nested PCR completed the 5'-terminus of the genome starting with a 21 bp A/T-only region that forms a potential stem-loop. Regions homologous to the C. cayetanensis mitochondrial genome 5'-terminus are found in all eimeriid mitochondrial genomes available and suggest this may be the ancestral start of eimeriid mitochondrial genomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The first record of Gregarina typographi Fuchs (Protista: Apicomplexa: Gregarinidae) from the European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Mustafa; Bakı, Hilal

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study is determining pathogens of Ips typographus from Eastern Black Sea Region in Turkey. Samples collected from the field were taken to laboratuar as soon as possible. Microscopic examination was completed by dissection with Ringer's solution. 780 Ips typographus beetles from Giresun, Rize and Artvin were examined. Gregarines were observed in the populations of I. typographus in the three regions. 27 of 780 beetles were found to be infected by the Gregarina typographi. Total rate of infection was 3.4% in three localities. During the study several life stages of the gregarine pathogen (trophozoite, gamont, Cysts and associative form) were observed. Gametocysts were spherical and from 77 to 85 μm in diameter. Total lengths of solitary gamonts were measured. from 90 to 155 μm. Measurements of gamonts and gametocysts of G. typographi were given and compared with other gregarines isolated from bark beetles. This pathogen is described as Gregarina typographi. The gregarine pathogen of Ips typographus is reported from Turkey for the first time.

  7. Monocystis julkae sp.nov., (Protista: Apicomplexa: Monocystidae) a new aseptate gregarine species of the genus Monocystis Stein, 1848 obtain from an Indian Earthworm, Eutyphoeus kherai, Julka, 1978.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Biplab; Bandyopadhyay, P K

    2017-03-01

    During the course of a biodiversity survey of the endoparasitic aseptate gregarines in the Malda district of West Bengal, India, seminal vesicles of the earthworm, Eutyphoeus kherai, Julka 1978 were found to be infested with a new species, Monocystis julkae sp.nov., of the genus, Monocystis Stein (Arch Anat Phys Med 181-223, 1848). The trophozoite is elongated but slightly constricted posteriorly. A tail like protrusion appears in the posterior end. Anterior end is rather wider than the posterior one. The whole body size of the trophozoite measures 102.2-184.0 (126.7 ± 19.9) µm × 40.9-81.8 (58.2 ± 10.0) µm. Size of the nucleus ranges from 10.2 to 16.3 (11.9 ± 1.9) µm × 8.1-12.2 (8.8 ± 1.2) µm. The gametocysts are ovoidal containing two unequal gametocytes. Diameter of it measures 61.3-98.1 (75.8 ± 8.6) µm. Oocysts are navicular and measures 6.9-10.0 (8.7 ± 0.9) µm × 3.0-4.6 (4.3 ± 0.4) µm.

  8. Morphological and morphometrical characterization of gametocytes of Hepatozoon procyonis Richards, 1961 (Protista, Apicomplexa) from a Brazilian wild procionid Nasua nasua and Procyon cancrivorus (Carnivora, Procyonidae).

    PubMed

    Soares Ferreira Rodrigues, André Flávio; Daemon, Erik; Massard, Carlos Luiz

    2007-01-01

    The species Hepatozoon procyonis Richards, 1961 was described in Procyon lotor in the USA and then in other reports in the USA, while in Panama H. procyonis has been described in Procyon cancrivorus. The objective of this paper is to report the occurrence of this species in the Brazilian procionids P. cancrivorus and Nasua nausa and to describe the morphology and morphometrics of the gametocytes. The analysis was based on blood smears, stained with Giemsa, which were examined under a photonic microscope. The morphometry was done with an ocular micrometer. It was based on the morphological characteristics and morphometric data on the gametocyte. It can be concluded that the species of the genus Hepatozoon that occurs in Brazilian procionids is the same as that occurring in procionids in Central and North America.

  9. Third lineage of rodent eimerians: morphology, phylogeny and re-description of Eimeria myoxi (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Eliomys quercinus (Rodentia: Gliridae).

    PubMed

    Kvičerová, Jana; Mikeš, Václav; Hypša, Václav

    2011-09-01

    Coccidian oocysts from feces of 46 individuals of the garden dormouse, Eliomys quercinus (Rodentia: Gliridae), were morphologically and molecularly characterized. Both morphological and sequence data (18S rDNA and ORF 470) showed low variability, indicating that all samples represent a single species. By comparison with published morphological descriptions of coccidia from glirid rodents, we determined that the samples represent Eimeria myoxi. Molecular data suggest that this species does not fall within the 2 known rodent-specific groups but branches as a third independent lineage. However, its exact position in respect to other eimerian clusters could not be established due to the lack of phylogenetic information at this taxonomic level for the 18S rRNA and ORF 470 genes. Based on these results, we provide a re-description of Eimeria myoxi, which contains morphological and molecular characteristics sufficient for its further unequivocal identification.

  10. Comparative ultrastructure and molecular phylogeny of Selenidium melongena n. sp. and S. terebellae Ray 1930 demonstrate niche partitioning in marine gregarine parasites (apicomplexa).

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kevin C; Heintzelman, Matthew B; Leander, Brian S

    2014-08-01

    Gregarine apicomplexans are a diverse group of single-celled parasites that have feeding stages (trophozoites) and gamonts that generally inhabit the extracellular spaces of invertebrate hosts living in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments. Inferences about the evolutionary morphology of gregarine apicomplexans are being incrementally refined by molecular phylogenetic data, which suggest that several traits associated with the feeding cells of gregarines arose by convergent evolution. The study reported here supports these inferences by showing how molecular data reveals traits that are phylogenetically misleading within the context of comparative morphology alone. We examined the ultrastructure and molecular phylogenetic positions of two gregarine species isolated from the spaghetti worm Thelepus japonicus: Selenidium terebellaeRay 1930 and S. melongena n. sp. The ultrastructural traits of S. terebellae were very similar to other species of Selenidium sensu stricto, such as having vermiform trophozoites with an apical complex, few epicytic folds, and a dense array of microtubules underlying the trilayered pellicle. By contrast, S. melongena n. sp. lacked a comparably discrete assembly of subpellicular microtubules, instead employing a system of fibrils beneath the cell surface that supported a relatively dense array of helically arranged epicytic folds. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of small subunit rDNA sequences derived from single-cell PCR unexpectedly demonstrated that these two gregarines are close sister species. The ultrastructural differences between these two species were consistent with the fact that S. terebellae infects the inner lining of the host intestines, and S. melongena n. sp. primarily inhabits the coelom, infecting the outside wall of the host intestine. Altogether, these data demonstrate a compelling case of niche partitioning and associated morphological divergence in marine gregarine apicomplexans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a protocol testing the ability of Stomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) to transmit Besnoitia besnoiti (Henry, 1913) (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae).

    PubMed

    Liénard, E; Salem, A; Jacquiet, P; Grisez, C; Prévot, F; Blanchard, B; Bouhsira, E; Franc, M

    2013-02-01

    Cattle besnoitiosis due to the cyst-forming coccidian parasite Besnoitia besnoiti has recently been reported in expansion in Europe since the end of the twentieth century. The B. besnoiti life cycle and many epidemiological traits are still poorly known. Hematophagous flies, including the worldwide-distributed Stomoxys calcitrans, could be mechanical vectors in the contamination of mouthparts after the puncture of cutaneous cysts or ingestion of infected blood. In this study, a protocol is presented to assess more deeply the role of S. calcitrans, reared in laboratory conditions, in parasite transmission. A preliminary trial showed that stable flies could transmit tachyzoites from bovine artificially parasite-enriched blood to B. besnoiti-free blood using glass feeders. Evidence of transmission was provided by the detection of parasite DNA with Ct values ranging between 32 and 37 in the blood recipient. In a second time, a B. besnoiti-infected heifer harboring many cysts in its dermis was used as a donor of B. besnoiti. An interruption of the blood meal taken by 300 stable flies from this heifer was performed. Immediately after the blood meal was interrupted, they were transferred to a glass feeder containing B. besnoiti-free blood from a non-infected heifer. Quantitative PCR and modified direct fluorescence antibody test (dFAT) were used to detect B. besnoiti DNA and entire parasites, respectively, in the blood recipient, the mouthparts, and the gut contents of S. calcitrans at two time intervals: 1 and 24 h after the interrupted blood meal. Parasite DNA was detected at both time intervals (1 and 24 h) in all samples (blood recipient, mouthparts, and gut contents of stable flies) while entire parasites by dFAT were only found in the abdominal compartment 1 h after the interrupted blood meal. Then, S. calcitrans were able to carry B. besnoiti from chronically infected cattle to an artificial recipient in the conditions of the protocol.

  12. Extra-intestinal localization of Goussia sp. (Apicomplexa) oocysts in Rana dalmatina (Anura: Ranidae), and the fate of infection after metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Jirků, M; Modrý, D

    2006-06-23

    Although coccidia of the genus Goussia are common parasites of fish, only 2 species have been described in amphibians: G. hyperolisi from common reed frogs Hyperolius viridiflavus from Kenya and G. neglecta from unspecified European water frogs of the genus Rana from Germany. The genus Goussia is characterized by an oocyst, with a fine oocyst wall, containing 4 dizoic sporocysts that are composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture and lacking a Stieda body (typical for the genus Eimeria). To date, infections in amphibians were generally considered to be specific to the intestine of aquatic larval stages (tadpoles) of anurans. Herein, we report on: (1) the presence of oocysts of Goussia sp. in an extra-intestinal location (liver) of tadpoles of the agile frog R. dalmatina and (2) the presence of oocysts in the liver of both juvenile and subadult R. dalmatina. These observations represent novel traits for Goussia infections in amphibians; they may explain the vertical transmission of Goussia in tadpoles.

  13. Intestinal Parasites in the Critically Endangered Przewalski's Gazelle ( Procapra przewalskii ) in China, with the Description of a New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunping; Du, Shouyang; Yang, Yanbin; Zhang, Xin; Duszynski, Donald W; Bian, Jianghui; Cao, Yifan

    2016-10-01

    We used a flotation technique to survey fecal samples from 27 Przewalski's gazelles ( Procapra przewalskii Büchner, 1891) for intestinal parasites. Samples were collected from the Qinghai Lake region, Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China, in April 2015. We report parasites belonging to two nematode (Nematodirus, Marshallagia) genera and one apicomplexan (Eimeria) genus; one of the latter was a new species from the critically endangered Przewalski's gazelle. Sporulated oocysts of the new eimerian were spheroidal; they had a thick, outer wall without a micropyle, but with a distinct polar granule and an oocyst residuum. Oocysts measured a mean of 18.6(±0.8)×17.3(±0.9) μm in length and width, with a mean 1.1(±0.1) length/width ratio and a spheroidal oocyst residuum that had a mean width of 2.0(±0.7) μm. Sporocysts were ovoid, measuring a mean of 9.4(±0.6)×5.5(±0.5) μm in length and width, with a mean 1.7(±0.2) length/width ratio. A Stieda body and sporocyst residuum were present, but a substieda body was absent. Sporozoites each had a small anterior refractile body and a larger, posterior refractile body; a small nucleus was visible between them.

  14. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan sp. n. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi sp. n. from both L. smaragdina we collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colorless, bilayered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but 1–4 polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules. PMID:24048748

  15. Two COWP-like cysteine rich proteins from Eimeria nieschulzi (coccidia, apicomplexa) are expressed during sporulation and involved in the sporocyst wall formation.

    PubMed

    Jonscher, Ernst; Erdbeer, Alexander; Günther, Marie; Kurth, Michael

    2015-07-25

    The family of cysteine rich proteins of the oocyst wall (COWPs) originally described in Cryptosporidium can also be found in Toxoplasma gondii (TgOWPs) localised to the oocyst wall as well. Genome sequence analysis of Eimeria suggests that these proteins may also exist in this genus and led us to the assumption that these proteins may also play a role in oocyst wall formation. In this study, COWP-like encoding sequences had been identified in Eimeria nieschulzi. The predicted gene sequences were subsequently utilized in reporter gene assays to observe time of expression and localisation of the reporter protein in vivo. Both investigated proteins, EnOWP2 and EnOWP6, were expressed during sporulation. The EnOWP2-promoter driven mCherry was found in the cytoplasm and the EnOWP2, respectively EnOWP6, fused to mCherry was initially observed in the extracytoplasmatic space between sporoblast and oocyst wall. This, so far unnamed compartment was designated as circumplasm. Later, the mCherry reporter co-localised with the sporocyst wall of the sporulated oocysts. This observation had been confirmed by confocal microscopy, excystation experiments and IFA. Transcript analysis revealed the intron-exon structure of these genes and confirmed the expression of EnOWP2 and EnOWP6 during sporogony. Our results allow us to assume a role, of both investigated EnOWP proteins, in the sporocyst wall formation of E. nieschulzi. Data mining and sequence comparisons to T. gondii and other Eimeria species allow us to hypothesise a conserved process within the coccidia. A role in oocyst wall formation had not been observed in E. nieschulzi.

  16. Reproductive effort and seasonality associated with male-biased parasitism in Gracilinanus agilis (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) infected by Eimeria spp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in the Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Strona, A L S; Levenhagem, M; Leiner, N O

    2015-07-01

    The aggregation of parasites among hosts is associated with differential host exposure and susceptibility to parasites, which varies according to host gender, body size, reproductive status and environmental factors. We evaluated the role of these factors on infestation by Eimeria spp. (Eimeriidae) in the agile gracile mouse opossum (Gracilinanus agilis), a semelparous didelphid inhabiting neotropical savannahs. Eimeria spp. abundance and prevalence among G. agilis were associated with the breeding status of individuals and to a lesser extent to climatic season, with both sexes presenting higher Eimeria spp. burdens during late breeding/wet season. On the other hand, male-biased parasitism was restricted to dry/mating season. We suggest that male spatial organization and diet may account for increased parasite burdens within this sex, although future studies should evaluate the role of physiological differences associated with androgen hormones. Finally, a rapid increase in Eimeria spp. loads among females during the late breeding/wet season seems associated with seasonal changes in susceptibility, due to breeding costs related to semelparity, and exposure to infective propagules, while male-die off seems to explain maintenance of higher Eimeria spp. burdens within this sex in the same period.

  17. Endogenous Life Cycle of Eimeria melanomytis (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Dusky Rice Rat, Melanomys caliginosus (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Duszynski, Donald W

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous stages of the life cycle of Eimeria melanomytis, infecting the peripheral epithelial cells of villi of the small intestine of experimentally infected young dusky rice rats, Melanomys caliginosus , were studied. Giemsa-stained mucosal scrapings and histological sections were examined for all the stages. Eimeria melanomytis has 3 generations of meronts (M), different in size, shape, and number of merozoites (m); and in size, shape, and location of the nuclei within the cytoplasm of the meronts. The 3 meront types, M1-M3, respectively, had 11-14 (m1), 7-10 (m2), and 20-30 (m3) merozoites. Macrogametocytes and microgametocytes, as well as macrogametes and microgametes, complete the sexual cycle forming the unsporulated oocysts. This parasite's endogenous development produced severe intestinal lesions in experimentally infected dusky rice rats.

  18. Mosquito and sand fly gregarines of the genus Ascogregarina and Psychodiella (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida, Aseptatorina)--overview of their taxonomy, life cycle, host specificity and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lantova, Lucie; Volf, Petr

    2014-12-01

    Mosquitoes and sand flies are important blood-sucking vectors of human diseases such as malaria or leishmaniasis. Nevertheless, these insects also carry their own parasites, such as gregarines; these monoxenous pathogens are found exclusively in invertebrates, and some of them have been considered useful in biological control. Mosquito and sand fly gregarines originally belonging to a single genus Ascogregarina were recently divided into two genera, Ascogregarina comprising parasites of mosquitoes, bat flies, hump-backed flies and fleas and Psychodiella parasitizing sand flies. Currently, nine mosquito Ascogregarina and five Psychodiella species are described. These gregarines go through an extraordinarily interesting life cycle; the mosquito and sand fly larvae become infected by oocysts, the development continues transtadially through the larval and pupal stages to adults and is followed by transmission to the offspring by genus specific mechanisms. In adult mosquitoes, ascogregarines develop in the Malpighian tubules, and oocysts are defecated, while in the sand flies, the gregarines are located in the body cavity, their oocysts are injected into the accessory glands of females and released during oviposition. These life history differences are strongly supported by phylogenetical study of SSU rDNA proving disparate position of Ascogregarina and Psychodiella gregarines. This work reviews the current knowledge about Ascogregarina and Psychodiella gregarines parasitizing mosquitoes and sand flies, respectively. It gives a comprehensive insight into their taxonomy, life cycle, host specificity and pathogenicity, showing a very close relationship of gregarines with their hosts, which suggests a long and strong parasite-host coevolution.

  19. The life cycle and host specificity of Psychodiella sergenti n. sp. and Ps. tobbi n. sp. (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in sand flies Phlebotomus sergenti and Ph. tobbi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Lantová, Lucie; Ghosh, Kashinath; Svobodová, Milena; Braig, Henk R; Rowton, Edgar; Weina, Peter; Volf, Petr; Votýpka, Jan

    2010-10-01

    Two new gregarines in the recently erected genus Psychodiella (formerly Ascogregarina), Psychodiella sergenti n. sp. and Psychodiella tobbi n. sp., are described based on morphology and life cycle observations conducted on larvae and adults of their natural hosts, the sand flies Phlebotomus sergenti and Phlebotomus tobbi, respectively. The phylogenetic analyses inferred from small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences indicate the monophyly of newly described species with Psychodiella chagasi. Ps. sergenti n. sp. and Ps. tobbi n. sp. significantly differ from each other in the life cycle and in the size of life stages. The sexual development of Ps. sergenti n. sp. (syzygy, formation of gametocysts and oocysts) takes place exclusively in blood-fed Ph. sergenti females, while the sexual development of Ps. tobbi n. sp. takes place also in males and unfed females of Ph. tobbi. The susceptibility of Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus papatasi, Ph. sergenti, Ph. tobbi, and Phlebotomus arabicus to both gregarines was examined by exposing 1st instar larvae to parasite oocysts. High host specificity was observed, as both gregarines were able to fully develop and complete regularly the life cycle only in their natural hosts. Both gregarines are considered as serious pathogens in laboratory-reared colonies of Old World sand flies.

  20. Cross-transmission studies with Eimeria arizonensis-like oocysts (Apicomplexa) in New World rodents of the Genera baiomys, Neotoma, Onychomys, Peromyscus, and Reithrodontomys (Muridae).

    PubMed

    Upton, S J; McAllister, C T; Brillhart, D B; Duszynski, D W; Wash, C D

    1992-06-01

    Cross-transmission experiments were performed using oocysts of an Eimeria arizonensis-like coccidian from Peromyscus leucopus and Peromyscus truei, an E. arizonensis-like coccidian from Reithrodontomys fulvescens, Eimeria baiomysis and Eimeria taylori from Baiomys taylori, Eimeria albigulae from Neotoma albigula, and Eimeria onychomysis from Onychomys spp., between representatives of the above host genera. The E. arizonensis-like coccidian from R. fulvescens infected Reithrodontomys megalotis, Reithrodontomys montanus, and Peromyscus leucopus. Oocysts of E. arizonensis from P. leucopus could be transmitted to both P. leucopus and R. megalotus. Oocysts of E. baiomysis and E. taylori infected only B. taylori. Oocysts of E. arizonensis from P. truei infected P. truei but not Neotoma mexicana or Onychomys leucogaster. Oocysts of E. albigulae from N. albigula were infective for N. mexicana but not for P. truei or O. leucogaster. Oocysts of E. onychomysis from Onychomys spp. infected O. leucogaster but not N. mexicana or P. truei. These results demonstrate that Peromyscus and Reithrodontomys, genera known to be related very closely evolutionarily, are capable of sharing E. arizonensis, whereas morphologically similar coccidians (E. albigulae, E. baiomysis, and E. onychomysis) from more distantly related hosts, are probably distinct and more stenoxenous. This also is the first report of coccidians infecting species of Reithrodontomys.

  1. Molecular investigations of the bat tick Argas vespertilionis (Ixodida: Argasidae) and Babesia vesperuginis (Apicomplexa: Piroplasmida) reflect "bat connection" between Central Europe and Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Szőke, Krisztina; Görföl, Tamás; Földvári, Gábor; Tu, Vuong Tan; Takács, Nóra; Kontschán, Jenő; Sándor, Attila D; Estók, Péter; Epis, Sara; Boldogh, Sándor; Kováts, Dávid; Wang, Yuanzhi

    2017-05-01

    Argas vespertilionis is a geographically widespread haematophagous ectoparasite species of bats in the Old World, with a suspected role in the transmission of Babesia vesperuginis. The aims of the present study were (1) to molecularly screen A. vespertilionis larvae (collected in Europe, Africa and Asia) for the presence of piroplasms, and (2) to analyze mitochondrial markers of A. vespertilionis larvae from Central Asia (Xinjiang Province, Northwestern China) in a phylogeographical context. Out of the 193 DNA extracts from 321 A. vespertilionis larvae, 12 contained piroplasm DNA (10 from Hungary, two from China). Sequencing showed the exclusive presence of B. vesperuginis, with 100% sequence identity between samples from Hungary and China. In addition, A. vespertilionis cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (cox1) and 16S rRNA gene sequences had 99.1-99.2 and 99.5-100% similarities, respectively, between Hungary and China. Accordingly, in the phylogenetic analyses A. vespertilionis from China clustered with haplotypes from Europe, and (with high support) outside the group formed by haplotypes from Southeast Asia. This is the first molecular evidence on the occurrence of B. vesperuginis in Asia. Bat ticks from hosts in Vespertilionidae contained only the DNA of B. vesperuginis (in contrast with what was reported on bat ticks from Rhinolophidae and Miniopteridae). Molecular taxonomic analyses of A. vespertilionis and B. vesperuginis suggest a genetic link of bat parasites between Central Europe and Central Asia, which is epidemiologically relevant in the context of any pathogens associated with bats.

  2. First report and description of a Cyrilia sp. (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae) from a freshwater Cururu Stingray Potamotrygon cf. histrix (Elasmobranchii: Potamotrygonidae), from the Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magro, N M; de Oliveira, A T; O'Dwyer, L H

    2016-08-01

    A haemogregarine is described in 12 cururu stingray (Potamotrygon cf. histrix), from Mariuá Archipelago, Negro River, in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. All animals, both male and female, were parasitized by the haemogregarine and parasitaemia varied between 0.8% and 10% of erythrocytes. The stages observed included trophozoites or merozoites, suspected meronts, and gamonts presumed to be of two types, macrogamonts and microgamonts. Most stages were observed inside mature erythrocytes, while others were extracellular. The stages observed were most similar to those characteristics of the genus Cyrilia, than to any other fish haemogregarine and may represent a new Cyrilia species.

  3. Cyrilia sp. (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae) in the Amazonian freshwater stingray Potamotrygon wallacei (cururu stingray) in different hydrological phases of the Rio Negro.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A T; Araújo, M L G; Pantoja-Lima, J; Aride, P H R; Tavares-Dias, M; Brinn, R P; Marcon, J L

    2016-08-15

    Intraerythrocytic parasites are frequently found in fish, including elasmobranchs. The Amazonian rivers present well defined annual hydrological cycles that results in drastic modifications of the environmental conditions with deep implications in the life cycle of the whole associated biota in those fluvial systems. The freshwater stingray Potamotrygon wallacei (stingray cururu) is a new species restricted to the Middle Rio Negro basin and it is subject to strong alterations in their natural habitats (igapós) a result of the constant variations in the water level of Rio Negro. This work demonstrates the occurrence of intraerythrocytic parasite Cyrilia sp. in this stingray species. Additionally, the prevalence and quantification of hemoparasites in different phases of Rio Negro were also established. Field sampling was carried in the Archipelago of Mariuá, Middle Rio Negro, involving different stages of the water cycle. The intraerythrocytic parasites were quantified by direct counting in blood smears using a total counting of 2000 erythrocytes in each blood smear. The presence of parasites intraerythrocytic generates changes in the morphology of blood cell. The largest amount of the hemoparasites was recorded in the drought period. We observed a decreasing tendency in the number of parasites in the blood between the drought periods and inundation. We concluded that the level of Negro River influences the incidence of intraerythrocytic parasites in the cururu stingray and the drought represents the period of larger susceptibility to the infestation.

  4. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai n. spp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) associated with severe myositis and hepatitis in the domestic dog (Canis familiaris)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sarcocystis species have a 2-host life cycle with carnivores as definitive hosts and herbivores as intermediate hosts. Occasionally dogs are definitive as well as intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis species. There are several reports of Sarcocystis sarcocysts in muscles of dogs but these species have...

  5. Evolutionary plasticity in coccidia - striking morphological similarity of unrelated coccidia (apicomplexa) from related hosts: Eimeria spp. from African and Asian Pangolins (Mammalia: Pholidota).

    PubMed

    Jirků, Miloslav; Kvičerová, Jana; Modrý, David; Hypša, Václav

    2013-07-01

    Two morphologically similar, but phylogenetically unrelated Eimeria species from ancient mammals, African Tree Pangolin Phataginus tricuspis and Sunda Pangolin Manis javanica (Pholidota: Manidae), from two distant biogeographic realms (Afrotropical and Oriental), are characterized and compared morphologically and molecularly. Phylogenetic analyses produced an unstable topology. However, while precise position of the two Eimeria species from pangolins could not be firmly established due to the lack of related taxa, it is evident that they are not closely related and do not fall into any of the so far recognized eimerian lineages. Moreover, an eimerian found in P. tricuspis is described as a new species Eimeria nkaka n. sp., based on morphology of oocysts, endogenous developmental stages and sequence data.

  6. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria labbeana-like (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica, Gmelin, 1789) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elloit, Aileen; Ryan, Una

    2016-07-01

    An Eimeria species is described from a domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica). Sporulated oocysts (n = 35) were subspherical, with a smooth bi-layered oocyst wall (1.0 μm thick). Oocysts measured 20.2 × 16.1 (22.0-18.9 × 15.7-18.9) μm, oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.38. Oocyst residuum and a polar granule were present. The micropyle was absent. Sporocysts are elongate-ovoid, 13.0 × 6.1 (14.5-12.5 × 5.5-7.0) μm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 2.13 (2.0-2.2), sporocyst residuum was present, composed of numerous granules in a spherical or ovoid mass. Each sporocyst contained 2 banana-shaped sporozoites, 12.3 × 3.5 (11.8-13.0 × 3.3-3.6) μm. A spherical-ellipsoid posterior refractile body was found in the sporozoites. A nucleus was located immediately anterior to the posterior refractile body. Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci; the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the 18S locus, the new isolate shared 98.0% genetic similarity with three Isospora isolates from Japan from the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica). At the 28S locus, it grouped separately and shared 92.4% and 92.5% genetic similarity with Isospora anthochaerae (KF766053) from a red wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) from Australia and an Isospora sp. (MS-2003 - AY283845) from a Himalayan grey-headed bullfinch (Pyrrhula erythaca) respectively. At COI locus, this new isolate was in a separate clade and shared 95.6% and 90.0% similarity respectively with Eimeria tiliquae n. sp. from a shingleback skink in Australia and an Eimeria sp. from a common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) from America. Based on the morphological data, this isolate is most similar to Eimeria labbeana. As no molecular data for E. labbeana is available and previous morphological data is incomplete, we refer to the current isolate as E. labbeana-like.

  7. Molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of an Eimeria krijgsmanni Yakimoff & Gouseff, 1938 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) mouse intestinal protozoan parasite by partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mochizuki, Masami; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we characterized an undocumented strain of Eimeria krijgsmanni by morphological and biological features. Here, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic analysis of this organism. Namely, 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences of E. krijgsmanni were analyzed to incorporate this species into a comprehensive Eimeria phylogeny. As a result, partial 18S rDNA sequence from E. krijgsmanni was successfully determined, and two different types, Type A and Type B, that differed by 1 base pair were identified. E. krijgsmanni was originally isolated from a single oocyst, and thus the result show that the two types might have allelic sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rDNA. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the two types of E. krijgsmanni 18S rDNA formed one of two clades among murine Eimeria spp.; these Eimeria clades reflected morphological similarity among the Eimeria spp. This is the third molecular phylogenetic characterization of a murine Eimeria spp. in addition to E. falciformis and E. papillata.

  8. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Solomon ground skink, Sphenomorphus solomonis (Boulenger) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1990 and November 1991, 19 Sphenomorphus spp. skinks, including nine S. jobiense, three S. simus, and seven Solomon ground skinks, S. solomonis (Boulenger), were collected from Madang and Morobe Provinces, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and examined for coccidia. A single S. solomonis was found to be infected with a new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875. Oöcysts of Eimeria perkinsae n. sp. are ellipsoidal with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 18.6 × 14.7 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 8.9 × 6.4 μm, L/W 1.4; neither Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum consisted of a loose cluster of granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites are comma-shaped with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the first report of coccidia from this skink genus.

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of Eimeria paludosa coccidian parasite (Apicomplexa:Eimeriidae) in a dusky moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa, Gould, 1846) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Brice, Belinda; Elloit, Aileen; Lee, Elvina; Ryan, Una

    2014-12-01

    An Eimeria species is described from a dusky moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa). Sporulated oocysts (n = 40) are ovoid, with a pitted single-layered oocyst wall in young oocysts and a relatively smooth wall in the mature oocysts. Oocyst wall was 1.0 µm thick, oocysts measured 17.3 × 13.3 (16.3-17.9 × 12.7-13.9) µm, oocyst length/width (L/W) ratio, 1.3. Oocyst residuum was absent. A large polar granule was always observed in the centre of the micropyle and many small polar granules were observed when the focus was on the wall. Sporocysts are elongate-ovoid, 8.4 × 5.1 (8.0-8.9 × 4.9-5.5) µm, sporocyst L/W ratio, 1.6 (1.5-1.8), sporocyst residuum was present, composed of numerous granules in a spherical or ovoid mass. Each sporocyst contained 2 elongate sporozoites, 7.7 × 2.6 (7-10 × 2.2-3) µm. A spherical-ellipsoid posterior refractile body was found in the sporozoites. A nucleus is located immediately anterior to the posterior refractile body. When the oocyst measurements and features were compared with valid Eimeria species from hosts in the Rallidae family, this Eimeria species was identified as E. paludosa. This is the first report of E. paludosa in Australia and the dusky moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa) in a new host for this species. Molecular analysis was conducted at three loci; the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene (COI). At the 18 S locus, E. paludosa shared 97.3% genetic similarity with Eimeria gruis (GenBank accession number: AB544336). It also shared 99.2% genetic similarity with Eimeria crecis (GenBank accession numbers: HE653904 and HE653905) and 98.5% similarity with Eimeria nenei (GenBank accession numbers: HE653906), both of which were identified from a corncrake (Crex crex) in the United Kingdom. At the 28S locus, E. paludosa shared 91.4% similarity with E. papillata from a chicken (Gallus gallus) in the USA. At COI locus, E. paludosa was in a clade by itself and shared 87.2% similarity with E. irresidua, from a European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) from the Czech Republic. This is the first molecular characterization of E. paludosa.

  10. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  11. A new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from tri-colored bats, Perimyotis subflavus (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), from the Ouachitas of Arkansas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Arlen, Robert; Connior, Matthew B

    2014-10-01

    Between February 2013 and October 2013, eleven tri-colored bats, Perimyotis subflavus were collected from Marion, Polk, and Searcy counties, Arkansas, and their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. Two of eleven (18%) harboured an eimerian that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria mcdanieli sp. n. were ellipsoidal to elongate with a bi-layered wall and measured (length × width, L × W) 28.3 × 17.9 μm, with an L/W ratio of 1.6. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a single polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 12.6 × 8.3 μm, with an L/W ratio of 1.5. A pronounced, nipple-like Stieda body was present as well as a substieda body. A sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed bubble-like granules. This is the third coccidian described from tri-colored bats and the sixth species reported from Arkansas chiropterans. In addition, both infected bats harbored a concurrent infection of Eimeria heidti McAllister, Burt, Seville, and Robison, 2011.

  12. Intestinal coccidiosis of anadromous and landlocked alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, caused by Goussia ameliae n. sp. and G. alosii n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lovy, Jan; Friend, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Anadromous alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, have experienced significant population level declines caused by factors including habitat destruction. Alewives occur in two different life histories, anadromous and landlocked forms. The landlocked alewife evolved from ancestral anadromous populations, resulting in an exclusively freshwater and phenotypically unique form. The occurrence of parasites in a host is linked to the environment, making alewives an ideal model to compare parasitology within a single species with contrasting life histories. Currently, little information exists on the presence and impacts of parasites in these fish populations; the present study sets out to better understand coccidiosis in the threatened anadromous populations and to understand how coccidian parasites compare in both life history forms. The intestinal coccidian, Goussia ameliae n. sp., was described infecting the pyloric cecum of 76% and 86% of young-of-the-year and adult anadromous alewives, respectively, from the Maurice River, New Jersey, USA. The coccidian was found in landlocked alewife populations with a prevalence of 92% and 34% in YOY and adult fish, respectively. An analysis of the small subunit 18S ribosomal RNA gene of G. ameliae from both life history forms demonstrated that the coccidian had 100% sequence identity, confirming the same parasite species in both forms. Though genetic analysis demonstrated G. ameliae to be identical, some differences were observed in sporulation and morphology of the parasite within the two populations. The sporocysts in anadromous populations were shorter and wider, and sporulation timing differed from that of landlocked fish. These differences may either be attributed to differences in the host type or to the sporulation environment. Lastly, alewives from landlocked populations were frequently co-infected with a second coccidian species in the posterior intestine, which occurred at a lower prevalence. This species, G. alosii n. sp., was described based on morphological characters of the sporulated oocysts in fresh parasitological preparations. PMID:25853050

  13. Sarcocystis masoni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae), and redescription of Sarcocystis aucheniae from llama (Lama glama), guanaco (Lama guanicoe) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Moré, Gastón; Regensburger, Cristian; Gos, M Laura; Pardini, Lais; Verma, Shiv K; Ctibor, Juliana; Serrano-Martínez, Marcos Enrique; Dubey, Jitender P; Venturini, M Cecilia

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable confusion concerning the species of Sarcocystis in South American camelids (SAC). Several species names have been used; however, proper descriptions are lacking. In the present paper, we redescribe the macroscopic sarcocyst forming Sarcocystis aucheniae and describe and propose a new name, Sarcocystis masoni for the microscopic sarcocyst forming species. Muscles samples were obtained from llamas (Lama glama) and guanacos (Lama guanicoe) from Argentina and from alpacas (Vicugna pacos) and llamas from Peru. Individual sarcocysts were processed by optical and electron microscopy, and molecular studies. Microscopic sarcocysts of S. masoni were up to 800 µm long and 35-95 µm wide, the sarcocyst wall was 2·5-3·5 µm thick, and had conical to cylindrical villar protrusions (vp) with several microtubules. Each vp had 11 or more rows of knob-like projections. Seven 18S rRNA gene sequences obtained from sarcocysts revealed 95-96% identity with other Sarcocystis spp. sequences reported in the GenBank. Sarcocysts of S. aucheniae were macroscopic, up to 1·2 cm long and surrounded by a dense and laminar 50 µm thick secondary cyst wall. The sarcocyst wall was up to 10 µm thick, and had branched vp, appearing like cauliflower. Comparison of the 11 sequences obtained from individual macroscopic cysts evidenced a 98-99% of sequence homology with other S. aucheniae sequences. In conclusion, 2 morphologically and molecularly different Sarcocystis species, S. masoni (microscopic cysts) and S. aucheniae (macroscopic cysts), were identified affecting different SAC from Argentina and Peru.

  14. Eimeria atlapetesi nom. nov., a replacement name for Eimeria pileata Soriano-Vargas et al., 2015 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), preoccupied by Eimeria pileata Straneva and Kelley, 1979 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), with observations on histopathology and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo; Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Zepeda-Velázquez, Andrea Paloma; Medina, Juan Pablo; Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; González-Gómez, Maricruz; Flores-Valle, Izanami Tereira; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2017-01-31

    Eimeria pileata Soriano-Vargas, Medina, Salgado-Miranda, García-Conejo, Galindo-Sánchez, Janczur, Berto and Lopes, 2015 is a junior homonym of Eimeria pileata Straneva and Kelley, 1979 and needs to be replaced. This coccidium was described from a rufous-capped brush finch Atlapetes pileatus Wagler in the Nevado de Toluca Natural Protected Area, Mexico. Thus, to maintain the original intent of the specific epithet derived from the scientific name of the type-host, the name Eimeria atlapetesi nom. nov. is proposed as a replacement name. Additionally, the current work reports another rufous-capped brush finch A. pileatus parasitized by E. atlapetesi in co-infection with an Isospora sp., providing observations of histopathology and phylogenetic analysis of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene from E. atlapetesi. Endogenous forms of E. atlapetesi and Isospora sp. were observed in intestinal sections. Few oocysts of Isospora sp. were observed; therefore they were not morphologically or molecularly identified. In return, E. atlapetesi was identified and it was phylogenetically close to Eimeria dispersa Tyzzer, 1929 from the domestic turkey Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus.

  15. Elongation Factor-1a is a novel protein associated with host cell invasion and a potential protective antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum*

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises obligate intracellular parasites that infect vertebrates. All invasive forms of Apicomplexa possess a unique complex of organelles at the anterior end, referred to as the apical complex, which is involved in host cell invasion. Previously, we generated the chicken m...

  16. The Genetic Basis of Specificity in Dinoflagellate-Invertebrate Symbiosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-30

    dinoflagellates which appear to share a common ance~tiy with the Apicomplexa and the Ciliata. . 3is~urioNi avAit.A6ILuf OF LaBSTRAC- 21. ASSTRAC I...cladistic and phenetic methods show that the dinoflagellates are more closely affiliated with the Apicomplexa than with the Ciliaa. Among the dinoflagellates

  17. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-15

    1985. Invasion and early development of Sarcocystis muris ( Apicomplexa , Sarcocystidae) in tissue cultures. J. Protozool. 32:446-453. 6. Entzeroth, R...secondary parasitophorous vacuole of Sarcocystis muris (Protozoa, Apicomplexa ). Eur. J. Cell Biol. 41:182-188. 7. Ladda, R., M. Aikawa, and H. Sprinz. 1969

  18. Colpodella spp.–like Parasite Infection in Woman, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Cong L.; Keeling, Patrick J.; Krause, Peter J.; Horak, Ales; Bent, Stephen; Rollend, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises intracellular protozoa that include many human pathogens. Their nearest relatives are chromerids and colpodellids. We report a case of a Babesia spp.–like relapsing infection caused by a newly described microorganism related to the Apicomplexa. This case is highly suggestive of a previously undescribed type of colpodellid that infects vertebrates. PMID:22260904

  19. Chapter 2: A historical perspective on the population decline of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Treesearch

    R. Roy Johnson; Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Lois T. Haight; Russell B. Duncan; Kenneth J. Kingsley

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) was discovered in the U.S. by Bendire in 1872 in the Tucson area (Coues 1872). During the next five decades, naturalists collected many specimens of this owl and typically described the subspecies as common or fairly common along some streams and rivers of central and southern Arizona...

  20. Chapter 4: The ferruginous pygmy-owl in the tropics and at the northern end of its range: Habitat relations and requirements

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; Scott H. Stoleson; Stephen M. Russell; Glenn A. Proudfoot; W. Scott Richardson

    2000-01-01

    The habitat needs of the ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) are poorly understood. In the tropics, this common bird of prey inhabits many distinct vegetation communities or environments (e.g., Monroe 1968, Meyer de Schauensee 1970, Stiles and Skutch 1989, Sick 1993). A resident of woodlands and open forests, it is also found in the open,...

  1. Chapter 3: The status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona: Population surveys and habitat assessment

    Treesearch

    W. Scott Richardson; Jean-Luc E. Cartron; David J. Krueper; Lauren Turner; Thomas H. Skinner

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD) began formal population surveys in an attempt to document the numbers and distribution of cactus ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Surveys were initiated to gather information on this little-known subspecies which was considered for listing at the time. Prior to...

  2. Introduction

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Finch Cartron; Deborah M.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1997, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Arizona population of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife 1997). Federal listing for the owl in Arizona resulted from a petition submitted in 1992 to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (...

  3. A Floral Transcriptome for Hippeastrum (Amaryllidaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two transcriptomes have been constructed from floral tissue of two Hippeastrum (Amaryllidaceae) species, H. brasilianum (Traub & J.L.Doran) Dutilh and H. papilio (Ravenna) Van Scheepan. The former has fragrant flowers, while flowers of the latter do not produce floral fragrance. RNA was isolated a...

  4. Chapter 6: Research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Deborah M. Finch; David J. Krueper

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe research needs for the conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) in Arizona. Estimates of population size, structure, and dynamics, as well as demographic data, are needed for the recovery team to formulate sound population objectives. Habitat loss due to residential development...

  5. Chapter 1: The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl: Taxonomy, distribution, and natural history

    Treesearch

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Glenn A. Proudfoot

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) is a small, cryptic owl that is often difficult to observe. Its natural history and conservation needs are poorly understood. Despite ongoing research in Texas and Arizona, the available information remains limited. In addition, factors influencing demographics (e.g., habitat...

  6. Sarcocystis arieticanis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) infecting the heart muscles of the domestic sheep, Ovis aries (Artiodactyla: Bovidae), from K. S. A. on the basis of light and electron microscopic data.

    PubMed

    Al Quraishy, Saleh; Morsy, Kareem; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Ghaffar, Fathy Abdel; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the heteroxenous life cycle of Sarcocystis species from three strains of the slaughtered sheep at Al-Azizia and Al-Saada abattoirs in Riyadh city, K.S.A., was studied. Muscle samples of the oesophagus, diaphragm, tongue, skeletal and heart muscles were examined. Varied natural infection rates in the muscles of the examined sheep strains were recorded as 83% in Niemy, 81.5% in Najdy and 90% in Sawakny sheep. Muscles of the diaphragm showed the highest infection level above all organs except Najdy sheep in which oesophagus has the highest rate. Also, the heart was the lowest infected organ (40% Niemy, 44% Najdy and 53% Sawakny). Microscopic sarcocysts of Sarcocystis arieticanis are easily identified in sections through the heart muscles of the domestic sheep Ovis aries (Artiodactyla: Bovidae). Cysts measured 38.5-64.4 μm (averaged 42.66 μm) in width and 62.4-173.6 μm (averaged 82.14 μm) in length. The validity of this species was confirmed by means of ultrastructural characteristics of the primary cyst wall (0.1-0.27 μm thick) which revealed the presence of irregularly shaped crowded and hairy-like projections underlined by a thin layer of ground substance. This layer consisted mainly of fine, dense homogenous granules enclosing the developing metrocytes and merozoites that usually contain nearly all the structures of the apical complex and fill the interior cavity of the cyst. Several septa derived from the ground substance divided the cyst into compartments. The merozoites were banana-shaped and measured 12-16 μm in length with centrally or posteriorly located nuclei. Experimental infection of carnivores by feeding heavily infected sheep muscles revealed that the dog, Canis familiaris, is the only final host of the present Sarcocystis species. Gamogony, sporogonic stages and characteristics of sporulated oocysts were also investigated.

  7. Cystoisospora canis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): development of monozoic tissue cysts in human cells, demonstration of egress of zoites from tissue cysts, and demonstration of repeat monozoic tissue cyst formation by zoites.

    PubMed

    Houk, Alice E; Lindsay, David S

    2013-11-08

    Sporozoites of Cystoisospora canis penetrated and developed to monozoic tissue cysts in 4 human, 1 monkey, 1 bovine and 2 canine cell lines. No asexual division was documented although multiple infection of a single cell was observed. Examination of cultures using transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that they were monozoic tissue cysts and contained a single sporozoite. The appearance of monozoic tissue cysts in all cell lines was similar but the parasitophorous vacuole surrounding some sporozoites in DH82 dog macrophages was swollen. Monozoic tissue cysts were observed for up to 127 days in human pigmented retinal epithelial cells. Treatment of cell cultures containing monozoic tissue cysts with 0.75 sodium taurocholic acid and 0.25% trypsin stimulated egress of zoites (former sporozoites) from tissue cysts. Zoites collected from monozoic tissue cysts were able to penetrate and develop to monozoic tissue cysts in new host cells. Monozoic tissue cysts survived exposure to acid pepsin solution indicating that they would be orally infectious. The tissue cyst wall surrounding zoites did not autofluoresce as did oocyst and sporocyst walls exposed to UV light. We believe that C. canis can be used as a model system to study extra-intestinal monozoic tissue cysts stages of Cystoisospora belli of humans.

  8. Endogenous development, pathogenicity and host specificity of Eimeria cahirinensis Couch, Blaustein, Duszynski, Shenbrot and Nevo, 1997 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Acomys dimidiatus (Cretzschmar 1826) (Rodentia: Muridae) from the Near East.

    PubMed

    Kvicerová, Jana; Ptácková, Pavla; Modrý, David

    2007-01-01

    Eimeria cahirinensis Couch et al. 1997 was found in faecal samples of Acomys dimidiatus from three different localities in the Near East. Twenty-two of 104 (21%) A. dimidiatus trapped on both the south- and north-facing slopes of "Evolution Canyon", Lower Nahal Oren, Mt. Carmel, Israel in August 2001 and 2002 were infected with E. cahirinensis. Oocysts were also obtained from a single individual of A. dimidiatus trapped in Wadi Ramm, Jordan in the summer of 1999. Laboratory-reared spiny mice (Acomys spp.) were inoculated to determine the prepatent and patent period, sporulation time, site of infection, immunogenicity, pathogenicity, pathology and morphology of endogenous stages of E. cahirinensis. Both asexual and sexual stages were localised in the apical part of duodenal and jejunal villi. An experimental inoculation of representatives of several rodent genera revealed the host range of E. cahirinensis to be limited to the genus Acomys.

  9. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Schellackia parasites (Apicomplexa) detected in American lizards are closely related to the genus Lankesterella: is the range of Schellackia restricted to the Old World?

    PubMed

    Megía-Palma, Rodrigo; Martínez, Javier; Paranjpe, Dhanashree; D'Amico, Verónica; Aguilar, Rocío; Palacios, María Gabriela; Cooper, Robert; Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco; Sinervo, Barry; Merino, Santiago

    2017-10-10

    Species of Schellackia Reichenow, 1919 have been described from the blood of reptiles distributed worldwide. Recently, Schellackia spp. detected in European and Asian lizards have been molecularly characterised. However, parasites detected in American lizard hosts remain uncharacterised. Thus, phylogenetic affinities between the Old and New World parasite species are unknown. In the present study, we characterised morphologically and molecularly the hemococcidian parasites (sporozoites) that infect three lizard hosts from North America and two from South America. In total, we generated 12 new 18S rRNA gene sequences of hemococcidian parasites infecting New World lizard hosts. By the microscopic examination of the smears we identified Schellackia golvani Rogier & Landau, 1975 (ex Anolis carolinensis Voigt) and Schellackia occidentalis Bonorris & Ball, 1955 (ex Uta stansburiana Baird & Girard and Sceloporus occidentalis Baird & Girard) in some samples, but the phylogenetic analysis indicated that all 18S rDNA sequences are distant from Schellackia species found in Old World lizards. In fact, the hemococcidian parasites detected in the New World lizards (including S. occidentalis and S. golvani) were closely related to the genus Lankesterella Labbé, 1899. Consequently, we suggest these two species to be included within the genus Lankesterella. Life history traits of hemococcidian parasites such as the type of host blood cells infected, host species or number of refractile bodies are not valid diagnostic characteristics to differentiate the parasites between the genera Schellackia and Lankesterella. Indeed, lankesterellid parasites with a different number of refractile bodies had a close phylogenetic origin. Based on the phylogenetic results we provide a systematic revision of the North American hemococcidians. Our recommendation is to include the species formerly described in the genus Schellackia that infect American lizards into Lankesterella (Lankesterellidae) as Lankesterella golvani (Rogier & Landau, 1975) n. comb and L. occidentalis (Bonorris & Ball, 1955) n. comb.

  10. [Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts (Apicomplexa, Cryptosporidiidae) in ostriches, Struthio camelus L., 1758 (Aves, Struthionidae) reared in North and Lowered Coastline regions of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco Carlos R; Ederli, Nicole B; Ederli, Bianca B; Albuquerque, Marcia C; Dos Santos, Michelle Daniele

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in ostriches reared in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The diagnosis of oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. in the feces of 77 ostriches was done by modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. The occurrence was observed in 44.4% of the examined animals. However, in a property 100% of the ostriches shed oocysts in their feces. Oocysts was subspherical in shape with 6.33 +/- 1.27 (4.31-9.63) by 5.90 +/- 1.18 (4.07-9.42) mm and shape index of 1.07 +/- 0.05 (1.00-1.29). Was verified a high occurrence of oocysts elimination. In spite was observed a uniform distribution of the oocysts measurements in the regression line (R2 = 0.9438) accentuated difference was evidenced in the morphometry of the oocysts, that suggests that more of a species of Cryptosporidium are parasitizing these birds.

  11. Discovery of a diverse clade of gregarine apicomplexans (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinorida) from Pacific eunicid and onuphid polychaetes, including descriptions of Paralecudina n. gen., Trichotokara japonica n. sp., and T. eunicae n. sp.

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Wakeman, Kevin C; Leander, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Marine gregarines are poorly understood apicomplexan parasites with large trophozoites that inhabit the body cavities of marine invertebrates. Two novel species of gregarines were discovered in polychaete hosts collected in Canada and Japan. The trophozoites of Trichotokara japonica n. sp. were oval to rhomboidal shaped, and covered with longitudinal epicytic folds with a density of six to eight folds/micron. The nucleus was situated in the middle of the cell, and the mucron was elongated and covered with hair-like projections; antler-like projections also extended from the anterior tip of the mucron. The distinctively large trophozoites of Trichotokara eunicae n. sp. lacked an elongated mucron and had a tadpole-like cell shape consisting of a bulbous anterior region and a tapered tail-like posterior region. The cell surface was covered with longitudinal epicytic folds with a density of three to five folds/micron. Small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences of both species were very divergent and formed a strongly supported clade with the recently described species Trichotokara nothriae and an environmental sequence (AB275074). This phylogenetic context combined with the morphological features of T. eunicae n. sp. required us to amend the description for Trichotokara. The sister clade to the Trichotokara clade consisted of environmental sequences and Lecudina polymorpha, which also possesses densely packed epicyctic folds (3-5 folds/micron) and a prominently elongated mucron. This improved morphological and molecular phylogenetic context justified the establishment of Paralecudina (ex. Lecudina) polymorpha n. gen. et comb. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  12. A new species of Isospora Schneider, 1881 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in Ruppell's agama Agama rueppelli (Vaillant) (Sauria: Agamidae) from East Africa, with a review of this genus in agamid lizards.

    PubMed

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Jirků, Miloslav; Malonza, Patrick Kenyatta; Modrý, David

    2009-11-01

    Coprological examinations of eight Ruppell's agamas Agama rueppelli (Vaillant) revealed the presence of a coccidium of the genus Isospora Schneider, 1881 that represents a previously undescribed species. Oöcysts of Isospora farahi n. sp. are spherical or subspherical, 29.1 (26-31) x 28.8 (26-31) microm, with a shape-index of 1.01 (1-1.07). An oöcyst residuum, polar granules and micropyle are absent. The oöcyst wall is bilayered, brownish and smooth, c. 1.5-2 microm thick. The sporocysts are oval, 16.6 (15-18) x 11.4 (11-12) microm, with a shape-index of 1.46 (1.25-1.64) and both Stieda and substieda bodies. A sporocyst residuum is present as medium-sized granules scattered irregularly among the sporozoites. The sporozoites are vermiform, with a large posterior spherical refractile body. Endogenous development is intranuclear in the epithelial cells of the small intestine. Sporulation is unknown, as oöcysts were recovered from the faeces.

  13. Morphology and histopathology of Calyptospora sp. (Apicomplexa: Calyptosporidae) in speckled peacock bass, Cichla temensis Humboldt, 1821 (Perciformes: Cichlidae), from the Marajó-Açu River, Marajó Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Hérika; Corrêa, José Luís; Tortelly, Rogerio; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Matos, Patrícia; Matos, Edilson

    2012-06-01

    Several species of coccidia are protozoan parasites that cause infection in a wide variety of animal groups. Calyptospora is an important genus of protozoan, which infests both freshwater and marine fish. The hepatopancreases of 150 speckled peacock bass captured on Marajó Island, Brazil were studied macro- and microscopically. Oocysts were found in 84 (56%) of the specimens in both the examination of the fresh material by compression and the analysis of histological sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Small, circular, homogeneous forms in negative contrast had a mean diameter of 21.2 μm, frequently with pyriform sporocysts, with a mean length of 9.2 μm and width of 3.1 μm, and a thin-walled capsule, were observed in both the hepatic and the pancreatic parenchyma, but were completely devoid of any inflammatory reaction. Calyptospora infections are documented for the first time in the Marajó-Açu River.

  14. Molecular systematics of marine gregarines (Apicomplexa) from North-eastern Pacific polychaetes and nemerteans, with descriptions of three novel species: Lecudina phyllochaetopteri sp. nov., Difficilina tubulani sp. nov. and Difficilina paranemertis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Chantangsi, Chitchai; Leander, Brian S

    2010-11-01

    Most eugregarine apicomplexans infecting the intestines of marine invertebrates have been described within the family Lecudinidae and the type genus Lecudina. The diversity of these parasites is vast and poorly understood and only a tiny number of species has been characterized at the molecular phylogenetic level. DNA sequences coupled with high-resolution micrographs of trophozoites provide an efficient and precise approach for delimiting gregarine lineages from one another and also facilitate our overall understanding of gregarine biodiversity. In this study, phylogenetic analyses of small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences from five (uncultivated) gregarines isolated from polychaetes and nemerteans in the North-eastern Pacific Ocean are presented. Lecudina phyllochaetopteri sp. nov. was isolated from the intestines of the parchment tubeworm Phyllochaetopterus prolifica (Polychaeta). Lecudina longissima and Lecudina polymorpha were both isolated from the intestines of Lumbrineris japonica (Polychaeta). Difficilina tubulani sp. nov. was isolated from the nemertean Tubulanus polymorpha and Difficilina paranemertis sp. nov. was isolated from the nemertean Paranemertes peregrina. This is the first report of molecular sequence data from gregarines that infect nemerteans. The two novel species of the genus Difficilina described in this study formed a strongly supported clade in the phylogenetic analyses. This Difficilina clade formed the sister group to a robust subclade of lecudinids consisting of Lecudina longissima, Lecudina phyllochaetopteri sp. nov. (which lacked epicytic folds), Lecudina tuzetae, species of the genus Lankesteria and several sequences derived from previous environmental DNA surveys of marine biodiversity.

  15. Hepatozoon langii n. sp. and Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Adele-orina: Hepatozoidae) from the crag lizard (Sauria: Cordylidae) Pseudocordylus langi from the North Eastern Drakensberg escarpment, Eastern Free State, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Van As, Johann; Davies, Angela J; Smit, Nico J

    2013-01-22

    Two new haemogregarine species, Hepatozoon langii n. sp. and Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp., are described from the pe-ripheral blood of the high altitude crag lizard, Pseudocordylus langi, collected between October 2006 and April 2009 from the North Eastern Drakensberg, Eastern Free State. Hepatozoon langii n. sp. has maturing and mature gamonts that appear encapsulated and have narrow, curved tails. Their cytoplasm stains pinkish-purple with Giemsa, while their nuclei are pur-ple stained with stranded chromatin. Mature gamonts measure 19.1 ± 1.0 (15.4-28.1) μm long by 6.2 ± 1.1 (3.5-7.9) μm wide. Hepatozoon vacuolatus n. sp. gamonts are mostly broader at one pole than the other, have bluish-pink cytoplasm characterised by distinctive rounded and oval vacuoles, and demonstrate pink granules with Giemsa staining. Nuclei stain purple and are mainly coarsely granular. Mature gamonts measure 16.5 ± 1.0 (14.7 - 17.6) μm long by 5.9 ± 1.2 (4.0 - 7.7) μm wide. Both species parasitize erythroblasts, as well as erythrocytes and can dehaemoglobinize the cytoplasm of their host cells. Hepatozoon langii n. sp occurred in the absence of H. vacuolatus n. sp., but the latter haemogregarine always formed mixed infections with the former; no stages intermediate between the two haemogregarine types were observed.

  16. Dissecting the interface between apicomplexan parasite and host cell: Insights from a divergent AMARON2 pair

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii are widely studied parasites in phylum Apicomplexa and the etiological agents of severe human malaria and toxoplasmosis, respectively. These intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated invasion strategy that relies on delivery of proteins into the...

  17. Identification of Eimeria acervulina conoid antigen using chicken monoclonal antibody and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa include a large number of medically important species. Among them, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium that cause watery diarrhea and mortality in humans and livestock, and Eimeria which induces gastrointestinal disorder in livestock and poul...

  18. Phylogenetic relationships of Cryptosporidium determined by ribosomal RNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Fielke, R; Lumb, R; Baverstock, P R

    1990-04-01

    Reverse transcription of total cellular RNA was used to obtain a partial sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA of Cryptosporidium, a protist currently placed in the phylum Apicomplexa. The semi-conserved regions were aligned with homologous sequences in a range of other eukaryotes, and the evolutionary relationships of Cryptosporidium were determined by two different methods of phylogenetic analysis. The prokaryotes Escherichia coli and Halobacterium cuti were included as outgroups. The results do not show an especially close relationship of Cryptosporidium to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa.

  19. Coprology of a single Northern white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus): first report of Isospora rastegaievae in Poland.

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M; Jeżewski, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Coprological analysis of a sample from one free-living hedgehog was done with the use of a direct flotation method with additional incubation of fecal material. The study revealed three types of eggs and oocysts in the feces. The most commonly diagnosed were oocysts of Isospora rastegaievae (543/3g), while oocysts of Monocystis sp. (267/3g) and eggs of Aonchotheca/Eucoleus spp. (52/3g) were seen less often. This is the first report of coccidia I. rastegaievae (Apicomplexa: Eimeriida) and acephaline gregarine Monocystis sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) infection in a hedgehog in Poland.

  20. Eugregarines reduce susceptibility of the hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus, to apicomplexan pathogens and retard larval development.

    PubMed

    Lord, Jeffrey C; Omoto, Charlotte K

    2012-10-01

    Eugregarines are abundant in a great diversity of invertebrates, and yet their relationships with their hosts are subject to controversy and confusion. We tested the effect of the eugregarine, Pyxinia crystalligera, on growth, development, and susceptibility to two Apicomplexa pathogens of the hide beetle, D. maculatus. Heavy infection with eugregarines provided partial protection from two pathogenic members of Apicomplexa, M. trogodermae and A. tribolii. Infection with P. crystalligera caused lower weight in beetle larvae, but did not significantly retard pupation or adult emergence. A. tribolii infection of Lepidoptera and M. trogodermae infection of D. maculatus are reported for the first time. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the state of Rondônia (Brazilian Western Amazon).

    PubMed

    Araújo, Maisa S; Messias, Mariluce R; Figueiró, Marivaldo R; Gil, Luiz Herman S; Probst, Christian M; Vidal, Newton M; Katsuragawa, Tony H; Krieger, Marco A; Silva, Luiz H Pereira da; Ozaki, Luiz S

    2013-06-03

    Simian malaria is still an open question concerning the species of Plasmodium parasites and species of New World monkeys susceptible to the parasites. In addition, the lingering question as to whether these animals are reservoirs for human malaria might become important especially in a scenario of eradication of the disease. To aid in the answers to these questions, monkeys were surveyed for malaria parasite natural infection in the Amazonian state of Rondônia, Brazil, a state with intense environmental alterations due to human activities, which facilitated sampling of the animals. Parasites were detected and identified in DNA from blood of monkeys, by PCR with primers for the 18S rRNA, CSP and MSP1 genes and sequencing of the amplified fragments. Multiplex PCR primers for the 18S rRNA genes were designed for the parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. An overall infection rate of 10.9% was observed or 20 out 184 monkey specimens surveyed, mostly by P. brasilianum. However, four specimens of monkeys were found infected with P. falciparum, two of them doubly infected with P. brasilianum and P. falciparum. In addition, a species of monkey of the family Aotidae, Aotus nigriceps, is firstly reported here naturally infected with P. brasilianum. None of the monkeys surveyed was found infected with P. simium/P. vivax. The rate of natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the Brazilian state of Rondônia is in line with previous surveys of simian malaria in the Amazon region. The fact that a monkey species was found that had not previously been described to harbour malaria parasites indicates that the list of monkey species susceptible to Plasmodium infection is yet to be completed. Furthermore, finding monkeys in the region infected with P. falciparum clearly indicates parasite transfer from humans to the animals. Whether this parasite can be transferred back to humans and how

  2. Natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the state of Rondônia (Brazilian Western Amazon)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Simian malaria is still an open question concerning the species of Plasmodium parasites and species of New World monkeys susceptible to the parasites. In addition, the lingering question as to whether these animals are reservoirs for human malaria might become important especially in a scenario of eradication of the disease. To aid in the answers to these questions, monkeys were surveyed for malaria parasite natural infection in the Amazonian state of Rondônia, Brazil, a state with intense environmental alterations due to human activities, which facilitated sampling of the animals. Methods Parasites were detected and identified in DNA from blood of monkeys, by PCR with primers for the 18S rRNA, CSP and MSP1 genes and sequencing of the amplified fragments. Multiplex PCR primers for the 18S rRNA genes were designed for the parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. Results An overall infection rate of 10.9% was observed or 20 out 184 monkey specimens surveyed, mostly by P. brasilianum. However, four specimens of monkeys were found infected with P. falciparum, two of them doubly infected with P. brasilianum and P. falciparum. In addition, a species of monkey of the family Aotidae, Aotus nigriceps, is firstly reported here naturally infected with P. brasilianum. None of the monkeys surveyed was found infected with P. simium/P. vivax. Conclusion The rate of natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the Brazilian state of Rondônia is in line with previous surveys of simian malaria in the Amazon region. The fact that a monkey species was found that had not previously been described to harbour malaria parasites indicates that the list of monkey species susceptible to Plasmodium infection is yet to be completed. Furthermore, finding monkeys in the region infected with P. falciparum clearly indicates parasite transfer from humans to the animals. Whether this parasite can be

  3. Identification of Plasmodium spp. in Neotropical primates of Maranhense Amazon in Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Di Santi, Silvia Maria; Manrique, Wilson Gómez; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2017-01-01

    In the Brazilian Amazon region, malaria caused by Plasmodium malariae is considered to be a zoonosis because of cross-transfer of the parasite between humans and Neotropical primates. To contribute information on this issue, we investigated occurrences of natural infection with Plasmodium sp. among Neotropical primates in the Maranhense Amazon (Amazon region of the state of Maranhão), in the northeastern region of Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 161 Neotropical primates of six species that were caught in an environmental reserve (Sítio Aguahy) and from captive primates (CETAS—Wildlife Screening Center, municipality of São Luís), in Maranhão. Plasmodium sp. was diagnosed based on light microscopy, PCR, qPCR and LAMP for amplification of the 18S rRNA gene. Serum samples were also assayed by means of indirect immunofluorescence for IgG antibodies against P. malariae/P. brasilianum, P. falciparum and P. berghei. Parasites were detected through light microscopy on five slides from captive primates (four Sapajus spp. and one Callithrix jacchus). In the molecular tests, 34.16% (55/161) and 29.81% (48/161) of the animals sampled were positive in the qPCR and PCR assays, respectively. In the PCR, 47/48 animals were positive for P. malariae/P. brasilianum; of these, eight were free-living primates and 39 from CETAS, São Luís. One sample showed a band in the genus-specific reaction, but not in the second PCR reaction. Anti-P. malariae/P. brasilianum IgG antibodies were detected in four serum samples from Sapajus spp. in captivity. In this study, circulation of P. malariae/P. brasilianum in Neotropical primates was confirmed, with low levels of parasitemia and low levels of antibodies. The importance of these animals as reservoirs of human malaria in the region studied is still unknown. This scenario has an impact on control and elimination of malaria in this region. PMID:28796820

  4. Eugregarines reduce susceptibility of the hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus, to apicomplexan pathogens and retard larval development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eugregarines are abundant in a great diversity of invertebrates, and yet their relationships with their hosts are subject to controversy and confusion. We tested the effect of the eugregarine, Pyxinia crystalligera, on growth, development, and susceptibility to two Apicomplexa pathogens of the hide ...

  5. Population genetics, diversity and spread of virulence in Toxoplasma gondii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Globally, an estimated third of the human population harbors infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled eukaryotic parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa (Dubey, 2010). Most infected persons are unaware of, and evidently unharmed by, the parasite cysts established in their muscles and/...

  6. Comparative genomics of the Rab protein family in Apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Langsley, Gordon; van Noort, Vera; Carret, Céline; Meissner, Markus; de Villiers, Etienne P.; Bishop, Richard; Pain, Arnab

    2008-01-01

    Rab genes encode a subgroup of small GTP-binding proteins within the ras super-family that regulate targeting and fusion of transport vesicles within the secretory and endocytic pathways. These genes are of particular interest in the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa, since a family of Rab GTPases has been described for Plasmodium and most putative secretory pathway proteins in Apicomplexa have conventional predicted signal peptides. Moreover, peptide motifs have now been identified within a large number of secreted Plasmodium proteins that direct their targeting to the red blood cell cytosol, the apicoplast, the food vacuole and Maurer's clefs; in contrast, motifs that direct proteins to secretory organelles (rhoptries, micronemes and microspheres) have yet to be defined. The nature of the vesicle in which these proteins are transported to their destinations remains unknown and morphological structures equivalent to the endoplasmic reticulum and trans-Golgi stacks typical of other eukaryotes cannot be visualised in Apicomplexa. Since Rab GTPases regulate vesicular traffic in all eukaryotes, and this traffic in intracellular parasites could regulate import of nutrient and drugs and export of antigens, host cell modulatory proteins and lactate we compare and contrast here the Rab families of Apicomplexa. PMID:18468471

  7. Sarcocystosis of animals and humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Species of Sarcocystosis, single-celled protozoan parasites in the Phylum Apicomplexa, are widespread in warm-blooded animals. Completion of the life cycle requires two host species: an intermediate (or prey) host and a definitive (or predator) host. Hosts can harbor more than one species of Sarcocy...

  8. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the Eimeria tenella microneme protein MIC2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Apicomplexan pathogens of the species Eimeria cause coccidiosis, an intestinal disease of chickens, which has a major economic impact on the poultry industry. Members of the phylum Apicomplexa share an assortment of unique secretory organelles (rhoptries, micronemes and dense granules) that me...

  9. Repertoire of theileria equi antigens bound by equine antibody during persistent phase of infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Theileriosis in horses and cattle is caused by tick-borne Apicomplexa parasites that cause death or persist for life in their respective hosts. Due to transmission risk associated with persistence, infection severely limits movement of horses and cattle between countries. The recent reemergence of T...

  10. Immune Response to Cryptosporidiosis in Philippine Children

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Pro- fection: present knowledge and future directions. duction of monoclonal antibodies specific for Lancet /.: 688-69 1. 111:83 165894 Eimeria ...111:73035602 inhibition of growth of Eimeria bovis and Ei- 3 1. van Asbeck BS, Verhoef J1. 1983. Iron and host meria papillata (Apicomplexa) in

  11. Comparative bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor genes suggests conservation of key regulatory domains among babesia bovis, B. microti and theileria equi.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apicomplexa tick borne hemoparasites including B. bovis, B. microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis respectively. These neglected parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate a...

  12. Actin Dynamics Is Controlled by a Casein Kinase II and Phosphatase 2C Interplay on Toxoplasma gondii Toxofilin

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Violaine; Cayla, Xavier; Faure, Grazyna; Garcia, Alphonse; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    Actin polymerization in Apicomplexa protozoa is central to parasite motility and host cell invasion. Toxofilin has been characterized as a protein that sequesters actin monomers and caps actin filaments in Toxoplasma gondii. Herein, we show that Toxofilin properties in vivo as in vitro depend on its phosphorylation. We identify a novel parasitic type 2C phosphatase that binds the Toxofilin/G-actin complex and a casein kinase II-like activity in the cytosol, both of which modulate the phosphorylation status of Toxofilin serine53. The interplay of these two molecules controls Toxofilin binding of G-actin as well as actin dynamics in vivo. Such functional interactions should play a major role in actin sequestration, a central feature of actin dynamics in Apicomplexa that underlies the spectacular speed and nature of parasite gliding motility. PMID:12802063

  13. Cryptosporidium is more closely related to the gregarines than to coccidia as shown by phylogenetic analysis of apicomplexan parasites inferred using small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Carreno, R A; Martin, D S; Barta, J R

    1999-11-01

    The phylogenetic placement of gregarine parasites (Apicomplexa: Gregarinasina) within the Apicomplexa was derived by comparison of small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Gregarine sequences were obtained from Gregarina niphandrodes Clopton, Percival, and Janovy, 1991, and Monocystis agilis Stein, 1848 (Eugregarinorida Léger 1900), as well as from Ophriocystis elektroscirrha McLaughlin and Myers, 1970 (Neogregarinorida Grassé 1953). The sequences were aligned with several other gregarine and apicomplexan sequences from GenBank and the resulting data matrix analyzed by parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods. The gregarines form a monophyletic clade that is a sister group to Cryptosporidium spp. The gregarine/ Cryptosporidium clade is separate from the other major apicomplexan clade containing the coccidia, adeleids, piroplasms, and haemosporinids. The trees indicate that the genus Cryptosporidium has a closer phylogenetic affinity with the gregarines than with the coccidia. These results do not support the present classification of the Cryptosporidiidae in the suborder Eimerioirina Léger, 1911.

  14. Cytoskeleton of Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Morrissette, Naomi S.; Sibley, L. David

    2002-01-01

    The Apicomplexa are a phylum of diverse obligate intracellular parasites including Plasmodium spp., the cause of malaria; Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum, opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised individuals; and Eimeria spp. and Theileria spp., parasites of considerable agricultural importance. These protozoan parasites share distinctive morphological features, cytoskeletal organization, and modes of replication, motility, and invasion. This review summarizes our current understanding of the cytoskeletal elements, the properties of cytoskeletal proteins, and the role of the cytoskeleton in polarity, motility, invasion, and replication. We discuss the unusual properties of actin and myosin in the Apicomplexa, the highly stereotyped microtubule populations in apicomplexans, and a network of recently discovered novel intermediate filament-like elements in these parasites. PMID:11875126

  15. Oxidative potential of some endophytic fungi using 1-indanone as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Fill, Taicia Pacheco; da Silva, Jose Vinicius; de Oliveira, Kleber Thiago; da Silva, Bianca Ferreira; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2012-06-01

    The oxidative potential of the fungus Penicillium brasilianum, a strain isolated as an endophyte from a Meliaceae plant (Melia azedarach), was investigated using 1-indanone as a substrate to track the production of monooxygenases. The fungus produced the dihydrocoumarin from 1-indanone with the classical Baeyer-Villiger reaction regiochemistry, and (-)-(R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone with 78% ee. Minor compounds resulting from lipase and SAM activities were also detected. The biotransformation procedures were also applied to a collection of Penicillium and Aspergillus fungi obtained from M. azedarach and Murraya paniculata. The results showed that Baeyer-Villiger were mostly active in fungi isolated from M. azedarach. Almost all of the fungi tested produced 3-hydroxy-1-indanone..

  16. Closed-tube DNA extraction using a thermostable proteinase is highly sensitive, capable of single parasite detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, B C; Power, M L; Bergquist, P L

    2007-12-01

    Current DNA extraction methods for parasites are labour-intensive and usually involve several steps, increasing the potential for cross-contamination. We describe here a closed-tube DNA extraction procedure based upon the use of a thermostable proteinase that enabled sensitive amplification of target loci from parasites from diverse lineages including Apicomplexa, Sarcomastgophora and Nematoda. Moreover, this procedure is not subject to cross-contamination and is readily adaptable to automation.

  17. Simian malaria in the Brazilian Atlantic forest: first description of natural infection of capuchin monkeys (Cebinae subfamily) by Plasmodium simium.

    PubMed

    de Alvarenga, Denise Anete Madureira; de Pina-Costa, Anielle; de Sousa, Taís Nóbrega; Pissinatti, Alcides; Zalis, Mariano G; Suaréz-Mutis, Martha C; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Brasil, Patrícia; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; de Brito, Cristiana Ferreira Alves

    2015-02-18

    In Brazil, two species of Plasmodium have been described infecting non-human primates, Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. These species are morphologically, genetically and immunologically indistinguishable from the human Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax parasites, respectively. Plasmodium simium has been observed naturally infecting monkeys of the genera Alouatta and Brachyteles in a restricted area of the Atlantic Forest in the south and southeast regions of Brazil. However, its reported geographical distribution and the diversity of its vertebrate hosts may be underestimated, since available data were largely based on analyses by microscopic examination of peripheral blood, a method with limited sensitivity, considering the potential sub-patent feature of these infections. The present study describes, for the first time, the natural infection of P. simium in capuchin monkeys from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Blood samples from 30 non-human primates belonging to nine species kept in the Primate Centre of Rio de Janeiro were collected. Fragments of spleen and liver from one dead monkey found in the neighborhoods of the Primate Centre were also analysed. Molecular diagnosis was performed by nested PCR (18SSU rRNA) and the amplified fragment was sequenced. Thirty per cent of the captive animals were infected with P. simium and/or P. brasilianum. The dead monkey tested positive for DNA of P. simium. For the first time, Cebinae primates (two specimens of genus Cebus and two of genus Sapajos) were found naturally infected by P. simium. The infection was confirmed by sequencing a small fragment of 18SSU rRNA. The results highlight the possibility of infection by P. simium in other species of non-human primates whose impact could be significant for the malaria epidemiology among non-human primates and, if it becomes clear that this P. simium is able to infect monkeys and, eventually, man, also for the maintenance of transmission of human malaria in

  18. Recent advances in understanding apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Seeber, Frank; Steinfelder, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular single-celled parasites belonging to the large phylum Apicomplexa are amongst the most prevalent and morbidity-causing pathogens worldwide. In this review, we highlight a few of the many recent advances in the field that helped to clarify some important aspects of their fascinating biology and interaction with their hosts. Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria, and thus the recent emergence of resistance against the currently used drug combinations based on artemisinin has been of major interest for the scientific community. It resulted in great advances in understanding the resistance mechanisms that can hopefully be translated into altered future drug regimens. Apicomplexa are also experts in host cell manipulation and immune evasion. Toxoplasma gondii and Theileria sp., besides Plasmodium sp., are species that secrete effector molecules into the host cell to reach this aim. The underlying molecular mechanisms for how these proteins are trafficked to the host cytosol ( T. gondii and Plasmodium) and how a secreted protein can immortalize the host cell ( Theileria sp.) have been illuminated recently. Moreover, how such secreted proteins affect the host innate immune responses against T. gondii and the liver stages of Plasmodium has also been unraveled at the genetic and molecular level, leading to unexpected insights. Methodological advances in metabolomics and molecular biology have been instrumental to solving some fundamental puzzles of mitochondrial carbon metabolism in Apicomplexa. Also, for the first time, the generation of stably transfected Cryptosporidium parasites was achieved, which opens up a wide variety of experimental possibilities for this understudied, important apicomplexan pathogen. PMID:27347391

  19. A dynamin is required for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Breinich, Manuela S; Ferguson, David J P; Foth, Bernardo J; van Dooren, Giel G; Lebrun, Maryse; Quon, Doris V; Striepen, Boris; Bradley, Peter J; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Carruthers, Vern B; Meissner, Markus

    2009-02-24

    Apicomplexans contain only a core set of factors involved in vesicular traffic. Yet these obligate intracellular parasites evolved a set of unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries, and dense granules) that are required for invasion and modulation of the host cell. Apicomplexa replicate by budding from or within a single mother cell, and secretory organelles are synthesized de novo at the final stage of division. To date, the molecular basis for their biogenesis is unknown. We demonstrate that the apicomplexan dynamin-related protein B (DrpB) belongs to an alveolate specific family of dynamins that is expanded in ciliates. DrpB accumulates in a cytoplasmic region close to the Golgi that breaks up during replication and reforms after assembly of the daughter cells. Conditional ablation of DrpB function results in mature daughter parasites that are devoid of micronemes and rhoptries. In the absence of these organelles, invasion-related secretory proteins are mistargeted to the constitutive secretory pathway. Mutant parasites are able to replicate but are unable to escape from or invade into host cells. DrpB is the essential mechanoenzyme for the biogenesis of secretory organelles in Apicomplexa. We suggest that DrpB is required during replication to generate vesicles for the regulated secretory pathway that form the unique secretory organelles. Our study supports a role of an alveolate-specific dynamin that was required for the evolution of novel, secretory organelles. In the case of Apicomplexa, these organelles further evolved to enable a parasitic lifestyle.

  20. Evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolate superphylum includes many free-living and parasitic organisms, which are united by the presence of alveolar sacs lying proximal to the plasma membrane, providing cell structure. All species comprising the apicomplexan group of alveolates are parasites and have adapted to the unique requirements of the parasitic lifestyle. Here the evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles that are involved in the critical process of egress from one cell and invasion of another is explored. The variations within the Apicomplexa and how these relate to species-specific biology will be discussed. In addition, recent studies have identified specific calcium-sensitive molecules that coordinate the various events and regulate the release of these secretory organelles within apicomplexan parasites. Some aspects of this machinery are conserved outside the Apicomplexa, and are beginning to elucidate the conserved nature of the machinery. Briefly, the relationship of this secretion machinery within the Apicomplexa will be discussed, compared with free-living and predatory alveolates, and how these might have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:23068912

  1. In silico analysis of the cyclophilin repertoire of apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Krücken, Jürgen; Greif, Gisela; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyclophilins (Cyps) are peptidyl cis/trans isomerases implicated in diverse processes such as protein folding, signal transduction, and RNA processing. They are also candidate drug targets, in particular for the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. In addition, cyclosporine is known to exhibit anti-parasitic effects on a wide range of organisms including several apicomplexa. In order to obtain new non-immunosuppressive drugs targeting apicomplexan cyclophilins, a profound knowledge of the cyclophilin repertoire of this phylum would be necessary. Results BLAST and maximum likelihood analyses identified 16 different cyclophilin subfamilies within the genomes of Cryptosporidium hominis, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Theileria annulata, Theileria parva, and Babesia bovis. In addition to good statistical support from the phylogenetic analysis, these subfamilies are also confirmed by comparison of cyclophilin domain architecture. Within an individual genome, the number of different Cyp genes that could be deduced varies between 7–9 for Cryptosporidia and 14 for T. gondii. Many of the putative apicomplexan cyclophilins are predicted to be nuclear proteins, most of them presumably involved in RNA processing. Conclusion The genomes of apicomplexa harbor a cyclophilin repertoire that is at least as complex as that of most fungi. The identification of Cyp subfamilies that are specific for lower eukaryotes, apicomplexa, or even the genus Plasmodium is of particular interest since these subfamilies are not present in host cells and might therefore represent attractive drug targets. PMID:19555495

  2. Combined amplicon pyrosequencing assays reveal presence of the apicomplexan "type-N" (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus) and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Slapeta, Jan; Linares, Marjorie C

    2013-01-01

    The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. "type-N" symbiont) belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata) is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa-Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus). We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales) formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef environments, it is important not only to understand the evolution of these

  3. The Conoid Associated Motor MyoH Is Indispensable for Toxoplasma gondii Entry and Exit from Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Graindorge, Arnault; Salamun, Julien; Marq, Jean Baptiste; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Many members of the phylum of Apicomplexa have adopted an obligate intracellular life style and critically depend on active invasion and egress from the infected cells to complete their lytic cycle. Toxoplasma gondii belongs to the coccidian subgroup of the Apicomplexa, and as such, the invasive tachyzoite contains an organelle termed the conoid at its extreme apex. This motile organelle consists of a unique polymer of tubulin fibres and protrudes in both gliding and invading parasites. The class XIV myosin A, which is conserved across the Apicomplexa phylum, is known to critically contribute to motility, invasion and egress from infected cells. The MyoA-glideosome is anchored to the inner membrane complex (IMC) and is assumed to translocate the components of the circular junction secreted by the micronemes and rhoptries, to the rear of the parasite. Here we comprehensively characterise the class XIV myosin H (MyoH) and its associated light chains. We show that the 3 alpha-tubulin suppressor domains, located in MyoH tail, are necessary to anchor this motor to the conoid. Despite the presence of an intact MyoA-glideosome, conditional disruption of TgMyoH severely compromises parasite motility, invasion and egress from infected cells. We demonstrate that MyoH is necessary for the translocation of the circular junction from the tip of the parasite, where secretory organelles exocytosis occurs, to the apical position where the IMC starts. This study attributes for the first time a direct function of the conoid in motility and invasion, and establishes the indispensable role of MyoH in initiating the first step of motility along this unique organelle, which is subsequently relayed by MyoA to enact effective gliding and invasion. PMID:26760042

  4. Cell division in Apicomplexan parasites is organized by a homolog of the striated rootlet fiber of algal flagella.

    PubMed

    Francia, Maria E; Jordan, Carly N; Patel, Jay D; Sheiner, Lilach; Demerly, Jessica L; Fellows, Justin D; de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Morrissette, Naomi S; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Striepen, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Apicomplexa are intracellular parasites that cause important human diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. During host cell infection new parasites are formed through a budding process that parcels out nuclei and organelles into multiple daughters. Budding is remarkably flexible in output and can produce two to thousands of progeny cells. How genomes and daughters are counted and coordinated is unknown. Apicomplexa evolved from single celled flagellated algae, but with the exception of the gametes, lack flagella. Here we demonstrate that a structure that in the algal ancestor served as the rootlet of the flagellar basal bodies is required for parasite cell division. Parasite striated fiber assemblins (SFA) polymerize into a dynamic fiber that emerges from the centrosomes immediately after their duplication. The fiber grows in a polarized fashion and daughter cells form at its distal tip. As the daughter cell is further elaborated it remains physically tethered at its apical end, the conoid and polar ring. Genetic experiments in Toxoplasma gondii demonstrate two essential components of the fiber, TgSFA2 and 3. In the absence of either of these proteins cytokinesis is blocked at its earliest point, the initiation of the daughter microtubule organizing center (MTOC). Mitosis remains unimpeded and mutant cells accumulate numerous nuclei but fail to form daughter cells. The SFA fiber provides a robust spatial and temporal organizer of parasite cell division, a process that appears hard-wired to the centrosome by multiple tethers. Our findings have broader evolutionary implications. We propose that Apicomplexa abandoned flagella for most stages yet retained the organizing principle of the flagellar MTOC. Instead of ensuring appropriate numbers of flagella, the system now positions the apical invasion complexes. This suggests that elements of the invasion apparatus may be derived from flagella or flagellum associated structures.

  5. Combined Amplicon Pyrosequencing Assays Reveal Presence of the Apicomplexan “type-N” (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus) and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Šlapeta, Jan; Linares, Marjorie C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. “type-N” symbiont) belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata) is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. Methods & Principal Findings We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa - Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus). We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales) formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. Significance This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef environments, it is

  6. Extraintestinal gamogony of Aggregata octopiana in the reared common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae).

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Bocina, Ivana

    2007-11-01

    Aggregata octopiana (Apicomplexa, Aggregatidae) is the most prevalent coccidian in the wild common octopus (Octopus vulgaris), whose heteroxenous life cycle includes gamogony and sporogony undergoing in the octopus digestive tract. In the infected reared octopi, we observed an unusual extraintestinal distribution of the coccidian, with both gamogony and sporogony ongoing in dermal and gill tissue. Oocysts and macrogamonts were embedded in the dermal connective tissue of octopian arms, demarcated by a thin cyst wall or multilayered dark membrane. In gill connective and epithelial tissue all developmental stages were observed, eliciting hemocytic infiltration. Sometimes a complete substitution of the tissue by cysts and developmental stages occurred, resulting in necrosis of gill tissue.

  7. Replication and maintenance of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome.

    PubMed

    Milton, Morgan E; Nelson, Scott W

    2016-08-01

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for many devastating diseases including malaria (Plasmodium spp.), toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma gondii), babesiosis (Babesia bovis), and cyclosporiasis (Cyclospora cayetanensis). Most Apicomplexans contain a unique and essential organelle called the apicoplast. Derived from an ancient chloroplast, the apicoplast replicates and maintains a 35 kilobase (kb) circular genome. Due to its essential nature within the parasite, drugs targeted to proteins involved in DNA replication and repair of the apicoplast should be potent and specific. This review summarizes the current knowledge surrounding the replication and repair of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast genome and identifies several putative proteins involved in replication and repair pathways.

  8. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution.

  9. [Cryptosporidium: phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Chacín-Bonilla, Leonor

    2007-03-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium in the phylum Apicomplexa were long thought to be closely related to the coccidia. However, despite strong morphological similarities to these organisms, Cryptosporidium has notable differences with them and similarities with the gregarine protozoa. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of molecular data, some authors place Cryptosporidium at the basis of the phylum Apicomplexa, others consider species of this genus to be phylogenetically too distant from the coccidia and do not include them in this group of protozoa, and others think that Cryptosporidium is closely related to gregarines. The taxonomy of this genus and the naming of species are undergoing rapid change due to the new and increasing molecular information. Molecular characterization of oocysts using polymerase chain reaction based procedures has not only a major impact on resolving the taxonomy of Cryptosporidium at the species level but also on the molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis. Today, it is recognized that this genus is a phenotypically and genotypically heterogeneous assemblage of largely morphologically identical species and genotypes. Fourteen Cryptosporidium species and 21 C. parvum genotypes are currently recognized. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that genetically related hosts often have related forms of Cryptosporidium. Application of molecular techniques to taxonomy and epidemiology is helping to characterize new and existing species and determine the sources of the parasites that will facilitate the identification of sources of water-borne cryptosporidiosis.

  10. Functional and phylogenetic evidence of a bacterial origin for the first enzyme in sphingolipid biosynthesis in a phylum of eukaryotic protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Mina, John G; Thye, Julie K; Alqaisi, Amjed Q I; Bird, Louise E; Dods, Robert H; Grøftehauge, Morten K; Mosely, Jackie A; Pratt, Steven; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schwarz, Ralph T; Pohl, Ehmke; Denny, Paul W

    2017-07-21

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate, intracellular eukaryotic apicomplexan protozoan parasite that can cause fetal damage and abortion in both animals and humans. Sphingolipids are essential and ubiquitous components of eukaryotic membranes that are both synthesized and scavenged by the Apicomplexa. Here we report the identification, isolation, and analyses of the Toxoplasma serine palmitoyltransferase, an enzyme catalyzing the first and rate-limiting step in sphingolipid biosynthesis: the condensation of serine and palmitoyl-CoA. In all eukaryotes analyzed to date, serine palmitoyltransferase is a highly conserved heterodimeric enzyme complex. However, biochemical and structural analyses demonstrated the apicomplexan orthologue to be a functional, homodimeric serine palmitoyltransferase localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, phylogenetic studies indicated that it was evolutionarily related to the prokaryotic serine palmitoyltransferase, identified in the Sphingomonadaceae as a soluble homodimeric enzyme. Therefore this enzyme, conserved throughout the Apicomplexa, is likely to have been obtained via lateral gene transfer from a prokaryote. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases with kelch-like repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Andreeva, Alexandra V

    2002-09-01

    This report describes the presence in plants of protein Ser/Thr phosphatases of the PPP family, homologous to PfPPalpha phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum. Like PfPPalpha, they possess large N-terminal domains and catalytic domains that are more closely related to the protein phosphatase 1 group. The N-terminal domains of PfPPalpha and its plant homologues contain tandem kelch-like repeats, not previously identified in any protein phosphatases, suggesting that the N-terminal domains may form beta-propeller structures mediating protein-protein interactions. We therefore suggest that this novel phosphatase group be designated as PPKLs for protein phosphatases with kelch-like repeat domains. Four PPKL isoforms are encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, of which at least three are expressed. PPKLs appear to be ubiquitous in Viridiplantae. The existence of a protein phosphatase group shared by Viridiplantae and Apicomplexa, but not other eukaryotes, is in line with the theory of the origin of Apicomplexa by endosymbiosis of nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes with red algae.

  12. Expression of Toxoplasma gondii dense granule protein7 (GRA7) in Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangwen; Qin, Mei; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Jingxia; Suo, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Dense granules are specialized secretory organelles of Apicomplexa parasites; the dense granule (GRA) proteins are believed to play a role in intracellular survival and the nutrient/waste exchange mechanism with the host cell. Until now, limited information is available concerning the characterization of GRA proteins in Eimeria. Eimeria tenella and Toxoplasma gondii are apicomplexan protozoa and share many similarities in biology and genomics. We hypothesized that GRA proteins from T. gondii could be expressed and have a similar function in E. tenella. To confirm the expression and localization of the GRA protein in T. gondii and E. tenella, a transient transfection strategy was used to express T. gondii GRA7 tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) (GRA7-YFP); T. gondii tachyzoites were transfected with the plasmid pTgtubGRA7-YFP/sagCAT, and E. tenella sporozoites were transfected with the pEtmic1GRA7-YFP/act construct. The results show that fluorescence can be expressed mainly into the parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) of the T. gondii. GRA7 of T. gondii can also be expressed in E. tenella and can lead the fluorescence protein into the PVs of the parasites and the cavity of the sporocysts. As for the extracellular stage, YFP gathered to form small particles in the released merozoites and sporozoites, suggesting a localization of the secretory organelles of E. tenella. These results suggest that GRA proteins have a conserved function across species of Apicomplexa in targeting proteins to the PVs.

  13. Jumbled Genomes: Missing Apicomplexan Synteny

    PubMed Central

    DeBarry, Jeremy D.; Kissinger, Jessica C.

    2011-01-01

    Whole-genome comparisons provide insight into genome evolution by informing on gene repertoires, gene gains/losses, and genome organization. Most of our knowledge about eukaryotic genome evolution is derived from studies of multicellular model organisms. The eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa contains obligate intracellular protist parasites responsible for a wide range of human and veterinary diseases (e.g., malaria, toxoplasmosis, and theileriosis). We have developed an in silico protein-encoding gene based pipeline to investigate synteny across 12 apicomplexan species from six genera. Genome rearrangement between lineages is extensive. Syntenic regions (conserved gene content and order) are rare between lineages and appear to be totally absent across the phylum, with no group of three genes found on the same chromosome and in the same order within 25 kb up- and downstream of any orthologous genes. Conserved synteny between major lineages is limited to small regions in Plasmodium and Theileria/Babesia species, and within these conserved regions, there are a number of proteins putatively targeted to organelles. The observed overall lack of synteny is surprising considering the divergence times and the apparent absence of transposable elements (TEs) within any of the species examined. TEs are ubiquitous in all other groups of eukaryotes studied to date and have been shown to be involved in genomic rearrangements. It appears that there are different criteria governing genome evolution within the Apicomplexa relative to other well-studied unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:21504890

  14. Library of Apicomplexan Metabolic Pathways: a manually curated database for metabolic pathways of apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundram, Achchuthan; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Vasieva, Olga; Jones, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    The Library of Apicomplexan Metabolic Pathways (LAMP, http://www.llamp.net) is a web database that provides near complete mapping from genes to the central metabolic functions for some of the prominent intracellular parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa. This phylum includes the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis and theileriosis—diseases with a huge economic and social impact. A number of apicomplexan genomes have been sequenced, but the accurate annotation of gene function remains challenging. We have adopted an approach called metabolic reconstruction, in which genes are systematically assigned to functions within pathways/networks for Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Cryptosporidium and Theileria species, and Babesia bovis. Several functions missing from pathways have been identified, where the corresponding gene for an essential process appears to be absent from the current genome annotation. For each species, LAMP contains interactive diagrams of each pathway, hyperlinked to external resources and annotated with detailed information, including the sources of evidence used. We have also developed a section to highlight the overall metabolic capabilities of each species, such as the ability to synthesize or the dependence on the host for a particular metabolite. We expect this new database will become a valuable resource for fundamental and applied research on the Apicomplexa. PMID:23193253

  15. Structures of parasitic CDPK domains point to a common mechanism of activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K.; Amani, Merhnaz; Qiu, Wei; Pizarro, Juan C.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Lin, Yu-Hui; Lew, Jocelyn; Hutchinson, Ashley; Hui, Raymond

    2011-11-23

    We recently determined the first structures of inactivated and calcium-activated calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) from Apicomplexa. Calcium binding triggered a large conformational change that constituted a new mechanism in calcium signaling and a novel EF-hand fold (CAD, for CDPK activation domain). Thus we set out to determine if this mechanism was universal to all CDPKs. We solved additional CDPK structures, including one from the species Plasmodium. We highlight the similarities in sequence and structure across apicomplexan and plant CDPKs, and strengthen our observations that this novel mechanism could be universal to canonical CDPKs. Our new structures demonstrate more detailed steps in the mechanism of calcium activation and possible key players in regulation. Residues involved in making the largest conformational change are the most conserved across Apicomplexa, leading us to propose that the mechanism is indeed conserved. CpCDPK3{_}CAD and PfCDPK{_}CAD were captured at a possible intermediate conformation, lending insight into the order of activation steps. PfCDPK3{_}CAD adopts an activated fold, despite having an inactive EF-hand sequence in the N-terminal lobe. We propose that for most apicomplexan CDPKs, the mode of activation will be similar to that seen in our structures, while specific regulation of the inactive and active forms will require further investigation.

  16. The Organellar Genomes of Chromera and Vitrella, the Phototrophic Relatives of Apicomplexan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexa are known to contain greatly reduced organellar genomes. Their mitochondrial genome carries only three protein-coding genes, and their plastid genome is reduced to a 35-kb-long circle. The discovery of coral-endosymbiotic algae Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which share a common ancestry with Apicomplexa, provided an opportunity to study possibly ancestral forms of organellar genomes, a unique glimpse into the evolutionary history of apicomplexan parasites. The structurally similar mitochondrial genomes of Chromera and Vitrella differ in gene content, which is reflected in the composition of their respiratory chains. Thus, Chromera lacks respiratory complexes I and III, whereas Vitrella and apicomplexan parasites are missing only complex I. Plastid genomes differ substantially between these algae, particularly in structure: The Chromera plastid genome is a linear, 120-kb molecule with large and divergent genes, whereas the plastid genome of Vitrella is a highly compact circle that is only 85 kb long but nonetheless contains more genes than that of Chromera. It appears that organellar genomes have already been reduced in free-living phototrophic ancestors of apicomplexan parasites, and such reduction is not associated with parasitism.

  17. Habitat selection by owls in a seasonal semi-deciduous forest in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Menq, W; Anjos, L

    2015-11-01

    This paper tested the hypothesis that the structural components of vegetation have impact over the distribution of owl species in a fragment of a semi-deciduous seasonal forest. This paper also determined which vegetation variables contributed to the spatial distribution of owl species. It was developed in the Perobas Biological Reserve (PBR) between September and December 2011. To conduct the owl census, a playback technique was applied at hearing points distributed to cover different vegetation types in the study area. A total of 56 individual owls of six species were recorded: Tropical Screech-Owl (Megascops choliba), Black-capped Screech-Owl (Megascops atricapilla), Tawny-browed Owl (Pulsatrix koeniswaldiana), Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum), Mottled Owl (Strix virgata) and Stygian Owl (Asio stygius). The results suggest that the variables of vegetation structure have impact on the occurrence of owls. The canopy height, the presence of hollow trees, fallen trees and glades are the most important structural components influencing owl distribution in the sampled area.

  18. Everybody needs sphingolipids, right! Mining for new drug targets in protozoan sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mina, John G M; Denny, P W

    2017-06-22

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are an integral part of all eukaryotic cellular membranes. In addition, they have indispensable functions as signalling molecules controlling a myriad of cellular events. Disruption of either the de novo synthesis or the degradation pathways has been shown to have detrimental effects. The earlier identification of selective inhibitors of fungal SL biosynthesis promised potent broad-spectrum anti-fungal agents, which later encouraged testing some of those agents against protozoan parasites. In this review we focus on the key enzymes of the SL de novo biosynthetic pathway in protozoan parasites of the Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastidae, outlining the divergence and interconnection between host and pathogen metabolism. The druggability of the SL biosynthesis is considered, alongside recent technology advances that will enable the dissection and analyses of this pathway in the parasitic protozoa. The future impact of these advances for the development of new therapeutics for both globally threatening and neglected infectious diseases is potentially profound.

  19. Detection of Theileria luwenshuni in sheep from Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Phipps, L Paul; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Goharriz, Hooman; Welchman, David; Johnson, Nicholas

    2016-04-13

    Theileria spp. are tick-borne protozoan parasites of the Phylum Apicomplexa, Order Piroplasmida that infect a wide range of wild and domestic animals. In Great Britain, Theileria spp. have been reported from livestock associated with transmission by the tick Haemaphysalis punctata. However, these reports have not been associated with disease. This study has investigated the cause of a disease outbreak accompanied by mortality in a flock of sheep grazing reclaimed marshland in north Kent. A polymerase chain reaction-reverse line blot assay indicated the presence of Theileria spp. in blood samples from five animals. Subsequent testing with a pan-piroplasm PCR of a larger panel of blood samples detected a piroplasm amplicon in 19 of 21 sheep submitted from the affected flock. Automated sequencing confirmed that these amplicons shared 99-100% identity with T. luwenshuni. The clinical and PCR data suggest infection with T. luwenshuni was associated with disease and mortality in this flock.

  20. Molecular survey of parasites in introduced Pelophylax perezi (Ranidae) water frogs in the Azores.

    PubMed

    James Harris, D; Spigonardi, Maria Pia; Maia, João P M C; Cunha, Regina T

    2013-12-01

    Water frogs, Pelophylax perezi, that are introduced in the Azores, were screened for parasites using PCR primers known to amplify Apicomplexa parasites, and using nematode-specific primers. With the former, three different organisms were detected: Hepatozoon, a trichodinid protozoan ciliate and a possible Stramenopile. Using the latter set of primers, a single unknown spirurid nematode was also detected. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Hepatozoon detected within amphibian hosts appear to form a clade, although relationships of these parasites do not match the vertebrate intermediate host phylogeny. Regarding the possible Stramenopile, it is unclear whether this organism was actually present on the amphibian or in the water on the surface of the tissue sample. Our findings highlight that many different organisms can be detected with these primers and that they can be used to screen introduced host populations to detect parasites that have been brought with them.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic infection of humans and animals, caused by the opportunistic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Infection in pregnant women may lead to abortion, stillbirth or other serious consequences in newborns. Infection in immunocompromised patients can be fatal if not treated. On average, one third of people are chronically infected worldwide. Although very limited information from China has been published in the English journals, T. gondii infection is actually a significant human health problem in China. In the present article, we reviewed the clinical features, transmission, prevalence of T. gondii infection in humans in China, and summarized genetic characterizations of reported T. gondii isolates. Educating the public about the risks associated with unhealthy food and life style habits, tracking serological examinations to special populations, and measures to strengthen food and occupational safety are discussed. PMID:21864327

  2. Parasites of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus from Western Johor Straits, Malaysian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Nur Fauzana; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2014-09-01

    This study describes the apicomplexa as well as other parasites infecting organs/tissues of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix Linnaeus, from Merambong Shoal, Western Johor Straits, Malaysia. Samples were collected randomly by hand picking, in November and December 2013. Histological techniques were performed, stained using Masson's Trichrome protocol and observed under light microscope. The results showed that gonad and gill were the most infected organs followed by digestive gland, intestine and adductor muscle. No pathology condition was observed in the mantle. Histophatological examination showed that the gregarine, Nematopsis, unidentified coccidian and Perkinsus were found in the gill and gonad, and also in the numerous hemocytes. Other pathological conditions such as bacteria-like inclusion and intracellular bacteria were also observed in the same organs. Further investigations are needed particularly on other molluscs present at the study area. Understanding the morphology and pathology of parasites infecting mollusks are very important for management of the resources.

  3. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  4. Electron microscopic study on macrogametogenesis of Eimeria labbeana infecting the Egyptian wild doves and host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Bashtar, A R; Abdel-Ghaffar, F A; Ahmed, A K

    1991-04-01

    The development of macrogametes of Eimeria labbeana was studied by electron microscopy in the epithelial cells of the villi at 96 hrs. post-infection. Appearance of young macrogamonts was characterized by the loss of the architecture of the apicomplexa (polar ring, rhoptries, micronemes, conoid, subpellicular microtubules), while the pellicle became only one unit membrane. This was associated by the formation of wall forming bodies II then I. Moreover, the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi were increased in the cytoplasm. Amylopectin granules as well as lipid globules were greatly increased in mature macrogametes. Host cell reaction due to infection included enlargement and deformation of infected cells, hypertrophy of their nuclei, swollen and degeneration of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolation of ground cytoplasm. These changes occur in both cells with and without parasite.

  5. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contributing factor for their pathogenesis in the host. As with other eukaryotes, successful mitosis is an essential requirement for Plasmodium reproduction; however, some aspects of Plasmodium mitosis are quite distinct and not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the architecture and key events of mitosis in Plasmodium falciparum and related parasites and compare them with the traditional mitotic events described for other eukaryotes. PMID:21317311

  6. Functional Analyses of the Toxoplasma gondii DNA Gyrase Holoenzyme: A Janus Topoisomerase with Supercoiling and Decatenation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Nagano, Soshichiro; Gardiner Heddle, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A number of important protozoan parasites including those responsible for toxoplasmosis and malaria belong to the phylum Apicomplexa and are characterised by their possession of a relict plastid, the apicoplast. Being required for survival, apicoplasts are potentially useful drug targets and their attractiveness is increased by the fact that they contain “bacterial” gyrase, a well-established antibacterial drug target. We have cloned and purified the gyrase proteins from the apicoplast of Toxoplasma gondii (the cause of toxoplasmosis), reconstituted the functional enzyme and succeeded in characterising it. We discovered that the enzyme is inhibited by known gyrase inhibitors and that, as well as the expected supercoiling activity, it is also able to decatenate DNA with high efficiency. This unusual dual functionality may be related to the apparent lack of topoisomerase IV in the apicoplast. PMID:26412236

  7. Malaria immunity in man and mosquito: insights into unsolved mysteries of a deadly infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Peter D.; Moebius, Jacqueline; Portugal, Silvia; Waisberg, Michael; Hart, Geoffrey; Garver, Lindsey S.; Miller, Louis H.; Barillas, Carolina; Pierce, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites of the obligate intracellular Apicomplexa family, the most deadly of which, Plasmodium falciparum, prevails in Africa. Malaria imposes a huge health burden on the world’s most vulnerable populations, claiming the lives of nearly a million children and pregnant women each year in Africa alone. Although there is keen interest in eradicating malaria, we do not yet have the necessary tools to meet this challenge, including an effective malaria vaccine and adequate vector control strategies. Here we review what is known about the mechanisms at play in immune resistance to malaria in both the human and mosquito hosts at each step in the parasite’s complex life cycle with a view towards developing the tools that will contribute to the prevention of disease and death and ultimately the goal of malaria eradication. In so doing we hope to inspire immunologists to participate in defeating this devastating disease. PMID:24655294

  8. Cytoskeleton assembly in Toxoplasma gondii cell division

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke; Beck, Josh R.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Meissner, Markus; Bradley, Peter J.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cell division across members of the protozoan parasite phylum Apicomplexa displays a surprising diversity between different species as well as between different life stages of the same parasite. In most cases, infection of a host cell by a single parasite results in the formation of a polyploid cell from which individual daughters bud in a process dependent on a final round of mitosis. Unlike other apicomplexans, Toxoplasma gondii divides by a binary process consisting of internal budding that results in only two daughter cells per round of division. Since T. gondii is experimentally accessible and displays the simplest division mode, it has manifested itself as a model for apicomplexan daughter formation. Here we review newly emerging insights in the prominent role that assembly of the cortical cytoskeletal scaffold plays in the process of daughter parasite formation. PMID:22878103

  9. Sarcocystis booliati n.sp. and a parasite of undetermined taxonomic position, Octoplasma garnhami n. gen. n. sp., from the moonrat, Echinosorex gymnurus.

    PubMed

    Dissanaike, A S; Poopalachelvam, M

    1975-06-01

    Sarcocystis booliati n.sp. is described from the moonrat Echinosorex gymnurus (Mammalia, Insectivora) from West Malaysia. The cysts are very thin-walled, not visible to the naked eye, and have no trabeculae or cytophaneres. They are found in skeletal but not heart muscle. The zoites are small, 5-8 by 2-3 mum with a mean of 6.5 by 2.2 mum, in dry fixed smears. Octoplasma garnhami n.gen. n.sp., a parasite of undetermined taxonomic status but belonging to the Coccidiasina, Apicomplexa, is also described from the same host. Only schizononts and pseudocysts with typically 8 zoites, have so far been seen in monocytes of the spleen and liver. The zoites are large, 15 by 3 mum and have a distinct nucleolus even in dry-fixed smears.

  10. Isoprenoid metabolism in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include some of the most prevalent and deadly human pathogens. Novel antiparasitic drugs are urgently needed. Synthesis and metabolism of isoprenoids may present multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The apicoplast-localized methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis is distinct from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway used by the mammalian host, and this pathway is apparently essential in most Apicomplexa. In this review, we discuss the current field of research on production and metabolic fates of isoprenoids in apicomplexan parasites, including the acquisition of host isoprenoid precursors and downstream products. We describe recent work identifying the first MEP pathway regulator in apicomplexan parasites, and introduce several promising areas for ongoing research into this well-validated antiparasitic target. PMID:25893156

  11. Lytic Cycle of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael W.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular pathogen within the phylum Apicomplexa. This protozoan parasite is one of the most widespread, with a broad host range including many birds and mammals and a geographic range that is nearly worldwide. While infection of healthy adults is usually relatively mild, serious disease can result in utero or when the host is immunocompromised. This sophisticated eukaryote has many specialized features that make it well suited to its intracellular lifestyle. In this review, we describe the current knowledge of how the asexual tachyzoite stage of Toxoplasma attaches to, invades, replicates in, and exits the host cell. Since this process is closely analogous to the way in which viruses reproduce, we refer to it as the Toxoplasma “lytic cycle.” PMID:10974128

  12. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-01-21

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum Rab1A Localizes to Rhoptries in Schizonts

    PubMed Central

    Morse, David; Webster, Wesley; Kalanon, Ming; Langsley, Gordon; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Over-expression of a GFP-PfRab1A fusion protein in Plasmodium falciparum schizonts produces a punctate pattern of fluorescence typical of rhoptries, secretory organelles involved in host cell invasion. The GFP-positive bodies were purified by a combination of differential and density gradient centrifugation and their protein content determined by MS/MS sequencing. Consistent with the GFP rhoptry-like pattern of transgenic parasites, four of the 19 proteins identified have been previously described to be rhoptry-associated and another four are ER or ER-associated proteins. Confirmation that GFP-PfRab1A decorates rhoptries was obtained by its co-localization with Rap1 and Ron4 in late phase schizonts. We conclude that PfRab1A potentially regulates vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the rhoptries in Apicomplexa parasites. PMID:27348424

  14. Proteomic analysis of the effect of diclazuril on second-generation merozoites of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-jiong; Li, Tao; Fu, Jian-jun; Zhang, Ke-yu; Wang, Xiao-yang; Liu, Yin-chun; Zhang, Hua-jing; Fan, Chao; Fei, Cheng-zhong; Xue, Fei-qun

    2014-03-01

    Diclazuril has long been used as an effective benzeneacetonitrile anticoccidial for the control of Eimeria tenella that causes coccidiosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the anticoccidial effects of diclazuril remains elusive. In this study, a proteomic analysis of the effect of diclazuril on second-generation merozoites of E. tenella was performed. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), 13 target proteins were found to be significantly affected by diclazuril treatment, with 11 of these proteins being identified as annotated proteins from E. tenella or other Apicomplexa parasites. These proteins contribute to various functions, including metabolism, protein synthesis, and host cell invasion. Using RT-PCR, we identified the potential pattern of transcriptional regulation induced by diclazuril, and we suggest some promising targets for the intervention of E. tenella infection.

  15. Functional characterization of a redundant Plasmodium TRAP family invasin, TRAP-like protein, by aldolase binding and a genetic complementation test.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Kirsten; Nie, Hui; Kumar, Sumit; Daly, Thomas M; Bergman, Lawrence W; Matuschewski, Kai

    2008-06-01

    Efficient and specific host cell entry is of exquisite importance for intracellular pathogens. Parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa are highly motile and actively enter host cells. These functions are mediated by type I transmembrane invasins of the TRAP family that link an extracellular recognition event to the parasite actin-myosin motor machinery. We systematically tested potential parasite invasins for binding to the actin bridging molecule aldolase and complementation of the vital cytoplasmic domain of the sporozoite invasin TRAP. We show that the ookinete invasin CTRP and a novel, structurally related protein, termed TRAP-like protein (TLP), are functional members of the TRAP family. Although TLP is expressed in invasive stages, targeted gene disruption revealed a nonvital role during life cycle progression. This is the first genetic analysis of TLP, encoding a redundant TRAP family invasin, in the malaria parasite.

  16. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  17. [The taxonomic rank and place of Colpodellida in the system of the Protista].

    PubMed

    Myl'nikov, A P; Krylov, M V; Frolov, A O

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of ultrastructure organisation and divergent processes in Colpodellida, Perkinsida, Gregarinea and Coccidea has confirmed the presence of unique basic structures in all of these organisms and the necessity to combine them into the single phylum Sporozoa. A taxonomic rank and place of Colpodellida in the system of living organisms is represented as follows: phylum Sporozoa Leuckart, 1879; em. Krylov, Mylnikov, 1986. (Syn.: Apicomplexa Levine, 1970). Predators or parasites. Common basic structure: pellicular membranes, subpellicular microtubules, micropores, conoid, rhoptries and micronemes, tubular mitochondrial cristae. Class Perkinsea Levine, 1978. Predators or parasites, vegetative stages with two heterodynamic flagella. Subclass 1. Colpodellia nom. nov. (Syn.: Spiromonadia Krylov, Mylnikov, 1986). Predators, two heterodynamic flagella with string-like mastigonemes (if present), division is exclusively within a cyst, with 2-4 daughter cells being produced, extrusomes are trichocyst-like. Subclass 2. Perkinsia Levine, 1978. Parasites, zoospores with two heterodynamic flagella, mastigonemes (if present) bristle-like or string-like.

  18. Transcript maturation in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, Elena S.; White, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The complex life cycles of apicomplexan parasites are associated with dynamic changes of protein repertoire. In Toxoplasma gondii, global analysis of gene expression demonstrates that dynamic changes in mRNA levels unfold in a serial cascade during asexual replication and up to 50% of encoded genes are unequally expressed in development. Recent studies indicate transcription as well as mRNA processing have important roles in fulfilling the “just-in-time” delivery of proteins to parasite growth and development. The prominence of post-transcriptional mechanisms in the Apicomplexa was demonstrated by mechanistic studies of the critical RNA-binding proteins and regulatory kinases. However, it is still early in our understanding of how transcription and post-transcriptional mechanisms are balanced to produce adequate numbers of specialized forms that is required to complete the parasite life cycle. PMID:24934558

  19. Cryptic organelle homology in Apicomplexan parasites: Insights from evolutionary cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Christen M.; Nisbet, R. Ellen; Ouologuem, Dinkorma T.; Roos, David S.; Dacks, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    The economic and clinical significance of apicomplexan parasites drives interest in their many evolutionary novelties. Distinctive intracellular organelles play key roles in parasite motility, invasion, metabolism, and replication, and understanding their relationship with the organelles of better-studied eukaryotic systems suggests potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Recent work has demonstrated divergent aspects of canonical eukaryotic components in the apicomplexa, including Golgi bodies and mitochondria. The apicoplast is a relict plastid of secondary endosymbiotic origin, harboring metabolic pathways distinct from those of host species. The inner membrane complex is derived from the cortical alveoli defining the superphylum Alveolata, but in apicomplexans functions in parasite motility and replication. Micronemes and rhoptries are associated with establishment of the intracellular niche, and define the apical complex for which the phylum is named. Morphological, cell biological and molecular evidence strongly suggest that these organelles are derived from the endocytic pathway. PMID:23932202

  20. The algal past and parasite present of the apicoplast.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Giel G; Striepen, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are genera of apicomplexan parasites that infect millions of people each year. The former causes malaria, and the latter causes neurotropic infections associated with a weakened or developing immune system. These parasites harbor a peculiar organelle, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is the product of an ancient endosymbiosis between a heterotrophic and a photosynthetic protist. We explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms that enabled a stable union of two previously independent organisms. These include the exchange of metabolites, transfer of genes, transport of proteins, and overall coordination of biogenesis and proliferation. These mechanisms are still active today and can be exploited to treat parasite infection. They were shaped by the dramatic changes that occurred in the evolution of the phylum Apicomplexa--including the gain and loss of photosynthesis, adaptation to symbiosis and parasitism, and the explosion of animal diversity-that ultimately provided an aquatic alga access to every biotope on this planet.

  1. Association between host's genetic diversity and parasite burden in damselflies.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, K M; Viitaniemi, H M; Leder, E H; Suhonen, J

    2013-08-01

    Recent research indicates that low genetic variation in individuals can increase susceptibility to parasite infection, yet evidence from natural invertebrate populations remains scarce. Here, we studied the relationship between genetic heterozygosity, measured as AFLP-based inbreeding coefficient fAFLP , and gregarine parasite burden from eleven damselfly, Calopteryx splendens, populations. We found that in the studied populations, 5-92% of males were parasitized by endoparasitic gregarines (Apicomplexa: Actinocephalidae). Number of parasites ranged from none to 47 parasites per male, and parasites were highly aggregated in a few hosts. Mean individual fAFLP did not differ between populations. Moreover, we found a positive association between individual's inbreeding coefficient and parasite burden. In other words, the more homozygous the individual, the more parasites it harbours. Thus, parasites are likely to pose strong selection pressure against inbreeding and homozygosity. Our results support the heterozygosity-fitness correlation hypothesis, which suggests the importance of heterozygosity for an individual's pathogen resistance.

  2. Microparasites of worldwide mullets.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Mykola

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focus on parasitic organisms, previously considered as protozoans. Viral, prokaryotic and fungal parasites caused diseases and disorders of worldwide mullets were also observed. Most of the known viruses associated with a high mortality of mullets were detected in Mugil cephalus. Prokaryotic microparasites were registered in M. cephalus, Moolgarda cunnesiu, Liza ramada and Mugil liza. Fungal pathogens were associated with representatives of the genera Aphanomyces, Achlya, Phialemonium, Ichthyophonus. Ichthyophonus sp. can be considered as a potential threat for marine fish aquaculture, especially in culture conditions. A new hyperparasitic microsporidium like organism was recorded in myxozoan Myxobolus parvus infecting grey mullet Liza haematocheilus in the Russian coastal zone of the Sea of Japan. The protozoan representatives of the phyla Dinoflagellata, Euglenozoa, Ciliophora and Apicomplexa were reviewed and analyzed. The review of myxosporean parasites from grey mullets includes 64 species belonging to 13 genera and 9 families infecting 16 fish species

  3. Emergence of Mutations in the K13 Propeller Gene of Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Dakar, Senegal, in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Boussaroque, Agathe; Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Camara, Cheikhou; Benoit, Nicolas; Fall, Mansour; Nakoulima, Aminata; Dionne, Pierre; Fall, Kadidiatou Ba; Diatta, Bakary; Diémé, Yaya; Wade, Boubacar

    2015-01-01

    The kelch 13 (K13) propeller gene is associated with artemisinin resistance. In a previous work, there were no mutations found in 138 Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected in 2012 and 2013 from patients residing in Dakar, Senegal (M. Torrentino-Madamet et al., Malar J 13:472, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-13-472). However, the N554H, Q613H, and V637I mutations were identified in the propeller region of K13 in 92 (5.5%) isolates in 2013 and 2014. There were five polymorphisms identified in the Plasmodium/Apicomplexa-specific domain (K123R, N137S, N142NN/NNN, T149S, and K189T/N). PMID:26503652

  4. Multiple host-switching of Haemosporidia parasites in bats

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Linda; Robert, Vincent; Csorba, Gabor; Hassanin, Alexandre; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Walston, Joe; Nhim, Thy; Goodman, Steve M; Ariey, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Background There have been reported cases of host-switching in avian and lizard species of Plasmodium (Apicomplexa, Haemosporidia), as well as in those infecting different primate species. However, no evidence has previously been found for host-swapping between wild birds and mammals. Methods This paper presents the results of the sampling of blood parasites of wild-captured bats from Madagascar and Cambodia. The presence of Haemosporidia infection in these animals is confirmed and cytochrome b gene sequences were used to construct a phylogenetic analysis. Results Results reveal at least three different and independent Haemosporidia evolutionary histories in three different bat lineages from Madagascar and Cambodia. Conclusion Phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests multiple host-switching of Haemosporidia parasites in bats with those from avian and primate hosts. PMID:18045505

  5. Sirtuins of parasitic protozoa: In search of function(s)

    PubMed Central

    Religa, Agnieszka A.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The SIR2 family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases, collectively called sirtuins, has been of central interest due to their proposed roles in life-span regulation and ageing. Sirtuins are one group of environment sensors of a cell interpreting external information and orchestrating internal responses at the sub-cellular level, through participation in gene regulation mechanisms. Remarkably conserved across all kingdoms of life SIR2 proteins in several protozoan parasites appear to have both conserved and intriguing unique functions. This review summarises our current knowledge of the members of the sirtuin families in Apicomplexa, including Plasmodium, and other protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania. The wide diversity of processes regulated by SIR2 proteins makes them targets worthy of exploitation in anti-parasitic therapies. PMID:22906508

  6. The cell biology of secondary endosymbiosis--how parasites build, divide and segregate the apicoplast.

    PubMed

    Vaishnava, Shipra; Striepen, Boris

    2006-09-01

    Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa harbour a chloroplast-like organelle, the apicoplast. The biosynthetic pathways localized to this organelle are of cyanobacterial origin and therefore offer attractive targets for the development of new drugs for the treatment of malaria and toxoplasmosis. The apicoplast also provides a unique system to study the cell biology of endosymbiosis. This organelle is the product of secondary endosymbiosis, the marriage of an alga and an auxotrophic eukaryote. This origin has led to a fascinating set of novel cellular mechanisms that are clearly distinct from those employed by the plant chloroplast. Here we explore how the apicoplast interacts with its 'host' to secure building blocks for its biogenesis and how the organelle is divided and segregated during mitosis. Considerable advances in parasite genetics and genomics have transformed apicomplexans, long considered hard to study, into highly tractable model organisms. We discuss how these resources might be marshalled to develop a detailed mechanistic picture of apicoplast cell biology.

  7. Malaria immunity in man and mosquito: insights into unsolved mysteries of a deadly infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Peter D; Moebius, Jacqueline; Portugal, Silvia; Waisberg, Michael; Hart, Geoffrey; Garver, Lindsey S; Miller, Louis H; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Pierce, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites of the obligate intracellular Apicomplexa phylum the most deadly of which, Plasmodium falciparum, prevails in Africa. Malaria imposes a huge health burden on the world's most vulnerable populations, claiming the lives of nearly one million children and pregnant women each year. Although there is keen interest in eradicating malaria, we do not yet have the necessary tools to meet this challenge, including an effective malaria vaccine and adequate vector control strategies. Here we review what is known about the mechanisms at play in immune resistance to malaria in both the human and mosquito hosts at each step in the parasite's complex life cycle with a view toward developing the tools that will contribute to the prevention of disease and death and, ultimately, to the goal of malaria eradication. In so doing, we hope to inspire immunologists to participate in defeating this devastating disease.

  8. Lipid kinases are essential for apicoplast homeostasis in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Sheiner, Lilach; Lentini, Gaëlle; Berry, Laurence; Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Wengelnik, Kai; Striepen, Boris; Lebrun, Maryse

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoinositides regulate numerous cellular processes by recruiting cytosolic effector proteins and acting as membrane signalling entities. The cellular metabolism and localization of phosphoinositides are tightly regulated by distinct lipid kinases and phosphatases. Here, we identify and characterize a unique phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) in Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Conditional depletion of this enzyme and subsequently of its product, PI(3)P, drastically alters the morphology and inheritance of the apicoplast, an endosymbiotic organelle of algal origin that is a unique feature of many Apicomplexa. We searched the T. gondii genome for PI(3)P-binding proteins and identified in total six PX and FYVE domain-containing proteins including a PIKfyve lipid kinase, which phosphorylates PI(3)P into PI(3,5)P2 . Although depletion of putative PI(3)P-binding proteins shows that they are not essential for parasite growth and apicoplast biology, conditional disruption of PIKfyve induces enlarged apicoplasts, as observed upon loss of PI(3)P. A similar defect of apicoplast homeostasis was also observed by knocking down the PIKfyve regulatory protein ArPIKfyve, suggesting that in T. gondii, PI(3)P-related function for the apicoplast might mainly be to serve as a precursor for the synthesis of PI(3,5)P2 . Accordingly, PI3K is conserved in all apicomplexan parasites whereas PIKfyve and ArPIKfyve are absent in Cryptosporidium species that lack an apicoplast, supporting a direct role of PI(3,5)P2 in apicoplast homeostasis. This study enriches the already diverse functions attributed to PI(3,5)P2 in eukaryotic cells and highlights these parasite lipid kinases as potential drug targets.

  9. Analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona microneme protein SnMIC10: protein characteristics and expression during intracellular development.

    PubMed

    Hoane, Jessica S; Carruthers, Vernon B; Striepen, Boris; Morrison, David P; Entzeroth, Rolf; Howe, Daniel K

    2003-07-01

    Sarcocystis neurona, an apicomplexan parasite, is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. Like other members of the Apicomplexa, S. neurona zoites possess secretory organelles that contain proteins necessary for host cell invasion and intracellular survival. From a collection of S. neurona expressed sequence tags, we identified a sequence encoding a putative microneme protein based on similarity to Toxoplasma gondii MIC10 (TgMIC10). Pairwise sequence alignments of SnMIC10 to TgMIC10 and NcMIC10 from Neospora caninum revealed approximately 33% identity to both orthologues. The open reading frame of the S. neurona gene encodes a 255 amino acid protein with a predicted 39-residue signal peptide. Like TgMIC10 and NcMIC10, SnMIC10 is predicted to be hydrophilic, highly alpha-helical in structure, and devoid of identifiable adhesive domains. Antibodies raised against recombinant SnMIC10 recognised a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 24 kDa in Western blots of S. neurona merozoites, consistent with the size predicted for SnMIC10. In vitro secretion assays demonstrated that this protein is secreted by extracellular merozoites in a temperature-dependent manner. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of SnMIC10 showed a polar labelling pattern, which is consistent with the apical position of the micronemes, and immunoelectron microscopy provided definitive localisation of the protein to these secretory organelles. Further analysis of SnMIC10 in intracellular parasites revealed that expression of this protein is temporally regulated during endopolygeny, supporting the view that micronemes are only needed during host cell invasion. Collectively, the data indicate that SnMIC10 is a microneme protein that is part of the excreted/secreted antigen fraction of S. neurona. Identification and characterisation of additional S. neurona microneme antigens and comparisons to orthologues in other Apicomplexa could provide further insight into the

  10. Structural and functional characterization of Bc28.1, major erythrocyte-binding protein from Babesia canis merozoite surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  11. Elongation Factor-1α Is a Novel Protein Associated with Host Cell Invasion and a Potential Protective Antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum *

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Teramoto-Kimata, Isao; Uni, Shigehiko; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Matsuda, Haruo; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi

    2013-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa comprises obligate intracellular parasites that infect vertebrates. All invasive forms of Apicomplexa possess an apical complex, a unique assembly of organelles localized to the anterior end of the cell and involved in host cell invasion. Previously, we generated a chicken monoclonal antibody (mAb), 6D-12-G10, with specificity for an antigen located in the apical cytoskeleton of Eimeria acervulina sporozoites. This antigen was highly conserved among Apicomplexan parasites, including other Eimeria spp., Toxoplasma, Neospora, and Cryptosporidium. In the present study, we identified the apical cytoskeletal antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) and further characterized this antigen in C. parvum to assess its potential as a target molecule against cryptosporidiosis. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that the reactivity of 6D-12-G10 with C. parvum sporozoites was similar to those of anti-β- and anti-γ-tubulins antibodies. Immunoelectron microscopy with the 6D-12-G10 mAb detected the antigen both on the sporozoite surface and underneath the inner membrane at the apical region of zoites. The 6D-12-G10 mAb significantly inhibited in vitro host cell invasion by C. parvum. MALDI-TOF/MS and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides revealed that the mAb 6D-12-G10 target antigen was elongation factor-1α (EF-1α). These results indicate that C. parvum EF-1α plays an essential role in mediating host cell entry by the parasite and, as such, could be a candidate vaccine antigen against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:24085304

  12. Rhoptry protein 5 (ROP5) Is a Key Virulence Factor in Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Liu, Jing; Li, Muzi; Fu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Qun

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum, of the Apicomplexa phylum, is a common cause of abortions in cattle and nervous system dysfunction in dogs. Rhoptry proteins of Apicomplexa play an important role in virulence. The objectives of this study were to study functions of NcROP5 in N. caninum by deleting the NcROP5 gene from the wild Nc-1 strain. We selected NcROP5 in ToxoDB and successfully constructed an NcROP5 gene-deleted vector, pTCR-NcROP5-CD KO. Then we screened the NcROP5 knockout strains (ΔNcROP5) at the gene, protein and transcription levels. Plaque assay, host cell invasion assay and intracellular proliferation test showed that the ΔNcROP5 strain had less plaque space, weakened invasion capacity and slower intracellular growth. Animal testing showed significantly lower cerebral load of ΔNcROP5 than the load of the Nc-1 strain, as well as a loss of virulence for the ΔNcROP5 strains. Phenotypic analyses using the label-free LC-MS/MS assay-based proteomic method and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed a reduction of NcGRA7 transcription and altered expression of multiple proteins including the apicomplexan family of binding proteins. The present study indicated that ROP5 is a key virulence factor in N. caninum in mice. The proteomic profiling of Nc-1 and ΔNcROP5 provided some data on differential proteins. These data provide a foundation for future research of protein functions in N. caninum. PMID:28326073

  13. Plasticity between MyoC- and MyoA-Glideosomes: An Example of Functional Compensation in Toxoplasma gondii Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Frénal, Karine; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Jacot, Damien; Polonais, Valérie; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The glideosome is an actomyosin-based machinery that powers motility in Apicomplexa and participates in host cell invasion and egress from infected cells. The central component of the glideosome, myosin A (MyoA), is a motor recruited at the pellicle by the acylated gliding-associated protein GAP45. In Toxoplasma gondii, GAP45 also contributes to the cohesion of the pellicle, composed of the inner membrane complex (IMC) and the plasma membrane, during motor traction. GAP70 was previously identified as a paralog of GAP45 that is tailored to recruit MyoA at the apical cap in the coccidian subgroup of the Apicomplexa. A third member of this family, GAP80, is demonstrated here to assemble a new glideosome, which recruits the class XIV myosin C (MyoC) at the basal polar ring. MyoC shares the same myosin light chains as MyoA and also interacts with the integral IMC proteins GAP50 and GAP40. Moreover, a central component of this complex, the IMC-associated protein 1 (IAP1), acts as the key determinant for the restricted localization of MyoC to the posterior pole. Deletion of specific components of the MyoC-glideosome underscores the installation of compensatory mechanisms with components of the MyoA-glideosome. Conversely, removal of MyoA leads to the relocalization of MyoC along the pellicle and at the apical cap that accounts for residual invasion. The two glideosomes exhibit a considerable level of plasticity to ensure parasite survival. PMID:25393004

  14. Protein kinases of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: the kinome of a divergent eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Pauline; Equinet, Leila; Packer, Jeremy; Doerig, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Background Malaria, caused by the parasitic protist Plasmodium falciparum, represents a major public health problem in the developing world. The P. falciparum genome has been sequenced, which provides new opportunities for the identification of novel drug targets. Eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) form a large family of enzymes with crucial roles in most cellular processes; hence malarial ePKS represent potential drug targets. We report an exhaustive analysis of the P. falciparum genomic database (PlasmoDB) aimed at identifying and classifying all ePKs in this organism. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics tools, we identified 65 malarial ePK sequences and constructed a phylogenetic tree to position these sequences relative to the seven established ePK groups. Predominant features of the tree were: (i) that several malarial sequences did not cluster within any of the known ePK groups; (ii) that the CMGC group, whose members are usually involved in the control of cell proliferation, had the highest number of malarial ePKs; and (iii) that no malarial ePK clustered with the tyrosine kinase (TyrK) or STE groups, pointing to the absence of three-component MAPK modules in the parasite. A novel family of 20 ePK-related sequences was identified and called FIKK, on the basis of a conserved amino acid motif. The FIKK family seems restricted to Apicomplexa, with 20 members in P. falciparum and just one member in some other Apicomplexan species. Conclusion The considerable phylogenetic distance between Apicomplexa and other Eukaryotes is reflected by profound divergences between the kinome of malaria parasites and that of yeast or mammalian cells. PMID:15479470

  15. Structural and Functional Characterization of Bc28.1, Major Erythrocyte-binding Protein from Babesia canis Merozoite Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  16. Solar Radiation Induces Non-Nuclear Perturbations and a False Start to Regulated Exocytosis in Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    King, Brendon J.; Hoefel, Daniel; Ee Wong, Pao; Monis, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion, climate warming and acidification of aquatic ecosystems have resulted in elevated levels of solar radiation reaching many aquatic environments with an increased deleterious impact on a wide range of living organisms. While detrimental effects on living organisms are thought to occur primarily through DNA damage, solar UV can also damage cellular proteins, lipids and signalling pathways. Cryptosporidium, a member of the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, contain numerous vesicular secretory organelles and their discharge via regulated exocytosis is essential for the successful establishment of infection. Using flow cytometric techniques we demonstrate that solar UV rapidly induces sporozoite exocytosis resulting in a significant reduction in the ability of sporozoites to attach and invade host cells. We found that solar UV induced sporozoite membrane depolarization, resulting in reduced cellular ATP and increased cytosolic calcium. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in the internal granularity of sporozoites, indicative of apical organelle discharge, which was confirmed by analysis of sporozoites with an exocytosis-sensitive dye. The precise timing of apical organelle discharge in the presence of a compatible host cell is critical for sporozoite attachment and invasion. Our results demonstrate for the first time how solar UV radiation can interfere with exocytosis, a fundamental cellular process in all eukaryotic cells. We contend that not only may the forecast increases in solar radiation in both aquatic and terrestrial environments significantly affect members of the Apicomplexa, solar UV-induced membrane depolarizations resulting in cytosolic calcium perturbation may affect a wider range of eukaryotic organisms through antagonistic effects on a myriad of calcium dependant cellular functions. PMID:20668710

  17. Spatial, Temporal, and Density-Dependent Components of Habitat Quality for a Desert Owl

    PubMed Central

    Flesch, Aaron D.; Hutto, Richard L.; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches

  18. Potential effects of the United States-Mexico border fence on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Aaron D; Epps, Clinton W; Cain, James W; Clark, Matt; Krausman, Paul R; Morgart, John R

    2010-02-01

    Security infrastructure along international boundaries threatens to degrade connectivity for wildlife. To explore potential effects of a fence under construction along the U.S.-Mexico border on wildlife, we assessed movement behavior of two species with different life histories whose regional persistence may depend on transboundary movements. We used radiotelemetry to assess how vegetation and landscape structure affect flight and natal dispersal behaviors of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls (Glaucidium brasilianum), and satellite telemetry, gene-flow estimates, and least-cost path models to assess movement behavior and interpopulation connectivity of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana). Flight height of Pygmy-Owls averaged only 1.4 m (SE 0.1) above ground, and only 23% of flights exceeded 4 m. Juvenile Pygmy-Owls dispersed at slower speeds, changed direction more, and had lower colonization success in landscapes with larger vegetation openings or higher levels of disturbance (p < or = 0.047), which suggests large vegetation gaps coupled with tall fences may limit transboundary movements. Female bighorn sheep crossed valleys up to 4.9 km wide, and microsatellite analyses indicated relatively high levels of gene flow and migration (95% CI for F(ST)=0.010-0.115, Nm = 1.9-24.8, M =10.4-15.4) between populations divided by an 11-km valley. Models of gene flow based on regional topography and movement barriers suggested that nine populations of bighorn sheep in northwestern Sonora are linked by dispersal with those in neighboring Arizona. Disruption of transboundary movement corridors by impermeable fencing would isolate some populations on the Arizona side. Connectivity for other species with similar movement abilities and spatial distributions may be affected by border development, yet mitigation strategies could address needs of wildlife and humans.

  19. Spatial, temporal, and density-dependent components of habitat quality for a desert owl.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Aaron D; Hutto, Richard L; van Leeuwen, Willem J D; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches

  20. The Toxoplasma Centrocone Houses Cell Cycle Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Anatoli; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Kim, Kami; Suvorova, Elena S; White, Michael W

    2017-08-22

    Our knowledge of cell cycle regulatory mechanisms in apicomplexan parasites is very limited. In this study, we describe a novel Toxoplasma gondii factor that has a vital role in chromosome replication and the regulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear mitotic structures, and we named this factor ECR1 for essential for chromosome replication 1. ECR1 was discovered by complementation of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant that suffers lethal, uncontrolled chromosome replication at 40°C similar to a ts mutant carrying a defect in topoisomerase. ECR1 is a 52-kDa protein containing divergent RING and TRAF-Sina-like zinc binding domains that are dynamically expressed in the tachyzoite cell cycle. ECR1 first appears in the unique spindle compartment of the Apicomplexa (centrocone) of the nuclear envelope in early S phase and then in the nucleus in late S phase where it reaches maximum expression. Following nuclear division, but before daughter parasites separate from the mother parasite, ECR1 is downregulated and is absent in new daughter parasites. The proteomics of ECR1 identified interactions with the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation machinery and the minichromosome maintenance complex, and the loss of ECR1 led to increased stability of a key member of this complex, MCM2. ECR1 also forms a stable complex with the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-related kinase, Tgondii Crk5 (TgCrk5), which displays a similar cell cycle expression and localization during tachyzoite replication. Importantly, the localization of ECR1/TgCrk5 in the centrocone indicates that this Apicomplexa-specific spindle compartment houses important regulatory factors that control the parasite cell cycle.IMPORTANCE Parasites of the apicomplexan family are important causes of human disease, including malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Parasite growth is the underlying cause of pathogenesis, yet despite this importance, the molecular basis for parasite replication is poorly understood. Filling

  1. Epidemiologic aspects of the malaria transmission cycle in an area of very low incidence in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Crispim; Boulos, Marcos; Coutinho, Arnídio F; Hatab, Maria do Carmo LD; Falqueto, Aloísio; Rezende, Helder R; Duarte, Ana Maria RC; Collins, William; Malafronte, Rosely S

    2007-01-01

    Background Extra-Amazonian autochthonous Plasmodium vivax infections have been reported in mountainous regions surrounded by the Atlantic Forest in Espírito Santo state, Brazil. Methods Sixty-five patients and 1,777 residents were surveyed between April 2001 and March 2004. Laboratory methods included thin and thick smears, multiplex-PCR, immunofluorescent assay (IFA) against P. vivax and Plasmodium malariae crude blood-stage antigens and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies against the P. vivax-complex (P. vivax and variants) and P. malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum circumsporozoite-protein (CSP) antigens. Results Average patient age was 35.1 years. Most (78.5%) were males; 64.6% lived in rural areas; 35.4% were farmers; and 12.3% students. There was no relevant history of travel. Ninety-five per cent of the patients were experiencing their first episode of malaria. Laboratory data from 51 patients were consistent with P. vivax infection, which was determined by thin smear. Of these samples, 48 were assayed by multiplex-PCR. Forty-five were positive for P. vivax, confirming the parasitological results, while P. malariae was detected in one sample and two gave negative results. Fifty percent of the 50 patients tested had IgG antibodies against the P. vivax-complex or P. malariae CSP as determined by ELISA. The percentages of residents with IgM and IgG antibodies detected by IFA for P. malariae, P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum who did not complain of malaria symptoms at the time blood was collected were 30.1% and 56.5%, 6.2% and 37.7%, and 13.5% and 13%, respectively. The same sera that reacted to P. vivax also reacted to P. malariae. The following numbers of samples were positive in multiplex-PCR: 23 for P. vivax; 15 for P. malariae; 9 for P. falciparum and only one for P. falciparum and P. malariae. All thin and thick smears were negative. ELISA against CSP antigens was positive in 25.4%, 6.3%, 10.7% and 15.1% of the samples tested for

  2. Structure and function of a G-actin sequestering protein with a vital role in malaria oocyst development inside the mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Hliscs, Marion; Sattler, Julia M; Tempel, Wolfram; Artz, Jennifer D; Dong, Aiping; Hui, Raymond; Matuschewski, Kai; Schüler, Herwig

    2010-04-09

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionary conserved G-actin-binding proteins that regulate microfilament turnover. CAPs have a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal adenylate cyclase binding domain, a central proline-rich segment, and a C-terminal actin binding domain. Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Cryptosporidium and the malaria parasite Plasmodium, express small CAP orthologs with homology to the C-terminal actin binding domain (C-CAP). Here, we demonstrate by reverse genetics that C-CAP is dispensable for the pathogenic Plasmodium blood stages. However, c-cap(-) parasites display a complete defect in oocyst development in the insect vector. By trans-species complementation we show that the Cryptosporidium parvum ortholog complements the Plasmodium gene functions. Purified recombinant C. parvum C-CAP protein binds actin monomers and prevents actin polymerization. The crystal structure of C. parvum C-CAP shows two monomers with a right-handed beta-helical fold intercalated at their C termini to form the putative physiological dimer. Our results reveal a specific vital role for an apicomplexan G-actin-binding protein during sporogony, the parasite replication phase that precedes formation of malaria transmission stages. This study also exemplifies how Plasmodium reverse genetics combined with biochemical and structural analyses of orthologous proteins can offer a fast track toward systematic gene characterization in apicomplexan parasites.

  3. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  4. Holding back the microfilament--structural insights into actin and the actin-monomer-binding proteins of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Olshina, Maya A; Wong, Wilson; Baum, Jake

    2012-05-01

    Parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for several major diseases of man, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These highly motile protozoa use a conserved actomyosin-based mode of movement to power tissue traversal and host cell invasion. The mode termed as 'gliding motility' relies on the dynamic turnover of actin, whose polymerisation state is controlled by a markedly limited number of identifiable regulators when compared with other eukaryotic cells. Recent studies of apicomplexan actin regulator structure-in particular those of the core triad of monomer-binding proteins, actin-depolymerising factor/cofilin, cyclase-associated protein/Srv2, and profilin-have provided new insights into possible mechanisms of actin regulation in parasite cells, highlighting divergent structural features and functions to regulators from other cellular systems. Furthermore, the unusual nature of apicomplexan actin itself is increasingly coming into the spotlight. Here, we review recent advances in understanding of the structure and function of actin and its regulators in apicomplexan parasites. In particular we explore the paradox between there being an abundance of unpolymerised actin, its having a seemingly increased potential to form filaments relative to vertebrate actin, and the apparent lack of visible, stable filaments in parasite cells.

  5. The Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 7 is involved in early steps of parasite division and is crucial for parasite survival.

    PubMed

    Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Berry, Laurence; Chen, Chun-Ti; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Lebrun, Maryse; Daher, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites express various calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), and some of them play essential roles in invasion and egress. Five of the six CDPKs conserved in most Apicomplexa have been studied at the molecular and cellular levels in Plasmodium species and/or in Toxoplasma gondii parasites, but the function of CDPK7 was so far uncharacterized. In T. gondii, during intracellular replication, two parasites are formed within a mother cell through a unique process called endodyogeny. Here we demonstrate that the knock-down of CDPK7 protein in T. gondii results in pronounced defects in parasite division and a major growth deficiency, while it is dispensable for motility, egress and microneme exocytosis. In cdpk7-depleted parasites, the overall DNA content was not impaired, but the polarity of daughter cells budding and the fate of several subcellular structures or proteins involved in cell division were affected, such as the centrosomes and the kinetochore. Overall, our data suggest that CDPK7 is crucial for proper maintenance of centrosome integrity required for the initiation of endodyogeny. Our findings provide a first insight into the probable role of calcium-dependent signalling in parasite multiplication, in addition to its more widely explored role in invasion and egress.

  6. Ellobiopsids of the genus Thalassomyces are alveolates.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Jeffrey D; Collins, Allen G; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Johnson, Patricia J; Roger, Andrew J

    2004-01-01

    Ellobiopsids are multinucleate protist parasites of aquatic crustaceans that possess a nutrient absorbing 'root' inside the host and reproductive structures that protrude through the carapace. Ellobiopsids have variously been affiliated with fungi, 'colorless algae', and dinoflagellates, although no morphological character has been identified that definitively allies them with any particular eukaryotic lineage. The arrangement of the trailing and circumferential flagella of the rarely observed bi-flagellated 'zoospore' is reminiscent of dinoflagellate flagellation, but a well-organized 'dinokaryotic nucleus' has never been observed. Using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences from two species of Thalassomyces, phylogenetic analyses robustly place these ellobiopsid species among the alveolates (ciliates, apicomplexans, dinoflagellates and relatives) though without a clear affiliation to any established alveolate lineage. Our trees demonstrate that Thalassomyces fall within a dinoflagellate + apicomplexa + Perkinsidae + "marine alveolate group 1" clade, clustering most closely with dinoflagellates. However, the poor statistical support for branches within this region indicates that additional data will be needed to resolve relationships among these taxa.

  7. Phylogeny and evolution of apicoplasts and apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes many parasitic genera of medical and veterinary importance including Plasmodium (causative agent of malaria), Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis), and Babesia (babesiosis). Most of the apicomplexan parasites possess a unique, essential organelle, the apicoplast, which is a plastid without photosynthetic ability. Although the apicoplast is considered to have evolved through secondary endosymbiosis of a red alga into the common ancestral cell of apicomplexans, its evolutionary history has been under debate until recently. The apicoplast has a genome around 30-40 kb in length. Repertoire and arrangement of the apicoplast genome-encoded genes differ among apicomplexan genera, although within the genus Plasmodium these are almost conserved. Genes in the apicoplast genome may be useful markers for Plasmodium phylogeny, because these are single copy (except for the inverted repeat region) and may have more phylogenetic signal than the mitochondrial genome that have been most commonly used for Plasmodium phylogeny. This review describes recent studies concerning the evolutionary origin of the apicoplast, presents evolutionary comparison of the primary structures of apicoplast genomes from apicomplexan parasites, and summarizes recent findings of malaria phylogeny based on apicoplast genome-encoded genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Motility of a Human Parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, Is Regulated by a Novel Lysine Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Heaslip, Aoife T.; Nishi, Manami; Stein, Barry; Hu, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa are a large group of obligate intracellular parasites. Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites, such as Plasmodium falciparum, cause diseases by reiterating their lytic cycle, comprising host cell invasion, parasite replication, and parasite egress. The successful completion of the lytic cycle requires that the parasite senses changes in its environment and switches between the non-motile (for intracellular replication) and motile (for invasion and egress) states appropriately. Although the signaling pathway that regulates the motile state switch is critical to the pathogenesis of the diseases caused by these parasites, it is not well understood. Here we report a previously unknown mechanism of regulating the motility activation in Toxoplasma, mediated by a protein lysine methyltransferase, AKMT (for Apical complex lysine (K) methyltransferase). AKMT depletion greatly inhibits activation of motility, compromises parasite invasion and egress, and thus severely impairs the lytic cycle. Interestingly, AKMT redistributes from the apical complex to the parasite body rapidly in the presence of egress-stimulating signals that increase [Ca2+] in the parasite cytoplasm, suggesting that AKMT regulation of parasite motility might be accomplished by the precise temporal control of its localization in response to environmental changes. PMID:21909263

  9. Inhibition and Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Teraya M.; Cassera, María B.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhan, Chenyang; Merino, Emilio F.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is a purine auxotroph that relies on purine salvage for proliferation. We have optimized T. gondii purine nucleoside phosphorylase (TgPNP) stability and crystallized TgPNP with phosphate and immucillin-H, a transition-state analogue that has high affinity for the enzyme. Immucillin-H bound to TgPNP with a dissociation constant of 370 pM, the highest affinity of 11 immucillins selected to probe the catalytic site. The specificity for transition-state analogues indicated an early dissociative transition state for TgPNP. Compared to Plasmodium falciparum PNP, large substituents surrounding the 5′-hydroxyl group of inhibitors demonstrate reduced capacity for TgPNP inhibition. Catalytic discrimination against large 5′ groups is consistent with the inability of TgPNP to catalyze the phosphorolysis of 5′-methylthioinosine to hypoxanthine. In contrast to mammalian PNP, the 2′-hydroxyl group is crucial for inhibitor binding in the catalytic site of TgPNP. This first crystal structure of TgPNP describes the basis for discrimination against 5′-methylthioinosine and similarly 5′-hydroxy-substituted immucillins; structural differences reflect the unique adaptations of purine salvage pathways of Apicomplexa. PMID:24585883

  10. The antifungal Aureobasidin A and an analogue are active against the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii but do not inhibit sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alqaisi, A Q I; Mbekeani, A J; Llorens, M Bassas; Elhammer, A P; Denny, P W

    2017-05-10

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, and toxoplasmosis is an important disease of both humans and economically important animals. With a limited array of drugs available there is a need to identify new therapeutic compounds. Aureobasidin A (AbA) is an antifungal that targets the essential inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC, sphingolipid) synthase in pathogenic fungi. This natural cyclic depsipeptide also inhibits Toxoplasma proliforation, with the protozoan IPC synthase orthologue proposed as the target. The data presented here show that neither AbA nor an analogue (Compound 20), target the protozoan IPC synthase orthologue or total parasite sphingolipid synthesis. However, further analyses confirm that AbA exhibits significant activity against the proliferative tachyzoite form of Toxoplasma, and Compound 20, whilst effective, has reduced efficacy. This difference was more evident on analyses of the direct effect of these compounds against isolated Toxoplasma, indicating that AbA is rapidly microbicidal. Importantly, the possibility of targeting the encysted, bradyzoite, form of the parasite with AbA and Compound 20 was demonstrated, indicating that this class of compounds may provide the basis for the first effective treatment for chronic toxoplasmosis.

  11. Unusual Kinetic and Structural Properties Control Rapid Assembly and Turnover of Actin in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondiiD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nivedita; Beatty, Wandy; Heuser, John; Sept, David; Sibley, L. David

    2006-01-01

    Toxoplasma is a protozoan parasite in the phylum Apicomplexa, which contains a number of medically important parasites that rely on a highly unusual form of motility termed gliding to actively penetrate their host cells. Parasite actin filaments regulate gliding motility, yet paradoxically filamentous actin is rarely detected in these parasites. To investigate the kinetics of this unusual parasite actin, we expressed TgACT1 in baculovirus and purified it to homogeneity. Biochemical analysis showed that Toxoplasma actin (TgACT1) rapidly polymerized into filaments at a critical concentration that was 3-4-fold lower than conventional actins, yet it failed to copolymerize with mammalian actin. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that TgACT1 filaments were 10 times shorter and less stable than rabbit actin. Phylogenetic comparison of actins revealed a limited number of apicomplexan-specific residues that likely govern the unusual behavior of parasite actin. Molecular modeling identified several key alterations that affect interactions between monomers and that are predicted to destabilize filaments. Our findings suggest that conserved molecular differences in parasite actin favor rapid cycles of assembly and disassembly that govern the unusual form of gliding motility utilized by apicomplexans. PMID:16319175

  12. Evidence of Taxa-, Clone-, and Kin-discrimination in Protists: Ecological and Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes, or protists, are among the most ancient organisms on Earth. Protists belong to multiple taxonomic groups; they are widely distributed geographically and in all environments. Their ability to discriminate among con- and heterospecifics has been documented during the past decade. Here we discuss exemplar cases of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination in five major lineages: Mycetozoa (Dictyostelium, Polysphondylium), Dikarya (Saccharomyces), Ciliophora (Tetrahymena), Apicomplexa (Plasmodium) and Archamoebae (Entamoeba). We summarize the proposed genetic mechanisms involved in discrimination-mediated aggregation (self versus different), including the csA, FLO and trg (formerly lag) genes, and the Proliferation Activation Factors (PAFs), which facilitate clustering in some protistan taxa. We caution about the experimental challenges intrinsic to studying recognition in protists, and highlight the opportunities for exploring the ecology and evolution of complex forms of cell-cell communication, including social behavior, in a polyphyletic, still superficially understood group of organisms. Because unicellular eukaryotes are the evolutionary precursors of multicellular life, we infer that their mechanisms of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination gave origin to the complex diversification and sophistication of traits associated with species and kin recognition in plants, fungi, invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:25400313

  13. Wet-surface-enhanced ellipsometric contrast microscopy identifies slime as a major adhesion factor during bacterial surface motility.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Adrien; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Mouhamar, Fabrice; Mignot, Tâm; Theodoly, Olivier

    2012-06-19

    In biology, the extracellular matrix (ECM) promotes both cell adhesion and specific recognition, which is essential for central developmental processes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, live studies of the dynamic interactions between cells and the ECM, for example during motility, have been greatly impaired by imaging limitations: mostly the ability to observe the ECM at high resolution in absence of specific staining by live microscopy. To solve this problem, we developed a unique technique, wet-surface enhanced ellipsometry contrast (Wet-SEEC), which magnifies the contrast of transparent organic materials deposited on a substrate (called Wet-surf) with exquisite sensitivity. We show that Wet-SEEC allows both the observation of unprocessed nanofilms as low as 0.2 nm thick and their accurate 3D topographic reconstructions, directly by standard light microscopy. We next used Wet-SEEC to image slime secretion, a poorly defined property of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that move across solid surfaces in absence of obvious extracellular appendages (gliding). Using combined Wet-SEEC and fluorescent-staining experiments, we observed slime deposition by gliding Myxococcus xanthus cells at unprecedented resolution. Altogether, the results revealed that in this bacterium, slime associates preferentially with the outermost components of the motility machinery and promotes its adhesion to the substrate on the ventral side of the cell. Strikingly, analogous roles have been proposed for the extracellular proteoglycans of gliding diatoms and apicomplexa, suggesting that slime deposition is a general means for gliding organisms to adhere and move over surfaces.

  14. Characterization of eukaryotic microbial diversity in hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberg, Karla B.; Nelson, William C.; Holm, Johanna B.; Eisenkolb, Nadine; Andrade, Karen; Emerson, Joanne B.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the community structure of the microbial eukaryotic community from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia, using near full length 18S rRNA sequences. Water samples were taken in both summer and winter over a 4-year period. The extent of eukaryotic diversity detected was low, with only 35 unique phylotypes using a 97% sequence similarity threshold. The water samples were dominated (91%) by a novel cluster of the Alveolate, Apicomplexa Colpodella spp., most closely related to C. edax. The Chlorophyte, Dunaliella spp. accounted for less than 35% of water column samples. However, the eukaryotic community entrained in a salt crust sample was vastly different and was dominated (83%) by the Dunaliella spp. The patterns described here represent the first observation of microbial eukaryotic dynamics in this system and provide a multiyear comparison of community composition by season. The lack of expected seasonal distribution in eukaryotic communities paired with abundant nanoflagellates suggests that grazing may significantly structure microbial eukaryotic communities in this system. PMID:23717306

  15. A Transmission Model for the Ecology of an Avian Blood Parasite in a Temperate Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Courtney C.; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Simon, Carl P.

    2013-01-01

    Most of our knowledge about avian haemosporidian parasites comes from the Hawaiian archipelago, where recently introduced Plasmodiumrelictum has contributed to the extinction of many endemic avian species. While the ecology of invasive malaria is reasonably understood, the ecology of endemic haemosporidian infection in mainland systems is poorly understood, even though it is the rule rather than the exception. We develop a mathematical model to explore and identify the ecological factors that most influence transmission of the common avian parasite, Leucocytozoonfringillinarum (Apicomplexa). The model was parameterized from White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichialeucophrys) and S. silvestre / craigi black fly populations breeding in an alpine ecosystem. We identify and examine the importance of altricial nestlings, the seasonal relapse of infected birds for parasite persistence across breeding seasons, and potential impacts of seasonal changes in black fly emergence on parasite prevalence in a high elevation temperate system. We also use the model to identify and estimate the parameters most influencing transmission dynamics. Our analysis found that relapse of adult birds and young of the year birds were crucial for parasite persistence across multiple seasons. However, distinguishing between nude nestlings and feathered young of the year was unnecessary. Finally, due to model sensitivity to many black fly parameters, parasite prevalence and sparrow recruitment may be most affected by seasonal changes in environmental temperature driving shifts in black fly emergence and gonotrophic cycles. PMID:24073288

  16. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  17. A Conserved Apicomplexan Microneme Protein Contributes to Toxoplasma gondii Invasion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My-Hang; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii critically relies on host cell invasion during infection. Proteins secreted from the apical micronemes are central components for host cell recognition, invasion, egress, and virulence. Although previous work established that the sporozoite protein with an altered thrombospondin repeat (SPATR) is a micronemal protein conserved in other apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Neospora, and Eimeria, no genetic evidence of its contribution to invasion has been reported. SPATR contains a predicted epidermal growth factor domain and two thrombospondin type 1 repeats, implying a role in host cell recognition. In this study, we assess the contribution of T. gondii SPATR (TgSPATR) to T. gondii invasion by genetically ablating it and restoring its expression by genetic complementation. Δspatr parasites were ∼50% reduced in invasion compared to parental strains, a defect that was reversed in the complemented strain. In mouse virulence assays, Δspatr parasites were significantly attenuated, with ∼20% of mice surviving infection. Given the conservation of this protein among the Apicomplexa, we assessed whether the Plasmodium falciparum SPATR ortholog (PfSPATR) could complement the absence of the TgSPATR. Although PfSPATR showed correct micronemal localization, it did not reverse the invasion deficiency of Δspatr parasites, because of an apparent failure in secretion. Overall, the results suggest that TgSPATR contributes to invasion and virulence, findings that have implications for the many genera and life stages of apicomplexans that express SPATR. PMID:25092910

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in hunted wild boars (Sus scrofa) from southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Roqueplo, Cedric; Blaga, Radu; Jean-Lou, Marie; Vallee, Isabelle; Davoust, Bernard

    2017-01-25

    Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908) is an obligate intracellular, parasitic protozoan within the phylum Apicomplexa that causes toxoplasmosis in mammalian hosts (including humans) and birds. Since meat of wild boar, Sus scrofa (Linnaeus), has been demonstrated to be a potential source of human infection, a careful evaluation of the prevalence of infection with T. gondii in hunted animals is needed to protect public health. In the Var area in southeastern France, we performed a spatio-temporal survey in order to investigate the prevalence of IgG antibodies in wild boars shot by hunters in the Canjuers military camp during two subsequent hunting seasons. Of 841 wild boars screened, antibodies (IgG) to T. gondii (modified agglutination test, cut-off 1 : 6) were found in 141 (16.8%) muscle extract samples. A significant association (p < 0.001) was found between positivity and age, but not gender, and hunting districts. The results obtained indicate that consumption of raw or undercooked meat from wild boars carries an important risk of infection with T. gondii. Wild boars may be considered as a bioindicator of parasite circulation in this ecosystem.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Apicoplast DNA Polymerase from Plasmodium falciparum: The First Look at a Plastidic A-Family DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Milton, Morgan E; Choe, Jun-Yong; Honzatko, Richard B; Nelson, Scott W

    2016-10-09

    Plasmodium falciparum, the primary cause of malaria, contains a non-photosynthetic plastid called the apicoplast. The apicoplast exists in most members of the phylum Apicomplexa and has its own genome along with organelle-specific enzymes for its replication. The only DNA polymerase found in the apicoplast (apPOL) was putatively acquired through horizontal gene transfer from a bacteriophage and is classified as an atypical A-family polymerase. Here, we present its crystal structure at a resolution of 2.9Å. P. falciparum apPOL, the first structural representative of a plastidic A-family polymerase, diverges from typical A-family members in two of three previously identified signature motifs and in a region not implicated by sequence. Moreover, apPOL has an additional N-terminal subdomain, the absence of which severely diminishes its 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. A compound known to be toxic to Plasmodium is a potent inhibitor of apPOL, suggesting that apPOL is a viable drug target. The structure provides new insights into the structural diversity of A-family polymerases and may facilitate structurally guided antimalarial drug design.

  20. Utility of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis using PCR.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Norose, Kazumi; Li, Kexin; Hikosaka, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa. Since this parasite causes severe clinical symptoms in immunocompromised patients, early diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is essential. PCR is currently used for early diagnosis, but there is no consensus regarding the most effective method for amplifying Toxoplasma DNA. In this study, we considered the utility of the cytochrome c subunit I (cox1) gene, which is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of this parasite, as a novel target of PCR for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. To do this, we compared its copy number per haploid nuclear genome and the detection sensitivity of cox1-PCR with the previously reported target genes B1 and 18S rRNA and the AF146527 repeat element. We found that the copy number of cox1 was high and that the PCR using cox1 primers was more efficient at amplifying Toxoplasma DNA than the other PCR targets examined. In addition, PCR using clinical samples indicated that the cox1 gene would be useful for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. These findings suggest that use of cox1-PCR would facilitate the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.