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Sample records for brazilian population based

  1. [Prevalence of depressive symptoms and associated factors among southern Brazilian adults: cross-sectional population-based study].

    PubMed

    Rombaldi, Airton José; da Silva, Marcelo Cozzensa; Gazalle, Fernando Kratz; Azevedo, Mario Renato; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2010-12-01

    To identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms and examine associated factors in a Southern Brazilian adult population, a cross-sectional population-based study was carried out, including 972 subjects, men and women, aged 20 to 69 years, living in the urban area of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul. The sampling strategy relied on the census tracts of the city as primary sampling units and households as the secondary units. The questionnaire included socio-demographic, behavioral and nutritional variables. The prevalence of sadness, anxiety, loss of energy, lack of will to do things, thinking about the past, and wishing to stay at home were 29.4%, 57.6%, 37.4%, 40.4%, 33.8%, and 54.3%, respectively. Female gender, older ages, smokers and obese individuals showed association with depressive symptoms. Population-based studies using longitudinal designs may help to clarify the relationship between biopsychosocial variables and depressive symptoms.

  2. Food cravings among Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Queiroz de Medeiros, Anna Cecília; Pedrosa, Lucia de Fatima Campos; Yamamoto, Maria Emilia

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a Brazilian version of the Food Craving Inventory (FCI-Br), adapted to the cultural-gastronomic context of Brazil, and to explore this behavior among adult Brazilians. The Study 1 population consisted of 453 adults from all regions of Brazil. Participants responded to a preliminary form of the instrument online. Exploratory factor analysis revealed an FCI-Br presenting 23 items and three factors: High Fat, Sweet Food and Traditional Meal. The FCI-Br overall reliability was considered adequate (α = 0.82), as were each of the sub-scales. The food items receiving higher average scores from the application of the instrument were chocolate (3.14 ± 1.28; women) and bread (2.94 ± 1.44, men). A significant association was observed between the specific-craving for Sweet Food and female respondents. Most participants reported experiencing more frequent episodes of food craving when alone (68.0%; n = 391) and during the afternoon (32.2%; n = 127) or evening (43.8%; n = 173) hours. Application of the FCI-Br in a population of 649 university students (Study 2) demonstrated a good adjustment of the model developed according to the Confirmatory factor analysis (χ(2)/gl = 2.82, CFI = 0.94; TLI = 0.93; RMSEA = 0.06). The current findings indicate that the FCI-Br has adequate psychometric properties to measure craving behavior with respect to specific food groups in the resident population of Brazil. The results of this study also shed light on the importance of considering the cultural diversity of a population when investigating eating behaviors.

  3. Excess weight and abdominal obesity in postmenopausal Brazilian women: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The menopause is associated with a tendency to gain weight. Several alterations in fat deposits occur, leading to changes in the distribution of body fat. There are strong indications that, in middle age, obesity is associated with increased mortality. This study set out to determine the factors associated with the prevalence of overweight and abdominal obesity in postmenopausal women in a population-based study in Brazil. Methods The sample included 456 women, aged 45–69 years, residing in the urban area of Maringa, Parana. Systematic sampling, with a probability proportional to the size of the census sector, was performed. Behavioral, economic, and sociodemographic data were collected, and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were determined. Results According to BMI criteria (≥25.0 kg/m2), 72.6% of the women were overweight, and according to WC (≥88 cm), 63.6% had abdominal obesity. Based on logistic regression analysis, the factors that were most closely associated with overweight were: having three or more children (odds ratio (OR): 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–3.00); and not taking hormone replacement therapy (OR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06–2.63). The prevalence of abdominal obesity was positively associated with greater parity (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05–1.72) and age older than 65 years (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.03–2.19). Conclusions This study found that the prevalences of overweight and abdominal obesity were higher for postmenopausal women who had three or more children. Age over 65 years was also a risk factor for abdominal obesity and no use of hormonal replacement therapy was a risk factor for overweight. PMID:24228934

  4. Eating practices and habitus in mothers. A Brazilian population-based survey.

    PubMed

    de Morais Sato, Priscila; da Rocha Pereira, Patrícia; de Carvalho Stelmo, Isis; Unsain, Ramiro Fernandez; Ulian, Mariana Dimitrov; Sabatini, Fernanda; Martins, Paula Andrea; Scagliusi, Fernanda Baeza

    2014-11-01

    A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted with mothers living in the city of Santos, Brazil, in order to investigate their eating practices, and the interface between those practices and the concept of habitus. From a cluster analysis of the scores for dietary pattern and for food preparation and consumption, the mothers were categorised into five clusters of eating practices: practical mothers (19.8%), symbiotic mothers (3.2%), health-conscious hedonists (17.3%), traditionalists (34.6%), and family cooks (25.1%). To access the habitus of the eating-practice clusters, the following variables were compared: location of residence, profession, socioeconomic status, weight-loss practices, risk behaviours for eating disorders, disordered eating attitudes, body dissatisfaction, and cultural and technological consumption. For all the groups, the observed eating practices were permeated by responsibility for the family's diet, but with different manifestations. For symbiotic mothers, practical mothers, and family cooks, the primary function of their relation with food was to nourish their families, with little expression of their own tastes and preferences. The traditionalists and the health-conscious hedonists, on the other hand, manifested their role as mothers by providing food considered 'nutritionally proper' to their family members. Furthermore, aspects of contemporary lifestyles, such as little time for food, individualisation of meals, and consumption of processed foods, were found to coexist with the valorisation and maintenance of the traditional meals within some groups. The variety of eating practices could not be understood as a linear association between economic and cultural capitals; however, eating practices seemed to interact with those capitals, composing a habitus.

  5. Impact of Malocclusion on the Quality of Life of Brazilian Adolescents: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luciana Freitas Gomes e; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Freitas, Heloiza Viana; Pereira, Alex Luiz Pozzobon; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa; Alves, Cláudia Maria Coelho

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of malocclusion on the quality of life (QOL) of adolescents in Brazil. We carried out a cross-sectional study in a sample population of 1015 schoolchildren aged 12 to 15 years from São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil. The explanatory variable was malocclusion, evaluated on the basis of the normative need or the adolescent’s self-perceived need for dental treatment. Normative need for dental treatment was determined by professional diagnosis, made on the basis of Angle’s classification, the Dental Aesthetic Index, and other morphological deviations (e.g., posterior crossbite, posterior open bite, and deep overbite). We analyzed the impact of malocclusion on the QOL using the Portuguese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14. Associations were estimated by using the prevalence ratio (PR) in Poisson regression analysis, with hierarchized modeling. An alpha of 5% was adopted as the criterion for statistical significance. The QOL of adolescents was impacted by malocclusion, classified by a normative need for treatment according to the Dental Aesthetic Index (PR = 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.56) or by the self-perceived need for treatment (PR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.81–3.56). Certain sociodemographic variables, including the head of the family (PR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.02–2.23), greater educational level of the head of the family (PR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.17–0.61), and female sex (PR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.05–1.89), had negative associations with QOL. We conclude that malocclusion has a negative impact on the QOL of adolescents, associated with socioeconomic conditions and the cosmetic effects of malocclusion. PMID:27690356

  6. Impact of Malocclusion on the Quality of Life of Brazilian Adolescents: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana Freitas Gomes E; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Freitas, Heloiza Viana; Pereira, Alex Luiz Pozzobon; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa; Alves, Cláudia Maria Coelho

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of malocclusion on the quality of life (QOL) of adolescents in Brazil. We carried out a cross-sectional study in a sample population of 1015 schoolchildren aged 12 to 15 years from São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil. The explanatory variable was malocclusion, evaluated on the basis of the normative need or the adolescent's self-perceived need for dental treatment. Normative need for dental treatment was determined by professional diagnosis, made on the basis of Angle's classification, the Dental Aesthetic Index, and other morphological deviations (e.g., posterior crossbite, posterior open bite, and deep overbite). We analyzed the impact of malocclusion on the QOL using the Portuguese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14. Associations were estimated by using the prevalence ratio (PR) in Poisson regression analysis, with hierarchized modeling. An alpha of 5% was adopted as the criterion for statistical significance. The QOL of adolescents was impacted by malocclusion, classified by a normative need for treatment according to the Dental Aesthetic Index (PR = 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.56) or by the self-perceived need for treatment (PR = 2.54; 95% CI = 1.81-3.56). Certain sociodemographic variables, including the head of the family (PR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.02-2.23), greater educational level of the head of the family (PR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.17-0.61), and female sex (PR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.05-1.89), had negative associations with QOL. We conclude that malocclusion has a negative impact on the QOL of adolescents, associated with socioeconomic conditions and the cosmetic effects of malocclusion.

  7. [New migratory flows of the Brazilian population].

    PubMed

    Sales, T

    1991-01-01

    "This article focuses [on] the recent emigration of Brazilians abroad. In the post World War II period, a new type of international migration was observed, caused by demands for labor in the receiving countries, where immigrants are integrated into the secondary labor market. The programs created to stimulate temporary foreign migrations resulted in the recent illegal migrations of Brazilians, most of them working in unskilled jobs. The study is based on data from a preliminary survey on the migratory flow from the city of Governador Valadares in the State of Minas Gerais, to Boston, in the U.S." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  8. Spirometry reference values in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Rufino, R; Costa, C H; Lopes, A J; Maiworm, A I; Maynard, K; Silva, L M R A; Dias, R M

    2017-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to provide new spirometry reference equations in a sample of the Brazilian population for the following parameters: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, peak of expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow at 50% (FEF50%), 75% average vital capacity (FEF25-75%), and average forced expiratory flow time (FEFT). This was a prospective study using results from chest radiographs, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires to investigate the participants' respiratory symptoms, sedentarism, and comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index). From December 2010 to July 2014, individuals were randomly selected from various locations in the state of Rio de Janeiro. All individuals were examined by a single technician in the morning at the laboratory, and performed the spirometry with the same spirometer. Spirometry values were tabulated for the creation of three equation models: linear regression, logarithmic regression, and logarithms through a method that incorporates the lambda, median, and coefficient of variation (LMS method). Initially, 7003 individuals from both genders were contacted, and 454 were recruited. The data from the new equations were compared with one Brazilian and eight international equations, resulting in a high correlation (r>0.9). The values derived from the LMS method and linear regression were very similar (P>0.5), and both could be used to acquire the reference values for Brazilian spirometry. Data derived from the equations of this study were different from the current Brazilian equation, which could be justified by the different method used.

  9. Private Health Care Coverage in the Brazilian population, according to the 2013 Brazilian National Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Stopa, Sheila Rizzato; Pereira, Cimar Azeredo; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Oliveira, Martha; Reis, Arthur Chioro Dos

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present the percentages of the Brazilian population holding health insurance plans, itemized by social-demographic characteristics, based on the data of the National Health Survey carried out in 2013, and to compare this information with the administrative data of the National Supplementary Health Agency for the same year. Data from the National Health Survey, and from the Beneficiaries Information System of the National Health Agency for the year 2013, were used. The percentage of people having a health plan was described according to stratification for: all of Brazil, urban/rural, Brazilian official Regions, Brazilian States and state capitals, gender, age group, level of schooling, position in the workforce, ethnic classification, and self-assessed state of health. Results include the following: The percentage of people saying they had some health plan in Brazil was 27.9% (CI 95%: 27.1-28.8). A significant difference was found relating to level of schooling - the percentage being highest for those who stated they had complete secondary education (68.8% CI 95%: 67.2-70.4) and for those who said they were currently in work (32.5% CI 95%: 31.5-33.5). The increase in health plan coverage in the Brazilian population reflects the improvement of the suply of employment and the growth in the country's economy.

  10. Genetic diversity of the captive Asian tapir population in Thailand, based on mitochondrial control region sequence data and the comparison of its nucleotide structure with Brazilian tapir.

    PubMed

    Muangkram, Yuttamol; Amano, Akira; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Thongtip, Nikorn; Kaolim, Nongnid; Sukmak, Manakorn; Kamolnorranath, Sumate; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Tipkantha, Wanlaya; Maikaew, Umaporn; Thomas, Warisara; Polsrila, Kanda; Dongsaard, Kwanreaun; Sanannu, Saowaphang; Wattananorrasate, Anuwat

    2016-03-02

    The Asian tapir (Tapirus indicus) has been classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (2008). Genetic diversity data provide important information for the management of captive breeding and conservation of this species. We analyzed mitochondrial control region (CR) sequences from 37 captive Asian tapirs in Thailand. Multiple alignments of the full-length CR sequences sized 1268 bp comprised three domains as described in other mammal species. Analysis of 16 parsimony-informative variable sites revealed 11 haplotypes. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis using median-joining network clearly showed three clades correlated with our earlier cytochrome b gene study in this endangered species. The repetitive motif is located between first and second conserved sequence blocks, similar to the Brazilian tapir. The highest polymorphic site was located in the extended termination associated sequences domain. The results could be applied for future genetic management based in captivity and wild that shows stable populations.

  11. Sleep complaints in the Brazilian population: Impact of socioeconomic factors

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Camila; Bittencourt, Lia; Garbuio, Silverio; Andersen, Monica Levy; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    National surveys are relevant for the study of sleep epidemiology since they can provide specific data about sleep in large dimension with important implications for the health system. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sleep complaints among the Brazilian population using a randomized cluster sample according to region and socioeconomic class. For this, a 3-stage sampling technique was used to randomly select Brazilian subjects of both genders older than 16 years. A total of 2017 subjects, from 132 different cities, were selected to estimate prevalence in the Brazilian population with a sampling error of ±2%. Questions about sleep complaints were administered face-to-face by Instituto Datafolha interviewers on April 10 and 16, 2012. Data were expanded using a weighted variable. The results showed that 76% of the study population suffers from at least 1 sleep complaint, indicating that approximately 108 million Brazilians may be affected by sleep disorders. On average, each subject had 1.9 sleep problems with the most common complaints being light and insufficient sleep, snoring, moving a lot during sleep, and insomnia, which usually occurred more than 3 times per week. Low income was associated with higher number of sleep complaints only in Northeast and Southeast regions. In conclusion, this study showed a high prevalence of sleep complaints in a sample of the Brazilian population, suggesting that sleep disorders may be markedly frequent in the Brazilian population with a possible correlation with the socioeconomic situation of the interviewed subjects. PMID:26483918

  12. Multilocus family-based association analysis of seven candidate polymorphisms with essential hypertension in an african-derived semi-isolated brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Kimura, L; Angeli, C B; Auricchio, M T B M; Fernandes, G R; Pereira, A C; Vicente, J P; Pereira, T V; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2012-01-01

    Background. It has been widely suggested that analyses considering multilocus effects would be crucial to characterize the relationship between gene variability and essential hypertension (EH). Objective. To test for the presence of multilocus effects between/among seven polymorphisms (six genes) on blood pressure-related traits in African-derived semi-isolated Brazilian populations (quilombos). Methods. Analyses were carried out using a family-based design in a sample of 652 participants (97 families). Seven variants were investigated: ACE (rs1799752), AGT (rs669), ADD2 (rs3755351), NOS3 (rs1799983), GNB3 (rs5441 and rs5443), and GRK4 (rs1801058). Sensitivity analyses were further performed under a case-control design with unrelated participants only. Results. None of the investigated variants were associated individually with both systolic and diastolic BP levels (SBP and DBP, respectively) or EH (as a binary outcome). Multifactor dimensionality reduction-based techniques revealed a marginal association of the combined effect of both GNB3 variants on DBP levels in a family-based design (P = 0.040), whereas a putative NOS3-GRK4 interaction also in relation to DBP levels was observed in the case-control design only (P = 0.004). Conclusion. Our results provide limited support for the hypothesis of multilocus effects between/among the studied variants on blood pressure in quilombos. Further larger studies are needed to validate our findings.

  13. Multilocus Family-Based Association Analysis of Seven Candidate Polymorphisms with Essential Hypertension in an African-Derived Semi-Isolated Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, L.; Angeli, C. B.; Auricchio, M. T. B. M.; Fernandes, G. R.; Pereira, A. C.; Vicente, J. P.; Pereira, T. V.; Mingroni-Netto, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. It has been widely suggested that analyses considering multilocus effects would be crucial to characterize the relationship between gene variability and essential hypertension (EH). Objective. To test for the presence of multilocus effects between/among seven polymorphisms (six genes) on blood pressure-related traits in African-derived semi-isolated Brazilian populations (quilombos). Methods. Analyses were carried out using a family-based design in a sample of 652 participants (97 families). Seven variants were investigated: ACE (rs1799752), AGT (rs669), ADD2 (rs3755351), NOS3 (rs1799983), GNB3 (rs5441 and rs5443), and GRK4 (rs1801058). Sensitivity analyses were further performed under a case-control design with unrelated participants only. Results. None of the investigated variants were associated individually with both systolic and diastolic BP levels (SBP and DBP, respectively) or EH (as a binary outcome). Multifactor dimensionality reduction-based techniques revealed a marginal association of the combined effect of both GNB3 variants on DBP levels in a family-based design (P = 0.040), whereas a putative NOS3-GRK4 interaction also in relation to DBP levels was observed in the case-control design only (P = 0.004). Conclusion. Our results provide limited support for the hypothesis of multilocus effects between/among the studied variants on blood pressure in quilombos. Further larger studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:23056922

  14. Associations between dietary patterns and self-reported hypertension among Brazilian adults: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Selem, Soraya Sant'Ana de Castro; Castro, Michelle Alessandra de; César, Chester Luiz Galvão; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Fisberg, Regina Mara

    2014-08-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent cardiovascular disease, the important modifiable risk factor of which is diet. The aim of this study was to derive dietary patterns and to test associations with self-reported hypertension and other characteristics, namely demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors. Data were obtained from the population-based cross-sectional study titled Health Survey of the City of São Paulo, with a random sample of residents of the city of São Paulo, Brazil, aged older than 20 years of both sexes (n=1,102). In 2008, a structured questionnaire with information about socioeconomic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary factors was applied. Dietary intake was estimated by two 24-hour dietary recalls, adjusted by Multiple Source Method. Dietary patterns were obtained through exploratory principal component factor analysis. Poisson regression was used to assess relationships. Three dietary patterns were identified: prudent (fruits, vegetables, whole-grain bread, white cheeses, juices, reduced-fat milk/nonfat milk), traditional (rice, beans, bread/toast/crackers, butter/margarine, whole milk, coffee/teas, sugar), and modern (sodas, pastries/sandwiches/pizzas, yellow cheeses, pastas, sauces, alcoholic beverages, sweets, processed meats). Hypertension and demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors, as well as the presence of health insurance, were associated with adherence to one or more identified dietary patterns. These results suggest the existence of a target audience for planning and executing public policies of food and nutrition to prevent and control hypertension.

  15. Falls and self-assessment of eyesight among elderly people: a population-based study in a south Brazilian municipality.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Bruno Pereira; de Oliveira Saes, Mirelle; Siqueira, Fernando Vinholes; Tomasi, Elaine; Silva, Suele Manjourany; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Thumé, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to verify the association between falls and self-assessment of visual acuity in elderly people by means of a cross-sectional population-based study involving 1593 elderly people (aged 60 or over) from the urban zone of the municipality of Bagé-RS. Poisson regression was used for association analysis. Fall prevalence in the last year was 28.0% (95%CI: 25.8; 30.2), with 45.0% of these having suffered two or more falls in the same period. Elderly people self-assessing their eyesight as bad/very poor (10.0%) or regular (33.3%) showed a linear increase in fall occurrence when compared to individuals who considered their eyesight to be good/excellent. Self-assessment of eyesight showed itself to be an important factor associated with the occurrence of falls. This results entails the need to make progress with tracing elderly people with eyesight difficulties and its possible impact on actions to prevent the occurrence of falls.

  16. Impact of malocclusion on oral health-related quality of life among Brazilian preschool children: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Anita Cruz; Paiva, Saul Martins; Viegas, Claudia Marina; Scarpelli, Ana Carolina; Ferreira, Fernanda Morais; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of malocclusion on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of children and their families. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. A representative sample of 1069 male and female preschoolers aged 60 to 71 months was randomly selected from public and private preschools and daycare centers. Data were collected using the B-ECOHIS. In addition, a questionnaire addressing socioeconomic and demographic data was self-administered by the parents/guardians. The criteria used to diagnose malocclusion were based on Foster and Hamilton (1969), Graboswki et al. (2007) and Oliveira et al. (2008). Descriptive, univariate and multiple Poison logistic regression analyses were carried out. The prevalence of malocclusion was observed in 46.2% of the children and deep overbite was the most prevalent type of malocclusion (19.7%), followed by posterior crossbite (13.1%), accentuated overjet (10.5%), anterior open bite (7.9%) and anterior crossbite (6.7%). The impact of malocclusion on OHRQoL was 32.7% among the children and 27.1% among the families. In Poisson multiple regression model adjusted for socioeconomic status, no significant association was found between malocclusion and OHRQoL of the children (PR=1.09, 95% CI: 0.96-1.24) and their families (PR=1.11, 95% CI: 0.94-1.31). It is concluded that children with malocclusion in this sample did not have a negative impact on their OHRQoL and of their families.

  17. Distribution of Brazilian dermatologists according to geographic location, population and HDI of municipalities: an ecological study*

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the geographic distribution of dermatologists in Brazilian municipalities in relation to the population, regions of the country and human development index. We conducted an ecological study based on data from the 2010 census, the 2010 human development index, and the records of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology. 5565 municipalities and 6718 dermatologists were surveyed. Only 504 (9.1%) municipalities had dermatologists, and accounted for 56.2% of the Brazilian population. The smallest population size and lowest HDI rate that best discriminated municipalities that did not have dermatologists were found to be 28,000 and 0.71, respectively. The average population density of dermatologists in cities was 1/23.000 inhabitants, and variations were independently associated with the HDI, the population of the municipalities and the region of the country. PMID:25387516

  18. Smoking and poverty in Brazil: an analysis of the profile of the smoking population based on the 2008-09 Brazilian government Family Budget Survey.

    PubMed

    Bazotti, Angelita; Finokiet, Manuela; Conti, Irio Luiz; França, Marco Tulio Aniceto; Waquil, Paulo Dabdab

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to characterize the Brazilian population who spent money with tobacco products. POF dataset was used from IBGE of the years 2008 and 2009. The same definition that IBGE usually use for tobacco consumer was applied, which is someone has spent money with any kind of tobacco products and its derivatives. It was used individual aspects taking into account such as gender, schooling, age (over 14 years old), income lines, regions and ethnics to characterize these populations. Descriptive statistics were employed to estimate the results and the complex sample design of the survey was considered. According to our results, on average, 10% of the Brazilian population have spent money with tobacco products. Besides, these people are older, earn low salaries and have less schooling than someone who does not consume tobacco. Moreover, for this population 1.5% of the family budget is spent on tobacco products. Last but not least, the most of tobacco consumers are men. In general, money which is spent on tobacco products can cause impressive effects on domestic budget because this value could supply other important necessities to the family. Although there are many monitoring and prevention strategies to avoid tobacco consume, deep knowledge about this population that actually consume these products can increase the efficacy of more specific policies.

  19. Utilization of medicines by the Brazilian population, 2003.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marcelo Felga de; Pascom, Ana Roberta Pati; Souza-Júnior, Paulo Roberto Borges de; Damacena, Giseli Nogueira; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the utilization of medicines by the Brazilian population, using data from the Brazilian World Health Survey. Medicines were grouped according to the active pharmaceutical ingredient based on an adaptation of the World Health Organization standard list of essential medicines. The analysis included the characteristics of individuals who keep medicines at home and who had used them within the reference period (within two weeks prior to the interview), according to presence of medical prescription. Nearly half of the participants (49.0%) reported use of medicines during the reference period. Older and wealthier individuals and those with chronic diseases or disabilities and with poor self-rated health keep and use medicines more frequently. For 25.0% of the individuals that had used medicines during the reference period, none of the drugs had been prescribed by a health professional. Among the individuals who had medicines prescribed in the last appointment, 13.0% were unable to obtain the prescribed medication (of these, 55.0% could not afford it). The most widely utilized group was that of the analgesics (22.0%), and only 51.0% of the individuals using this type of medicine had received a medical prescription for it.

  20. Relationship between Tasks Performed, Personality Traits, and Sleep Bruxism in Brazilian School Children - A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Negra, Junia Maria; Paiva, Saul Martins; Abreu, Mauro Henrique; Flores-Mendoza, Carmen Elvira; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Background Tasks can be instruments of stress and may affect the health of children. Sleep bruxism is a multifactorial sleep-related movement disorder that affects children and adults. The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between children’s tasks, personality traits and sleep bruxism. Methods And Findings A cross-sectional, population-based study of 652 randomly selected Brazilian schoolchildren (52% of whom were female), aged from 7 to 10 years was conducted in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A questionnaire based on criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) was completed by parents. In addition, the Neuroticism and Responsibility sub-scales of the Big Five Questionnaire for Children (BFQ-C) were administered to the children. Psychological tests were administered and evaluated by psychologists. The Social Vulnerability Index from the city council database was used to determine the social classification of the families. Chi-square and Poisson regression statistical tests were used with a 95% confidence interval. The majority of families were classified as having low social vulnerability (61.3%), whereas, 38.7% were classified as having high social vulnerability. Regarding extracurricular activities, the majority of girls performed household work (56.4%) and some artistic activity (51.3%) while sporting activities were most common among boys (61%). The results of the Poisson regression model indicated that sleep bruxism was most prevalent in children who scored highly in the Neuroticism sub-scale, and who frequently performed household tasks. Conclusion Children whose personality domain has a high level of Neuroticism and who perform household chores imposed by the family are more vulnerable to sleep bruxism. PMID:24244614

  1. Brazilian population 1982: growth, migration, race, religion.

    PubMed

    Sanders, T G

    1982-01-01

    . The top 10 of the 30 largest cities in the country all have more than 1 million inhabitants. Another manifestation of urbanization within states is the overall loss of population in the rural areas while most of the capital cities grew quite rapidly. Brazil is a multiracial society based on the native Amerindians, Europeans, Middle Easterners, the decendants of African slaves, and Orientals. A substantial portion of the population is racially mixed and cannot be placed within any of these categories. In the 1980 census the racial categories were the ones used in prevouse censuses: white, black, yellow, and "parda" (mixed). Brazil's population is predominantly white, but nearly 45% is racially mixed or black. Orientals are less than 1%. In regard to religion, the clearest trend is an increase in Protestants.

  2. Influence of early life factors on body mass index trajectory during childhood: a population-based longitudinal analysis in the Western Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Barbara H; Villamor, Eduardo; Augusto, Rosângela A; Cardoso, Marly A

    2015-04-01

    Low- to middle-income countries may experience the occurrence of a dual burden of under and overnutrition. To better understand the overall progression of body mass index (BMI) during childhood, we estimated average BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ) growth curves in a population-based longitudinal study of 255 children living in the Brazilian Amazon. Children were aged 0.1-5.5 years at recruitment (2003). We collected data on socio-economic and maternal characteristics, children's birthweight and infant feeding practices. Child anthropometric measurements were taken in 2003, 2007 and 2009. BAZ differences among categories of exposure variables were calculated at 6 and 12 months, and 2, 7 and 10 years. At baseline, the mean (standard deviation) age was 2.6 (1.4) years; 12.9% were overweight and 3.9% thin. After adjustment, mean BAZ estimates were mostly negative. Boys were close to the median value for BAZ until 12 months, whereas girls were below the median (P=0.05). Children from households above the wealth median were 0.36 z- and 0.49 z-less underweight than poorer children at 7 and 10 years, respectively (P<0.01). Maternal BMI was positively associated with children's BAZ since 12 months old; BAZ in children from overweight mothers was higher by 0.69 compared with their counterparts at 10 years (P<0.01). Birthweight was positively related to BAZ up until 2 years (P=0.01). Socio-economic background and maternal nutritional status are important predictors of BAZ throughout childhood. Although excessive weight gain is a public health concern, it is critical to restrict inequities, while promoting healthier growth in developing countries.

  3. Demography, vulnerabilities and right to health to Brazilian prison population.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marden Marques; Bueno, Paula Michele Martins Gomes

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the latest research on the profile of the Brazilian prison population, its demography and current laws and regulations. It aims in the direction of ensuring the human right to health. Brazilian prison system is a complex universe in which state and federal criminal contexts keep more than 607,000 people in custody. This population is composed of 75% of young and black people, 67% poorly educated and 41% are pre-trial detainees, living in overcrowded prisons and architecturally vandalized, with population growth of around 575% in 24 years, making this environment a major focus of production of diseases. The prison becomes the object of differentiated intervention by public bodies linked to the executive and the judiciary - it is worth remarking that the data show the high level of inequalities and health vulnerabilities among the prison population, whose needs involve a set of cross-sector of transverse public policies actions towards penal execution.

  4. Male recombination in Brazilian populations of Drosophila ananassae.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Beatriz; Matsuda, Muneo; Tobari, Yoshiko N

    2016-07-01

    With few exceptions, spontaneous crossing over does not normally occur in male Drosophila. Drosophila ananassae males show considerable amounts of crossing over. In wild males of D. ananassae from Asian (2008) and Brazilian populations (1986 and 2007) variable frequencies of meiotic crossing over, estimated from chiasmata counts, suggested the existence of factors controlling male crossing over in these populations. To corroborate for such prediction, we present data on spontaneous recombination in F1 males of D. ananassae heterozygous for chromosomes of the same Brazilian populations (1986) and marker chromosomes using three testers stocks. Mean recombination value was low, although high variability existed between individual frequencies. Recombination frequencies between lines in each tester stock were not significantly different, excepting when the 3ple-px and 3ple-cy testers were compared (p < 0.05). These two testers differ in respect to the regional distribution of crossovers. The occurrence of recombination in chromosomes 2 and 3 in F1 males tested with e(65) se; bri ru was not related, suggesting they are under independent genetic control. Our data are consistent with proposed genetic factors controlling male crossing over in the tester stocks and to the presence of enhancers and suppressors of male crossing over segregating in the Brazilian populations (1986).

  5. Reduced genetic diversity in endemic Brazilian Lymania spp (Bromeliaceae) populations and implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Pamponét, V C C; Alves, T F; Martinez, R A; Corrêa, R X; Gaiotto, F A

    2013-10-10

    We analyzed the genetic diversity of populations of two sympatric species of Lymania (Bromeliaceae), both endemic to the Atlantic rainforest of southern Bahia (Brazil). Lymania azurea has a restricted occurrence, while Lymania smithii has a wider distribution. Our aim was to provide genetic data to contribute to the design of more efficient conservation strategies for these bromeliads, possibly justifying inclusion in the official Brazilian list of Endangered Species. Up to now, L. azurea has been classified by the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment as "data deficient". We sampled four populations of L. azurea throughout its distribution area in southern Bahia and two populations of L. smithii in the same region. Genotyping was performed with 48 random amplified polymorphic DNA markers. Based on the Jaccard genetic similarity index, L. smithii has greater diversity than L. azurea. An analysis of molecular variation showed greater genetic variance within than between populations for both species. L. azurea was found to have 20% inbreeding, probably due to population fragmentation, with L. smithii showing only 10%. When we analyzed pairs of populations of L. azurea within a conservation unit, we found low population structure (ФST = 0.098), apparently due to a large degree of gene flow between them. In disturbed areas, we found a higher ФST (0.372). We found low genetic variability for L. azurea, probably as a consequence of habitat fragmentation, supporting the need for its inclusion in the Brazilian list of endangered flora.

  6. Demographic profile of oral nonodontogenic cysts in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Filizola-de Oliveira, Daniel J.; Roman-Martelli, Stephanie J.; Etges, Adriana; Neutzling-Gomes, Ana P.; Chaves-Tarquínio, Sandra B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of oral non-odontogenic cysts (ONOC) in a Brazilian population over a 53-year period and to compare this data with the literature. Study Design: A total of 20.391 biopsies records were evaluated, from April/1959 to August/2012. Cases of oral developmental cysts were selected. Data regarding age, gender, time of evolution, and anatomic site of all cases were collected. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: Among 20.391 oral biopsies, 71 (0.35%) met the criteria of ONOC. Females accounted for 50.70% of all cases. The mean age observed was 38.14 years (range: 5-88 years). Nasopalatine duct cysts, oral lymphoepithelial cysts and epidermoid cysts were the most common ONOC, accounting for 63 cases (88.73%). Nasopalatine duct cysts occurred in 31 cases (43.66%), followed by 22 patients with oral lymphoepithelial cysts (30.99%) and 10 cases of epidermoid cysts (14.08%). Nasopalatine duct cysts revealed predominance among males (58.06). Oral lymphoepithelial cysts were more commonly observed in tongue (50%). Epidermoid cysts were most frequently found in the buccal mucosa (40.00%). Conclusions: The differential diagnosis of ONOC is based on the clinical, radiological, and histological findings. It is difficult to establish an epidemiological profile of ONOCs, considering the low frequency of these lesions and the divergences in the demographic and clinical presentation data among different populations. Key words:Diagnosis, epidemiology, jaw cysts, mouth. PMID:24316702

  7. Economic and social characteristics of the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Sanders, T G

    1982-01-01

    The question of whether Brazilians have improved their economic situation since 1970 is controversial. A number of questions on the Brazilian census of 1980 dealt with the economic and social characteristics of the population. The usefulness of census data lies in their capacity to indicate trends every 10 years. Consequently, one can get some idea of whether Brazil is making progress in certain aspects of modernization or in improving the skills and living conditions of the people. Census data have limitations. They indicate averages, not specific cases. They fail to raise a number of questions about economic and social conditions that would improve understanding. Discussion is focused on population structure and the economy, income, housing, education, and health. Brazil is continuing the process of modernization by which population shifts from the primary sector (agriculture and mining) into other sectors of the economy. The 14.88% of the work force in agriculture, livestock, and fishing represent about 30% of the potentially economically active (PEA) population. 1/3 of the population is still rural, but the trend since 1940 is striking. The momentum of decline intensified in both 1960-70 and 1970-80, reflecting a process of abandoning small farms, mechanizing larger farms, and a general flow of population to the cities. All other sectors of the economy have increased the proportion of people working in them. The data of 1980 reflect a period of sustained economic growth that culminated in that year with an increase of 8%. In 1981 and 1982, Brazil had been in a recession so that in 1983 some of these figures might have changed. The dispute began when the results of the 1970 census were used to show that income was becoming more concentrated, i.e., the top percentages, in comparison with 1960, received a larger share of national income, while the lowest percentages received less. The differences in income between men and women is particularly strong in the

  8. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Brazilian Populations of Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae): Implications for Pest Management.

    PubMed

    Silva-Brandão, Karina L; Santos, Thiago V; Cônsoli, Fernando L; Omoto, Celso

    2015-02-01

    The sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), is the main pest of sugarcane in Brazil. Genetic variability and gene flow among 13 Brazilian populations of the species were evaluated based on mitochondrial DNA sequences to estimate the exchange of genetic information within and among populations. We found high genetic structure among sampled localities (ΦST=0.50923), and pairwise genetic distances were significantly correlated to geographic distances. Demographic analysis and genealogical network of mitochondrial sequences indicate population growth and admixture of D. saccharalis populations, events likely related to the sequential expansion of the corn and sugarcane crops in Brazil. The implications of these findings for pest management are discussed.

  9. Transcultural validation of the ALS-CBS Cognitive Section for the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Branco, Lucas M T; Zanao, Tamires; De Rezende, Thiago J; Casseb, Raphael F; Balthazar, Marcio F; Woolley, Susan C; França, Marcondes C

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive decline (CD) is common but often under-recognized in ALS due to the scarcity of adequate cognitive screening methods. In this scenario, the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cognitive Behavioural Screen (ALS-CBS) is the most investigated instrument and presents high sensitivity to identify CD. Currently, there are no validated cognitive screening tools for ALS patients in the Brazilian population and little is known about the frequency of ALS related CD in the country. We assessed the accuracy of the Brazilian Portuguese version of ALS-CBS Cognitive Section (ALS-CBS-Br) for classifying the cognitive status of Brazilian patients compared to a standard neuropsychological battery, and estimated the prevalence of CD in the Brazilian ALS population. Among 73 initially recruited ALS patients, 49 were included. Twenty-four patients were excluded due to severe motor disability, FTD diagnosis or non-acceptance. Ten healthy controls were also included. Ten ALS patients (20%) were diagnosed with executive dysfunction (ALSci) based on the battery results. ALS-CBS-Br scores were significantly lower in the ALSci group (p < 0.001). The scale accuracy in detecting executive dysfunction was 0.906. Optimal cut-off score was 10/20 (specificity 0.872 and sensitivity 0.900). In conclusion, the ALS-CBS-Br may facilitate the recognition of CD in routine clinical care and complement future studies in our population.

  10. Stunting in children under five years old is still a health problem in the Western Brazilian Amazon: a population-based study in Assis Brasil, Acre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Saulo Augusto Silva; Ramalho, Alanderson Alves; Pereira, Thasciany Moraes; Branco, Fernando Luiz Cunha Castelo; Oliart-Guzmán, Humberto; Delfino, Breno Matos; Braña, Athos Muniz; Martins, Antonio Camargo; Filgueira-Júnior, José Alcântara; Santos, Ana Paula; Campos, Rhanderson Gardinali; Guimarães, Andréia Silva; Araújo, Thiago Santos de; Oliveira, Cristieli Sérgio de Menezes; Codeço, Cláudia Torres; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica

    2016-06-01

    Despite the process of nutritional transition in Brazil, in some places, such as the Amazon region, stunting is still an important public health problem. We identified the prevalence and factors associated with stunting in children under five years old residing in the urban area of Assis Brasil. A survey was conducted in which a questionnaire on socioeconomic, maternal and children's conditions was applied, and height or length was measured. The children with height for age index below -2 Z-scores were considered stunted, according to the criteria by the World Health Organization. Four hundred and twenty-eight children were evaluated. Of these, 62 were stunted. Factors associated with stunting, according to adjusted models, were: the presence of open sewer, the wealth index for households, the receipt of governmental financial aid and the mother's height, age and education. Therefore, it was observed that family and the mother's characteristics as well as environmental and socioeconomic factors were closely related to the occurrence of stunting in the population studied, and such nutritional disturbance is still a health problem in the Brazilian Amazon.

  11. Prevalence of malocclusions in a young Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Grando, G; Young, A A A; Vedovello Filho, M; Vedovello, S A S; Ramirez-Yañez, G O

    2008-01-01

    Malocclusions are generally treated in adolescents and adults, but they are established at an early age. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusions in a young Brazilian population. The sample included 926 children, 8 to 12 years old, attending 5 public schools in the state of Goias, Brazil The type of occlusion was visually determined during the oral exam and statistical analysis, Chi-square test, was performed to correlate the prevalence of malocclusion with gender and with age. 819 patients out of the 926 patients had some type of malocclusion. From those, 513 patients had a class I malocclusion, 201 patients were classified as class II malocclusion, and 105 patients were class III malocclusion. Vertically, 62 patients showed a deep bite and 61 patients had an open bite. Transversely, 40 patients presented a bilateral posterior crossbite, 54 patients had a posterior crossbite on the left side, and 39 patients had a posterior crossbite on the right side. No significant correlation between gender and malocclusions was found and the number of patients with malocclusions between boys and girls were similar. Considering the three spatial planes, there is a high prevalence of malocclusions among the young Brazilian population. Therefore, the dental community must improve health policies and treat malocclusions earlier.

  12. Impact of maternal age on birth outcomes: a population-based study of primiparous Brazilian women in the city of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of maternal age at first birth on low birth weight, preterm birth and low Apgar scores at one minute and at five minutes among live births delivered to primiparous Brazilian women in the city of São Paulo. Analyses were based on 73,820 birth records from the 1998 birth cohort. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between maternal age and each outcome variable, controlling for the following risk factors: delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Maternal ages below 20 and above 30 years were significantly associated with the risks of low birth weight and preterm birth, but no association was found between maternal ages and Apgar score, with the exception that ages 15-19 reduced the odds of a low one-minute score. Even though this result seems to be inconsistent, low birth weight, preterm birth and low Apgar scores measure different dimensions of newborn well-being, and the association of each measure with maternal age is expected to diverge.

  13. [The characteristics of Brazilian population and the population policy of the Brazilian government].

    PubMed

    Lu, Y

    1982-03-29

    Current population trends in Brazil are described, with attention to ethnic composition, uneven spatial distribution, rapid growth in underdeveloped regions, and rural-urban migration. Consideration is also given to the government's population policy, including the dissemination of population information, the provision of free contraceptives, and the adoption of a target of a birth rate below 20 per 1,000 during the period 1981-2000.

  14. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in a brazilian military police population

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Viviani-Silva; Godinho, Eliane-Lopes; Farias, Lucyana-Conceição; Marques-Silva, Luciano; Santos, Sérgio-Henrique-Sousa; Rodrigues-Neto, João-Felício; Ferreira, Raquel-Conceição; De-Paula, Alfredo-Maurício-Batista; Martins, Andréa-Maria-Eleutério-de Barros-Lima

    2015-01-01

    Background Data obtained from oral health surveys are very important for identifying disease-susceptible groups and for developing dental care and prevention programs. So, the purpose of the current article was to investigate the prevalence of oral mucosa lesions (OMLs) in a population of Brazilian police. Material and Methods Interviews and oral cavity examinations were performed on a sample of 395 police officers who were randomly selected by the calibrated researcher. The number of individuals was obtained by a sample calculation using the finite population correction. The diagnostic criteria were based on the WHO (1997) criteria and adapted to Brazilian surveys. Results In total, 8.61% of the population presented some OML. Traumatic injuries and benign migratory glossitis (BMG) were the most prevalent lesions. Conclusions The prevalence of potentially malignant disorders was lower than among the Brazilian population.The most prevalent lesion among the police officers was related to trauma. Patients dissatisfied with oral health had a higher risk of presenting OMLs. Key words:Mouth disease, mouth mucosa, military personnel, public health, oral pathology, oral leukoplakia. PMID:26155334

  15. Impacts of social research on policy formulation: lessons from the Brazilian experience in the population field.

    PubMed

    Martine, G; Faria, V

    1988-10-01

    Numerous changes in population growth and distribution patterns and significant social transformations have occurred in Brazil and 20 years of impressive population research have analyzed these changes. Quality demographic data have existed since 1940, and, since the early 1970s, the data base has expanded greatly. Yet Brazil has never set a distinct population policy nor employed population specialists to formulate the nation's views in population policy. This intimates that the interests and peculiarities of the predominant styles of development and of the dominant interest groups in any given time period filters any influence of population research. Hence, contrary to popular belief, Brazilian government planners determining programs and projects do not necessarily incorporate the results of demographic research into their decision making. Therefore, it is wrong to judge the quality of any population research, or of any social research, based on its confirmed influence, or lack of influence, on social policies and on planning in general. In addition, population researchers have different methodological outlooks, value orientations, and /or ideological commitments so the definition of scientific growth cannot be universally recognized. Nevertheless, in the long run, major advances in population policy can be attributed to a true increase in academic interest in population, and different interest groups have access to an improved data base and to the large amount of information available on demographic trends with which to discuss population problems and make adequate appraisals. In the short run, however, population research does not make a significant impact on population policy.

  16. Polymorphic Alu insertions in six Brazilian African-derived populations.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Vicente, João Pedro; Otto, Paulo A; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    At least 25 African-derived populations (quilombo remnants) are believed to exist in the Ribeira River Valley, located in the southern part of São Paulo State, Brazil. We studied four Alu polymorphic loci (APO, ACE, TPA25, and FXIIIB) in individuals belonging to six quilombo remnants in addition to individuals sampled from the city of São Paulo. The allelic frequencies observed in the quilombo remnants were similar to those previously observed in African-derived populations from Central and North America. Genetic variability indexes (Fst and Gst values) in our quilombos were higher than the reported values for the majority of other populations analyzed for the same kind of markers, but lower than the variability usually observed in Amerindian groups. The observed high degree of genetic differentiation may be due to genetic drift, especially the founder effect. Our results suggest that these populations behave genetically as semi-isolates. The degree of genetic variability within populations was larger than among them, a finding described in other studies. In the neighbor-joining tree, some of the Brazilian quilombos clustered with the African and African-derived populations (São Pedro and Galvão), others with the Europeans (Pilões, Maria Rosa, and Abobral). Pedro Cubas was placed in an isolated branch. Principal component analysis was also performed and confirmed the trends observed in the neighbor-joining tree. Overall, the quilombos showed a higher degree of gene flow than average when compared to other worldwide populations, but similar to other African-derived populations.

  17. HLA-F polymorphisms in a Euro-Brazilian population from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Manvailer, L F S; Wowk, P F; Mattar, S B; da Siva, J S; da Graça Bicalho, M; Roxo, V M M S

    2014-12-01

    HLA-F is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene. It codes class Ib MHC molecules with restricted distribution and less nucleotide variations than MHC class Ia genes. Of the 22 alleles registered on the IMGT database only four alleles encode for proteins that differ in their primary structure. To estimate genotype and allele frequencies, this study targeted on known protein coding regions of the HLA-F gene. Genotyping was performed by Sequence Base Typing (SBT). The sample was composed by 199-unrelated bone marrow donors from the Brazilian Bone Marrow Donor Registry (REDOME), Euro-Brazilians, from Southern Brazil. About 1673 bp were analyzed. The most frequent allele was HLA-F*01:01 (87.19%), followed by HLA-F*01:03 (12.31%), HLA-F*01:02 (0.25%) and HLA-F*01:04 (0.25%). Significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) was verified between HLA-F and HLA classes I and II alleles. This is the first study regarding HLA-F polymorphisms in a Euro-Brazilian population contributing to the Southern Brazilian genetic characterization.

  18. Population genetic analysis of insertion-deletion polymorphisms in a Brazilian population using the Investigator DIPplex kit.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Palha, Teresinha de Jesus Brabo; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; Cavalcante, Giovanna Chaves; Marrero, Andrea; de Souza, Ilíada Rainha; Seki Uehara, Clineu Julien; Silveira da Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares; Koshikene, Daniela; da Silva, Dayse Aparecida; de Carvalho, Elizeu Fagundes; Chemale, Gustavo; Freitas, Jorge M; Alexandre, Lídia; Paranaiba, Renato T F; Soler, Mirella Perruccio; Santos, Sidney

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the diversity of 30 insertion/deletion (INDEL) markers (Investigator(®) DIPplex kit) in a sample of 519 individuals from six Brazilian states and to evaluate their applicability in forensic genetics. All INDEL markers were found to be highly polymorphic in the Brazilian population and were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. To determine their forensic suitability in the Brazilian population, the markers were evaluated for discrimination power, match probability and exclusion power. The combined discrimination power (CDP), combined match power (CMP) and combined power of exclusion (CPE) were higher than 0.999999, 3.4 × 10(-13) and 0.9973, respectively. Further comparison of 29 worldwide populations revealed significant genetic differences between continental populations and a closer relationship between the Brazilian and European populations.

  19. Effectiveness of a multidimensional web-based intervention program to change Brazilian health practitioners' attitudes toward the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population.

    PubMed

    Costa, Angelo Brandelli; Pase, Paola Fagundes; de Camargo, Eric Seger; Guaranha, Camila; Caetano, Adriano Henrique; Kveller, Daniel; da Rosa Filho, Heitor Thomé; Catelan, Ramiro Figueiredo; Koller, Silvia Helena; Nardi, Henrique Caetano

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multidimensional (educational, affective and behavioural) web-based intervention to change healthcare practitioners' attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population. It aimed to measure gender and sexual (GenSex) prejudice pre- and post-intervention in relation to sociodemographic characteristics. A total of 307 health practitioners from southern Brazil enrolled and completed the follow-up assessment. The intervention had significant effects, varying across traditionally high prejudiced groups. State- and street-level continuous prejudice reduction policies are suggested.

  20. Secular trends in smoking during pregnancy according to income and ethnic group: four population-based perinatal surveys in a Brazilian city

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Mariangela F; Matijasevich, Alicia; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Horta, Bernardo L; Santos, Ina S; Barros, Aluisio J D; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess socioeconomic and ethnic inequalities in smoking during pregnancy over three decades (1982–2011). Setting Population-based study in Pelotas City, Brazil. Participants All urban women giving birth in the city hospitals in 1982 (5909), 1993 (5223) and 2004 (4201), plus all urban and rural women delivering from January 2011 to April 2012 (6275). Primary outcome Self-reported smoking during pregnancy. Results The prevalence of smoking during pregnancy fell from 35.7% in 1982 to 21.0% in 2011. In each survey, prevalence decreased with increasing income (p<0.001). In the poorest quintile, smoking fell by 27.4% in the period studied compared to 67.1% in the wealthiest quintile. In all surveys, prevalence was lower among white women than among those who classified themselves as black or brown (p<0.001). Over time, smoking declined by 50.0% among the former and 30.7% among the latter. Absolute and relative inequalities both increased over time. Conclusions The reduction in smoking during pregnancy was primarily due to a decline among white, high-income women. Further efforts are needed to reduce smoking among all population groups. PMID:26832432

  1. Frequency of the delta ccr5 deletion allele in the urban Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Passos, G A; Picanço, V P

    1998-04-01

    Studies on screening genes conferring resistance to HIV-1 and AIDS onset have shown a direct relationship between a 32 base pair (bp) deletion in the CCR5 beta-chemokine receptor gene (delta ccr5 mutant allele) and long survival of HIV-1 infected individuals bearing this mutation. These findings led to an interest in studies of delta ccr5 allele distribution in human populations. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 193-bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 161-bp product from the 32-bp deletion allele. In an investigation of the urban Brazilian population we detected a 93% frequency of normal CCR5/CCR5 homozygous individuals and a 7% frequency of CCR5/delta ccr5 heterozygous individuals. The frequency of the delta ccr5 mutant allele in this population is 0.035; however, no homozygous delta ccr5 individual has been detected thus far. This is the first evidence for the contribution of the delta ccr5 allele to the genetic background of the urban Brazilian population, which is characterized by intense ethnic admixture. These findings open perspectives for further studies on the relationship between delta ccr5 allele frequency and AIDS onset in high-risk HIV-1 exposures individuals.

  2. Absence of the deltaccr5 mutation in indigenous populations of the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Leboute, A P; de Carvalho, M W; Simões, A L

    1999-11-01

    Carriers of the deltaccr5 allele, which contains a deletion of 32 bases in relation to the normal allele of the beta-chemokine receptor gene (CCR5), have increased resistance to HIV-1 infection. The higher frequency of this mutation in Europeans than in Blacks and Asians, has generated interest in determining its distribution in other populations. The population of this study involved 300 Amerindians from four Brazilian Amazon tribes (Tikuna, Baniwa, Kashinawa, and Kanamari). All of the individuals were homozygous for the normal allele, which corroborates the hypothesis that the deltaccr5 allele has a European origin, and that its occurrence in urban populations in South America is the result of immigration.

  3. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment in a Brazilian population: The Botucatu Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Schellini, Silvana Artioli; Durkin, Shane R; Hoyama, Erika; Hirai, Flavio; Cordeiro, Ricardo; Casson, Robert J; Selva, Dinesh; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper reports population-based data on the prevalence and causes of visual impairment among children and adults in Botucatu, Brazil. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted involving a random start point and then systematic sampling of an urban Brazilian population in the city of Botucatu. There were approximately 3 300 individuals aged 1 to 91 years who were eligible to participate in the study. Of this sample, 2485 (75.3%) underwent ophthalmic examination. The ophthalmic examination included uncorrected (presenting) and best corrected distance visual acuity using standardized protocols. The primary cause of decreased visual acuity was identified for all patients with visual impairment. Results Presenting low vision and presenting blindness were found in 5.2% (95% CI: 4.3–6.1) and 2.2% (95% CI: 1.6–2.8) of the population, respectively. Unilateral presenting low vision and unilateral presenting blindness were found in 8.3% (95% CI: 7.2–9.5) and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.9–4.4) of the population respectively. Best corrected low vision was found in 1.3% of the population (95% CI: 0.9–1.7) and best corrected blindness was discovered in 0.4% of people (95% CI: 0.2–0.7). The main cause of presenting low vision was refractive error (72.3%) and cataract was the most prevalent cause of blindness (50%). Conclusion The main causes of low vision and blindness in this Brazilian city were uncorrected refractive errors, cataract, and retinal diseases. Programs to further reduce the burden of visual impairment need to be targeted toward the correction of refractive error and surgery for cataracts. PMID:19691835

  4. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  5. Nutritional status of children under 5 years of age in the Brazilian Western Amazon before and after the Interoceanic highway paving: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of undernutrition, overweight and associated factors, before and after the implementation of the Interoceanic Highway. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study on children under 5 years of age was conducted in the municipality of Assis Brasil, AC, Brazil, in 2003 and 2010. Prevalence of undernutrition was observed by using height-for-age Z-scores (HAZ) and adopting a cut-off point equal to or lower than a -2 Z-score. Overweight prevalence was defined by a cut-off point equal to or greater than a +2 Z-score of the WHZ index. Z-scores were calculated relative to WHO 2006 reference data. Semi-structured questionnaires were applied to the children’s guardians, investigating family socio-economic and demographic characteristics, morbidities, access to services and child care. Associated factors were identified by hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of low HAZ (undernutrition) was 7.0% in 2003 and 12.2% in 2010. The prevalence of high WHZ (overweight) was 1.0% and 6.6% for 2003 and 2010, respectively. It was not possible to adjust the multiple model for the year 2003. The factors associated with low HAZ in 2010 were: wealth index, the situation of living with biological parents, maternal height and presence of open sewage, whereas the factors associated with a high WHZ in the same year were: child’s age, mother’s time of residence in the location, mother’s body mass index. Conclusions Overweight increase within this undernutrition scenario reveals that the process of nutritional transition began in this Amazonian city only in the last decade, and therefore, it is delayed when compared to overweight in other parts of Brazil. Such nutritional transition in Assis Brasil may have been facilitated by the construction of the Interoceanic Highway. PMID:24283293

  6. Xeroderma pigmentosum: low prevalence of germline XPA mutations in a Brazilian XP population.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Karina Miranda; França de Nóbrega, Amanda; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2015-04-22

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter) was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening.

  7. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: Low Prevalence of Germline XPA Mutations in a Brazilian XP Population

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Karina Miranda; França de Nóbrega, Amanda; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Achatz, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by DNA repair defects that cause photophobia, sunlight-induced cancers, and neurodegeneration. Prevalence of germline mutations in the nucleotide excision repair gene XPA vary significantly in different populations. No Brazilian patients have been reported to carry a germline mutation in this gene. In this study, the germline mutational status of XPA was determined in Brazilian patients exhibiting major clinical features of XP syndrome. The study was conducted on 27 unrelated patients from select Brazilian families. A biallelic inactivating transition mutation c.619C>T (p.Arg207Ter) was identified in only one patient with a history of neurological impairment and mild skin abnormalities. These findings suggest that XP syndrome is rarely associated with inherited disease-causing XPA mutations in the Brazilian population. Additionally, this report demonstrates the effectiveness of genotype-phenotype correlation as a valuable tool to guide direct genetic screening. PMID:25913378

  8. [New professional competences in the field of health and the aging Brazilian population: integrality, interdisciplinarity, intersectoriality].

    PubMed

    da Motta, Luciana Branco; de Aguiar, Adriana Cavalcanti

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges faced by medical education with regard to the aging Brazilian population as well as the specificities of senior health care services, aiming at systematizing the contents and practices needed to prepare health professionals. The assumption is based on a clear gap between appropriate contents for quality geriatric practices and health policy guidelines on the one hand, and current undergraduate and graduate level medical programs on the other. This epidemiological and demographic transition positions Geriatrics and Gerontology as fields of expertise in an expanding market, both in the public and private sectors, which raises the discussion on medical training standardization and health HR distribution. However, the little emphasis given to these fields in current curricula does not only reflect a mere pedagogical issue. In spite of the existing legislation, everything points to the fact that the importance of these contents to society is not yet clear. Including the aging process in undergraduate programs as part of the life course and in all of its aspects is a priority for the Brazilian population. A broad discussion on the role played by graduate, permanent, and continuing education is needed in order to face the challenge of quality aging.

  9. Historical Shifts in Brazilian P. falciparum Population Structure and Drug Resistance Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, Sean M.; Viana, Giselle M. Rachid; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Sridaran, Sankar; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; de Oliveira, Alexandre Macedo; Barnwell, John W.; Escalante, Ananias A.; Povoa, Marinete Marins; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-01-01

    Previous work suggests that Brazilian Plasmodium falciparum has limited genetic diversity and a history of bottlenecks, multiple reintroductions due to human migration, and clonal expansions. We hypothesized that Brazilian P. falciparum would exhibit clonal structure. We examined isolates collected across two decades from Amapá, Rondônia, and Pará state (n = 190). By examining more microsatellites markers on more chromosomes than previous studies, we hoped to define the extent of low diversity, linkage disequilibrium, bottlenecks, population structure, and parasite migration within Brazil. We used retrospective genotyping of samples from the 1980s and 1990s to explore the population genetics of SP resistant dhfr and dhps alleles. We tested an existing hypothesis that the triple mutant dhfr mutations 50R/51I/108N and 51I/108N/164L developed in southern Amazon from a single origin of common or similar parasites. We found that Brazilian P. falciparum had limited genetic diversity and isolation by distance was rejected, which suggests it underwent bottlenecks followed by migration between sites. Unlike Peru, there appeared to be gene flow across the Brazilian Amazon basin. We were unable to divide parasite populations by clonal lineages and pairwise FST were common. Most parasite diversity was found within sites in the Brazilian Amazon, according to AMOVA. Our results challenge the hypothesis that triple mutant alleles arose from a single lineage in the Southern Amazon. SP resistance, at both the double and triple mutant stages, developed twice and potentially in different regions of the Brazilian Amazon. We would have required samples from before the 1980s to describe how SP resistance spread across the basin or describe the complex internal migration of Brazilian parasites after the colonization efforts of past decades. The Brazilian Amazon basin may have sufficient internal migration for drug resistance reported in any particular region to rapidly spread to

  10. Education and WHO Recommendations for Fruit and Vegetable Intake Are Associated with Better Cognitive Function in a Disadvantaged Brazilian Elderly Population: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Valero, Maria; Furlan-Viebig, Renata; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; da Silva, Simon Almeida; Vallada, Homero; Scazufca, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Brazil has one of the fastest aging populations in the world and the incidence of cognitive impairment in the elderly is expected to increase exponentially. We examined the association between cognitive impairment and fruit and vegetable intake and associated factors in a low-income elderly population. A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out with 1849 individuals aged 65 or over living in São Paulo, Brazil. Cognitive function was assessed using the Community Screening Instrument for Dementia (CSI-D). Fruit and vegetable intake was assessed with a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and categorized into quartiles of intake and into total daily fruit and vegetable intake using the cut-off points for the WHO recommendations (<400grams/day or ≥400 grams/day). The association between cognitive impairment and each quartile of intake, and WHO recommendation levels, was evaluated in two separate multivariate logistic models. The WHO recommendations for daily intakes ≥400 grams/day were significantly associated with 47% decreased prevalence of cognitive impairment. An effect modification was found in both models between cognitive impairment and “years of education and physical activity” and “years of education and blood levels of HDL” So that, having 1 or more years of education and being physically active or having 1 or more years of education and levels higher than 50 mg/dl of HDL-cholesterol strongly decreased the prevalence of cognitive impairment. In this socially deprived population with very low levels of education and physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake, those who attained WHO recommendations, had 1 year or more of education and were physically active had a significantly lower prevalence of cognitive impairment. A more comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of mental health is needed to develop effective public policies in developing countries. PMID:24736378

  11. Haptoglobin gene subtypes in three Brazilian population groups of different ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana L; Akimoto, Arthur K; Alves, Penha C Z; Hiragi, Cássia O; Penalva, Guilherme C; Oliveira, Silviene F; Grisolia, Cesar K; Klautau-Guimarães, Maria N

    2009-07-01

    Haptoglobin is a plasma hemoglobin-binding protein that limits iron loss during normal erythrocyte turnover and hemolysis, thereby preventing oxidative damage mediated by iron excess in the circulation. Haptoglobin polymorphism in humans, characterized by the Hp(*1) and Hp (*2) alleles, results in distinct phenotypes known as Hp1-1, Hp2-1 and Hp2-2, whose frequencies vary according to the ethnic origin of the population. The Hp(*1) allele has two subtypes, Hp (*1F) and Hp (*1S) , that also vary in their frequencies among populations worldwide. In this work, we examined the distribution frequencies of haptoglobin subtypes in three Brazilian population groups of different ethnicities. The haptoglobin genotypes of Kayabi Amerindians (n = 56), Kalunga Afro-descendants (n = 70) and an urban population (n = 132) were determined by allele-specific PCR. The Hp(*1F) allele frequency was highest in Kalunga (29.3%) and lowest in Kayabi (2.6%). The Hp(*1F)/Hp(*1S) allele frequency ratios were 0.6, 1.0 and 0.26 for the Kayabi, Kalunga and urban populations, respectively. This variation was attributable largely to the Hp(*1F) allele. However, despite the large variation in Hp(*1F) frequencies, results of F (ST) (0.0291) indicated slight genetic differentiation among subpopulations of the general Brazilian population studied here. This is the first Brazilian report of variations in the Hp(*1F) and Hp(*1S) frequencies among non-Amerindian Brazilians.

  12. The heterogeneous HLA genetic composition of the Brazilian population and its relevance to the optimization of hematopoietic stem cell donor recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fabreti-Oliveira, R A; Nascimento, E; Fonseca, C G; Santos, M A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecular variation across the Brazilian population in order to determine possible regional differences, which would be highly relevant to optimizing donor recruitment strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and understanding the population genetic background of this heterogeneous country. HLA data of 551 HSCT donors from five Brazilian regions were characterized by high-resolution DNA alleles at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci and compared with other populations in Brazil and worldwide populations. Allele and haplotype frequencies were estimated. The analysis was performed to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among different loci in each recruitment center. Genetic variation was explored through genetic distance analyzed by using a new algorithm based on linear algebra, taking into account geographic regions of Brazil. The results indicated a heterogeneous genetic composition of the Brazilian population, such that HLA allele and haplotype frequencies exhibit different distributions among Brazilian regions, which has important implications for donor matching. In addition, a pronounced differentiation was observed by the absence of clustering of the regional populations in the reduced-dimension space. These data may be useful for increasing donor recruitment with more genetic representativeness in the Brazilian Volunteer Bone Marrow Donors Registry (REDOME).

  13. Use of generic medicines by the Brazilian population: an evaluation of PNAUM 2014

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Dal-Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the existence of differences in the use of generic medicines in Brazil according to demographic and socioeconomic variables and acquisition sources of the medicines. METHODS Population-based cross-sectional study, conducted with data from the Pesquisa Nacional de Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines). Data collection took place between September, 2013 and February, 2014 in homes of Brazilian cities (urban area). The use of medicines has been investigated in relation to the treatment of chronic diseases and, in the case of acute events, regarding use over the previous 15 days. Generics were identified by visualization of packaging presented by the users of the medicines. The independent variables used were sex, age, education level, economic class, and region of the Country. The statistical significance of differences between the groups was evaluated by Pearson’s Chi-squared test, considering a 5% significance level. RESULTS The prevalence of generic medicines use was 45.5% (95%CI 43.7–47.3). There was no difference considering education level. The prevalence was higher in females (47.0%; 95%CI 44.9–49.0) than in males (43.1%; 95%CI 40.5–45.8), and were higher with increasing age. Generic medicines were more used in the economic class C (47.0%; 95%CI 44.9–49.1) and in the South (50.6%; 95%CI 46.6–54.6) and Southeast (49.9%; 95%CI 46.8–53.0) regions. Generics accounted for 37.3% of the medicines provided by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS Currently, there is a choice of purchase or free provision by the Brazilian Unified Health System, characterized by quality assurance and reduced price regarding branded medicines considered as reference. In the private market, a considerable part of the population is choosing generic medicines thanks to the availability of this option for virtually all

  14. Haptoglobin gene subtypes in three Brazilian population groups of different ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Haptoglobin is a plasma hemoglobin-binding protein that limits iron loss during normal erythrocyte turnover and hemolysis, thereby preventing oxidative damage mediated by iron excess in the circulation. Haptoglobin polymorphism in humans, characterized by the Hp*1 and Hp *2 alleles, results in distinct phenotypes known as Hp1-1, Hp2-1 and Hp2-2, whose frequencies vary according to the ethnic origin of the population. The Hp*1 allele has two subtypes, Hp *1F and Hp *1S , that also vary in their frequencies among populations worldwide. In this work, we examined the distribution frequencies of haptoglobin subtypes in three Brazilian population groups of different ethnicities. The haptoglobin genotypes of Kayabi Amerindians (n = 56), Kalunga Afro-descendants (n = 70) and an urban population (n = 132) were determined by allele-specific PCR. The Hp*1F allele frequency was highest in Kalunga (29.3%) and lowest in Kayabi (2.6%). The Hp*1F/Hp*1S allele frequency ratios were 0.6, 1.0 and 0.26 for the Kayabi, Kalunga and urban populations, respectively. This variation was attributable largely to the Hp*1F allele. However, despite the large variation in Hp*1F frequencies, results of F ST (0.0291) indicated slight genetic differentiation among subpopulations of the general Brazilian population studied here. This is the first Brazilian report of variations in the Hp*1F and Hp*1S frequencies among non-Amerindian Brazilians. PMID:21637505

  15. Butyrylcholinesterase polymorphisms (BCHE and CHE2 loci) in Brazilian Indian and admixed populations.

    PubMed

    Alcântara, V M; De Lourenço, M A; Salzano, F M; Petzl-Erler, M L; Coimbra, C E; Santos, R V; Chautard-Freire-Maia, E A

    1995-10-01

    The genetic variability of butyrylcholinesterase, determined by the BCHE and CHE2 loci, was examined in nine Brazilian Indian groups. In addition, a search for the presence of the BCHE*F allele was also performed in eight other Brazilian Indian samples and in five admixed (black-Indian-white) rural Amazonian communities previously studied for the CHE2 locus and the BCHE*A allele. In the Indian populations the frequency of the BCHE*F allele varied from 0 to 7.1% +/- 3.4 and the frequency of the CHE2 C5+ phenotype ranged from 1.4% +/- 1.4 to 45.9% +/- 3.8. This study seems to be the first to report the presence of the BCHE*F allele in native Americans. The BCHE*A allele appeared in one Indian group (1.4% +/- 1.0), and we suggest that its existence in this tribe and in other native Americans can be explained by gene flow from white populations. Gene flow may also be the reason for the occurrence of the BCHE*F allele in Brazilian Indians, whereas the CHE2*C5+ allele may have been present in the paleo-Indians. The distributions of both the BCHE*F allele and the CHE2 C5+ phenotype in Brazilian Indians seem to be the result of the action of random genetic drift.

  16. Distribution of CYP2D6 alleles and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Genro, Júlia P; Sortica, Vinicius A; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D J; dos Santos, Andrea K Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-01-01

    The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions.

  17. Distribution of CYP2D6 Alleles and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; de Moraes, Maria Elizabete; Pena, Sergio D. J.; dos Santos, Ândrea K. Ribeiro; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The CYP2D6 enzyme is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. This enzyme metabolizes approximately 25% of currently prescribed medications. The CYP2D6 gene presents a high allele heterogeneity that determines great inter-individual variation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of CYP2D6 alleles, genotypes and predicted phenotypes in Brazilians. Eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms and CYP2D6 duplications/multiplications were genotyped by TaqMan assays in 1020 individuals from North, Northeast, South, and Southeast Brazil. Eighteen CYP2D6 alleles were identified in the Brazilian population. The CYP2D6*1 and CYP2D6*2 alleles were the most frequent and widely distributed in different geographical regions of Brazil. The highest number of CYPD6 alleles observed was six and the frequency of individuals with more than two copies ranged from 6.3% (in Southern Brazil) to 10.2% (Northern Brazil). The analysis of molecular variance showed that CYP2D6 is homogeneously distributed across different Brazilian regions and most of the differences can be attributed to inter-individual differences. The most frequent predicted metabolic status was EM (83.5%). Overall 2.5% and 3.7% of Brazilians were PMs and UMs respectively. Genomic ancestry proportions differ only in the prevalence of intermediate metabolizers. The IM predicted phenotype is associated with a higher proportion of African ancestry and a lower proportion of European ancestry in Brazilians. PM and UM classes did not vary among regions and/or ancestry proportions therefore unique CYP2D6 testing guidelines for Brazilians are possible and could potentially avoid ineffective or adverse events outcomes due to drug prescriptions. PMID:25329392

  18. Relevant genetic differentiation among Brazilian populations of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Mosè; Lima, Kátia Manuela; Guglielmino, Carmela Rosalba; Lanzavecchia, Silvia Beatriz; Juri, Marianela; Vera, Teresa; Cladera, Jorge; Scolari, Francesca; Gomulski, Ludvik; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Gasperi, Giuliano; Silva, Janisete Gomes; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We used a population genetic approach to detect the presence of genetic diversity among six populations of Anastrepha fraterculus across Brazil. To this aim, we used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers, which may capture the presence of differentiative processes across the genome in distinct populations. Spatial analyses of molecular variance were used to identify groups of populations that are both genetically and geographically homogeneous while also being maximally differentiated from each other. The spatial analysis of genetic diversity indicates that the levels of diversity among the six populations vary significantly on an eco-geographical basis. Particularly, altitude seems to represent a differentiating adaptation, as the main genetic differentiation is detected between the two populations present at higher altitudes and the other four populations at sea level. The data, together with the outcomes from different cluster analyses, identify a genetic diversity pattern that overlaps with the distribution of the known morphotypes in the Brazilian area. PMID:26798258

  19. Relevant genetic differentiation among Brazilian populations of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Manni, Mosè; Lima, Kátia Manuela; Guglielmino, Carmela Rosalba; Lanzavecchia, Silvia Beatriz; Juri, Marianela; Vera, Teresa; Cladera, Jorge; Scolari, Francesca; Gomulski, Ludvik; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Gasperi, Giuliano; Silva, Janisete Gomes; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa

    2015-01-01

    We used a population genetic approach to detect the presence of genetic diversity among six populations of Anastrepha fraterculus across Brazil. To this aim, we used Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers, which may capture the presence of differentiative processes across the genome in distinct populations. Spatial analyses of molecular variance were used to identify groups of populations that are both genetically and geographically homogeneous while also being maximally differentiated from each other. The spatial analysis of genetic diversity indicates that the levels of diversity among the six populations vary significantly on an eco-geographical basis. Particularly, altitude seems to represent a differentiating adaptation, as the main genetic differentiation is detected between the two populations present at higher altitudes and the other four populations at sea level. The data, together with the outcomes from different cluster analyses, identify a genetic diversity pattern that overlaps with the distribution of the known morphotypes in the Brazilian area.

  20. Human JCV infections as a bio-anthropological marker of the formation of Brazilian Amazonian populations.

    PubMed

    Cayres-Vallinoto, Izaura M V; Vallinoto, Antonio C R; Azevedo, Vânia N; Machado, Luis Fernando Almeida; Ishak, Marluísa de Oliveira Guimarães; Ishak, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) is a member of the Polyomaviridae family. It presents a tropism to kidney cells, and the infection occurs in a variety of human population groups of different ethnic background. The present study investigated the prevalence of JCV infection among human populations from the Brazilian Amazon region, and describes the molecular and phylogenetic features of the virus. Urine samples from two urban groups of Belém (healthy subjects), one Brazilian Afro-descendant "quilombo" from the Rio Trombetas region, and native Indians from the Wai-Wai, Urubu-Kaapor, Tembé, Assurini, Arara do Laranjal, Aukre, Parakanã, Surui and Munduruku villages were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (230 bp) and IG (610 bp) regions using a polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences (440 nucleotides, nt) from 48 samples were submitted to phylogenetic analysis. The results confirmed the occurrence of types A (subtype EU), B (subtypes Af-2, African and MY, Asiatic) and C (subtype Af-1) among healthy subjects; type B, subtypes Af-2 and MY, among the Afro-Brazilians; and type B, subtype MY, within the Surui Indians. An unexpected result was the detection of another polyomavirus, the BKV, among Afro-descendants. The present study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of JC and BK polyomaviruses infecting humans from the Brazilian Amazon region. The results show a large genetic variability of strains circulating in the region, infecting a large group of individuals. The presence of European, Asiatic and African subtypes associated to the ethnic origin of the population samples investigated herein, highlights the idea that JCV is a fairly good marker for studying the early migration of human populations, reflecting their early and late history. Furthermore, the identification of the specific mutations associated to the virus subtypes, suggests that these mutations have occurred after the entrance of the virus in the Amazon region of Brazil.

  1. Impact of Physical Activity Interventions on Blood Pressure in Brazilian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Vivian Freitas Rezende; Albino, Flávia Barbizan; de Moura, Karen Fernandes; Maftum, Gustavo Jorge; dos Santos, Mauro de Castro; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino

    2015-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in the Brazilian population. Lifestyle changes, including physical activity, are important for lowering blood pressure levels and decreasing the costs associated with outcomes. Objective Assess the impact of physical activity interventions on blood pressure in Brazilian individuals. Methods Meta-analysis and systematic review of studies published until May 2014, retrieved from several health sciences databases. Seven studies with 493 participants were included. The analysis included parallel studies of physical activity interventions in adult populations in Brazil with a description of blood pressure (mmHg) before and after the intervention in the control and intervention groups. Results Of 390 retrieved studies, eight matched the proposed inclusion criteria for the systematic review and seven randomized clinical trials were included in the meta-analysis. Physical activity interventions included aerobic and resistance exercises. There was a reduction of -10.09 (95% CI: -18.76 to -1.43 mmHg) in the systolic and -7.47 (95% CI: -11.30 to -3.63 mmHg) in the diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions Available evidence on the effects of physical activity on blood pressure in the Brazilian population shows a homogeneous and significant effect at both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. However, the strength of the included studies was low and the methodological quality was also low and/or regular. Larger studies with more rigorous methodology are necessary to build robust evidence. PMID:26016783

  2. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  3. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; Dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F(ST) coefficients) to the present database ranged from F(ST) = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F(ST) = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  4. Prevalence of multimorbidity in the Brazilian adult population according to socioeconomic and demographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Januse Nogueira de; Roncalli, Ângelo Giuseppe; Cancela, Marianna de Camargo; Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra de

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on the occurrence of multimorbidity is important from the viewpoint of public policies, as this condition increases the consumption of medicines as well as the utilization and expenses of health services, affecting life quality of the population. The objective of this study was to estimate prevalence of self-reported multimorbidity in Brazilian adults (≥18 years old) according to socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. A descriptive study is presented herein, based on data from the National Health Survey, which was a household-based survey carried out in Brazil in 2013. Data on 60,202 adult participants over the age of 18 were included. Prevalences and its respective confidence intervals (95%) were estimated according to sex, age, education level, marital status, self-reported skin color, area of residence, occupation and federative units (states). Poisson regression models univariate and multivariate were used to evaluate the association between socioeconomic and demographic variables with multimorbidity. To observe the combinations of chronic conditions the most common groups in pairs, trios, quartets and quintets of chronic diseases were observed. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 23.6% and was higher among women, in individuals over 60 years of age, people with low educational levels, people living with partner, in urban areas and among unemployed persons. The states of the South and Southeast regions presented higher prevalence. The most common groups of chronic diseases were metabolic and musculoskeletal diseases. The results demonstrated high prevalence of multimorbidity in Brazil. The study also revealed that a considerable share of the economically active population presented two or more chronic diseases. Data of this research indicated that socioeconomic and demographic aspects must be considered during the planning of health services and development of prevention and treatment strategies for chronic diseases, and consequently

  5. Family reintegration of children and adolescents in foster care in Brazilian municipalities with different population sizes.

    PubMed

    Iannelli, Andrea M; Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Pinto, Liana Wernersbach; Pinto, Liana Wenersbach

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this article is to present and analyze data from Brazilian foster care services for children / adolescents from the perspective of family reintegration. It also seeks to support the implementation of public policies in order to provide effective reintegration in accordance with the differing local contexts. It uses data from 1,157 municipalities that have foster care services. The methodology takes into account the data collection of 2,624 Brazilian centers and 36,929 children and adolescents in care. The growing number of children/adolescents in care is in line with the increase in population size: 8.4 per small city; 60 per large city and 602.4 per metropolis. With respect to care residence in a different municipality there are varying indices: 12.4% in metropolises and 33.6% in small cities, revealing the absence of centers close to family units in the smaller communities. Regarding the activities promoted together with families, it was seen that there are still units that do not perform any activities, which runs contrary to Brazilian law. It is clear that policies for the child/adolescent in foster care centers need to consider the capacity of the municipality in accordance with population size to implement support actions for families to assist in family reintegration.

  6. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  7. Ocelot Population Status in Protected Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Rodrigo Lima; Paschoal, Ana Maria de Oliveira; Doherty, Paul Francis; Hirsch, André; Chiarello, Adriano Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Forest fragmentation and habitat loss are detrimental to top carnivores, such as jaguars (Panthera onca) and pumas (Puma concolor), but effects on mesocarnivores, such as ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), are less clear. Ocelots need native forests, but also might benefit from the local extirpation of larger cats such as pumas and jaguars through mesopredator release. We used a standardized camera trap protocol to assess ocelot populations in six protected areas of the Atlantic forest in southeastern Brazil where over 80% of forest remnants are < 50 ha. We tested whether variation in ocelot abundance could be explained by reserve size, forest cover, number of free-ranging domestic dogs and presence of top predators. Ocelot abundance was positively correlated with reserve size and the presence of top predators (jaguar and pumas) and negatively correlated with the number of dogs. We also found higher detection probabilities in less forested areas as compared to larger, intact forests. We suspect that smaller home ranges and higher movement rates in smaller, more degraded areas increased detection. Our data do not support the hypothesis of mesopredator release. Rather, our findings indicate that ocelots respond negatively to habitat loss, and thrive in large protected areas inhabited by top predators. PMID:26560347

  8. Frequency and origins of hemoglobin S mutation in African-derived Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    De Mello Auricchio, Maria Teresa Balester; Vicente, João Pedro; Meyer, Diogo; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2007-12-01

    Africans arrived in Brazil as slaves in great numbers, mainly after 1550. Before the abolition of slavery in Brazil in 1888, many communities, called quilombos, were formed by runaway or abandoned African slaves. These communities are presently referred to as remnants of quilombos, and many are still partially genetically isolated. These remnants can be regarded as relicts of the original African genetic contribution to the Brazilian population. In this study we assessed frequencies and probable geographic origins of hemoglobin S (HBB*S) mutations in remnants of quilombo populations in the Ribeira River valley, São Paulo, Brazil, to reconstruct the history of African-derived populations in the region. We screened for HBB*S mutations in 11 quilombo populations (1,058 samples) and found HBB*S carrier frequencies that ranged from 0% to 14%. We analyzed beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes linked to the HBB*S mutation in 86 chromosomes and found the four known African haplotypes: 70 (81.4%) Bantu (Central Africa Republic), 7 (8.1%) Benin, 7 (8.1%) Senegal, and 2 (2.3%) Cameroon haplotypes. One sickle cell homozygote was Bantu/Bantu and two homozygotes had Bantu/Benin combinations. The high frequency of the sickle cell trait and the diversity of HBB*S linked haplotypes indicate that Brazilian remnants of quilombos are interesting repositories of genetic diversity present in the ancestral African populations.

  9. SSR characterization of Oryza glumaepatula populations from the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado biomes.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Aluana Gonçalves; Rosa, Thalita Marra; Borba, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Rangel, Paulo Hideo Nakano; Brondani, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    The level and distribution of the genetic variability in 18 natural populations of Oryza glumaepatula that were collected from two Brazilian states were estimated using a set of 23 highly informative SSR markers. Samples comprising 78 and 117 individuals from populations of the states of Tocantins and Roraima, respectively, were evaluated in order to integrate and support previous studies that were carried out with populations of O. glumaepatula from Brazil. A total of 189 alleles were identified with an average of 8.22 alleles per locus. The 11 populations from Roraima presented, in combination, a higher genetic diversity (HE = 0.245) compared with that of the seven populations from Tocantins (HE = 0.212). All of the populations showed high and significant inbreeding values (mean f = 0.59); however, the mean was higher in Tocantins populations, indicating a higher gene flow in Roraima populations. The overall coefficient of genetic differentiation (FST) among the populations was high and significant (0.59) and was higher in Tocantins due to the isolation of each population, in contrast to Roraima, where gene flow occurred more frequently. The SSR panel used in this work resulted to be informative (polymorphism information content = 0.201) for assessing genetic structure in O. glumaepatula populations.

  10. Development of new microsatellites for the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and analysis of genetic diversity in Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Élida Mara Leite; Miranda, Rodrigo Rodrigues Cambraia de; Furtado, Luis Fernando Viana; Redondo, Rodrigo Aparecido Fernandes; Tennessen, Jacob Adam; Blouin, Michael Scott

    2017-03-10

    Considering the great efforts towards formulating a vaccine against hookworms, and the concerns about the spread of drug resistance through hookworm populations, it is justified to study the molecular diversity and population genetic structure of these nematodes. This work had the aim to develop microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic structure and the molecular diversity of Brazilian populations of Ancylostoma caninum. Seven microsatellites markers were successfully used to characterize five Brazilian populations. These findings may contribute to a better comprehension of the ecology, patterns of transmission, drug resistances and development of immunotherapeutic strategies in hookworms.

  11. Translating Population Difference: The Use and Re-Use of Genetic Ancestry in Brazilian Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past ten years, there has been an expansion of scientific interest in population genetics linked to both understanding histories of human migration and the way that population difference and diversity may account for and/or be implicated in health and disease. In this article, I examine how particular aspects of a globalizing research agenda related to population differences and genetic ancestry are taken up in locally variant ways in the nascent field of Brazilian cancer genetics. Drawing on a broad range of ethnographic data from clinical and nonclinical contexts in the south of Brazil, I examine the ambiguities that attention to genetic ancestry generates, so revealing the disjunctured and diverse ways a global research agenda increasingly orientated to questions of population difference and genetic ancestry is being used and reused. PMID:26452039

  12. Translating Population Difference: The Use and Re-Use of Genetic Ancestry in Brazilian Cancer Genetics.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    In the past ten years, there has been an expansion of scientific interest in population genetics linked to both understanding histories of human migration and the way that population difference and diversity may account for and/or be implicated in health and disease. In this article, I examine how particular aspects of a globalizing research agenda related to population differences and genetic ancestry are taken up in locally variant ways in the nascent field of Brazilian cancer genetics. Drawing on a broad range of ethnographic data from clinical and nonclinical contexts in the south of Brazil, I examine the ambiguities that attention to genetic ancestry generates, so revealing the disjunctured and diverse ways a global research agenda increasingly orientated to questions of population difference and genetic ancestry is being used and reused.

  13. On slaves and genes: "origins" and "processes" in genetic studies of the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Calvo-González, Elena

    2014-01-01

    In this article I examine how contemporary geneticists investigating the history and configuration of the Brazilian population engage with other academic disciplines. To do so I use as a case study some articles published by geneticists researching the presence of hemoglobin S variants in Brazil, in which there is a clear pretension to contribute to the analysis of issues such as slavery or Brazil's ethnic identity. By contrasting these studies with contemporary works from history and the social science, the explanatory centrality of "origin" in the genetic studies analyzed is problematized, as is the lack of interaction with the epistemological characteristics of other areas of knowledge.

  14. Characterization of p53 gene mutations in a Brazilian population with oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Anna C M; Cherubini, Karen; Herter, Nilton; Furian, Roque; Santos, Diogenes S; Squier, Christopher; Domann, Frederick E

    2004-02-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are present in approximately 50% of all human cancers. We sought to determine the frequency and type of p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the oral cavity in a Brazilian population. To identify p53 mutations we used PCR-SSCP in tumor tissue microdissected from paraffin- embedded and from fresh-frozen sections followed by direct sequencing of SSCP bands with altered electrophoretic mobility. We identified p53 mutations in 40% of the human SCC analyzed. The mutations were of a broad spectrum, with a preponderance of G --> A and A --> G transitions with an apparent hotspot at the CpG dinucleotide at codon 290. Patient samples were stratified according to tobacco and alcohol consumption as well as by anatomic location of the tumor, and although trends did emerge, no statistically significant associations were obtained between the occurance of TP53 mutations and these lifestyle habits. We conclude that p53 mutations are common among oral cavity cancers in this population, and stress the significance of this study since it is the first analysis of p53 mutation in oral cancer in a southern Brazilian population.

  15. Population structures of Brazilian tall coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) by microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Coconut palms of the Tall group were introduced to Brazil from the Cape Verde Islands in 1553. The present study sought to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within Brazilian Tall coconut populations. Samples were collected of 195 trees from 10 populations. Genetic diversity was accessed by investigating 13 simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci. This provided a total of 68 alleles, ranging from 2 to 13 alleles per locus, with an average of 5.23. The mean values of gene diversity (He ) and observed heterozygosity (Ho ) were 0.459 and 0.443, respectively. The genetic differentiation among populations was estimated at θ^P=0.1600and the estimated apparent outcrossing rate was ta = 0.92. Estimates of genetic distances between the populations varied from 0.034 to 0.390. Genetic distance and the corresponding clustering analysis indicate the formation of two groups. The first consists of the Baía Formosa, Georgino Avelino, and São José do Mipibu populations and the second consists of the Japoatã, Pacatuba, and Praia do Forte populations. The correlation matrix between genetic and geographic distances was positive and significant at a 1% probability. Taken together, our results suggest a spatial structuring of the genetic variability among the populations. Geographically closer populations exhibited greater similarities. PMID:21637579

  16. Genetic diversity of four populations of Qualea grandiflora Mart. in fragments of the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Antiqueira, Lia Maris Orth Ritter; Kageyama, Paulo Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    We analyzed the genetic structure and diversity of Qualea grandiflora Mart., the most abundant woody species in the Brazilian Cerrado. Eight microsatellite loci were used to analyze samples from four populations subjected to different types of anthropic pressure, distributed throughout the state of São Paulo in the regions of Assis, Brotas, Itirapina and Pedregulho. Results indicated a mean number of 12 alleles per locus, but only six effective alleles. Alleles private to particular populations and rare alleles were also detected. An excess of homozygotes and moderate levels of inbreeding were observed. No clones were identified. All populations departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p < 0.05). Spatial structure was observed in the distribution of specimens in distance classes ranging from 30 to 40 km and three genetic clusters were identified, with genotypes in the Pedregulho population differing from the others by up to 90 %. The influence of the Wahlund effect on the studied populations lies between 8.5 and 53.3 %. Estimates of effective population size were low (<10), and the minimum viable area for conservation in the short-, medium- and long-term was estimated to be between 4 and 184 ha. Gene flow was high enough to counter the effects of genetic drift. The genetic diversity and divergence between the studied populations indicated that the Pedregulho population should be considered an Evolutionary Significant Unit and a Management Unit.

  17. Population structure of the Brazilian southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Gómez, Daniel R.; da Silva, José Jairo; Costa, Fernando; Binneck, Eliseu; Marin, Silvana R. R.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L.

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Green Stink Bug, Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), is a cosmopolitan and economically important pest to several crops. Studies on N. viridula migration and population structure have been neglected. We studied geographically distinct Brazilian N. viridula populations to assess their variability and to determine gene flow among them. DNA from specimens collected on soybean fields were subjected to RAPD analysis to determine genetic similarity and population structure parameters. All N. viridula populations studied were genetically distinct from the others. The maximum similarity occurred between populations from Londrina and Sertanópolis (Parana State). The Cruz Alta population was the most divergent from the others. Despite the short distance between Cambé and Londrina (ca. 29 km), and the absence of geographic barriers, both populations clustered in different groups and the estimated gene flow index (Nm) among them was 2.02, indicating relatively restricted migration. The estimated overall index, Nm was 1.41 suggesting that N. viridula is a better flier than the Neotropical Brown stink bug, Euschistus heros (Nm =0.83). PMID:17119605

  18. Is the negative evaluation of dental services among the Brazilian elderly population associated with the type of service?

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Jardim, Lorena Amaral; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Quintão; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the prevalence of the negative evaluation of dental services among elderly Brazilians and at investigating whether the prevalence was higher among those using public or philanthropic provider services than among those paying privately or using private health plans. Additionally, factors associated with this negative assessment were identified. Interview and survey data were collected in the residences of participants by trained and calibrated examiners as part of a national epidemiological survey of oral health conditions of the Brazilian population in 2002/2003. The dependent variable was obtained in response to questions regarding whether the participant had ever used dental services, the frequency of use, and the quality of this service. Potential responses to the questions regarding the quality of service were very poor or poor, fair, and good or very good. The main independent variable was the system of health care used with potential responses being health plan or private, public, and philanthropic services. We conducted univariate (linear tendency χ2 test) and multiple descriptive analyses, and the partial proportional Odds model for ordinal logistic regression. Among the elderly, 196 (3.7%) evaluated the provided services negatively (very poor or poor). Participants with the following responses were more likely to evaluate the services negatively: those who had used public or philanthropic services, men, those with higher education, the ones who had not received information about preventing dental problems, those who perceived pain in their teeth and gums in the last six months, and those who self-reported their oral health and speech was poor. In conclusion, elderly Brazilian users of public and philanthropic services were more likely than users of private or insurance-based plans to evaluate their dental services negatively, regardless of the other investigated variables.

  19. Global pharmacogenomics: distribution of CYP3A5 polymorphisms and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Vargens, Daniela D; Santoro, Ana Beatriz; Hutz, Mara H; de Moraes, Maria Elisabete; Pena, Sérgio D J; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Struchiner, Claudio José

    2014-01-01

    The influence of self-reported "race/color", geographical origin and genetic ancestry on the distribution of three functional CYP3A5 polymorphisms, their imputed haplotypes and inferred phenotypes was examined in 909 healthy, adult Brazilians, self-identified as White, Brown or Black ("race/color" categories of the Brazilian census). The cohort was genotyped for CYP3A5*3 (rs776746), CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272) and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343), CYP3A5 haplotypes were imputed and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes were inferred according to the number of defective CYP3A5 alleles. Estimates of the individual proportions of Amerindian, African and European ancestry were available for the entire cohort. Multinomial log-linear regression models were applied to infer the statistical association between the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles, haplotypes and phenotypes (response variables), and self-reported Color, geographical region and ancestry (explanatory variables). We found that Color per se or in combination with geographical region associates significantly with the distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes, whereas geographical region per se influences the frequency distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles. The odds of having the default CYP3A5*3 allele and the poor metabolizer phenotype increases continuously with the increase of European ancestry and decrease of African ancestry. The opposite trend is observed in relation to CYP3A5*6, CYP3A5*7, the default CYP3A5*1 allele, and both the extensive and intermediate phenotypes. No significant effect of Amerindian ancestry on the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles or phenotypes was observed. In conclusion, this study strongly supports the notion that the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Brazilian population must be acknowledged in the design and interpretation of pharmacogenomic studies, and dealt with as a continuous variable, rather than proportioned in arbitrary categories that do not capture the diversity of the

  20. Global Pharmacogenomics: Distribution of CYP3A5 Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in the Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Vargens, Daniela D.; Santoro, Ana Beatriz; Hutz, Mara H.; de Moraes, Maria Elisabete; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Struchiner, Claudio José

    2014-01-01

    The influence of self-reported “race/color”, geographical origin and genetic ancestry on the distribution of three functional CYP3A5 polymorphisms, their imputed haplotypes and inferred phenotypes was examined in 909 healthy, adult Brazilians, self-identified as White, Brown or Black (“race/color” categories of the Brazilian census). The cohort was genotyped for CYP3A5*3 (rs776746), CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272) and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343), CYP3A5 haplotypes were imputed and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes were inferred according to the number of defective CYP3A5 alleles. Estimates of the individual proportions of Amerindian, African and European ancestry were available for the entire cohort. Multinomial log-linear regression models were applied to infer the statistical association between the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles, haplotypes and phenotypes (response variables), and self-reported Color, geographical region and ancestry (explanatory variables). We found that Color per se or in combination with geographical region associates significantly with the distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes, whereas geographical region per se influences the frequency distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles. The odds of having the default CYP3A5*3 allele and the poor metabolizer phenotype increases continuously with the increase of European ancestry and decrease of African ancestry. The opposite trend is observed in relation to CYP3A5*6, CYP3A5*7, the default CYP3A5*1 allele, and both the extensive and intermediate phenotypes. No significant effect of Amerindian ancestry on the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles or phenotypes was observed. In conclusion, this study strongly supports the notion that the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Brazilian population must be acknowledged in the design and interpretation of pharmacogenomic studies, and dealt with as a continuous variable, rather than proportioned in arbitrary categories that do not capture the diversity

  1. Study on a Brazilian isolate. I. Population structure and random genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, J C; Arce-Gomez, B

    1987-01-01

    A number of parameters were evaluated in order to determine the level of isolation of a small Brazilian community existing in partial geographic isolation and thereby evaluate the random genetic drift potential in the population. On a theoretical basis, it is concluded that the probability of genetic drift is low but cannot be excluded. The relatively small proportion of migrants (26%), the limited individual mobility, as given by marital distance (29 +/- 7 km), the mean migrational distance (46 +/- 11 km), the small effective size (122), and the value of the product Neme (26) agree with the possibility of genetic drift in this population. The observed coefficient of inbreeding (0.00239) is lower than that expected (0.0066) for random mating, suggesting some pressures against consanguineous marriage.

  2. Genetic structuring among silverside fish (Atherinella brasiliensis) populations from different Brazilian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Cortinhas, Maria Cristina; Kersanach, Ralf; Proietti, Maíra; Dumont, Luiz Felipe Cestari; D'Incao, Fernando; Lacerda, Ana Luzia F.; Prata, Pedro Sanmartin; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Noleto, Rafael Bueno; Ramsdorf, Wanessa; Boni, Talge Aiex; Prioli, Alberto José; Cestari, Marta Margarete

    2016-09-01

    Estuaries are dynamic environments, key for the survival of innumerous ecologically or economically important fish species. Among these species are Neotropical silversides (Atherinella brasiliensis), which are resident and abundant in Brazilian estuaries and used as a complementary source of income and food for local communities. To better understand silverside populations in Brazil, we evaluated the genetic diversity, structure and demography of fish sampled at six estuaries from the northeastern to the southern coast, using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and mitochondrial DNA (D-loop) markers. High haplotype diversities (h ranging from 0.75 to 0.99) were found in all populations except Carapebus, located in Southeast Brazil (h = 0.54). A total of 69 mtDNA haplotypes were found, with Itaparica (Northeast Brazil) and Carapebus presenting only exclusive haplotypes, while some were shared among populations in the South. Strong regional structure was observed, with very high differentiation between Itaparica and Carapebus, as well as among these two populations and the ones from the Southern region (Paranaguá, Conceição, Camacho and Patos). Among southern areas, low/moderate structure was detected. Most populations showed unimodal mismatch distributions indicating recent demographic expansion, while Carapebus presented a multimodal distribution characteristic of a stable or bottlenecked population. Times since possible population expansion were highest in Itaparica (32,500 ya) and Carapebus (29,540 ya), while in the Southern region longest time was observed at Conceição (25,540 ya) and shortest at Patos (9720 ya). In a general manner, haplotype diversities were directly related to times since population expansions; again, Carapebus was the exception, displaying long time since expansion but low diversity, possibly due to a recent bottleneck caused by the isolation and human impacts this lagoon is subject to. Isolation by Distance was significant for Itaparica

  3. First record of intestinal parasites in a wild population of jaguar in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Srbek-Araujo, Ana Carolina; Santos, Juliana Lúcia Costa; Almeida, Viviane Medeiros de; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Chiarello, Adriano Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Small and isolated wildlife populations may be more susceptible to disease, which makes illness an important issue to investigate regarding the conservation of large carnivores. Here, we present the results of the first investigation of intestinal parasites in one of the last remaining populations of jaguars in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We studied parasites from fecal samples using three different techniques for parasitological examination: floatation in saturated sodium chloride solution, sedimentation and formalin-ether centrifugation. Intestinal parasites were detected in 70% of the analyzed samples, and seven taxa (mean = 3.7 taxa/sample) were identified. All the groups of parasites that were identified have been recorded in previous jaguar studies. However, the records of Class Trematoda and nematodes Trichuridae are the first evidence of these groups of worms in free-ranging jaguars in Brazil. Although our results do not provide conclusive evidence on the health of this jaguar population, given its very small size (approximately 20 animals) we stress the need to properly understand the dynamics of disease in this wild population and to evaluate the risk of contracting new diseases from domestic species inhabiting the neighboring areas. These represent imperative actions for the successful conservation of this threatened population of jaguar.

  4. Investigation of host candidate malaria-associated risk/protective SNPs in a Brazilian Amazonian population.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Simone; Clark, Taane G; Campino, Susana; Suarez-Mutis, Martha Cecília; Rockett, Kirk A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Fernandes, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon is a hypo-endemic malaria region with nearly 300,000 cases each year. A variety of genetic polymorphisms, particularly in erythrocyte receptors and immune response related genes, have been described to be associated with susceptibility and resistance to malaria. In order to identify polymorphisms that might be associated with malaria clinical outcomes in a Brazilian Amazonian population, sixty-four human single nucleotide polymorphisms in 37 genes were analyzed using a Sequenom massARRAY iPLEX platform. A total of 648 individuals from two malaria endemic areas were studied, including 535 malaria cases (113 individuals with clinical mild malaria, 122 individuals with asymptomatic infection and 300 individuals with history of previous mild malaria) and 113 health controls with no history of malaria. The data revealed significant associations (p<0.003) between one SNP in the IL10 gene (rs1800896) and one SNP in the TLR4 gene (rs4986790) with reduced risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the IRF1 gene (rs2706384) with increased risk for clinical malaria, one SNP in the LTA gene (rs909253) with protection from clinical malaria and one SNP in the TNF gene (RS1800750) associated with susceptibility to clinical malaria. Also, a new association was found between a SNP in the CTL4 gene (rs2242665), located at the major histocompatibility complex III region, and reduced risk for clinical malaria. This study represents the first association study from an Amazonian population involving a large number of host genetic polymorphisms with susceptibility or resistance to Plasmodium infection and malaria outcomes. Further studies should include a larger number of individuals, refined parameters and a fine-scale map obtained through DNA sequencing to increase the knowledge of the Amazonian population genetic diversity.

  5. Main visual symptoms associated to refractive errors and spectacle need in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Schellini, Silvana; Ferraz, Fabio; Opromolla, Paula; Oliveira, Laryssa; Padovani, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the main visual symptoms in a Brazilian population sample, associated to refractive errors (REs) and spectacle need to suggest priorities in preventive programs. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted in nine counties of the southeast region of Brazil, using a systematic sampling of households, between March 2004 and July 2005. The population was defined as individuals aged between 1 and 96y, inhabitants of 3600 residences to be evaluated and 3012 households were included, corresponding to 8010 subjects considered for participation in the survey, of whom 7654 underwent ophthalmic examinations. The individuals were evaluated according their demographic data, eye complaints and eye examination including the RE and the need to prescribe spectacles according to age. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software package and descriptive analysis using 95% confidence intervals (P<0.05). RESULTS The main symptom detected was asthenopia, most frequent in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, with a significant decline after the 4th decade. Astigmatism was the RE most associated with asthenopia. Reduced near vision sight was more frequent in those ≥40y with a progressive decline thereafter. Spectacles were most frequently required in subjects of ≥40 years of age. CONCLUSION The main symptom related to the vision was asthenopia and was associated to astigmatism. The greatest need for spectacles prescription occurred after 40's, mainly to correct near vision. Subjects of ≥40 years old were determined to be at high risk of uncorrected REs. These observations can guide intervention programs for the Brazilian population. PMID:27990372

  6. [Prevalence and alcohol user profile in adult population in a south Brazilian city].

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Traebert, Jefferson; Loguercio, Alessandro; Kehrig, Ruth Terezinha

    2010-05-01

    This is an observational cross-sectional survey which included 707 individuals from a south Brazilian city (Joaçaba, in Santa Catarina State) aiming to know the alcohol user prevalence as well as the profile of the user. The results showed that 45.5% (322) of that population consume alcohol on regular basis and had used it at least once in the last month. The regular alcohol consumption occurs predominantly on males (p <0.001), in people under 39 years old (p =0.007), occurring predominantly with ones working comparing to the ones not working, (p <0.001), have more than 8 years of education (p <0.001) and with income greater than 1738.00 reais - Brazilian currency (p <0.001). The regular alcohol consumption was greater on those who classified his health status as regular, good or very good (p <0.006), also this relation happen to those people who haven't been under hospital internment in the last year (p <0.013). The depression levels scored by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) showed low levels to those who regularly consume alcohol (p <0.047).

  7. COMPARISON OF TW2 AND TW3 SKELETAL AGE DIFFERENCES IN A BRAZILIAN POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana Isabel; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria; Casanova, Marcia Spinelli

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the differences between the skeletal ages estimated by TW2 and TW3 methods through their RUS and Carpal systems. Material and Methods: A sample of two hundred and forty hand and wrist radiographs of male and female Brazilian children aged 84-199 months was evaluated by five observers. The Dunnet test was performed for statistical analysis. Results: Results showed higher skeletal ages estimated by TW2RUS than TW3RUS and Carpal for both genders. For girls a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between TW2RUS and TW3RUS over the entire age range. For boys this difference was observed from 108 months onwards. In general RUS skeletal ages were higher than the chronological age and Carpal skeletal ages for both genders. The overestimation of chronological age was smaller for TW3RUS than for TW2RUS, and this last system showed a statistically significant difference regarding chronological age over the entire age range for girls, whereas for boys this difference was seen from 132 months onwards. For girls TW3 RUS and Carpal showed a significant difference regarding chronological age in the oldest age groups; in boys TW3RUS did not show a significant difference regarding chronological age. For Carpal, these results were more variable. Conclusion: It seems reasonable to recommend the use of the TW3 system for the studied Brazilian population. PMID:19089046

  8. Genetic risk factors for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a Brazilian population with high African ancestry.

    PubMed

    do Rego Borges, Andrea; Sá, Jamile; Hoshi, Ryuichi; Viena, Camila Sane; Mariano, Lorena C; de Castro Veiga, Patricia; Medrado, Alena Peixoto; Machado, Renato Assis; de Aquino, Sibele Nascimento; Messetti, Ana Camila; Spritz, Richard A; Coletta, Ricardo D; Reis, Silvia R A

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL ± P) is the most common orofacial birth defect, exhibiting variable prevalence around the world, often attributed to ethnic and environmental differences. Linkage analyses and genome-wide association studies have identified several genomic susceptibility regions for NSCL ± P, mostly in European-derived or Asian populations. Genetic predisposition to NSCL ± P is ethnicity-dependent, and the genetic basis of susceptibility to NSCL ± P likely varies among populations. The population of Brazil is highly admixed, with highly variable ancestry; thus, the genetic determinants of NSCL ± P susceptibility may be quite different. This study tested association of 8 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously identified by genome-wide studies in other populations, with NSCL ± P in a Brazilian population with high African ancestry. SNPs rs560426, rs642961, rs1530300, rs987525, rs3758249, rs7078160, rs17085106, and rs13041247 were genotyped in 293 Brazilian patients with NSCL ± P and 352 unaffected Brazilian controls. Each sample was also genotyped for 40 biallelic short insertion/deletion polymorphic markers to characterize genetic ancestry. The average African ancestry background was 31.1% for the NSCL ± P group and 36.7% for the control group. After adjustment for ancestry and multiple testing, the minor alleles of rs3758249 (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25-2.01, P = 0.0001) and rs7078160 (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.21-2.07, P = 0.0002) were significantly associated with risk of NSCL ± P. Polymorphisms located in IRF6 (rs642961) and 8q24 (rs1530300 and rs987525) showed marginal associations in this Brazilian population with high African ancestry. These results indicate that rs3758249 at 9q22 and rs7078160 at 10q25.3 represent risk loci for NSCL ± P in the Brazilian population with high African ancestry.

  9. Unraveling Brazilian Indian population prostate good health: clinical, anthropometric and genetic features

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Mario M.; Reis, Leonardo O.; Ferreira, Ubirajara; Cardoso, Ulieme Oliveira; Barbieri, Raquel Bueno; de Mendonça, Gustavo B.; Ward, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare dietary, lifestyle, clinical, anthropometric, genetic and prostatic features of Brazilian Indians and non-Indians (Amazon). Methods 315 men, 228 Indians and 89 non-Indians, ≥40 years old were submitted to digital rectal examination, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), testosterone, TP53 and GSTP1 genotyping, anthropometric, lifestyle, dietary, personal and familial medical history. Prostatic symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results Macuxis and Yanomamis represented 43.6% and 14.5% of Indians respectively who spontaneously referred no prostate symptoms. Mean IPSS was 7, range 3-19, with only 15% of moderate symptoms (score 8-19); Mean age was 54.7 years, waist circumference 86.6 cm, BMI 23.9 kg/m2. Yanomamis presented both lower BMI (21.4 versus 24.8 and 23.3, p=0,001) and prostate volume than Macuxis and “other ethnic groups” (15 versus 20, p=0.001). Testosterone (414 versus 502 and 512, p=0.207) and PSA (0.48 versus 0.6 and 0.41, p=0.349) were similar with progressive PSA increase with aging. Val/Val correlated with lower PSA (p=0.0361). Indians compared to control population presented: - TP53 super representation of Arg/Arg haplotype, 74.5% versus 42.5%, p<0.0001. -GSTP1 Ile/Ile 35.3% versus 60.9%; Ile/Val 45.9% versus 28.7%; Val/Val 18.8% versus 10.3%; p=0.0003. Conclusions Observed specific dietary, lifestyle, anthropometric and genetic profile for TP53 and GSTP1 may contribute to Brazilian Indian population prostate good health. PMID:26005978

  10. Recovering mitochondrial DNA lineages of extinct Amerindian nations in extant homopatric Brazilian populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brazilian Amerindians have experienced a drastic population decrease in the past 500 years. Indeed, many native groups from eastern Brazil have vanished. However, their mitochondrial mtDNA haplotypes, still persist in Brazilians, at least 50 million of whom carry Amerindian mitochondrial lineages. Our objective was to test whether, by analyzing extant rural populations from regions anciently occupied by specific Amerindian groups, we could identify potentially authentic mitochondrial lineages, a strategy we have named 'homopatric targeting'. Results We studied 173 individuals from Queixadinha, a small village located in a territory previously occupied by the now extinct Botocudo Amerindian nation. Pedigree analysis revealed 74 unrelated matrilineages, which were screened for Amerindian mtDNA lineages by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A cosmopolitan control group was composed of 100 individuals from surrounding cities. All Amerindian lineages identified had their hypervariable segment HVSI sequenced, yielding 13 Amerindian haplotypes in Queixadinha, nine of which were not present in available databanks or in the literature. Among these haplotypes, there was a significant excess of haplogroup C (70%) and absence of haplogroup A lineages, which were the most common in the control group. The novelty of the haplotypes and the excess of the C haplogroup suggested that we might indeed have identified Botocudo lineages. To validate our strategy, we studied teeth extracted from 14 ancient skulls of Botocudo Amerindians from the collection of the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro. We recovered mtDNA sequences from all the teeth, identifying only six different haplotypes (a low haplotypic diversity of 0.8352 ± 0.0617), one of which was present among the lineages observed in the extant individuals studied. Conclusions These findings validate the technique of homopatric targeting as a useful new strategy to study the peopling and colonization of the New

  11. [Brazilian scientific production based on Orem's nursing theory: integrative review].

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Maria Lúcia; Fegadoli, Débora; Méier, Marineli Joaquim; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Labronici, Liliana Maria; Raimondo-Ferraz, Maria Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Integrative review, held in the databases LILACS, SciELO and BDENF from January 2005 to May 2009, aimed to summarize the Brazilian scientific production based on Orem's Nursing Theory. We obtained 23 articles, analyzed by simple descriptive statistics. It was found that 100% of the studies focused on adults. Of this total, 65,22% returned to the chronicle diseases. In 39,15% of the searches, the theory was used in full and in 34,80% one of the constructs. 91,30% of publications aimed to the construction and deployment of the structured and theoretically grounded practice of care. It was concluded that the theory has been used as theoretical and philosophical basis to justify the practice of nursing in a variety of situations in order to emphasize the role of the nurse in the care.

  12. MtDNA haplogroup analysis of black Brazilian and sub-Saharan populations: implications for the Atlantic slave trade.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wilson Araújo; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Marrero, Andrea; Elion, Jacques; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Zago, Marco Antonio

    2006-02-01

    Seventy individuals from two African and four black Brazilian populations were studied for the first hypervariable segment of mtDNA. To delineate a more complete phylogeographic scenario of the African mtDNA haplogroups in Brazil and to provide additional information on the nature of the Atlantic slave trade, we analyzed our data together with previously published data. The results indicate different sources of African slaves for the four major Brazilian regions. In addition, the data revealed patterns that differ from those expected on the basis of historical registers, thus suggesting the role of ethnic sex differences in the slave trade.

  13. Sex differences in risk factors for coronary heart disease: a study in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Castanho, Vera S; Oliveira, Letícia S; Pinheiro, Hildete P; Oliveira, Helena CF; de Faria, Eliana C

    2001-01-01

    Background In Brazil coronary heart disease (CHD) constitutes the most important cause of death in both sexes in all the regions of the country and interestingly, the difference between the sexes in the CHD mortality rates is one of the smallest in the world because of high rates among women. Since a question has been raised about whether or how the incidence of several CHD risk factors differs between the sexes in Brazil the prevalence of various risk factors for CHD such as high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and cigarette smoking was compared between the sexes in a Brazilian population; also the relationships between blood cholesterol and the other risk factors were evaluated. Results The population presented high frequencies of all the risk factors evaluated. High blood cholesterol (CHOL) and hypertension were more prevalent among women as compared to men. Hypertension, diabetes and smoking showed equal or higher prevalence in women in pre-menopausal ages as compared to men. Obesity and physical inactivity were equally prevalent in both sexes respectively in the postmenopausal age group and at all ages. CHOL was associated with BMI, sex, age, hypertension and physical inactivity. Conclusions In this population the high prevalence of the CHD risk factors indicated that there is an urgent need for its control; the higher or equal prevalences of several risk factors in women could in part explain the high rates of mortality from CHD in females as compared to males. PMID:11305930

  14. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  15. Spatial and temporal country-wide survey of temephos resistance in Brazilian populations of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Chediak, Mateus; G Pimenta, Fabiano; Coelho, Giovanini E; Braga, Ima A; Lima, José Bento P; Cavalcante, Karina Ribeiro LJ; de Sousa, Lindemberg C; de Melo-Santos, Maria Alice V; Macoris, Maria de Lourdes da G; de Araújo, Ana Paula; Ayres, Constância Flávia J; Andrighetti, Maria Teresa M; Gomes, Ricristhi Gonçalves de A; Campos, Kauara B; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2016-01-01

    The organophosphate temephos has been the main insecticide used against larvae of the dengue and yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) in Brazil since the mid-1980s. Reports of resistance date back to 1995; however, no systematic reports of widespread temephos resistance have occurred to date. As resistance investigation is paramount for strategic decision-making by health officials, our objective here was to investigate the spatial and temporal spread of temephos resistance in Ae. aegypti in Brazil for the last 12 years using discriminating temephos concentrations and the bioassay protocols of the World Health Organization. The mortality results obtained were subjected to spatial analysis for distance interpolation using semi-variance models to generate maps that depict the spread of temephos resistance in Brazil since 1999. The problem has been expanding. Since 2002-2003, approximately half the country has exhibited mosquito populations resistant to temephos. The frequency of temephos resistance and, likely, control failures, which start when the insecticide mortality level drops below 80%, has increased even further since 2004. Few parts of Brazil are able to achieve the target 80% efficacy threshold by 2010/2011, resulting in a significant risk of control failure by temephos in most of the country. The widespread resistance to temephos in Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations greatly compromise effective mosquito control efforts using this insecticide and indicates the urgent need to identify alternative insecticides aided by the preventive elimination of potential mosquito breeding sites. PMID:27143489

  16. Spatial and temporal country-wide survey of temephos resistance in Brazilian populations of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Chediak, Mateus; G Pimenta, Fabiano; Coelho, Giovanini E; Braga, Ima A; Lima, José Bento P; Cavalcante, Karina Ribeiro Lj; Sousa, Lindemberg C de; Melo-Santos, Maria Alice V de; Macoris, Maria de Lourdes da G; Araújo, Ana Paula de; Ayres, Constância Flávia J; Andrighetti, Maria Teresa M; Gomes, Ricristhi Gonçalves de A; Campos, Kauara B; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2016-05-01

    The organophosphate temephos has been the main insecticide used against larvae of the dengue and yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) in Brazil since the mid-1980s. Reports of resistance date back to 1995; however, no systematic reports of widespread temephos resistance have occurred to date. As resistance investigation is paramount for strategic decision-making by health officials, our objective here was to investigate the spatial and temporal spread of temephos resistance in Ae. aegypti in Brazil for the last 12 years using discriminating temephos concentrations and the bioassay protocols of the World Health Organization. The mortality results obtained were subjected to spatial analysis for distance interpolation using semi-variance models to generate maps that depict the spread of temephos resistance in Brazil since 1999. The problem has been expanding. Since 2002-2003, approximately half the country has exhibited mosquito populations resistant to temephos. The frequency of temephos resistance and, likely, control failures, which start when the insecticide mortality level drops below 80%, has increased even further since 2004. Few parts of Brazil are able to achieve the target 80% efficacy threshold by 2010/2011, resulting in a significant risk of control failure by temephos in most of the country. The widespread resistance to temephos in Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations greatly compromise effective mosquito control efforts using this insecticide and indicates the urgent need to identify alternative insecticides aided by the preventive elimination of potential mosquito breeding sites.

  17. Independent origins of loss-of-function mutations conferring oxamniquine resistance in a Brazilian schistosome population.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Frédéric D; Le Clec'h, Winka; Eng, Nina; Rugel, Anastasia R; Assis, Rafael Ramiro de; Oliveira, Guilherme; Holloway, Stephen P; Cao, Xiaohang; Hart, P John; LoVerde, Philip T; Anderson, Timothy J C

    2016-06-01

    Molecular surveillance provides a powerful approach to monitoring the resistance status of parasite populations in the field and for understanding resistance evolution. Oxamniquine was used to treat Brazilian schistosomiasis patients (mid-1970s to mid-2000s) and several cases of parasite infections resistant to treatment were recorded. The gene underlying resistance (SmSULT-OR) encodes a sulfotransferase required for intracellular drug activation. Resistance has a recessive basis and occurs when both SmSULT-OR alleles encode for defective proteins. Here we examine SmSULT-OR sequence variation in a natural schistosome population in Brazil ∼40years after the first use of this drug. We sequenced SmSULT-OR from 189 individual miracidia (1-11 per patient) recovered from 49 patients, and tested proteins expressed from putative resistance alleles for their ability to activate oxamniquine. We found nine mutations (four non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, three non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms and two indels). Both mutations (p.E142del and p.C35R) identified previously were recovered in this field population. We also found two additional mutations (a splice site variant and 1bp coding insertion) predicted to encode non-functional truncated proteins. Two additional substitutions (p.G206V, p.N215Y) tested had no impact on oxamniquine activation. Three results are of particular interest: (i) we recovered the p.E142del mutation from the field: this same deletion is responsible for resistance in an oxamniquine selected laboratory parasite population; (ii) frequencies of resistance alleles are extremely low (0.27-0.8%), perhaps due to fitness costs associated with carriage of these alleles; (iii) that four independent resistant alleles were found is consistent with the idea that multiple mutations can generate loss-of-function alleles.

  18. Exploring the Distribution of Genetic Markers of Pharmacogenomics Relevance in Brazilian and Mexican Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz-Peña, Vania; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Struchiner, Claudio Jose; Roela, Rosimeire A.; Furuya-Mazzotti, Tatiane K.; Chammas, Roger; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; McLeod, Howard L.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Studies of pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the effect of the polymorphisms can differ in magnitude or be absent depending on the population being assessed. We used the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array to characterize the distribution of polymorphisms of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) relevance in two samples from the most populous Latin American countries, Brazil and Mexico. The sample from Brazil included 268 individuals from the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, and was stratified into census categories. The sample from Mexico comprised 45 Native American Zapotecas and 224 self-identified Mestizo individuals from 5 states located in geographically distant regions in Mexico. We evaluated the admixture proportions in the Brazilian and Mexican samples using a panel of Ancestry Informative Markers extracted from the DMET array, which was validated with genome-wide data. A substantial variation in ancestral proportions across census categories in Brazil, and geographic regions in Mexico was identified. We evaluated the extent of genetic differentiation (measured as FST values) of the genetic markers of the DMET Plus array between the relevant parental populations. Although the average levels of genetic differentiation are low, there is a long tail of markers showing large frequency differences, including markers located in genes belonging to the Cytochrome P450, Solute Carrier (SLC) and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) families as well as other genes of PGx relevance such as ABCC8, ADH1A, CHST3, PON1, PPARD, PPARG, and VKORC1. We show how differences in admixture history may have an important impact in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies at the population level. PMID:25419701

  19. Assessment of sexual risk behaviors and perception of vulnerability to sexually transmitted diseases/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in women, 1999-2012: a population based survey in a medium-sized Brazilian city.

    PubMed

    Mesenburg, Marilia Arndt; Muniz, Ludmila Correa; Silveira, Mariângela Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Sexual behavior is a key factor for susceptibility to sexually transmitted diseases. An evaluation of the sexual behavior of women at reproductive age was conducted in 1999. A replication of this study aims to evaluate the current situation and identify changes in sexual behavior, 13 years later. This is a population-based cross-sectional study, conducted with 1071 women in Pelotas, Brazil. Compared to the 1999 study, a 14% increase in early sexual debut and an 8% decrease in the non-use of condoms were observed in 2012. The proportion of women who reported anal sex doubled between these periods. There was no trend of increase or decrease in the prevalence of behaviors with distinct patterns being observed for each of them. Reduction of non-use of condoms may be an indicator of the effectiveness of campaigns to promote safe sex. However, the increased prevalence of early sexual debut and anal sex indicates the need for campaigns to continue and to expand their focus, especially among vulnerable groups.

  20. Duration of exclusive breastfeeding in a Brazilian population: new determinants in a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Determinants of the duration of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) differ in effect and magnitude across populations. The present study aimed to identify factors associated with discontinuation of EBF in a municipality in northeastern Brazil, including variables that have received little or no attention in previous literature. Methods This cohort study involved 1,344 mother-child pairs selected from maternity hospitals in Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil. Subjects were followed up for 6 months through monthly home visits, and discontinuation of EBF was recorded. Possible determinants were tested using Cox’s four-level hierarchical survival model, taking into consideration the temporal proximity of the predisposing factors to interruption of EBF. Median duration of EBF was estimated using Kaplan-Meier’s survival curve. Results Median duration of EBF was 89 days. Out of the 19 variables tested, 9 showed an association with EBF cessation; of these, two had never been evaluated in Brazilian studies, namely, mother partner’s appreciation for breastfeeding (hazard ratio [HR] 0.62; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.48-0.79) and limiting the number of nighttime feeds at the breast (HR 1.58; 95% CI 1.11-2.23). Another two variables that had been previously evaluated, but had never been described as determinants of discontinuation of EBF showed association: presence of cracked nipples (HR 2.54; 95% CI 2.06-3.13) and prenatal care provided by public services (HR 1.34; 95% CI 1.17-1.55). Other variables showing associations with the outcome were: guidance on breastfeeding received at the hospital (HR 0.80; 95% CI 0.68-0.92), birth in a Baby-Friendly Hospital (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.73-0.99), less than or equal to 8 years of maternal schooling (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.17-1.53), mother working outside the home (HR 1.73; 95% CI 1.53-1.95), and use of a pacifier (HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.14-1.71). Conclusions The study confirmed that the factors associated with EBF duration are

  1. Distribution and dissemination of the Val1016Ile and Phe1534Cys Kdr mutations in Aedes aegypti Brazilian natural populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chemical control of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue, is being seriously threatened due to the development of pyrethroid resistance. Substitutions in the 1016 and 1534 sites of the voltage gated sodium channel (AaNaV), commonly known as kdr mutations, confer the mosquito with knockdown resistance. Our aim was to evaluate the allelic composition of natural populations of Brazilian Ae. aegypti at both kdr sites. Methods The AaNaV IIIS6 region was cloned and sequenced from three Brazilian populations. Additionally, individual mosquitoes from 30 populations throughout the country were genotyped for 1016 and 1534 sites, based in allele-specific PCR. For individual genotypes both sites were considered as a single locus. Results The 350 bp sequence spanning the IIIS6 region of the AaNa V gene revealed the occurrence of the kdr mutation Phe1534Cys in Brazil. Concerning the individual genotyping, beyond the susceptible wild-type (NaVS), two kdr alleles were identified: substitutions restricted to the 1534 position (NaVR1) or simultaneous substitutions in both 1016 and 1534 sites (NaVR2). A clear regional distribution pattern of these alleles was observed. The NaVR1kdr allele occurred in all localities, while NaVR2 was more frequent in the Central and Southeastern localities. Locations that were sampled multiple times in the course of a decade revealed an increase in frequency of the kdr mutations, mainly the double mutant allele NaVR2. Recent samples also indicate that NaVR2 is spreading towards the Northern region. Conclusions We have found that in addition to the previously reported Val1016Ile kdr mutation, the Phe1534Cys mutation also occurs in Brazil. Allelic composition at both sites was important to elucidate the actual distribution of kdr mutations throughout the country. Studies to determine gene flow and the fitness costs of these kdr alleles are underway and will be important to better understand the dynamics of Ae. aegypti

  2. Population Structure and Evidence for Both Clonality and Recombination among Brazilian Strains of the Subgenus Leishmania (Viannia)

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls, Katrin; Cupolillo, Elisa; Silva, Soraia O.; Schweynoch, Carola; Côrtes Boité, Mariana; Mello, Maria N.; Mauricio, Isabel; Miles, Michael; Wirth, Thierry; Schönian, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Parasites of the subgenus Leishmania (Viannia) cause varying clinical symptoms ranging from cutaneous leishmaniases (CL) with single or few lesions, disseminated CL (DL) with multiple lesions to disfiguring forms of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL). In this population genetics study, 37 strains of L. (V.) guyanensis, 63 of L. (V.) braziliensis, four of L. (V.) shawi, six of L. (V.) lainsoni, seven of L. (V.) naiffi, one each of L. (V.) utingensis and L. (V.) lindenbergi, and one L. (V.) lainsoni/L. naiffi hybrid from different endemic foci in Brazil were examined for variation at 15 hyper-variable microsatellite markers. Methodology/Principal findings: The multilocus microsatellite profiles obtained for the 120 strains were analysed using both model- and distance-based methods. Significant genetic diversity was observed for all L. (Viannia) strains studied. The two cluster analysis approaches identified two principal genetic groups or populations, one consisting of strains of L. (V.) guyanensis from the Amazon region and the other of strains of L. (V.) braziliensis isolated along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. A third group comprised a heterogeneous assembly of species, including other strains of L. braziliensis isolated from the north of Brazil, which were extremely polymorphic. The latter strains seemed to be more closely related to those of L. (V.) shawi, L. (V.) naiffi, and L. (V.) lainsoni, also isolated in northern Brazilian foci. The MLMT approach identified an epidemic clone consisting of 13 strains of L. braziliensis from Minas Gerais, but evidence for recombination was obtained for the populations of L. (V.) braziliensis from the Atlantic coast and for L. (V.) guyanensis. Conclusions/Significance: Different levels of recombination versus clonality seem to occur within the subgenus L. (Viannia). Though clearly departing from panmixia, sporadic, but long-term sustained recombination might explain the tremendous genetic diversity and

  3. SLC24A5 and ASIP as phenotypic predictors in Brazilian population for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Lima, F A; de Araújo Lima, Felícia; Gonçalves, F T; de Toledo Gonçalves, Fernanda; Fridman, C; Fridman, Cintia

    2015-07-01

    Pigmentation is a variable and complex trait in humans and it is determined by the interaction of environmental factors, age, disease, hormones, exposure to ultraviolet radiation and genetic factors, including pigmentation genes. Many polymorphisms of these genes have been associated with phenotypic diversity of skin, eyes and hair color in homogeneous populations. Phenotype prediction from biological samples using genetic information has benefited forensic area in some countries, leading some criminal investigations. Herein, we evaluated the association between polymorphisms in the genes SLC24A5 (rs1426654) and ASIP (rs6058017) with skin, eyes and hair colors, in 483 healthy individuals from Brazilian population for attainable use in forensic practice. The volunteers answered a questionnaire where they self-reported their skin, eye and hair colors. The polymorphic homozygous genotype of rs1426654∗A and rs6058017∗A in SLC24A5 and ASIP respectively, showed strongest association with fairer skin (OR 47.8; CI 14.1-161.6 and OR 8.6; CI 2.5-29.8); SLC24A5 alone showed associations with blue eyes (OR 20.7; CI 1.2-346.3) and blond hair (OR 26.6; CI 1.5-460.9). Our data showed that polymorphic genotypes (AA), in both genes, are correlated with characteristics of light pigmentation, while the ancestral genotype (GG) is related to darker traits, corroborating with previous studies in European and African populations. These associations show that specific molecular information of an individual may be useful to access some phenotypic features in an attempt to help forensic investigations, not only on crime scene samples but also in cases of face reconstructions in unknown bodies.

  4. Population Education: A Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Willard J.

    To aid junior high and high school educators and curriculum planners as they develop population education programs, the book provides an overview of the population education knowledge base. In addition, it suggests learning activities, discussion questions, and background information which can be integrated into courses dealing with population,…

  5. Associations of OCA2-HERC2 SNPs and haplotypes with human pigmentation characteristics in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Edilene S; Fracasso, Nádia C A; Strazza Júnior, Paulo S; Simões, Aguinaldo L; Mendes-Junior, Celso T

    2017-01-01

    Panels composed of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to pigmentation, when associated with different phenotypes, may assist in predicting the physical appearance of an individual, being very useful in forensic caseworks. We evaluated the association of seven OCA2-HERC2 SNPs and haplotypes with pigmentation characteristics (eye, skin, hair and freckles) in the highly admixed and phenotypically heterogeneous Brazilian population. All the seven SNPs evaluated presented one allele associated with phenotypes from at least two pigmentation features and the alternative allele associated with the opposite phenotypes from the same trait. The genotypic associations followed the same pattern for all seven SNPs. Nine haplotypes were observed in our sample and eight were associated with at least two pigmentation traits. Such SNPs and haplotypes could be deemed as good predictors for the presence of freckles and for skin, eye and hair pigmentation in the Brazilian population.

  6. The relative frequency of odontogenic tumors: A study of 376 cases in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Verde-Osterne, Rafael; Turatti, Eveline; Cordeiro-Teixeira, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are rare lesions, exclusive of the jaws, that are derived from epithelial and/or ectomesenchymal elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. Their biological behavior is heterogeneous, including hamartomatous tissue proliferation, benign nonaggressive and aggressive neoplasms, and malignant tumors with metastatic capacity. The aim of this study was to describe the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population. In addition, a review of the literature identified studies on odontogenic tumors that follow the 2005 World Health Organization. Material and Methods A total of 376 cases of odontogenic tumors from an oral pathology service were reviewed about age, gender, anatomic site and histologic diagnosis. Results Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (31.6%) were the most common, followed by ameloblastoma (28.5%), and odontoma (22.6%). The mean age was 32.2 years, and more than half the patients (52.1%) were in the second and third decades of life. The male to female ratio was 1:1.37, with a maxilla to mandible ratio of 1:2.08. Conclusions The variation in relative frequency of tumors observed among the several series, including the present study, is probably due in part to cultural differences between geographic areas but also to the study design. Key words:Pathology, epidemiology, odontogenic tumors. PMID:28160576

  7. Is the Brazilian pharmaceutical policy ensuring population access to essential medicines?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate medicine prices, availability and affordability in Brazil, considering the differences across three types of medicines (originator brands, generics and similar medicines) and different types of facilities (private pharmacies, public sector pharmacies and “popular pharmacies”). Methods Data on prices and availability of 50 medicines were collected in 56 pharmacies across six cities in Southern Brazil using the World Health Organization / Health Action International methodology. Median prices obtained were divided by international reference prices to derive the median price ratio (MPR). Results In the private sector, prices were 8.6 MPR for similar medicines, 11.3 MRP for generics and 18.7 MRP for originator brands, respectively. Mean availability was 65%, 74% and 48% for originator brands, generics and similar medicines, respectively. In the public sector, mean availability of similar medicines was 2–7 times higher than that of generics. Mean overall availability in the public sector ranged from 68.8% to 81.7%. In “popular pharmacies”, mean availability was greater than 90% in all cities. Conclusions Availability of medicines in the public sector does not meet the challenge of supplying essential medicines to the entire population, as stated in the Brazilian constitution. This has unavoidable repercussions for affordability, particularly amongst the lower socio-economic strata. PMID:22436555

  8. Amerindian (but not African or European) ancestry is significantly associated with diurnal preference within an admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kieren J; Campos Santos, Hadassa; Beijamini, Felipe; Duarte, Núbia E; Horimoto, Andréa R V R; Taporoski, Tâmara P; Vallada, Homero; Negrão, André B; Krieger, José E; Pedrazzoli, Mário; Knutson, Kristen L; Pereira, Alexandre C; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2017-01-01

    Significant questions remain unanswered regarding the genetic versus environmental contributions to racial/ethnic differences in sleep and circadian rhythms. We addressed this question by investigating the association between diurnal preference, using the morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ), and genetic ancestry within the Baependi Heart Study cohort, a highly admixed Brazilian population based in a rural town. Analysis was performed using measures of ancestry, using the Admixture program, and MEQ from 1,453 individuals. We found an association between the degree of Amerindian (but not European of African) ancestry and morningness, equating to 0.16 units for each additional percent of Amerindian ancestry, after adjustment for age, sex, education, and residential zone. To our knowledge, this is the first published report identifying an association between genetic ancestry and MEQ, and above all, the first one based on ancestral contributions within individuals living in the same community. This previously unknown ancestral dimension of diurnal preference suggests a stratification between racial/ethnic groups in an as yet unknown number of genetic polymorphisms.

  9. Clustering and combining pattern of metabolic syndrome components in a rural Brazilian adult population.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Adriano Marçal; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Metabolic syndrome is characterized by clustering of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and arterial hypertension. The aim of this study was to estimate the probability of clustering and the combination pattern of three or more metabolic syndrome components in a rural Brazilian adult population. DESIGN AND SETTING This was a cross-sectional study conducted in two rural communities located in the Jequitinhonha Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil. METHODS The sample was composed of 534 adults (both sexes). Waist circumference, blood pressure and demographic, lifestyle and biochemical characteristics were assessed. The prevalences of metabolic syndrome and its components were estimated using the definitions of the National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III. A binomial distribution equation was used to evaluate the probability of clustering of metabolic syndrome components. The statistical significance level was set at 5% (P < 0.05). RESULTS Metabolic syndrome was more frequent among women (23.3%) than among men (6.5%). Clustering of three or more metabolic syndrome components was greater than expected by chance. The commonest combinations of three metabolic syndrome components were: hypertriglyceridemia + low levels of HDL-c + arterial hypertension and abdominal obesity + low levels of HDL-c + arterial hypertension; and of four metabolic syndrome components: abdominal obesity + hypertriglyceridemia + low levels of HDL-c + arterial hypertension. CONCLUSION The population studied presented high prevalence of metabolic syndrome among women and clustering of its components greater than expected by chance, suggesting that the combination pattern was non-random.

  10. Levels of taurine introgression in the current Brazilian Nelore and Gir indicine cattle populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high density panel of more than 777000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to investigate the population structure of Nelore and Gir, compared to seven other populations worldwide. Principal Component Analysis and model-based ancestry estimation clearly separate the indici...

  11. Sickle cell disease in a Brazilian population from Sao Paulo: a study of the beta s haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, M S; Nechtman, J F; Figueiredo, M S; Kerbauy, J; Arruda, V R; Sonati, M F; Saad, S O; Costa, F F; Stoming, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have determined the frequency of beta S haplotypes in a Brazilian sickle cell disease population from Sao Paulo, Brazil, by analyzing sequence variations in the immediate 5' flanking and second intervening sequence (IVSII) regions of the gamma globin genes. This association between sequence differences and beta s haplotype backgrounds was determined by screening genomic DNA samples using dot blot analysis of polymerase chain reaction products. We studied 148 beta s chromosomes, and found that haplotype 20 (CAR or Bantu) significantly predominated in this population. This is in agreement with the findings of the historical Portuguese Atlantic slave trade from Africa to South America.

  12. Population structure of Annona crassiflora: an endemic plant species of the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, R; Setotaw, T A; Rodrigues, F A; França, D V C; da Silveira, F A; Pio, L A S; Pasqual, M

    2016-12-23

    Habitat fragmentation has numerous consequences, particularly to endemic species, and has a negative impact on the genetic diversity of neglected species, leading to genetic drift. Annona crassiflora Mart. is a species that is endemic to Brazil, and its incidence in the Cerrado biome has decreased. The identification and characterization of its remaining diversity is necessary for its conservation. Our aim was to study the population structure of A. crassiflora populations from different Cerrado regions in Minas Gerais State, Brazil (Corinto, Curvelo, Carmo da Mata, Boa Esperança, and Paraguaçu) using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers and DNA content. Nuclear DNA content was estimated by flow cytometry using 10 individuals from each population. ISSR markers were used for genotyping accessions in order to study their genetic diversity and population structures. We found considerable genetic variation among populations, with the highest variability observed in the Curvelo population. There was a significant positive correlation between DNA content and latitude (r = 0.46, P = 0. 0003). A Bayesian-based cluster analysis grouped the populations into three clusters, which followed their geographical origins. There was some level of genetic diversity and differentiation among the populations, suggesting the need for a conservation plan for this species. The ISSR markers and DNA content analysis were effective in studying the genetic diversity and population structure of A. crassiflora.

  13. HLA-F coding and regulatory segments variability determined by massively parallel sequencing procedures in a Brazilian population sample.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thálitta Hetamaro Ayala; Buttura, Renato Vidal; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana Caricati; Mendes-Junior, Celso Teixeira; Castelli, Erick C

    2016-10-01

    Human Leucocyte Antigen F (HLA-F) is a non-classical HLA class I gene distinguished from its classical counterparts by low allelic polymorphism and distinctive expression patterns. Its exact function remains unknown. It is believed that HLA-F has tolerogenic and immune modulatory properties. Currently, there is little information regarding the HLA-F allelic variation among human populations and the available studies have evaluated only a fraction of the HLA-F gene segment and/or have searched for known alleles only. Here we present a strategy to evaluate the complete HLA-F variability including its 5' upstream, coding and 3' downstream segments by using massively parallel sequencing procedures. HLA-F variability was surveyed on 196 individuals from the Brazilian Southeast. The results indicate that the HLA-F gene is indeed conserved at the protein level, where thirty coding haplotypes or coding alleles were detected, encoding only four different HLA-F full-length protein molecules. Moreover, a same protein molecule is encoded by 82.45% of all coding alleles detected in this Brazilian population sample. However, the HLA-F nucleotide and haplotype variability is much higher than our current knowledge both in Brazilians and considering the 1000 Genomes Project data. This protein conservation is probably a consequence of the key role of HLA-F in the immune system physiology.

  14. A minimum set of ancestry informative markers for determining admixture proportions in a mixed American population: the Brazilian set.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hadassa C; Horimoto, Andréa V R; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Barreto, Mauricio L; Horta, Bernardo L; Lima-Costa, Maria F; Gouveia, Mateus H; Machado, Moara; Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, José M; Esteban, Nubia; Magalhaes, Wagner C S; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Kehdy, Fernanda S G; Pereira, Alexandre C

    2016-05-01

    The Brazilian population is considered to be highly admixed. The main contributing ancestral populations were European and African, with Amerindians contributing to a lesser extent. The aims of this study were to provide a resource for determining and quantifying individual continental ancestry using the smallest number of SNPs possible, thus allowing for a cost- and time-efficient strategy for genomic ancestry determination. We identified and validated a minimum set of 192 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) for the genetic ancestry determination of Brazilian populations. These markers were selected on the basis of their distribution throughout the human genome, and their capacity of being genotyped on widely available commercial platforms. We analyzed genotyping data from 6487 individuals belonging to three Brazilian cohorts. Estimates of individual admixture using this 192 AIM panels were highly correlated with estimates using ~370 000 genome-wide SNPs: 91%, 92%, and 74% of, respectively, African, European, and Native American ancestry components. Besides that, 192 AIMs are well distributed among populations from these ancestral continents, allowing greater freedom in future studies with this panel regarding the choice of reference populations. We also observed that genetic ancestry inferred by AIMs provides similar association results to the one obtained using ancestry inferred by genomic data (370 K SNPs) in a simple regression model with rs1426654, related to skin pigmentation, genotypes as dependent variable. In conclusion, these markers can be used to identify and accurately quantify ancestry of Latin Americans or US Hispanics/Latino individuals, in particular in the context of fine-mapping strategies that require the quantification of continental ancestry in thousands of individuals.

  15. Population structure and reproductive period of two introduced fish species in a Brazilian semiarid region reservoir.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marla Melise de Oliveira; Lopes, Suzany Iasnaya Moreira; da Costa, Rodrigo Silva; Novaes, José Luís Costa

    2015-09-01

    The Amazonian fish species Plagioscion squamosissimus (Sciaenidae) and Cichla monoculus Cichlidae), have been widely introduced into different reservoirs in Brazil, and have caused many negative mpacts on local fish fauna. The aim of this study was to evaluate the population structure (abundance, length structure, length-weight relationship, sex ratio, and length at first maturity) and the reprodutive period of these wo species in the Santa Cruz Reservoir (built in 2002), located in the Brazilian semiarid region, for their adequate management and local species conservation policies. Specimens were collected quarterly in eight sites from February 2010 to November 2013 using gillnets (12 to 70 mm mesh between adjacent knots). The specimens captured were counted and the following biometric and biological data were analysed: standard length, total weight, and reproductive data, such as, sex, weight and gonadal maturity stage. The species abundances were estimated by CPUE and expressed as the number of individuals per gill net area x gill net exposition time (m2 x h); length frequency histograms were built with intervals of 5 cm. The length-weight parameters were estimated with a linear regression after a logarithmic transformation of the data. With the reproductive data we estimated sex ratio, reproduction period and length at first maturity (L50). We captured a total of 1,071 specimens of P. squamosissimus and 156 specimens of C. monoculus. Both species showed higher abundances in 2010, 0.004306 m2 x h and 0.00022 m2 x h, respectively, but this parameter decreased from 2010 to 2013. Standard length ranged between 6.4 and 46.2 cm for P. squamosissimus (20.025.0 cm was the most frequent class), and 7.0 and 38.7 cm for C. monocidus (10.0-15.0 cm was the most frequent class). The length-weight relationships were described by the following equations: log10Wt = -1.8349+3.0899log10Lp and R2= 0.9795 for P. squamosissimus, and log10 Wt = -1.7944+3.0885log10Lp and Wt = 0

  16. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Populations of Annona crassiflora Mart. of Brazilian Savanna and Its Association with Chemical Variability.

    PubMed

    Egydio-Brandão, Anary Priscila Monteiro; Furlan, Claudia Maria; Dos Santos, Déborah Yara Alves Cursino

    2016-08-01

    Annona crassiflora Mart. is a native tree from Brazilian savanna. Isoquinoline alkaloids are characteristic of species of Annonaceae. This work aimed to assess the magnitude of genetic diversity among different populations of A. crassiflora using AFLP markers, and verify the existence of any correlation between the AFLP data and previous reported alkaloid composition. A. crassiflora from eight populations in the states of São Paulo, Goiás, Minas Gerais, and Distrito Federal were analyzed. The data suggest a low, moderate, and high level of genetic diversity from different populations of A. crassiflora. Concentration of alkaloids was significantly correlated with AFLP data, suggesting interaction between chemical and molecular markers in A. crassiflora. The data of association between the chemical and genetic differentiation of A. crassiflora may be useful to establish cultivation areas allowing the definition of strategies to preserve their genetic diversity with an interest in specific chemotypes for genetic improvement programs focused on sustainable utilization of this specie.

  17. Inbreeding effects in Solanum lycocarpum A. St.-Hil populations, an endangered species of the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Moura, T M; Siqueira, M V B M; Oliveira, G C X

    2013-11-26

    The inbreeding effective population size is an estimate of inbreeding and genetic drift in populations. It is an important tool for conservation genetics because it represents the number of individuals that are effectively contributing alleles to the subsequent generations. Several studies have been published in the last decades on the genetic structure of natural plant populations of the Cerrado, the Central-Brazilian savannahs, but most of them do not present effective size estimates. The objective of this study was to show such estimates for Solanum lycocarpum, a Cerrado species that is in danger of genetic erosion. We utilized microsatellites, isozymes, and 2 natural populations for each marker to estimate the population inbreeding effective size of a group of populations (N(^)e(v)) and the minimum number of populations that should be conserved (S(^)(ref)) in order to retain an effective number of 500. For the 2 markers that were utilized, only approximately 12% of the individuals are effective in the populations. The value obtained for S(^)(ref) was approximately 80.

  18. Genetic differentiation among populations of the Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja; Aves: Pelecaniformes) in three Brazilian Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Miño, Carolina Isabel; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif

    2014-08-01

    Effective population size, levels of genetic diversity, gene flow, and genetic structuring were assessed in 205 colonial Roseate spoonbills from 11 breeding colonies from north, central west, and south Brazil. Colonies and regions exhibited similar moderate levels of diversity at five microsatellite loci (mean expected heterozygosity range 0.50-0.62; allelic richness range 3.17-3.21). The central west region had the highest Ne (59). F ST values revealed low but significant genetic structuring among colonies within the north and within the south regions. Significant global genetic structuring was found between the northern and central western populations as well as between the northern and southern populations. An individual-based Bayesian clustering method inferred three population clusters. Assignment tests correctly allocated up to 64% of individuals to their source regions. Collectively, results revealed complex demographic dynamics, with ongoing gene flow on a local scale, but genetic differentiation on a broader scale. Populations in the three regions may all be conserved, but special concern should be given to central western ones, which can significantly contribute to the species' gene pool in Brazil.

  19. Diversity and genetic connectivity among populations of a threatened tree (Dalbergia nigra) in a recently fragmented landscape of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Resende, Luciana Cunha; Ribeiro, Renata Acácio; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2011-09-01

    In this study we evaluated the influence of recent landscape fragmentation on the dynamics of remnant fragments from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. This biome is one of the richest in the world and has been extensively deforested and fragmented. We sampled five populations of the threatened Dalbergia nigra, a tree endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, two located in a large reserve of continuous forest and three in fragments of different sizes and levels of disturbance. In order to assess historical changes, considering the longevity of the analyzed species, 119 adults and 116 saplings were genotyped for six microsatellite loci. Lower levels of genetic diversity were found in the most impacted fragments when compared to the most preserved population located inside the reserve, and there was significant genetic structure among the populations studied (pairwise F(ST) = 0.031-0.152; pairwise D(EST) = 0.039-0.301). However, genetic structure among saplings (F ST) = 0.056; D(EST) = 0.231) was significantly lower than among adults (F(ST) = 0.088; D(EST) = 0.275). Estimates of contemporary gene flow based on assignment tests corroborated this result, suggesting that fragmentation led to an increase in gene flow. This connectivity among remnant fragments could mitigate the loss of genetic diversity through a metapopulation dynamic, but the high rate of habitat loss and the unknown long-term genetic effects add uncertainty. These results, taken together with the presence of private alleles in disturbed populations, highlight the importance of preserving the extant fragments.

  20. Reliability of Nationwide Prevalence Estimates of Dementia: A Critical Appraisal Based on Brazilian Surveys

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The nationwide dementia prevalence is usually calculated by applying the results of local surveys to countries’ populations. To evaluate the reliability of such estimations in developing countries, we chose Brazil as an example. We carried out a systematic review of dementia surveys, ascertained their risk of bias, and present the best estimate of occurrence of dementia in Brazil. Methods and Findings We carried out an electronic search of PubMed, Latin-American databases, and a Brazilian thesis database for surveys focusing on dementia prevalence in Brazil. The systematic review was registered at PROSPERO (CRD42014008815). Among the 35 studies found, 15 analyzed population-based random samples. However, most of them utilized inadequate criteria for diagnostics. Six studies without these limitations were further analyzed to assess the risk of selection, attrition, outcome and population bias as well as several statistical issues. All the studies presented moderate or high risk of bias in at least two domains due to the following features: high non-response, inaccurate cut-offs, and doubtful accuracy of the examiners. Two studies had limited external validity due to high rates of illiteracy or low income. The three studies with adequate generalizability and the lowest risk of bias presented a prevalence of dementia between 7.1% and 8.3% among subjects aged 65 years and older. However, after adjustment for accuracy of screening, the best available evidence points towards a figure between 15.2% and 16.3%. Conclusions The risk of bias may strongly limit the generalizability of dementia prevalence estimates in developing countries. Extrapolations that have already been made for Brazil and Latin America were based on a prevalence that should have been adjusted for screening accuracy or not used at all due to severe bias. Similar evaluations regarding other developing countries are needed in order to verify the scope of these limitations. PMID:26131563

  1. Identifying the cutoff score for the PCL-R scale (psychopathy checklist-revised) in a Brazilian forensic population.

    PubMed

    Morana, Hilda Clotilde Penteado; Arboleda-Flórez, Julio; Câmara, Fernando Portela

    2005-01-06

    This study introduces a Portuguese-language version of psychopathy checklist-revised (PCL-R) [Harv. Mental Health Lett. 12 (1995) 4] in the Brazilian penitentiary system. Hare's scale is used extensively in many other countries. In a forensic population sample of 56 male subjects classified as psychopaths and non-psychopaths [Manual for the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Multi-Health System, Toronto, 1991], 33 correlated to global personality disorder (GPD) and 23 to partial personality disorder (PPD), respectively, subtypes of antisocial personality disorder [Manual for the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Multi-Health System, Toronto, 1991]. Subjects were evaluated through psychiatric and neurological examinations, review of judicial records, Rorschach and PCL-R. A control group of 30 subjects without criminological or psychiatric history was also evaluated with the same instruments. PCL-R validation and identification of cutoff score for Psychopathy (GPD group) was assessed through the concurrent use of the Rorschach. PCL-R cutoff score for the Brazilian population was set at 23. Sensitivity was determined at 84.8%, and reliability was high (Kappa index = 0.87). GPD individuals were characterized as clearly psychopathic according to PCL-R criteria while PPD individuals can only be considered mildly psychopathic, with better chance of rehabilitation.

  2. A multiplex PCR for 11 X chromosome STR markers and population data from a Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; Leite, Fabio Pereira das Neves; Hutz, Mara Helena; Palha, Teresinha de Jesus Brabo Ferreira; Ribeiro dos Santos, Andrea Kely Campos; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of X-STR polymorphisms has received the attention of several researchers, mainly due to its applicability to the investigation of complex kinship cases. Although many X-STRs have been validated for forensic use, little is known about the variations of these polymorphisms in different populations of the world. The present work describes a new multiplex system that allows the simultaneous analysis of 11 X-STR markers, for use both in paternity determination and more complex forensic cases. The loci investigated include DXS9895, DXS7132, DXS6800, DXS9898, DXS6789, DXS7133, DXS7130, HPRTB, GATA31E08, DXS7423, and DXS10011, which together afford a power of discrimination in the order of 0.999999. In addition, this work presents the genotyping results obtained for a sample of 324 individuals (182 males and 142 females) from the admixed population of Belém, Pará, located in the Brazilian Amazon Region.

  3. Species composition, community and population dynamics of two gallery forests from the Brazilian Cerrado domain

    PubMed Central

    Almado, Roosevelt P; Miazaki, Angela S; Diniz, Écio S; Moreira, Luis C B; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand the impacts of global changes on future community compositions, knowledge of community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our knowledge of community composition, biomass stock and maintenance of gallery forests in the Brazilian Cerrado, we provide two datasets from the 0.5 ha Corrego Fazendinha Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot and the Corrego Fundo Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot situated in the Bom Despacho region, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. New information We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 3417 trees and treelets identified during three censuses in both areas. PMID:27660529

  4. Polymorphic markers suggest a gene flow of CFTR gene from Sub-Saharan/Arabian and Mediterranean to Brazilian Population.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Giselda M K; Cabello, Pedro H; Llerena, Juan C; Fernandes, Octavio

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 2 diallelic loci (M470V and T854T) and a microsatellite IVS8(T)n of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has shown different haplotype distribution in Brazilian cystic fibrosis (CF) chromosomes carrying different CF mutations. The DeltaF508 mutation was in absolute linkage disequilibrium with 1-1 haplotype (M470V-T854T). Most of DeltaF508 chromosomes (84%) were found to carry the IVS8-9T. The most frequent haplotypes IVS8-7T and 2-1 (M470V-T854T) were found associated with Non-DeltaF508 mutations. Although there is a remarkable linkage disequilibrium between these markers with CFTR locus, the mutations R334W (7T-1-2 and 7T-2-1) and the 3120 + 1G --> A (7T-1-2 and 9T-1-2) are associated with two different haplotypes probably introduced in the Brazilian population by migration. These findings suggest that recombination events from the original haplotype and gene flow among different ethnic groups (sub-Saharan and Mediterranean) might have resulted in CF mutations associated with different haplotypes by independent introductions.

  5. [Analysis of individual spending on smoking based on the Brazilian Family Budget Survey, 2002-2003].

    PubMed

    Kroeff, Locimara Ramos; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2010-12-01

    In order to discuss new parameters for assessing personal spending on smoking in Brazil, this study aimed to describe the population's socio-demographic characteristics and the proportions of spending on smoking. The sample included individuals that spend money on smoking, according to the Brazilian Family Budget Survey for 2002-2003, conducted by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. In the lowest income bracket, the proportion of spending on smoking for expenses greater than the median varied negatively by as much as 10% as compared to the proportion of spending on smoking for income greater than the median. For intermediate income brackets, the two proportions were similar, and in the higher income brackets there was a reversal, with a positive difference of up to 15%. The percentage of spending on smoking doubled for all the groups with low schooling. As income and schooling increased, there was a proportional reduction in spending on smoking.

  6. [The needed Brazilian Health System and the possible Brazilian Health System: management strategies. An experience-based reflection].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luis Eugenio Portela Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    The present text presents a reflection about the author's experience as head of a Health Department of a big city during two and a half years. It presents a systematization of the strategic projects, the political and technical activities and the managerial routine, in which he was involved. It identifies three levels (macro, meso and micro) and four dimensions of management (social-political, institutional, technical-sanitary and administrative in the strict sense). In each dimension, on the three levels, it discusses management strategies designed to contribute to the construction of a universal and equitable Brazilian Health System (SUS). Although it may be premature to evaluate the degree of implantation and the effects of the proposed strategies, their analysis and discussion can be useful for being strongly based on empirical elements. The paper concludes that, even though the consolidation of the SUS is a political struggle that surpasses the management arena, managers are important agents who need to know how to develop strategies able to foster the principles of universality and equity.

  7. A multivariate-based conflict prediction model for a Brazilian freeway.

    PubMed

    Caleffi, Felipe; Anzanello, Michel José; Cybis, Helena Beatriz Bettella

    2017-01-01

    Real-time collision risk prediction models relying on traffic data can be useful in dynamic management systems seeking at improving traffic safety. Models have been proposed to predict crash occurrence and collision risk in order to proactively improve safety. This paper presents a multivariate-based framework for selecting variables for a conflict prediction model on the Brazilian BR-290/RS freeway. The Bhattacharyya Distance (BD) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are applied to a dataset comprised of variables that potentially help to explain occurrence of traffic conflicts; the parameters yielded by such multivariate techniques give rise to a variable importance index that guides variables removal for later selection. Next, the selected variables are inserted into a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) model to estimate conflict occurrence. A matched control-case technique is applied using traffic data processed from surveillance cameras at a segment of a Brazilian freeway. Results indicate that the variables that significantly impacted on the model are associated to total flow, difference between standard deviation of lanes' occupancy, and the speed's coefficient of variation. The model allowed to asses a characteristic behavior of major Brazilian's freeways, by identifying the Brazilian typical heterogeneity of traffic pattern among lanes, which leads to aggressive maneuvers. Results also indicate that the developed LDA-PCA model outperforms the LDA-BD model. The LDA-PCA model yields average 76% classification accuracy, and average 87% sensitivity (which measures the rate of conflicts correctly predicted).

  8. The Impact of Selection with Diflubenzuron, a Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor, on the Fitness of Two Brazilian Aedes aegypti Field Populations

    PubMed Central

    Belinato, Thiago Affonso; Valle, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Several Aedes aegypti field populations are resistant to neurotoxic insecticides, mainly organophoshates and pyrethroids, which are extensively used as larvicides and adulticides, respectively. Diflubenzuron (DFB), a chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI), was recently approved for use in drinking water, and is presently employed in Brazil for Ae. aegypti control, against populations resistant to the organophosphate temephos. However, tests of DFB efficacy against field Ae. aegypti populations are lacking. In addition, information regarding the dynamics of CSI resistance, and characterization of any potential fitness effects that may arise in conjunction with resistance are essential for new Ae. aegypti control strategies. Here, the efficacy of DFB was evaluated for two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations known to be resistant to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Laboratory selection for DFB resistance was then performed over six or seven generations, using a fixed dose of insecticide that inhibited 80% of adult emergence in the first generation. The selection process was stopped when adult emergence in the diflubenzuron-treated groups was equivalent to that of the control groups, kept without insecticide. Diflubenzuron was effective against the two Ae. aegypti field populations evaluated, regardless of their resistance level to neurotoxic insecticides. However, only a few generations of DFB selection were sufficient to change the susceptible status of both populations to this compound. Several aspects of mosquito biology were affected in both selected populations, indicating that diflubenzuron resistance acquisition is associated with a fitness cost. We believe that these results can significantly contribute to the design of control strategies involving the use of insect growth regulators. PMID:26107715

  9. The Impact of Selection with Diflubenzuron, a Chitin Synthesis Inhibitor, on the Fitness of Two Brazilian Aedes aegypti Field Populations.

    PubMed

    Belinato, Thiago Affonso; Valle, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Several Aedes aegypti field populations are resistant to neurotoxic insecticides, mainly organophoshates and pyrethroids, which are extensively used as larvicides and adulticides, respectively. Diflubenzuron (DFB), a chitin synthesis inhibitor (CSI), was recently approved for use in drinking water, and is presently employed in Brazil for Ae. aegypti control, against populations resistant to the organophosphate temephos. However, tests of DFB efficacy against field Ae. aegypti populations are lacking. In addition, information regarding the dynamics of CSI resistance, and characterization of any potential fitness effects that may arise in conjunction with resistance are essential for new Ae. aegypti control strategies. Here, the efficacy of DFB was evaluated for two Brazilian Ae. aegypti populations known to be resistant to both temephos and the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Laboratory selection for DFB resistance was then performed over six or seven generations, using a fixed dose of insecticide that inhibited 80% of adult emergence in the first generation. The selection process was stopped when adult emergence in the diflubenzuron-treated groups was equivalent to that of the control groups, kept without insecticide. Diflubenzuron was effective against the two Ae. aegypti field populations evaluated, regardless of their resistance level to neurotoxic insecticides. However, only a few generations of DFB selection were sufficient to change the susceptible status of both populations to this compound. Several aspects of mosquito biology were affected in both selected populations, indicating that diflubenzuron resistance acquisition is associated with a fitness cost. We believe that these results can significantly contribute to the design of control strategies involving the use of insect growth regulators.

  10. A population-based study of the stratum corneum moisture

    PubMed Central

    de Farias Pires, Thiago; Azambuja, Ana Paula; Horimoto, Andrea Roseli Vançan Russo; Nakamura, Mary Sanae; de Oliveira Alvim, Rafael; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2016-01-01

    Background The stratum corneum (SC) has important functions as a bound-water modulator and a primary barrier of the human skin from the external environment. However, no large epidemiological study has quantified the relative importance of different exposures with regard to these functional properties. In this study, we have studied a large sample of individuals from the Brazilian population in order to understand the different relationships between the properties of SC and a number of demographic and self-perceived variables. Methods One thousand three hundred and thirty-nine individuals from a rural Brazilian population, who were participants of a family-based study, were submitted to a cross-sectional examination of the SC moisture by capacitance using the Corneometer® CM820 and investigated regarding environmental exposures, cosmetic use, and other physiological and epidemiological measurements. Self-perception-scaled questions about skin conditions were also applied. Results We found significant associations between SC moisture and sex, age, high sun exposure, and sunscreen use frequency (P<0.025). In specific studied sites, self-reported race and obesity were also found to show significant effects. Dry skin self-perception was also found to be highly correlated with the objective measurement of the skin. Other environmental effects on SC moisture are also reported. PMID:27143945

  11. Gender Differences: Examination of the 12-Item Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI-12) in an Older Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Lisa F.; Vafaei, Afshin; Guerra, Ricardo; Freire, Aline; Phillips, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although gender is often acknowledged as a determinant of health, measuring its components, other than biological sex, is uncommon. The Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) quantifies self-attribution of traits, indicative of gender roles. The BSRI has been used with participants across cultures and countries, but rarely in an older population in Brazil, as we have done in this study. Our primary objective was to determine whether the BSRI-12 can be used to explore gender in an older Brazilian population. Methods The BSRI was completed by volunteer participants, all community dwelling adults aged 65+ living in Natal, Brazil. Exploratory factor analysis was performed, followed by a varimax rotation (orthogonal solution) for iteration to examine the underlying gender roles of feminine, masculine, androgynous and undifferentiated, and to validate the BSRI in older adults in Brazil. Results The 278 participants, (80 men, 198 women) were 65–99 years old (average 73.6 for men, 74.7 for women). Age difference between sexes was not significant (p = 0.22). A 12 item version of the BSRI (BSRI-12) previously validated among Spanish seniors was used and showed validity with 5 BSRI-12 items (Cronbach=0.66) loading as feminine, 6 items (Cronbach=0.51) loading onto masculine roles and neither overlapping with the category of biological sex of respondent. Conclusions Although the BSRI-12 appears to be a valid indicator of gender among elderly Brazilians, the gender role status identified with the BSRI-12 was not correlated with being male or female. PMID:24098482

  12. Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Influence on Bone Metabolism and Density in a Brazilian Population of Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Marlianne Leite; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Madeira, Miguel; Lopes, Renata Francioni; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss

    2017-02-20

    Vitamin D supplementation is universal for postmenopausal women, but not for elderly men, in whom osteoporosis is also commonly neglected. This study aimed to evaluate vitamin D deficiency and its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone resorption, and bone density in Brazilian men. A total of 120 men, 20-93 years, were evaluated for serum calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), parathyroid hormone, biochemical markers of bone resorption (carboxy-terminal telopeptide, carboxy-terminal peptide of type I collagen), and bone mineral density (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), chronic diseases, and medications affecting bone were the exclusion criteria. No participant reported previous low-impact fractures. In the overall population, 25(OH)D levels were below 30 ng/mL in 46.7%, and below 20 ng/mL in 27.6%. Among the 93 patients 50 years and older, 28 had osteoporosis. In those 70 years and older, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (42.1%), secondary hyperparathyroidism (46.4%), high bone resorption (39.6%), decreased GFR (39.2%), and osteoporosis (41.4%) was significantly higher than in the younger subjects (p < 0.005 for all comparisons). Serum parathyroid hormone increased with aging and declining GFR, but was not significantly associated with 25(OH)D or bone mineral density. There was a clear contribution of vitamin D deficiency to increased bone resorption and osteoporosis. Binary logistic regression model considering age, 25(OH)D, and bone resorption identified age ≥70 years as the main determinant of osteoporosis. Our data demonstrate a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a male population living in Rio de Janeiro, and emphasize its participation on the pathogenesis of age-related bone loss. (Vitamin D deficiency and osteoporosis are common in elderly Brazilian men.).

  13. Male-specific contributions to the Brazilian population of Espirito Santo.

    PubMed

    de F Figueiredo, Raquel; Ambrosio, Isabela B; Braganholi, Danilo F; Chemale, Gustavo; Martins, Joyce A; Gomes, Veronica; Gusmão, Leonor; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    2016-05-01

    Y chromosome markers have been widely studied due to their various applications in the fields of forensic and evolutionary genetics. In this study, 35 Y-SNPs and 17 Y-STRs were genotyped in 253 males from the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil. A total of 18 haplogroups and 243 haplotypes were detected; the haplogroup and haplotype diversities were 0.7794 and 0.9997, respectively. Genetic distance analysis using the Y-STR data showed no statistically significant differences between Espirito Santo and other admixed populations from Brazil. The classification of paternal lineages based on haplogroups showed a predominant European contribution (85.88%), followed by African (11.37%) and Amerindian (2.75%) contributions.

  14. [Design and implementation of the ELSA-Brasil biobank: a prospective study in a Brazilian population].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alexandre C; Bensenor, Isabela M; Fedeli, Ligia M; Castilhos, Cristina; Vidigal, Pedro G; Maniero, Viviane; Leite, Claudia M; Pimentel, Robercia A; Duncan, Bruce B; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Lotufo, Paulo A

    2013-06-01

    The Brazilian Longitudinal Study for Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) is a multicenter prospective cohort of civil servants designed to assess the determinants of chronic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. The present article describes the main design and implementation points of the ELSA-Brasil biobank project. Economic, political, logistical and technological aspects of this study are characterized. Additionally, it discusses the final biorepository protocol and the facilities implemented to achieve this objective. The design and implementation process of the ELSA-Brasil biobank took three years to be performed. Both the central and local biobanks were built according to the best biorepository techniques, using different technological solutions for the distinct needs expected in this study.

  15. [Critical analysis of the diet quality of the Brazilian population according to the Healthy Eating Index: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Patrícia Regina Silva; Rocha, Naruna Pereira; Milagres, Luana Cupertino; de Novaes, Juliana Farias

    2015-12-01

    In light of the importance of studying instruments that assess the food quality of the population, this study sought to conduct a systematic review of the quality of the diet of the Brazilian population using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and duly analyzing its methodology and results. The major electronic databases were used for the selection of studies. After the searches with the key words, 32 articles were included in this review. The growing interest of the scientific community in addressing this issue was observed, with recent studies using this instrument in Brazil. Methodological issues of articles were evaluated and discussed taking into consideration the revised versions and adaptations of the HEI. Some common results were highlighted among the studies such as low consumption of fruit, vegetables and/or dairy products, and the wider consumption of meat and eggs, cholesterol, total fat and saturated fat. Among the articles that address the HEI and socioeconomic aspects it was seen that quality of diet improves both in accordance with the increasing level of education of parents and with the family income in the population studied. The HEI can be used to monitor changes in dietary patterns and also as a nutrition education and health promotion tool.

  16. Evaluation of the association between the JAK2 46/1 haplotype and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sarah Pagliarini- e-; Santos, Bruna Cunha; de Figueiredo Pereira, Elizangela Mendes; Ferreira, Mari Ellen; Baraldi, Elaine Cristina; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The JAK2 46/1 haplotype has recently been described as a major contributing factor to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasm, whether positive or negative for the JAK2 V617F mutation. The G allele, identified by a single-nucleotide polymorphism known as JAK2 rs10974944, is part of the JAK2 46/1 haplotype. The aim of this study was to verify the association between the presence of the G allele and the development of BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms in our population. METHODS: Blood and oral mucosa swab samples were obtained from 56 patients of two local Brazilian hospitals who had previously been diagnosed with BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Blood samples from 90 local blood donors were used as controls. The presence of the G allele was assessed using a PCR-RFLP assay after extracting DNA from the samples. RESULTS: The presence of the G allele was strongly associated with the presence of BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (p = 0.0001; OR = 2.674; 95% CI = 1.630−4.385) in the studied population. CONCLUSION: In agreement with previous reports, the JAK2 46/1 haplotype, represented in this study by the presence of the G allele, is an important predisposing factor in the oncogenetic development of these neoplasms in our population. PMID:23420150

  17. Comparison of serum creatinine levels in different color/race categories in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Roberto Carlos de Brito; Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff de; Kang, Hye Chung; Rosa, Maria Luiza Garcia; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2015-07-01

    Serum creatinine (sCr) is usually higher among black people in the United States due to increased muscle mass, justifying the addition of race adjustment in creatinine-based formulas to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We aimed to assess if sCr levels are different in low-income communities in Brazil according to their race. A total of 1,303 participants were enrolled (58% females, 50±14 years-old, 33% self-defined as white, 41% as mixed race, and 26% as black). No significant differences in sCr were found between racial groups and no influence of race on sCr was seen in the linear regression analysis. The eGFR, calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula with no race adjustment, was no different between whites, mixed race and blacks. However, using such adjustment, eGFR for mixed race and black individuals was significantly higher than for whites (p < 0.001). In conclusion, no significant differences in sCr levels were found between racial groups, raising doubts as to whether race adjustment in eGFR formula should be used in that population.

  18. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma in a Brazilian population: clinico-pathological analysis of 38 cases.

    PubMed

    Mariano, F V; Noronha, A L F; Gondak, R O; Altemani, A M de A M; de Almeida, O P; Kowalski, L P

    2013-06-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is a rare tumour, with different prevalence rates reported among studies. Epidemiological studies of large series of CXPAs in developing countries are scarce. The aim of the present study was to describe Brazilian patients with CXPA; this was a retrospective study of 38 patients. Demographic and clinico-pathological features were evaluated. No preferential gender was found, and the mean age at diagnosis was 57.6 years. The most commonly involved site was the parotid, followed by the submandibular and the minor salivary glands. A prevalence of clinical stages III and IV was observed at diagnosis. The most common histological subtypes were salivary duct carcinoma, adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified, myoepithelial carcinoma, and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma. Moreover, by invasive phase, most were frankly invasive carcinoma. Recurrence was observed in seven out of 24 patients with outcome information available, and all were invasive cases. All seven patients died of causes related to the disease. The distributions of cases according to age, gender, tumour location, and clinical stage were similar to those reported in the literature. Frankly invasive cases presented a worse prognosis. More information is needed to further our understanding of the clinico-pathological aspects of CXPA.

  19. Exploring the applicability of analysing X chromosome STRs in Brazilian admixed population.

    PubMed

    Auler-Bittencourt, Eloisa; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato; Lima, Maria Jenny Mitraud; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; dos Santos, Sidney Emannuel Batista

    2015-09-01

    Kinship and parentage analyses always involve one sample being compared to another sample or a few samples with a specific relationship question in mind. In most cases, the analysis of autosomal STR markers is sufficient to determine the genetic kinship. However, when genetic profiles are reconstructed from supposed relatives, for whom the family configuration available for analysis is deficient, the examination may be inconclusive. This study reports practical examples of actual cases analysing the efficiency of the chromosome X STR (STR-ChrX) markers. Three cases with different degrees of efficiency and impact were selected as follows: the identification of two charred bodies in a traffic accident, in which the family setting available was not complete, and one filiation analysis resulting from rape. This is the first paper reporting the use of the multiplex STR 12 ChrX in actual cases using the software Familias 1.8 and Brazilian regional frequency data. Our study clarifies the complex analysis using this powerful tool for professionals in the forensic science community, for both civil and criminal justice. We also discuss state-of-the-art ChrX STR markers and its implications and applications for legal procedures. The data presented here should be used in other studies of complex cases to improve the progress of the current justice system.

  20. Differentiation of African Components of Ancestry to Stratify Groups in a Case–Control Study of a Brazilian Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Mario H.; Luchessi, Andre D.; Genvigir, Fabiana D.V.; Cerda, Alvaro; Rodrigues, Alice C.; Willrich, Maria A.V.; Arazi, Simone S.; Dorea, Egidio L.; Bernik, Marcia M.S.; Faludi, Andre A.; Bertolami, Marcelo C.; Santos, Carla; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Freire, Ana; Lareu, Maria Victoria; Phillips, Christopher; Porras-Hurtado, Liliana; Fondevila, Manuel; Hirata, Rosario D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Balancing the subject composition of case and control groups to create homogenous ancestries between each group is essential for medical association studies. Methods: We explored the applicability of single-tube 34-plex ancestry informative markers (AIM) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to estimate the African Component of Ancestry (ACA) to design a future case–control association study of a Brazilian urban sample. Results: One hundred eighty individuals (107 case group; 73 control group) self-described as white, brown-intermediate or black were selected. The proportions of the relative contribution of a variable number of ancestral population components were similar between case and control groups. Moreover, the case and control groups demonstrated similar distributions for ACA <0.25 and >0.50 categories. Notably a high number of outlier values (23 samples) were observed among individuals with ACA <0.25. These individuals presented a high probability of Native American and East Asian ancestral components; however, no individuals originally giving these self-described ancestries were observed in this study. Conclusions: The strategy proposed for the assessment of ancestry and adjustment of case and control groups for an association study is an important step for the proper construction of the study, particularly when subjects are taken from a complex urban population. This can be achieved using a straight forward multiplexed AIM-SNPs assay of highly discriminatory ancestry markers. PMID:22288895

  1. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae) in a Brazilian savanna.

    PubMed

    Silva, I A; Valenti, M W; Silva-Matos, D M

    2009-08-01

    Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of the dry season in 2006. We sampled and measured all individuals of Z. rhoifolium found in 80 plots of 25 m(2). We found 149 individuals before the fire and 112 after the fire, of which 77 were resprouts from burned seedlings and saplings. We did not find significant differences between the population structure before and after the fire. The spatial distribution of the population remained clumped after the fire. Thus, the Z. rhoifolium population was very resilient to a severe fire. We did not find any new seedlings. As a consequence, resprouting seems to be more important than sexual reproduction in promptly regenerating the Z. rhoifolium populations.

  2. An Equation for the Prediction of Oxygen Consumption in a Brazilian Population.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro de; Stefani, Charles de Moraes; Nascimento, João Agnaldo do; Almeida, Narla Miranda de; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Ribeiro In Memoriam, Jorge Pinto; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-09-12

    Background: The equations predicting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max or peak) presently in use in cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) softwares in Brazil have not been adequately validated. These equations are very important for the diagnostic capacity of this method. Objective: Build and validate a Brazilian Equation (BE) for prediction of VO2peak in comparison to the equation cited by Jones (JE) and the Wasserman algorithm (WA). Methods: Treadmill evaluation was performed on 3119 individuals with CPET (breath by breath). The construction group (CG) of the equation consisted of 2495 healthy participants. The other 624 individuals were allocated to the external validation group (EVG). At the BE (derived from a multivariate regression model), age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity level were considered. The same equation was also tested in the EVG. Dispersion graphs and Bland-Altman analyses were built. Results: In the CG, the mean age was 42.6 years, 51.5% were male, the average BMI was 27.2, and the physical activity distribution level was: 51.3% sedentary, 44.4% active and 4.3% athletes. An optimal correlation between the BE and the CPET measured VO2peak was observed (0.807). On the other hand, difference came up between the average VO2peak expected by the JE and WA and the CPET measured VO2peak, as well as the one gotten from the BE (p = 0.001). Conclusion: BE presents VO2peak values close to those directly measured by CPET, while Jones and Wasserman differ significantly from the real VO2peak.

  3. An Equation for the Prediction of Oxygen Consumption in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Antonio Eduardo Monteiro; Stefani, Charles de Moraes; do Nascimento, João Agnaldo; de Almeida, Narla Miranda; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background The equations predicting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max or peak) presently in use in cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) softwares in Brazil have not been adequately validated. These equations are very important for the diagnostic capacity of this method. Objective Build and validate a Brazilian Equation (BE) for prediction of VO2peak in comparison to the equation cited by Jones (JE) and the Wasserman algorithm (WA). Methods Treadmill evaluation was performed on 3119 individuals with CPET (breath by breath). The construction group (CG) of the equation consisted of 2495 healthy participants. The other 624 individuals were allocated to the external validation group (EVG). At the BE (derived from a multivariate regression model), age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and physical activity level were considered. The same equation was also tested in the EVG. Dispersion graphs and Bland-Altman analyses were built. Results In the CG, the mean age was 42.6 years, 51.5% were male, the average BMI was 27.2, and the physical activity distribution level was: 51.3% sedentary, 44.4% active and 4.3% athletes. An optimal correlation between the BE and the CPET measured VO2peak was observed (0.807). On the other hand, difference came up between the average VO2peak expected by the JE and WA and the CPET measured VO2peak, as well as the one gotten from the BE (p = 0.001). Conclusion BE presents VO2peak values close to those directly measured by CPET, while Jones and Wasserman differ significantly from the real VO2peak. PMID:25352504

  4. Nucleotide variability of HV-I in admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Feio-Dos-Santos, Ana Cecília; Carvalho, Bruno Maia; Batista dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea Kely Campos

    2006-12-20

    The analysis of genetic variation in the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA has been used as a tool in the study of history of different human populations, as Amerindians, Afro-descendents populations and furthermore admixed populations. In this study, the mitochondrial DNA was analyzed in 158 unrelated individuals in an admixed population of the Amazonian Region: Santarém-PA-Brazil. The polymorphisms were detected using both levels, analysis of restriction enzyme and direct sequencing. We observed a total of 49 different haplotypes were found determined by 46 variable nucleotides. The more frequent haplotypes (Hap03) was shared by five samples and 43 sequences were unique. The genetic diversity was estimated to 0.989+/-0.0067 and the probability of two random individuals showed identical mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were 2.8%.

  5. Validation of a physical anthropology methodology using mandibles for gender estimation in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Suzana Papile Maciel; BRITO, Liz Magalhães; de PAIVA, Luiz Airton Saavedra; BICUDO, Lucilene Arilho Ribeiro; CROSATO, Edgard Michel; de OLIVEIRA, Rogério Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Validation studies of physical anthropology methods in the different population groups are extremely important, especially in cases in which the population variations may cause problems in the identification of a native individual by the application of norms developed for different communities. Objective This study aimed to estimate the gender of skeletons by application of the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995), previously used in a population sample from Northeast Brazil. Material and Methods The accuracy of this method was assessed for a population from Southeast Brazil and validated by statistical tests. The method used two mandibular measurements, namely the bigonial distance and the mandibular ramus height. The sample was composed of 66 skulls and the method was applied by two examiners. The results were statistically analyzed by the paired t test, logistic discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Results The results demonstrated that the application of the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995) in this population achieved very different outcomes between genders, with 100% for females and only 11% for males, which may be explained by ethnic differences. However, statistical adjustment of measurement data for the population analyzed allowed accuracy of 76.47% for males and 78.13% for females, with the creation of a new discriminant formula. Conclusion It was concluded that methods involving physical anthropology present high rate of accuracy for human identification, easy application, low cost and simplicity; however, the methodologies must be validated for the different populations due to differences in ethnic patterns, which are directly related to the phenotypic aspects. In this specific case, the method of Oliveira, et al. (1995) presented good accuracy and may be used for gender estimation in Brazil in two geographic regions, namely Northeast and Southeast; however, for other regions of the country (North, Central West and South), previous methodological

  6. Molecular characterization of Brazilian equid herpesvirus type 1 strains based on neuropathogenicity markers

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Enio; Lara, Maria do Carmo C.S.H.; Cunha, Elenice M.S.; Villalobos, Eliana M.C.; Mori, Claudia M.C.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Brandão, Paulo E.; Fernandes, Wilson R.; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J.

    2015-01-01

    Partial nucleotide sequences of ORF72 (glycoprotein D, gD), ORF64 (infected cell protein 4, ICP4) and ORF30 (DNA polymerase) genes were compared with corresponding sequences of EHV-1 reference strains to characterize the molecular variability of Brazilian strains. Virus isolation assays were applied to 74 samples including visceral tissue, total blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasal swabs of specimens from a total of 64 animals. Only one CSF sample (Iso07/05 strain) was positive by virus isolation in cell culture. EHV-1 Iso07/05 neurologic strain and two abortion visceral tissues samples (Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) were PCR-positive for ORF33 (glycoprotein B, gB) gene of EHV-1. A sequence analysis of the ORF72, ORF64 and ORF30 genes from three EHV-1 archival strains (A3/97, A4/72, A9/92) and three clinical samples (Iso07/05, Iso11/06 and Iso33/06) suggested that among Brazilian EHV-1 strains, the amplified region of the gD gene sequence is highly conserved. Additionally, the analysis of ICP4 gene showed high nucleotide and amino acid identities when compared with genotype P strains, suggesting that the EHV-1 Brazilian strains belonged to the same group. All the EHV-1 Brazilian strains were classified as non-neuropathogenic variants (N752) based on the ORF30 analysis. These findings indicate a high conservation of the gD-, ICP4- and ORF30-encoding sequences. Different pathotypes of the EHV-1 strain might share identical genes with no specific markers, and tissue tropism is not completely dependent on the gD envelope, immediate-early ICP4 and DNA polymerase proteins. PMID:26273275

  7. Prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in a Brazilian population sample at-risk for hereditary breast cancer and characterization of its genetic ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Paula, André E.; Pereira, Rui; Andrade, Carlos E.; Felicio, Paula S.; Souza, Cristiano P.; Mendes, Deise R.P.; Volc, Sahlua; Berardinelli, Gustavo N.; Grasel, Rebeca S.; Sabato, Cristina S.; Viana, Danilo V.; Machado, José Carlos; Costa, José Luis; Mauad, Edmundo C.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Arun, Banu; Reis, Rui M.; Palmero, Edenir I.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are very few data about the mutational profile of families at-risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) from Latin America (LA) and especially from Brazil, the largest and most populated country in LA. Results Of the 349 probands analyzed, 21.5% were BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated, 65.3% at BRCA1 and 34.7% at BRCA2 gene. The mutation c.5266dupC (former 5382insC) was the most frequent alteration, representing 36.7% of the BRCA1 mutations and 24.0% of all mutations identified. Together with the BRCA1 c.3331_3334delCAAG mutation, these mutations constitutes about 35% of the identified mutations and more than 50% of the BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Interestingly, six new mutations were identified. Additionally, 39 out of the 44 pathogenic mutations identified were not previously reported in the Brazilian population. Besides, 36 different variants of unknown significance (VUS) were identified. Regarding ancestry, average ancestry proportions were 70.6% European, 14.5% African, 8.0% Native American and 6.8% East Asian. Materials and methods This study characterized 349 Brazilian families at-risk for HBOC regarding their germline BRCA1/BRCA2 status and genetic ancestry. Conclusions This is the largest report of BRCA1/BRCA2 assessment in an at-risk HBOC Brazilian population. We identified 21.5% of patients harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and characterized the genetic ancestry of a sample group at-risk for hereditary breast cancer showing once again how admixed is the Brazilian population. No association was found between genetic ancestry and mutational status. The knowledge of the mutational profile in a population can contribute to the definition of more cost-effective strategies for the identification of HBOC families. PMID:27741520

  8. Alleles of HLA-DRB1*04 Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Porto dos Santos, Maisa; de Melo Silva, Cláudia Maria; Alves de Almeida, Vanessa; Assumpção Antunes, Irineide

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic host factors are associated with susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Strong associations of HLA class II genes with TB are reported. We analyzed the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles to identify subtypes associated with pulmonary TB and their interaction with risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and gender in 316 pulmonary TB patients and 306 healthy individuals from the Brazilian Amazon. The HLA-DRB1*04 was prevalent in patients with pulmonary TB (p<0.0001; OR = 2.94; 95% CI = 2.12 to 4.08). Direct nucleotide sequencing of DRB1 exon 2 identified nine subtypes of HLA-DRB1*04. The subtype HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0019; OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.70) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary TB while DRB1*04:07:01 (p<0.0001; OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.33) to protection. Notably, the interaction between alcohol and HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 increased the risk for developing pulmonary TB (p = 0.0001; OR = 51.3; 95% CI = 6.81 to 386). Multibacillary pulmonary TB, the clinical presentation of disease transmission, was strongly associated with interaction to alcohol (p = 0.0026; OR = 11.1; 95% CI = 3.99 to 30.9), HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0442; OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.03 to 3.93) and DRB1*04:92 (p = 0.0112; OR = 8.62; 95% CI = 1.63 to 45.5). These results show that HLA-DRB1*04 are associated with pulmonary TB. Interestingly, three subtypes, DRB1*04:07:01, DRB1*04:11:01 and DRB1*04:92 of the HLA-DRB1*04 could be potential immunogenetic markers that may help to explain mechanisms involved in disease development. PMID:26901036

  9. Genetic structure and gene flow among Brazilian populations of Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population genetic studies are essential to the better application of pest management strategies, including the monitoring of the evolution of resistance to insecticides and genetically modified plants. Bt-crops have been instrumental in controlling Heliothis virescens (F.), a pest that has develop...

  10. Seasonal Variation in Population Abundance and Chytrid Infection in Stream-Dwelling Frogs of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Joice; Longo, Ana V.; Gaiarsa, Marília P.; Alencar, Laura R. V.; Lambertini, Carolina; Leite, Domingos S.; Carvalho-e-Silva, Sergio P.; Zamudio, Kelly R.; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Martins, Marcio

    2015-01-01

    Enigmatic amphibian declines were first reported in southern and southeastern Brazil in the late 1980s and included several species of stream-dwelling anurans (families Hylodidae and Cycloramphidae). At that time, we were unaware of the amphibian-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd); therefore, pollution, habitat loss, fragmentation and unusual climatic events were hypothesized as primary causes of these declines. We now know that multiple lineages of Bd have infected amphibians of the Brazilian Atlantic forest for over a century, yet declines have not been associated specifically with Bd outbreaks. Because stream-dwelling anurans occupy an environmental hotspot ideal for disease transmission, we investigated temporal variation in population and infection dynamics of three stream-adapted species (Hylodes asper, H. phyllodes, and Cycloramphus boraceiensis) on the northern coast of São Paulo state, Brazil. We surveyed standardized transects along streams for four years, and show that fluctuations in the number of frogs correlate with specific climatic variables that also increase the likelihood of Bd infections. In addition, we found that Bd infection probability in C. boraceiensis, a nocturnal species, was significantly higher than in Hylodes spp., which are diurnal, suggesting that the nocturnal activity may either facilitate Bd zoospore transmission or increase susceptibility of hosts. Our findings indicate that, despite long-term persistence of Bd in Brazil, some hosts persist with seasonally variable infections, and thus future persistence in the face of climate change will depend on the relative effect of those changes on frog recruitment and pathogen proliferation. PMID:26161777

  11. Influence of Educational Level, Stage, and Histological Type on Survival of Oral Cancer in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Thinali Sousa; de Barros Silva, Paulo Goberlânio; Sousa, Eric Fernandes; da Cunha, Maria do PSS; de Aguiar, Andréa Silvia Walter; Costa, Fábio Wildson Gurgel; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate associated with oral cancer is estimated at approximately 12,300 deaths per year, and the survival rate is only 40% to 50% for diagnosed patients and is closely related to the duration of time between disease perception and its diagnosis and treatment. Socioeconomic risk factors are determinants of the incidence and mortality related to oral cancer. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 573 records of patients with oral cancer at Haroldo Juaçaba Hospital – Cancer Institute of Ceará from 2000 to 2009 to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic factors on survival and epidemiological behavior of this neoplasia in a Brazilian population. In this study, patients with oral cancer were males greater than 60 years of age, presented squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of mouth and were characterized by low education levels. A total of 573 lesions were found in oral cavities. Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that the histological type, tumor stage, and low degree of education significantly influenced survival. A lower patient survival rate was correlated with a more advanced stage of disease and a worse prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a higher mortality when compared with other histological types of malign neoplasia. PMID:26817864

  12. Molecular analysis and conventional cytology: association between HPV and bacterial vaginosis in the cervical abnormalities of a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Peres, A L; Camarotti, J R S L; Cartaxo, M; Alencar, N; Stocco, R C; Beçak, W; Pontes-Filho, N T; Araújo, R F F; Lima-Filho, J L; Martins, D B G

    2015-08-14

    We investigated the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Papanicolaou smears in a Brazilian population. Cross-sectional analysis was performed on 673 samples collected from women attending public health centers in Olinda (PE, Brazil) by conventional cytology methodology and molecular analysis, PCR tests (GP5+/6+ and MY09/11). Cytological abnormalities, BV, and HPV-DNA were detected in 23 (3.4%) samples, 189 samples (28.1%), and 210 samples (31.2%), respectively. GP5+/6+ primers resulted in higher detection performance than MY09/11 primers, with 81% concordance between both primers (P < 0.0001). The occurrence of HPV-DNA and BV had ORs of 8.59 (P < 0.0001) and 2.91 (P = 0.0089) for abnormal cytology, respectively, whereas the concomitant presence of both infections showed an OR equal to 3.82 (P = 0.0054). Therefore, we observed an association between abnormal cervical cytology and HPV infection, BV, or both HPV infection and BV. These results highlight the necessity of monitoring patients presenting not only HPV, but also BV, as risk factors for cervical lesion development.

  13. Nucleotide variability of HV-I in Afro-descendents populations of the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea Kely Campos; Carvalho, Bruno Maia; Feio-dos-Santos, Ana Cecília; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2007-03-22

    The analysis of genetic variation in the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA, provides unique information about the population diversity and human identification. In this study, the mitochondrial DNA sequences of the first hypervariable region (HV-I) were analyzed in 243 unrelated individuals of seven Afro-descendents populations of the Amazon Region. Sequence polymorphisms were detected using PCR and direct sequencing analysis. A total of 133 different haplotypes were found determined by 97 variable nucleotides. Each one of the three more frequent haplotypes was shared by 9 samples and 91 sequences were unique. The genetic diversity was estimated to 0.9898+/-0.0016 and the probability of two random individuals showed identical mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were 1.2%.

  14. Multilocus analyses of seven candidate genes suggest interacting pathways for obesity-related traits in Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Cláudia B; Kimura, Lilian; Auricchio, Maria T; Vicente, João P; Mattevi, Vanessa S; Zembrzuski, Verônica M; Hutz, Mara H; Pereira, Alexandre C; Pereira, Tiago V; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2011-06-01

    We investigated whether variants in major candidate genes for food intake and body weight regulation contribute to obesity-related traits under a multilocus perspective. We studied 375 Brazilian subjects from partially isolated African-derived populations (quilombos). Seven variants displaying conflicting results in previous reports and supposedly implicated in the susceptibility of obesity-related phenotypes were investigated: β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) (Arg16Gly), insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2) (rs7566605), leptin (LEP) (A19G), LEP receptor (LEPR) (Gln223Arg), perilipin (PLIN) (6209T > C), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) (Pro12Ala), and resistin (RETN) (-420 C > G). Regression models as well as generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) were employed to test the contribution of individual effects and higher-order interactions to BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR) variation and risk of overweight/obesity. The best multilocus association signal identified in the quilombos was further examined in an independent sample of 334 Brazilian subjects of European ancestry. In quilombos, only the PPARG polymorphism displayed significant individual effects (WHR variation, P = 0.028). No association was observed either with the risk of overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), risk of obesity alone (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) or BMI variation. However, GMDR analyses revealed an interaction between the LEPR and ADRB2 polymorphisms (P = 0.009) as well as a third-order effect involving the latter two variants plus INSIG2 (P = 0.034) with overweight/obesity. Assessment of the LEPR-ADRB2 interaction in the second sample indicated a marginally significant association (P = 0.0724), which was further verified to be limited to men (P = 0.0118). Together, our findings suggest evidence for a two-locus interaction between the LEPR Gln223Arg and ADRB2 Arg16Gly variants in the risk of overweight/obesity, and highlight further the importance of multilocus effects in

  15. Population bases and the 2011 Census.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In an increasingly complex society there are a number of different population definitions that can be relevant for users, beyond the standard definition used in counting the population. This article describes the enumeration base for the 2011 Census and how alternative population outputs may be produced. It provides a background as to how the questions on the questionnaire were decided upon and how population bases can be constructed from the Census. Similarities and differences between the information collected across the three UK Censuses (England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) are discussed. Finally, issues around estimating the population on alternative bases are presented.

  16. Genetic variability and natural selection at the ligand domain of the Duffy binding protein in brazilian Plasmodium vivax populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax malaria is a major public health challenge in Latin America, Asia and Oceania, with 130-435 million clinical cases per year worldwide. Invasion of host blood cells by P. vivax mainly depends on a type I membrane protein called Duffy binding protein (PvDBP). The erythrocyte-binding motif of PvDBP is a 170 amino-acid stretch located in its cysteine-rich region II (PvDBPII), which is the most variable segment of the protein. Methods To test whether diversifying natural selection has shaped the nucleotide diversity of PvDBPII in Brazilian populations, this region was sequenced in 122 isolates from six different geographic areas. A Bayesian method was applied to test for the action of natural selection under a population genetic model that incorporates recombination. The analysis was integrated with a structural model of PvDBPII, and T- and B-cell epitopes were localized on the 3-D structure. Results The results suggest that: (i) recombination plays an important role in determining the haplotype structure of PvDBPII, and (ii) PvDBPII appears to contain neutrally evolving codons as well as codons evolving under natural selection. Diversifying selection preferentially acts on sites identified as epitopes, particularly on amino acid residues 417, 419, and 424, which show strong linkage disequilibrium. Conclusions This study shows that some polymorphisms of PvDBPII are present near the erythrocyte-binding domain and might serve to elude antibodies that inhibit cell invasion. Therefore, these polymorphisms should be taken into account when designing vaccines aimed at eliciting antibodies to inhibit erythrocyte invasion. PMID:21092207

  17. Epidemiology of multimorbidity within the Brazilian adult general population: Evidence from the 2013 National Health Survey (PNS 2013)

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo-Marques, João Mazzoncini; Coxon, Domenica; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Middle-income countries are facing a growing challenge of adequate health care provision for people with multimorbidity. The objectives of this study were to explore the distribution of multimorbidity and to identify patterns of multimorbidity in the Brazilian general adult population. Data from 60202 adults, aged ≥18 years that completed the individual questionnaire of the National Health Survey 2013 (Portuguese: “Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde”–“PNS”) was used. We defined multimorbidity as the presence of two or more chronic conditions, including self-reported diagnoses and responses to the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire for depression. Multivariate Poisson regression analyses were used to explore relationship between multimorbidity and demographic factors. Exploratory tetrachoric factor analysis was performed to identify multimorbidity patterns. 24.2% (95% CI 23.5–24.9) of the study population were multimorbid, with prevalence rate ratios being significantly higher in women, older people and those with lowest educational level. Multimorbidity occurred earlier in women than in men, with half of the women and men aged 55–59 years and 65–69 years, respectively, were multimorbid. The absolute number of people with multimorbidity was approximately 2.5-fold higher in people younger than 65 years than older counterparts (9920 vs 3945). Prevalence rate ratios of any mental health disorder significantly increased with the number of physical conditions. 46.7% of the persons were assigned to at least one of three identified patterns of multimorbidity, including: “cardio-metabolic”, “musculoskeletal-mental” and “respiratory” disorders. Multimorbidity in Brazil is as common as in more affluent countries. Women in Brazil develop diseases at younger ages than men. Our findings can inform a national action plan to prevent multimorbidity, reduce its burden and align health-care services more closely with patients’ needs. PMID:28182778

  18. A Data Mining Approach to Identify Sexuality Patterns in a Brazilian University Population.

    PubMed

    Waleska Simões, Priscyla; Cesconetto, Samuel; Toniazzo de Abreu, Larissa Letieli; Côrtes de Mattos Garcia, Merisandra; Cassettari Junior, José Márcio; Comunello, Eros; Bisognin Ceretta, Luciane; Aparecida Manenti, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the profile and experience of sexuality generated from a data mining classification task. We used a database about sexuality and gender violence performed on a university population in southern Brazil. The data mining task identified two relationships between the variables, which enabled the distinction of subgroups that better detail the profile and experience of sexuality. The identification of the relationships between the variables define behavioral models and factors of risk that will help define the algorithms being implemented in the data mining classification task.

  19. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles of Brazilian Candida dubliniensis isolates based on ID 32C system.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sydney Hartz; Horta, Jorge A; Milán, Eveline P; Scheid, Liliane A; Vainstein, Marilene H; Santurio, Janio M; Colombo, Arnaldo L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the identification of 19 Brazilian C. dubliniensis based on the biochemical profile exhibited when tested by the commercial identification kit ID 32C (bioMerieux). Thirteen of the isolates were rigorously identified as C. dubliniensis and the remaining isolates (six) were considered as having a doubtful profile but the software also suggested that there was 83.6% of chances for them to be C. dubliniensis. As well as pointed by the literature the identification obtained by phenotypic tests should be considered presumptive for C. dubliniensis due to variability of this new species.

  20. Random mating and reproductive compatibility among Argentinean and southern Brazilian populations of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Rull, J; Abraham, S; Kovaleski, A; Segura, D F; Islam, A; Wornoayporn, V; Dammalage, T; Tomas, U Santo; Vera, M T

    2012-08-01

    As a prerequisite for area-wide application of the sterile insect technique in an area encompassing northern Argentina and southern Brazil, prezygotic and postzygotic reproductive compatibility among three geographically distant populations in the area was tested. In field cages, sexually mature adults of each population were found to be sexually compatible, mating duration was not affected by fly origin and there was no clear evidence of spatial partition of mating location. In the laboratory, homotypic and heterotypic crosses for all possible combinations displayed similar levels of fertility and yielded F1 adults without distortion of the sex ratio. Finally, F1 hybrid and parental adults produced equally viable F2 eggs. Put together, our results and those from earlier studies suggest that a large area, ranging from Buenos Aires to the surroundings of São Paulo, could be managed using a single A. fraterculus mass-reared strain. At the northern margin of this area, two A. fraterculus morphotypes appear to coexist in sympatry. We delineate future research to further delimit the distribution of the aff1 morphotype (Argentina-southern Brazil) and to gain insight into evolutionary patterns producing divergence and radiation of tropical fruit fly species.

  1. Age-specific seroprevalence to an immunodominant Cryptosporidium sporozoite antigen in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, M. J.; Elwin, K.; Massad, E.; Azevedo, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection was investigated in a representative sample of a normal population in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil using a recombinant form of the immunodominant 27-kDa sporozoite antigen. IgG seropositivity was low in infants following loss of maternal antibody but quickly increased to approximately 60% by 5 years, then 80% by the age of 10 years, after which prevalence remained constant. The broad range of antibody concentrations is consistent with previous reports that the IgG response to C. parvum is short-lived. There is also evidence that average antibody concentrations increase with age. Results suggest that the recombinant antigen may be a more sensitive method of measuring seroprevalence than the native antigen in Western blot. Although cross-sectional studies can provide an insight into the epidemiology of C. parvum in normal populations, further studies investigating the dynamics of the humoral immune responses to Cryptosporidium and the use of serology in epidemiological studies are required. PMID:16181518

  2. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-str loci in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ramos, Luiz Patrick Vidal; de Jesus Brabo Ferreira Palha, Teresinha; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2012-01-01

    The allelic and haplotype frequencies of 17 Y-STR loci most commonly used in forensic testing were estimated in a sample of 138 unrelated healthy males from Macapá, in the northern Amazon region of Brazil. The average gene diversity was 0.6554 ± 0.3315. 134 haplotypes of the 17 loci were observed, 130 of them unique and four present in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity index was 0.9996 + 0.0009, with the most frequent haplogroups being R1b (52.2%), E1b1b (11.6%), J2 (10.1%) and Q (7.2%). Most haplogroups of this population belonged to European male lineages (89.2%), followed by Amerindian (7.2%) and African (3.6%) lineages. PMID:22481873

  3. Associations of polymorphisms of folate cycle enzymes and risk of breast cancer in a Brazilian population are age dependent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Barbosa, Rita de Cássia; Menezes, Débora Costa; Freire, Thiago Fernando Vasconcelos; Sales, Diogo Campos; Alencar, Victor Hugo Medeiros; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism have been shown to be implicated in breast cancer risk but with contradictory results. In this case-control study, we investigated the association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C, TYMS 5'-UTR, MTR A2756G and cSHMT C1420T and also the folate carrier (RFC1 G80A) and breast cancer risk in a northeastern Brazilian population. The study included 183 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 183 controls volunteers without any history of cancer. Also a significant number of healthy individuals were included for allelic frequency in the population studied. Risk of breast cancer was estimated by conditional logistic regression. An association with risk was found for women carrying the MTR A2756G polymorphic allele (AG, P = 0.0036; AG/GG, P = 0.0040), and a protective effect in carriers of the RFC1 G80A polymorphic allele (GA, P = 0.0015; AA, P = 0.0042). Stratifying the data by age (cutoff point of 50 years old), different distributions were observed for breast cancer risk. For women ≤50 years, the risk observed in the presence of the polymorphic allele MTR 2756 (AG/GG) in the general analysis was, restricted to this age group (P = 0.0118). Conversely, for women over 50, the risk of breast cancer development was statistically associated with the MTHFR 677CT genotype, but especially significant was risk associated with the presence of the polymorphic allele of cSHMT C1420T (P = 0.0120) and the protective effect associated with the RFC1 G80A polymorphism allele (P = 0.0021), was restrict to this age group. These data indicate that the cutoff age used (50 years old) was appropriate, since it was able to discriminate risk in each age group in the population studied and also to point to the importance of age in the analyses of cancer-associated polymorphisms.

  4. Resistance Status to the Insecticides Temephos, Deltamethrin, and Diflubenzuron in Brazilian Aedes aegypti Populations

    PubMed Central

    Viana-Medeiros, Priscila Fernandes; Araújo, Simone Costa; Martins, Ademir J.; Lima, José Bento Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Insecticides are still largely applied in public health to control disease vectors. In Brazil, organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PY) are used against Aedes aegypti for years. Since 2009 Insect Growth Regulators (IGR) are also employed in the control of larvae. We quantified resistance to temephos (OP), deltamethrin (PY), and diflubenzuron (IGR) of A. aegypti samples from 12 municipalities distributed throughout the country, collected between 2010 and 2012. High levels of resistance to neurotoxic insecticides were detected in almost all populations: RR95 to temephos varied between 4.0 and 27.1; the lowest RR95 to deltamethrin was 13.1, and values higher than 70.0 were found. In contrast, all samples were susceptible to diflubenzuron (RR95 < 2.3). Biochemical tests performed with larvae and adults discarded the participation of acetylcholinesterase, the OP target, and confirmed involvement of the detoxifying enzymes esterases, mixed function oxidases, and glutathione-S-transferases. The results obtained were discussed taking into account the public chemical control component and the increase in the domestic use of insecticides during dengue epidemic seasons in the evaluated municipalities. PMID:27419140

  5. Salivary Gland Tumor: A Review of 599 Cases in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flávia Aparecida; Duarte, Eliza Carla Barroso; Taveira, Cláudia Teixeira; Máximo, Aline Abreu; de Aquino, Érica Carvalho; Alencar, Rita de Cássia

    2009-01-01

    Salivary gland tumors consist of a group of heterogeneous lesions with complex clinicopathological characteristics and distinct biological behaviors. Worldwide series show a contrast in the relative incidence of salivary gland tumors, with some discrepancies in clinicopathological data. The main aim of this study was to describe demographic characteristics of 599 cases in a population from Central Brazil over a 10-year period and compare these with other epidemiological studies. Benign tumors represented 78.3% of the cases. Women were the most affected (61%) and the male:female ratio was 1:1.6. Parotid gland tumors were the most frequent (68.5% of cases) and patient age ranged from 1 to 88 years-old (median of 45 years old). The most frequent tumors were pleomorphic adenomas (68.4%) and benign tumors were significantly more frequent in the parotid (75.9%), while malignant tumors were more frequent in the minor salivary glands (40%) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, women and the parotid gland were the most affected and pleomorphic adenoma was the most frequent lesion, followed by adenoid cystic carcinoma and Warthin’s tumor. PMID:20596844

  6. Population ecology of the blue crab Callinectes danae (Crustacea: Portunidae) in a Brazilian tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marina S L C; Barreto, Aline V; Negromonte, Aurinete O; Schwamborn, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims at describing the population ecology of the swimming crab Callinectes danae Smith, 1869 in one of the most productive estuaries of Brazil, the Santa Cruz Channel. These crabs were monthly collected from January to December/2009 at four stations along the channel, two in the upper and two in the lower estuary. A total of 2373 specimens of C. danae were collected during the study. Males had a larger average carapace width than non-ovigerous females (60.0 ± 15.6 mm and 52.9 ± 12.4 mm, respectively), an adaptation that gives greater protection for females during the copulation. Overall sex ratio did not differ significantly from 1:1. However, evaluating sex-ratio by sampling area, males and juveniles of both sexes occurred preferentially in the upper estuary (p < 0.05), while adult females, including ovigerous, inhabited the lower estuary, an area of major marine influence (p < 0.05). While juveniles look for estuarine waters due to the benefit from the shelter and abundance of food, ovigerous females migrate to areas of greater depth and higher salinity in order to provide a more favorable environment for embryonic and larval development and to enhance larval dispersal. Recruitment of juveniles was continuous along the year, but intensified from March to June and, with less intensity, from October to December.

  7. Clinical and radiological analysis of a series of periapical cysts and periapical granulomas diagnosed in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Daniel-Petitet; Rodrigues, Janderson-Teixeira; dos Santos, Teresa-Cristina-Ribeiro-Bartholomeu; Armada, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Background Periapical cysts (PC) and periapical granulomas (PG) are the two most common chronic inflammatory periapical diseases, but their clinicoradiological characteristics can vary depending on the methods employed in each study. The aim of the present work was to analyze the clinical and radiological profile of a series of PC and PG diagnosed in a Brazilian population. Material and Methods The files of two Oral Pathology laboratories were reviewed and all cases diagnosed as PG and PC were selected for the study. Clinical and radiological information were retrieved and data were tabulated and descriptively and comparatively analyzed. Results Final sample was composed by 647 inflammatory periapical lesions, including 244 PG (38%) and 403 PC (62%). The number of women affected by PG was significantly higher than the number of women affected by PC (p=0.037). Anterior region of the maxilla was the most common affected area for both entities (39% of the cases), but the most common anatomical location of PG (anterior maxilla and posterior maxilla) was different from PC (anterior maxilla and posterior mandible) (p<0.0001). Upper lateral incisor was the most affected tooth. The mean radiological size of the PC was larger than the mean radiological size of the PG (p<0.0001) and PC showed well-defined radiological images more frequently than PG (p<0.0001). Conclusions PC were more common than PG, both showed predilection for adult females, most lesions affected predominantly the anterior maxilla and PC presented larger mean radiological diameter and well-defined images when compared with PG. Key words:Periapical granuloma, periapical cyst, radicular cyst, diagnosis, Oral Pathology. PMID:28149477

  8. Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis: Molossidae, Chiroptera) at high altitude: links to migratory insect populations.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Gary F; Gillam, Erin H; Westbrook, John K; Lee, Ya-Fu; Jensen, Michael L; Balsley, Ben B

    2008-07-01

    Existing information on the activity of bats in the aerosphere is restricted almost exclusively to altitudes that are within a few tens of meters above the ground. We report a total of 50.2 h of ultrasonic recordings made using radio microphonic bat detectors suspended from free-floating helium balloons and from kites. The data include a total of 22 353 echolocative calls from ground-level to 1118 m above ground level (AGL). These calls are attributed to Brazilian free-tailed bats based on acoustic features and the large numbers and high-altitude aerial dispersion of these bats over the local landscape. Bat activity varied significantly throughout the air column and was greatest at 400-500 m AGL and near ground level. Feeding buzzes, indicating feeding on aerial prey, were most abundant near ground level and at 400-500 m, and were detected to altitudes of ∼ 900 m AGL. The peak activity of bats at 400-500 m AGL is concordant with the altitude of the atmospheric boundary layer and the seasonal formation of the low-elevation southerly wind jet that has been identified as a major aeroecological corridor for the nocturnal dispersal of noctuid moths and other insects.

  9. Association of Cytokines in Individuals Sensitive and Insensitive to Dust Mites in a Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Caniatti, Marcela Caleffi da Costa Lima; Marchioro, Ariella Andrade; Guilherme, Ana Lúcia Falavigna; Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Allergic reaction to dust mites is a relatively common condition among children, triggering cutaneous and respiratory responses that have a great impact on the health of this population. Anaphylactic hypersensitivity is characterized by an exacerbated response involving the production of regulatory cytokines responsible for stimulating the production of IgE antibodies. Objective To investigate an association of variants in cytokine genes (IL1A−889, IL1B−511, +3962, IL1R1970, IL1RA11100, IL4RA+1902, IL12−1188, IFNG+874, TGFB1codon 10, codon 25, TNFA−308, −238, IL2−330, +166, IL4−1098, −590, −33, IL6−174, nt565, and IL10−1082, −819, −592) between patients sensitive to dust mites and a control group. Methods A total of 254 patients were grouped as atopic and non-atopic according to sensitivity as evaluated by the Prick Test and to cytokine genotyping by the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) method using the Cytokine Genotyping Kit. Results A comparison between individuals allergic to Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and Blomia tropicalis and a non-atopic control group showed significant differences between allele and genotype frequencies in the regulatory regions of cytokine genes, with important evidence for IL4−590 in T/C (10.2% vs. 43.1%, odd ratio [OR] = 0.15, p = 5.2 10−8, pc = 0.0000011, and 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 0.07–0.32) and T/T genotypes (42.9% vs. 13.8%, OR = 4.69, p = 2.5 10−6, pc = 0.000055, and 95%CI = 2.42–9.09). Other associations were observed in the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1A−889 (T/T, C, and T) and IL2−330 (G/T and T/T) and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4RA+1902 (A and G), IL4−590 (T/C, T/T, C, and T), and IL10−592 (A/A, C/A, A, and C). Conclusion Our results suggest a possible association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytokine genes and hypersensitivity to dust mites

  10. Analyzing NEXRAD doppler radar images to assess nightly dispersal patterns and population trends in Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Horn, Jason W; Kunz, Thomas H

    2008-07-01

    Operators of early weather-surveillance radars often observed echoes on their displays that did not behave like weather pattern, including expanding ring-like shapes they called angels. These echoes were caused by high-flying insects, migrating birds, and large colonies of bats emerging from roosts to feed. Modern weather-surveillance radar stations in the United States (NEXt-generation RADar or NEXRAD) provide detailed images that clearly show evening bat emergences from large colonies. These images can be used to investigate the flight behavior of groups of bats and population trends in large colonies of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) in south-central Texas which are clearly imaged by local NEXRAD radar stations. In this study, we used radar reflectivity data from the New Braunfels, Texas NEXRAD station to examine relative colony size, direction of movement, speed of dispersion, and altitude gradients of bats from these colonies following evening emergence. Base reflectivity clear-air-mode Level-II images were geo-referenced and compiled in a GIS along with locations of colonies and features on the landscape. Temporal sequences of images were filtered for the activity of bats, and from this, the relative size of bat colonies, and the speed and heading of bat emergences were calculated. Our results indicate cyclical changes in colony size from year to year and that initial headings taken by bats during emergence flights are highly directional. We found that NEXRAD data can be an effective tool for monitoring the nightly behavior and seasonal changes in these large colonies. Understanding the distribution of a large regional bat population on a landscape scale has important implications for agricultural pest management and conservation efforts.

  11. Brazilian consensus on photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; Cunha, José Antônio Jabur da; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva dos; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection.

  12. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  13. Evaluation of functional capacity in individuals with signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal disease: results of the BRAZCO population study (Brazilian COPCORD Study).

    PubMed

    Jennings, Fabio; Sato, Emilia Inoue; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi

    2015-11-01

    The disability caused by the musculoskeletal signs and symptoms affects the quality of life of a population, especially that related to health. The objective of this study is to evaluate the functional capacity of individuals of the Brazilian population who presented musculoskeletal signs and symptoms (MSK-S). The prevalence of MSK-S was evaluated in 5000 individuals (>15 years) in 16 capitals from the five regions of Brazil using the COPCORD Core Questionnaire. Those individuals (n = 2494) that experienced MSK-S and referred some level of disability at the time of the interview were invited to complete the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). The HAQ-DI scores were compared among regions, and subgroups according to gender, age and type of activity. Three hundred ninety-four (7.9 %) participants reported disability at the time of the interview. The average score of HAQ-DI was 1.09 (SD = 0.71), and the Brazilian region with the highest level of disability was the North region. Among individuals without history of trauma, the disability was higher when the duration of MSK-S was longer. Disability was shown to worsen with increasing age, and the group with 25-34 years showed the lowest scores. Females showed worse functional capacity scores compared to males (p = 0.002). Individuals showed higher degrees of difficulty or were incapable of performing the activities walking, reaching, usual activities and dressing. MSK-S reduce the functional capacity of individuals of the Brazilian general population. The reduction in functional capacity was mainly observed in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal complaints not due to trauma, as well as in female gender and in advancing age.

  14. Prevalence of Depression and Depression Care for Populations Registered in Primary Care in Two Remote Cities in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression has been widely studied in high-income countries and in large cities of low-income countries; however, little is known about the prevalence and treatment gap of depression in remote areas of the Amazonian region in Brazil. Objectives The objectives of this study are to estimate the prevalence of depression in adults registered with the Family Health Strategy in two remote cities in the Brazilian Amazon and to investigate the proportion of individuals with depression that received mental health care. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of an adult population registered with primary care clinics in the cities of Coari and Tefé, State of Amazon, Brazil. Depression was defined as a score of ≥10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Depression care was evaluated by asking participants with depression if they received antidepressants and/or had been seen by a health professional at a community mental health center in the three months prior to the interview. Poisson regression was used to examine the unadjusted and adjusted associations between depression and exposure variables. Results The overall prevalence of depression was 19.1% (95% CI: 17.2–21.1), with 22.2% (95% CI: 19.3–25.0) among women and 16.0% (95% CI: 13.4–18.5) among men. The prevalence of depression in Coari and Tefé were 18.3% (CI 95% 15.7–21.0) and 19.9% (95% CI:17.2–22.7), respectively. Being a woman, lacking social support, increasing exposure to stressful life events and having a higher number medical comorbidities were consistently associated with depression. Lower educational attainment and income, tobacco use, and risky alcohol use were also associated with depression in the unadjusted analyses. Only 11.5% of those with depression were receiving antidepressants and/or visited the mental health care facility during the three months prior to the interview. Conclusion Approximately one in five adults in our sample had depression. A high

  15. Cohort profile: the Baependi Heart Study—a family-based, highly admixed cohort study in a rural Brazilian town

    PubMed Central

    Negrão, André B; Horimoto, Andréa R V R; Duarte, Nubia E; Gonçalves, Guilherme C; Soler, Júlia M P; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Taporoski, Tâmara P; de Oliveira, Camila M; Alvim, Rafael O; Pereira, Alexandre C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major challenge to global health. The same epidemiological transition scenario is replayed as countries develop, but with variations based on environment, culture and ethnic mixture. The Baependi Heart Study was set up in 2005 to develop a longitudinal family-based cohort study that reflects on some of the genetic and lifestyle-related peculiarities of the Brazilian populations, in order to evaluate genetic and environmental influences on CVD risk factor traits. Participants Probands were recruited in Baependi, a small rural town in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, following by first-degree and then increasingly more distant relatives. The first follow-up wave took place in 2010, and the second in 2016. At baseline, the study evaluated 1691 individuals across 95 families. Cross-sectional data have been collected for 2239 participants. Findings to date Environmental and lifestyle factors and measures relevant to cardiovascular health have been reported. Having expanded beyond cardiovascular health outcomes, the phenotype datasets now include genetics, biochemistry, anthropometry, mental health, sleep and circadian rhythms. Many of these have yielded heritability estimates, and a shared genetic background of anxiety and depression has recently been published. In spite of universal access to electricity, the population has been found to be strongly shifted towards morningness compared with metropolitan areas. Future plans A new follow-up, marking 10 years of the study, is ongoing in 2016, in which data are collected as in 2010 (with the exception of the neuropsychiatric protocol). In addition to this, a novel questionnaire package collecting information about intelligence, personality and spirituality is being planned. The data set on circadian rhythms and sleep will be amended through additional questionnaires, actimetry, home sleep EEG recording and dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) analysis. Finally, the anthropometric

  16. Need for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents: evaluation based on public health

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Carolina Vieira; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Danilo Cangussu; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Jones, Kimberly Marie; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and the severity of malocclusions and to analyze factors associated with the need for orthodontic treatment of Brazilian adolescents. METHODS: This exploratory, cross-sectional study was carried out based on secondary data from the national epidemiological survey on oral health in Brazil (2002-2003). Socio-demographic conditions, self-perception, and the existence and degree of malocclusion, using the Dental Aesthetic Index, were evaluated in 16,833 adolescent Brazilians selected by probabilistic sample by conglomerates. The dependent variable need orthodontic treatment was estimated from the severity of malocclusion. The magnitude and direction of the association in bivariate and multivariate analyzes from a Robust Poisson regression was estimated. RESULTS: The majority of the adolescents needed orthodontic treatment (53.2%). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of the need for orthodontic treatment was larger among females, non-whites, those that perceived a need for treatment, and those that perceived their appearance as normal, bad, or very bad. The need for orthodontic treatment was smaller among those that lived in the Northeast and Central West macro-regions compared to those living in Southeast Brazil and it was also smaller among those that perceived their chewing to be normal or their oral health to be bad or very bad. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high prevalence of orthodontic treatment need among adolescents in Brazil and this need was associated with demographic and subjective issues. The high prevalence of orthodontic needs in adolescents is a challenge to the goals of Brazil's universal public health system. PMID:25769190

  17. Introducing DNA concepts to Swiss high school students based on a Brazilian educational game.

    PubMed

    da S Cardona, Tânia; Spiegel, Carolina N; Alves, Gutemberg G; Ducommun, Jacques; Henriques-Pons, Andrea; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C

    2007-11-01

    Subjects such as techniques for genetic diagnosis, cloning, sequencing, and gene therapy are now part of our lives and raise important questions about ethics, future medical diagnosis, and such. Students from different countries observe this explosion of biotechnological applications regardless of their social, academic, or cultural backgrounds, although they are not usually familiar with their theoretical genetic bases. To introduce some molecular biology concepts for high school students, we developed a new problem for the Brazilian board game "Discovering the cell" ("Célula Adentro©" in Portuguese), a pedagogic tool based on inquiry-, cooperative-, and problem-based learning. This problem (Case) is based on the forensic DNA, which represents an interesting theme for students, as it recurrently appears on newspapers and television series. In this work, we tested this game with secondary students and teachers from Switzerland. Our results indicate that the game "Discovering the cell" is well accepted by both students and teachers and may represent a good pedagogical approach to help teaching complex themes in molecular biology, even with students from different socioeconomical, cultural, and academic backgrounds.

  18. [Obesity in adults: a population based study in a small town in South of Brazil, 2005].

    PubMed

    Sarturi, Juliana Barbosa; das Neves, Janaina; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2010-01-01

    Changes in nutritional pattern in Brazilian population have been observed mainly in relation to obesity increase. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of obesity and associated factors in adult population in Santo Angelo, Rio Grande do Sul State, 2005. A cross sectional study was carried out involving adult subjects from 20 to 59 years old (n=434), of both sexes. People with Body Mass Index equal to or higher than 30 kg/m(2) were considered obese. A questionnaire was applied to collect data related to socioeconomic, demographic, and behavioral conditions. The multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the associated factors. The response rate was 95.0% and the prevalence of obesity was equal to 16.6% (CI 95% 13.120.1). Presence of obesity was positively associated with lack of physical activity, none feeding habits care, and some individuals that mentioned current health problems regardless of sex. The prevalence of obesity found was similar to other Brazilian population based studies. The results may support planning and implementing prevention actions as well as obesity control in adult population taking into account the relevant details of a small size town.

  19. Post-crackdown effectiveness of field-based forest law enforcement in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Börner, Jan; Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Hargrave, Jorge; König, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory enforcement of forest conservation laws is often dismissed as an ineffective approach to reducing tropical forest loss. Yet, effective enforcement is often a precondition for alternative conservation measures, such as payments for environmental services, to achieve desired outcomes. Fair and efficient policies to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) will thus crucially depend on understanding the determinants and requirements of enforcement effectiveness. Among potential REDD candidate countries, Brazil is considered to possess the most advanced deforestation monitoring and enforcement infrastructure. This study explores a unique dataset of over 15 thousand point coordinates of enforcement missions in the Brazilian Amazon during 2009 and 2010, after major reductions of deforestation in the region. We study whether local deforestation patterns have been affected by field-based enforcement and to what extent these effects vary across administrative boundaries. Spatial matching and regression techniques are applied at different spatial resolutions. We find that field-based enforcement operations have not been universally effective in deterring deforestation during our observation period. Inspections have been most effective in reducing large-scale deforestation in the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, where average conservation effects were 4.0 and 9.9 hectares per inspection, respectively. Despite regional and actor-specific heterogeneity in inspection effectiveness, field-based law enforcement is highly cost-effective on average and might be enhanced by closer collaboration between national and state-level authorities.

  20. Post-Crackdown Effectiveness of Field-Based Forest Law Enforcement in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Jan; Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Hargrave, Jorge; König, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory enforcement of forest conservation laws is often dismissed as an ineffective approach to reducing tropical forest loss. Yet, effective enforcement is often a precondition for alternative conservation measures, such as payments for environmental services, to achieve desired outcomes. Fair and efficient policies to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) will thus crucially depend on understanding the determinants and requirements of enforcement effectiveness. Among potential REDD candidate countries, Brazil is considered to possess the most advanced deforestation monitoring and enforcement infrastructure. This study explores a unique dataset of over 15 thousand point coordinates of enforcement missions in the Brazilian Amazon during 2009 and 2010, after major reductions of deforestation in the region. We study whether local deforestation patterns have been affected by field-based enforcement and to what extent these effects vary across administrative boundaries. Spatial matching and regression techniques are applied at different spatial resolutions. We find that field-based enforcement operations have not been universally effective in deterring deforestation during our observation period. Inspections have been most effective in reducing large-scale deforestation in the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, where average conservation effects were 4.0 and 9.9 hectares per inspection, respectively. Despite regional and actor-specific heterogeneity in inspection effectiveness, field-based law enforcement is highly cost-effective on average and might be enhanced by closer collaboration between national and state-level authorities. PMID:25875656

  1. Sustained Reduction of the Dengue Vector Population Resulting from an Integrated Control Strategy Applied in Two Brazilian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Regis, Lêda N.; Acioli, Ridelane Veiga; Silveira, José Constantino; Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Ribeiro, Cândida M. Nogueira.; da Silva, Juliana C. Serafim.; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Oliveira, Cláudia M. F.; Barbosa, Rosângela M. R.; Braga, Cynthia; Rodrigues, Marco Aurélio Benedetti; Silva, Marilú Gomes N. M.; Ribeiro Jr., Paulo Justiniano; Bonat, Wagner Hugo; de Castro Medeiros, Liliam César; Carvalho, Marilia Sa; Furtado, André Freire

    2013-01-01

    Aedes aegypti has developed evolution-driven adaptations for surviving in the domestic human habitat. Several trap models have been designed considering these strategies and tested for monitoring this efficient vector of Dengue. Here, we report a real-scale evaluation of a system for monitoring and controlling mosquito populations based on egg sampling coupled with geographic information systems technology. The SMCP-Aedes, a system based on open technology and open data standards, was set up from March/2008 to October/2011 as a pilot trial in two sites of Pernambuco -Brazil: Ipojuca (10,000 residents) and Santa Cruz (83,000), in a joint effort of health authorities and staff, and a network of scientists providing scientific support. A widespread infestation by Aedes was found in both sites in 2008–2009, with 96.8%–100% trap positivity. Egg densities were markedly higher in SCC than in Ipojuca. A 90% decrease in egg density was recorded in SCC after two years of sustained control pressure imposed by suppression of >7,500,000 eggs and >3,200 adults, plus larval control by adding fishes to cisterns. In Ipojuca, 1.1 million mosquito eggs were suppressed and a 77% reduction in egg density was achieved. This study aimed at assessing the applicability of a system using GIS and spatial statistic analysis tools for quantitative assessment of mosquito populations. It also provided useful information on the requirements for reducing well-established mosquito populations. Results from two cities led us to conclude that the success in markedly reducing an Aedes population required the appropriate choice of control measures for sustained mass elimination guided by a user-friendly mosquito surveillance system. The system was able to support interventional decisions and to assess the program’s success. Additionally, it created a stimulating environment for health staff and residents, which had a positive impact on their commitment to the dengue control program. PMID:23844059

  2. Analysis of the CCR5 gene coding region diversity in five South American populations reveals two new non-synonymous alleles in Amerindians and high CCR5*D32 frequency in Euro-Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) molecule is an important co-receptor for HIV. The effect of the CCR5*D32 allele in susceptibility to HIV infection and AIDS disease is well known. Other alleles than CCR5*D32 have not been analysed before, neither in Amerindians nor in the majority of the populations all over the world. We investigated the distribution of the CCR5 coding region alleles in South Brazil and noticed a high CCR5*D32 frequency in the Euro-Brazilian population of the Paraná State (9.3%), which is the highest thus far reported for Latin America. The D32 frequency is even higher among the Euro-Brazilian Mennonites (14.2%). This allele is uncommon in Afro-Brazilians (2.0%), rare in the Guarani Amerindians (0.4%) and absent in the Kaingang Amerindians and the Oriental-Brazilians. R223Q is common in the Oriental-Brazilians (7.7%) and R60S in the Afro-Brazilians (5.0%). A29S and L55Q present an impaired response to β-chemokines and occurred in Afro- and Euro-Brazilians with cumulative frequencies of 4.4% and 2.7%, respectively. Two new non-synonymous alleles were found in Amerindians: C323F (g.3729G > T) in Guarani (1.4%) and Y68C (g.2964A > G) in Kaingang (10.3%). The functional characteristics of these alleles should be defined and considered in epidemiological investigations about HIV-1 infection and AIDS incidence in Amerindian populations. PMID:21637640

  3. Non-HDL cholesterol is a good predictor of the risk of increased arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women in an urban Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Alvim, Rafael; Mourao, Carlos Alberto; Magalhães, Géssica Lopes; de Oliveira, Camila Maciel; Krieger, José Eduardo; Mill, José Geraldo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased arterial stiffness is an important determinant of the risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipid profile impairment, especially hypercholesterolemia, is associated with stiffer blood vessels. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine which of the five circulating lipid components (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides) is the best predictor of increased arterial stiffness in an urban Brazilian population. METHODS: A random sample of 1,662 individuals from the general population of Vitoria, Brazil (25-64 years), was selected, and lipid components were measured using standard methods. Pulse wave velocity was measured using a non-invasive automatic device, and increased arterial stiffness was defined as a pulse wave velocity ≥10 m/s. RESULTS: In men, only total cholesterol (OR=1.59; CI=1.02 to 2.48, p=0.04) was associated with the risk of increased arterial stiffness. In women, HDL-C (OR=1.99; CI=1.18 to 3.35, p=0.01) and non-HDL-C (OR=1.61; CI=1.01 to 2.56, p=0.04) were good predictors of the risk of increased arterial stiffness. However, these associations were only found in postmenopausal women (OR=2.06; CI=1.00 to 4.26, p=0.05 for HDL-C and OR=1.83; CI=1.01 to 3.33, p=0.04 for non-HDL-C). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that both HDL-C and non-HDL-C are good predictors of the risk of increased arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women in an urban Brazilian population and may be useful tools for assessing the risk of arterial stiffness. PMID:28273234

  4. Standardization of the face-hand test in a Brazilian multicultural population: prevalence of sensory extinction and implications for neurological diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Fogaroli, Marcelo Ortolani; Theotonio, Rodolfo Mazeto; de Carvalho Nunes, Hélio Rubens; de Lima Resende, Luiz Antônio; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The face-hand test is a simple, practical, and rapid test to detect neurological syndromes. However, it has not previously been assessed in a Brazilian sample; therefore, the objective of the present study was to standardize the face-hand test for use in the multi-cultural population of Brazil and identify the sociodemographic factors affecting the results. METHODS: This was a cross sectional study of 150 individuals. The sociodemographic variables that were collected included age, gender, race, body mass index and years of education. Standardization of the face-hand test occurred in 2 rounds of 10 sensory stimuli, with the participant seated to support the trunk and their vision obstructed in a sound-controlled environment. The face-hand test was conducted by applying 2 rounds of 10 sensory stimuli that were applied to the face and hand simultaneously. The associations between the face-hand test and sociodemographic variables were analyzed using Mann-Whitney tests and Spearman correlations. Binomial models were adjusted for the number of face-hand test variations, and ROC curves evaluated sensitivity and specificity of sensory extinction. RESULTS: There was no significant relationship between the sociodemographic variables and the number of stimuli perceived for the face-hand test. There was a high relative frequency of detection, 8 out of 10 stimuli, in this population. Sensory extinction was 25.3%, which increased with increasing age (OR=1.4[1:01–1:07]; p=0.006) and decreased significantly with increasing education (OR=0.82[0.71-0.94]; p=0.005). CONCLUSION: In the Brazilian population, a normal face-hand test score ranges between 8–10 stimuli, and the results indicate that sensory extinction is associated with increased age and lower levels of education. PMID:28076517

  5. Abnormalities in apolipoprotein and lipid levels in an HIV-infected Brazilian population under different treatment profiles: the relevance of apolipoprotein E genotypes and immunological status.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Abrão, Emiliana P; Mikawa, Angela Y; Landgraf, Viviane O; da Costa, Paulo I

    2004-05-01

    HIV infection is associated with disturbances in lipid metabolism due to a host's response mechanism and the current antiretroviral therapy. The pathological appearance and progression of atherosclerosis is dependent on the presence of injurious agents in the vascular endothelium and variations in different subsets of candidate genes. Therefore, the Hha I polymorphism in the apolipoprotein E gene was evaluated in addition to triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and apolipoprotein (apo) Al, B and E levels in 86 Brazilian HIV-infected patients and 29 healthy controls. The allele frequency for apoE in the HIV-infected group and controls was in agreement with data on the Brazilian population. Dyslipidemia was observed in the HIV group and verified by increased levels of triglycerides, VLDL and apoE, and decreased levels of HDL and apoAl. The greatest abnormalities in these biochemical variables were shown in the HIV-infected individuals whose immune function was more compromised. The effect of the genetic variation at the APOE gene on biochemical variables was more pronounced in the HIV-infected individuals who carried the apoE2/3 genotype. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)-receiving group presented increased levels of total cholesterol and apoE. Dyslipidemia was a predictable consequence of HIV infection and the protease inhibitors intensified the increase in apoE values.

  6. Combined venomics, venom gland transcriptomics, bioactivities, and antivenomics of two Bothrops jararaca populations from geographic isolated regions within the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Machado, Larissa; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Jorge, Roberta Jeane B; Leitão-De-Araújo, Moema; Alves, Maria Lúcia M; Alvares, Diego Janisch; De Miranda, Joari; Nowatzki, Jenifer; de Morais-Zani, Karen; Fernandes, Wilson; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita Mitico; Fernández, Julián; Zingali, Russolina B; Gutiérrez, José María; Corrêa-Netto, Carlos; Calvete, Juan J

    2016-03-01

    Bothrops jararaca is a slender and semi-arboreal medically relevant pit viper species endemic to tropical and subtropical forests in southern Brazil, Paraguay, and northern Argentina (Misiones). Within its geographic range, it is often abundant and is an important cause of snakebite. Although no subspecies are currently recognized, geographic analyses have revealed the existence of two well-supported B. jararaca clades that diverged during the Pliocene ~3.8Mya and currently display a southeastern (SE) and a southern (S) Atlantic rainforest (Mata Atlântica) distribution. The spectrum, geographic variability, and ontogenetic changes of the venom proteomes of snakes from these two B. jararaca phylogroups were investigated applying a combined venom gland transcriptomic and venomic analysis. Comparisons of the venom proteomes and transcriptomes of B. jararaca from the SE and S geographic regions revealed notable interpopulational variability that may be due to the different levels of population-specific transcriptional regulation, including, in the case of the southern population, a marked ontogenetic venom compositional change involving the upregulation of the myotoxic PLA2 homolog, bothropstoxin-I. This population-specific marker can be used to estimate the proportion of venom from the southern population present in the B. jararaca venom pool used for the Brazilian soro antibotrópico (SAB) antivenom production. On the other hand, the southeastern population-specific D49-PLA2 molecules, BinTX-I and BinTX-II, lend support to the notion that the mainland ancestor of Bothrops insularis was originated within the same population that gave rise to the current SE B. jararaca phylogroup, and that this insular species endemic to Queimada Grande Island (Brazil) expresses a pedomorphic venom phenotype. Mirroring their compositional divergence, the two geographic B. jararaca venom pools showed distinct bioactivity profiles. However, the SAB antivenom manufactured in Vital Brazil

  7. [Polarization reversal in the development of Brazilian metropolises? An analysis based on demographic indicators, using the example of Sao Paulo].

    PubMed

    Bahr, J; Wehrhahn, R

    1995-01-01

    "Using the example of Sao Paulo, this paper addresses itself to the question of how far the decrease in growth rates one observes in large Brazilian metropolises can be interpreted as a process of polarization reversal. The analysis is carried out on the basis of demographic data from small area units, which include the results from the most recent 1991 census. Although it had already been possible in the 1970s to discern first indications of such a process setting in, in the decade 1981-91 indicators of population growth and migration balances agree in pointing to a polarization reversal." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  8. Methodological quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Riera, Rachel; Torloni, Maria Regina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based health journal. METHOD: All systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health published in the last five years in the Brazilian Journal of Evidence-based Health were retrieved. Two independent reviewers critically assessed the methodological quality of reviews and trials using AMSTAR and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Table, respectively. RESULTS: Systematic reviews and clinical trials accounted for less than 10% of the 61 original studies on women's health published in the São Paulo Medical Journal over the last five years. All five reviews were considered to be of moderate quality; the worst domains were publication bias and the appropriate use of study quality in formulating conclusions. All three clinical trials were judged to have a high risk of bias. The participant blinding, personnel and outcome assessors and allocation concealment domains had the worst scores. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the systematic reviews and clinical trials on women's health recently published in a Brazilian evidence-based journal are of low to moderate quality. The quality of these types of studies needs improvement. PMID:23778332

  9. A morphological perceptron with gradient-based learning for Brazilian stock market forecasting.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ricardo de A

    2012-04-01

    Several linear and non-linear techniques have been proposed to solve the stock market forecasting problem. However, a limitation arises from all these techniques and is known as the random walk dilemma (RWD). In this scenario, forecasts generated by arbitrary models have a characteristic one step ahead delay with respect to the time series values, so that, there is a time phase distortion in stock market phenomena reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a suitable model inspired by concepts in mathematical morphology (MM) and lattice theory (LT). This model is generically called the increasing morphological perceptron (IMP). Also, we present a gradient steepest descent method to design the proposed IMP based on ideas from the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and using a systematic approach to overcome the problem of non-differentiability of morphological operations. Into the learning process we have included a procedure to overcome the RWD, which is an automatic correction step that is geared toward eliminating time phase distortions that occur in stock market phenomena. Furthermore, an experimental analysis is conducted with the IMP using four complex non-linear problems of time series forecasting from the Brazilian stock market. Additionally, two natural phenomena time series are used to assess forecasting performance of the proposed IMP with other non financial time series. At the end, the obtained results are discussed and compared to results found using models recently proposed in the literature.

  10. Color and genomic ancestry in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Flavia C.; Amado, Roberto C.; Lambertucci, José R.; Rocha, Jorge; Antunes, Carlos M.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2003-01-01

    This work was undertaken to ascertain to what degree the physical appearance of a Brazilian individual was predictive of genomic African ancestry. Using a panel of 10 population-specific alleles, we assigned to each person an African ancestry index (AAI). The procedure was able to tell apart, with no overlaps, 20 males from northern Portugal from 20 males from São Tomé Island on the west coast of Africa. We also tested 10 Brazilian Amerindians and observed that their AAI values fell in the same range as the Europeans. Finally, we studied two different Brazilian population samples. The first consisted of 173 individuals from a rural Southeastern community, clinically classified according to their Color (white, black, or intermediate) with a multivariate evaluation based on skin pigmentation in the medial part of the arm, hair color and texture, and the shape of the nose and lips. In contrast to the clear-cut results with the African and European samples, our results showed large variances and extensive overlaps among the three Color categories. We next embarked on a study of 200 unrelated Brazilian white males who originated from cosmopolitan centers of the four major geographic regions of the country. The results showed AAI values intermediate between Europeans and Africans, even in southern Brazil, a region predominantly peopled by European immigrants. Our data suggest that in Brazil, at an individual level, color, as determined by physical evaluation, is a poor predictor of genomic African ancestry, estimated by molecular markers. PMID:12509516

  11. Genotyping-by-sequencing approach indicates geographic distance as the main factor affecting genetic structure and gene flow in Brazilian populations of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae)

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Brandão, Karina Lucas; Silva, Oscar Arnaldo Batista Neto e; Brandão, Marcelo Mendes; Omoto, Celso; Sperling, Felix A H

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta is one of the major pests of stone and pome fruit species in Brazil. Here, we applied 1226 SNPs obtained by genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether host species associations or other factors such as geographic distance structured populations of this pest. Populations from the main areas of occurrence of G. molesta were sampled principally from peach and apple orchards. Three main clusters were recovered by neighbor-joining analysis, all defined by geographic proximity between sampling localities. Overall genetic structure inferred by a nonhierarchical amova resulted in a significant ΦST value = 0.19109. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that SNPs gathered by genotyping-by-sequencing can be used to infer genetic structure of a pest insect in Brazil; moreover, our results indicate that those markers are very informative even over a restricted geographic scale. We also demonstrate that host plant association has little effect on genetic structure among Brazilian populations of G. molesta; on the other hand, reduced gene flow promoted by geographic isolation has a stronger impact on population differentiation. PMID:26029261

  12. Baseline susceptibility and monitoring of Brazilian populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) to Vip3Aa20 insecticidal protein.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Oderlei; Amado, Douglas; Sousa, Renan S; Segatti, Fabiana; Fatoretto, Julio; Burd, Anthony D; Omoto, Celso

    2014-04-01

    The genetically modified maize expressing Vip3Aa20 insecticidal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner is abiotechnological option for the control of Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and Diatraea saccharalis (F.) in Brazil. To support an Insect Resistance Management program, we conducted studies of baseline susceptibility and monitoring of Brazilian populations of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis to the Vip3Aa20 insecticidal protein. Neonates were exposed to Vip3Aa20 applied on artificial diet surface. Mortality and growth inhibition were assessed after 7 d. All populations were susceptible to Vip3Aa20. The LC50 ranged from 92.38 to 611.65 ng Vip3Aa20/cm2 for 16 populations of S. frugiperda (6.6-fold variation), and between 61.18 and 367.86 ng Vip3Aa20/cm2 for 6 populations of D. saccharalis (sixfold variation). The EC50 ranged from 21.76 to 70.09 and 48.65 to 163.60 ng Vip3Aa20/cm2 for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. There was a low interpopulation variation in susceptibility to Vip3Aa20, which represents the natural geographic variation in the response, and not the variation caused by previous exposure to selection pressure. For these two pests, the diagnostic concentrations of 2,000 and 3,600 ng of Vip3Aa20/cm2 caused high mortality. These diagnostic concentrations will be used in resistance monitoring programs in Brazil.

  13. Population Genetic Analysis Reveals a High Genetic Diversity in the Brazilian Cryptococcus gattii VGII Population and Shifts the Global Origin from the Amazon Rainforest to the Semi-arid Desert in the Northeast of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Trilles, Luciana; Martins, Marilena; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Pham, Cau D.; Martins, Liline; dos Santos, Wallace; Chang, Marilene; Brito-Santos, Fabio; Santos, Dayane C. S.; Fortes, Silvana; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Wanke, Bodo; Melhem, Márcia S. C.; Lazéra, Márcia S.; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are responsible globally for almost one million cryptococcosis cases yearly, mostly in immunocompromised patients, such as those living with HIV. Infections due to C. gattii have mainly been described in tropical and subtropical regions, but its adaptation to temperate regions was crucial in the species evolution and highlighted the importance of this pathogenic yeast in the context of disease. Cryptococcus gattii molecular type VGII has come to the forefront in connection with an on-going emergence in the Pacific North West of North America. Taking into account that previous work pointed towards South America as an origin of this species, the present work aimed to assess the genetic diversity within the Brazilian C. gattii VGII population in order to gain new insights into its origin and global dispersal from the South American continent using the ISHAM consensus MLST typing scheme. Our results corroborate the finding that the Brazilian C. gattii VGII population is highly diverse. The diversity is likely due to recombination generated from sexual reproduction, as evidenced by the presence of both mating types in clinical and environmental samples. The data presented herein strongly supports the emergence of highly virulent strains from ancestors in the Northern regions of Brazil, Amazonia and the Northeast. Numerous genotypes represent a link between Brazil and other parts of the world reinforcing South America as the most likely origin of the C. gattii VGII subtypes and their subsequent global spread, including their dispersal into North America, where they caused a major emergence. PMID:27529479

  14. Temperature-Dependent Development and Survival of Brazilian Populations of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis capitata, from Tropical, Subtropical and Temperate Regions

    PubMed Central

    Ricalde, Marcelo P.; Nava, Dori E.; Loeck, Alci E.; Donatti, Michele G.

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is one of the principal exotic pests affecting Brazilian production in the northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil. In the south, it is has potential as a serious threat to temperate-climate fruit farms, since it is already found in urban and suburban communities in this region. We studied the biological characteristics of C. capitata populations from Pelotas-RS (temperate climate), Petrolina-PE (tropical), and Campinas-SP (subtropical). Ceratitis capitata biology was studied under controlled temperature (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 ± 1 °C), 70 ± 10% RH, and 14:10 L:D photoperiod. The duration and survival rate of the egg, larval, and pupal stages were evaluated and the thermal requirements of these three populations were determined. The duration and survival of these developmental stages varied with temperature, with similar values for the three populations, except for some variation in the egg phase. Egg to adult developmental time for all three populations was inversely proportional to temperature; from 15 to 30 °C developmental time varied from 71.2 to 17.1, 70.2 to 17.1, and 68.5 to 16.9 days, respectively. Survival during development was affected at 15 to 30 °C, and differed significantly from survival at 20 to 25 °C. At 35 °C, immature stages did not develop. The basal temperature and degree-day requirement were similar for all immature stages except for the egg stage. The basal temperatures and thermal constants were 9.30 and 350, 8.47 and 341, and 9.60 °C and 328 degree-days for the Pelotas, Petrolina, and Campinas populations, respectively. Results suggested that survival and thermal requirements are similar for these tropical, subtropical, and temperate populations of C. capitata, and demonstrate the species' capacity to adapt to different climate conditions. PMID:22963468

  15. Temperature-dependent development and survival of Brazilian populations of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, from tropical, subtropical and temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Marcelo P; Nava, Dori E; Loeck, Alci E; Donatti, Michele G

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is one of the principal exotic pests affecting Brazilian production in the northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil. In the south, it is has potential as a serious threat to temperate-climate fruit farms, since it is already found in urban and suburban communities in this region. We studied the biological characteristics of C. capitata populations from Pelotas-RS (temperate climate), Petrolina-PE (tropical), and Campinas-SP (subtropical). Ceratitis capitata biology was studied under controlled temperature (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 ± 1 °C), 70 ± 10% RH, and 14:10 L:D photoperiod. The duration and survival rate of the egg, larval, and pupal stages were evaluated and the thermal requirements of these three populations were determined. The duration and survival of these developmental stages varied with temperature, with similar values for the three populations, except for some variation in the egg phase. Egg to adult developmental time for all three populations was inversely proportional to temperature; from 15 to 30 °C developmental time varied from 71.2 to 17.1, 70.2 to 17.1, and 68.5 to 16.9 days, respectively. Survival during development was affected at 15 to 30 °C, and differed significantly from survival at 20 to 25 °C. At 35 °C, immature stages did not develop. The basal temperature and degree-day requirement were similar for all immature stages except for the egg stage. The basal temperatures and thermal constants were 9.30 and 350, 8.47 and 341, and 9.60 °C and 328 degree-days for the Pelotas, Petrolina, and Campinas populations, respectively. Results suggested that survival and thermal requirements are similar for these tropical, subtropical, and temperate populations of C. capitata, and demonstrate the species' capacity to adapt to different climate conditions.

  16. Population Genetics of Jaguars (Panthera onca) in the Brazilian Pantanal: Molecular Evidence for Demographic Connectivity on a Regional Scale.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Fernanda Pedone; Haag, Taiana; Azevedo, Fernando C C; Silveira, Leandro; Cavalcanti, Sandra M C; Salzano, Francisco M; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are important threats to carnivores worldwide, and can be especially intense for large predators. Jaguars have already been extirpated from over half of their original area of distribution, and few regions still maintain large populations. For these, detailed understanding is crucial for setting appropriate recovery targets in impacted areas. The Pantanal is among the best examples of a region with a large jaguar population in a healthy environment. Here, we analyzed 12 microsatellite loci to characterize genetic diversity and population structure of 52 jaguars sampled in 4 localities of the southern Pantanal, and compared them with prior studies of heavily fragmented populations of the Atlantic Forest. Although we observed some internal structure among the Pantanal localities, our results indicated that this area comprises a single population with high genetic variability. Moreover, our comparative analyses supported the hypothesis that the strong population structure observed in the Atlantic Forest derives from recent, anthropogenic fragmentation. We also observed significant but low levels of genetic differentiation between the Pantanal and Atlantic Forest populations, indicating recent connectivity between jaguars occurring in these biomes. Evidence for admixture between the Pantanal and a population on the western boundary of the Atlantic Forest corroborates the transitional nature of the latter area, where the jaguar population has already been extirpated. Our results can be used to understand jaguar population dynamics in a region that is less disturbed than the Atlantic forest, and to support the design of conservation strategies that maintain and restore natural connectivity among currently isolated areas.

  17. Reevaluating Suitability Estimates Based on Dynamics of Cropland Expansion in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Noojipady, Praveen; Macedo, Marcia M.; Victoria, Daniel C.; Bolfe, Edson L.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural suitability maps are a key input for land use zoning and projections of cropland expansion. Suitability assessments typically consider edaphic conditions, climate, crop characteristics, and sometimes incorporate accessibility to transportation and market infrastructure. However, correct weighting among these disparate factors is challenging, given rapid development of new crop varieties, irrigation, and road networks, as well as changing global demand for agricultural commodities. Here, we compared three independent assessments of cropland suitability to spatial and temporal dynamics of agricultural expansion in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso during 2001 2012. We found that areas of recent cropland expansion identified using satellite data were generally designated as low to moderate suitability for rainfed crop production. Our analysis highlighted the abrupt nature of suitability boundaries, rather than smooth gradients of agricultural potential, with little additional cropland expansion beyond the extent of the flattest areas (0-2% slope). Satellite-based estimates of the interannual variability in the use of existing crop areas also provided an alternate means to assess suitability. On average, cropland areas in the Cerrado biome had higher utilization (84%) than croplands in the Amazon region of northern Mato Grosso (74%). Areas of more recent expansion had lower utilization than croplands established before 2002, providing empirical evidence for lower suitability or alternative management strategies (e.g., pasture soya rotations) for lands undergoing more recent land use transitions. This unplanted reserve constitutes a large area of potentially available cropland (PAC)without further expansion, within the management limits imposed for pest management and fallow cycles. Using two key constraints on future cropland expansion, slope and restrictions on further deforestation of Amazon or Cerrado vegetation, we found little available flat land for

  18. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and gluthatione S-transferases M1 and T1 gene polymorphisms in three Brazilian population groups.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Hiragi, Cássia; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Rocha, Dulce Maria Sucena; de Oliveira, Silviene Fabiana; Hatagima, Ana; de Nazaré Klautau-Guimarães, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) reduce the oxidation rates in the organism. Gluthatione S-transferases (GSTs) play a vital role in phase 2 of biotransformation of many substances. Variation in the expression of these enzymes suggests individual differences for the degree of antioxidant protection and geographical differences in the distribution of these variants. We described the distribution frequency of CAT (21A/T), SOD2 (Ala9Val), GPX1 (Pro198Leu), GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms in three Brazilian population groups: Kayabi Amerindians (n = 60), Kalunga Afro-descendants (n = 72), and an urban mixed population from Federal District (n = 162). Frequencies of the variants observed in Kalunga (18% to 58%) and Federal District (33% to 63%) were similar to those observed in Euro and Afro-descendants, while in Kayabi (3% to 68%), depending on the marker, frequencies were similar to the ones found in different ethnic groups. Except for SOD2 in all population groups studied here, and for GPX1 in Kalunga, the genotypic distributions were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. These data can clarify the contribution of different ethnicities in the formation of mixed populations, such as that of Brazil. Moreover, outcomes will be valuable resources for future functional studies and for genetic studies in specific populations. If these studies are designed to comprehensively explore the role of these genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of human diseases they may help to prevent inconsistent genotype-phenotype associations in pharmacogenetic studies.

  19. Population-Based Smoking Cessation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this report was to provide the Ministry of Health Promotion (MHP) with a summary of existing evidence-based reviews of the clinical and economic outcomes of population-based smoking cessation strategies. Background Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Ontario, linked to approximately 13,000 avoidable premature deaths annually – the vast majority of these are attributable to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive lung disease. (1) In Ontario, tobacco related health care costs amount to $6.1 billion annually, or about $502 per person (including non-smokers) and account for 1.4% of the provincial domestic product. (2) In 2007, there were approximately 1.7 to 1.9 million smokers in Ontario with two-thirds of these intending to quit in the next six months and one-third wanting to quit within 30 days. (3) In 2007/2008, Ontario invested $15 million in cessation programs, services and training. (4) In June 2009, the Ministry of Health Promotion (MHP) requested that MAS provide a summary of the evidence base surrounding population-based smoking cessation strategies. Project Scope The MAS and the MHP agreed that the project would consist of a clinical and economic summary of the evidence surrounding nine population-based strategies for smoking cessation including: Mass media interventions Telephone counselling Post-secondary smoking cessation programs (colleges/universities) Community-wide stop-smoking contests (i.e. Quit and Win) Community interventions Physician advice to quit Nursing interventions for smoking cessation Hospital-based interventions for smoking cessation Pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation, specifically: Nicotine replacement therapies Antidepressants Anxiolytic drugs Opioid antagonists Clonidine Nicotine receptor partial agonists Reviews examining interventions for Cut Down to Quit (CDTQ) or harm reduction were not included in this review. In addition

  20. Genetic variation and variation in aggressiveness to native and exotic hosts among Brazilian populations of Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Thomas C; Thorpe, Daniel J; Alfenas, Acelino C

    2011-05-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata is a complex of many species that cause wilt and cankers on woody plants and rot of storage roots or corms of many economically important crops worldwide. In Brazil, C. fimbriata infects different cultivated crop plants that are not native to Brazil, including Gmelina arborea, Eucalyptus spp., Mangifera indica (mango), Ficus carica (fig), and Colocasia esculenta (inhame). Phylogenetic analyses and inoculation studies were performed to test the hypothesis that there are host-specialized lineages of C. fimbriata in Brazil. The internal transcribed spacer region ribosomal DNA sequences varied greatly but there was little resolution of lineages based on these sequences. A portion of the MAT1-2 mating type gene showed less variation, and this variation corresponded more closely with host of origin. However, mango isolates were found scattered throughout the tree. Inoculation experiments on the five exotic hosts showed substantial variation in aggressiveness within and among pathogen populations. Native hosts from the same families as the exotic hosts tended to be less susceptible than the cultivated hosts, but there was little correlation between aggressiveness to the cultivated and native hosts of the same family. Cultivation and vegetative propagation of exotic crops may select for strains that are particularly aggressive on those crops.

  1. [Brazilian colonization in the Paraguayan agricultural frontier].

    PubMed

    Neupert, R F

    1991-04-01

    This work briefly describes Brazilian colonization of the Paraguayan agricultural frontier, analyzes factors responsible for expelling population from Brazil and for attracting Brazilians to Paraguay, and assesses the economic and social consequences of immigration to the area. Paraguay's vast and sparsely populated agricultural frontier in areas outside the Central subregion underwent a process of intense colonization from the early 1960s to the mid-1980s. The Paraguayan government initiated an ambitious colonization program in 1963 to increase production, relieve population pressure and subdivision of small parcels in the Central subregion, encourage agricultural modernization, and produce a more diversified agriculture. Paraguayan agriculture in the early 1960s suffered from excessive concentration of land in a few hands and resulting exclusion of around 3/4 of workers from ownership and from any possibility of obtaining credit to fund technological improvements. Results of studies 2 decades after implementation of the colonization plan suggest that it has failed in significant areas. Although a considerable population redistribution alleviated pressure in the Central subregion, it apparently resulted more from spontaneous movement of peasants outside the colonization areas than from the official program. Concentration of lands is now occurring in the colonization area. Assistance for agricultural modernization and diversification of production in the peasant sector has been minimal. On the other hand, production of soy, wheat, and cotton for export increased substantially, because of an entrepreneurial agriculture capitalized by foreign as well as national interests The unmet goals of the colonization program would have required structural reforms rather than simple spatial redistribution of the population. Many of the colonists in the 1970s were Brazilian families displaced by mechanized agriculture in the southern states of Parana, Santa Catarina, and Rio

  2. Brazilian propolis extract used as an additive to decrease methane emissions from the rumen microbial population in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nadine Woruby; Zeoula, Lucia Maria; Yoshimura, Emerson Henri; Machado, Erica; Macheboeuf, Didier; Cornu, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    Propolis is a product that is rich in phenolic compounds and can be utilized in animal nutrition as a dietary additive. In this study, the effects of a Brazilian green propolis extract on rumen fermentation and gas production were determined. The fate of propolis phenolic compounds in the rumen medium was also investigated. Fermentation was done in 24-h batches over three periods. Inoculates were obtained from cows fed on grassland hay and concentrate. Propolis extract in a hydroalcoholic solution was applied at increasing doses to the substrate (1 to 56 g/kg). The fermentation substrate consisted on a mixture of alfalfa hay, soybean meal, and wheat grain mixture in dry matter. After 24 h of fermentation, seven new compounds were observed in the medium in amounts that correlated to the propolis dose. The dose of propolis extract linearly decreased the pH of the medium and linearly increased propionate production, which reduced the acetate-to-propionate ratio and influenced the total production of short-chain fatty acids. Propolis also linearly reduced methane production and increased the carbon dioxide-to-methane ratio. Ammonia nitrogen levels and in vitro digestibility of organic matter were similar among the treatments. The combination of increased propionate production and decreased methane production suggests better energy utilization from the feed.

  3. Transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm: Brazilian Application

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Fabio; Salles, João; Hamdy, Osama; Coutinho, Walmir; Regina Baptista, Deise; Benchimol, Alexander; Marchetti, Albert; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Mechanick, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, pre-diabetes, and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide, especially in the developing nations of South America. Brazil has experienced an exponential increase in the prevalence of these chronic non-communicable diseases. The rising prevalence is probably due to changing eating patterns, sedentary living, and a progressive aging of the population. These trends and their underlying causes carry untoward consequences for all Brazilians and the future of Brazilian public health and the healthcare system. Lifestyle changes that include healthy eating (nutrition therapy) and regular physical activity (structured exercise) represent efficient inexpensive measures to prevent and/or treat the aforementioned disorders and are recommended for all afflicted patients. Regrettably, the implementation of lifestyle changes is fraught with clinical and personal challenges in real life. The transcultural Diabetes Nutrition Algorithm (tDNA) is a therapeutic tool intended to foster implementation of lifestyle recommendations and to improve disease-related outcomes in common clinical settings. It is evidence-based and amenable to cultural adaptation. The Brazilian Diabetes Association, Society of Cardiology and Ministry of Health guidelines for nutrition therapy and physical exercise were considered for the Brazilian adaptation. The resultant tDNA-Brazil and its underlying recommendations are presented and explained. PMID:26340638

  4. Brazilian Mothers with HIV: Experiences with Diagnosis and Treatment in a Human Rights Based Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Jessica; Galvao, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz; Lindau, Stacy Tessler

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on in-depth interviews with a group of urban poor HIV positive mothers in Northeastern Brazil, this essay examines their experiences with HIV medical diagnosis and treatment. It argues that strong social and religious networks as well as the Universal HIV treatment program provide Northeastern Brazilian mothers with forms of support that may be absent in other countries. It further suggests that more research be done to determine how particular forms of health care, such as the human rights based approach Brazil has taken to HIV/AIDS, inform patient-provider relationships. PMID:22150016

  5. Genetic structure of red-handed howler monkey populations in the fragmented landscape of Eastern Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We genotyped 15 microsatellite loci in order to evaluate the effects of habitat fragmentation, caused by flooding of the Tucuruí reservoir, on the genetic structure of Alouatta belzebul in eastern Amazonia. The analysis included two populations sampled in 1984, representing both margins of the Tocantins river, and three populations sampled 18 years later. Minimal differences in the diversity levels between present-day (Ho = 0.62-0.69 and AR = 6.07-7.21) and pre-flooding (Ho = 0.60-0.62 and A R = 6.27-6.77) populations indicated there was no significant loss of genetic variability, possibly because of successful management strategies applied during the flooding. The changes observed were limited to shifts in the composition of alleles, which presumably reflect the admixture of subpopulations during flooding. Given this, there were significant differences in the Rst values (p = 0.05) in all but one between-site comparison. Both present-day and original populations showed a deficit of heterozygotes, which suggests that this may be typical of the species, at least at a local level, perhaps because of specific ecological characteristics. The relatively large number of private alleles recorded in all populations may be a consequence of the Wahlund effect resulting from population admixture or a process of expansion rather than the loss of rare alleles through genetic drift. Additionally, the levels of genetic variability observed in this study were higher than those reported for other species of Neotropical primates, suggesting good fitness levels in these A. belzebul populations. Regular genetic monitoring of remnant populations, especially on islands, should nevertheless be an integral component of long-term management strategies. PMID:21637590

  6. Genetic structure of red-handed howler monkey populations in the fragmented landscape of Eastern Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Heitor B; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Ferrari, Stephen F; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula C

    2010-10-01

    We genotyped 15 microsatellite loci in order to evaluate the effects of habitat fragmentation, caused by flooding of the Tucuruí reservoir, on the genetic structure of Alouatta belzebul in eastern Amazonia. The analysis included two populations sampled in 1984, representing both margins of the Tocantins river, and three populations sampled 18 years later. Minimal differences in the diversity levels between present-day (Ho = 0.62-0.69 and A(R) = 6.07-7.21) and pre-flooding (Ho = 0.60-0.62 and A (R) = 6.27-6.77) populations indicated there was no significant loss of genetic variability, possibly because of successful management strategies applied during the flooding. The changes observed were limited to shifts in the composition of alleles, which presumably reflect the admixture of subpopulations during flooding. Given this, there were significant differences in the Rst values (p = 0.05) in all but one between-site comparison. Both present-day and original populations showed a deficit of heterozygotes, which suggests that this may be typical of the species, at least at a local level, perhaps because of specific ecological characteristics. The relatively large number of private alleles recorded in all populations may be a consequence of the Wahlund effect resulting from population admixture or a process of expansion rather than the loss of rare alleles through genetic drift. Additionally, the levels of genetic variability observed in this study were higher than those reported for other species of Neotropical primates, suggesting good fitness levels in these A. belzebul populations. Regular genetic monitoring of remnant populations, especially on islands, should nevertheless be an integral component of long-term management strategies.

  7. About rats and jackfruit trees: modeling the carrying capacity of a Brazilian Atlantic Forest spiny-rat Trinomys dimidiatus (Günther, 1877) - Rodentia, Echimyidae - population with varying jackfruit tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus L.) abundances.

    PubMed

    Mello, J H F; Moulton, T P; Raíces, D S L; Bergallo, H G

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a six-year study aimed at evaluating if and how a Brazilian Atlantic Forest small mammal community responded to the presence of the invasive exotic species Artocarpus heterophyllus, the jackfruit tree. In the surroundings of Vila Dois Rios, Ilha Grande, RJ, 18 grids were established, 10 where the jackfruit tree was present and eight were it was absent. Previous results indicated that the composition and abundance of this small mammal community were altered by the presence and density of A. heterophyllus. One observed effect was the increased population size of the spiny-rat Trinomys dimidiatus within the grids where the jackfruit trees were present. Therefore we decided to create a mathematical model for this species, based on the Verhulst-Pearl logistic equation. Our objectives were i) to calculate the carrying capacity K based on real data of the involved species and the environment; ii) propose and evaluate a mathematical model to estimate the population size of T. dimidiatus based on the monthly seed production of jackfruit tree, Artocarpus heterophyllus and iii) determinate the minimum jackfruit tree seed production to maintain at least two T. dimidiatus individuals in one study grid. Our results indicated that the predicted values by the model for the carrying capacity K were significantly correlated with real data. The best fit was found considering 20~35% energy transfer efficiency between trophic levels. Within the scope of assumed premises, our model showed itself to be an adequate simulator for Trinomys dimidiatus populations where the invasive jackfruit tree is present.

  8. An Unsupervised Rule-Based Method to Populate Ontologies from Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Eduardo; Siqueira, Sean; Andreatta, Alexandre

    An increasing amount of information is available on the web and usually is expressed as text. Semantic information is implicit in these texts, since they are mainly intended for human consumption and interpretation. Because unstructured information is not easily handled automatically, an information extraction process has to be used to identify concepts and establish relations among them. Ontologies are an appropriate way to represent structured knowledge bases, enabling sharing, reuse and inference. In this paper, an information extraction process is used for populating a domain ontology. It targets Brazilian Portuguese texts from a biographical dictionary of music, which requires specific tools due to some language unique aspects. An unsupervised rule-based method is proposed. Through this process, latent concepts and relations expressed in natural language can be extracted and represented as an ontology, allowing new uses and visualizations of the content, such as semantically browsing and inferring new knowledge.

  9. Population data of 16 autosomal STR loci of the Powerplex ESX 17 System in a Brazilian Population from the State of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Almeida Prado Oliveira e Sousa, Maria Luiza; de Oliveira, Marco Aurelio Tuena; Auler-Bittencout, Eloisa A; Soares-Vieira, Jose Arnaldo; Munoz, Daniel Romero; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato

    2014-07-01

    The State of São Paulo is the most populous state in Brazil, including approximately one fifth of the population of the country. In addition to a strong economy, the state has relatively good social indicators when compared with the rest of the country. The capital city, also called São Paulo, is the sixth largest city in the world. Its population is considered the most multicultural and racially mixed in Brazil. Currently, the largest populations in São Paulo are of Italian, Lebanese, Spanish and Japanese origin, and the state has the largest number of Northeasterners outside of the Northeast region. This population structure may lead to a particular genotype frequency. In this context, the formation of a new database containing the allele frequencies of five new genetic markers (D2S441, D10S1248, D22S1045, D1S1656 and D12S391) in a sample population is relevant. The allele frequencies of 16 STR loci, including the five new European Standard Set (ESS) loci, were calculated in a sample of 1088-1098 unrelated individuals, who geographically represent the Capital city.

  10. Impact of forest fragment size on the population structure of three palm species (Arecaceae) in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest.

    PubMed

    Portela, Rita de Cássia Quitete; dos Santos, Flavio Antonio Maes

    2014-06-01

    The main threats to natural populations in terrestrial ecosystems have been widly recognized to be the habitat fragmentation and the exploitation of forest products. In this study, we compared the density of the populations and the structure of three tropical palm species, Astrocaryum aculeatissimum, Euterpe edulis and Geonoma schottiana. For this, we selected five forest fragments of different sizes (3 500ha, 2 400ha, 57ha, 21ha and 19ha) where palms were censused in nine 30 x 30m plots. We tracked the palms survival from 2005 to 2007, and recorded all new individuals encountered. Each individual was assigned in one of the five ontogenetic stages: seedling, infant, juvenile, immature and reproductive. The demographic structure of each palm species was analyzed and compared by a generalized linear model (GLM). The analysis was performed per palm species. The forest fragment area and the year of observation were explanatory variables, and the proportion of individuals in each ontogenetic class and palm density were response variables. The total number of individuals (from seedlings to reproductives, of all species) monitored was 6 450 in 2005, 7 268 in 2006, and 8 664 in 2007. The densities of two palm species were not influenced by the size of the fragment, but the population density of A. aculeatissimum was dependent on the size of the fragment: there were more individuals in the bigger than in the smaller forest fragments. The population structure of A. aculeatissimum, E. edulis, and G. schottiana was not altered in the smaller fragments, except the infants of G. schottiana. The main point to be drawn from the results found in this study is that the responses of density and population structure seem not to be dependent on fragment size, except for one species that resulted more abundant in bigger fragments.

  11. Allele frequencies data and statistic parameters for 13 STR loci in a population of the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Palha, Teresinha de Jesus Brabo Ferreira; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2007-05-24

    Allele frequencies for 13 short tandem repeat (D3S1358, vWA, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, TH01, TPOX, D16S539, CSF1PO, D8S1179 and FGA) loci were determined in a sample of 325 unrelated individuals from the population of the Amazon of Belém, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensic and paternity testing. The forensic parameters investigated presented high values. The power of discrimination and the probability of exclusion for these 13 STRs are 99.999999999992% and 99.9998%, respectively. In conclusion, these 13 markers are suitable for forensic analysis and paternity tests of the Amazonian population.

  12. A population-based Habitable Zone perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsom, Andras

    2015-08-01

    What can we tell about exoplanet habitability if currently only the stellar properties, planet radius, and the incoming stellar flux are known? The Habitable Zone (HZ) is the region around stars where planets can harbor liquid water on their surfaces. The HZ is traditionally conceived as a sharp region around the star because it is calculated for one planet with specific properties e.g., Earth-like or desert planets , or rocky planets with H2 atmospheres. Such planet-specific approach is limiting because the planets’ atmospheric and geophysical properties, which influence the surface climate and the presence of liquid water, are currently unknown but expected to be diverse.A statistical HZ description is outlined which does not select one specific planet type. Instead the atmospheric and surface properties of exoplanets are treated as random variables and a continuous range of planet scenarios are considered. Various probability density functions are assigned to each observationally unconstrained random variable, and a combination of Monte Carlo sampling and climate modeling is used to generate synthetic exoplanet populations with known surface climates. Then, the properties of the liquid water bearing subpopulation is analyzed.Given our current observational knowledge of small exoplanets, the HZ takes the form of a weakly-constrained but smooth probability function. The model shows that the HZ has an inner edge: it is unlikely that planets receiving two-three times more stellar radiation than Earth can harbor liquid water. But a clear outer edge is not seen: a planet that receives a fraction of Earth's stellar radiation (1-10%) can be habitable, if the greenhouse effect of the atmosphere is strong enough. The main benefit of the population-based approach is that it will be refined over time as new data on exoplanets and their atmospheres become available.

  13. Brazilian medical students' perceptions of expert versus non-expert facilitators in a (non) problem-based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Couto, Lucélio B; Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Restini, Carolina B A; Faria-Jr, Milton; Romão, Gustavo S

    2015-01-01

    Background In problem-based learning (PBL), the facilitator plays an important role in guiding the student learning process. However, although content expertise is generally regarded as a useful but non-essential prerequisite for effective PBL facilitation, the perceived importance of content knowledge may be subject to cultural, contextual, and/or experiential influences. Aim We sought to examine medical students' perceptions of subject-matter expertise among PBL facilitators in a region of the world (Brazil) where such active learning pedagogies are not widely used in university or pre-university settings. Results Of the 252 Brazilian medical students surveyed, significantly (p≤0.001) greater proportions viewed content expert facilitators to be more effective than their non-expert counterparts at building knowledge (95% vs. 6%), guiding the learning process (93% vs. 7%), achieving cognitive learning (92% vs. 18%), generating learning goals (87% vs. 15%), and motivating self-study (80% vs. 15%). Discussion/conclusion According to Brazilian medical students, subject-matter expertise among PBL facilitators is essential to the learning process. We believe this widespread perception is due, in large part, to the relative lack of prior educational exposure to such pedagogies.

  14. [Dental pain and associated factors in Brazilian adolescents: the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009].

    PubMed

    Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Paludetto Junior, Moacir; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Peres, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental pain and associated socio-demographic and behavioral factors in Brazilian adolescents, using data from the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009. The survey was conducted by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and Ministry of Health in students 11 to 17 years of age or older in the 27 State capitals, using a self-administered questionnaire. Analyses included Poisson regression following a hierarchical approach. Prevalence of dental pain in the sample (n = 54,985) in the previous six months was 17.8% (95%CI: 17.5-18.1). Higher prevalence was associated with female gender, age 14 years and over, racial self-identification as black, brown, or indigenous, enrollment in public schools, lower maternal schooling, not living with the mother, history of smoking or drinking, less frequent toothbrushing, and heavy consumption of sweets and soft drinks. Dental pain was thus associated with socio-demographic factors and health-related behaviors.

  15. Association of polymorphisms at the ADIPOR1 regulatory region with type 2 diabetes and body mass index in a Brazilian population with European or African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Kimura, L; Errera, F I V; Angeli, C B; Mingroni-Netto, R C; Silva, M E R; Canani, L H S; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2008-06-01

    Association studies between ADIPOR1 genetic variants and predisposition to type 2 diabetes (DM2) have provided contradictory results. We determined if two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP c.-8503G>A and SNP c.10225C>G) in regulatory regions of ADIPOR1 in 567 Brazilian individuals of European (EA; N = 443) or African (AfA; N = 124) ancestry from rural (quilombo remnants; N = 439) and urban (N = 567) areas. We detected a significant effect of ethnicity on the distribution of the allelic frequencies of both SNPs in these populations (EA: -8503A = 0.27; AfA: -8503A = 0.16; P = 0.001 and EA: 10225G = 0.35; AfA: 10225G = 0.51; P < 0.001). Neither of the polymorphisms were associated with DM2 in the case-control study in EA (SNP c.-8503G>A: DM2 group -8503A = 0.26; control group -8503A = 0.30; P = 0.14/SNP 10225C>G: DM2 group 10225G = 0.37; control group 10225G = 0.32; P = 0.40) and AfA populations (SNP c.-8503G>A: DM2 group -8503A = 0.16; control group -8503A = 0.15; P = 0.34/SNP 10225C>G: DM2 group 10225G = 0.51; control group 10225G = 0.52; P = 0.50). Similarly, none of the polymorphisms were associated with metabolic/anthropometric risk factors for DM2 in any of the three populations, except for HDL cholesterol, which was significantly higher in AfA heterozygotes (GC = 53.75 +/- 17.26 mg/dL) than in homozygotes. We conclude that ADIPOR1 polymorphisms are unlikely to be major risk factors for DM2 or for metabolic/anthropometric measurements that represent risk factors for DM2 in populations of European and African ancestries.

  16. Population-based study on infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jaqueline Costa; Mingarelli, Alexandre Marchezoni; Segri, Neuber José; Zavala, Arturo Alejandro Zavala; Takano, Olga Akiko

    2017-03-01

    Although Brazil has reduced social, economic and health indicators disparities in the last decade, intra- and inter-regional differences in child mortality rates (CMR) persist in regions such as the state capital of Mato Grosso. This population-based study aimed to investigate factors associated with child mortality in five cohorts of live births (LB) of mothers living in Cuiabá (MT), Brazil, 2006-2010, through probabilistic linkage in 47,018 LB. We used hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Of the 617 child deaths, 48% occurred in the early neonatal period. CMR ranged from 14.6 to 12.0 deaths per thousand LB. The following remained independently associated with death: mothers without companion (OR = 1.32); low number of prenatal consultations (OR = 1.65); low birthweight (OR = 4.83); prematurity (OR = 3.05); Apgar ≤ 7 at the first minute (OR = 3.19); Apgar ≤ 7 at the fifth minute (OR = 4.95); congenital malformations (OR = 14.91) and male gender (OR = 1.26). CMR has declined in Cuiabá, however, there is need to guide public healthcare policies in the prenatal and perinatal period to reduce early neonatal mortality and further studies to identify the causes of preventable deaths.

  17. Measuring population fluctuation of jatropha stem-borer [Cophes notaticeps (Marshall)] in the Brazilian Cerrado using a new trap.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C M; Silva, C N; Frizzas, M R; Dianese, A C

    2017-02-10

    This study aimed to monitor the population fluctuation of Cophes notaticeps (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in a jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) plantation in the Federal District, Brazil, through the use of a new trap, combined with different attractive lures and trap colors. The study was conducted at Embrapa Cerrados (Planaltina/DF) in a field trial with 720 plants. The new trap, named CPAC16, was made with PVC pipes (100 mm in diameter) of about 40 cm in length, with a window (8 × 10 cm2) in its center to enable insect access. A lure compartment was fixed on the inside of the trap`s top, and a pot, containing water and detergent, was placed at its bottom to collect the insects. The traps were painted in red, yellow, blue and green. Molasses, ethanol and pineapple were used as attractive lures. The traps were in the field trial area between May 2013 and April 2014 and the insects were collected weekly. The incidence of plants presenting damage caused by C. notaticeps was evaluated in the beginning and at the end of the study. The CPAC16 trap proved efficient in monitoring C. notaticeps. About 3494 of C. notaticeps adults were collected during the study. There were no significant differences among traps painted with different colors. The most attractive lure was molasses collecting 75.2% (n = 2627) of the specimens. Although the population peak occurred in December (n = 1162), C. notaticeps were collected throughout the year. The incidence of plants attacked by C. notaticeps ranged from 66.4% (start) to 100% (end).

  18. Coherent Population Oscillation-Based Light Storage.

    PubMed

    Neveu, P; Maynard, M-A; Bouchez, R; Lugani, J; Ghosh, R; Bretenaker, F; Goldfarb, F; Brion, E

    2017-02-17

    We theoretically study the propagation and storage of a classical field in a Λ-type atomic medium using coherent population oscillations (CPOs). We show that the propagation eigenmodes strongly relate to the different CPO modes of the system. Light storage in such modes is discussed by introducing a "populariton" quantity, a mixture of populations and field, by analogy to the dark state polariton used in the context of electromagnetically induced transparency light storage protocol. As experimentally shown, this memory relies on populations and is then-by contrast with usual Raman coherence optical storage protocols-robust to dephasing effects.

  19. Coherent Population Oscillation-Based Light Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, P.; Maynard, M.-A.; Bouchez, R.; Lugani, J.; Ghosh, R.; Bretenaker, F.; Goldfarb, F.; Brion, E.

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the propagation and storage of a classical field in a Λ -type atomic medium using coherent population oscillations (CPOs). We show that the propagation eigenmodes strongly relate to the different CPO modes of the system. Light storage in such modes is discussed by introducing a "populariton" quantity, a mixture of populations and field, by analogy to the dark state polariton used in the context of electromagnetically induced transparency light storage protocol. As experimentally shown, this memory relies on populations and is then—by contrast with usual Raman coherence optical storage protocols—robust to dephasing effects.

  20. Effect of autochthonous bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis on bacterial population dynamics and growth of halotolerant bacteria in Brazilian charqui.

    PubMed

    Biscola, Vanessa; Abriouel, Hikmate; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Capuano, Verena Sant'Anna Cabral; Gálvez, Antonio; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo

    2014-12-01

    Charqui is a fermented, salted and sun-dried meat product, widely consumed in Brazil and exported to several countries. Growth of microorganisms in this product is unlikely due to reduced Aw, but halophilic and halotolerant bacteria may grow and cause spoilage. Charqui is a good source of lactic acid bacteria able to produce antimicrobial bacteriocins. In this study, an autochthonous bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 69), isolated from charqui, was added to the meat used for charqui manufacture and evaluated for its capability to prevent the growth of spoilage bacteria during storage up to 45 days. The influence of L. lactis 69 on the bacterial diversity during the manufacturing of the product was also studied, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). L. lactis 69 did not affect the counts and diversity of lactic acid bacteria during manufacturing and storage, but influenced negatively the populations of halotolerant microorganisms, reducing the spoilage potential. The majority of tested virulence genes was absent, evidencing the safety and potential technological application of this strain as an additional hurdle to inhibit undesirable microbial growth in this and similar fermented meat products.

  1. Gender differences in the perception of asthma and respiratory symptoms in a population sample of asthma patients in four Brazilian cities*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Montealegre, Federico; Fish, James; Jardim, José Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of asthma, by gender, in a population sample of asthma patients in Brazil. METHODS: We conducted face-to-face interviews with 400 subjects (> 12 years of age) included in a national probability telephone sample of asthma patients in the Brazilian state capitals of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Curitiba, and Salvador. Each of those 400 subjects completed a 53-item questionnaire that addressed five asthma domains: symptoms; impact of asthma on quality of life; perception of asthma control; exacerbations; and treatment/medication. RESULTS: Of the 400 patients interviewed, 272 (68%) were female. In relation to respiratory symptoms, the proportion of women reporting extremely bothersome symptoms (cough with sputum, tightness in the chest, cough/shortness of breath/tightness in the chest during exercise, nocturnal shortness of breath, and nocturnal cough) was greater than was that of men. Daytime symptoms, such as cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, and tightness in the chest, were more common among women than among men. Women also more often reported that their asthma interfered with normal physical exertion, social activities, sleep, and life in general. Regarding the impact of asthma on quality of life, the proportion of subjects who reported that asthma caused them to feel that they had no control over their lives and affected the way that they felt about themselves was also greater among women than among men. CONCLUSIONS: Among women, asthma tends to be more symptomatic, as well as having a more pronounced effect on activities of daily living and on quality of life. PMID:25610499

  2. Association between Periodontal Condition and Nutritional Status of Brazilian Adolescents: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    CAVALCANTI, Alessandro L.; RAMOS, Ianny A.; CARDOSO, Andreia M. R.; FERNANDES, Liege Helena F.; ARAGÃO, Amanda S.; SANTOS, Fábio G.; AGUIAR, Yêska P. C.; CARVALHO, Danielle F.; MEDEIROS, Carla C. M.; De S. C. SOARES, Renata; CASTRO, Ricardo D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a serious problem of public health and affects all socio-economic groups, irrespective of age, sex or ethnicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontal condition and nutritional status of adolescents. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study using a probability cluster sampling, and the sample was defined by statistical criterion, consisting of 559 students aged 15–19 yr enrolled in public schools of adolescents of Campina Grande, PB, Brazil in 2012. Socioeconomic characteristics were analyzed, as well as self-reported general and oral health, anthropometric data and periodontal condition (CPI and OHI-S). Descriptive and analytical analysis from bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression analysis with 5% significance level was performed. Results: Of the 559 adolescents, 18.6% were overweight and 98.4% had some form of periodontal changes such as: bleeding (34.3%), calculus (38.8%), shallow pocket (22.9%) and deep pocket (2.3%). There was association between presence of periodontal changes with obesity (P<0.05; CI 95%: 0.99 [0.98 – 0.99]). Conclusion: The association between presence of periodontal changes and obesity status in adolescents was indicated. PMID:28053924

  3. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Dilélio, Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Siqueira, Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Silva, Suele Manjourany; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults. METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided by a doctor, by other health professional or home care in the last three months). Based on the results obtained by the description of the sample, a projection is provided for adults living in Brazilian urban areas. RESULTS The highest prevalence of lack of access to health services and to provision of care by health professionals was for hospitalization (3.0%), whilst the lowest prevalence was for care provided by a doctor (1.1%). The lack of access to care provided by other health professionals was 2.0%; to accident and emergency services, 2.1%; and to home care, 2.9%. As for prevalences, the greatest absolute lack of access occurred in emergency care (more than 360,000 adults). The main reasons were structural and organizational problems, such as unavailability of hospital beds, of health professionals, of appointments for the type of care needed and charges made for care. CONCLUSIONS The universal right to health care in Brazil has not yet been achieved. These projections can help health care management in scaling the efforts needed to overcome this problem, such as expanding the infrastructure of health services and the workforce. PMID:26061454

  4. Treatment for TMD with occlusal splint and electromyographic control: application of the FARC protocol in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Vieira e Silva, Carolina A; da Silva, Marco Antônio M Rodrigues; Melchior, Melissa de Oliveira; de Felício, Cláudia Maria; Sforza, Chiarella; Tartaglia, Gianluca M

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply Functional Anatomy Research Center (FARC) Protocol of TMD treatment, which includes the use of a specific type of mandibular occlusal splint, adjusted based on the electromyographic index, in a group of 15 patients with disc displacement, classified according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and then analyzing the results compared with the control group. The clinical evaluations were completed both before and after the treatment. Electromyographic (EMG) data was collected and recorded on the day the splint was inserted (visit 1), after one week (visit 2) and after five weeks of treatment (visit 3). The control group consisted of 15 asymptomatic subjects, according to the same diagnostic criteria (RDC/TMD), who were submitted to the same evaluations with the same interval periods as the treatment group. Immediately after splint adjustment, masseter muscle symmetry and total muscular activity were significantly different with than without the splint (p < 0.05), showing an increased neuromuscular coordination. After treatment, significant variations (p < .05) were found in mouth opening and in pain remission. There were no significant differences among the three sessions, either with or without the splint. There were significant differences between the TMD and control groups for all analyzed indices of muscular symmetry, activity and torque, with the exception of total muscular activity. The use of the splint promoted balance of the EMG activities during its use, relieving symptoms. EMG parameters identified neuromuscular imbalance, and allowed an objective analysis of different phases of TMD treatment, differentiating individuals with TMD from the asymptomatic subjects.

  5. Subdural haemorrhages in infants: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Jayawant, S; Rawlinson, A; Gibbon, F; Price, J; Schulte, J; Sharples, P; Sibert, J R; Kemp, A M

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To identify the incidence, clinical outcome, and associated factors of subdural haemorrhage in children under 2 years of age, and to determine how such cases were investigated and how many were due to child abuse. Design Population based case series. Setting South Wales and south west England. Subjects Children under 2 years of age who had a subdural haemorrhage. We excluded neonates who developed subdural haemorrhage during their stay on a neonatal unit and infants who developed a subdural haemorrhage after infection or neurosurgical intervention. Main outcome measures Incidence and clinical outcome of subdural haemorrhage in infants, the number of cases caused by child abuse, the investigations such children received, and associated risk factors. Results Thirty three children (23 boys and 10 girls) were identified with subdural haemorrhage. The incidence was 12.8/100 000 children/year (95% confidence interval 5.4 to 20.2). Twenty eight cases (85%) were under 1 year of age. The incidence of subdural haemorrhage in children under 1 year of age was 21.0/100 000 children/year and was therefore higher than in the older children. The clinical outcome was poor: nine infants died and 15 had profound disability. Only 22 infants had the basic investigations of a full blood count, coagulation screen, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, skeletal survey or bone scan, and ophthalmological examination. In retrospect, 27 cases (82%) were highly suggestive of abuse. Conclusion Subdural haemorrhage is common in infancy and carries a poor prognosis; three quarters of such infants die or have profound disability. Most cases are due to child abuse, but in a few the cause is unknown. Some children with subdural haemorrhage do not undergo appropriate investigations. We believe the clinical investigation of such children should include a full multidisciplinary social assessment, an ophthalmic examination, a skeletal survey supplemented with a bone scan or a

  6. Brazilian gemstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Rui Ribeiro

    1981-04-01

    Brazil counts as a gemmological province because of the variety of gem minerals present in the country. Most Brazilian states and territories produce gemstones, the State of Minas Gerais being the most important producer both in volume and in number of species. Diamonds are chiefly derived by panning from alluvial deposits in Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso and Goiás. Among other gemstones, the most important are aquamarines, beryls, chrysoberyls, topazes, amethysts, tourmalines, emeralds and agates, and their respective varieties. The occurrences of these gemstones, as well as of a great number of others, are described for each state in which they are found.

  7. Brazilian Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae) Clusters by Major Biogeographical Region

    PubMed Central

    Bergo, Eduardo S.; Randel, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    The major drivers of the extensive biodiversity of the Neotropics are proposed to be geological and tectonic events together with Pliocene and Pleistocene environmental and climatic change. Geographical barriers represented by the rivers Amazonas/Solimões, the Andes and the coastal mountain ranges in eastern Brazil have been hypothesized to lead to diversification within the primary malaria vector, Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi Root, which primarily inhabits rainforest. To test this biogeographical hypothesis, we analyzed 786 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 populations of An. darlingi from across the complex Brazilian landscape. Both model-based (STRUCTURE) and non-model-based (Principal Components and Discriminant Analysis) analysis of population structure detected three major genetic clusters that correspond with newly described Neotropical biogeographical regions: 1) Atlantic Forest province (= southeast population); 2) Parana Forest province (= West Atlantic forest population, with one Chacoan population - SP); and 3) Brazilian dominion population (= Amazonian population with one Chacoan population - TO). Significant levels of pairwise genetic divergences were found among the three clusters, allele sharing among clusters was negligible, and geographical distance did not contribute to differentiation. We infer that the Atlantic forest coastal mountain range limited dispersal between the Atlantic Forest province and the Parana Forest province populations, and that the large, diagonal open vegetation region of the Chacoan dominion dramatically reduced dispersal between the Parana and Brazilian dominion populations. We hypothesize that the three genetic clusters may represent three putative species. PMID:26172559

  8. Brazilian Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae) Clusters by Major Biogeographical Region.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Kevin J; Conn, Jan E; Bergo, Eduardo S; Randel, Melissa A; Sallum, Maria Anice M

    2015-01-01

    The major drivers of the extensive biodiversity of the Neotropics are proposed to be geological and tectonic events together with Pliocene and Pleistocene environmental and climatic change. Geographical barriers represented by the rivers Amazonas/Solimões, the Andes and the coastal mountain ranges in eastern Brazil have been hypothesized to lead to diversification within the primary malaria vector, Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi Root, which primarily inhabits rainforest. To test this biogeographical hypothesis, we analyzed 786 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 populations of An. darlingi from across the complex Brazilian landscape. Both model-based (STRUCTURE) and non-model-based (Principal Components and Discriminant Analysis) analysis of population structure detected three major genetic clusters that correspond with newly described Neotropical biogeographical regions: 1) Atlantic Forest province (= southeast population); 2) Parana Forest province (= West Atlantic forest population, with one Chacoan population - SP); and 3) Brazilian dominion population (= Amazonian population with one Chacoan population - TO). Significant levels of pairwise genetic divergences were found among the three clusters, allele sharing among clusters was negligible, and geographical distance did not contribute to differentiation. We infer that the Atlantic forest coastal mountain range limited dispersal between the Atlantic Forest province and the Parana Forest province populations, and that the large, diagonal open vegetation region of the Chacoan dominion dramatically reduced dispersal between the Parana and Brazilian dominion populations. We hypothesize that the three genetic clusters may represent three putative species.

  9. Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Oppositional-Defiant Symptoms in Brazilian Adolescents: Gender Prevalence and Agreement between Teachers and Parents in a Non-English Speaking Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra-Pinheiro, Maria Antonia; Mattos, Paulo; Regalla, Maria Angelica

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess hyperactivity (H/I), inattention (IN), and oppositional-defiant (OP) symptoms in a nonclinical Brazilian sample of adolescents, and to investigate the association between scoring profiles of teachers and parents, symptom levels, and gender. Method: Symptoms were assessed through the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelhman (SNAP-IV)…

  10. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Benseñor, I M; Tófoli, L F; Andrade, L

    2003-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in S o Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1) by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness). The odds ratio (OR) for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4), dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4) and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6), when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  11. Community-Based Education for Indigenous Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, David

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of key issues that community-based education initiatives presuppose and highlight. Argues that community-based education is fundamentally different from the more widely-known notion of community education because its implication extends beyond the local community through a critical questioning and contesting of wider…

  12. Brazilian Sign Language Lexicography and Technology: Dictionary, Digital Encyclopedia, Chereme-based Sign Retrieval, and Quadriplegic Deaf Communication Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capovilla, Fernando C.; Duduchi, Marcelo; Raphael, Walkiria D.; Luz, Renato D.; Rozados, Daniela; Capovilla, Alessandra G. S.; Macedo, Elizeu C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the Brazilian Sign language digital encyclopedia, which contains a databank of 5,600 signs glossed in Portuguese and English, along with descriptions and illustrations of their signed form. (Author/VWL)

  13. Female Educators, Development, and Human Capital: A Brazilian Case. Working Paper #35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Linda

    The role of female educators in the Brazilian Amazon community of Itaituba (population in 1970: 12,690) has fallen short of that envisioned by the policymakers and social scientists in the early 1970s, as indicated by research conducted in 1976-77. Based on the "human capital" theory, better-trained local teachers were to train the local…

  14. Systematics of Spiny Predatory Katydids (Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Based on Morphology and Molecular Data

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Verônica Saraiva; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Yotoko, Karla Suemy Clemente

    2014-01-01

    Listroscelidinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are insectivorous Pantropical katydids whose taxonomy presents a long history of controversy, with several genera incertae sedis. This work focused on species occurring in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, one of the world's most threatened biomes. We examined material deposited in scientific collections and visited 15 conservation units from Rio de Janeiro to southern Bahia between November 2011 and January 2012, catching 104 specimens from 10 conservation units. Based on morphological and molecular data we redefined Listroscelidini, adding a new tribe, new genus and eight new species to the subfamily. Using morphological analysis, we redescribed and added new geographic records for six species, synonymized two species and built a provisional identification key for the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae. Molecular results suggest two new species and a new genus to be described, possibly by the fission of the genus Hamayulus. We also proposed a 500 bp region in the final portion of the COI to be used as a molecular barcode. Our data suggest that the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae are seriously endangered, because they occur in highly preserved forest remnants, show high rates of endemism and have a narrow geographic distribution. Based on our results, we suggest future collection efforts must take into account the molecular barcode data to accelerate species recognition. PMID:25118712

  15. Systematics of spiny predatory katydids (Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest based on morphology and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Verônica Saraiva; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano; Yotoko, Karla Suemy Clemente

    2014-01-01

    Listroscelidinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are insectivorous Pantropical katydids whose taxonomy presents a long history of controversy, with several genera incertae sedis. This work focused on species occurring in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, one of the world's most threatened biomes. We examined material deposited in scientific collections and visited 15 conservation units from Rio de Janeiro to southern Bahia between November 2011 and January 2012, catching 104 specimens from 10 conservation units. Based on morphological and molecular data we redefined Listroscelidini, adding a new tribe, new genus and eight new species to the subfamily. Using morphological analysis, we redescribed and added new geographic records for six species, synonymized two species and built a provisional identification key for the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae. Molecular results suggest two new species and a new genus to be described, possibly by the fission of the genus Hamayulus. We also proposed a 500 bp region in the final portion of the COI to be used as a molecular barcode. Our data suggest that the Atlantic Forest Listroscelidinae are seriously endangered, because they occur in highly preserved forest remnants, show high rates of endemism and have a narrow geographic distribution. Based on our results, we suggest future collection efforts must take into account the molecular barcode data to accelerate species recognition.

  16. Detection of renal dysfunction based on serum creatinine levels in a Brazilian community: the Bambuí Health and Ageing Study.

    PubMed

    Passos, V M A; Barreto, S M; Lima-Costa, M F F

    2003-03-01

    There are few population-based studies of renal dysfunction and none conducted in developing countries. In the present study the prevalence and predictors of elevated serum creatinine levels (SCr > or = 1.3 mg/dl for men and 1.1 mg/dl for women) were determined among Brazilian adults (18-59 years) and older adults (>60 years). Participants included all older adults (N = 1742) and a probabilistic sample of adults (N = 818) from Bambu town, MG, Southeast Brazil. Predictors were investigated using multiple logistic regression. Mean SCr levels were 0.77 +/- 0.15 mg/dl for adults, 1.02 +/- 0.39 mg/dl for older men, and 0.81 +/- 0.17 mg/dl for older women. Because there were only 4 cases (0.48%) with elevated SCr levels among adults, the analysis of elevated SCr levels was restricted to older adults. The overall prevalence of elevated SCr levels among the elderly was 5.09% (76/1494). The prevalence of hypercreatinemia increased significantly with age (chi = 26.17, P = 0.000), being higher for older men (8.19%) than for older women (5.29%, chi = 5.00, P = 0.02). Elevated SCr levels were associated with age 70-79 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-4.42), hypertension (OR = 3.04, 95% CI: 1.34-6.92), use of antihypertensive drugs (OR = 2.46, 95% CI: 1.26-4.82), chest pain (OR = 3.37, 95% CI: 1.31-8.74), and claudication (OR = 3.43, 95% CI: 1.30-9.09) among men, and with age >80 years (OR = 4.88, 95% CI: 2.24-10.65), use of antihypertensive drugs (OR = 4.06, 95% CI: 1.67-9.86), physical inactivity (OR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.11-4.02) and myocardial infarction (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.58-9.62) among women. The prevalence of renal dysfunction observed was much lower than that reported in other population-based studies, but predictors were similar. New investigations are needed to confirm the variability in prevalence and associated factors of renal dysfunction among populations.

  17. A Population-based Habitable Zone Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsom, Andras

    2015-11-01

    What can we tell about exoplanet habitability if currently only the stellar properties, planet radius, and the incoming stellar flux are known? A planet is in the habitable zone (HZ) if it harbors liquid water on its surface. The HZ is traditionally conceived as a sharp region around stars because it is calculated for one planet with specific properties. Such an approach is limiting because the planet’s atmospheric and geophysical properties, which influence the presence of liquid water on the surface, are currently unknown but expected to be diverse. A statistical HZ description is outlined that does not favor one planet type. Instead, the stellar and planet properties are treated as random variables, and a continuous range of planet scenarios is considered. Various probability density functions are assigned to each random variable, and a combination of Monte Carlo sampling and climate modeling is used to generate synthetic exoplanet populations with known surface climates. Then, the properties of the subpopulation bearing liquid water is analyzed. Given our current observational knowledge, the HZ takes the form of a weakly constrained but smooth probability function. The HZ has an inner edge, but a clear outer edge is not seen. Currently only optimistic upper limits can be derived for the potentially observable HZ occurrence rate. Finally, we illustrate through an example how future data on exoplanet atmospheres will help to narrow down the probability that an exoplanet harbors liquid water, and we identify the greatest observational challenge in the way of finding a habitable exoplanet.

  18. The ethical dilemma of population-based medical decision making.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, R S; Federman, D G

    1998-11-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a growing interest in population-based medicine. Some elements in healthcare have used population-based medicine as a technique to decrease healthcare expenditures. However, in their daily practice of medicine, physicians must grapple with the question of whether they incorporate population-based medicine when making decisions for an individual patient. They therefore may encounter an ethical dilemma. Physicians must remember that the physician-patient relationship is of paramount importance and that even well-conducted research may not be applicable to an individual patient.

  19. [Opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry and the local development logic based on the Brazilian biomes: the basis for a national policy discussion].

    PubMed

    Villas Bôas, Glauco de Kruse; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois

    2007-06-01

    This study discusses new concepts in the technological development of plant-derived medicines and their relevance to public health, highlighting opportunities in the pharmaceutical market both for the production of herbal medicines and the development of new drugs based on plant substrates and molecules. Recent theoretical and scientific premises for the socioeconomic development of the "Knowledge Age" (considering local production arrangements and systems) could guarantee a competitive advantage for the sector, given the exuberant flora and biodiversity in the various Brazilian biomes.

  20. AN INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODEL OF COTTUS POPULATION DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We explored population dynamics of a southern Appalachian population of Cottus bairdi using a spatially-explicit, individual-based model. The model follows daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals as a function of flow and temperature. We modeled movement of juveniles...

  1. Ozone stomatal flux and O3 concentration-based metrics for Astronium graveolens Jacq., a Brazilian native forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Cassimiro, Jéssica C; Moura, Bárbara B; Alonso, Rocio; Meirelles, Sérgio T; Moraes, Regina M

    2016-06-01

    The current levels of surface ozone (O3) are high enough to negatively affect trees in large regions of São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil, where standards for the protection of vegetation against the adverse effects of O3 do not exist. We evaluated three O3 metrics - phytotoxic ozone dose (POD), accumulated ozone exposure over the threshold of 40 ppb h (AOT40), and the sum of all hourly average concentrations (SUM00) - for the Brazilian native tropical tree species Astronium graveolens Jacq. We used the DO3SE (Deposition of Ozone for Stomatal Exchange) model and calculated PODY for different thresholds (from 0 to 6 mmol O3 m(-2) PLA s(-1)), evaluating the model's performance through the relationship between measured and modelled conductance. The response parameters were: visible foliar injury, considered as incidence (% injured plants), severity (% injured leaves in relation to the number of leaves on injured plants), and leaf abscission. The model performance was suitable and significant (R(2) = 0.58; p < 0.001). POD0 was better correlated to incidence and leaf abscission, and SUM00 was better correlated to severity. The highest values of O3 concentration-based metrics (AOT40 and SUM00) did not coincide with those of POD0. Further investigation may improve the model and contribute to the proposition of a national standard for the protection of native species.

  2. Costs of detection bias in index-based population monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, C.T.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Managers of wildlife populations commonly rely on indirect, count-based measures of the population in making decisions regarding conservation, harvest, or control. The main appeal in the use of such counts is their low material expense compared to methods that directly measure the population. However, their correct use rests on the rarely-tested but often-assumed premise that they proportionately reflect population size, i.e., that they constitute a population index. This study investigates forest management for the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) and the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) at the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in central Georgia, U.S.A. Optimal decision policies for a joint species objective were derived for two alternative models of Wood Thrush population dynamics. Policies were simulated under scenarios of unbiasedness, consistent negative bias, and habitat-dependent negative bias in observed Wood Thrush densities. Differences in simulation outcomes between biased and unbiased detection scenarios indicated the expected loss in resource objectives (here, forest habitat and birds) through decision-making based on biased population counts. Given the models and objective function used in our analysis, expected losses were as great as 11%, a degree of loss perhaps not trivial for applications such as endangered species management. Our analysis demonstrates that costs of uncertainty about the relationship between the population and its observation can be measured in units of the resource, costs which may offset apparent savings achieved by collecting uncorrected population counts.

  3. Dietary patterns associated with overweight and obesity among Brazilian schoolchildren: an approach based on the time-of-day of eating events.

    PubMed

    Kupek, Emil; Lobo, Adriana S; Leal, Danielle B; Bellisle, France; de Assis, Maria Alice A

    2016-12-01

    Several studies reported that the timing of eating events has critical implications in the prevention of obesity, but dietary patterns regarding the time-of-day have not been explored in children. The aim of this study was to derive latent food patterns of daily eating events and to examine their associations with overweight/obesity among schoolchildren. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted with 7-10-year-old Brazilian schoolchildren (n 1232) who completed the Previous Day Food Questionnaire, illustrated with twenty-one foods/beverages in six daily eating events. Latent class analysis was used to derive dietary patterns whose association with child weight status was evaluated by multivariate multinomial regression. Four mutually exclusive latent classes of dietary patterns were identified and labelled according to the time-of-day of eating events and food intake probability (FIP): (A) higher FIP only at lunch; (B) lower FIP at all eating events; (C) higher FIP at lunch, afternoon and evening snacks; (D) lower FIP at breakfast and at evening snack, higher FIP at other meals/snacks. The percentages of children within these classes were 32·3, 48·6, 15·1 and 4·0 %, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the mean probabilities of obesity for these classes were 6 % (95 % CI 3·0, 9·0), 13 % (95 % CI 9·0, 17·0), 12 % (95 % CI 6·0, 19) and 11 % (95 % CI 5·0, 17·0), in the same order. In conclusion, the children eating traditional lunch with rice and beans as the main meal of the day (class A) had the lowest obesity risk, thus reinforcing the importance of both the food type and the time-of-day of its intake for weight status.

  4. Stochastic population forecasts based on conditional expert opinions

    PubMed Central

    Billari, F C; Graziani, R; Melilli, E

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops and applies an expert-based stochastic population forecasting method, which can also be used to obtain a probabilistic version of scenario-based official forecasts. The full probability distribution of population forecasts is specified by starting from expert opinions on the future development of demographic components. Expert opinions are elicited as conditional on the realization of scenarios, in a two-step (or multiple-step) fashion. The method is applied to develop a stochastic forecast for the Italian population, starting from official scenarios from the Italian National Statistical Office. PMID:22879704

  5. IBSEM: An Individual-Based Atlantic Salmon Population Model.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Marco; Heino, Mikko; Gilbey, John; Araki, Hitoshi; Svåsand, Terje; Glover, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Ecology and genetics can influence the fate of individuals and populations in multiple ways. However, to date, few studies consider them when modelling the evolutionary trajectory of populations faced with admixture with non-local populations. For the Atlantic salmon, a model incorporating these elements is urgently needed because many populations are challenged with gene-flow from non-local and domesticated conspecifics. We developed an Individual-Based Salmon Eco-genetic Model (IBSEM) to simulate the demographic and population genetic change of an Atlantic salmon population through its entire life-cycle. Processes such as growth, mortality, and maturation are simulated through stochastic procedures, which take into account environmental variables as well as the genotype of the individuals. IBSEM is based upon detailed empirical data from salmon biology, and parameterized to reproduce the environmental conditions and the characteristics of a wild population inhabiting a Norwegian river. Simulations demonstrated that the model consistently and reliably reproduces the characteristics of the population. Moreover, in absence of farmed escapees, the modelled populations reach an evolutionary equilibrium that is similar to our definition of a 'wild' genotype. We assessed the sensitivity of the model in the face of assumptions made on the fitness differences between farm and wild salmon, and evaluated the role of straying as a buffering mechanism against the intrusion of farm genes into wild populations. These results demonstrate that IBSEM is able to capture the evolutionary forces shaping the life history of wild salmon and is therefore able to model the response of populations under environmental and genetic stressors.

  6. IBSEM: An Individual-Based Atlantic Salmon Population Model

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Marco; Heino, Mikko; Gilbey, John; Araki, Hitoshi; Svåsand, Terje; Glover, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Ecology and genetics can influence the fate of individuals and populations in multiple ways. However, to date, few studies consider them when modelling the evolutionary trajectory of populations faced with admixture with non-local populations. For the Atlantic salmon, a model incorporating these elements is urgently needed because many populations are challenged with gene-flow from non-local and domesticated conspecifics. We developed an Individual-Based Salmon Eco-genetic Model (IBSEM) to simulate the demographic and population genetic change of an Atlantic salmon population through its entire life-cycle. Processes such as growth, mortality, and maturation are simulated through stochastic procedures, which take into account environmental variables as well as the genotype of the individuals. IBSEM is based upon detailed empirical data from salmon biology, and parameterized to reproduce the environmental conditions and the characteristics of a wild population inhabiting a Norwegian river. Simulations demonstrated that the model consistently and reliably reproduces the characteristics of the population. Moreover, in absence of farmed escapees, the modelled populations reach an evolutionary equilibrium that is similar to our definition of a ‘wild’ genotype. We assessed the sensitivity of the model in the face of assumptions made on the fitness differences between farm and wild salmon, and evaluated the role of straying as a buffering mechanism against the intrusion of farm genes into wild populations. These results demonstrate that IBSEM is able to capture the evolutionary forces shaping the life history of wild salmon and is therefore able to model the response of populations under environmental and genetic stressors. PMID:26383256

  7. The association between ALS and population density: A population based study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kirsten M; Abhinav, Kumar; Wijesekera, Lokesh; Ganesalingam, Jeban; Goldstein, Laura H; Janssen, Anna; Dougherty, Andrew; Willey, Emma; Stanton, Biba R; Turner, Martin R; Ampong, Mary-Ann; Sakel, Mohammed; Orrell, Richard; Howard, Robin; Shaw, Christopher E; Nigel Leigh, P; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to assess whether rural residence is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the south-east of England using a population based register. Previous studies in different populations have produced contradictory findings. Residence defined by London borough or non-metropolitan district at time of diagnosis was recorded for each incident case in the South-East England ALS Register between 1995 and 2005. Each of the 26 boroughs or districts of the catchment area of the register was classified according to population density. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence of ALS was calculated for each region and the relationship with population density tested by linear regression, thereby controlling for the underlying population structure. We found that population density in region of residence at diagnosis explained 25% of the variance in ALS rates (r = 0.5, p < 0.01). Thus, in this cohort in the south-east of England, people with ALS were more likely to be resident in areas of high population density at diagnosis.

  8. The use of metabolomics in population-based research.

    PubMed

    Su, L Joseph; Fiehn, Oliver; Maruvada, Padma; Moore, Steven C; O'Keefe, Stephen J; Wishart, David S; Zanetti, Krista A

    2014-11-01

    The NIH has made a significant commitment through the NIH Common Fund's Metabolomics Program to build infrastructure and capacity for metabolomics research, which should accelerate the field. Given this investment, it is the ideal time to start planning strategies to capitalize on the infrastructure being established. An obvious gap in the literature relates to the effective use of metabolomics in large-population studies. Although published reports from population-based studies are beginning to emerge, the number to date remains relatively small. Yet, there is great potential for using metabolomics in population-based studies to evaluate the effects of nutritional, pharmaceutical, and environmental exposures (the "exposome"); conduct risk assessments; predict disease development; and diagnose diseases. Currently, the majority of the metabolomics studies in human populations are in nutrition or nutrition-related fields. This symposium provided a timely venue to highlight the current state-of-science on the use of metabolomics in population-based research. This session provided a forum at which investigators with extensive experience in performing research within large initiatives, multi-investigator grants, and epidemiology consortia could stimulate discussion and ideas for population-based metabolomics research and, in turn, improve knowledge to help devise effective methods of health research.

  9. The Brazilian Honeybee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michener, Charles D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the unusually aggressive Brazilian honeybee, which exhibits many of the attributes of its African antecedants. Describes its abundance and distribution, behaviorial characteristics, future spread, and the potential impact of the Brazilian bee in North America. (JR)

  10. Cross-cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the modified FRESNO Test to evaluate the competence in evidence based practice by physical therapists

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anderson M.; Costa, Lucíola C. M.; Comper, Maria L.; Padula, Rosimeire S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Modified Fresno Test was developed to assess knowledge and skills of both physical therapy (PT) professionals and students to use evidence-based practice (EBP). OBJECTIVES: To translate the Modified Fresno Test into Brazilian-Portuguese and to evaluate the test's reproducibility. METHOD: The first step consisted of adapting the instrument into the Brazilian-Portuguese language. Then, a total of 57 participants, including PT students, PT professors and PT practitioners, completed the translated instrument. The responses from the participants were used to evaluate reproducibility of the translated instrument. Internal consistency was calculated using the Cronbach's alpha. Reliability was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables, and the Kappa coefficient (K) for categorical variables. The agreement was assessed using the standard error of the measurement (SEM). RESULTS: The cross-cultural adaptation process was appropriate, providing an adequate Brazilian-Portuguese version of the instrument. The internal consistency was good (α=0.769). The reliability for inter- and intra-rater assessment were ICC=0.89 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.93); for evaluator 1 was ICC=0.85 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.93); and for evaluator 2 was ICC=0.98 (95% CI 0.97 to 0.99). The SEM was 13.04 points for inter-rater assessment, 12.57 points for rater 1 and 4.59 points for rater 2. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian-Portuguese language version of the Modified Fresno Test showed satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility. The Modified Fresno Test will allow physical therapy professionals and students to be evaluated on the use of understanding EBP. PMID:26786079

  11. [Characteristics of malaria epidemics in the municipalities of the Brazilian Amazon, 2010].

    PubMed

    Braz, Rui Moreira; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen; Tauil, Pedro Luiz

    2013-05-01

    Malaria epidemics occur annually in various municipalities (counties) in the Brazilian Amazon. However, health services do not systematically adopt tools to detect and promptly control these events. This article aimed to characterize malaria epidemics in the Brazilian Amazon Region based on their duration, the Plasmodium species involved, and the population's degree of vulnerability. An automatic malaria incidence monitoring system based on quartiles was assessed for prompt identification of malaria epidemics. In 2010, epidemics were identified in 338 (41.9%) of the counties in the Brazilian Amazon. P. falciparum and P. vivax epidemics were detected, both singly and in combination. Epidemics lasted from 1 to 4 months in 58.3% of the counties, 5 to 8 months in 34.5%, and 9 to 12 months in 17.4%. Systematic monitoring of malaria incidence could contribute to early detection of epidemics and improve the effectiveness of control measures.

  12. Geochemistry of Brazilian oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, C.C.

    1983-02-01

    A general survey of the main brazilian oil shale formations presenting their location, oil reserve, age and stratigraphy introduces this paper. It is followed by a comparative survey of the data on chemical composition (elementary, minerals and organic constituents/biological markers) and of thermal alteration indexes in order to define their maturity. The geochemical phenomena involved with a large diabase intrusion in the Irati formation is particularly stressed. The analytical methods of Solid Phase Extraction and Functional Group Marker developed for the analysis of bitumens and kerogens and the results obtained from the application of these methods to brazilian oil shales are discussed. The paper ends with a brief description of a comprehensive analytical bibliography on brazilian oil shales prepared to serve as a data base for these organites.

  13. Validation of a web-based questionnaire to assess the dietary intake of Brazilian children aged 7-10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Intake and Physical Activity of School Children (CAAFE) comprises an online questionnaire to self-report diet and physical activity of Brazilian schoolchildren. The present study aimed to assess the validity (matches, omissions and intrusions) and moderating factors of the CAAFE. Direct obs...

  14. Validation of a web-based questionnaire to assess the dietary intake of Brazilian children aged 7-10 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Intake and Physical Activity of School Children (CAAFE) comprises an online questionnaire to self-report diet and physical activity of Brazilian schoolchildren. The present study aimed to assess the validity (matches, omissions, and intrusions) and moderating factors of the CAAFE. Direct ob...

  15. Working conditions of Brazilian immigrants in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Eduardo Siqueira, C; Jansen, Tiago

    2012-06-01

    Brazilian immigration to Massachusetts and other states in the US grew significantly in the last two decades. There is a lack of data about the working conditions and health and safety hazards faced by Brazilian immigrant workers. We surveyed over 500 workers in Eastern Massachusetts through a community-based participatory research project to explore occupational and immigration factors that may represent a risk to the health of Brazilian immigrant workers, who mostly work in the construction, housecleaning, and food services segments of the state labor force. Our pilot study suggests that Brazilian immigrant workers are exposed to chemical, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial job hazards and have experienced a variety of health symptoms that may be associated with these work environment exposures. Since most Brazilian workers have not received proper training to recognize the hazards, there is an urgent need for the implementation of culturally adequate training programs and enforcement of safety and health regulations to prevent occupational injuries and fatalities.

  16. Unbiased methods for population-based association studies.

    PubMed

    Devlin, B; Roeder, K; Bacanu, S A

    2001-12-01

    Large, population-based samples and large-scale genotyping are being used to evaluate disease/gene associations. A substantial drawback to such samples is the fact that population substructure can induce spurious associations between genes and disease. We review two methods, called genomic control (GC) and structured association (SA), that obviate many of the concerns about population substructure by using the features of the genomes present in the sample to correct for stratification. The GC approach exploits the fact that population substructure generates "over dispersion" of statistics used to assess association. By testing multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, only some of which are pertinent to the disease of interest, the degree of overdispersion generated by population substructure can be estimated and taken into account. The SA approach assumes that the sampled population, although heterogeneous, is composed of subpopulations that are themselves homogeneous. By using multiple polymorphisms throughout the genome, this "latent class method" estimates the probability sampled individuals derive from each of these latent subpopulations. GC has the advantage of robustness, simplicity, and wide applicability, even to experimental designs such as DNA pooling. SA is a bit more complicated but has the advantage of greater power in some realistic settings, such as admixed populations or when association varies widely across subpopulations. It, too, is widely applicable. Both also have weaknesses, as elaborated in our review.

  17. Sustainability in Brazilian Federal Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palma, Lisiane Celia; de Oliveira, Lessandra M.; Viacava, Keitiline R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the number of courses related to sustainability offered in bachelor degree programs of business administration in Brazilian federal universities. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory research was carried out based on a descriptive scope. The process of mapping federal universities in Brazil…

  18. Absence of Correlation between IL-28B Gene Polymorphisms and the Clinical Presentation of Chronic Hepatitis B in an Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Conde, Simone Regina Souza; Rocha, Luciana L.; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Soares Monteiro, Julius Caesar Mendes; Fonseca Filgueiras, Nathália Karla; de Almeida Lins, Pedro Alves; Silva dos Santos, Bruna Tereza; Bonfim Freitas, Felipe; da Silva Graça, Ednelza; Demachki, Sâmia; Ferreira de Araújo, Marialva Tereza; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The present study investigated the prevalence of the IL-28B polymorphisms rs12979860 and rs8099917 in chronic hepatitis B patients from a case study in Eastern Amazonia. Methods. In total, 65 chronically infected HBV patients and 97 healthy subjects who were anti-HBc and anti-HBs positive (control group) were evaluated between May 2011 and December 2012. The groups of patients were designated as inactive carriers, chronic hepatitis without cirrhosis, and chronic hepatitis with cirrhosis based on clinical, pathological, biochemical, hematological, and virological variables. The patients were genotyped using quantitative real-time PCR. Results. The frequencies of the rs12979860 polymorphism were similar between the infected group (32.3% CC, 41.5% CT, and 26.2 TT) and the control population (35% CC, 47.4% CT, and 17.6% TT), and the frequencies of the rs8099917 polymorphism (7.7% GG, 35.4% GT, and 56.9% TT versus 7.2% GG, 35.1% GT, and 57.7% TT) were also similar in both groups. The associations between the rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms and the clinical manifestations were not statistically significant. Conclusion. In conclusion, these polymorphisms had a similar distribution between infected and control groups, indicating that they were not associated with susceptibility and the clinical evolution of hepatitis B in the examined population. PMID:24817780

  19. Results of a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a mobile SMS-based intervention on treatment adherence in HIV/AIDS-infected Brazilian women and impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Martini; Barbosa, Bárbara Jaqueline Peres; e Costa, Durval Alex Gomes; Sigulem, Daniel; de Fátima Marin, Heimar; Filho, Adauto Castelo; Pisa, Ivan Torres

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a warning system based on mobile SMS messages increases the adherence of HIV-infected Brazilian women to antiretroviral drug-based treatment regimens and their impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages. Design A randomized controlled trial was conducted from May 2009 to April 2010 with HIV-infected Brazilian women. All participants (n = 21) had a monthly multidisciplinary attendance; each participant was followed over a 4-month period, when adherence measures were obtained. Participants in the intervention group (n = 8) received SMS messages 30 min before their last scheduled time for a dose of medicine during the day. The messages were sent every Saturday and Sunday and on alternate days during the working week. Participants in the control group (n = 13) did not receive messages. Measurements Self-reported adherence, pill counting, microelectronic monitors (MEMS) and an interview about the impressions and satisfaction with respect to incoming messages. Results The HIV Alert System (HIVAS) was developed over 7 months during 2008 and 2009. After the study period, self-reported adherence indicated that 11 participants (84.62%) remained compliant in the control group (adherence exceeding 95%), whereas all 8 participants in the intervention group (100.00%) remained compliant. In contrast, the counting pills method indicated that the number of compliant participants was 5 (38.46%) for the control group and 4 (50.00%) for the intervention group. Microelectronic monitoring indicated that 6 participants in the control group (46.15%) were adherent during the entire 4-month period compared to 6 participants in the intervention group (75.00%). According to the feedback of the 8 participants who completed the research in the intervention group, along with the feedback of 3 patients who received SMS for less than 4 months, that is, did not complete the study, 9 (81.81%) believed that the SMS messages aided them in treatment

  20. A New Dietary Supplement Based on Bovine Blood: Recovering Brazilian Children from Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Teodósio, N R; Perez, E P; Alves, A J; Dimenstein, W; Guedes, R C

    2000-01-01

    Two compounds ("Prothemol" and "Plasmel"), based on bovine blood as source of high quality-protein, were tested as supplement for malnourished children. Prothemol is a powder containing desiccated bovine red cells, with 23.32 g% protein and 18.8 mg% iron, without any limiting amino acid. Plasmel (a syrup) contains 44.7% bovine plasma, 54.3% saccharose and 1500 IU% retinol. Children, 32-60 month old, from a day-nursery service in Recife, Brazil, received Prothemol + Plasmel for 90 (n = 14) or 180 days (n = 8). When compared to age-matched control children (n = 12 and n = 6, respectively), they presented significantly higher increments in weight and height, and in some haematological parameters. Clinical signs associated to malnutrition (faces suggesting suffering or sadness; brightnessless eyes; apathy; reduced mobility; reduced communication with their classmates and adults) were found in 12 treated children (85.7%) and in 9 controls (75%). Recovery from these signs begun after 51 ± 20.6 and 103.5 ± 14.6 days, for the treated and control groups, respectively (P < 0.05) and occurred in 100% of the treated children and in 67% (6 of 9 children) in the controls. We suggest that Prothemol + Plasmel is an effective dietary supplement to help treating malnutrition in children, recovering them from clinical signs indicative of improving neural functions.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the VSP-A (Vécu et Santé Perçue de l'Adolescent), a health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument for adolescents, in a healthy Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment, encompassing the adolescents' perceptions of their mental, physical, and social health and well-being is increasingly considered an important outcome to be used to identify population health needs and to provide targeted medical care. Although validated instruments are essential for accurately assessing HRQoL outcomes, there are few cross-culturally adapted tools for use in Brazil, and none designed exclusively for use among adolescents. The Vécu et Santé Perçue de l'Adolescent (VSP-A) is a generic, multidimensional self-reported instrument originally developed and validated in France that evaluates HRQoL of ill and healthy adolescents. Purpose To cross-culturally adapt and validate the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the VSP-A, a generic HRQoL measure for adolescents originally developed in France. Methods The VSP-A was translated following a well-validated forward-backward process leading to the Brazilian version. The psychometric evaluation was conducted in a sample of 446 adolescents (14-18 years) attending 2 public high schools of São Gonçalo City. The adolescents self-reported the Brazilian VSP-A, the validated Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist and socio-demographic information. A retest evaluation was carried out on a sub-sample (n = 195) at a two-week interval. The internal construct validity was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), multi-trait scaling analyses, Rasch analysis evaluating unidimensionality of each scale and Cronbach's alpha coefficients. The reproducibility was evaluated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Zumbo's ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to detect differential item functioning (DIF) between the Brazilian and the French items. External construct validity was investigated testing expected differences between groups using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Mann-Whitney tests and the univariate general regression linear model

  2. [The list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program and the Brazilian National Pharmaceutical Care Policy].

    PubMed

    Yamauti, Sueli Miyuki; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the list of drugs in the Popular Pharmacy Program in Brazil (PFPB) in relation to the country's pharmaceutical care policy. The list of drugs in the PFPB was compared to the Brazilian and international reference lists of essential medicines, the components of pharmaceutical care in Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), and drug production by the country's government pharmaceutical laboratories. The PFPB list includes 119 drugs, of which 19.3% and 47.1% were not selected on the Brazilian and international reference lists, respectively; 16.8% are not used in primary care, and 40.3% are not produced by the country's government laboratories. A revision of the PFPB list based on the essential medicines concept (World Health Organization), alignment of pharmaceutical care policies, and production by government laboratories are essential to improve quality of health care, management, training of prescribers, and information for the population.

  3. Evidence of inadequate docosahexaenoic acid status in Brazilian pregnant and lactating women.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alexandre G; Trugo, Nádia M F

    2009-04-01

    Recently published data concerning dietary intake of fat and food sources of (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in Brazil are reviewed together with data on biochemical indices of PUFA status during pregnancy and lactation and PUFA composition of breast milk in Brazilian adolescents and adults. Potential inadequacies of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status among Brazilian pregnant and lactating women have not yet been thoroughly evaluated. The data reviewed show that dietary intake of food sources of n-3 LCPUFA is low and possibly deficient in Brazil, and that biochemical indices of maternal DHA status and breast milk DHA content are low compared to the international literature. These data indicate inadequate DHA status among Brazilian women during pregnancy and lactation, but this evidence needs confirmation through comprehensive and specific population-based studies.

  4. Healthcare Needs of and Access Barriers for Brazilian Transgender and Gender Diverse People.

    PubMed

    Costa, Angelo Brandelli; da Rosa Filho, Heitor Tome; Pase, Paola Fagundes; Fontanari, Anna Martha Vaitses; Catelan, Ramiro Figueiredo; Mueller, Andressa; Cardoso, Dhiordan; Soll, Bianca; Schwarz, Karine; Schneider, Maiko Abel; Gagliotti, Daniel Augusto Mori; Saadeh, Alexandre; Lobato, Maria Inês Rodrigues; Nardi, Henrique Caetano; Koller, Silvia Helena

    2016-11-01

    Transgender and gender diverse people (TGD) have specific healthcare needs and struggles with access barriers that should be addressed by public health systems. Our study aimed to address this topic in the Brazilian context. A hospital and web-based cross-sectional survey built with input from the medical and transgender communities was developed to assess TGD healthcare needs of and access barriers in two Brazilian states. Although services that assist this population have existed in Brazil since the 1990s, TGD have difficulty accessing these services due to discrimination, lack of information and a policy design that does not meet the needs of TGD. A history of discrimination was associated with a 6.72-fold increase in the frequency of health service avoidance [95% CI (4.5, 10.1)]. This article discusses the urgent necessity for adequate health policies and for the training of professionals regarding the needs of Brazilian TGD.

  5. Brazilian adolescents’ knowledge and beliefs about abortion methods: a school-based internet inquiry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Internet surveys that draw from traditionally generated samples provide the unique conditions to engage adolescents in exploration of sensitive health topics. Methods We examined awareness of unwanted pregnancy, abortion behaviour, methods, and attitudes toward specific legal indications for abortion via a school-based internet survey among 378 adolescents aged 12–21 years in three Rio de Janeiro public schools. Results Forty-five percent knew peers who had undergone an abortion. Most students (66.0%) did not disclose abortion method knowledge. However, girls (aOR 4.2, 95% CI 2.4-7.2), those who had experienced their sexual debut (aOR1.76, 95% CI 1.1-3.0), and those attending a prestigious magnet school (aOR 2.7 95% CI 1.4-6.3) were more likely to report methods. Most abortion methods (79.3%) reported were ineffective, obsolete, and/or unsafe. Herbs (e.g. marijuana tea), over-the-counter medications, surgical procedures, foreign objects and blunt trauma were reported. Most techniques (85.2%) were perceived to be dangerous, including methods recommended by the World Health Organization. A majority (61.4%) supported Brazil’s existing law permitting abortion in the case of rape. There was no association between gender, age, sexual debut, parental education or socioeconomic status and attitudes toward legal abortion. However, students at the magnet school supported twice as many legal indications (2.7, SE.27) suggesting a likely role of peers and/or educators in shaping abortion views. Conclusions Abortion knowledge and attitudes are not driven simply by age, religion or class, but rather a complex interplay that includes both social spaces and gender. Prevention of abortion morbidity and mortality among adolescents requires comprehensive sexuality and reproductive health education that includes factual distinctions between safe and unsafe abortion methods. PMID:24521075

  6. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Botucatu, Brazil: A Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Fabiana Venegas; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Abraão, Lígia Maria; Martins, Patrícia Y. F.; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2014-01-01

    Recent increases in the incidence and severity of staphylococcal infections renewed interest in studies that assess the burden of asymptomatic carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the community setting. We conducted a population-based survey in the city of Botucatu, Brazil (122,000 inhabitants), in order to identify the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains). Nasal swabs were obtained from 686 persons over one year of age. Resistance to methicillin was assessed through phenotypic methods, identification of the mecA gene and typing of the Staphylococcal Chromosome Cassette mec (SCCmec). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were characterized using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and spa typing. Polymerase chain reaction was applied to identify genes coding for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) in isolates. The prevalence of overall S. aureus carriage was 32.7% (95%CI, 29.2%–36.2%). Carriers were significantly younger (mean age, 28.1 versus 36.3 for non-carriers; OR for age, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.97–0.99) and likely to report recent skin infection (OR, 1.85; 95%CI, 1.03–3.34). Carriage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was found in 0.9% of study subjects (95%CI, 0.4%–1.8%). All MRSA isolates harbored SCCmec type IV, and belonged to spa types t002 or t021, but none among them harbored genes coding for PLV. In MLST, most isolates belonged to clones ST5 or ST1776. However, we found one subject who carried a novel clone, ST2594. Two out of six MRSA carriers had household contacts colonized with isolates similar to theirs. Our study pointed to dissemination of community-associated MRSA among the Brazilian population. PMID:24663818

  7. Evidenced-Based Treatment of Depression in the College Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carolyn L.

    2005-01-01

    This review explores evidence-based treatment for depression within the college and university population. Treatments for depression in adults are among the most rigorous studied treatment modalities in the psychotherapy literature, providing consistent evidence for the efficacy of at least two treatments, cognitive behavioral therapy and…

  8. Partnerships for Lifelong Learning Policies: A Brazilian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Brazilian inequality is the result of multiple complex determinations but the heterogeneity with which quality education is distributed among the population remains at its core. When we consider the Brazilian labour market we see that the heterogeneity in the levels of schooling of the workforce is the principle determinant for wage inequality…

  9. The contribution of volunteer-based monitoring data to the assessment of harmful phytoplankton blooms in Brazilian urban streams.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Davi Gasparini Fernandes; Casali, Simone Pereira; de Falco, Patrícia Bortoletto; Thornhill, Ian; Loiselle, Steven Arthur

    2017-04-15

    Urban streams are vulnerable to a range of impacts, leading to the impairment of ecosystem services. However, studies on phytoplankton growth in tropical lotic systems are still limited. Citizen science approaches use trained volunteers to collect environmental data. We combined data on urban streams collected by volunteers with data obtained by professional scientists to identify potential drivers of phytoplankton community and determine thresholds for Cyanobacteria development. We combined datasets (n=117) on water quality and environmental observations in 64 Brazilian urban streams with paired data on phytoplankton. Sampling activities encompassed dry (July 2013 and July 2015) and warm (February and November 2014) seasons. Volunteers quantified phosphate (PO4(3-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and turbidity in each stream using colorimetric and optical methods and recorded environmental conditions in the immediate surroundings of the sites through visual observations. We used non-parametric statistics to identify correlations among nutrients, turbidity and phytoplankton. We also looked for thresholds with respect to high Cyanobacteria abundance (>50,000cells/mL). The streams were characterized by relatively high nutrient concentrations (PO4(3-): 0.11mg/L; NO3(-): 2.6mg/L) and turbidity (49 NTU). Phytoplankton densities reached 189,000cells/mL, mainly potentially toxic Cyanobacteria species. Moderate but significant (p<0.05) correlations were observed between phytoplankton density and turbidity (ρ=0.338, Spearman) and PO4(3-) (ρ=0.292), but not with NO3(-). Other important variables (river flow, temperature and light) were not assessed. Volunteers' observations covaried with phytoplankton density (p<0.05, Kruskal-Wallis), positively with increasing number of pollution sources and negatively with presence of vegetation in the riparian zone. Our results indicate that thresholds for PO4(3-) (0.11mg/L) can be used to separate systems with high Cyanobacteria density. The number

  10. GIS-Based Population Model Applied to Nevada Transportation Routes

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1999-03-04

    Recently, a model based on geographic information system (GIS) processing of US Census Block data has made high-resolution population analysis for transportation risk analysis technically and economically feasible. Population density bordering each kilometer of a route may be tabulated with specific route sections falling into each of three categories (Rural, Suburban or Urban) identified for separate risk analysis. In addition to the improvement in resolution of Urban areas along a route, the model provides a statistically-based correction to population densities in Rural and Suburban areas where Census Block dimensions may greatly exceed the 800-meter scale of interest. A semi-automated application of the GIS model to a subset of routes in Nevada (related to the Yucca Mountain project) are presented, and the results compared to previous models including a model based on published Census and other data. These comparisons demonstrate that meaningful improvement in accuracy and specificity of transportation risk analyses is dependent on correspondingly accurate and geographically-specific population density data.

  11. What are the boundaries of legal guardianship in Alzheimer's disease? An evidence-based update in the context of the Brazilian Civil Code.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Felipe K; Salles, Ana C; de Santiago, Clarisse R

    2016-03-01

    The Brazilian Civil Code, which came into force in 2002, established a functional criterion for guardianship proceedings and introduced the concept of "limited guardianship," applied to cases in which incapacity to exercise civil rights is partial. With population aging and the growth in the number of older people with cognitive impairments, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the need to invoke legal remedies against elder abuse increased; however, difficulties in assessing capacity still lead to a majority of decisions in favor of plenary guardianship. The present article compiled data on capacity in AD subjects. The varying degrees of decision-making impairment at different stages of AD might be compatible with limited guardianship in milder cases of the disease.

  12. Population-based case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Scott, William K

    2012-07-01

    This unit provides an overview of the design and analysis of population-based case-control studies of genetic risk factors for complex disease. Considerations specific to genetic studies are emphasized. The unit reviews basic study designs differentiating case-control studies from others, presents different genetic association strategies (candidate gene, genome-wide association, and high-throughput sequencing), introduces basic methods of statistical analysis for case-control data and approaches to combining case-control studies, and discusses measures of association and impact. Admixed populations, controlling for confounding (including population stratification), consideration of multiple loci and environmental risk factors, and complementary analyses of haplotypes, genes, and pathways are briefly discussed. Readers are referred to basic texts on epidemiology for more details on general conduct of case-control studies.

  13. Scientometrics: Nature Index and Brazilian science.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valter

    2016-09-01

    A recent published newspaper article commented on the (lack of) quality of Brazilian science and its (in) efficiency. The newspaper article was based on a special issue of Nature and on a new resource for scientometrics called Nature Index. I show here arguments and sources of bias that, under the light of the principle in dubio pro reo, it is questionable to dispute the quality and efficiency of the Brazilian science on these grounds, as it was commented on the referred article. A brief overview of Brazilian science is provided for readers to make their own judgment.

  14. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  15. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  16. [Behaviors related to sunlight exposure versus protection in a random population sample from 15 Brazilian State capitals and the Federal District, 2002-2003].

    PubMed

    Szklo, André Salem; Almeida, Liz Maria de; Figueiredo, Valeska; Lozana, José de Azevedo; Azevedo e Silva Mendonça, Gulnar; Moura, Lenildo de; Szklo, Moysés

    2007-04-01

    This article examines region-specific relations between prevalence of protection against sunlight and socio-demographic and behavioral variables in Brazil. Data were derived from a cross-sectional population-based random sample. Information on sunlight exposure was available for a total of 16,999 individuals 15 years and older. Comparing the North and South of Brazil, crude differences between women and men in the use of "sunscreen" and "protective headwear" were +10.9% (95%CI: 7.1; 14.6) and -11.6% (95%CI: -17.0; -6.3) in the North and +21.3% (95%CI: 17.7; 24.9) and -16.0% (95%CI: -20.2; -12.5) in the South. Adjusted differences by selected variables confirmed that women use more sunscreen protection and less headwear protection as compared to men in both the North and South, but the difference was not homogeneous by region (interaction term p value < 0.05).

  17. Identification of a novel subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus in a population of naturally infected felines in the Brazilian Federal District.

    PubMed

    Marçola, T G; Gomes, C P C; Silva, P A; Fernandes, G R; Paludo, G R; Pereira, R W

    2013-06-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus that is found worldwide, and it can be assigned to six subtypes (A, B, C, D, E, and a putative subtype F) based on sequencing analysis of the env and gag genes. Subtypes A and B are the most common worldwide. In Brazil, several authors have isolated only subtype B, and its prevalence differs markedly among investigated populations. Blood samples from 200 domestic felines from the Federal District in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Samples that tested positive for FIV were then cloned, sequenced, and analyzed phylogenetically and statistically. The results represent the first description of FIV infection in the Central Region of Brazil and suggest that only 2 % of felines in this region are positive for the virus. In addition, the analysis showed that one out of the four positive samples that we detected could not be assigned to any of the six classical subtypes. This sample was taken as a putative novel subtype of the FIV virus. The remaining three positive samples were assigned to subtype B, with differences existing among these samples.

  18. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  19. Geographic distribution and population characteristics of the endangered white-fronted spider monkey (Ateles marginatus) on the lower Tapajós River in central Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Ravetta, André L; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2009-07-01

    The white-fronted spider monkey, Ateles marginatus, is endemic to Brazilian Amazon between the Tapajós and Xingu Rivers, and is classified as endangered due primarily to habitat loss. This study presents data on the distribution and relative abundance of the species in the northwestern corner of its distribution, on the lower Tapajós River, centered on the 545,000 ha Tapajós National Forest (Flona Tapajós). Quantitative data were collected in line transect surveys at 14 sites, and confirmatory interviews were conducted at these, and a further four sites. The results indicate that A. marginatus is extinct or extremely rare at sites in the northern extreme of the study area, but is relatively widespread further south, except in very small fragments (<100 ha). While the present-day occurrence of A. marginatus is clearly affected by habitat fragmentation, the species' original distribution appears to have been characterized by local lacunas, determined by factors relating to habitat quality. While hunting pressure does not seem to be a major threat at the present time, competition with a second atelid, Alouatta discolor, may have reinforced the effects of habitat disturbance in some areas, especially smaller fragments. Grouping patterns were typical of the genus, including an apparent female bias in the sex ratio of adults. Overall, the results indicate an ongoing decline in the occurrence of A. marginatus within the study area, local extinction, especially in smaller fragments, and an urgent need for the establishment of effective conservation measures.

  20. Comparison of genetic damage in Brazilian footwear-workers exposed to solvent-based or water-based adhesive.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Vanina Dahlström; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; da Silva, Juliana; Erdtmann, Bernardo

    2005-05-02

    Research has shown that workers employed in footwear manufacture are at increased risk of some cancers, the strongest evidence being for nasal cancer and leukemia. Footwear-workers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of solvents in degreasers, cleaners, primers, and adhesives used in the production process as toluene, n-hexane, acetone, and possibly dust particles, additives in shoe materials and degradation products of materials. The recognition of the potential health-hazards of solvent-based adhesives (SBAs) has lead to the development of adhesives with no organic solvents, the water-based adhesives (WBA). We investigated footwear-workers (all males) exposed to SBA (n=29) (for 3.98+/-4.13 years), and WBA (n=16), which had spent the six months previous to the study employed in an experimental section which used only water-based adhesives, although they had previously worked in sections which used solvent-based adhesives (for 5.80+/-4.03 years); 25 healthy subjects were used as controls. The Comet assay and the micronucleus test were used as endpoints, while the traditional parameters for assessing exposure to toluene in organic mixtures by measuring the concentration of urinary hippuric acid were also assessed. Our results showed a significantly lower mean concentration of hippuric acid in the control group than found in the SBA (P<0.001) and WBA (P<0.05) groups. The Comet assay results showed that there was a significant increase in the mean damage index for the SBA (P<0.001) group in comparison to the WBA group and control (P<0.05). For the micronucleus test in binucleated lymphocytes and exfoliated buccal cell, the three groups were not statistically different. Our study demonstrated that water-based adhesives are clearly a better option for safeguarding the health of footwear-workers, even with possibility of isocyanate presence, while the positive results observed in SBA group might be explained by chloroprene presence in the adhesive.

  1. Frailty and cardiovascular risk in community-dwelling elderly: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni; Pessoa, Germane Silva; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a possible bidirectional connection between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the frailty syndrome in older people. Purpose To verify the relationship between CVD risk factors and the frailty syndrome in community-dwelling elderly. Methods This population-based study used data from the Fragilidade em Idosos Brasileiros (FIBRA) Network Study, a cross-sectional study designed to investigate frailty profiles among Brazilian older adults. Frailty status was defined as the presence of three or more out of five of the following criteria: unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported fatigue, slow walking speed, and low physical activity level. The ascertained CVD risk factors were self-reported and/or directly measured hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, waist circumference measurement, and smoking. Results Of the 761 participants, 9.7% were characterized as frail, 48.0% as pre-frail, and 42.3% as non-frail. The most prevalent CVD risk factor was hypertension (84.4%) and the lowest one was smoking (10.4%). It was observed that among those participants with four or five risk factors there was a higher proportion of frail and pre-frail compared with non-frail (Fisher’s exact test: P=0.005; P=0.021). Self-reported diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among frail and pre-frail participants when compared with non-frail participants (Fisher’s exact test: P≤0.001; P≤0.001). There was little agreement between self-reported hypertension and hypertension identified by blood pressure measurement. Conclusion Hypertension was highly prevalent among the total sample. In addition, frail and pre-frail older people corresponded to a substantial proportion of those with more CVD risk factors, especially diabetes mellitus, highlighting the need for preventive strategies in order to avoid the co-occurrence of CVD and frailty. PMID:25336932

  2. Physical activity and medicine use: evidence from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Andrea D; Hallal, Pedro C; Barros, Aluisio JD

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the association between physical activity practice and medicine use; data from these studies are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between level of physical activity and medicine use in adults aged 20 years or more. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in the first semester of 2002 in the urban area of Pelotas; a medium-sized Southern Brazilian city. Physical activity was assessed with the short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A physical activity score was created as the weekly time spent in moderate-intensity activities plus twice the weekly time spent in vigorous-intensity activities. Medicine use in the 15 days prior to the interview was also assessed. Adjusted analyses taking into account the sampling design was carried out using Poisson regression. Wald tests for heterogeneity and linear trend were used to calculate significance. Results Out of the 3,182 individuals interviewed, 41% were not sufficiently active according to current physical activity guidelines. Only 34% of the subjects did not use medicines in the previous 15 days, and 18% used three or more drugs in the same period. Level of physical activity was inversely associated with the number of medicines used both in the crude and in the adjusted analyses. Conclusion There are well-documented benefits of physical activity for several chronic diseases in the literature. Data from the present study suggest that medicine use is also positively affected by physical activity behavior. PMID:16956396

  3. Changing roles of population-based cancer registries in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roder, David; Creighton, Nicola; Baker, Deborah; Walton, Richard; Aranda, Sanchia; Currow, David

    2015-09-01

    Registries have key roles in cancer incidence, mortality and survival monitoring and in showing disparities across the population. Incidence monitoring began in New South Wales in 1972 and other jurisdictions soon followed. Registry data are used to evaluate outcomes of preventive, screening, treatment and support services. They have shown decreases in cancer incidence following interventions and have been used for workforce and other infrastructure planning. Crude markers of optimal radiotherapy and chemotherapy exist and registry data are used to show shortfalls against these markers. The data are also used to investigate cancer clusters and environmental concerns. Survival data are used to assess service performance and interval cancer data are used in screening accreditation. Registries enable determination of risk of multiple primary cancers. Clinical quality registries are used for clinical quality improvement. Population-based cancer registries and linked administrative data complement clinical registries by providing high-level system-wide data. The USA Commission on Cancer has long used registries for quality assurance and service accreditation. Increasingly population-based registry data in Australia are linked with administrative data on service delivery to assess system performance. Addition oftumour stage and otherprognostic indicators is important forthese analyses and is facilitated by the roll-out of structured pathology reporting. Data linkage with administrative data, following checks on the quality of these data, enables assessment of patterns of care and other performance indicators for health-system monitoring. Australian cancer registries have evolved and increasingly are contributing to broader information networks for health system management.

  4. Evaluating Nicotine Replacement Therapy and Stage-Based Therapies in a Population-Based Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Friedman, Robert H.; Fava, Joseph L.; Gulliver, Suzy B.; Keller, Stefan; Sun, Xiaowu; Ramelson, Harley; Prochaska, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation are typically evaluated using volunteer samples (efficacy trials) but should also be evaluated in population-based trials (effectiveness trials). Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone and in combination with behavioral interventions was evaluated on a population of smokers from a New England…

  5. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  6. Wealth Inequality and Mental Disability Among the Chinese Population: A Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjie; Du, Wei; Pang, Lihua; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2015-10-19

    In the study described herein, we investigated and explored the association between wealth inequality and the risk of mental disability in the Chinese population. We used nationally represented, population-based data from the second China National Sample Survey on Disability, conducted in 2006. A total of 1,724,398 study subjects between the ages of 15 and 64, including 10,095 subjects with mental disability only, were used for the analysis. Wealth status was estimated by a wealth index that was derived from a principal component analysis of 10 household assets and four other variables related to wealth. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for mental disability for each category, with the lowest quintile category as the referent. Confounding variables under consideration were age, gender, residence area, marital status, ethnicity, education, current employment status, household size, house type, homeownership and living arrangement. The distribution of various types and severities of mental disability differed significantly by wealth index category in the present population. Wealth index category had a positive association with mild mental disability (p for trend <0.01), but had a negative association with extremely severe mental disability (p for trend <0.01). Moreover, wealth index category had a significant, inverse association with mental disability when all severities of mental disability were taken into consideration. This study's results suggest that wealth is a significant factor in the distribution of mental disability and it might have different influences on various types and severities of mental disability.

  7. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity.

  8. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity. PMID:26561012

  9. The simcyp population based simulator: architecture, implementation, and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Jamei, Masoud; Marciniak, Steve; Edwards, Duncan; Wragg, Kris; Feng, Kairui; Barnett, Adrian; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Developing a user-friendly platform that can handle a vast number of complex physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models both for conventional small molecules and larger biologic drugs is a substantial challenge. Over the last decade the Simcyp Population Based Simulator has gained popularity in major pharmaceutical companies (70% of top 40 - in term of R&D spending). Under the Simcyp Consortium guidance, it has evolved from a simple drug-drug interaction tool to a sophisticated and comprehensive Model Based Drug Development (MBDD) platform that covers a broad range of applications spanning from early drug discovery to late drug development. This article provides an update on the latest architectural and implementation developments within the Simulator. Interconnection between peripheral modules, the dynamic model building process and compound and population data handling are all described. The Simcyp Data Management (SDM) system, which contains the system and drug databases, can help with implementing quality standards by seamless integration and tracking of any changes. This also helps with internal approval procedures, validation and auto-testing of the new implemented models and algorithms, an area of high interest to regulatory bodies.

  10. Atomic clock based on transient coherent population trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Tao; Deng Ke; Chen Xuzong; Wang Zhong

    2009-04-13

    We proposed a scheme to implement coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock based on the transient CPT phenomenon. We proved that the transient transmitted laser power in a typical {lambda} system near CPT resonance features as a damping oscillation. Also, the oscillating frequency is exactly equal to the frequency detuning from the atomic hyperfine splitting. Therefore, we can directly measure the frequency detuning and then compensated to the output frequency of microwave oscillator to get the standard frequency. By this method, we can further simplify the structure of CPT atomic clock, and make it easier to be digitized and miniaturized.

  11. Climate change in the Brazilian northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Regina R.; Haarsma, Reindert J.; Hoelzemann, Judith J.

    2012-10-01

    Climate Change, Impacts and Vulnerabilities in Brazil: Preparing the Brazilian Northeast for the Future; Natal, Brazil, 27 May to 01 June 2012 The variability of the semiarid climate of the Brazilian northeast has enormous environmental and social implications. Because most of the population in this area depends on subsistence agriculture, periods of severe drought in the past have caused extreme poverty and subsequent migration to urban centers. From the ecological point of view, frequent and prolonged droughts can lead to the desertification of large areas. Understanding the causes of rainfall variability, in particular periods of severe drought, is crucial for accurate forecasting, mitigation, and adaptation in this important region of Brazil.

  12. Estimating glomerular filtration rate in a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Anoop; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Barbara EK; Muntner, Paul; Brazy, Peter C; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Nieto, F Javier; Danforth, Lorraine G; Schubert, Carla R; Tsai, Michael Y; Klein, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-estimating equations are used to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in population-based studies. However, it has been suggested that since the commonly used GFR equations were originally developed from samples of patients with CKD, they underestimate GFR in healthy populations. Few studies have made side-by-side comparisons of the effect of various estimating equations on the prevalence estimates of CKD in a general population sample. Patients and methods: We examined a population-based sample comprising adults from Wisconsin (age, 43–86 years; 56% women). We compared the prevalence of CKD, defined as a GFR of <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine, by applying various commonly used equations including the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation, Cockcroft–Gault (CG) equation, and the Mayo equation. We compared the performance of these equations against the CKD definition of cystatin C >1.23 mg/L. Results: We found that the prevalence of CKD varied widely among different GFR equations. Although the prevalence of CKD was 17.2% with the MDRD equation and 16.5% with the CG equation, it was only 4.8% with the Mayo equation. Only 24% of those identified to have GFR in the range of 50–59 mL/min per 1.73 m2 by the MDRD equation had cystatin C levels >1.23 mg/L; their mean cystatin C level was only 1 mg/L (interquartile range, 0.9–1.2 mg/L). This finding was similar for the CG equation. For the Mayo equation, 62.8% of those patients with GFR in the range of 50–59 mL/min per 1.73 m2 had cystatin C levels >1.23 mg/L; their mean cystatin C level was 1.3 mg/L (interquartile range, 1.2–1.5 mg/L). The MDRD and CG equations showed a false-positive rate of >10%. Discussion: We found that the MDRD and CG equations, the current standard to estimate GFR, appeared to overestimate the prevalence of CKD in a general population sample. PMID:20730018

  13. Redescription of Hemieuryale pustulata von Martens, 1867 (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea) based on Brazilian specimens, with notes on systematics and habitat association.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Anne Isabelley; Dias, Thelma Lúcia Pereira; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; Stöhr, Sabine

    2015-03-02

    We redescribe Hemieuryale pustulata on the basis of 325 specimens obtained from the continental shelf off northeastern and southeastern Brazil. This is the first record of the species for Brazil. We illustrate for the first time details of the dental plate, oral plate, and vertebrae. Few morphological variations were observed in our extensive material. All specimens were associated with the gorgonian Nicella guadalupensis, suggesting an obligatory association in the Brazilian littoral. H. pustulata did not reveal a particular pattern of distribution on its host gorgonian, but larger gorgonians tend to support a larger number of ophiuroids. In addition to expanding the knowledge on morphology and ecology, we extend the known bathymetric distribution of the species, which is now known from 18 to 330 m.

  14. Variability of cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant bacteria in two Brazilian intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Jacques R; Oliveira, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare cutaneous and nasal population levels between patients colonized and infected by multidrug-resistant organisms in two intensive care units. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in adult intensive care units of two hospitals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil (April 2012 to February 2013). Clinical and demographic data were first collected by reviewing patients’ charts. Then, samples collected with nasal, groin, and perineum swabs were cultivated in selective media for 48 h at 37°C. After isolation, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility and biochemical identification were performed. Results: A total of 53 cases of colonization were observed by the following bacteria in decreasing frequencies: imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (50.9%), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (43.4%), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (37.7%), imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32.1%), oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (7.5%), and imipenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (5.7%). Among these colonization cases, 26 (49.0%) were followed by infection with bacteria phenotypically similar to those of the colonization. A relation between high population levels of colonization by most of the multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection was observed. After colonization/infection, bacterial population levels decreased progressively and spontaneously until disappearance by day 45 in all the anatomical sites and for all the multidrug-resistant organisms. Conclusion: There was a correlation between high population levels of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms at anatomical sites and a subsequent infection. Reduction in multidrug-resistant organism populations after colonization at anatomical sites could be a preventive measure to reduce evolution to infection as well as transmission of these bacteria between patients in intensive care unit. PMID:26770762

  15. Young adults' trajectories of Ecstasy use: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Andrew; Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Plotnikova, Maria; Wells, Helene; Legosz, Margot; Kemp, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Young adults' Ecstasy use trajectories have important implications for individual and population-level consequences of Ecstasy use, but little relevant research has been conducted. This study prospectively examines Ecstasy trajectories in a population-based sample. Data are from the Natural History Study of Drug Use, a retrospective/prospective cohort study conducted in Australia. Population screening identified a probability sample of Ecstasy users aged 19-23 years. Complete data for 30 months of follow-up, comprising 4 time intervals, were available for 297 participants (88.4% of sample). Trajectories were derived using cluster analysis based on recent Ecstasy use at each interval. Trajectory predictors were examined using a generalized ordered logit model and included Ecstasy dependence (World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Instrument), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale), aggression (Young Adult Self Report) and contextual factors (e.g. attendance at electronic/dance music events). Three Ecstasy trajectories were identified (low, intermediate and high use). At its peak, the high-use trajectory involved 1-2 days Ecstasy use per week. Decreasing frequency of use was observed for intermediate and high-use trajectories from 12 months, independently of market factors. Intermediate and high-use trajectory membership was predicted by past Ecstasy consumption (>70 pills) and attendance at electronic/dance music events. High-use trajectory members were unlikely to have used Ecstasy for more than 3 years and tended to report consistently positive subjective effects at baseline. Given the social context and temporal course of Ecstasy use, Ecstasy trajectories might be better understood in terms of instrumental rather than addictive drug use patterns.

  16. On the accuracy of population analyses based on fitted densities().

    PubMed

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Clavaguéra, Carine; Köster, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Population analyses are part of the theoretical chemist's toolbox. They provide means to extract information about the repartition of the electronic density among molecules or solids. The values of atomic multipoles in a molecule can shed light on its electrostatic properties and may help to predict how different molecules could interact or to rationalize chemical reactivity for instance. Not being physical observables to which a quantum mechanical operator can be associated, atomic charges and higher order atomic multipoles cannot be defined unambiguously in a molecule, and therefore, several population schemes (PS) have been devised in the last decades. In the context of density functional theory (DFT), PS based on the electron density seem to be best grounded. In particular, some groups have proposed various iterative schemes the outcomes of which are very encouraging. Modern implementations of DFT that are for example based on density fitting techniques permit the investigation of molecular systems comprising of hundreds of atoms. However, population analyses following iterative schemes may become very CPU time consuming for such large systems. In this article, we investigate if the computationally less expensive analyses of the variationally fitted electronic densities can be safely carried out instead of the Kohn-Sham density. It is shown that as long as flexible auxiliary function sets including f and g functions are used, the multipoles extracted from the fitted densities are extremely close to those obtained from the KS density. We further assess if the multipoles obtained through the Hirshfeld's approach, in its standard or iterative form, can be a useful approach to calculate interaction energies in non-covalent complexes. Relative energies computed with the AMOEBA polarizable forced field combined to iterative Hirshfeld multipoles are encouraging.

  17. Optimal inverse functions created via population-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Alan L; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    Finding optimal inputs for a multiple-input, single-output system is taxing for a system operator. Population-based optimization is used to create sets of functions that produce a locally optimal input based on a desired output. An operator or higher level planner could use one of the functions in real time. For the optimization, each agent in the population uses the cost and output gradients to take steps lowering the cost while maintaining their current output. When an agent reaches an optimal input for its current output, additional agents are generated in the output gradient directions. The new agents then settle to the local optima for the new output values. The set of associated optimal points forms an inverse function, via spline interpolation, from a desired output to an optimal input. In this manner, multiple locally optimal functions can be created. These functions are naturally clustered in input and output spaces allowing for a continuous inverse function. The operator selects the best cluster over the anticipated range of desired outputs and adjusts the set point (desired output) while maintaining optimality. This reduces the demand from controlling multiple inputs, to controlling a single set point with no loss in performance. Results are demonstrated on a sample set of functions and on a robot control problem.

  18. Copula-Based Approach to Synthetic Population Generation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Generating synthetic baseline populations is a fundamental step of agent-based modeling and simulation, which is growing fast in a wide range of socio-economic areas including transportation planning research. Traditionally, in many commercial and non-commercial microsimulation systems, the iterative proportional fitting (IPF) procedure has been used for creating the joint distribution of individuals when combining a reference joint distribution with target marginal distributions. Although IPF is simple, computationally efficient, and rigorously founded, it is unclear whether IPF well preserves the dependence structure of the reference joint table sufficiently when fitting it to target margins. In this paper, a novel method is proposed based on the copula concept in order to provide an alternative approach to the problem that IPF resolves. The dependency characteristic measures were computed and the results from the proposed method and IPF were compared. In most test cases, the proposed method outperformed IPF in preserving the dependence structure of the reference joint distribution. PMID:27490692

  19. Assessment of Self-Regulatory Code Violations in Brazilian Television Beer Advertisements*

    PubMed Central

    Vendrame, Alan; Pinsky, Ilana; Souza E Silva, Rebeca; Babor, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that alcoholic beverage advertisements may have an adverse effect on teenagers and young adults, owing to their vulnerability to suggestive message content. This study was designed to evaluate perceived violations of the content guidelines of the Brazilian alcohol marketing self-regulation code, based on ratings of the five most popular beer advertisements broadcast on television in the summer of 2005–2006 and during the 2006 FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) World Cup games. Method: Five beer advertisements were selected from a previous study showing that they were perceived to be highly appealing to a sample of Brazilian teenagers. These advertisements were evaluated by a sample of Brazilian high school students using a rating procedure designed to measure the content of alcohol advertisements covered in industry self-regulation codes. Results: All five advertisements were found to violate multiple guidelines of the Brazilian code of marketing self-regulation. The advertisement with the greatest number of violations was Antarctica's “Male Repellent,” which was perceived to violate 11 of the 16 guidelines in the code. Two advertisements had nine violations, and one had eight. The guidelines most likely to be violated by these advertisements were Guideline 1, which is aimed at protecting children and teenagers, and Guideline 2, which prohibits content encouraging excessive and irresponsible alcoholic beverage consumption. Conclusions: The five beer advertisements rated as most appealing to Brazilian teenagers were perceived by a sample of the same population to have violated numerous principles of the Brazilian self-regulation code governing the marketing of alcoholic beverages. Because of these numerous perceived code violations, it now seems important for regulatory authorities to submit industry marketing content to more systematic evaluation by young people and public health experts and for researchers

  20. Understanding the genetic diversity, spatial genetic structure and mating system at the hierarchical levels of fruits and individuals of a continuous Theobroma cacao population from the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Silva, C R S; Albuquerque, P S B; Ervedosa, F R; Mota, J W S; Figueira, A; Sebbenn, A M

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mating patterns of populations of tree species is a key component of ex situ genetic conservation. In this study, we analysed the genetic diversity, spatial genetic structure (SGS) and mating system at the hierarchical levels of fruits and individuals as well as pollen dispersal patterns in a continuous population of Theobroma cacao in Pará State, Brazil. A total of 156 individuals in a 0.56 ha plot were mapped and genotyped for nine microsatellite loci. For the mating system analyses, 50 seeds were collected from nine seed trees by sampling five fruits per tree (10 seeds per fruit). Among the 156 individuals, 127 had unique multilocus genotypes, and the remaining were clones. The population was spatially aggregated; it demonstrated a significant SGS up to 15 m that could be attributed primarily to the presence of clones. However, the short seed dispersal distance also contributed to this pattern. Population matings occurred mainly via outcrossing, but selfing was observed in some seed trees, which indicated the presence of individual variation for self-incompatibility. The matings were also correlated, especially within (r̂p(m)=0.607) rather than among the fruits (r̂p(m)=0.099), which suggested that a small number of pollen donors fertilised each fruit. The paternity analysis suggested a high proportion of pollen migration (61.3%), although within the plot, most of the pollen dispersal encompassed short distances (28 m). The determination of these novel parameters provides the fundamental information required to establish long-term ex situ conservation strategies for this important tropical species. PMID:21139632

  1. Genetic diversity and structure of Brazilian ginger germplasm (Zingiber officinale) revealed by AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Eleonora Zambrano; Bajay, Miklos Maximiliano; Siqueira, Marcos Vinícius Bohrer Monteiro; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Pinheiro, José Baldin

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is a vegetable with medicinal and culinary properties widely cultivated in the Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The knowledge of ginger species' genetic variability is essential to direct correctly future studies of conservation and genetic improvement, but in Brazil, little is known about this species' genetic variability. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity and structure of 55 Brazilian accessions and 6 Colombian accessions of ginger, using AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) molecular markers. The molecular characterization was based on 13 primers combinations, which generated an average of 113.5 polymorphic loci. The genetic diversity estimates of Nei (Hj), Shannon-Weiner index (I) and an effective number of alleles (n e ) were greater in the Colombian accessions in relation to the Brazilian accessions. The analysis of molecular variance showed that most of the genetic variation occurred between the two countries while in the Brazilian populations there is no genetic structure and probably each region harbors 100 % of genetic variation found in the samples. The bayesian model-based clustering and the dendrogram using the dissimilarity's coefficient of Jaccard were congruent with each other and showed that the Brazilian accessions are highly similar between themselves, regardless of the geographic region of origin. We suggested that the exploration of the interspecific variability and the introduction of new varieties of Z.officinale are viable alternatives for generating diversity in breeding programs in Brazil. The introduction of new genetic materials will certainly contribute to a higher genetic basis of such crop.

  2. Comorbidity profile of poliomyelitis survivors in a Chinese population: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Previous reports of comorbid conditions in poliomyelitis survivors mainly focused on some disease categories, such as respiratory diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric diseases, neurological diseases and cancer. Data regarding a wide spectrum of medical comorbidities in patients with poliomyelitis is still sparse. This study aimed to investigate and profile the wide range of comorbidities among the survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in a Chinese population. In total, 2,032 paralytic poliomyelitis patients were selected as the study group and the comparison group consisted of 10,160 randomly selected enrollees. The comorbidities for analysis were based on a modified version of the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index. Conditional logistic regression analyses were computed to investigate the risk of comorbidities for these two groups. As compared to controls, patients with paralytic poliomyelitis had significantly higher prevalence of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, peripheral vascular disorder, stroke, paralysis, migraines, Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, pulmonary circulation disorders, chronic pulmonary disease, liver disease, peptic ulcers, hepatitis B or C, deficiency anemias, depression, and lymphoma. Most of the differences are of clinical interest, ORs often being between 2 and 3. No significant difference between poliomyelitis patients and controls was observed in the prevalence of SLE, tuberculosis, alcohol abuse and drug abuse. Our findings demonstrate that survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis in Taiwan are at higher risk of having multiple medical comorbidities although some potential confounding factors including educational level, marital status, obesity and physical activity are not available in our database. The pattern is generally consistent with previous observations from Western populations. Nevertheless, we found several novel associations

  3. Spike-Based Population Coding and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, Martin; Denève, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Compelling behavioral evidence suggests that humans can make optimal decisions despite the uncertainty inherent in perceptual or motor tasks. A key question in neuroscience is how populations of spiking neurons can implement such probabilistic computations. In this article, we develop a comprehensive framework for optimal, spike-based sensory integration and working memory in a dynamic environment. We propose that probability distributions are inferred spike-per-spike in recurrently connected networks of integrate-and-fire neurons. As a result, these networks can combine sensory cues optimally, track the state of a time-varying stimulus and memorize accumulated evidence over periods much longer than the time constant of single neurons. Importantly, we propose that population responses and persistent working memory states represent entire probability distributions and not only single stimulus values. These memories are reflected by sustained, asynchronous patterns of activity which make relevant information available to downstream neurons within their short time window of integration. Model neurons act as predictive encoders, only firing spikes which account for new information that has not yet been signaled. Thus, spike times signal deterministically a prediction error, contrary to rate codes in which spike times are considered to be random samples of an underlying firing rate. As a consequence of this coding scheme, a multitude of spike patterns can reliably encode the same information. This results in weakly correlated, Poisson-like spike trains that are sensitive to initial conditions but robust to even high levels of external neural noise. This spike train variability reproduces the one observed in cortical sensory spike trains, but cannot be equated to noise. On the contrary, it is a consequence of optimal spike-based inference. In contrast, we show that rate-based models perform poorly when implemented with stochastically spiking neurons. PMID:21379319

  4. Increasing incidence of cataract surgery: Population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gollogly, Heidrun E.; Hodge, David O.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Erie, Jay C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To estimate the incidence of cataract surgery in a defined population and to determine longitudinal cataract surgery patterns. SETTING Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. DESIGN Cohort study. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) databases were used to identify all incident cataract surgeries in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. Age-specific and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated and adjusted to the 2010 United States white population. Data were merged with previous REP data (1980 to 2004) to assess temporal trends in cataract surgery. Change in the incidence over time was assessed by fitting generalized linear models assuming a Poisson error structure. The probability of second-eye cataract surgery was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS Included were 8012 cataract surgeries from 2005 through 2011. During this time, incident cataract surgery significantly increased (P < .001), peaking in 2011 with a rate of 1100 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval, 1050–1160). The probability of second-eye surgery 3, 12, and 24 months after first-eye surgery was 60%, 76%, and 86%, respectively, a significant increase compared with the same intervals in the previous 7 years (1998 to 2004) (P < .001). When merged with 1980 to 2004 REP data, incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 3 decades (P < .001). CONCLUSION Incident cataract surgery steadily increased over the past 32 years and has not leveled off, as reported in Swedish population-based series. Second-eye surgery was performed sooner and more frequently, with 60% of residents having second-eye surgery within 3-months of first-eye surgery. PMID:23820302

  5. Population-based prevention of influenza in Dutch general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hak, E; Hermens, R P; van Essen, G A; Kuyvenhoven, M M; de Melker, R A

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in high-risk groups has been proven, vaccine coverage continues to be less than 50% in The Netherlands. To improve vaccination rates, data on the organizational factors, which should be targeted in population-based prevention of influenza, is essential. AIM: To assess the organizational factors in Dutch general practice, which were associated with the influenza vaccination rate in 1994. METHOD: A retrospective questionnaire study was undertaken in 1586 of the 4758 Dutch general practices, which were randomly selected. A total of 1251 (79%) practices returned a questionnaire. The items verified were practice profile, urbanization, delegation index, use of computer-based patient records, influenza vaccination characteristics and influenza vaccination rate. RESULTS: No differences were found with regard to the percentage of single-handed practices (65%), practices situated in urban area (38%), practices with a pharmacy (12%), patients insured by the National Health Service (59%) and use of computer-based patient records (57%) when compared with national statistics. The mean overall influenza vaccination rate was 9.0% (SD 4.0%). Using a logistic regression analysis, a high vaccination rate (> or = 9%) was associated with the use of personal reminders (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 1.3-2.2), monitoring patient compliance (OR 1.8, 1.3-2.4), marking risk patients in computer-based patient records (OR 1.3, 1.0-1.6), a small number of patients per full-time practice assistant (OR 1.5, 1.1-1.9), urban areas (OR 1.6, 1.3-2.1) and single-handed practices (OR 1.5, 1.1-1.9). CONCLUSION: Improvement of vaccination rates in high-risk patients may be achievable by promoting the use of personal reminders and computer-based patient records, as well as monitoring patient compliance. In addition, the role of practice assistants with regard to preventive activities should be developed further. Practices situated in rural areas and

  6. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  7. Central poststroke pain: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Klit, Henriette; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Andersen, Grethe; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2011-04-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is a specific pain condition arising as a direct consequence of a cerebrovascular lesion. There is limited knowledge about the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of this often neglected but important consequence of stroke. In this population-based study, a questionnaire was sent out to all (n=964) stroke patients identified through the Danish National Indicator Project Stroke Database in Aarhus County, Denmark, between March 2004 and February 2005. All surviving patients who fulfilled 4 questionnaire criteria for possible CPSP (n=51) were selected for further clinical examination, and their pain was classified by using stringent and well-defined criteria and a detailed, standardized clinical examination. The minimum prevalence of definite or probable CPSP in this population is 7.3% and the prevalence of CPSP-like dysesthesia or pain is 8.6%. Pinprick hyperalgesia was present in 57%, cold allodynia in 40%, and brush-evoked dysesthesia in 51% of patients with CPSP. Because of its negative impact on quality of life and rehabilitation, pain is an important symptom to assess in stroke survivors.

  8. Epidemiology and Control of Child Toxocariasis in the Western Brazilian Amazon – A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliart-Guzmán, Humberto; Delfino, Breno M.; Martins, Antonio C.; Mantovani, Saulo A. S.; Braña, Athos M.; Pereira, Thasciany M.; Branco, Fernando L. C. C.; Ramalho, Alanderson A.; Campos, Rhanderson G.; Fontoura, Pablo S.; de Araujo, Thiago S.; de Oliveira, Cristieli S. M.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Codeço, Cláudia T.; da Silva-Nunes, Mônica

    2014-01-01

    Toxocara spp. infection and the seroconversion rate in the Amazon have been poorly investigated. This study analyzed individual and household-level risk factors for the presence of IgG antibodies to Toxocara spp. in urban Amazonian children over a period of 7 years and evaluated the seroconversion rates over a 1-year follow-up. In children < 59 months of age, the overall prevalence rate was 28.08% in 2003 and 23.35% in 2010. The 2010–2011 seroconversion rates were 13.90% for children 6–59 months of age and 12.30% for children 84–143 months of age. Multilevel logistic regression analysis identified child age, previous wheezing, and current infection with hookworm as significant associated factors for Toxocara spp. seropositivity in 2003. In 2010, age, previous helminthiasis, and having a dog were associated with seropositivity, whereas having piped water inside the household was a protective factor. Control programs mainly need to target at-risk children, water quality control, and animal deworming strategies. PMID:24515946

  9. Exomic variants of an elderly cohort of Brazilians in the ABraOM database.

    PubMed

    Naslavsky, Michel Satya; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; de Almeida, Tatiana Ferreira; Ezquina, Suzana A M; Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Pho, Nam; Bozoklian, Daniel; Sandberg, Tatiana Orli Milkewitz; Brito, Luciano Abreu; Lazar, Monize; Bernardo, Danilo Vicensotto; Amaro, Edson; Duarte, Yeda A O; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Zatz, Mayana

    2017-03-23

    Brazilians are highly admixed with ancestry from Europe, Africa, America, and Asia yet still underrepresented in genomic databanks. We hereby present a collection of exomic variants from 609 elderly Brazilians in a census-based cohort (SABE609) with comprehensive phenotyping. Variants were deposited in ABraOM (Online Archive of Brazilian Mutations), a web-based public database. Population representative phenotype and genotype repositories are essential for variant interpretation through allele frequency filtering; since elderly individuals are less likely to harbor pathogenic mutations for early and adult-onset diseases, such variant databases are of great interest. Among the over 2.3 million variants from the present cohort, 1,282,008 were high-confidence calls. Importantly, 207,621 variants were absent from major public databases. We found 9,791 potential loss of function variants with about 300 mutations per individual. Pathogenic variants on clinically relevant genes (ACMG) were observed in 1.15% of the individuals and correlated with clinical phenotype. We conducted incidence estimation for prevalent recessive disorders based upon heterozygous frequency and concluded that it relies on appropriate pathogenicity assertion. These observations illustrate the relevance of collecting demographic data from diverse, poorly characterized populations. Census-based datasets of aged individuals with comprehensive phenotyping are an invaluable resource towards the improved understanding of variant pathogenicity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic diversity of the HLA-G coding region in Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon: a possible role of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Junior, C T; Castelli, E C; Meyer, D; Simões, A L; Donadi, E A

    2013-12-01

    HLA-G has an important role in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy, and evidence that balancing selection acts in the promoter and 3'UTR regions has been previously reported. To determine whether selection acts on the HLA-G coding region in the Amazon Rainforest, exons 2, 3 and 4 were analyzed in a sample of 142 Amerindians from nine villages of five isolated tribes that inhabit the Central Amazon. Six previously described single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and the Expectation-Maximization (EM) and PHASE algorithms were used to computationally reconstruct SNP haplotypes (HLA-G alleles). A new HLA-G allele, which originated in Amerindian populations by a crossing-over event between two widespread HLA-G alleles, was identified in 18 individuals. Neutrality tests evidenced that natural selection has a complex part in the HLA-G coding region. Although balancing selection is the type of selection that shapes variability at a local level (Native American populations), we have also shown that purifying selection may occur on a worldwide scale. Moreover, the balancing selection does not seem to act on the coding region as strongly as it acts on the flanking regulatory regions, and such coding signature may actually reflect a hitchhiking effect.

  11. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  12. GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Wang, Yingjie; Yan, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Geographically, poverty status is not only related with social-economic factors but also strongly affected by geographical environment. In the paper, GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis method is introduced for revealing their regional differences. More than 100000 poor villages and 592 national key poor counties are chosen for the analysis. The results show that poverty distribution tends to concentrate in most of west China and mountainous rural areas of mid China. Furthermore, the fifth census data are overlaid to those poor areas in order to gain its internal diversity of social-economic characteristics. By overlaying poverty related social-economic parameters, such as sex ratio, illiteracy, education level, percentage of ethnic minorities, family composition, finding shows that poverty distribution is strongly correlated with high illiteracy rate, high percentage minorities, and larger family member.

  13. Predictors of Childhood Anxiety: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have explored predictors of early childhood anxiety. Objective To determine the prenatal, postnatal, and early life predictors of childhood anxiety by age 5. Methods Population-based, provincial administrative data (N = 19,316) from Manitoba, Canada were used to determine the association between demographic, obstetrical, psychosocial, medical, behavioral, and infant factors on childhood anxiety. Results Risk factors for childhood anxiety by age 5 included maternal psychological distress from birth to 12 months and 13 months to 5 years post-delivery and an infant 5-minute Apgar score of ≤7. Factors associated with decreased risk included maternal age < 20 years, multiparity, and preterm birth. Conclusion Identifying predictors of childhood anxiety is a key step to early detection and prevention. Maternal psychological distress is an early, modifiable risk factor. Future research should aim to disentangle early life influences on childhood anxiety occurring in the prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods. PMID:26158268

  14. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  15. Ground-based Solar Observations and Plasma Bubbles in Brazilian Sector During a Period of Extreme Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardelli-Coelho, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Tardelli, A.; de Abreu, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Studies presented on the relation of the Sun-Earth system are currently of great importance. Ionospheric irregularities in the F-region, caused by geomagnetic storms have significant and adverse effects on the Earth. The recent advancement in technological techniques for monitoring space weather has facilitated these studies. The focus of this study was to determine whether a geomagnetic storm interfered with the generation, propagation, and durability of plasma bubbles that occurred over a period of solar minimum in two cities in the Brazilian sector, São José dos Campos - SP, designated SJC, (23.21°S, 45.86°W; dip latitude 17.6°S), low-latitude region and near the south crest of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly; and Palmas - TO, called PAL (10.28°S, 48.33°W; dip latitude 6.7°S), near the magnetic equator, located in the geographical South, tropical region and the hemisphere opposite the magnetic equator. This study was conducted with data analysis of five years (2006-2010) for SJC and four years (2007-2010) for PAL, considering the 24th solar cycle, using an all-sky imaging photometer operating with interference filters in OI 630.0 nm emission resulting from dissociative recombination process that occurs at an altitude of 250-300 km (F-region).

  16. Influence of the βs haplotype and α-thalassemia on stroke development in a Brazilian population with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Igor F; Falcão, Diego A; Hatzlhofer, Betania L; Cunha, Anderson F; Santos, Magnun N; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Costa, Fernando F; Azevedo, Renata C; Machado, Cíntia G; Araújo, Aderson S; Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Bezerra, Marcos A

    2014-07-01

    Stroke is a catastrophic complication of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) and is one of the leading causes of death in both adults and children with SCA. Evidence suggests that some genetic polymorphisms could be related to stroke development, but their association remains controversial. Here, we performed genotyping of five published single nucleotide polymorphisms, the α-thalassemia genotype, the G6PD A (-) variant deficiency, and the β(S) haplotype in a large series of SCA patients with well-defined stroke phenotypes. Of 261 unrelated SCA patients included in the study, 67 (9.5 %) presented a documented, primary stroke event. Markers of haemolysis (red blood cell (RBC) counts, p = 0.023; reticulocyte counts, p = 0.003; haemoglobin (Hb) levels, p < 0.001; indirect bilirubin levels, p = 0.006; lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, p = 0.001) were associated with stroke susceptibility. Genetically, only the β(S) haplotype (odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.56 to 4.31; p = 0.003) and the α(3.7kb)-thalassemia genotype (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.11 to 0. 83; p = 0.02) were associated with increased and decreased stroke risk, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the β(S) haplotype was independently associated with stroke development (OR 2.26, 95 % CI 1.16 to 4.4; p = 0.016). Our findings suggest that only the β(S) haplotypes and the α(3.7kb)-thalassemia genotype modulate the prevalence of stroke in our SCA population. Genetic heterogeneity among different populations may account for the irreproducibility amongst different studies.

  17. Medullary carcinoma of the large intestine: a population based analysis.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sathaiah, Magesh; Singla, Smit; Sukumar, Shyam; Karunamurthy, Arivarasan; Pragatheeshwar, Kothai Divya; Lee, Kenneth K W; Zeh, Herbert; Kane, Kevin M; Bartlett, David L

    2010-10-01

    Medullary carcinoma (MC) of the colorectum is a relatively new histological type of adenocarcinoma characterized by poor glandular differentiation and intraepithelial lymphocytic infiltrate. To date, there has been no epidemiological study of this rare tumor type, which has now been incorporated as a separate entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of colorectal cancers. We used the population-based registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify all cases of colorectal MC between 1973 and 2006 and compared them to poorly and undifferentiated colonic adenocarcinomas (PDA and UDA, respectively). We observed that MCs were rare tumors, constituting approximately 5-8 cases for every 10,000 colon cancers diagnosed, with a mean annual incidence of 3.47 (+/-0.75) per 10 million population. Mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 (+/-12.5) years, with incidence increasing with age. MCs were twice as common in females, who presented at a later age, with a lower stage and a trend towards favorable prognosis. MCs were extremely rare among African-Americans. MCs were most common in the proximal colon (74%), where they present at a later age than the sigmoid colon. There were no cases reliably identified in the rectum or appendix. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (CEA) were elevated prior to first course of treatment in 40% of the patients. MCs were more commonly poorly differentiated (72%), with 22% being undifferentiated. MCs commonly presented with Stage II disease, with 10% presenting with metastases. Only one patient presented with N2b disease (>7 positive nodes). Early outcome analyses showed that MCs have 1- and 2-year relative survival rates of 92.7 and 73.8% respectively. Although MCs showed a trend towards better early overall survival, undifferentiated MCs present more commonly with Stage III, with comparatively worse early outcomes.

  18. Stratification of ALS patients' survival: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Marin, Benoît; Couratier, Philippe; Arcuti, Simona; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fontana, Andrea; Nicol, Marie; Raymondeau, Marie; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Preux, Pierre Marie

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and patient risk stratification are areas of considerable research interest. We aimed (1) to describe the survival of a representative cohort of French ALS patients, and (2) to identify covariates associated with various patterns of survival using a risk classification analysis. ALS patients recruited in the FRALim register (2000-2013) were included. Time-to-death analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox model. A recursive partitioning and amalgamation (RECPAM) algorithm analysis identified subgroups of patients with different patterns of survival. Among 322 patients, median survival times were 26.2 and 15.6 months from time of onset and of diagnosis, respectively. Four groups of patients were identified, depending on their baseline characteristics and survival (1) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (median survival time (MST) 10.6 months); (2) ALSFRS-R slope >0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 18.1 months); (3) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and definite or probable ALS (MST: 22.5 months), and (4) ALSFRS-R slope ≤0.46/month and possible or probable laboratory-supported ALS (MST: 37.6 months). Median survival time is among the shortest ever reported by a worldwide population-based study. This is probably related to the age structure of the patients (the oldest identified to date), driven by the underlying population (30 % of subjects older than 60 years). Further research in the field of risk stratification could help physicians better anticipate prognosis of ALS patients, and help improve the design of randomized controlled trials.

  19. Multicenter study for efficacy and safety evaluation of a fixeddose combination gel with adapalen 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% (Epiduo® for the treatment of acne vulgaris in Brazilian population*

    PubMed Central

    Sittart, José Alexandre de Souza; da Costa, Adilson; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane; Follador, Ivonise; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; de Castro, Lia Cândida Miranda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The current options for the treatment of acne vulgaris present many mechanisms of action. For several times, dermatologists try topical agents combinations, looking for better results. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a topical, fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel for the treatment of acne vulgaris in the Brazilian population. METHODS This is a multicenter, open-label and interventionist study. Patients applied 1.0 g of the fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel on the face, once daily at bedtime, during 12 weeks. Lesions were counted in all of the appointments, and the degree of acne severity, overall improvement, tolerability and safety were evaluated in each visit. RESULTS From 79 recruited patients, 73 concluded the study. There was significant, fast and progressive reduction of non-inflammatory, inflammatory and total number of lesions. At the end of the study, 75.3% of patients had a reduction of >50% in non-inflammatory lesions, 69.9% in inflammatory lesions and 78.1% in total number of lesions. Of the 73 patients, 71.2% had good to excellent response and 87.6% had satisfactory to good response. In the first week of treatment, erythema, burning, scaling and dryness of the skin were frequent complaints, but, from second week on, these signals and symptoms have reduced. CONCLUSION The fixed-dose combination of adapalene 0.1% and benzoyl peroxide 2.5% gel is effective, safe, well tolerated and apparently improves patient compliance with the treatment. PMID:27168522

  20. [Bullying in Brazilian schools: results from the National School-based Health Survey (PeNSE), 2009].

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi; Mello, Flavia Carvalho Malta de; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Crespo, Claudio; Carvalho, Mércia Gomes Oliveira de; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Porto, Denise Lopes

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and describe the occurrence of bullying among students in the 9th year (8th grade) from public and private schools from 26 Brazilian state capitals and the Federal District. It is a cross-sectional study involving 60,973 students and 1,453 public and private schools. Data analysis indicates that 5.4% (IC95%: 5.1%-5.7%) of students reported having suffered bullying almost always or always in the last 30 days, 25.4% (IC95%: 24.8%-26.0%) were rarely or sometimes the victim of bullying and 69.2% (IC95%: 68.5%-69.8%) of students felt no humiliation or provocation at school. The capital with higher frequency of bullying was Belo Horizonte (6.9%; IC95%: 5,9%-7,9%), Minas Gerais, and the lowest was Palmas (3.5%; IC95%: 2.6%-4.5%), Tocantins. Boys reported more bullying (6,0%; IC95%: 5.5%-6.5%) compared with girls (4,8%; IC95%: 4.4%-5.3%). There was no difference between public schools 5.5% (IC95%: 5.1%-5.8%) and private (5.2%) (IC95%: 4.6%-5.8%), except in Aracaju, Sergipe, that show more bullying in private schools. The findings indicate an urgent need for intersectoral action from educational policies and practices that enforce the reduction and prevention of the occurrence of bullying in schools in Brazil.

  1. Population-based public health interventions: practice-based and evidence-supported. Part I.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda Olson; Strohschein, Susan; Lia-Hoagberg, Betty; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2004-01-01

    The Intervention Wheel is a population-based practice model that encompasses three levels of practice (community, systems, and individual/family) and 17 public health interventions. Each intervention and practice level contributes to improving population health. The Intervention Wheel, previously known as the Public Health Intervention Model, was originally introduced in 1998 by the Minnesota Department of Health, Section of Public Health Nursing. The model has been widely disseminated and used throughout the United States since that time. The evidence supporting the Intervention Wheel was recently subjected to a rigorous critique by regional and national experts. This critical process, which involved hundreds of public health nurses, resulted in a more robust Intervention Wheel and established the validity of the model. The critique also produced basic steps and best practices for each of the 17 interventions. Part I describes the Intervention Wheel, defines population-based practice, and details the recommended modifications and validation process. Part II provides examples of the innovative ways that the Intervention Wheel is being used in public health/public health nursing practice, education, and administration. The two articles provide a foundation and vision for population-based public health nursing practice and direction for improving population health.

  2. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms.

  3. Psoriasis and dyslipidaemia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dreiher, Jacob; Weitzman, Dahlia; Davidovici, Batya; Shapiro, Jonathan; Cohen, Arnon D

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrated an association between psoriasis and the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between psoriasis and dyslipidaemia. A cross-sectional study was performed utilizing a population-based database. Psoriasis patients were compared with enrollees without psoriasis regarding the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and lipid levels. Comparison of lipid levels was performed on a "low-risk" subset of subjects without diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The study included 10,669 psoriasis patients and 22,996 subjects without psoriasis. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia was significantly higher in psoriasis patients (odds ratio (OR) = 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40-1.55). The association remained significant after controlling for confounders (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.12-1.26, p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis of the "low-risk" subset, triglyceride levels were higher in psoriasis patients and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower. This study supports previous reports of an association between psoriasis and lipid abnormalities.

  4. Stress and dysmenorrhoea: a population based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Wang, X; Wang, W; Chen, C; Ronnennberg, A; Guang, W; Huang, A; Fang, Z; Zang, T; Wang, L; Xu, X

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dysmenorrhoea is the most common gynaecological disorder in women of reproductive age. Despite the association between stress and pregnancy outcomes, few studies have examined the possible link between stress and dysmenorrhoea. Aims and Methods: Using a population based cohort of Chinese women, the independent effect of women's perceived stress in the preceding menstrual cycle on the incidence of dysmenorrhoea in the subsequent cycle was investigated prospectively. The analysis included 1160 prospectively observed menstrual cycles from 388 healthy, nulliparous, newly married women who intended to conceive. The perception of stress and the occurrence of dysmenorrhoea in each menstrual cycle were determined from daily diaries recorded by the women. Results: After adjustment for important covariates, the risk of dysmenorrhoea was more than twice as great among women with high stress compared to those with low stress in the preceding cycle (OR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.4 to 4.3). The risk of dysmenorrhoea was greatest among women with both high stress and a history of dysmenorrhoea compared to women with low stress and no history of dysmenorrhoea (OR = 10.4, 95% CI 4.9 to 22.3). Stress in the follicular phase of the preceding cycles had a stronger association with dysmenorrhoea than stress in the luteal phase of the preceding cycles. Conclusion: This study shows a significant association between stress and the incidence of dysmenorrhoea, which is even stronger among women with a history of dysmenorrhoea. PMID:15550609

  5. Population-Based Incidence and Prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Emily C.; Marder, Wendy; Cagnoli, Patricia; Lewis, Emily E.; DeGuire, Peter; Gordon, Caroline; Helmick, Charles G.; Wang, Lu; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Dhar, J. Patricia; Leisen, James; Shaltis, Diane; McCune, W. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a sociodemographically diverse southeastern Michigan source population of 2.4 million people. Methods SLE cases fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria (primary case definition) or meeting rheumatologist-judged SLE criteria (secondary definition) and residing in Wayne or Washtenaw Counties during 2002–2004 were included. Case finding was performed from 6 source types, including hospitals and private specialists. Age-standardized rates were computed, and capture–recapture was performed to estimate underascertainment of cases. Results The overall age-adjusted incidence and prevalence (ACR definition) per 100,000 persons were 5.5 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 5.0–6.1) and 72.8 (95% CI 70.8–74.8). Among females, the incidence was 9.3 per 100,000 persons and the prevalence was 128.7 per 100,000 persons. Only 7 cases were estimated to have been missed by capture–recapture, adjustment for which did not materially affect the rates. SLE prevalence was 2.3-fold higher in black persons than in white persons, and 10-fold higher in females than in males. Among incident cases, the mean ± SD age at diagnosis was 39.3 ± 16.6 years. Black SLE patients had a higher proportion of renal disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (40.5% and 15.3%, respectively) as compared to white SLE patients (18.8% and 4.5%, respectively). Black patients with renal disease were diagnosed as having SLE at younger age than white patients with renal disease (mean ± SD 34.4 ± 14.9 years versus 41.9 ± 21.3 years; P = 0.05). Conclusion SLE prevalence was higher than has been described in most other population-based studies and reached 1 in 537 among black female persons. There were substantial racial disparities in the burden of SLE, with black patients experiencing earlier age at diagnosis, >2-fold increases in SLE incidence and prevalence, and increased

  6. Ophthalmic manifestations of tuberous sclerosis: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, S; O'Callaghan, F; Osborne, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has retinal and non-retinal ophthalmic manifestations. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of the ophthalmic manifestations and of refractive errors in a population of patients with TSC.
METHODS—179 patients identified were in a prevalence study of TSC in the south of England and 107 of these agreed to full ophthalmic examination which was successful in 100. Ophthalmic examination included examination of the eyelids, cover test, examination of the irides, dilation funduscopy using both direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy, and refraction using retinoscopy. Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent <−0.5D and hyperopia as a spherical equivalent >+0.5D.
RESULTS—Retinal hamartomas were seen in 44 of the 100 patients. The commonest morphological type of hamartoma seen was the flat, translucent lesion in 31 of the 44 patients (70%). The multinodular "mulberry" lesion was seen in 24 of the 44 patients (55%) and the transitional type lesion was seen in four of the 44 patients (9%). Punched out areas of retinal depigmentation were seen in 39 of the 100 patients but only six of 100 controls. 27% of eyes were myopic, 22% were hyperopic, and 27% had astigmatism >0.75D. Of the non-retinal findings, 39 patients had angiofibromas of the eyelids, five had non-paralytic strabismus, and three had colobomas.
CONCLUSION—Apart from the higher prevalence of flat retinal hamartomas, the findings of this study compare closely with previous large clinic based series of TSC patients. Refractive findings were similar to previous studies of a similarly aged non-TSC population. This is the first series to document the statistically significant association of punched out chorioretinal depigmentation with TSC and the authors believe that it should be looked for as an aid to diagnosis.

 PMID:11264130

  7. Energy expenditure through physical activity in a population of community-dwelling Brazilian elderly: cross-sectional evidences from the Bambuí Cohort Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Juciany Rodrigues de Oliveira; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda; Firmo, Josélia O A; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate physical activity energy expenditure among older adults. The study comprised 1,585 residents in Bambuí, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, aged > 60 years (91% of the town's total elderly), and examined the frequency and duration of 23 types of physical activity among them. Median energy expenditure was 975 MET.min/week (1,195.8 among men and 803.1 among women), declining significantly with age in both sexes. The prevalence of sedentary lifestyles (< 450 MET.min/week) was 31.2%. Unhurried walking accounted for about 1/3 of total energy expenditure. Multivariate analysis based on ordinal logistic regression showed inverse associations between energy expenditure and age and hospitalizations in both sexes. Among men, inverse associations were observed with smoking, number of chronic diseases and number of medical appointments. These results emphasize the need for effective strategies to increase physical activity in older elderly, and underscore the high prevalence of walking in this group.

  8. ERICA: prevalences of hypertension and obesity in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; da Veiga, Gloria Valeria; Schaan, Beatriz; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of arterial hypertension and obesity and the population attributable fraction of hypertension that is due to obesity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Data from participants in the Brazilian Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), which was the first national school-based, cross-section study performed in Brazil were evaluated. The sample was divided into 32 geographical strata and clusters from 32 schools and classes, with regional and national representation. Obesity was classified using the body mass index according to age and sex. Arterial hypertension was defined when the average systolic or diastolic blood pressure was greater than or equal to the 95th percentile of the reference curve. Prevalences and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of arterial hypertension and obesity, both on a national basis and in the macro-regions of Brazil, were estimated by sex and age group, as were the fractions of hypertension attributable to obesity in the population. RESULTS We evaluated 73,399 students, 55.4% female, with an average age of 14.7 years (SD = 1.6). The prevalence of hypertension was 9.6% (95%CI 9.0-10.3); with the lowest being in the North, 8.4% (95%CI 7.7-9.2) and Northeast regions, 8.4% (95%CI 7.6-9.2), and the highest being in the South, 12.5% (95%CI 11.0-14.2). The prevalence of obesity was 8.4% (95%CI 7.9-8.9), which was lower in the North region and higher in the South region. The prevalences of arterial hypertension and obesity were higher in males. Obese adolescents presented a higher prevalence of hypertension, 28.4% (95%CI 25.5-31.2), than overweight adolescents, 15.4% (95%CI 17.0-13.8), or eutrophic adolescents, 6.3% (95%CI 5.6-7.0). The fraction of hypertension attributable to obesity was 17.8%. CONCLUSIONS ERICA was the first nationally representative Brazilian study providing prevalence estimates of hypertension in adolescents. Regional and sex differences were observed. The study indicates

  9. Scalable Entity-Based Modeling of Population-Based Systems, Final LDRD Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A J; Smith, S G; Vassilevska, T K; Jefferson, D R

    2005-01-27

    The goal of this project has been to develop tools, capabilities and expertise in the modeling of complex population-based systems via scalable entity-based modeling (EBM). Our initial focal application domain has been the dynamics of large populations exposed to disease-causing agents, a topic of interest to the Department of Homeland Security in the context of bioterrorism. In the academic community, discrete simulation technology based on individual entities has shown initial success, but the technology has not been scaled to the problem sizes or computational resources of LLNL. Our developmental emphasis has been on the extension of this technology to parallel computers and maturation of the technology from an academic to a lab setting.

  10. Associations of childhood eczema severity: A US population based study

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Jonathan I.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about predictors of eczema severity in the US population. We sought to determine the distribution and associations of childhood eczema severity in the US. We analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a prospective questionnaire-based study of a nationally representative sample of 91,642 children (0-17yr). The prevalence of childhood eczema was 12.97% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]=12.42–13.53); 67.0% (95% CI: 64.8–69.2) had mild, 26.0% (95% CI: 23.9–28.1) moderate and 7.0% (95% CI: 5.8–8.3) severe disease. There was significant statewide-variation of the distribution of eczema severity (Rao-Scott chi square, P=0.004), with highest rates of severe disease in Northeastern and Midwestern states. In univariate models, eczema severity was increased with older age, African-American and Hispanic race/ethnicity, lower household income, oldest child in the family, home with a single mother, lower paternal/maternal education level, maternal general health, maternal/paternal emotional health, dilapidated housing and garbage on the streets. In multivariate survey logistic regression models using stepwise and backward selection, moderate–severe eczema was associated with older age, lower household income and fair or poor maternal health, but inversely associated with birthplace outside the US. These data indicate that environmental and/or lifestyle factors play an important role in eczema severity. PMID:24819283

  11. Distributions of personal VOC exposures: a population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chunrong; D'Souza, Jennifer; Batterman, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    Information regarding the distribution of volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and exposures is scarce, and there have been few, if any, studies using population-based samples from which representative estimates can be derived. This study characterizes distributions of personal exposures to ten different VOCs in the U.S. measured in the 1999--2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Personal VOC exposures were collected for 669 individuals over 2-3 days, and measurements were weighted to derive national-level statistics. Four common exposure sources were identified using factor analyses: gasoline vapor and vehicle exhaust, methyl tert-butyl ether (MBTE) as a gasoline additive, tap water disinfection products, and household cleaning products. Benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes chloroform, and tetrachloroethene were fit to log-normal distributions with reasonably good agreement to observations. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene and trichloroethene were fit to Pareto distributions, and MTBE to Weibull distribution, but agreement was poor. However, distributions that attempt to match all of the VOC exposure data can lead to incorrect conclusions regarding the level and frequency of the higher exposures. Maximum Gumbel distributions gave generally good fits to extrema, however, they could not fully represent the highest exposures of the NHANES measurements. The analysis suggests that complete models for the distribution of VOC exposures require an approach that combines standard and extreme value distributions, and that carefully identifies outliers. This is the first study to provide national-level and representative statistics regarding the VOC exposures, and its results have important implications for risk assessment and probabilistic analyses.

  12. Recurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum across generations: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Skjærven, Rolv; Grjibovski, Andrej M; Gunnes, Nina; Vangen, Siri; Magnus, Per

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of hyperemesis gravidarum (hyperemesis) according to whether the daughters and sons under study were born after pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Registry data from Norway. Participants Linked generational data from the medical birth registry of Norway (1967-2006): 544 087 units of mother and childbearing daughter and 399 777 units of mother and child producing son. Main outcome measure Hyperemesis in daughters in mother and childbearing daughter units and hyperemesis in female partners of sons in mother and child producing son units. Results Daughters who were born after a pregnancy complicated by hyperemesis had a 3% risk of having hyperemesis in their own pregnancy, while women who were born after an unaffected pregnancy had a risk of 1.1% (unadjusted odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 2.4 to 3.6). Female partners of sons who were born after pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis had a risk of 1.2% (1.0, 0.7 to 1.6). Daughters born after a pregnancy not complicated by hyperemesis had an increased risk of the condition if the mother had hyperemesis in a previous or subsequent pregnancy (3.2 (1.6 to 6.4) if hyperemesis had occurred in one of the mother’s previous pregnancies and 3.7 (1.5 to 9.1) if it had occurred in a later pregnancy). Adjustment for maternal age at childbirth, period of birth, and parity did not change the estimates. Restrictions to firstborns did not influence the results. Conclusions Hyperemesis gravidarum is more strongly influenced by the maternal genotype than the fetal genotype, though environmental influences along the maternal line cannot be excluded as contributing factors. PMID:21030362

  13. Satellite-based automated burned area detection: A performance assessment of the MODIS MCD45A1 in the Brazilian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Fernando Moreira De; Ferreira, Laerte G.

    2015-04-01

    Burnings, which cause major changes to the environment, can be effectively monitored via satellite data, regarding both the identification of active fires and the estimation of burned areas. Among the many orbital sensors suitable for mapping burned areas on global and regional scales, the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board the Terra and Aqua platforms, has been the most widely utilized. In this study, the performance of the MODIS MCD45A1 burned area product was thoroughly evaluated in the Brazilian savanna, the second largest biome in South America and a global biodiversity hotspot, characterized by a conspicuous climatic seasonality and the systematic occurrence of natural and anthropogenic fires. Overall, September MCD45A1 polygons (2000-2012) compared well to the Landsat-based reference mapping (r2 = 0.92) and were closely accompanied, on a monthly basis, by MOD14 and MYD14 hotspots (r2 = 0.89), although large omissions errors, linked to landscape patterns, structures, and overall conditions depicted in each reference image, were observed. In spite of its spatial and temporal limitations, the MCD45A1 product proved instrumental for mapping and understanding fire behavior and impacts on the Cerrado landscapes.

  14. Alterations in land uses based on amendments to the Brazilian Forest Law and their influences on water quality of a watershed.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Filho, J L; Degani, R M; Soares, F S; Periotto, N A; Blanco, F P; Abe, D S; Matsumura-Tundisi, T; Tundisi, J E; Tundisi, J G

    2015-01-01

    The amendments to the Forest Law proposed by the Brazilian government that allow partial substitution of forested areas by agricultural activities raised deep concern about the integrity of aquatic ecosystems. To assess the impacts of this alteration in land uses on the watershed, diffuse loads of total nitrogen (Nt) and total phosphorus (Pt) were estimated in Lobo Stream watershed, southeastern Brazil, based on export coefficients of the Model of Correlation between Land Use and Water Quality (MQUAL). Three scenarios were generated: scenario 1 (present scenario), with 30-meter-wide permanent preservation areas along the shore of water bodies and 50-meter-radius in springs; scenario 2, conservative, with 100-meter-wide permanent preservation areas along water bodies; and scenario 3, with the substitution of 20% of natural forest by agricultural activities. Results indicate that a suppression of 20% of forest cover would cause an increase in nutrient loads as well as in the trophic state of aquatic ecosystems of the watershed. This could result in losses of ecosystem services and compromise the quality of water and its supply for the basin. This study underlines the importance of forest cover for the maintenance of water quality in Lobo Stream watershed.

  15. Attitudes of a group of Brazilian orthodontists towards the diagnosis and management of primary headache (migraine): an electronic-based survey

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Reynaldo Leite; KERBER, Florence de Carvalho; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA, Juliana

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of orthodontists in the diagnosis and management of migraine without aura. Material and Methods Participants were dentists, recruited among members of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (ABOR). An e-mail was sent to all ABOR members, with a link to a website, especially prepared for this research. Dentists were presented to a report of a fictional patient fulfilling diagnostic criteria for a primary headache disorder, known as migraine without aura. Participants were asked to describe how they would relieve the patient's pain. Professional procedures were classified as "adequate" or "inadequate" according to the answers given. Results 161 valid answers were received (18.8% response rate). Of them, 36% of the actions were considered to be "adequate" procedures, while 64% were "inadequate". The results yielded 12 main procedures, based on common characteristics. Eighty-two orthodontists suggested orthodontic treatment with or without orthognathic surgery, and some suggested using stabilization appliances prior to the orthodontic treatment. Conclusions The majority of participants proposed inadequate therapies, and 51% suggested orthodontic correction of occlusion, including orthognathic surgery. Educational activities on migraine should also target orthodontists. PMID:22231006

  16. Comparative karyology of Brazilian vampire bats Desmodus rotundus and Diphylla ecaudata (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera): banding patterns, base-specific fluorochromes and FISH of ribosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Santos, N; Fagundes, V; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Y; De Souza, M J

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides new data on chromosomes of Brazilian vampire bats Desmodus rotundus and Diphylla ecaudata. These species were analyzed by GTG, CBG- and CB-DAPI banding, AgNO3/CMA3 sequential staining, base-specific fluorochrome dyes and in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probe. C-banding (CBG) revealed constitutive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric regions in all autosomes and the X and Y chromosomes appeared entirely heterochromatic in both species. CB-DAPI revealed a coincident banding pattern to that obtained by CBG. Triple staining CMA3/DA/DAPI revealed an R-banding and a weak G-banding pattern in the karyotypes. Sequential AgNO3/CMA3 staining showed a NOR located interstitially on the long arm of pair 8 in D. rotundus and on the short arm of pair 13 in D. ecaudata. FISH with a rDNA probe confirmed the location and number of NORs; a difference neither in intensity nor in size of hybridization signal was detected between homologues for both species.

  17. [Assessment of the nutritional status of Brazilian adolescents by body mass index].

    PubMed

    Sichieri, R; Allam, V L

    1996-01-01

    The assessment of nutritional status of adolescents is not an easy task because it should take into account sex, age, weight, stature and sexual maturation of the adolescents. In addition, an adequate classification should also be related to subsequent health-related outcomes during adult life. On the other side, screening for overweight and underweight among adolescents is highly desirable since nutritional status during adolescence correlates with adult body habitus. The objective of this study was to propose a classification for screening the nutritional status of Brazilian adolescents based on the body mass index (kg/m(2)) provided by the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Saúde e Nutrição-PNSN, a national survey of the Brazilian population carried out on 1989. We defined as cutoff the 10th and 90th percentile of the body mass index distribution and the 10th percentile for stature.

  18. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  19. Population genetics of Parascaris equorum based on DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Tydén, E; Morrison, D A; Engström, A; Nielsen, M K; Eydal, M; Höglund, J

    2013-01-01

    The large roundworm of horses, Parascaris equorum is considered ubiquitous in breeding operations, and is regarded as a most important helminth pathogen of foals. Over the past decade, this parasite has been reported increasingly resistant to anthelmintic drugs worldwide. This paper reports analysis of the population genetic structure of P. equorum. Adult parasites (n=194) collected from Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Germany, Brazil and the USA were investigated by amplified restriction fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. The genetic variation was low (Hj=0.12-0.4), for the global population of worms. This was accompanied by a weak degree of population structure (Fst=0.2), low gene flow (Nm=1.0) and low mutation rate (4 Nμ=0.07). Thus, the low genetic diversity is probably a result of a low mutation rate in DNA, although the gene flow (due to global movement of horses) is large enough to allow the spread of novel mutations. Surprisingly, isolates from Icelandic horses were not found to be different from other isolates, in spite of the fact that these have been isolated for thousands of years. The study indicates that the global P. equorum population is essentially homogenous, and continents do not appear to be strong barriers for the population structure of this species. Consequently, the potential spread of rare anthelmintic resistance genes may be rapid in a homogenous population.

  20. [Social support assessment in Brazilian studies: conceptual aspects and measures].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Tonantzin Ribeiro; Pawlowski, Josiane; Bandeira, Denise Ruschel; Piccinini, Cesar Augusto

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the different ways of evaluating the social support in Brazilian studies. A surveying of scientific Brazilian publications from 1987 to 2007 was done in the Indexpsi, Pepsic, SciELO and Lilacs databases according to keywords social support and social network. Fifty-five studies included some type of assessing social support in Brazilian samples. The results indicated a rise in the number of studies about social support assessment in the last years using interviews to investigate received and perceived support, predominantly. However, the construction was applied without theoretical basis and was associated with many other concepts, sometimes without an appropriate articulation. Besides, there were evidences of lacking reliable, valid and standardized instruments to Brazilian population by considering the instruments currently used and revised by this study.

  1. A Brazilian Oz?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiex, Nola Kortner

    Both the American author, L. Frank Baum, and his Brazilian counterpart, Jose Monteiro Lobato, created children's books that featured alternative worlds, peopled by characters who fascinated many generations of young readers. The authors were both born in the second half of the nineteenth century into families of privilege, and both enjoyed idyllic…

  2. [The Brazilian population: demographic and spatial dynamics].

    PubMed

    Bret, B; Le Gauffey, Y; Thery, H; Waniez, P

    1984-01-01

    Recent demographic trends in Brazil are reviewed. A continuing decline in fertility is noted as the demographic transition proceeds. The differences by region and between rural and urban areas are considered. Attention is also paid to differences in spatial distribution and to internal migration.

  3. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey). The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. Results The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%); and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%). Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Conclusions Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying exposure differed between

  4. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Judith; Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Greenlees, Ruth; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth S; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O’Mahony, Mary T; Pierini, Anna; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien E K; Wellesley, Diana; Wiesel, Awi; Dolk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of microcephaly in Europe, determine if the diagnosis of microcephaly is consistent across Europe, and evaluate whether changes in prevalence would be detected using the current European surveillance performed by EUROCAT (the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies). Design Questionnaire and population based observational study. Setting 24 EUROCAT registries covering 570 000 births annually in 15 countries. Participants Cases of microcephaly not associated with a genetic condition among live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks’ gestation, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly at any gestation. Main outcome measures Prevalence of microcephaly (1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2012) analysed with random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneity across registries. Results 16 registries responded to the questionnaire, of which 44% (7/16) used the EUROCAT definition of microcephaly (a reduction in the size of the brain with a skull circumference more than 3 SD below the mean for sex, age, and ethnic origin), 19% (3/16) used a 2 SD cut off, 31% (5/16) were reliant on the criteria used by individual clinicians, and one changed criteria between 2003 and 2012. Prevalence of microcephaly in Europe was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.96) per 10 000 births, with registries varying from 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) to 4.3 (3.6 to 5.0) per 10 000 (χ2=338, df=23, I2=93%). Registries with a 3 SD cut off reported a prevalence of 1.74 per 10 000 (0.86 to 2.93) compared with those with the less stringent 2 SD cut off of 1.21 per 10 000 (0.21 to 2.93). The prevalence of microcephaly would need to increase in one year by over 35% in Europe or by over 300% in a single registry to reach statistical significance (P<0.01). Conclusions EUROCAT could detect increases in the prevalence of microcephaly from the Zika virus of a similar magnitude to those observed in Brazil. Because of the rarity

  5. Timing and quality of sleep in a rural Brazilian family-based cohort, the Baependi Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Beijamini, F; Knutson, K L; Lorenzi-Filho, G; Egan, K J; Taporoski, T P; De Paula, L K G; Negrão, A B; Horimoto, A R V R; Duarte, N E; Vallada, H; Krieger, J E; Pedrazzoli, M; Pereira, A C; von Schantz, M

    2016-12-23

    Sleep is modulated by several factors, including sex, age, and chronotype. It has been hypothesised that contemporary urban populations are under pressure towards shorter sleep duration and poorer sleep quality. Baependi is a small town in Brazil that provides a window of opportunity to study the influence of sleep patterns in a highly admixed rural population with a conservative lifestyle. We evaluated sleep characteristics, excessive daytime sleepiness, and chronotype using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire questionnaires, respectively. The sample consisted of 1,334 subjects from the Baependi Heart study (41.5% male; age: 46.5 ± 16.2 y, range: 18-89 years). Average self-reported sleep duration was 07:07 ± 01:31 (bedtime 22:32 ± 01:27, wake up time: 06:17 ± 01:25 hh:min), sleep quality score was 4.9 + 3.2, chronotype was 63.6 ± 10.8 and daytime sleepiness was 7.4 ± 4.8. Despite a shift towards morningness in the population, chronotype remained associated with reported actual sleep timing. Age and sex modulated the ontogeny of sleep and chronotype, increasing age was associated with earlier sleep time and shorter sleep duration. Women slept longer and later, and reported poorer sleep quality than men (p < 0.0001). This study provides indirect evidence in support of the hypothesis that sleep timing was earlier prior to full urbanisation.

  6. Timing and quality of sleep in a rural Brazilian family-based cohort, the Baependi Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Beijamini, F.; Knutson, K. L.; Lorenzi-Filho, G.; Egan, K. J.; Taporoski, T. P.; De Paula, L. K. G.; Negrão, A. B.; Horimoto, A. R. V. R.; Duarte, N. E.; Vallada, H.; Krieger, J. E.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Pereira, A. C.; von Schantz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is modulated by several factors, including sex, age, and chronotype. It has been hypothesised that contemporary urban populations are under pressure towards shorter sleep duration and poorer sleep quality. Baependi is a small town in Brazil that provides a window of opportunity to study the influence of sleep patterns in a highly admixed rural population with a conservative lifestyle. We evaluated sleep characteristics, excessive daytime sleepiness, and chronotype using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire questionnaires, respectively. The sample consisted of 1,334 subjects from the Baependi Heart study (41.5% male; age: 46.5 ± 16.2 y, range: 18–89 years). Average self-reported sleep duration was 07:07 ± 01:31 (bedtime 22:32 ± 01:27, wake up time: 06:17 ± 01:25 hh:min), sleep quality score was 4.9 + 3.2, chronotype was 63.6 ± 10.8 and daytime sleepiness was 7.4 ± 4.8. Despite a shift towards morningness in the population, chronotype remained associated with reported actual sleep timing. Age and sex modulated the ontogeny of sleep and chronotype, increasing age was associated with earlier sleep time and shorter sleep duration. Women slept longer and later, and reported poorer sleep quality than men (p < 0.0001). This study provides indirect evidence in support of the hypothesis that sleep timing was earlier prior to full urbanisation. PMID:28008932

  7. Mortality in Adults with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, F.; Smith, L. K.; McGrother, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability (ID) experience a variety of health inequalities compared with the general population including higher mortality rates. This is the first UK population-based study to measure the extent of excess mortality in people with ID compared with the general population. Method: Indirectly standardized…

  8. Identifying areas susceptible to desertification in the Brazilian northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. M. S. P.; Tomasella, J.; Alvalá, R. C. S.; Sestini, M. F.; Affonso, A. G.; Rodriguez, D. A.; Barbosa, A. A.; Cunha, A. P. M. A.; Valles, G. F.; Crepani, E.; de Oliveira, S. B. P.; de Souza, M. S. B.; Calil, P. M.; de Carvalho, M. A.; Valeriano, D. M.; Campello, F. C. B.; Santana, M. O.

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 57% of the Brazilian northeast region is recognized as semi-arid land and has been undergoing intense land use processes in the last decades, which have resulted in severe degradation of its natural assets. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the areas that are susceptible to desertification in this region based on the 11 influencing factors of desertification (pedology, geology, geomorphology, topography data, land use and land cover change, aridity index, livestock density, rural population density, fire hot spot density, human development index, conservation units) which were simulated for two different periods: 2000 and 2010. Each indicator were assigned weights ranging from 1 to 2 (representing the best and the worst conditions), representing classes indicating low, moderate and high susceptibility to desertification. The results indicate that 94% of the Brazilian northeast region is under moderate to high susceptibility to desertification. The areas that were susceptible to soil desertification increased by approximately 4.6% (83.4 km2) from 2000 to 2010. The implementation of the methodology provides the technical basis for decision-making that involves mitigating actions and the first comprehensive national assessment within the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification framework.

  9. MLST-Based Population Genetic Analysis in a Global Context Reveals Clonality amongst Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii VNI Isolates from HIV Patients in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Fonseca, Fernanda M.; Ferreira, Thatiana B.; Mora, Delio J.; Andrade-Silva, Juliana; Khan, Aziza; Dao, Aiken; Reis, Eduardo C.; Almeida, Margarete T. G.; Maltos, Andre; Junior, Virmondes R.; Trilles, Luciana; Rickerts, Volker; Chindamporn, Ariya; Sykes, Jane E.; Cogliati, Massimo; Nielsen, Kirsten; Boekhout, Teun; Fisher, Matthew; Kwon-Chung, June; Engelthaler, David M.; Lazéra, Marcia; Meyer, Wieland; Silva-Vergara, Mario L.

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an important fungal infection in immunocompromised individuals, especially those infected with HIV. In Brazil, despite the free availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the public health system, the mortality rate due to Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis is still high. To obtain a more detailed picture of the population genetic structure of this species in southeast Brazil, we studied 108 clinical isolates from 101 patients and 35 environmental isolates. Among the patients, 59% had a fatal outcome mainly in HIV-positive male patients. All the isolates were found to be C. neoformans var. grubii major molecular type VNI and mating type locus alpha. Twelve were identified as diploid by flow cytometry, being homozygous (AαAα) for the mating type and by PCR screening of the STE20, GPA1, and PAK1 genes. Using the ISHAM consensus multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, 13 sequence types (ST) were identified, with one being newly described. ST93 was identified from 81 (75%) of the clinical isolates, while ST77 and ST93 were identified from 19 (54%) and 10 (29%) environmental isolates, respectively. The southeastern Brazilian isolates had an overwhelming clonal population structure. When compared with populations from different continents based on data extracted from the ISHAM-MLST database (mlst.mycologylab.org) they showed less genetic variability. Two main clusters within C. neoformans var. grubii VNI were identified that diverged from VNB around 0.58 to 4.8 million years ago. PMID:28099434

  10. MLST-Based Population Genetic Analysis in a Global Context Reveals Clonality amongst Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii VNI Isolates from HIV Patients in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Fonseca, Fernanda M; Ferreira, Thatiana B; Mora, Delio J; Andrade-Silva, Juliana; Khan, Aziza; Dao, Aiken; Reis, Eduardo C; Almeida, Margarete T G; Maltos, Andre; Junior, Virmondes R; Trilles, Luciana; Rickerts, Volker; Chindamporn, Ariya; Sykes, Jane E; Cogliati, Massimo; Nielsen, Kirsten; Boekhout, Teun; Fisher, Matthew; Kwon-Chung, June; Engelthaler, David M; Lazéra, Marcia; Meyer, Wieland; Silva-Vergara, Mario L

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an important fungal infection in immunocompromised individuals, especially those infected with HIV. In Brazil, despite the free availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the public health system, the mortality rate due to Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis is still high. To obtain a more detailed picture of the population genetic structure of this species in southeast Brazil, we studied 108 clinical isolates from 101 patients and 35 environmental isolates. Among the patients, 59% had a fatal outcome mainly in HIV-positive male patients. All the isolates were found to be C. neoformans var. grubii major molecular type VNI and mating type locus alpha. Twelve were identified as diploid by flow cytometry, being homozygous (AαAα) for the mating type and by PCR screening of the STE20, GPA1, and PAK1 genes. Using the ISHAM consensus multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, 13 sequence types (ST) were identified, with one being newly described. ST93 was identified from 81 (75%) of the clinical isolates, while ST77 and ST93 were identified from 19 (54%) and 10 (29%) environmental isolates, respectively. The southeastern Brazilian isolates had an overwhelming clonal population structure. When compared with populations from different continents based on data extracted from the ISHAM-MLST database (mlst.mycologylab.org) they showed less genetic variability. Two main clusters within C. neoformans var. grubii VNI were identified that diverged from VNB around 0.58 to 4.8 million years ago.

  11. Genetic structure of Balearic honeybee populations based on microsatellite polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    De la Rúa, Pilar; Galián, José; Serrano, José; Moritz, Robin FA

    2003-01-01

    The genetic variation of honeybee colonies collected in 22 localities on the Balearic Islands (Spain) was analysed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Previous studies have demonstrated that these colonies belong either to the African or west European evolutionary lineages. These populations display low variability estimated from both the number of alleles and heterozygosity values, as expected for the honeybee island populations. Although genetic differentiation within the islands is low, significant heterozygote deficiency is present, indicating a subpopulation genetic structure. According to the genetic differentiation test, the honeybee populations of the Balearic Islands cluster into two groups: Gimnesias (Mallorca and Menorca) and Pitiusas (Ibiza and Formentera), which agrees with the biogeography postulated for this archipelago. The phylogenetic analysis suggests an Iberian origin of the Balearic honeybees, thus confirming the postulated evolutionary scenario for Apis mellifera in the Mediterranean basin. The microsatellite data from Formentera, Ibiza and Menorca show that ancestral populations are threatened by queen importations, indicating that adequate conservation measures should be developed for protecting Balearic bees. PMID:12729553

  12. A stage-based model of manatee population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Langtimm, C.A.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    A stage-structured population model for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) was developed that explicitly incorporates uncertainty in parameter estimates. The growth rates calculated with this model reflect the status of the regional populations over the most recent 10-yr period. The Northwest and Upper St. Johns River regions have growth rates (8) of 1.037 (95% interval, 1.016?1.056) and 1.062 (1.037?1.081), respectively. The Southwest region has a growth rate of 0.989 (0.946?1.024), suggesting this population has been declining at about 1.1% per year. The estimated growth rate in the Atlantic region is 1.010 (0.988?1.029), but there is some uncertainty about whether adult survival rates have been constant over the last 10 yr; using the mean survival rates from the most recent 5-yr period, the estimated growth rate in this region is 0.970 (0.938?0.998). Elasticity analysis indicates that the most effective management actions should seek to increase adult survival rates. Decomposition of the uncertainty in the growth rates indicates that uncertainty about population status can best be reduced through increased monitoring of adult survival rate.

  13. Public assistance, drug testing, and the law: the limits of population-based legal analysis.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice T

    2014-01-01

    In Populations, Public Health and the Law, legal scholar Wendy Parmet urges courts to embrace population-based legal analysis, a public health inspired approach to legal reasoning. Parmet contends that population-based legal analysis offers a way to analyze legal issues--not unlike law and economics--as well as a set of values from which to critique contemporary legal discourse. Population-based analysis has been warmly embraced by the health law community as a bold new way of analyzing legal issues. Still, population-based analysis is not without its problems. At times, Parmet claims too much territory for the population perspective. Moreover, Parmet urges courts to recognize population health as an important norm in legal reasoning. What should we do when the insights of public health and conventional legal reasoning conflict? Still in its infancy, population-based analysis offers little in the way of answers to these questions. This Article applies population-based legal analysis to the constitutional problems that arise when states condition public assistance benefits on passing a drug test, thereby highlighting the strengths of the population perspective and exposing its weaknesses.

  14. Association between Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Schoolchildren and Both Prenatal and Postnatal Factors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Bendo, Cristiane Baccin; Zarzar, Patrícia Maria; Vale, Miriam Pimenta

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies throughout the world have investigated potential factors involved in the occurrence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH), the findings are varied and inconclusive. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of MIH and identify associated prenatal, perinatal and postnatal factors among Brazilian schoolchildren aged 8 and 9 years. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with a randomly selected population-based sample of 1181 schoolchildren. Information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as prenatal, perinatal and postnatal aspects was obtained through questionnaires. The clinical examination included the investigation of MIH based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. Dental caries in the permanent dentition and developmental defects of enamel (DDE) on the primary second molars were also recorded. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, bivariate tests and Poisson regression with robust variance. Results The prevalence of MIH was 20.4%. MIH was more frequent among children with dental caries in the permanent dentition (PR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.98–3.61), those with DDE on the primary second molars (PR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.87–3.45) and those who experienced asthma/bronchitis in the first four years of life (PR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.45–2.56). Conclusions The prevalence of MIH was high and was associated with dental caries, the presence of DDE on primary second molars and the experience of asthma/bronchitis in early life. These findings could be useful in the identification of children in need of shorter recall intervals to prevent the consequences of MIH, such as enamel breakdown dental caries. PMID:27280451

  15. Transgender Population Size in the United States: a Meta-Regression of Population-Based Probability Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sevelius, Jae M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Transgender individuals have a gender identity that differs from the sex they were assigned at birth. The population size of transgender individuals in the United States is not well-known, in part because official records, including the US Census, do not include data on gender identity. Population surveys today more often collect transgender-inclusive gender-identity data, and secular trends in culture and the media have created a somewhat more favorable environment for transgender people. Objectives. To estimate the current population size of transgender individuals in the United States and evaluate any trend over time. Search methods. In June and July 2016, we searched PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Web of Science for national surveys, as well as “gray” literature, through an Internet search. We limited the search to 2006 through 2016. Selection criteria. We selected population-based surveys that used probability sampling and included self-reported transgender-identity data. Data collection and analysis. We used random-effects meta-analysis to pool eligible surveys and used meta-regression to address our hypothesis that the transgender population size estimate would increase over time. We used subsample and leave-one-out analysis to assess for bias. Main results. Our meta-regression model, based on 12 surveys covering 2007 to 2015, explained 62.5% of model heterogeneity, with a significant effect for each unit increase in survey year (F = 17.122; df = 1,10; b = 0.026%; P = .002). Extrapolating these results to 2016 suggested a current US population size of 390 adults per 100 000, or almost 1 million adults nationally. This estimate may be more indicative for younger adults, who represented more than 50% of the respondents in our analysis. Authors’ conclusions. Future national surveys are likely to observe higher numbers of transgender people. The large variety in questions used to ask

  16. Characterisation of the chemical profiles of Brazilian and Andean morphotypes belonging to the Anastrepha fraterculus complex (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Ferreira, Luana Lima; de Aquino, Nathaly Costa; Tavares, Raphael de Farias; Rodriguez, Laura D.; Mendonça, Adriana de Lima; Canal, Nelson Augusto; do Nascimento, Ruth Rufino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fruit fly sexual behaviour is directly influenced by chemical and non-chemical cues that play important roles in reproductive isolation. The chemical profiles of pheromones and cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) of eight fruit fly populations of the Andean, Brazilian-1 and Brazilian-3 morphotypes of the Anastrepha fraterculus cryptic species complex originating from Colombia (four populations) and Brazil (four populations) were analysed using two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The resulting chemical diversity data were studied using principal component analyses. Andean morphotypes could be discriminated from the Brazilian-1 and Brazilian-3 morphotypes by means of male-borne pheromones and/or male and female CH profiles. The Brazilian-1 and Brazilian-3 morphotypes were found to be monophyletic. The use of chemical profiles as species- and sex-specific signatures for cryptic species separations is discussed. PMID:26798260

  17. A Case-based Retrieval System using Natural Language Processing and Population-based Visualization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; Taira, Ricky K; Viñuela, Fernando; Bui, Alex A T

    2011-07-01

    Electronic medical records capture large quantities of patient data generated as a result of routine care. Secondary use of this data for clinical research could provide new insights into the evolution of diseases and help assess the effectiveness of available interventions. Unfortunately, the unstructured nature of clinical data hinders a user's ability to understand this data: tools are needed to structure, model, and visualize the data to elucidate patterns in a patient population. We present a case-based retrieval framework that incorporates an extraction tool to identify concepts from clinical reports, a disease model to capture necessary context for interpreting extracted concepts, and a model-driven visualization to facilitate querying and interpretation of the results. We describe how the model is used to group, filter, and retrieve similar cases. We present an application of the framework that aids users in exploring a population of intracranial aneurysm patients.

  18. Population based models of cortical drug response: insights from anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Liley, David T. J.

    2008-01-01

    A great explanatory gap lies between the molecular pharmacology of psychoactive agents and the neurophysiological changes they induce, as recorded by neuroimaging modalities. Causally relating the cellular actions of psychoactive compounds to their influence on population activity is experimentally challenging. Recent developments in the dynamical modelling of neural tissue have attempted to span this explanatory gap between microscopic targets and their macroscopic neurophysiological effects via a range of biologically plausible dynamical models of cortical tissue. Such theoretical models allow exploration of neural dynamics, in particular their modification by drug action. The ability to theoretically bridge scales is due to a biologically plausible averaging of cortical tissue properties. In the resulting macroscopic neural field, individual neurons need not be explicitly represented (as in neural networks). The following paper aims to provide a non-technical introduction to the mean field population modelling of drug action and its recent successes in modelling anaesthesia. PMID:19003456

  19. New population based reference values for spinal mobility measures based on the NHANES 2009–10

    PubMed Central

    Assassi, Shervin; Weisman, Michael H.; Lee, MinJae; Savage, Laurie; Diekman, Laura; Graham, Tiffany A.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Schall, Joan I.; Gensler, Lianne S.; Deodhar, Atul A.; Clegg, Daniel O.; Colbert, Robert A.; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report population based percentile reference values for selected spinal mobility measures in a nationally representative sample of 5103 U.S. adults ages 20–69 years examined in the 2009–10 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods Occiput-to-Wall Distance (OWD), Thoracic Expansion (TE), and Anterior Lumbar Flexion (ALF – modified Schober test) were measured by trained examiners in a standardized fashion. TE was measured at the xyphosternal level while the lower reference point for ALF was a line marked at the level of the superior margin of the lateral iliac crests. We report reference values based on the 95th percentile of OWD and 5th percentile of TE and ALF measurements, as well as other summary statistics for these measures in the study population. Results An OWD of more than zero was present in 3.8 % of participants while 8.8% of participants had out of range values for TE based the commonly used threshold of 2.5 cm. The 95th percentile of OWD measurement was zero while the 5th percentile measurements for TE and ALF were 1.9 and 2 cm, respectively. The spinal measures were significantly associated with gender, age, ethnicity, height, and body mass index. Exclusion of individuals with severe obesity (BMI > 35) changed the proposed reference values for TE and ALF to 2.2 and 1.9 cm, respectively. Conclusion We verified the reference value of zero for OWD. Using the reported population based percentile values, new reference values for TE and the ALF can be derived. PMID:24782356

  20. Friendship-based partner switching promotes cooperation in heterogeneous populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wu, Te; Li, Zhiwu; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The forming of human social ties tends to be with similar individuals. This study concentrates on the emergence of cooperation among heterogeneous populations. A simple model is proposed by considering the impact of interplay between the evolution of strategies and that of social partnerships on cooperation dynamics. Whenever two individuals acquire the rewards by playing prisoner's dilemma game with each other, the friendship (friendship is quantified as the weight of a link) between the two individuals deepens. Individuals can switch off the social ties with the partners who are unfriendly and rewire to similar new ones. Under this partner switching mechanism, population structure is divided into several groups and cooperation can prevail. It is observed that the frequent tendency of partner switching can lead to the enhancement of cooperative behavior under the enormous temptation to defect. Moreover, the influence of discounting the relationship between different individuals is also investigated. Meanwhile, the cooperation prevails when the adjustment of friendships mainly depends on the incomes of selected individuals rather than that of their partners. Finally, it is found that too similar population fail to maximize the cooperation and there exists a moderate similarity that can optimize cooperation.

  1. Health Literacy in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Duong, Van Tuyen; Lin, I-Feng; Sorensen, Kristine; Pelikan, Jürgen M; Van Den Broucke, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Chang, Peter Wushou

    2015-11-01

    Data on health literacy (HL) in the population is limited for Asian countries. This study aimed to test the validity of the Mandarin version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q) for use in the general public in Taiwan. Multistage stratification random sampling resulted in a sample of 2989 people aged 15 years and above. The HLS-EU-Q was validated by confirmatory factor analysis with excellent model data fit indices. The general HL of the Taiwanese population was 34.4 ± 6.6 on a scale of 50. Multivariate regression analysis showed that higher general HL is significantly associated with the higher ability to pay for medication, higher self-perceived social status, higher frequency of watching health-related TV, and community involvement but associated with younger age. HL is also associated with health status, health behaviors, and health care accessibility and use. The HLS-EU-Q was found to be a useful tool to assess HL and its associated factors in the general population.

  2. The Net Carbon Flux due to Deforestation and Forest Re-Growth in the Brazilian Amazon: Analysis using a Process-Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, A. I.; Little, W. S.; Houghton, R. A.; Scott, N. A.; White, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a process-based model of forest growth, carbon cycling, and land cover dynamics named CARLUC (for CARbon and Land Use Change) to estimate the size of terrestrial carbon pools in terra firme (non-flooded) forests across the Brazilian Legal Amazon and the net flux of carbon resulting from forest disturbance and forest recovery from disturbance. Our goal in building the model was to construct a relatively simple ecosystem model that would respond to soil and climatic heterogeneity that allows us to study of the impact of Amazonian deforestation, selective logging, and accidental fire on the global carbon cycle. This paper focuses on the net flux caused by deforestation and forest re-growth over the period from 1970-1998. We calculate that the net flux to the atmosphere during this period reached a maximum of approx. 0.35 PgC/yr (1PgC = 1 x 10(exp I5) gC) in 1990, with a cumulative release of approx. 7 PgC from 1970- 1998. The net flux is higher than predicted by an earlier study by a total of 1 PgC over the period 1989-1 998 mainly because CARLUC predicts relatively high mature forest carbon storage compared to the datasets used in the earlier study. Incorporating the dynamics of litter and soil carbon pools into the model increases the cumulative net flux by approx. 1 PgC from 1970-1998, while different assumptions about land cover dynamics only caused small changes. The uncertainty of the net flux, calculated with a Monte-Carlo approach, is roughly 35% of the mean value (1 SD).

  3. Evidence-Based Practice: a survey regarding behavior, knowledge, skills, resources, opinions and perceived barriers of Brazilian physical therapists from São Paulo state

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tatiane M.; Costa, Lucíola C. M.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) has been widely used by health professionals. However, no study in Brazil has investigated the data regarding the knowledge and difficulties related to EBP from a representative sample of physical therapists. OBJECTIVE: To identify behavior, knowledge, skills, resources, opinions and perceived barriers of Brazilian physical therapists from the state of São Paulo regarding EBP. METHOD: A customized questionnaire about behavior, knowledge, skills, resources, opinions and perceived barriers regarding EBP was sent by email to a sample of 490 physical therapists registered by the Registration Board of São Paulo, Brazil. Physical therapists who did not respond to the questionnaire were contacted by telephone and/or letter. The data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: The final response rate was 64.4% (316/490). Because 60 physical therapists were no longer practicing, 256 answers were analyzed. The physical therapists reported that they routinely read scientific papers (89.5%) as a resource for professional development, followed by continuing education courses (88.3%) and books (86.3%). Approximately 35% of the respondents reported a clear understanding of the implementation of research findings in their practice; approximately 37% reported no difficulties in critically appraising scientific papers; and 67.2% strongly agreed that EBP is important for their practice. The most commonly reported barriers were related to difficulties in obtaining full-text papers (80.1%), using EBP may represent higher cost (80.1%) and the language of publication of the papers (70.3%). CONCLUSION: Physical therapists from São Paulo state believe that they have knowledge and skills to use EBP. Although they have favorable opinions regarding its implementation, they still encounter difficulties in implementing EBP successfully. PMID:26443977

  4. "For whom was it effective?" Moderators of the effect of a school-based intervention on potential physical activity determinants among Brazilian students.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Filho, Valter Cordeiro; da Silva, Kelly Samara; Mota, Jorge; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha; Gubert, Fabiane do Amaral; Lopes, Adair da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about the effects of school-based interventions on modifiable physical activity (PA) determinants (e.g., social support), and whether the intervention effect differs according to students' characteristics (e.g., age and gender) are relevant PA promotion topics. This study aims to answer these topics among Brazilian students. This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted with 548 students in the intervention group and 537 in the control group (51.5% of boys; aged 11-18years). The four-month intervention included strategies focused on training teachers, opportunities for PA in the school environment, and health education. Potential PA determinants (attitude, self-efficacy, support of friends, parents, and teachers, perceived neighborhood environment and PA facilities in school) and moderators (gender, age, socioeconomic status (SES), and PA level at baseline) were assessed using self-reported instrument. Height and weight were measured to estimate the students' body mass index (BMI) status. Generalized linear models were used. In general, there was a significant and positive intervention effect for attitude, support of friends and teachers for PA, as well as PA facilities in school; effect size was 0.29, 0.24, 0.34, and 0.29, respectively (P<0.05). Age (support of friends, parents and teachers, and PA facilities in school), SES (support of friends and PA facilities in school), and BMI status (support of friends) were moderators of the intervention effect on some outcomes. In conclusion, the intervention improved potential PA determinants, but some changes occurred differently according to students' characteristics. These findings should be considered in PA policies in the school context.

  5. Shared Genetic Factors of Anxiety and Depression Symptoms in a Brazilian Family-Based Cohort, the Baependi Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Taporoski, Tâmara P.; Negrão, André B.; Horimoto, Andréa R. V. R.; Duarte, Nubia E.; Alvim, Rafael O.; de Oliveira, Camila M.; Krieger, José E.; von Schantz, Malcolm; Vallada, Homero; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic and genetic overlap between anxiety and depression symptoms in an admixed population from extended family pedigrees. Participants (n = 1,375) were recruited from a cohort of 93 families (mean age±SD 42±16.3, 57% female) in the rural town of Baependi, Brazil. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to assess depression and anxiety symptoms. Heritability estimates were obtained by an adjusted variance component model. Bivariate analyses were performed to obtain the partition of the covariance of anxiety and depression into genetic and environmental components, and to calculate the genetic contribution modulating both sets of symptoms. Anxiety and depression scores were 7.49±4.01 and 5.70±3.82, respectively. Mean scores were affected by age and were significantly higher in women. Heritability for depression and anxiety, corrected for age and sex, were 0.30 and 0.32, respectively. Significant genetic correlations (ρg = 0.81) were found between anxiety and depression scores; thus, nearly 66% of the total genetic variance in one set of symptoms was shared with the other set. Our results provided strong evidence for a genetic overlap between anxiety and depression symptoms, which has relevance for our understanding of the biological basis of these constructs and could be exploited in genome-wide association studies. PMID:26650098

  6. Development of normative data for the Brazilian adaptation of the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test.

    PubMed

    Fornazieri, Marco Aurélio; dos Santos, Clayson Alan; Bezerra, Thiago Freire Pinto; Pinna, Fábio de Rezende; Voegels, Richard Louis; Doty, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    It is well established that olfactory dysfunction has significant implications for safety, nutrition, and quality of life. The more reliable standardized tests of olfactory function, such as the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), assess odor identification ability. Unfortunately, cultural factors can influence such tests, as a number of odors are not universally recognized. In this study, a Portuguese language version of the UPSIT was administered to an age- and sex-stratified prospective sample of 1820 Brazilian subjects. Normative data were developed for a subset of 1578 subjects who reported having no difficulties smelling or tasting. Individuals with a history of head trauma or, in the case of those over the age of 64 years, Mini-Mental State Examination Scores <24, were excluded from analysis. As in other populations, the test scores were significantly influenced by age and sex. The median overall difference between the North American and Brazilian UPSIT scores was 2.2 points for men and 0.8 points for women, although subtle age-related differences were also apparent. This research represents that largest clinical study of olfaction ever performed in South America. Correction factors based upon age and sex are provided to allow for direct comparisons of Brazilian test scores to those based upon North American norms.

  7. Predictors of Cerebral Palsy in Very Preterm Infants: The EPIPAGE Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaino, Ghada; Khoshnood, Babak; Kaminski, Monique; Pierrat, Veronique; Marret, Stephane; Matis, Jacqueline; Ledesert, Bernard; Thiriez, Gerard; Fresson, Jeanne; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Zupan-Simunek, Veronique; Arnaud, Catherine; Burguet, Antoine; Larroque, Beatrice; Breart, Gerard; Ancel, Pierre-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the independent role of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, and several other neonatal and obstetric factors, as potential predictors of cerebral palsy (CP) in a large population-based cohort of very preterm infants. Method: As part of EPIPAGE, a population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data…

  8. Universal Screening for Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Fitting a Population-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schanding, G. Thomas, Jr.; Nowell, Kerri P.

    2013-01-01

    Schools have begun to adopt a population-based method to conceptualizing assessment and intervention of students; however, little empirical evidence has been gathered to support this shift in service delivery. The present study examined the fit of a population-based model in identifying students' behavioral and emotional functioning using a…

  9. Brazilian Trichoptera Checklist II

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A second assessment of Brazilian Trichoptera species records is presented here. A total of 625 species were recorded for Brazil. This represents an increase of 65.34% new species recorded during the last decade. The Hydropsychidae (124 spp.), followed by the Hydroptilidae (102 spp.) and Polycentropodidae (97 spp.), are the families with the greatest richness recorded for Brazil. The knowledge on Trichoptera biodiversity in Brazil is geographically unequal. The majority of the species is recorded for the southeastern region. PMID:25349524

  10. Building Social and Cultural Capital among Young People in Disadvantaged Communities: Lessons from a Brazilian Sport-Based Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaaij, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the concepts of social and cultural capital as analytical tools for investigating the capacity of sport-based intervention programs to contribute to the personal, social and professional development of disadvantaged young people. It draws on survey data (n = 129) and qualitative interviews (n = 53) with participants of the…

  11. The Brazilian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Junqueira, Daniela R; Cisneros, Lígia C; Ferreira, Lucas C; Murphy, Kate; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hopper, John L; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-12-01

    The Brazilian Twin Registry (BTR) was established in 2013 and has impelled twin research in South America. The main aim of the initiative was to create a resource that would be accessible to the Brazilian scientific community as well as international researchers interested in the investigation of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of common diseases, phenotypes, and human behavior traits. The BTR is a joint effort between academic and governmental institutions from Brazil and Australia. The collaboration includes the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil, the University of Sydney and University of Melbourne in Australia, the Australian Twin Registry, as well as the research foundations CNPq and CAPES in Brazil. The BTR is a member of the International Network of Twin Registries. Recruitment strategies used to register twins have been through participation in a longitudinal study investigating genetic and environmental factors for low back pain occurrence, and from a variety of sources including media campaigns and social networking. Currently, 291 twins are registered in the BTR, with data on demographics, zygosity, anthropometrics, and health history having been collected from 151 twins using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Future BTR plans include the registration of thousands of Brazilian twins identified from different sources and collaborate nationally and internationally with other research groups interested on twin studies.

  12. The growth of XXX females: population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, S G; Pan, H; McKie, M

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinal measurements of height, sitting height and leg length are compared between 11 XXX girls identified by cytogenetic screening, and 16 chromosomally normal controls from the same population using a nonparametric method. While height velocity did not differ between the two groups either during the pubertal or the mid-childhood spurts, leg length velocity was significantly increased during the mid-childhood spurt, between 4 and 9 years of age. A further contribution to the increased leg length came from the slower decline in leg length velocity at the end of the pubertal spurt. The possible mechanisms involved in these changes are discussed.

  13. Brazilian minister sets global goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    Marco Antonio Raupp, the mathematical physicist who is now Brazil's minister of science, technology and innovation, talks to Physics World about the challenges and opportunities for Brazilian research.

  14. Variants of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene and incident glucose intolerance in Japanese-Brazilians.

    PubMed

    Franco, L F; Crispim, F; Pereira, A C; Moisés, R S

    2011-03-01

    Common variants of the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in different ethnic groups. The Japanese-Brazilian population has one of the highest prevalence rates of diabetes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TCF7L2, rs7903146 and rs12255372, could predict the development of glucose intolerance in Japanese-Brazilians. In a population-based 7-year prospective study, we genotyped 222 individuals (72 males and 150 females, aged 56.2 ± 10.5 years) with normal glucose tolerance at baseline. In the study population, we found that the minor allele frequency was 0.05 for SNP rs7903146 and 0.03 for SNP rs12255372. No significant allele or genotype association with glucose intolerance incidence was found for either SNP. Haplotypes were constructed with these two SNPs and three haplotypes were defined: CG (frequency: 0.94), TT (frequency = 0.027) and TG (frequency = 0.026). None of the haplotypes provided evidence for association with the incidence of glucose intolerance. Despite no associations between incidence of glucose intolerance and SNPs of the TCF7L2 gene in Japanese-Brazilians, we found that carriers of the CT genotype for rs7903146 had significantly lower insulin levels 2 h after a 75-g glucose load than carriers of the CC genotype. In conclusion, in Japanese-Brazilians, a population with a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, common TCF7L2 variants did not make major contributions to the incidence of glucose tolerance abnormalities.

  15. Social and dental status along the life course and oral health impacts in adolescents: a population-based birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Harmful social conditions in early life might predispose individuals to dental status which in turn may impact on adolescents' quality of life. Aims To estimate the prevalence of oral health impacts among 12 yr-old Brazilian adolescents (n = 359) and its association with life course socioeconomic variables, dental status and dental services utilization in a population-based birth cohort in Southern Brazil. Methods Exploratory variables were collected at birth, at 6 and 12 yr of age. The Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index (OIDP) was collected in adolescence and it was analyzed as a ranked outcome (OIDP from 0 to 9). Unadjusted and adjusted multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was performed guided by a theoretical determination model. Results The response rate was of 94.4% (n = 339). The prevalence of OIDP = 1 was 30.1% (CI95%25.2;35.0) and OIDP ≥ 2 was 28.0% (CI95%23.2;32.8). The most common daily activity affected was eating (44.8%), follow by cleaning the mouth and smiling (15.6%, and 15.0%, respectively). In the final model mother schooling and mother employment status in early cohort participant's life were associated with OIDP in adolescence. As higher untreated dental caries at age 6 and 12 years, and the presence of dental pain, gingival bleeding and incisal crowing in adolescence as higher the OIDP score. On the other hand, dental fluorosis was associated with low OIDP score. Conclusion Our findings highlight the importance of adolescent's early life social environmental as mother schooling and mother employment status and the early and later dental status on the adolescent's quality of life regardless family income and use of dental services. PMID:19930601

  16. Brazilian Cerrado Soil Actinobacteria Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Suela Silva, Monique; Naves Sales, Alenir; Teixeira Magalhães-Guedes, Karina; Ribeiro Dias, Disney; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2013-01-01

    A total of 2152 Actinobacteria strains were isolated from native Cerrado (Brazilian Savannah) soils located in Passos, Luminárias, and Arcos municipalities (Minas Gerais State, Brazil). The soils were characterised for chemical and microbiological analysis. The microbial analysis led to the identification of nine genera (Streptomyces, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Amycolatopsis, Microbacterium, Frankia, Leifsonia, Nakamurella, and Kitasatospora) and 92 distinct species in both seasons studied (rainy and dry). The rainy season produced a high microbial population of all the aforementioned genera. The pH values of the soil samples from the Passos, Luminárias, and Arcos regions varied from 4.1 to 5.5. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of phosphorus, magnesium, and organic matter in the soils among the studied areas. Samples from the Arcos area contained large amounts of aluminium in the rainy season and both hydrogen and aluminium in the rainy and dry seasons. The Actinobacteria population seemed to be unaffected by the high levels of aluminium in the soil. Studies are being conducted to produce bioactive compounds from Actinobacteria fermentations on different substrates. The present data suggest that the number and diversity of Actinobacteria spp. in tropical soils represent a vast unexplored resource for the biotechnology of bioactives production. PMID:23555089

  17. [Negotiating knowledge and power: the National Policy for Comprehensive Men's Healthcare and the Brazilian Society of Urology].

    PubMed

    Müller, Rita Flores; Birman, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate the negotiations and disputes between different kinds of knowledge and power in the history of the Brazilian National Policy for Comprehensive Men's Healthcare based on the creation in 2008 of the Technical Area for Men's Health within the Ministry of Health's Department of Strategic Programs. We observed the Brazilian Society of Urology's position as the policy was being drawn up, including the discourse adopted, based on interviews held with managers from the Ministry of Health and the assistant representative of the United Nations Population Fund in Brazil. We analyzed the visibility of the male body in signs of resistance to the interventions of biopower in the expression of the right to health.

  18. An agent-based computational model for tuberculosis spreading on age-structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graciani Rodrigues, C. C.; Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based computational model to study the spreading of the tuberculosis (TB) disease on age-structured populations. The model proposed is a merge of two previous models: an agent-based computational model for the spreading of tuberculosis and a bit-string model for biological aging. The combination of TB with the population aging, reproduces the coexistence of health states, as seen in real populations. In addition, the universal exponential behavior of mortalities curves is still preserved. Finally, the population distribution as function of age shows the prevalence of TB mostly in elders, for high efficacy treatments.

  19. E-Commerce Sites: Use Intention by Brazilian Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, Cayley; Lacerda, Lucas; Antunes, Diego R.

    This article discusses the behavior of Brazilian's intention of use e-commerce sites. To explain its use, or not, the Unified Theory of Acceptance of Technology (UTAUT) was used. A survey was conducted through a questionnaire based on variables from UTAUT available for twenty days over the Web, that prompted 1900 responses. The results indicate that Effort and Social Influence are the variables of the model that better explain Brazilian user's intention to use e-commerce sites.

  20. Population-based imaging biobanks as source of big data.

    PubMed

    Gatidis, Sergios; Heber, Sophia D; Storz, Corinna; Bamberg, Fabian

    2016-09-09

    Advances of computational sciences over the last decades have enabled the introduction of novel methodological approaches in biomedical research. Acquiring extensive and comprehensive data about a research subject and subsequently extracting significant information has opened new possibilities in gaining insight into biological and medical processes. This so-called big data approach has recently found entrance into medical imaging and numerous epidemiological studies have been implementing advanced imaging to identify imaging biomarkers that provide information about physiological processes, including normal development and aging but also on the development of pathological disease states. The purpose of this article is to present existing epidemiological imaging studies and to discuss opportunities, methodological and organizational aspects, and challenges that population imaging poses to the field of big data research.

  1. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity of Brazilian Schoolchildren: Usability Testing of a Web-Based Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has been used with increasing frequency for the assessment of diet and physical activity in health surveys. A number of Web-based questionnaires have been developed for children and adolescents. However, their usability characteristics have scarcely been reported, despite their potential importance for improving the feasibility and validity of ICT-based methods. Objective The objective of this study was to describe the usability evaluation of the Consumo Alimentar e Atividade Física de Escolares (CAAFE) questionnaire (Food Consumption and Physical Activity Questionnaire for schoolchildren), a new Web-based survey tool for the self-assessment of diet and physical activity by schoolchildren. Methods A total of 114 schoolchildren aged 6 to 12 years took part in questionnaire usability testing carried out in computer classrooms at five elementary schools in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Schoolchildren used a personal computer (PC) equipped with software for recording what is on the computer screen and the children’s speech during usability testing. Quantitative and qualitative analyses took into account objective usability metrics such as error counts and time to complete a task. Data on the main difficulties in accomplishing the task and the level of satisfaction expressed by the children were assessed by the observers using a standardized form and interviews with the children. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to summarize both the quantitative and the qualitative aspects of the data obtained. Results The mean time for completing the questionnaire was 13.7 minutes (SD 3.68). Compared to the children in 2nd or 3rd grades, those in 4th or 5th grades spent less time completing the questionnaire (median 12.4 vs 13.3 minutes, P=.022), asked for help less frequently (median 0 vs 1.0 count, P=.005), had a lower error count (median 2.0 vs 8.0 count, P<.001), and obtained a higher overall

  2. Familial clustering of ALS in a population-based resource

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Summer B.; Figueroa, Karla P.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent of an inherited contribution to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mortality. Methods: Death certificates (DCs) from 1904 to 2009 were analyzed from patients with at least 3 generations recorded in the Utah Population Database, a genealogic and medical database of more than 2 million Utah residents. Among probands whose DCs listed ALS, the relative risk (RR) of death with ALS was determined among spouses and first- through fifth-degree relatives, using birth year-, sex-, and birthplace-matched cohorts. Results: Eight hundred seventy-three patients with ALS met the inclusion criteria. Among 3,531 deceased first-degree relatives of probands, the RR of dying with ALS was increased compared with control cohorts (RR = 4.91, 95% confidence interval 3.36, 6.94). The RR of dying with ALS was also increased among 9,386 deceased second-degree relatives (RR = 2.85, 95% confidence interval 2.06, 3.84). The RR of dying with ALS was not increased among third- through fifth-degree relatives. More affected first-degree relatives were male (p = 0.014). No cases of conjugal ALS were observed. Conclusions: This study is suggestive of familial clustering in excess of expected for ALS. Our results confirm the results of prior studies of familial ALS, suggesting applicability of our findings to other mixed European populations. Furthermore, this work expands on previous studies by quantifying the RR of ALS among more distant relatives. The use of mortality data obtained from DCs reduces the ascertainment and recall bias of many previous studies. Finally, the excess of ALS among second-degree relatives and lack of conjugal ALS are strongly supportive of a genetic contribution. PMID:24306004

  3. Addendum to "Population-Based Prevention of Child Maltreatment: The U.S. Triple P System Population Trial".

    PubMed

    Prinz, Ronald J; Sanders, Matthew R; Shapiro, Cheri J; Whitaker, Daniel J; Lutzker, John R

    2016-04-01

    A previous article published several years ago (Prinz et al. Prevention Science, 10, 1-12, 2009) described the main results of a place-randomized-design study focused on the prevention of child-maltreatment-related outcomes at a population level through the implementation of a multilevel system of parenting and family support (the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program). The current report, prepared at the encouragement of the journal, provides additional details about procedures, measures, and design-related decisions, presents an additional analysis of the main outcome variables, and poses questions about the study and its implications. We also offer guidance about how the field can move forward to build on this line of research. From the outset, the three designated primary child maltreatment outcomes were county-wide rates for substantiated child maltreatment cases, out-of-home placements, and hospital-treated child maltreatment injuries, derived from independent data sources available through administrative archival records. Baseline equivalence between the two intervention conditions was reaffirmed. The additional analysis, which made use of a 5-year baseline (replacing a 1-year baseline) and ANCOVA, yielded large effect sizes for all three outcomes that converged with those from the original analyses. Overall, the study underscored the potential for community-wide parenting and family support to produce population-level preventive impact on child maltreatment. Issues addressed included (1) the need for replication of population-oriented maltreatment prevention strategies like the one tested in this randomized experiment, (2) the need to demonstrate that a parenting-based population approach to maltreatment prevention can also impact children's adjustment apart from child abuse, and (3) the role of implementation science for achieving greater population reach and maintenance over time.

  4. Revisiting the hierarchy of urban areas in the Brazilian Amazon: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sandra; Brondízio, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The Legal Brazilian Amazon, while the largest rainforest in the world, is also a region where most residents are urban. Despite close linkages between rural and urban processes in the region, rural areas have been the predominant focus of Amazon-based population-environment scholarship. Offering a focus on urban areas within the Brazilian Amazon, this paper examines the emergence of urban hierarchies within the region. Using a combination of nationally representative data and community based surveys, applied to a multivariate cluster methodology (Grade of Membership), we observe the emergence of sub-regional urban networks characterized by economic and political inter-dependency, population movement, and provision of services. These networks link rural areas, small towns, and medium and large cities. We also identify the emergence of medium-size cities as important nodes at a sub-regional level. In all, the work provides insight on the proposed model of ‘disarticulated urbanization’ within the Amazon by calling attention to the increasing role of regional and sub-regional urban networks in shaping the future expansion of land use and population distribution in the Amazon. We conclude with a discussion of implications for increasing intra-regional connectivity and fragmentation of conservation areas and ecosystems in the region. PMID:23129877

  5. [Self-perception of the need for full dental prosthesisamong toothless elderly Brazilians].

    PubMed

    Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Souza, Samilly Evangelista; Sampaio, Aline Araujo; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Ferreira, Efigenia Ferreira E; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2016-11-01

    The objective is to estimate the prevalence of self-perception of the need for a full dental prosthesis among toothless elderly Brazilians aged 65 to 74, as well as identify the associated factors. It is a cross-sectional study based on the national survey of oral health conditions of the Brazilian population, called SB Brazil - 2010. The dependent variable was the self-perceived need for full dental prosthesis, considering the purchase of new or replacement of the existing prosthesis. Descriptive bivariate and multiple analyses were conducted on 3514 elderly people, of which 2039 (55%) elderly self-perceived the need for a full denture. The self-perception of the need for a full denture was higher among those who needed dental prosthesis and who were dissatisfied with their oral health conditions. In addition to the high prevalence of self-perception of the need for prosthesis identified, the results identified that normative and subjective conditions of oral health remained associated with this self-perception among elderly Brazilians.

  6. Understanding exoplanet populations with simulation-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehead, Robert Charles

    The Kepler candidate catalog represents an unprecedented sample of exoplanet host stars. This dataset is ideal for probing the populations of exoplanet systems and exploring their architectures. Confirming transiting exoplanets candidates through traditional follow-up methods is challenging, especially for faint host stars. Most of Kepler's validated planets relied on statistical methods to separate true planets from false-positives. Multiple transiting planet systems (MTPS) have been previously shown to have low false-positive rates and over 850 planets in MTPSs have been statistically validated so far. We show that the period-normalized transit duration ratio (xi) offers additional information that can be used to establish the planetary nature of these systems. We briefly discuss the observed distribution of xi for the Q1-Q17 Kepler Candidate Search. We also use xi to develop a Bayesian statistical framework combined with Monte Carlo methods to determine which pairs of planet candidates in an MTPS are consistent with the planet hypothesis for a sample of 862 MTPSs that include candidate planets, confirmed planets, and known false-positives. This analysis proves to be efficient and advantageous in that it only requires catalog-level bulk candidate properties and galactic population modeling to compute the probabilities of a myriad of feasible scenarios composed of background and companion stellar blends in the photometric aperture, without needing additional observational follow-up. Our results agree with the previous results of a low false-positive rate in the Kepler MTPSs. This implies, independently of any other estimates, that most of the MTPSs detected by Kepler are planetary in nature, but that a substantial fraction could be orbiting stars other than then the putative target star, and therefore may be subject to significant error in the inferred planet parameters resulting from unknown or mismeasured stellar host attributes. We also apply approximate

  7. Gaussian process-based Bayesian nonparametric inference of population size trajectories from gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Julia A; Minin, Vladimir N

    2013-03-01

    Changes in population size influence genetic diversity of the population and, as a result, leave a signature of these changes in individual genomes in the population. We are interested in the inverse problem of reconstructing past population dynamics from genomic data. We start with a standard framework based on the coalescent, a stochastic process that generates genealogies connecting randomly sampled individuals from the population of interest. These genealogies serve as a glue between the population demographic history and genomic sequences. It turns out that only the times of genealogical lineage coalescences contain information about population size dynamics. Viewing these coalescent times as a point process, estimating population size trajectories is equivalent to estimating a conditional intensity of this point process. Therefore, our inverse problem is similar to estimating an inhomogeneous Poisson process intensity function. We demonstrate how recent advances in Gaussian process-based nonparametric inference for Poisson processes can be extended to Bayesian nonparametric estimation of population size dynamics under the coalescent. We compare our Gaussian process (GP) approach to one of the state-of-the-art Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF) methods for estimating population trajectories. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that our method has better accuracy and precision. Next, we analyze two genealogies reconstructed from real sequences of hepatitis C and human Influenza A viruses. In both cases, we recover more believed aspects of the viral demographic histories than the GMRF approach. We also find that our GP method produces more reasonable uncertainty estimates than the GMRF method.

  8. Discrimination of Brazilian propolis according to the seasoning using chemometrics and machine learning based on UV-Vis scanning data.

    PubMed

    Tomazzoli, Maíra Maciel; Pai Neto, Remi Dal; Moresco, Rodolfo; Westphal, Larissa; Zeggio, Amélia Regina Somensi; Specht, Leandro; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2015-10-21

    Propolis is a chemically complex biomass produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera) from plant resins added of salivary enzymes, beeswax, and pollen. The biological activities described for propolis were also identified for donor plant's resin, but a big challenge for the standardization of the chemical composition and biological effects of propolis remains on a better understanding of the influence of seasonality on the chemical constituents of that raw material. Since propolis quality depends, among other variables, on the local flora which is strongly influenced by (a)biotic factors over the seasons, to unravel the harvest season effect on the propolis' chemical profile is an issue of recognized importance. For that, fast, cheap, and robust analytical techniques seem to be the best choice for large scale quality control processes in the most demanding markets, e.g., human health applications. For that, UV-Visible (UV-Vis) scanning spectrophotometry of hydroalcoholic extracts (HE) of seventy-three propolis samples, collected over the seasons in 2014 (summer, spring, autumn, and winter) and 2015 (summer and autumn) in Southern Brazil was adopted. Further machine learning and chemometrics techniques were applied to the UV-Vis dataset aiming to gain insights as to the seasonality effect on the claimed chemical heterogeneity of propolis samples determined by changes in the flora of the geographic region under study. Descriptive and classification models were built following a chemometric approach, i.e. principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) supported by scripts written in the R language. The UV-Vis profiles associated with chemometric analysis allowed identifying a typical pattern in propolis samples collected in the summer. Importantly, the discrimination based on PCA could be improved by using the dataset of the fingerprint region of phenolic compounds (λ = 280-400ηm), suggesting that besides the biological activities of those

  9. Burden of parkinsonism: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Mark; Slaughter, Pamela M; Theriault, Marc-Erick; DeBoer, Donald P; Naylor, C David

    2003-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a significant burden of illness and cost to society, which has been difficult to quantify. Our objective was to use linked administrative databases from the population of Ontario, Canada, to assess the prevalence of parkinsonism, physician- and drug-related costs, and hospital utilization for parkinsonian patients compared with age/sex matched controls. An inception cohort of parkinsonian cases from 1993/1994 was age and sex matched (1:2) to controls and followed for 6 years. Patients were identified by the diagnostic code for PD, the use of specific PD drugs, or a combination. The parkinsonian case cohort (15,304) was matched to (30,608) controls that did not have parkinsonism. The age-adjusted prevalence rates were 3.63 for men and for 3.24 women per 1,000 (increased by 5.4% for men and 9.8% for women). Physician costs were 1.4 times more, there were 1.44 times more hospital admissions, admissions were on average 1.19 times longer, and drug costs were 3.0 times more for parkinsonian cases. We conclude that the substantially higher physician and drug costs as well as hospitalization rates compared with controls clearly suggest that parkinsonism is associated with large direct costs to society.

  10. Birth order and mortality: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron; Kolk, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study uses Swedish population register data to investigate the relationship between birth order and mortality at ages 30 to 69 for Swedish cohorts born between 1938 and 1960, using a within-family comparison. The main analyses are conducted with discrete-time survival analysis using a within-family comparison, and the estimates are adjusted for age, mother's age at the time of birth, and cohort. Focusing on sibships ranging in size from two to six, we find that mortality risk in adulthood increases with later birth order. The results show that the relative effect of birth order is greater among women than among men. This pattern is consistent for all the major causes of death but is particularly pronounced for mortality attributable to cancers of the respiratory system and to external causes. Further analyses in which we adjust for adult socioeconomic status and adult educational attainment suggest that social pathways only mediate the relationship between birth order and mortality risk in adulthood to a limited degree.

  11. Historical sketch of Slovak Haban (Hutterite) population based on autosomal STR analysis.

    PubMed

    Soták, M; Petrejčíková, E; Siváková, D; Rębała, K; Bôžiková, A; Bernasovský, I; Carnogurská, J; Boronová, I; Mačeková, S; Homol'ová, L; Sovičová, A; Gabriková, D; Rusínová, L; Bernasovská, J

    2011-10-01

    According to the Hutterite chronicles, the Habans arrived from Austrian Tyrol, Switzerland, and northernmost Italy and stayed in four regions of Slovakia (Sobotište, Vel'ké Leváre, Moravský Svätý Ján, Trenčín). There are some communities in western Slovakia that retained their Haban cultural identity and still identify themselves as descendents of the Hutterite population with their own specific customs. Slovak Habans are typical founder population with significant social isolation for which high degree of inbreeding is typical. Present study investigated STR polymorphisms as a powerful genetic tool for population genetic studies. The aim was to perform a comparative, population genetic study based on 15 STR loci widely used in forensic genetics, of the Haban population, the Slovak majority population and the population of Tyrol. We analyzed allele frequencies and other statistical parameters in three selected populations in order to identify groups of specific ethnic origin and establish their genetic relationship. The data set included 110 unrelated Habans and 201 unrelated individuals from the Slovak majority population, as well as allelic frequencies for the population of Austrian Tyrol available in the literature. Population pairwise FST values used as a short term genetic distance between populations showed significant differentiation between the Habans and both reference populations (FST=0.0025 and 0.0042 for comparison with the Slovaks and Austrians, respectively; p<10(-3)). The Slovak Hutterites were demonstrated to be genetically distinct and more closely related to their geographic neighbors than to their historical ancestral population, which may be at least partially explained by gene flow between neighboring Haban and Slovak populations.

  12. Brazilian Portuguese Ethnonymy and Europeanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    Delineates the incorporation and analyzes the impact of European borrowings in Brazilian racio-ethnic terminology. This overview covers French, Italian, Spanish, and English influences. Borrowings from European languages have had a small impact on the calculus of Brazilian racio-ethnic terms. (43 references) (Author/CK)

  13. [The Brazilian National Health Conference: challenges for the country].

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Paulo

    2015-10-01

    This article was published in the context of the upcoming 15th Brazilian National Health Conference and addresses the country's health challenges based on the history of previous conferences. The authors analyze the evolution of health as a public policy agenda, highlighting the role of such institutions as the Brazilian Center for Health Studies (CEBES), the Brazilian Association of Collective Health (Abrasco), and the National Health Council in advocating and establishing the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). The article also focuses on expectations concerning the 15th National Health Conference within a political and economic scenario that raises questions and challenges both for the future of health policy, exemplified by SUS, and the current capacity to mobilize stakeholders.

  14. Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Emerson; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Public health actions endorsed by the federal government, for instance, health promotion initiatives, usually have greater impact at population level compared to other types of initiatives. This commentary aims to instigate debate on the importance and necessity of producing federally endorsed brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion. PMID:25210830

  15. Vowel Harmony: A Variable Rule in Brazilian Portuguese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisol, Leda

    1989-01-01

    Examines vowel harmony in the "Gaucho dialect" of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. Informants from four areas of the state were studied: the capital city (Porto Alegre), the border region with Uruguay, and two areas of the interior populated by descendants of nineteenth-century immigrants from Europe, mainly Germans and…

  16. Brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Emerson; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2014-08-01

    Public health actions endorsed by the federal government, for instance, health promotion initiatives, usually have greater impact at population level compared to other types of initiatives. This commentary aims to instigate debate on the importance and necessity of producing federally endorsed brazilian physical activity guidelines as a strategy for health promotion.

  17. An individual-based model for population viability analysis of humpback chub in Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pine, William Pine; Healy, Brian; Smith, Emily Omana; Trammell, Melissa; Speas, Dave; Valdez, Rich; Yard, Mike; Walters, Carl; Ahrens, Rob; Vanhaverbeke, Randy; Stone, Dennis; Wilson, Wade

    2013-01-01

    We developed an individual-based population viability analysis model (females only) for evaluating risk to populations from catastrophic events or conservation and research actions. This model tracks attributes (size, weight, viability, etc.) for individual fish through time and then compiles this information to assess the extinction risk of the population across large numbers of simulation trials. Using a case history for the Little Colorado River population of Humpback Chub Gila cypha in Grand Canyon, Arizona, we assessed extinction risk and resiliency to a catastrophic event for this population and then assessed a series of conservation actions related to removing specific numbers of Humpback Chub at different sizes for conservation purposes, such as translocating individuals to establish other spawning populations or hatchery refuge development. Our results suggested that the Little Colorado River population is generally resilient to a single catastrophic event and also to removals of larvae and juveniles for conservation purposes, including translocations to establish new populations. Our results also suggested that translocation success is dependent on similar survival rates in receiving and donor streams and low emigration rates from recipient streams. In addition, translocating either large numbers of larvae or small numbers of large juveniles has generally an equal likelihood of successful population establishment at similar extinction risk levels to the Little Colorado River donor population. Our model created a transparent platform to consider extinction risk to populations from catastrophe or conservation actions and should prove useful to managers assessing these risks for endangered species such as Humpback Chub.

  18. Brazilian eugenics and its international connections: an analysis based on the controversies between Renato Kehl and Edgard Roquette-Pinto, 1920-1930.

    PubMed

    Souza, Vanderlei Sebastião de

    2016-12-01

    In this article, I analyze the dialogue and exchanges between Brazilian eugenicists and their counterparts abroad in the early decades of the twentieth century. Through an examination of Renato Kehl's and Edgard Roquette-Pinto's eugenics projects and the controversies between these two leaders of the eugenics movement in Brazil, I investigate their contact with the movements in countries like the United States, Germany, England, Sweden, and Norway and show that the ties that the two researchers maintained with so-called mainline eugenic thought were broader and more extensive than first believed. The result was the shaping of different brands of Brazilian eugenics, expanding the international circulation of ideas and extrapolating the borders of "Latin eugenics."

  19. [Efficiency of Brazilian States and the Federal District in the public kidney transplant system based on DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis) and the Malmquist index].

    PubMed

    Costa, Cassia Kely Favoretto; Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Sampaio, Luciano Menezes Bezerra

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of Brazilian States and the Federal District in the public kidney transplant system and their productivity trends from 2006 to 2011. The authors used Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) with slack and the Malmquist index with slack. Inputs included spending on hospital services and health professionals in the system. The output was the number of kidney transplants performed in each State. The data showed a significant discrepancy between States in the number of kidney transplants. The transplant system's inefficiency may result from inadequate management, failure to comply with national guidelines, inactive hospital transplant committees, and overburdened hospital staff. Institutional changes promoted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health (procedures improvement and standardization) failed to increase productivity in most States during this period.

  20. Autistic Traits in a Population-Based ADHD Twin Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiersen, Angela M.; Constantino, John N.; Volk, Heather E.; Todd, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Most diagnostic nomenclatures do not allow for the concurrent diagnosis of autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Clinic-based studies suggest autistic symptoms are common in children with ADHD, but such studies are prone to referral bias. This study assesses whether children with ADHD selected from the general…

  1. Building the Evidence Base for Population-Level Interventions: Barriers and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifsey, Sarah; Cash, Amanda; Anthony, Jodi; Mathis, Sheryl; Silva, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Population-level interventions focused on policy, systems, and environmental change strategies are increasingly being used to affect and improve the health of populations. At the same time, emphasis on implementing evidence-based public health practices and programming is increasing, particularly at the federal level. Valuing strategies in the…

  2. Relationship Status among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Brian H.; Kalb, Luther G.; Zablotsky, Benjamin; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite speculation about an 80% divorce rate among parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), very little empirical and no epidemiological research has addressed the issue of separation and divorce among this population. Data for this study was taken from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a population-based,…

  3. Big data for population-based cancer research: the integrated cancer information and surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Anne-Marie; Olshan, Andrew F; Green, Laura; Meyer, Adrian; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Basch, Ethan; Carpenter, William R

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Cancer Information and Surveillance System (ICISS) facilitates population-based cancer research by developing extensive information technology systems that can link and manage large data sets. Taking an interdisciplinary 'team science' approach, ICISS has developed data, systems, and methods that allow researchers to better leverage the power of big data to improve population health.

  4. Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

    2006-09-01

    The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),<1 h/week (2 h men, 0 h women) at work, 4 h/week (5 h men, 4 h women) during leisure time and 1 h/week (1 h men, 1.5 h women) while commuting to work. Factors associated with increased occupational cold exposure among men were: being employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

  5. Efficient population assignment and outlier detection in human populations using biallelic markers chosen by principal component-based rankings.

    PubMed

    Raaum, Ryan L; Wang, Alex B; Al-Meeri, Ali M; Mulligan, Connie J

    2010-06-01

    Whole-genome studies of genetic variation are now performed routinely and have accelerated the identification of disease-associated allelic variants, positive selection, recombination, and structural variation. However, these studies are sensitive to the presence of outlier data from individuals of different ancestry than the rest of the sample. Currently, the most common method of excluding outlier individuals is to collect a population sample and exclude outliers after genome-wide data have been collected. Here we show that a small collection of 20-27 polymorphic Alu insertions, selected using a principal component-based method with genetic ancestry estimates, may be used to easily assign Africans, East Asians, and Europeans to their population of origin. In addition, we show that samples from a geographically and genetically intermediate population (in our study, samples from India) can be identified within the original sample of Africans, East Asians, and Europeans. Finally, we show that outlier individuals from neighboring geographic regions (in our study, Yemen and sub-Saharan Africa) can be identified. These results will be of value in preselection of samples for more in-depth analysis as well as customized identification of maximally informative polymorphic markers for regional studies.

  6. [The Brazilguayans, Brazilian migrants in Paraguay].

    PubMed

    Pebayle, R

    1994-01-01

    "Since the 1950s, the population of Eastern regions of Paraguay has grown with the steady influx of Brazilian immigrants. Planters from Parana and Sao Paulo, mechanized wheat and soy farmers from the southern campos and cattle farmers from the Matto Grosso do Sul have joined mixed farmers, descendants of European settlers from the south of Brazil. Despite some local conflicts, the Brazilguayans...[in] Oriente [province] seem to be on the road to integration in Paraguay." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND SPA AND POR)

  7. Diffusion-based population statistics using tract probability maps.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Demian; Kanterakis, Efstathios; Gur, Ruben C; Deriche, Rachid; Verma, Ragini

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel technique for the tract-based statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data. In our technique, we represent each white matter (WM) tract as a tract probability map (TPM): a function mapping a point to its probability of belonging to the tract. We start by automatically clustering the tracts identified in the brain via tractography into TPMs using a novel Gaussian process framework. Then, each tract is modeled by the skeleton of its TPM, a medial representation with a tubular or sheet-like geometry. The appropriate geometry for each tract is implicitly inferred from the data instead of being selected a priori, as is done by current tract-specific approaches. The TPM representation makes it possible to average diffusion imaging based features along directions locally perpendicular to the skeleton of each WM tract, increasing the sensitivity and specificity of statistical analyses on the WM. Our framework therefore facilitates the automated analysis of WM tract bundles, and enables the quantification and visualization of tract-based statistical differences between groups. We have demonstrated the applicability of our framework by studying WM differences between 34 schizophrenia patients and 24 healthy controls.

  8. Prevalence and correlates of dizziness in community-dwelling older people: a cross sectional population based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is a common complaint among older adults and has been linked to a wide range of health conditions, psychological and social characteristics in this population. However a profile of dizziness is still uncertain which hampers clinical decision-making. We therefore sought to explore the relationship between dizziness and a comprehensive range of demographic data, diseases, health and geriatric conditions, and geriatric syndromes in a representative sample of community-dwelling older people. Methods This is a cross-sectional, population-based study derived from FIBRA (Network for the Study of Frailty in Brazilian Elderly Adults), with 391 elderly adults, both men and women, aged 65 years and older. Elderly participants living at home in an urban area were enrolled through a process of random cluster sampling of census regions. The outcome variable was the self-report of dizziness in the last year. Several feelings of dizziness were investigated including vertigo, spinning, light or heavy headedness, floating, fuzziness, giddiness and instability. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the adjusted odds ratios and build the probability model for dizziness. Results The complaint of dizziness was reported by 45% of elderly adults, from which 71.6% were women (p=0.004). The multivariate regression analysis revealed that dizziness is associated with depressive symptoms (OR = 2.08; 95% CI 1.29–3.35), perceived fatigue (OR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.21-3.10), recurring falls (OR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.11-3.62) and excessive drowsiness (OR = 1.91; 95% CI 1.11–3.29). The discrimination of the final model was AUC = 0.673 (95% CI 0.619-0.727) (p< 0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of dizziness in community-dwelling elderly adults is substantial. It is associated with other common geriatric conditions usually neglected in elderly adults, such as fatigue and drowsiness, supporting its possible multifactorial manifestation. Our findings

  9. United States Indigenous Populations and Dementia: Is There a Case for Culture-based Psychosocial Interventions?

    PubMed

    Browne, Colette V; Ka'opua, Lana Sue; Jervis, Lori L; Alboroto, Richard; Trockman, Meredith L

    2016-04-05

    Dementia is an issue of increasing importance in indigenous populations in the United States. We begin by discussing what is known about dementia prevalence and elder family caregiving in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian populations. We briefly highlight examples of culture-based programming developed to address a number of chronic diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect these communities. These programs have produced positive health outcomes in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian populations and may have implications for research and practice in the dementia context of culture-based interventions. Evidence-based and culture-based psychosocial programming in dementia care for indigenous populations in the United States designed by the communities they intend to serve may offer elders and families the best potential for care that is accessible, respectful, and utilized.

  10. Long Term Influences of Age–Education Transition on the Brazilian Labour Market

    PubMed Central

    DE LIMA AMARAL, ERNESTO FRIEDRICH; RIOS-NETO, EDUARDO LUIZ GONÇALVES; POTTER, JOSEPH E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the long term mean earnings of the male Brazilian population, taking into account the ageing process of the population and the increase in educational attainment. Using census data, household sample surveys, as well as population and education projections, estimates indicate that an ageing population and an increase in education will have a 2 percent impact on the annual growth of an average income in Brazil by 2050. The challenge for the future is to improve the proportion of the Brazilian population with completed college degrees. PMID:26146430

  11. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  12. Interim 2003-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The 2003-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, and using essentially the same underlying assumptions as for the previous 2002-based projections, show the population of the United Kingdom rising from 59.6 million in 2003, passing 60 million during 2005, to reach 65.7 million by 2031. Longer-term projections suggest the population will peak around 2050 at nearly 67 million and then very gradually start to fall. The population will become older with the median age expected to rise from 38.4 years in 2003 to 43.3 years by 2031. In 2003, there were around 700 thousand (six per cent) more children aged under 16, than people of state pensionable age. However, from 2007, the population of pensionable age is projected to exceed the number of children.

  13. Archaea in Natural and Impacted Brazilian Environments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, archaeal diversity surveys have received increasing attention. Brazil is a country known for its natural diversity and variety of biomes, which makes it an interesting sampling site for such studies. However, archaeal communities in natural and impacted Brazilian environments have only recently been investigated. In this review, based on a search on the PubMed database on the last week of April 2016, we present and discuss the results obtained in the 51 studies retrieved, focusing on archaeal communities in water, sediments, and soils of different Brazilian environments. We concluded that, in spite of its vast territory and biomes, the number of publications focusing on archaeal detection and/or characterization in Brazil is still incipient, indicating that these environments still represent a great potential to be explored. PMID:27829818

  14. QTL mapping for combining ability in different population-based NCII designs: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanzhi; Sun, Congwei; Chen, Yuan; Dai, Zhijun; Qu, Zhen; Zheng, Xingfei; Yu, Sibin; Mou, Tongmin; Xu, Chenwu; Hu, Zhongli

    2013-12-01

    The NCII design (North Carolina mating design II) has been widely applied in studies of combining ability and heterosis. The objective of our research was to estimate how different base populations, sample sizes, testcross numbers and heritability influence QTL analyses of combining ability and heterosis. A series of Monte Carlo simulation experiments with QTL mapping were then conducted for the base population performance, testcross population phenotypic values and the general combining ability (GCA), specific combining ability (SCA) and Hmp (midparental heterosis) datasets. The results indicated that: (i) increasing the number of testers did not necessarily enhance the QTL detection power for GCA, but it was significantly related to the QTL effect. (ii) The QTLs identified in the base population may be different from those from GCA dataset. Similar phenomena can be seen from QTL detected in SCA and Hmp datasets. (iii) The QTL detection power for GCA ranked in the order of DH(RIL) based > F2 based > BC based NCII design, when the heritability was low. The recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (or DHs) allows more recombination and offers higher mapping resolution than other populations. Further, their testcross progeny can be repeatedly generated and phenotyped. Thus, RIL based (or DH based) NCII design was highly recommend for combining ability QTL analysis. Our results expect to facilitate selecting elite parental lines with high combining ability and for geneticists to research the genetic basis of combining ability.

  15. Interim 2001-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This article describes new 2001-based national population projections which were carried out following the publication in September 2002 of the first results of the 2001 Census. These "interim" projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, take preliminary account of the results of the Census which showed that the base population used in previous projections was overestimated. The interim projections also incorporate a reduced assumption of net international migration to the United Kingdom, informed by the first results of the 2001 Census and taking account of more recent migration information. The population of the United Kingdom is now projected to increase from an estimated 58.8 million in 2001 to reach 63.2 million by 2026. The projected population at 2026 is about 1.8 million (2.8 per cent) lower than in the previous (2000-based) projections.

  16. Measures of frailty in population-based studies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although research productivity in the field of frailty has risen exponentially in recent years, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the measurement of this syndrome. This overview offers three services: first, we provide a comprehensive catalogue of current frailty measures; second, we evaluate their reliability and validity; third, we report on their popularity of use. Methods In order to identify relevant publications, we searched MEDLINE (from its inception in 1948 to May 2011); scrutinized the reference sections of the retrieved articles; and consulted our own files. An indicator of the frequency of use of each frailty instrument was based on the number of times it had been utilized by investigators other than the originators. Results Of the initially retrieved 2,166 papers, 27 original articles described separate frailty scales. The number (range: 1 to 38) and type of items (range of domains: physical functioning, disability, disease, sensory impairment, cognition, nutrition, mood, and social support) included in the frailty instruments varied widely. Reliability and validity had been examined in only 26% (7/27) of the instruments. The predictive validity of these scales for mortality varied: for instance, hazard ratios/odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for mortality risk for frail relative to non-frail people ranged from 1.21 (0.78; 1.87) to 6.03 (3.00; 12.08) for the Phenotype of Frailty and 1.57 (1.41; 1.74) to 10.53 (7.06; 15.70) for the Frailty Index. Among the 150 papers which we found to have used at least one of the 27 frailty instruments, 69% (n = 104) reported on the Phenotype of Frailty, 12% (n = 18) on the Frailty Index, and 19% (n = 28) on one of the remaining 25 instruments. Conclusions Although there are numerous frailty scales currently in use, reliability and validity have rarely been examined. The most evaluated and frequently used measure is the Phenotype of Frailty. PMID:23786540

  17. Assessing population structure and gene flow in Montana wolverines (Gulo gulo) using assignment-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Cegelski, C C; Waits, L P; Anderson, N J

    2003-11-01

    In North America, wolverines once occupied a continuous range from Alaska southward to New Mexico. In the lower 48 states, small remnant populations remain only in the northwestern United States. Among these remnant populations, the Montana population has the highest probability of long-term persistence given its size and proximity to healthy populations in Canada. In this study, we evaluate population genetic structure and gene flow among Montana wolverines using 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Bayesian and frequency-based assignment tests revealed significant population substructure and provide support for at least three subpopulations in Montana. FST values between subpopulations ranged from 0.08 to 0.10 and provide evidence for male-biased dispersal. The high degree of population substructure and low levels of gene flow contrast results from wolverine population genetic studies in less fragmented landscapes of Alaska and Canada. This study provides additional support for the hypothesis that large carnivore populations of Montana are becoming increasingly fragmented due to human development and disturbance.

  18. Defining Sickle Cell Disease Mortality Using a Population-Based Surveillance System, 2004 through 2008

    PubMed Central

    Paulukonis, Susan T.; Eckman, James R.; Snyder, Angela B.; Hagar, Ward; Feuchtbaum, Lisa B.; Zhou, Mei; Grant, Althea M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Population-based surveillance data from California and Georgia for years 2004 through 2008 were linked to state death record files to determine the all-cause death rate among 12,143 patients identified with sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods All-cause death rates, by age, among these SCD patients were compared with all-cause death rates among both African Americans and the total population in the two states. All-cause death rates were also compared with death rates for SCD derived from publicly available death records: the compressed mortality files and multiple cause of death files. Results Of 12,143 patients identified with SCD, 615 patients died. The all-cause mortality rate for the SCD population was lower than the all-cause mortality rate among African Americans and similar to the total population all-cause mortality rates from birth through age 4 years, but the rate was higher among those with SCD than both the African American and total population rates from ages 5 through 74 years. The count of deceased patients identified by using population-based surveillance data (n=615) was more than twice as high as the count identified in compressed mortality files using SCD as the underlying cause of death alone (n=297). Conclusion Accurate assessment of all-cause mortality and age at death requires long-term surveillance via population-based registries of patients with accurately diagnosed SCD. PMID:26957672

  19. The Brazilian mineral resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurlen, Hartmut; Cassedanne, Jacques Pierre

    1981-04-01

    The activity of the first generation of Brazilian geologists began in the early sixties. Systematic exploration work since then has evidenced some important new mineral reserves in Brazil. The most important examples are the 18 × 10 9 tons of high-grade iron ore (Carajás District), formed by supergene enrichment on iron formations older than 1800 m.y., the 2.5 × 10 9 tons of bauxite and similar reserves of kaolinite as residual enrichment in Cenozoic sediments in the Amazonas Basin (Oriximina, Capim); the potash and magnesium-rich evaporites near Aracajú(Sergipe); the large residual concentrations of phosphate, anatase, pyrochlore and rare earths related to Cretaceous alkaline complexes with carbonatites; and some garnierite and asbestos deposits related to ultramafic rocks in the states of Goiás and Piauí.

  20. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  1. Estimating population size in wastewater-based epidemiology. Valencia metropolitan area as a case study.

    PubMed

    Rico, María; Andrés-Costa, María Jesús; Picó, Yolanda

    2017-02-05

    Wastewater can provide a wealth of epidemiologic data on common drugs consumed and on health and nutritional problems based on the biomarkers excreted into community sewage systems. One of the biggest uncertainties of these studies is the estimation of the number of inhabitants served by the treatment plants. Twelve human urine biomarkers -5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), acesulfame, atenolol, caffeine, carbamazepine, codeine, cotinine, creatinine, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), naproxen, salicylic acid (SA) and hydroxycotinine (OHCOT)- were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to estimate population size. The results reveal that populations calculated from cotinine, 5-HIAA and caffeine are commonly in agreement with those calculated by the hydrochemical parameters. Creatinine is too unstable to be applicable. HCTZ, naproxen, codeine, OHCOT and carbamazepine, under or overestimate the population compared to the hydrochemical population estimates but showed constant results through the weekdays. The consumption of cannabis, cocaine, heroin and bufotenine in Valencia was estimated for a week using different population calculations.

  2. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Senegal based on microsatellite and cytogenetic data.

    PubMed

    Cohuet, A; Dia, I; Simard, F; Raymond, M; Fontenille, D

    2004-06-01

    The study of chromosomal inversions distribution within natural Anopheles funestus populations from West Africa revealed high levels of genetic structuring. In Burkina Faso, this was interpreted as evidence for incipient speciation, and two chromosomal forms were described, namely 'Folonzo' and 'Kiribina'. Assignation of field collected specimens to one chromosomal form depends upon application of an algorithm based on chromosomal inversions. We assessed relevance and applicability of this algorithm on An. funestus populations from Senegal, where both forms occur. Furthermore, we estimated the level of genetic differentiation between populations using microsatellite loci spread over the whole genome. Significant genetic differentiation was revealed between geographical populations of An. funestus, and the pattern observed suggested isolation by distance. Chromosomal heterogeneity was not detected by microsatellite markers. Thus, although incipient speciation could not be ruled out by our data, our results suggest that differential environmental selection pressure acting on inversions should be considered a major factor in shaping their distribution in wild An. funestus populations.

  3. 2002-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The 2002-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, show the population of the United Kingdom rising from 59.2 million in 2002 to nearly 65 million by 2031. Longer-term projections suggest the population will peak around 2050 at over 65 million and then gradually start to fall. The population will become gradually older with the median age expected to rise from 38.2 years in 2002 to 43.3 years by 2031. In 2002, there were around 850 thousand (8 per cent) more children aged under 16, than people of state pensionable age. However, from 2007, the population of pensionable age is projected to exceed the number of children.

  4. 1998-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C

    2000-01-01

    The 1998-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, show the population of the United Kingdom rising from 59.2 million in 1998 to over 63.5 million by 2021. Longer-term projections suggest the population will peak around 2036 and then gradually start to fall. The population will become gradually older with the median age expected to rise from 36.9 years in 1998 to nearly 42 years by 2021. In 1998, there were 1.4 million (13 per cent) more children aged under 16, than people of pensionable age. However, by 2008, the population of pensionable age is projected to exceed the number of children.

  5. 2000-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and its constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The 2000-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary at the request of the Registrars General, show the population of the United Kingdom rising from 59.8 million in 2000 to nearly 65 million by 2025. Longer-term projections suggest the population will peak at nearly 66 million around 2040 and then gradually start to fall. The population will become gradually older with the median age expected to rise from 37.4 years in 2000 to 42.4 years by 2025. In 2000, there were 1.3 million (12 per cent) more children aged under 16, than people of state pensionable age. However, by 2007, the population of state pensionable age is projected to exceed the number of children.

  6. Brazilian Eratosthenes Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhi, R.; Vilaça, J.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of Brazilian Eratosthenes Project is the development and application of teaching training actions according the ``docent autonomy" concept to basic Astronomy Education. Argentina coordinates the project in South America, but Brazil works in this project since 2010 with the theme ``Projeto Eratóstenes Brasil" in the homepage: http://sites.google.com/site/projetoerato. Two schools measure a sticks shadow and communicate their results. After, they calculate an average radius of Earth. The stick (gnomon) should stay in vertical position in the leveled ground. Since 2010, the project received hundreds of Brazilian schools with different experiments that were constructed with autonomy, because our site doesn't show some itinerary pre-ready to elaborate the experiments. To collect data for our research, we will use interviews via Skype with the teachers. These data are useful to researches about Science Education area and the Teaching Formation. Teaching professional practice could change and we see modifications in the teachers work, what depends of their realities and context. This project intents to respect the docent autonomy. This autonomy to responsible modifications during continued formation is called ``activist formative model" according Langhi & Nardi (Educação em Astronomia: repensando a formação de professores. São Paulo: Escrituras Editora, 2012). This project discusses about researches in Astronomy Education - still extreme rare in Brazil, when we compare with other areas in Science Education. We believe that actions like this could motivate the students to learn more Astronomy. Furthermore, this national action can be a rich source of data to investigations about teaching formation and scientific divulgation.

  7. Including trait-based early warning signals helps predict population collapse.

    PubMed

    Clements, Christopher F; Ozgul, Arpat

    2016-03-24

    Foreseeing population collapse is an on-going target in ecology, and this has led to the development of early warning signals based on expected changes in leading indicators before a bifurcation. Such signals have been sought for in abundance time-series data on a population of interest, with varying degrees of success. Here we move beyond these established methods by including parallel time-series data of abundance and fitness-related trait dynamics. Using data from a microcosm experiment, we show that including information on the dynamics of phenotypic traits such as body size into composite early warning indices can produce more accurate inferences of whether a population is approaching a critical transition than using abundance time-series alone. By including fitness-related trait information alongside traditional abundance-based early warning signals in a single metric of risk, our generalizable approach provides a powerful new way to assess what populations may be on the verge of collapse.

  8. Genetic diversity of Iranian honey bee (Apis mellifera meda Skorikow, 1829) populations based on ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, A; Mirmoayedi, A; Kahrizi, D; Zarei, L; Jamali, S

    2016-04-30

    Honey bee is one of the most important insects considering its role in agriculture,ecology and economy as a whole. In this study, the genetic diversity of different Iranian honey bee populations was evaluated using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. During May to September 2014, 108 young worker honey bees were collected from six different populations in 30 different geoclimatic locations from Golestan, Mazendaran, Guilan, West Azerbaijan, East Azerbaijan, Ardebil provinces of Iran. DNA was extracted from the worker honey bees. The quality and quantity of extracted DNA were measured. A set of ten primers were screened with the laboratory populations of honey bees. The number of fragments produced in the different honey bee populations varied from 3 to 10, varying within 150 to 1500 bp. The used ten ISSR primers generated 40 polymorphic fragments, and the average heterozygosity for each primer was 0.266. Maximum numbers of bands were recorded for primer A1. A dendrogram based on the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic mean (UPGMA) method generated two sub-clusters. Honey bee populations of Golestan, Mazendaran, Guilan provinces were located in the first group. The second group included honey bee populations of Ardebil, West Azerbaijan, East Azerbaijan provinces, but this group showed a close relationship with other populations. The results showed obviously the ability of the ISSR marker technique to detect the genetic diversity among the honey bee populations.

  9. A venue-based method for sampling hard-to-reach populations.

    PubMed Central

    Muhib, F. B.; Lin, L. S.; Stueve, A.; Miller, R. L.; Ford, W. L.; Johnson, W. D.; Smith, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Constructing scientifically sound samples of hard-to-reach populations, also known as hidden populations, is a challenge for many research projects. Traditional sample survey methods, such as random sampling from telephone or mailing lists, can yield low numbers of eligible respondents while non-probability sampling introduces unknown biases. The authors describe a venue-based application of time-space sampling (TSS) that addresses the challenges of accessing hard-to-reach populations. The method entails identifying days and times when the target population gathers at specific venues, constructing a sampling frame of venue, day-time units (VDTs), randomly selecting and visiting VDTs (the primary sampling units), and systematically intercepting and collecting information from consenting members of the target population. This allows researchers to construct a sample with known properties, make statistical inference to the larger population of venue visitors, and theorize about the introduction of biases that may limit generalization of results to the target population. The authors describe their use of TSS in the ongoing Community Intervention Trial for Youth (CITY) project to generate a systematic sample of young men who have sex with men. The project is an ongoing community level HIV prevention intervention trial funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The TSS method is reproducible and can be adapted to hard-to-reach populations in other situations, environments, and cultures. PMID:11889287

  10. Genetic relationships among twelve Chinese indigenous goat populations based on microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Hong; Bian, Ci; Wang, Hai-Sheng; Wei, Hong; Liu, Bang; Yu, Mei; Fan, Bin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Zhu, Meng-Jin; Li, Shi-Jun; Xiong, Tong-An; Li, Kui

    2002-01-01

    Twelve Chinese indigenous goat populations were genotyped for twenty-six microsatellite markers recommended by the EU Sheep and Goat Biodiversity Project. A total of 452 goats were tested. Seventeen of the 26 microsatellite markers used in this analysis had four or more alleles. The mean expected heterozygosity and the mean observed heterozygosity for the population varied from 0.611 to 0.784 and 0.602 to 0.783 respectively. The mean FST (0.105) demonstrated that about 89.5% of the total genetic variation was due to the genetic differentiation within each population. A phylogenetic tree based on the Nei (1978) standard genetic distance displayed a remarkable degree of consistency with their different geographical origins and their presumed migration throughout China. The correspondence analysis did not only distinguish population groups, but also confirmed the above results, classifying the important populations contributing to diversity. Additionally, some specific alleles were shown to be important in the construction of the population structure. The study analyzed the recent origins of these populations and contributed to the knowledge and genetic characterization of Chinese indigenous goat populations. In addition, the seventeen microsatellites recommended by the EU Sheep and Goat Biodiversity Project proved to be useful for the biodiversity studies in goat breeds. PMID:12473236

  11. Research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yunsheng, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Population genomics, a new paradigm for population genetics, combine the concepts and techniques of genomics with the theoretical system of population genetics and improve our understanding of microevolution through identification of site-specific effect and genome-wide effects using genome-wide polymorphic sites genotypeing. With the appearance and improvement of the next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, the numbers of plant species with complete genome sequences increased rapidly and large scale resequencing has also been carried out in recent years. Parallel sequencing has also been done in some plant species without complete genome sequences. These studies have greatly promoted the development of population genomics and deepened our understanding of the genetic diversity, level of linking disequilibium, selection effect, demographical history and molecular mechanism of complex traits of relevant plant population at a genomic level. In this review, I briely introduced the concept and research methods of population genomics and summarized the research progress of plant population genomics based on high-throughput sequencing. I also discussed the prospect as well as existing problems of plant population genomics in order to provide references for related studies.

  12. Population-based medical and disease management: an evaluation of cost and quality.

    PubMed

    Wise, Christopher G; Bahl, Vinita; Mitchell, Rita; West, Brady T; Carli, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    Reports by the Institute of Medicine and the Health Care Financing Administration have emphasized that the integration of medical care delivery, evidence-based medicine, and chronic care disease management may play a significant role in improving the quality of care and reducing medical care costs. The specific aim of this project is to assess the impact of an integrated set of care coordination tools and chronic disease management interventions on utilization, cost, and quality of care for a population of beneficiaries who have complementary health coverage through a plan designed to apply proactive medical and disease management processes. The utilization of health care services by the study population was compared to another population from the same geographic service area and covered by a traditional fee-for-service indemnity insurance plan that provided few medical or disease management services. Evaluation of the difference in utilization was based on the difference in the cost per-member-per-month (PMPM) in a 1-year measurement period, after adjusting for differences in fee schedules, case-mix and healthcare benefit design. After adjustments for both case-mix and benefit differences, the study group is $63 PMPM less costly than the comparison population for all members. Cost differences are largest in the 55-64 and 65 and above age groups. The study group is $115 PMPM lower than the comparison population for the age category of 65 years and older, after adjustments for case-mix and benefits. Health Plan Employer and Data Information Set (HEDIS)-based quality outcomes are near the 90th percentile for most indications. The cost outcomes of a population served by proactive, population-based disease management and complex care management, compared to an unmanaged population, demonstrates the potential of coordinated medical and disease management programs. Further studies utilizing appropriate methodologies would be beneficial.

  13. Disease management to population-based health: steps in the right direction?

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2003-05-16

    This issue brief reviews the evolution of the disease management model and the ways it relates to care coordination and case management approaches. It also looks at examples of population-based disease management programs operating in both the private and public sectors and reviews the evidence of their success. Finally, the paper considers the policy implications of adapting this model to a Medicare fee-for-service population.

  14. Alternative Model-Based and Design-Based Frameworks for Inference from Samples to Populations: From Polarization to Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterba, Sonya K.

    2009-01-01

    A model-based framework, due originally to R. A. Fisher, and a design-based framework, due originally to J. Neyman, offer alternative mechanisms for inference from samples to populations. We show how these frameworks can utilize different types of samples (nonrandom or random vs. only random) and allow different kinds of inference (descriptive vs.…

  15. Prevalence of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS): A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Varun; Alikhan, Ali; Vazquez, Benjamin G.; Weaver, Amy L.; Davis, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a follicular occlusion disorder occurring in apocrine-rich regions of the skin. Estimates of the prevalence of this disorder have not been population-based. We sought to provide population-based information on the prevalence of HS in Olmsted County, Minnesota as of 1/1/2009. METHODS Rochester Epidemiology Project, a unique infrastructure that combines and makes accessible all medical records in Olmsted County since the 1960s, was used to collect population-based data on the prevalence of HS. RESULTS We identified 178 confirmed cases of HS that included 135 females and 43 males, and estimated the total sex- and age-adjusted prevalence in Olmsted County to be 127.8 per 100,000 or 0.13%. The total prevalence was significantly higher among women than men. CONCLUSION This study represents the first population-based investigation on the prevalence of HS. In this population-based cohort, HS was less prevalent than previous reports have suggested. PMID:25228133

  16. Advancing Community–Based Research with Urban American Indian Populations: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, William E.; Wendt, Dennis C.; Saftner, Melissa A.; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. has witnessed significant growth among urban AI populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations. PMID:24659391

  17. Advancing community-based research with urban American Indian populations: multidisciplinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, William E; Wendt, Dennis C; Saftner, Melissa A; Marcus, John; Momper, Sandra L

    2014-09-01

    The US has witnessed significant growth among urban American Indian (AI) populations in recent decades, and concerns have been raised that these populations face equal or greater degrees of disadvantage than their reservation counterparts. Surprisingly little urban AI research or community work has been documented in the literature, and even less has been written about the influences of urban settings on community-based work with these populations. Given the deep commitments of community psychology to empowering disadvantaged groups and understanding the impact of contextual factors on the lives of individuals and groups, community psychologists are well suited to fill these gaps in the literature. Toward informing such efforts, this work offers multidisciplinary insights from distinct idiographic accounts of community-based behavioral health research with urban AI populations. Accounts are offered by three researchers and one urban AI community organization staff member, and particular attention is given to issues of community heterogeneity, geography, membership, and collaboration. Each first-person account provides “lessons learned” from the urban context in which the research occurred. Together, these accounts suggest several important areas of consideration in research with urban AIs, some of which also seem relevant to reservation-based work. Finally, the potential role of research as a tool of empowerment for urban AI populations is emphasized, suggesting future research attend to the intersections of identity, sense of community, and empowerment in urban AI populations.

  18. Child, Family, School and Community Risk Factors for Poor Mental Health in Brazilian Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Anna; Fleitlich-Bilyk, Bacy; Patel, Vikram; Goodman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To identify risk factors for poor child mental health in the southeastern Brazilian municipality of Taubate. Method: In 2001 we carried out a representative school-based survey of Brazilian schoolchildren ages 7 to 14 years (response rate, 83%). We collected extensive data on child mental health and on potential risk and protective…

  19. The Brazilian Experience with Agroecological Extension: A Critical Analysis of Reform in a Pluralistic Extension System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diesel, Vivien; Miná Dias, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the Brazilian experience in designing and implementing a recent extension policy reform based on agroecology, and reflect on its wider theoretical implications for extension reform literature. Design/methodology/approach: Using a critical public analysis we characterize the evolution of Brazilian federal extension policy…

  20. Scales of Political Action and Social Movements in Education: The Case of the Brazilian Black Movement and Law 10.639

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Renato Emerson Nascimento; Soeterik, Inti Maya

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines social coordination by the Brazilian Black Movement in the area of Brazilian education. It explains how these developments relate to the construction of race-based public education policies in the country. Focus goes to the process of creation and implementation of law 10.639 in Brazilian Basic education. Using the concept…

  1. Probability and amounts of yogurt intake are differently affected by sociodemographic, economic, and lifestyle factors in adults and the elderly-results from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Possa, Gabriela; de Castro, Michelle Alessandra; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Fisberg, Mauro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this population-based cross-sectional health survey (N = 532) was to investigate the factors associated with the probability and amounts of yogurt intake in Brazilian adults and the elderly. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data on demographics, socioeconomic information, presence of morbidities and lifestyle and anthropometric characteristics. Food intake was evaluated using two nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls and a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Approximately 60% of the subjects were classified as yogurt consumers. In the logistic regression model, yogurt intake was associated with smoking (odds ratio [OR], 1.98), female sex (OR, 2.12), and age 20 to 39 years (OR, 3.11). Per capita family income and being a nonsmoker were factors positively associated with the amount of yogurt consumption (coefficients, 0.61 and 3.73, respectively), whereas the level of education of the head of household was inversely associated (coefficient, 0.61). In this study, probability and amounts of yogurt intake are differently affected by demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors in adults and the elderly.

  2. A Population-Based Study of the Association between Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Cognitive Impairment in Old Age (The Bambuí Study)

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda; Castro-Costa, Erico; Uchôa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Joselia; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Ferri, Cleusa P.; Prince, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background Limited clinical data suggest that chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection, which causes Chagas’ disease (ChD), is associated with cognitive impairment. This study investigated this association in a large population-based sample of older adults. Methods Participants in this cross-sectional study comprised 1,449 persons aged ≥60 years from a Brazilian endemic area (Bambuí). Cognitive functioning was ascertained by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), considering its score in percentiles [≤14 (<5th percentile), 15–22 (5th to <25th) and ≥23]. Hypothesized risk factors were T. cruzi infection, ChD-related electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and use of digoxin medication. Potential confounders included depressive symptoms, smoking, stroke, hemoglobin, HDL cholesterol, blood glucose, systolic blood pressure, and use of psychoactive medication. Results The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 37.6%. There was a graded and independent association between infection and the MMSE score (adjusted odds ratios estimated by ordinal logistic regression = 1.99; 95% CI 1.43–2.76). No significant associations between the MMSE score and ECG abnormalities or digoxin medication use were found. Conclusions This study provides for the first time epidemiological evidence of an association between T. cruzi infection and cognitive impairment which was not mediated by either ChD-related ECG abnormalities or digoxin medication use. PMID:19088484

  3. Evaluation of the impact of serogroup C meningococcal disease vaccination program in Brazil and its regions: a population-based study, 2001-2013

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Camile; de Moraes, José Cássio; da Silva, Gabriela Drummond Marques; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meningococcal C conjugate (MenC) vaccine was introduced as part of the Brazilian National Immunisation Program in 2010 for children < 1 year of age. OBJECTIVES The study objective was to evaluate the impact of this vaccination strategy. METHODS An observational, mixed ecological and analytical study was conducted, based on time series panel data from surveillance records (2001-2013). FINDINGS A total of 37,538 of meningococcal disease cases were recorded during the study period. Of these, 19,997 were attributed to serogroup C. A decrease in meningococcal disease serogroup C (MDC) incidence among children aged < 1 year [65.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 20.5-84.7%] and 1-4 years (46.9%; 95%CI: 14.6-79.1%) were found in the three years following vaccination introduction. Vaccination impact on the reduction of MDC incidence varied from 83.7% (95%CI: 51.1-100.0%) in the Midwest region to 56.7% (95%CI: 37.4-76.0%) in the Northeast region. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Vaccination against MDC in Brazil had a positive impact on the population of children aged < 1 year, across all regions, and on the 1-4 year-old cohort. Nevertheless, in our view there is scope for improving the vaccination strategy adopted in Brazil. PMID:28327788

  4. Population-based HIV prevalence and associated factors in male-to-female transsexuals from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Angelo Brandelli; Fontanari, Anna Martha Vaitses; Jacinto, Michelle Moraes; da Silva, Dhiordan Cardoso; Lorencetti, Emilaine Karine; da Rosa Filho, Heitor Tomé; Mueller, Andressa; de Garcia, Claudia Garcia; Nardi, Henrique Caetano; Koller, Silvia Helena; Lobato, Maria Inês Rodrigues

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed HIV prevalence and associated factors in 284 male-to-female transsexuals from southern Brazil. Seroprevalence was 25 %. Seroprevalence was higher and associated with older age, residence in the metropolitan area, history of diagnosis of other STDs, and reported history of sex work. The year of diagnosis showed no significant relationship with the prevalence of HIV nor the fact of being in a stable relationship, a history of drug use, years of education, and race/ethnicity. The odds of HIV infection compared with the general Brazilian population was 55.55 (95 % CI 38.39-80.39). Changes in the views of the vulnerable groups to HIV/AIDS in Brazil and efforts in the construction of strategies of prevention and in the guarantee of human rights are required.

  5. Use of the Brazilian People’s Pharmacy Program by older adults

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Vanessa Iribarrem Avena; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Meucci, Rodrigo Dalke; Lutz, Bárbara Heather

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and factors associated with the use of the expanded Brazilian People’s Pharmacy Program among older adults and the reasons for not using it. METHODS In this population-based cross-sectional study conducted in the urban area of Pelotas, RS, Southern Brazil, we evaluated 1,305 older adults (aged 60 years or over) who had used medication in the last 15 days. Independent variables were socioeconomic factors, economic status, household income in minimum wages, educational attainment in years of schooling and occupational status. Demographic variables were sex, age, marital status, and self-reported skin color/race. Poisson regression was employed to analyze the factors associated with the use of the program. RESULTS The prevalence of use was 57.0% whilst the prevalence of knowledge of the program was 87.0%. In individuals aged 80 years or over, use of the program was 41.0%. As to the origin of the prescriptions used by older adults, 46.0% were from the Brazilian Unified Health System. The main reasons for not using the program were: difficulty in getting prescriptions, medication shortage, and ignorance about the medications offered and about the program. Higher age, lower income, presence of chronic diseases, and use of four or more medications were associated with use of the program. CONCLUSIONS It is necessary to expand the knowledge and use of the Brazilian People’s Pharmacy Program, especially among older adults, and to improve the dissemination of its list of medications to users and physicians. Thus it will be possible to reduce spending on long-term medications, which are especially important for this population. PMID:27143613

  6. Net Carbon Balance for the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    The general purpose of this research was to use recent satellite-based estimates of deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia to calculate the net flux of carbon associated with deforestation and subsequent regrowth of secondary forests. We have made such a calculation, in the process comparing two estimates of deforestation and two estimates of biomass for the region. Both estimates were based on the RADAMBRASIL survey. They differed in the equations used to convert wood-volumes to total biomass. The net flux of carbon from changes in land use seems to vary from year to year, perhaps by as much as a factor of 4.

  7. Genetic diversity of Vriesea cacuminis (Bromeliaceae): an endangered and endemic Brazilian species.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, P C C; Pinheiro, L C; Domingues, R; Forzza, R C; Machado, M A; Viccini, L F

    2013-06-13

    Data about the genetic structure can help to understand the evolutionary process of natural populations as well as to drive strategies of conservation. Vriesea cacuminis, an endemic Brazilian Bromeliad, has been found in 2 areas of Minas Gerais State. One is a legal preservation unit (Ibitipoca State Park) and the other an unprotected area (Serra Negra). The 2 areas belong to the Mantiqueira Mountain Range Complex; both are characterized by steep relief with high altitudes and by heterogenic vegetation formed by a mosaic of rocky fields and forest fragments. According to International Union for Conservation of Nature criteria, V. cacuminis is designated as "vulnerable". We examined the genetic variability and population structure of 70 individuals (3 populations) of V. cacuminis, using 16 ISSR markers. Although V. cacuminis is considered a rare species, the estimated genetic diversity was found to be relatively high (Shannon index = 0.33; percentage of polymorphic bands = 87%). The populations were found not to be structured (AMOVA test, ΦST = 0.16), probably due to the cross-breeding. Based on Bayesian analysis, this species includes one cluster containing the populations from Ibitipoca State Park and another cluster including the population from Serra Negra. This information will help determine strategies to maintain the genetic variability of these populations.

  8. Population-based preconception carrier screening: how potential users from the general population view a test for 50 serious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Birnie, Erwin; Abbott, Kristin M; Sinke, Richard J; Lucassen, Anneke M; Schuurmans, Juliette; Kaplan, Seyma; Verkerk, Marian A; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    With the increased international focus on personalized health care and preventive medicine, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has substantially expanded the options for carrier screening of serious, recessively inherited diseases. NGS screening tests not only offer reproductive options not previously available to couples, but they may also ultimately reduce the number of children born with devastating disorders. To date, preconception carrier screening (PCS) has largely targeted single diseases such as cystic fibrosis, but NGS allows the testing of many genes or diseases simultaneously. We have developed an expanded NGS PCS test for couples; simultaneously it covers 50 very serious, early-onset, autosomal recessive diseases that are untreatable. This is the first, noncommercial, population-based, expanded PCS test to be offered prospectively to couples in a health-care setting in Europe. So far, little is known about how potential users view such a PCS test. We therefore performed an online survey in 2014 among 500 people from the target population in the Netherlands. We enquired about their intention to take an expanded PCS test if one was offered, and through which provider they would like to see it offered. One-third of the respondents said they would take such a test were it to be offered. The majority (44%) preferred the test to be offered via their general practitioner (GP) and 58% would be willing to pay for the test, with a median cost of €75. Our next step is to perform an implementation study in which this PCS test will be provided via selected GPs in the Northern Netherlands. PMID:27165008

  9. Increased risk of chronic osteomyelitis after hip replacement: a retrospective population-based cohort study in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Hung, D-Z; Tien, N; Lin, C-L; Lee, Y-R; Wang, C C N; Chen, J-J; Lim, Y-P

    2017-04-01

    The correlation between hip replacement (Hip-Repl) and chronic osteomyelitis (COM) has not been studied in Asian populations. Thus, we assessed Hip-Repl-related risk of developing COM via a population-based, nationwide, retrospective cohort study. The Hip-Repl cohort was obtained from Taiwan's Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, and included patients who underwent Hip-Repl between 2000 and 2010; the control cohort was also selected from this database. Patients with a history of COM were excluded in both cohorts. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) by age, sex, and comorbidities for developing COM. A total of 5349 patients who received a Hip-Repl and 10,372 matched controls were enrolled. In the Hip-Repl group, the risk for COM was 4.18-fold [95 % confidence interval (CI) = 2.24-7.80] higher than that in the control group after adjustment. For patients aged ≤65 years, the risk was 10.0-fold higher (95 % CI = 2.89-34.6). Furthermore, the risk was higher in the Hip-Repl cohort than in the non-Hip-Repl cohort, for both patients without comorbidity (aHR = 16.5, 95 % CI = 2.07-132.3) and those with comorbidity (aHR = 3.49, 95 % CI = 1.78-6.83). The impact of Hip-Repl on the risk for COM was greater among patients not using immunosuppressive drugs, and occurred during the first postoperative year. Patients who received Hip-Repl have an increased risk of developing COM. This risk was higher among males and patients aged 65 years or younger, and during the first postoperative year.

  10. Individual-Based Model Framework to Assess Population Consequences of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Exposure in Bottlenose Dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ailsa J.; McConnell, Bernie J.; Rowles, Teri K.; Aguilar, Alex; Borrell, Asuncion; Schwacke, Lori; Reijnders, Peter J.H.; Wells, Randall S.

    2006-01-01

    Marine mammals are susceptible to the effects of anthropogenic contaminants. Here we examine the effect of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) accumulation scenarios on potential population growth rates using, as an example, data obtained for the population of bottlenose dolphins from Sarasota Bay, Florida. To achieve this goal, we developed an individual-based model framework that simulates the accumulation of PCBs in the population and modifies first-year calf survival based on maternal blubber PCB levels. In our example the current estimated annual PCB accumulation rate for the Sarasota Bay dolphin population might be depressing the potential population growth rate. However, our predictions are limited both by model naivety and parameter uncertainty. We emphasize the need for more data collection on the relationship between maternal blubber PCB levels and calf survivorship, the annual accumulation of PCBs in the blubber of females, and the transfer of PCBs to the calf through the placenta and during lactation. Such data require continued efforts directed toward long-term studies of known individuals in wild and semi-wild populations. PMID:16818247

  11. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Palmero, Edenir Inez; Pinheiro, Manuela; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia de Oliveira; Machado, Taisa Manuela Bonfim; Sandes, Kiyoko Abe; Toralles, Betânia; Garicochea, Bernardo; Izetti, Patricia; Pereira, Maria Luiza Saraiva; Bock, Hugo; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo Martins; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4%) individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del) and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil.

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Cossio, Silvia Liliana; Palmero, Edenir Inez; Pinheiro, Manuela; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia de Oliveira; Machado, Taisa Manuela Bonfim; Sandes, Kiyoko Abe; Toralles, Betânia; Garicochea, Bernardo; Izetti, Patricia; Pereira, Maria Luiza Saraiva; Bock, Hugo; Vargas, Fernando Regla; Moreira, Miguel Ângelo Martins; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4%) individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del) and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil. PMID:27303907

  13. A Brazilian Portuguese cross-cultural adaptation of the modified JOA scale for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pratali, Raphael R.; Smith, Justin S.; Motta, Rodrigo L.N.; Martins, Samuel M.; Motta, Marcel M.; Rocha, Ricardo D.; Herrero, Carlos Fernando P.S.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a version of the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. METHODS: The well-established process of forward-backward translation was employed along with cross-cultural adaptation. RESULTS: Three bilingual translators (English and native Portuguese) performed the forward translation of the mJOA scale from English to Portuguese based on iterative discussions used to reach a consensus translation. The translated version of the mJOA scale was then back-translated into English by a native English-speaking translator unaware of the concepts involved with the mJOA scale. The original mJOA scale and the back-translated version were compared by a native North American neurosurgeon, and as they were considered equivalent, the final version of the mJOA scale that had been translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted was defined. CONCLUSION: To facilitate global and cross-cultural comparisons of the severity of cervical myelopathy, this study presents a version of the mJOA scale that was translated into Portuguese and cross-culturally adapted for the Brazilian population. PMID:28273233

  14. Suicide by people in a community justice pathway: population-based nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    King, Carlene; Senior, Jane; Webb, Roger T.; Millar, Tim; Piper, Mary; Pearsall, Alison; Humber, Naomi; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The elevated risk of suicide in prison and after release is a well-recognised and serious problem. Despite this, evidence concerning community-based offenders' suicide risk is sparse. We conducted a population-based nested case–control study of all people in a community justice pathway in England and Wales. Our data show 13% of general population suicides were in community justice pathways before death. Suicide risks were highest among individuals receiving police cautions, and those having recent, or impending prosecution for sexual offences. Findings have implications for the training and practice of clinicians identifying and assessing suicidality, and offering support to those at elevated risk. PMID:26159602

  15. [Spatial structure analysis and distribution simulation of Therioaphis trifolii population based on geostatistics and GIS].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Leng, Yun-fa; Zhu, Meng-meng; Wang, Fang

    2007-11-01

    Based on geographic information system and geostatistics, the spatial structure of Therioaphis trifolii population of different periods in Yuanzhou district of Guyuan City, the southern Ningxia Province, was analyzed. The spatial distribution of Therioaphis trifolii population was also simulated by ordinary Kriging interpretation. The results showed that Therioaphis trifolii population of different periods was correlated spatially in the study area. The semivariograms of Therioaphis trifolii could be described by exponential model, indicating an aggregated spatial arrangement. The spatial variance varied from 34.13%-48.77%, and the range varied from 8.751-12.049 km. The degree and direction of aggregation showed that the trend was increased gradually from southwest to northeast. The dynamic change of Therioaphis trifolii population in different periods could be analyzed intuitively on the simulated maps of the spatial distribution from the two aspects of time and space, The occurrence position and degree of Therioaphis trifolii to a state of certain time could be determined easily.

  16. 1996-based national population projections for the United Kingdom and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C

    1998-01-01

    The 1996-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, show the population of the United Kingdom rising from 58.8 million in 1996 to over 62 million by 2021. The population will become gradually older with the mean age expected to rise from 38.4 years in 1996 to nearly 42 years by 2021. The number of children aged under 16 is projected to fall by 1.0 million (9 per cent) by 2021, while the number aged 65 and over is projected to increase by 2.7 million (29 per cent). Longer-term projections suggest the population will peak around 2031 and then gradually start to fall.

  17. 2004-based national population projections for the UK and constituent countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The 2004-based national population projections, carried out by the Government Actuary in consultation with the Registrars General, show the population of the United Kingdom (UK) rising from 59.8 million in 2004, passing 60 million in 2005 and 65 million in 2023, to reach 67.0 million by 2031. In the longer-term, the projections suggest that the population will continue rising beyond 2031 but at a much lower rate of growth. The population will become older with the median age expected to rise from 38.6 years in 2004 to 42.9 years by 2031. With the current plans for a common state pension age of 65 for both sexes from 2020, the number of people of working age for every person of state pensionable age is projected to fall from 3.33 in 2004 to 2.62 by 2031.

  18. 2 nd Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Luquetti, Alejandro; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Coura, José Rodrigues; Torres, Rosália Morais; Melo, José Renan da Cunha; Almeida, Eros Antonio de; Oliveira, Wilson de; Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Rezende, Joffre Marcondes de; Pinto, Fabiane Scalabrini; Ferreira, Antonio Walter; Rassi, Anis; Fragata, Abílio Augusto; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Correia, Dalmo; Jansen, Ana Maria; Andrade, Glaucia Manzan Queiroz; Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli de Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Rassi, Anis; Campos, Dayse Elisabeth; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Santos, Silvana Eloi; Chiari, Egler; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Moreira, Eliane Furtado; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Silva, Eliane Lages; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Carvalho, Noêmia Barbosa; Cardoso, Alessandra Viana; Silva, Rafaella Albuquerque E; Costa, Veruska Maia da; Vivaldini, Simone Monzani; Oliveira, Suelene Mamede; Valente, Vera da Costa; Lima, Mayara Maia; Alves, Renato Vieira

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected chronic condition with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. It has considerable psychological, social, and economic impacts. The disease represents a significant public health issue in Brazil, with different regional patterns. This document presents the evidence that resulted in the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease. The objective was to review and standardize strategies for diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of Chagas disease in the country, based on the available scientific evidence. The consensus is based on the articulation and strategic contribution of renowned Brazilian experts with knowledge and experience on various aspects of the disease. It is the result of a close collaboration between the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health. It is hoped that this document will strengthen the development of integrated actions against Chagas disease in the country, focusing on epidemiology, management, comprehensive care (including families and communities), communication, information, education, and research .

  19. The Brazilian scientific balloon program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Joao

    The Brazilian scientific balloon program is based almost entirely at the National Institute for Space Research -INPE, which has a facility for research and development of scientific balloon systems such as telemetry, command, power supply, separation and flight train devices, ballast control systems, ATC transponders, shock absorbers and especially different launching tech-niques. The Balloon Launching Center of INPE operates since the early 70s, when the first launches were performed in cooperation with French groups for astronomical gamma-ray obser-vations. Since then, the center was involved in a large numbers of international collaborations with France, Japan, United Kingdom, USA, Italy, Germany and Tasmania. INPEs high-energy astrophysics group developed several X and Gamma-ray experiments that were launched in balloons since the early 80s. The most complex of these payloads is the MASCO experiment, launched in 2004. It consists in a 2-ton experiment with a large gamma-ray imaging coded-mask telescope and an attitude control system developed at INPE. Currently, the high-energy group is developing a prototype balloon experiment for the MIRAX satellite, named protoMIRAX. Others scientists at INPE have also used balloons for cosmic rays, geophysics and atmospheric electricity experiments.

  20. Group dialogue empowers Brazilian women.

    PubMed

    Badiani, R; Becker, J

    1995-11-01

    In response to an alarming rise in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Brazilian women during the early 1990s, the Sociedade Civil Bem-Estar Familiar no Brazil (BEMFAM) developed a project that integrates HIV prevention with clinical services, community-based prevention activities, and sexually transmitted disease diagnosis and treatment. Preliminary interviews with clinic clients revealed that women's fears they would be considered unfaithful were impeding their ability to suggest condom use to their sexual partners. Condom use within a relationship was considered appropriate only for pregnancy prevention. To facilitate dialogue about sexual health, BEMFAM developed a women's group intervention project. All women who attend a BEMFAM clinic are invited to participate in a one-hour group discussion before receiving medical services. Novela-style booklets with stories and characters women can relate to their own lives are used to stimulate discussion. Participants learn to use condoms correctly by putting them on a penis model and anticipate situations in which they would be able to negotiate condom use. The group setting enables women to gain confidence and practice assertiveness in a non-threatening, supportive environment. Their identification with other women's stories empowers women to take control of their health and sexual lives. Between October 1994 and July 1995, 3464 women participated in group discussions organized by BEMFAM and 40,688 condoms were distributed; 18% of these women returned to the clinic for additional condoms.

  1. Hallux amputation after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Oliveira, Sâmella Silva de; Sachett, Jacqueline de Almeida Gonçalves; Silva, Iran Mendonça da; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater stingray injuries are a common problem in the Brazilian Amazon, affecting mostly riverine and indigenous populations. These injuries cause severe local and regional pain, swelling and erythema, as well as complications, such as local necrosis and bacterial infection. Herein, we report a case of bacterial infection and hallux necrosis, after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon, which eventually required amputation. Different antimicrobial regimens were administered at different stages of the disease; however, avoiding amputation through effective treatment was not achieved.

  2. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  3. Global research neglect of population-based approaches to smoking cessation: time for a more rigorous science of population health interventions.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David; Mitrou, Francis; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2011-09-01

    It has been argued that the preponderance of studies into individual smoking cessation therapies seems grossly out of proportion to the number of people who use these therapies to quit smoking, and that this imbalance is due to factors such as the role of the pharmaceutical industry in funding research and a general bias towards individual- rather than population-based approaches to medical and health problems. We believe that there are other significant factors that affect the balance of research in smoking cessation, such as the higher standards of evidence required to justify the implementation of individual medical therapies compared with population-based interventions. We argue that research practitioners in the area of population tobacco control are well placed to address this imbalance by setting more rigorous standards of evidence for population health interventions. This could be achieved by setting aside a small proportion of funds from population health and advocacy activities to invest in studying their effectiveness. We believe that this would potentially return information of sufficient value to justify increasing overall population investment beyond the cost of the additional research component. Additional benefits would be gained from increased research in this area, such as better understanding of how to translate tobacco control initiatives to developing countries with high smoking rates, and how to target disadvantaged and marginalized populations more effectively in developed countries that continue to have high rates of smoking and low rates of smoking cessation, despite the existence of broad population-based strategies.

  4. A4-1: Evaluation of the Utilization-Based Population Denominators in the HMORN Context

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Irina; Hitz, Paul; Bredfeldt, Christine; Butani, Amy; Pardee, Roy; Johnson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Defining a population denominator is a major challenge in practice-based research. Because health plan membership is unknown, population denominators must be determined by alternate methods, e.g., healthcare utilization. Such an approach may introduce bias since the resulting population may only represent a small portion of individuals who are affiliated with a healthcare organization. Moreover, healthcare utilization is often confounded by demographic and socio-economic factors, potentially compounding bias in the population estimates. Methods The majority of HMORN member organizations have health plans, whose enrollment information is captured in the Virtual Data Warehouse (VDW) Enrollment file. The health plan enrollment provides a well-defined population denominator. In order to participate in multi-site research, HMORN member organizations without health plans, such as Essentia Health (EH), need to determine an enrollment proxy. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a utilization-based enrollment proxy algorithm. Four HMORN sites with Epic electronic medical records (three sites with and one site without standard VDW enrollment files) participated in the study. The utilization-based algorithm was applied in two steps: 1) creating the base table from Clarity (Epic) database; and 2) creating the utilization-based enrollment proxy using predetermined selection rules. Results EH implementation of the enrollment proxy for years 2002–2012 contained 390,000 “enrollment” periods for 378,000 unique patients. The EH algorithm was applied to the data from the three sites with health plans; the resulting enrollment proxy files were compared to the standard enrollment files. Patient demographic data (age, sex) and place of residence categorized by rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) codes (urban, large rural, small/isolated rural), as well as race and socio-economic measures (Census file), were used to characterize the deviations between two

  5. Population-based public health interventions: innovations in practice, teaching, and management. Part II.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda Olson; Strohschein, Susan; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Lia-Hoagberg, Betty

    2004-01-01

    The Intervention Wheel is a population-based practice model that encompasses three levels of practice (community, systems, and individual/family) and 17 public health interventions. Each intervention and practice level contributes to improving population health. The Intervention Wheel, previously known as the Public Health Intervention Model, was originally introduced in 1998 by the Minnesota Department of Health, Section of Public Health Nursing (PHN). The model has been widely disseminated and used throughout the United States since that time. The evidence supporting the Intervention Wheel was recently subjected to a rigorous critique by regional and national experts. This critical process, which involved hundreds of public health nurses, resulted in a more robust Intervention Wheel and established the validity of the model. The critique also produced basic steps and best practices for each of the 17 interventions. Part I describes the Intervention Wheel, defines population-based practice, and details the recommended modifications and validation process. Part II provides examples of the innovative ways that the Intervention Wheel is being used in public health/PHN practice, education, and administration. The two articles provide a foundation and vision for population-based PHN practice and direction for improving population health.

  6. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese and validation of the "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Post-acne Scarring" *

    PubMed Central

    Cachafeiro, Thais Hofmann; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Maldonado, Gabriela; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Postacne Scarring" was developed in English for acne scar grading, based on the number and severity of each type of scar. The aims of this study were to translate this scale into Brazilian Portuguese and verify its reliability and validity. The study followed five steps: Translation, Expert Panel, Back Translation, Approval of authors and Validation. The translated scale showed high internal consistency and high test-retest reliability, confirming its reproducibility. Therefore, it has been validated for our population and can be recommended as a reliable instrument to assess acne scarring. PMID:25184939

  7. A new method of projecting populations based on trends in life expectancy and survival.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Les; Smith, David

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing concern about the lack of accuracy in population projections at national levels. A common problem has been the systematic underestimation of improvements in mortality, especially at older ages, resulting in projections that are too low. In this paper, we present a method that is based on projecting survivorship rather than mortality, which uses the same data but differs technically. In particular, rather than extrapolating trends in mortality, we use trends in life expectancy to establish a robust statistical relation between changes in life expectancy and survivorship using period life tables. We test the approach on data for England and Wales for the population aged 50 and over, and show that it gives more accurate projections than official projections using the same base data. Using the model to project the population aged 50 and over to 2020, our method suggests nearly 0.6 million more people in this age group than official projections.

  8. An overview of population-based algorithms for multi-objective optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, Ioannis; Purshouse, Robin C.; Fleming, Peter J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present an overview of the most prominent population-based algorithms and the methodologies used to extend them to multiple objective problems. Although not exact in the mathematical sense, it has long been recognised that population-based multi-objective optimisation techniques for real-world applications are immensely valuable and versatile. These techniques are usually employed when exact optimisation methods are not easily applicable or simply when, due to sheer complexity, such techniques could potentially be very costly. Another advantage is that since a population of decision vectors is considered in each generation these algorithms are implicitly parallelisable and can generate an approximation of the entire Pareto front at each iteration. A critique of their capabilities is also provided.

  9. Estimating and modeling the cure fraction in population-based cancer survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Paul C; Thompson, John R; Weston, Claire L; Dickman, Paul W

    2007-07-01

    In population-based cancer studies, cure is said to occur when the mortality (hazard) rate in the diseased group of individuals returns to the same level as that expected in the general population. The cure fraction (the proportion of patients cured of disease) is of interest to patients and is a useful measure to monitor trends in survival of curable disease. There are 2 main types of cure fraction model, the mixture cure fraction model and the non-mixture cure fraction model, with most previous work concentrating on the mixture cure fraction model. In this paper, we extend the parametric non-mixture cure fraction model to incorporate background mortality, thus providing estimates of the cure fraction in population-based cancer studies. We compare the estimates of relative survival and the cure fraction between the 2 types of model and also investigate the importance of modeling the ancillary parameters in the selected parametric distribution for both types of model.

  10. Brazilian obesity prevention and control initiatives.

    PubMed

    Jaime, P C; da Silva, A C F; Gentil, P C; Claro, R M; Monteiro, C A

    2013-11-01

    Obesity prevalence in the Brazilian adult population is 12.5% among men and 16.9% among women. Obesity control has been a subject of concern in Brazilian health policies since the publication of the National Food and Nutrition Policy in 1999. The initiatives include a comprehensive national intersectorial plan for obesity prevention and control focused on confronting its social and environmental causes, development of a food and nutrition education framework aimed at intersectorial public policies in the food and nutritional security field, promotion and provision of healthy food in school environments (linked to family farming), structuring nutrition actions in primary healthcare in the national healthcare system, promoting community physical activity, food regulation and control, and encouragement of public participation and food control. We conclude that several initiatives have been developed in Brazil to deal with the challenge of implementing an intergovernmental, intersectorial response to reverse the rising overweight and obesity rates. The success of this response will depend on a governance model that promotes joint and integrated action by different sectors and active participation of society to consolidate the actions, places and laws that protect health and promote healthy lifestyles.

  11. Socioeconomic differences in childhood injury: a population based epidemiologic study in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Faelker, T.; Pickett, W.; Brison, R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To determine whether risks for childhood injury vary according to socioeconomic gradients. Design—Population based, retrospective study. The percentage of individuals living below the poverty line (described ecologically using census data) was the primary measure of socioeconomic status. Setting—Catchment area of a tertiary medical centre that provides emergency services to all area residents. Area residents aged 0–19 years during 1996 were included. Observations—Injuries that occurred during 1996 were identified by an emergency department based surveillance system. The study population was divided into socioeconomic grades based upon percentages of area residents living below the poverty line. Multiple Poisson regression analyses were used to quantify associations and assess the statistical significance of trends. Results—5894 childhood injuries were identified among 35 380 eligible children; 985 children with missing socioeconomic data were excluded. A consistent relation between poverty and injury was evident. Children in the highest grade (indicating higher poverty levels) experienced injury rates that were 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.48 to 1.89) higher than those in the lowest grade (adjusted relative risk for grades 1-V: 1.00,1.10,1.22,1.42, 1.67; ptrend<0.001). These patterns were observed within age/sex strata; for home, recreational, and fall injuries; and for injuries of minor and moderate severities. Conclusions—Socioeconomic differences in childhood injury parallel mortality and morbidity gradients identified in adult populations. This study confirms that this health gradient is observable in a population of children using emergency department data. Given the population based nature of this study, these findings are likely to be reflected in other settings. The results suggest the need for targeted injury prevention efforts among children from economically disadvantaged populations, although the exact requirements of the

  12. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Sidney, John; Dinh, Kenny; Southwood, Scott; Newman, Mark J; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA) alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at . Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine), and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups. PMID:16545123

  13. Antioxidant intake among Brazilian adults - The Brazilian Osteoporosis Study (BRAZOS): a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antioxidant nutrient intake and the lesser formation of free radicals seem to contribute to chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intake profile of the main dietary antioxidants in a representative sample of the adult Brazilian population and discuss the main consequences of a low intake of these micronutrients on overall health. Methods The sample comprised 2344 individuals aged 40 years or older from 150 cities and was based on a probabilistic sample from official data. The research was conducted through in-home interviews administered by a team trained for this purpose. Dietary intake information was obtained through 24-h recall. The Nutrition Data System for Research software program was used to analyze data on the intake of vitamins A, C and E, selenium and zinc, which was compared to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). Differences in intake according to sex, anthropometrics, socioeconomic status and region were also evaluated. The SPSS statistical package (version 13) was used for the statistical analysis. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Higher proportions of low intake in relation to recommended values were found for vitamin E (99.7%), vitamin A (92.4%) and vitamin C (85.1%) in both genders. Intake variations were found between different regions, which may reflect cultural habits. Conclusion These results should lead to the development of public health policies that encourage educational strategies for improving the intake of micronutrients, which are essential to overall health and prevention of non-communicable diseases. PMID:21513578

  14. Population history, biogeography, and taxonomy of orangutans (Genus: Pongo) based on a population genetic meta-analysis of multiple loci.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines orangutan population history and evolution through a meta-analysis of seven loci collected from both Sumatran and Bornean orangutans. Within orangutans, most loci show that the Sumatran population is about twice as diverse as the Bornean population. Orangutans are more diverse than African apes and humans. Sumatran and Bornean populations show significant genetic differentiation from one another and their history does not differ significantly from an 'island model' (population splitting without gene flow). Two different methods support a divergence of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans at 2.7-5 million years ago. This suggests that Pleistocene events, such as the cyclical exposure of the Sunda shelf and the Toba volcanic eruption, did not have a major impact on the divergence of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Pairwise mismatch analyses, however, suggest that Bornean orangutans have undergone a recent population expansion (beginning 39,000-64,000 years ago), while Sumatran orangutan populations were stable. Pleistocene events may have contributed to these aspects of orangutan population history. These conclusions are applied to the debate on orangutan taxonomy.

  15. Genetic diversity among brazilian isolates of beauveria bassiana: comparisons with non-brazilian isolates and other beauveria species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandes, E.K.K.; Moraes, A.M.L.; Pacheco, R.S.; Rangel, D.E.N.; Miller, M.P.; Bittencourt, V.R.E.P.; Roberts, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The genetic diversity of Beauveria bassiana was investigated by comparing isolates of this species to each other (49 from different geographical regions of Brazil and 4 from USA) and to other Beauveria spp. Methods and Results: The isolates were examined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), and rDNA sequencing. MLEE and AFLP revealed considerable genetic variability among B. bassiana isolates. Several isolates from South and Southeast Brazil had high similarity coefficients, providing evidence of at least one population with clonal structure. There were clear genomic differences between most Brazilian and USA B. bassiana isolates. A Mantel test using data generated by AFLP provided evidence that greater geographical distances were associated with higher genetic distances. AFLP and rDNA sequencing demonstrated notable genotypic variation between B. bassiana and other Beauveria spp. Conclusion: Geographical distance between populations apparently is an important factor influencing genotypic variability among B. bassiana populations in Brazil. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study characterized many B. bassiana isolates. The results indicate that certain Brazilian isolates are considerably different from others and possibly should be regarded as separate species from B. bassiana sensu latu. The information on genetic variation among the Brazilian isolates, therefore, will be important to comprehending the population structure of B. bassiana in Brazil. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Anticoagulation and population risk of stroke and death in incident atrial fibrillation: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Amy Y.X.; Malo, Shaun; Wilton, Stephen; Parkash, Ratika; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Hill, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and death. Anticoagulation therapy is an effective treatment for stroke prevention, but remains underused in the community. We sought to determine the effectiveness and safety of anticoagulation therapy in an inception cohort with new-onset atrial fibrillation in the province of Alberta, Canada. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study of atrial fibrillation using an administrative database from Alberta's publicly funded and universally available health care system. All new-onset atrial fibrillation patients from Jan. 1, 2009, to Dec. 31, 2010, were included in the cohort and followed through Dec. 31, 2013. We assessed anticoagulation status as a predictor of stroke and death using time-to-event analysis and adjusted for sex and CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 yr, diabetes mellitus and prior stroke or transient ischemic attack) score using Cox proportional hazards modelling. Results: We identified 10 745 patients, 7358 (68.5%) of whom received anticoagulation therapy, principally with warfarin (n = 6997, 95.1%). Anticoagulation therapy was associated with significantly decreased risk of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-0.82), all stroke (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.91), all stroke and death (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.62-0.72) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.62-0.72), despite an association with increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (HR 1.92, 95% CI 1.17-3.16). There was a neutral association with subdural (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.53-1.93) and gastrointestinal (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.70-1.31) hemorrhage. Interpretation: Anticoagulation therapy is effective and safe for stroke prevention and decreases mortality in patients with incident atrial fibrillation. These population data support an aggressive approach to screening for atrial fibrillation and treatment with anticoagulant medicines to prevent stroke and death. PMID:27280108

  17. The dynamics of Brazilian protozoology over the past century

    PubMed Central

    Elias, M Carolina; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M; Mena-Chalco, Jesus P

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian scientists have been contributing to the protozoology field for more than