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Sample records for breast cancer compared

  1. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  2. Cancerous versus noncancerous breasts. A comparative morphological analysis of the entire glandular tree of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sarnelli, R; Squartini, F

    1989-01-01

    Cancerous and clinically normal autopsy obtained breasts were collected in order to compare the physiopathological profile of both types of glandular tree. Each breast was visualized by whole thin sections and observed under a stereomicroscope with removal of the more interesting changes for histology. The comparison was made between 67 atrophic cancerous breasts and 88 atrophic control breasts. The results were as follows: 25% of the cancerous breasts versus 47% of control breasts showed no changes, atypical lobules, microfoci of "in situ" and/or infiltrating cancer were present in 46% of cancerous breasts and in 16% of control breasts, showing a significant correlation with clinical cancer. All other types of functional and proliferative changes, variously associated each other, were found in 29% of cancerous and in 37% of control breasts. Our morphological data agree completely with the statements in follow-up studies carried out on benign breast biopsies. The significant differences in the physiopathological profile of the glandular tree between "normal" and cancerous breasts, confirms that some changes are causally related to clinical cancer.

  3. Comparing breast cancer risk between lesbians and their heterosexual sisters.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Suzanne L; Roberts, Stephanie A; Nussey, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences between lesbians and their heterosexual sisters in the established risks for developing breast cancer. The design for this study was a matched (lesbian with heterosexual sister) cross-sectional, mail-back, anonymous survey. We distributed the surveys throughout the state of California to English-speaking women who identified themselves as lesbians, age 40 and older, and their sisters. Using the modified Gail Breast Cancer Risk model as well as other well-established factors associated with the development of breast cancer, we compared the breast cancer risk potential for 324 sister pairs (N = 648). Data were analyzed using paired t-tests, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), McNemar's chi(2), or the Bowker statistic, as appropriate for the level of data. The lesbians had significantly higher 5-year (p <.0001) and lifetime (p =.001) risk for developing breast cancer. The reasons for lesbians' predicted rate of breast cancer were most likely their higher scores on all pregnancy-related variables and the relatively high number of breast biopsies they reported. The lesbians had used birth control pills less (p <. 0001), had significantly fewer pregnancies (p <.0001), children (p <.0001), abortions (p <.0001), and miscarriages (p <.0001) as well as significantly more breast biopsies (p =.02) than did their heterosexual sisters. A lesbian who comes out to her clinician is relying on the clinician to be informed and be open to discuss her life. When a lesbian has a lump or a suspicious mammogram, she needs her clinician to advocate for her within the health care system because she is at higher risk for having cancer than a heterosexual woman.

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  5. Comparative membrane proteomics analyses of breast cancer cell lines to understand the molecular mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenjing; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer in women. Breast cancer brain metastasis is currently considered an issue of concern among breast cancer patients. Membrane proteins play important roles in breast cancer brain metastasis, involving cell adhesion and penetration of blood-brain barrier. To understand the mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed in conjunction with enrichment of membrane proteins to analyze the proteomes from five different breast cancer and a brain cancer cell lines. Quantitative proteomic data of all cell lines were compared with MDA-MB-231BR which is a brain seeking breast cancer cell line, thus representing brain metastasis characteristics. Label-free proteomics of the six cell lines facilitates the identification of 1238 proteins and the quantification of 899 proteins of which more than 70% were membrane proteins. Unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) of the label-free proteomics data resulted in a distinct clustering of cell lines, suggesting quantitative differences in the expression of several proteins among the different cell lines. Unique protein expressions in 231BR were observed for 28 proteins. The up-regulation of STAU1, AT1B3, NPM1, hnRNP Q, and hnRNP K and the down-regulation of TUBB4B and TUBB5 were noted in 231BR relative to 231 (precursor cell lines from which 231BR is derived). These proteins might contribute to the breast cancer brain metastasis. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) supported the great brain metastatic propensity of 231BR and suggested the importance of the up-regulation of integrin proteins and down-regulation of EPHA2 in brain metastasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Localized therapy for male breast cancer: functional advantages with comparable outcomes using breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Fogh, Shannon; Kachnic, Lisa A; Goldberg, Saveli I; Taghian, Alphonse G; Powell, Simon N; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2013-10-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) accounts for approximately 1% of all breast cancers. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment of MBC generally follows the same principles as treatment of female breast cancer. However, the traditional surgical approach for MBC is modified radical mastectomy (MRM) or total simple mastectomy (TSM) instead of breast conservation surgery (BCS). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of BCS as an alternative to mastectomy for MBC with respect to musculoskeletal functionality and treatment outcome. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of all male patients with breast cancer who presented to Massachusetts General Hospital or Boston Medical Center for localized therapy from 1990 to 2003. Musculoskeletal functionality (tissue fibrosis, arm edema, and range of motion) and treatment outcome (local-regional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival) were evaluated. Functional/cosmetic outcomes were assessed by multidisciplinary review of patient follow-up visits and were scored as either "good-excellent" or "fair-poor" to account for subjectivity between different clinicians. Forty-two patients in total were identified to undergo localized treatment. Thirty patients (71%) received MRM, 4 (10%) had TSM, and 8 (19%) underwent BCS. Actuarial overall 1-year fair-poor documented tissue fibrosis, arm edema, and decreased range of motion rates were 13%, 23%, and 27% for patients receiving MRM; 25%, 0%, and 50% for patients who underwent TSM; and 13%, 0%, and 0% for those undergoing BCS, respectively. Overall survival and disease-free survival were not statistically different between the groups. These data suggest that breast conservation therapy may be considered a reasonable local treatment option for male patients presenting with breast cancer because it may offer functional advantages over mastectomy with comparable rates of local control and disease-free survival and overall survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  7. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  8. Comparative Proteomics of Tumor and Paired Normal Breast Tissue Highlights Potential Biomarkers in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Gustavo Góes; Gomig, Talita Helen Bombardelli; Kaviski, Rodrigo; Santos Sousa, Karla; Kukolj, Caroline; De Lima, Rubens Silveira; De Andrade Urban, Cicero; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide, and about 57,000 new cases are expected for the Brazilian population in 2015. Elucidation of protein expression and modification is essential for the biological understanding, early diagnosis and therapeutics of breast cancer. The main objectives of the study are comparison between the proteome of tumor and paired non-tumor breast cancer tissues, describing all identified proteins, highlighting the ones most differentially expressed and comparing the data with existing literature. The five paired samples from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were analyzed by 2-DE and MS. We collected 161 identified spots corresponding to 110 distinct proteins. Forty-three differentially-expressed spots were common to at least two samples, and the ten proteins with the highest-fold changes were CASPE, ENOG, TPM1, CAPG, VIME, TPM3, TRFE, PDIA6, WDR61 and PDIA3. Metabolic enzymes and proteins with binding functions were the most representative functional classes of proteins with increased and decreased expression in tumor tissue respectively. Taking the fold change as a parameter, we point to future targets to be studied by functional methods in a search for biomarkers for initiation and progress of breast cancer. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... age 35, and having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a ...

  10. Poorer survival of male breast cancer compared with female breast cancer patients may be due to biological differences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingyu; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Li; Li, Shufen; Shi, Yehui; Tong, Zhongsheng

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to compare disease-free survival and overall survival in a group of matched males and females with breast cancer, and to analyze possible treatment- and gender-related differences. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 150 operable male breast cancer patients treated in our hospital from December 1980 to June 2012. Each male breast cancer patient recorded in the database was matched with two female breast cancer patients of equal stage. Prognosis in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival was evaluated. The mean age at diagnosis was 58.6 ± 9.7 years for males and 57.2 ± 10.3 years for females. The median follow-up was 69 months for males and 81 months for females. Significant differences were identified for tumor location, hormone receptor status, molecular subtypes and hormone therapy between the two groups. Monofactorial analysis demonstrated that tumor size, lymph node state, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, molecular subtypes and adjuvant chemotherapy treatment were prognostic factors in male breast cancer patients. The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival rates were 65.6 and 40.1% for males, and 74.9 and 51.5% for females, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 72.9 and 53.9% for males, and 83.2 and 68.5% for females, respectively. There was significantly difference in disease-free survival and overall survival between the two matched groups (P = 0.002). Male breast cancer patients had inferior outcome despite of equal stage in comparison with matched female breast cancer patients, which demonstrates that biological differences may contribute to the worse prognosis.

  11. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... idea of what to expect in the future. Breast cancer stages range from 0 to IV. The higher the ... is based on many factors, including: Type of breast cancer Stage of the cancer (staging is a tool your ...

  12. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer: comparative analysis of early and delayed reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Seidel, William; Bins-Ely, Jorge; Ongaratto Barazzetti, Daniel; Della Giustina, Renata; Walter, Gustavo P; Ferri, Thiago A; Maurici, Rosemeri; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína L

    2017-06-01

    Early reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer with definitive implants has been widely used, especially with the evolution of conservative surgical breast cancer treatments. We aimed to identify different characteristics associated with plastic surgery, based on immediate or delayed reconstruction time and evaluate quality of life in patients undergoing mastectomy for cancer. This is a cross-sectional analytical study that evaluated adult patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer and breast reconstruction in Plastic Surgery Service at a tertiary hospital. Between March 2011 and November 2015, 58 patients who underwent mastectomy were included, with a mean age of 51.6±10.6 years and 98.3% of them being women. Eighty percent of the patients underwent a radical mastectomy and 20% underwent segmentectomies. Immediate and delayed surgical reconstructions occurred in 22.4% and 77.6% of the cases, respectively, including immediate reconstruction with the local flap trade (15.5%), immediate reconstruction with prosthesis (6.9%), transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap (6.9%), delayed reconstruction with local flap (8.6%), expander and prosthesis (35.7%), and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi flap and prosthesis (22.4%). When comparing subjects undergoing reconstructive surgery based on timing of reconstruction, it was observed that patients undergoing delayed breast reconstruction surgery presented a higher proportion of radical mastectomy (90.7% vs. 41.7%; P=0.001) and the need for two or more surgical interventions (64.1% vs. 20.0%; P=0.029). There was no difference in the quality of life according to reconstruction time. The characteristics associated with postmastectomy reconstruction timing are related to preoperative factors such as the procedure employed and the number of interventions performed and have no influence on complications or the quality of life.

  13. A comparative study of knowledge and awareness of colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Camilleri-Brennan, J; Steele, R J

    1999-12-01

    To assess and compare knowledge and awareness of colorectal cancer and breast cancer in a sample of the general population. Eleven hundred visitors to six different outpatient clinics, in a University Hospital, were given a study-specific questionnaire, based on educational material from the British Association of Cancer United Patients (CancerBACUP). The questionnaire consisted of 12 statements on the incidence, presentation, detection, treatment and prognosis of colorectal and breast cancer. One thousand and sixty-eight individuals returned the questionnaire. One thousand and four completed questionnaires were analysed. The mean age (SD) of respondents was 50.1 (17.2) years, and the male to female ratio was 2:3. Respondents had read more about breast than about colorectal cancer (60.3%vs 32.4%, P<0.0001, McNemar's test). The proportion of correct answers for each statement on breast cancer was higher than for answers to corresponding items on colorectal cancer. Mean overall scores (95% CI) for breast and colorectal cancer were 88.1 (86.9, 89.2) and 64.4 (62.5, 66.3) respectively, the mean difference (95% CI) being 23.7 (22.0, 25.5). Scores were higher for breast cancer irrespective of age or gender. There is a low level of understanding of colorectal cancer in the general population when compared to breast cancer. This highlights the importance of public education in this common cancer. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  15. The Distinct Role of Comparative Risk Perceptions in a Breast Cancer Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Amanda J.; Ubel, Peter A.; Smith, Dylan M.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Nair, Vijay; Derry, Holly A.; Zhang, Aijun; Pitsch, Rosemarie K.; Alford, Sharon Hensley; McClure, Jennifer B.; Fagerlin, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative risk perceptions may rival other types of information in terms of effects on health behavior decisions. Purpose We examined associations between comparative risk perceptions, affect, and behavior while controlling for absolute risk perceptions and actual risk. Methods Women at an increased risk of breast cancer participated in a program to learn about tamoxifen which can reduce the risk of breast cancer. Women reported comparative risk perceptions of breast cancer and completed measures of anxiety, knowledge, and tamoxifen-related behavior intentions. Three months later, women reported their behavior. Results Comparative risk perceptions were positively correlated with anxiety, knowledge, intentions, and behavior three months later. After controlling for participants’ actual risk of breast cancer and absolute risk perceptions, comparative risk perceptions predicted anxiety and knowledge, but not intentions or behavior. Conclusions Comparative risk perceptions can affect patient outcomes like anxiety and knowledge independently of absolute risk perceptions and actual risk information. PMID:21698518

  16. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  17. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  18. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it.

  19. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Killian, J Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R; Strong, Louise C; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E; Robison, Leslie L; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  20. Characterization of Genomic Alterations in Radiation-Associated Breast Cancer among Childhood Cancer Survivors, Using Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaohong R.; Killian, J. Keith; Hammond, Sue; Burke, Laura S.; Bennett, Hunter; Wang, Yonghong; Davis, Sean R.; Strong, Louise C.; Neglia, Joseph; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Robison, Leslie L.; Bhatia, Smita; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Inskip, Peter D.; Meltzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29), had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26), estrogen receptor (ER)-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28), and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22). Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12). Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an “amplifier” genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25764003

  1. Analysis of Chemokine Receptor Gene Expression in Esophageal Cancer Cells Compared with Breast Cancer with Insights into Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    MISHAN, Mohammad Amir; HEIRANI-TABASI, Asieh; MOKHBERIAN, Neda; HASSANZADE, Malihe; KALALIAN MOGHADDAM, Hamid; BAHRAMI, Ahmad Reza; AHMADIANKIA, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemokine receptors have been shown to play an important role in the development and metastatic spread of various malignancies. In this study, the gene expression profile of some key chemokine receptors involved in metastasis has been investigated in esophageal and breast cancer cell lines. Methods: In a descriptive study, gene expression profile of CCR1, CCR6, CCR7, CCR9, CXCR1, and CXCR4 in human esophageal cancer cell line (KYSE-30) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF7) were analyzed using real-time PCR and their results were compared accordingly. Results: We demonstrated for the first time the expression of CCR1, CCR6, CCR7, CCR9, CXCR1, and CXCR4 at transcriptional level in human esophageal cancer cell line. The expression of CCR1, CCR7 and CXCR4 were lower in esophageal compared with breast cancer cells, although without significant difference. CCR9 was highly expressed in esophageal cancer cells as compared to the breast cancer cells (P < 0.05). Similarly, the expression of CCR6 and CXCR1 were higher, although without significant difference. Conclusion: Esophageal cancer cells like breast cancer express some key chemokine receptors involved in metastasis. Targeting of proposed receptors in esophageal cancer may be a novel strategy for prevention of cancer metastasis. PMID:26576348

  2. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  3. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  5. A Prognostic Analysis of Male Breast Cancer (MBC) Compared with Post-Menopausal Female Breast Cancer (FBC).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-Fei; Yang, Hong-Jian; Yu, Yang; Zou, De-Hong; Miao, Lu-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is known to be rare compared with female breast cancer (FBC) and to account for only 1% of all breast cancers. To date, male patients diagnosed with breast cancer are normally treated based on the guidelines for FBC. Specifically, studies have found that diagnosing and treating MBC patients under the guidelines for the treatment of post-menopausal FBC are more favorable than are those of pre/peri-menopausal FBC from a physiological perspective because MBC and post-menopausal FBC patients show high estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the tumor and low estrogen expression in the body. In this medical study, we aimed to examine whether MBC actually has the same prognosis as post-menopausal FBC. We identified MBC patients who were diagnosed as operable and who completed clinical treatment and we used follow-up data that were collected from January 2001 to January 2011. Each MBC patient was paired with four FBC patients who were diagnosed within the same period (two were pre/peri-menopausal, and two were post-menopausal). We compared disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among three groups, i.e., pre/peri-menopausal FBC (group A), post-menopausal FBC (group B) and MBC (group M), using the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards regression model. We also evaluated the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients using t-tests and chi-square tests. We used ten consecutive years of data that were collected at Zhejiang Provincial Cancer Hospital. We identified 91 MBC cases for group M, 182 FBC cases for group A and 182 FBC cases for group B. The median follow-up period was 112 months. MBC cases were much more frequently ER positive than those of group A and group B (p<0.01); a similar trend was also found for progesterone (PR)-positive cases (p<0.01). The MBC group showed much lower human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression than did the other groups (p<0.01). The 10-year OS rates were 79.1% for

  6. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population.

  7. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  8. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Victorino, V. J.; Herrera, A. C. S. A.; Cecchini, A. L.; Simão, A. N. C.; Tomita, L. Y.; Cecchini, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  9. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  10. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how early the cancer was diagnosed. Left untreated, breast cancer can spread to other parts of the body, including internal organs. This could cause serious health problems or be fatal. It is very important to get treatment as soon as possible.Living with cancer during ...

  11. Breast Cancer: Comparative Effectiveness of Positron Emission Mammography and MR Imaging in Presurgical Planning for the Ipsilateral Breast1

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kathleen S.; Schilling, Kathy; Tartar, Marie; Pisano, Etta D.; Larsen, Linda Hovanessian; Narayanan, Deepa; Ozonoff, Al; Miller, Joel P.; Kalinyak, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the performance of positron emission mammography (PEM), as compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, including the effect on surgical management, in ipsilateral breasts with cancer. Materials and Methods: Four hundred seventy-two women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were offered breast-conserving surgery consented from September 2006 to November 2008 to participate in a multicenter institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant protocol. Participants underwent contrast material–enhanced MR imaging and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PEM in randomized order; resultant images were interpreted independently. Added biopsies and changes in surgical procedure for the ipsilateral breast were correlated with histopathologic findings. Performance characteristics were compared by using the McNemar test and generalized estimating equations. Results: Three hundred eighty-eight women (median age, 58 years; age range, 26–93 years; median estimated tumor size, 1.5 cm) completed the study. Additional cancers were found in 82 (21%) women (82 ipsilateral breasts; median tumor size, 0.7 cm). Twenty-eight (34%) of the 82 breasts were identified with both PEM and MR imaging; 21 (26%) breasts, with MR imaging only; 14 (17%) breasts, with PEM only; and seven (8.5%) breasts, with mammography and ultrasonography. Twelve (15%) cases of additional cancer were missed at all imaging examinations. Integration of PEM and MR imaging increased cancer detection—to 61 (74%) of 82 breasts versus 49 (60%) of 82 breasts identified with MR imaging alone (P < .001). Of 306 breasts without additional cancer, 279 (91.2%) were correctly assessed with PEM compared with 264 (86.3%) that were correctly assessed with MR imaging (P = .03). The positive predictive value of biopsy prompted by PEM findings (47 [66%] of 71 cases) was higher than that of biopsy prompted by MR findings (61 [53%] of 116 cases) (P = .016). Of 116 additional cancers, 61 (53%) were depicted

  12. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  13. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2014. Last Medical Review: June 1, 2016 Last Revised: August 18, 2016 Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Radiation for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Hormone ...

  14. Suppression of Ovarian Function With Either Tamoxifen or Exemestane Compared With Tamoxifen Alone in Treating Premenopausal Women With Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  16. Matched-pair analysis of patients with female and male breast cancer: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Robert; Foerster, Frank G; Wulff, Volkhard; Schubotz, Birgit; Baaske, Dieter; Wolfgarten, Matthias; Kuhn, Walther C; Rudlowski, Christian

    2011-08-04

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease accounting for approximately 1% of all breast carcinomas. Presently treatment recommendations are derived from the standards for female breast cancer. However, those approaches might be inadequate because of distinct gender specific differences in tumor biology of breast cancer. This study was planned in order to contrast potential differences between female and male breast cancer in both tumor biological behavior and clinical management. MBC diagnosed between 1995-2007 (region Chemnitz/Zwickau, Saxony, Germany) was retrospectively analyzed. Tumor characteristics, treatment and follow-up of the patients were documented. In order to highlight potential differences each MBC was matched with a female counterpart (FBC) that showed accordance in at least eight tumor characteristics (year of diagnosis, age, tumor stage, nodal status, grade, estrogen- and progesterone receptors, HER2 status). 108 male/female matched-pairs were available for survival analyses. In our study men and women with breast cancer had similar disease-free (DFS) and overall (OS) survival. The 5-years DFS was 53.4% (95% CI, range 54.1-66.3) in men respectively 62.6% (95% CI, 63.5-75.3) in women (p > 0.05). The 5-years OS was 71.4% (95% CI, 62.1-72.7%) and 70.3% (95% CI, 32.6-49.6) in women (p > 0.05). In males DFS analyses revealed progesterone receptor expression as the only prognostic relevant factor (p = 0.006). In multivariate analyses for OS both advanced tumor size (p = 0.01) and a lack of progesterone receptor expression were correlated (p = 0.01) with poor patients outcome in MBC. Our comparative study revealed no survival differences between male and female breast cancer patients and gives evidence that gender is no predictor for survival in breast cancer. This was shown despite of significant gender specific differences in terms of frequency and intensity of systemic therapy in favor to female breast cancer.

  17. Variation in mammographic appearance between projections of small breast cancers compared with radial scars.

    PubMed

    Cawson, Jennifer N; Nickson, Carolyn; Evans, Jill; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    The study aims to assess variation in appearance between mammographic projections (conspicuity variation) for invasive breast cancers (IBCs) compared with radial scars (RS). Conspicuity variation has been previously described as characteristic of RS. The lesions were also compared with respect to breast density and the proportion of cases detected by one of two readers and required a third (consensus) read. The study was approved by the BreastScreen Victoria research committee. Mammograms of 75 randomly selected invasive breast cancers, with histological diameter ≤10 mm (IBC), were mixed with 67 consecutively detected RS, all from a double-reading population-based breast cancer screening programme. On blinded review, these 142 lesions were classified for mammographic findings and assessed for marked or minor conspicuity variation between views. We assessed the associations between lesion type, lesion spicules and centres, breast density, conspicuity variation and proportion detected by one reader only. Marked conspicuity variation was common, but not statistically different for IBC and RS (64% vs. 66%, χ(2) = 0.8, P = 0.04). Conspicuity variation did not correlate with spiculation type (long, fine or short, broad based) or lesion centres (lucent or dense) (ρ < 0.05, P = 0.5), and showed no significant change with increasing Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System breast density (IBC, χ(2) = 2.3, P = 0.5; RS, χ(2) = 0.95, P = 0.6). Density did not vary by lesion type. In the screening programme, 29% of IBC (125 of 431) versus 43% of RS (32 of 75) had been detected by one of two readers (χ(2) = 2.7, P = 0.098). Two-thirds of small IBCs displayed marked conspicuity variation, similar to RS. Therefore, conspicuity variation does not discriminate between IBC and RS. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  18. Adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen compared to aromatase inhibitors for 257 male breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eggemann, Holm; Ignatov, Atanas; Smith, Bobbie J; Altmann, Udo; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Röhl, Freidrich W; Jahn, Mark; Costa, Serban-Dan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AI) on the survival of men with breast cancer. We analyzed 257 male patients with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer from numerous German population-based cancer registries treated with tamoxifen (N = 207) or aromatase inhibitors (N = 50). The median follow-up was 42.2 (range 2-115) months. Median age at diagnosis was 68 (range 36-91) years. Thirty-seven (17.9 %) patients treated with tamoxifen and 16 (32.0 %) patients treated with AI died (log rank p = 0.007). After the adjustment for the patient's age, tumor size, node status, and tumor grading, the AI treatment was linked to a 1.5-fold increase in risk of mortality compared to tamoxifen (HR 1.55; 95 % CI: 1.13-2.13; p = 0.007). The overall survival in male breast cancer was significantly better after adjuvant treatment with tamoxifen compared to an aromatase inhibitor. Tamoxifen should be considered as the treatment of choice for hormone-receptor-positive male breast cancer.

  19. Comparative metabolic and lipidomic profiling of human breast cancer cells with different metastatic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Hyun; Kwon, Yeo-Jung; Chun, Young-Jin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    This study conducted comprehensive and comparative metabolic and lipidomic profiling of a human epithelial breast cell line (MCF-10A), a slightly metastatic (MCF-7), and a highly metastatic (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell line using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct infusion mass spectrometry (DI-MS). Among 39 metabolites identified by GC-MS analysis, xanthine, glucose-6-phosphate, mannose-6-phosphate, guanine, and adenine were selected as prognostic markers of breast cancer metastasis. Major metabolic pathways involved in differentiation of the cell lines were alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism, purine metabolism and glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among 44 intact lipid species identified by DI-MS analysis, the levels of most phospholipids were higher in both metastatic groups than in normal cells. Specifically, the levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) 18:0/20:4, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 18:0/20:4, and phosphatidylcholine (PC) 18:0/20:4 were markedly higher while those of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 18:1/18:1 and PI 18:0/18:1 were lower in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. A partial-least-squares regression model was developed and validated for predicting the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. The information obtained in this study will be useful when developing diagnostic tools and for identifying potential therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27564096

  20. Educational differences in responses to breast cancer symptoms: A qualitative comparative study.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Afrodita; Black, Georgia; Vedsted, Peter; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Whitaker, Katriina L

    2017-02-01

    Advanced stage at diagnosis for breast cancer is associated with lower socio-economic status (SES). We explored what factors in the patient interval (time from noticing a bodily change to first consultation with a health care professional) may contribute to this inequality. Qualitative comparative study. Semi-structured interviews with a sample of women (≥47 years) from higher (n = 15) and lower (n = 15) educational backgrounds, who had experienced at least one potential breast cancer symptom. Half the participants (n = 15) had sought medical help, half had not (n = 15). Without making breast cancer explicit, we elicited women's sense-making around their symptoms and help-seeking decisions. Containment of symptoms and confidence in acting upon symptoms emerged as two broad themes that differentiated lower and higher educational groups. Women from lower educational backgrounds tended to attribute their breast symptoms to trivial factors and were reticent in using the word 'cancer'. Despite 'knowing' that symptoms could be related to cancer, women with lower education invoked lack of medical knowledge - 'I am not a doctor' - to express uncertainty about interpreting symptoms and accessing help. Women with higher education were confident about interpreting symptoms, seeking information online, and seeking medical help. Our findings suggest that knowledge of breast cancer alone may not explain socio-economic differences in how women respond to breast cancer symptoms as women with lower education had 'reasons' not to react. Research is needed on how to overcome a wider spectrum of psycho-social factors to reduce future inequality. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Seven of ten breast cancers in the UK are diagnosed after people contact their doctor with symptoms. Women from lower socio-economic backgrounds are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced disease. There is little evidence related to potential drivers of this SES

  1. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Lower prevalence of breast cancer and cancers of the reproductive system among former college athletes compared to non-athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, R. E.; Wyshak, G.; Albright, N. L.; Albright, T. E.; Schiff, I.; Jones, K. P.; Witschi, J.; Shiang, E.; Koff, E.; Marguglio, M.

    1985-01-01

    The prevalence (lifetime occurrence) rate of cancers of the reproductive system (uterus, ovary, cervix and vagina) and breast cancer was determined for 5,398 living alumnae, 2,622 of whom were former college athletes and 2,776 non-athletes, from data on medical and reproductive history, athletic training and diet. The former athletes had a significantly lower risk of cancer of the breast and reproductive system than did the non-athletes. The relative risk (RR), non-athletes/athletes, for cancers of the reproductive system was 2.53. 95% confidence limits (CL) (1.17, 5.47). The RR for breast cancer was 1.86, 95% CL (1.00, 3.47). The analysis controlled for potential confounding factors including age, family history of cancer, age of menarche, number of pregnancies, use of oral contraceptives, use of oestrogen in the menopausal period, smoking, and leanness. Of the college athletes, 82.4% had been on pre-college teams compared to 24.9% of the college non-athletes. We conclude that long term athletic training may lower the risk of breast cancer and cancers of the reproductive system. PMID:4074640

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Mckenna; Snyder, Nicole A.; Housman, Genevieve; Leary, Meghan; Lapinska, Karolina; Heerboth, Sarah; Willbanks, Amber; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance. PMID:27213343

  4. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population.

  5. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  6. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  7. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  8. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  9. Breast cancer treatment in clinical practice compared to best evidence and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B S; de Pouvourville, N; Chhatre, S; Jayadevappa, R; Weinberg, D

    2004-01-12

    There is sparse evidence on community practice patterns in treating women with breast cancer. This study compared care of women with breast cancer with evidence from meta-analyses and US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical guidelines. Records of 4395 women with breast cancer were abstracted from practices of 19 surgeon oncologists in six specialty practices in the Philadelphia region during 1995-1999. Patients were followed through December 2001. Low-frequency data were obtained on all patients. All other data were from a random sample of 464 women, minimum of 50 patients per practice. Actual care provided was compared to NCCN guidelines and results of meta-analyses. Fewer than half the women received treatments reflecting meta-analysis results or NCCN guidelines, by disease stage/TNM status. Adherence to either standard varied from 0% for LCIS to 87% for stages IIA or IIB node positive. There are multiple interactive reasons for low adherence to guidelines or meta-analyses results, including insufficient health system supports to clinicians, inadequate organisation and delivery systems and ineffective continuing medical education. The paucity of written information from patient records on physician/patient interactions limits the understanding of treatment decisions.

  10. Breast size, handedness and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C C; Trichopoulos, D

    1991-01-01

    Bra cup size and handedness were studied as possible risk factors for breast cancer. Data for 3918 cases and 11,712 controls from 7 centres were used to examine the association of handedness with laterality of breast cancer; data for 2325 cases and 7008 controls from 4 centres were used to assess the relation of bra cup size to breast cancer risk. There was a suggestive (P about 0.10) association of handedness with breast cancer laterality: odds ratio of a left-handed (or ambidextrous) woman having a left-sided cancer 1.22 (95% CI 0.96-1.56). Handedness may affect the lateral occurrence of breast cancer, although this tumour is in general more common in the left breast, possibly because this breast is usually slightly larger. Premenopausal women who do not wear bras had half the risk of breast cancer compared with bra users (P about 0.09), possibly because they are thinner and likely to have smaller breasts. Among bra users, larger cup size was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (P about 0.026), although the association was found only among postmenopausal women and was accounted for, in part, by obesity. These data suggest that bra cup size (and conceivably mammary gland size) may be a risk factor for breast cancer.

  11. Comparative pathology of breast cancer in a randomised trial of screening.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T J; Lamb, J; Donnan, P; Alexander, F E; Huggins, A; Muir, B B; Kirkpatrick, A E; Chetty, U; Hepburn, W; Smith, A

    1991-07-01

    In the Edinburgh Randomised Breast Screening Project (EBSP) to December 1988 there were 500 cancers in the study population invited to screening and 340 cancers identified in the control population. The size and negative lymph node status characteristics of invasive cancers from the two populations were significantly different (P less than 0.05). The cancers detected by screening were predominantly 'early stage', with 16% noninvasive (PTIS) and 42% invasive stage I (pT1 node negative), whereas cancers were frequently 'late stage' (more than pT2) and inoperable in nonattenders (44%) and controls (36%). Grouped according to customary size ranges of invasive cancers, the proportion of cases lymph node positive differed in those screen detected compared with controls, but the benefit in favour of screen detection was not constant. In comparisons of cancers detected at prevalence and incidence screens, as a test of conformity with screening theory, no significant differences were apparent according to size and lymph node status, yet the characteristics of histological type of cancer discriminated significantly (P less than 0.05). When these same histological characteristics were used to compare survival, the capacity to separate invasive cancers into two groups having good and poor survival probabilities was evident, with a significant improvement for the screen detected poor survival group compared with controls (P less than 0.05).

  12. Quality of life among Egyptian women with breast cancer after sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous breast reconstruction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Denewer, Adel; Farouk, Omar; Kotb, Sherif; Setit, Ahmed; Abd El-Khalek, Seham; Shetiwy, Mosab

    2012-06-01

    Breast reconstruction is considered as an integrated part of the modern breast surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether immediate autologous breast reconstruction influences QOL and patient satisfaction outcomes among Egyptian women with breast cancer in comparison to the traditional mastectomy. This is a prospective study in which 200 Egyptian women with non metastatic breast cancer were included; group I (100 patients) underwent sparing mastectomy with immediate autologous breast reconstruction and group II (100 patients) underwent traditional mastectomy. The patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction was evaluated by special questionnaire and the reasons given by traditional mastectomy patients for not having breast reconstruction were recorded. Both breast impact of treatment scale (BITS) and body satisfaction scale (BSS) were evaluated in both groups. Patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction had a high mean score of 14.44 out of total degrees of 20 and most of them voted yes for having the same reconstruction again if they were offered it and would recommend reconstruction to other patients. No difference was found between the two groups as regard the BITS score. However, the BSS score showed a higher score among the reconstruction group. Egyptian ladies with breast cancer show better QOL and body image satisfaction outcomes following immediate breast reconstruction.

  13. Genetic changes at specific stages of breast cancer progression detected by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuxia; Niu, Yun; Wang, Xiaowei; Wei, Li; Lu, Song

    2009-02-01

    Although a simple linear progression model for breast cancer has already been proposed, its validity still remains controversial. Especially, the genetic and molecular features of breast cancer at different stages during the development and progression, as well as their relationship, have rarely been studied under the same experimental conditions simultaneously. According to these limitations in this research area, the current study applied comparative genomic hybridization technique to investigate genomic changes in 15 cases of breast atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 15 cases of ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 15 cases of invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC) and the relationship among the genetic changes. Thirty commonly altered regions that were identified included known (gains of 1q,8q, 17q,20q,Xq and losses of 8p,13q,16q,17p,22q) and several uncharacterized (gains of 2q,5p, 10p,12q,16p,18q, etc. and losses of 11p13-pter,11q,14q,Xp, etc). The overall frequency of copy number losses was higher in IDC than that in DCIS (P = 0.013). ADH showed more frequent gain of 17q than that in IDC (P = 0.007), and IDC exhibited a higher frequency for the loss of 22q than that in ADH (P = 0.018). On one hand, several common genomic changes shared by ADH, DCIS, and IDC make a linear relationship for these three lesions possible. On the other hand, the heterogeneity has also showed clonal diversification and different pathways of breast cancer progression. The regions of chromosomal copy number alterations may bring new insights into the strategy for tumor progression blocking and the discovery of new potential targets for breast cancer treatment.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of breast MRI and mammography in screening young women with elevated risk of developing breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Anand K; Visvanathan, Kala; Harvey, Susan C

    2016-08-01

    Screening guidelines recommend that women with 20 % or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer undergo annual breast MRI screening to supplement mammography, irrespective of age. In patients less than 40 years, mammography is often avoided due to concerns about radiation and decreased performance. However, prior studies have been limited by large percentages of women above 40 with decreased breast density. Our purpose was to test whether adding mammography to breast MRI screening compared to breast MRI screening alone in women below 40 increases cancer detection rates. After obtaining IRB approval, chart review identified patients aged 25-40 years undergoing breast MR screening (2005-2014). Demographics, risk factors, BI-RADS assessments, background parenchymal enhancement, and mammographic breast tissue density were recorded. Cancer detection rates, short-term follow-up (BIRADS 3), image-guided biopsy (BIRADS 4,5), and PPV1-3 were calculated. 342 breast MRI exams were identified (average age was 33, 37 % were nulliparous, and 64 % had prior benign biopsy), 226 (66 %) of which underwent concurrent mammography. Risk factors included 64 % with breast cancer in first-degree relative(s), 90 % had heterogeneous or extremely dense breast tissue on mammography, and 16 % were BRCA carriers. Four invasive cancers were detected by MRI (11.7 cancers/1000 examinations, 95 % CI 8.3, 15.1). None of these was detected by mammography, and no cancers were independently identified by mammography. Breast MRI screening in high-risk women under 40 yielded elevated cancer detection rates (11.7/1000). The cancer detection rate for mammography was 0 %, suggesting that MRI alone may be useful in screening high-risk women under 40.

  15. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  16. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  17. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  18. Adverse mental health outcomes in breast cancer survivors compared to women who did not have cancer: systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Helena; Williams, Rachael; Müller, Martin; Harewood, Rhea; Bhaskaran, Krishnan

    2017-08-14

    Recent increasing trends in breast cancer incidence and survival have resulted in unprecedented numbers of cancer survivors in the general population. A cancer diagnosis may have a profound psychological impact, and breast cancer treatments often cause long-term physical sequelae, potentially affecting women's mental health. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and summarise all studies that have compared mental health outcomes in breast cancer survivors, versus women who did not have cancer. This study will be a systematic review of the literature. Four databases, including MEDLINE and PsycINFO, will be searched to identify potentially relevant studies. The search expressions will use a Boolean logic, including terms for the target population (women who have had breast cancer), outcomes (psychiatric disorders) and comparators (e.g. risk, hazard). All mental disorders will be eligible, except those with onset normally occurring during childhood or strong genetic basis (e.g. Huntington disease). The eligibility of the studies will be assessed in two phases: (1) considering the information provided in the title and abstract; (2) evaluating the full text. Studies including women diagnosed with breast cancer 1 year or more ago and that provide original data on mental health outcomes will be eligible. Studies in which all women were undergoing surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or hospitalised or institutionalised, will be excluded, as well as studies that include patients selected on the basis of symptomatology. Two investigators will do the screening of the references and the data extraction independently, with results compared and discrepancies resolved by involving a third investigator when necessary. Study quality and risk of bias will be assessed across six broad domains. Results will be summarised by outcome, and summary measures of frequency and/or association will be computed if possible. This review will summarise the evidence on the mental

  19. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  20. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  1. A comparative study of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer: Risk factors, presentation, characteristics and management

    PubMed Central

    Surakasula, Aruna; Nagarjunapu, Govardhana Chary; Raghavaiah, K. V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Indian women. This study evaluates the differences between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer women regarding risk factors, nature of disease presentation, tumor characteristics, and management. Methods: This is a prospective observational study, conducted in the Oncology Department of St. Ann's Cancer Hospital, for a period of 6 months from January to August 2012. Data on basic demography, clinical and pathological tumor profile, and treatment details were collected prospectively for each patient based on patient interviews and medical records. Findings: Among 100 female patients taken up for the study, 48 were premenopausal and 52 had reached menopause. The mean age of presentation for breast carcinoma was a decade earlier in these patients compared with western patients. The risk factors for both pre-and post-menopausal breast cancer were found similar other than late menopause in postmenopausal patients. Having dense breast tissue was a predominant risk factor among all women. Late presentation was the common phenomenon in almost all patients. The treatment given was not based on any standard guidelines due to inadequate public health policies. Conclusion: Late stage at presentation of breast cancer is the main problem and possesses a challenge to the health care community. In order to reduce the burden of breast cancer, a multi-sectorial approach and evidence-based strategies aiming at early detection and effective management of the disease are required. PMID:24991630

  2. The Genomic Grade Assay Compared With Ki67 to Determine Risk of Distant Breast Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Azim, Hatem A; Desmedt, Christine; Veys, Isabelle; Larsimont, Denis; Salgado, Roberto; Lyng, Maria B; Viale, Giuseppe; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Kammler, Rosita; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Rothé, Françoise; Laïos, Ioanna; Ditzel, Henrik J; Regan, Meredith M; Piccart, Martine; Michiels, Stefan; Sotiriou, Christos

    2016-02-01

    The Genomic Grade Index (GGI) was previously developed, evaluated on frozen tissue, and shown to be prognostic in early breast cancer. To test the GGI in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumors, a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay was developed and named the Genomic Grade (GG). The GG assay has the potential to increase the clinical application of the GGI, but robust demonstration of the clinical validity of the GG assay is required. To evaluate the prognostic ability of the GG assay to detect breast cancer recurrence compared with centrally reviewed immunohistochemical testing of Ki67 antigen proliferation. This is an internationally collaborative substudy of a large phase 3 4-arm adjuvant trial. Patients had endocrine receptor-positive, node-positive, or node-negative nonmetastatic primary breast cancer. Patients included in this study had available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of their primary tumors and were randomized to either a 5-year tamoxifen monotherapy arm or a 5-year letrozole monotherapy arm. Associations between either GG assay results or log2-transformed Ki67 data and survival end points were evaluated using Cox regression models stratified for chemotherapy use; the 2 vs 4 arm randomization option; and endocrine therapy assignment with and without adjustment for clinicopathological parameters, including centrally reviewed histological grade, hormone receptors, and ERBB2 (formerly HER2 or HER2/neu). The likelihood ratio statistic was used to assess the added prognostic value. Central evaluation and comparison, blinded for clinical information, of the GG assay, breast cancer histological grade, and Ki67. Distant recurrence-free interval (DRFI). Genomic Grade assay data were obtained in 883 breast cancer samples (62%). At a median follow-up of 8.1 years, 84 (10%) had distant recurrences. Increasing GG or Ki67 were both significantly associated with lower DRFI and added independent prognostic

  3. A comparative biomarker study of 514 matched cases of male and female breast cancer reveals gender-specific biological differences.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Abeer M; Ball, Graham R; Brannan, Rebecca A; Cserni, Gabor; Di Benedetto, Anna; Dent, Jo; Fulford, Laura; Honarpisheh, Helen; Jordan, Lee; Jones, J Louise; Kanthan, Rani; Maraqa, Loaie; Litwiniuk, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Pollock, Steven; Provenzano, Elena; Quinlan, Philip R; Reall, Georgina; Shousha, Sami; Stephens, Mark; Verghese, Eldo T; Walker, Rosemary A; Hanby, Andrew M; Speirs, Valerie

    2012-06-01

    Male breast cancer remains understudied despite evidence of rising incidence. Using a co-ordinated multi-centre approach, we present the first large scale biomarker study to define and compare hormone receptor profiles and survival between male and female invasive breast cancer. We defined and compared hormone receptor profiles and survival between 251 male and 263 female breast cancers matched for grade, age, and lymph node status. Tissue microarrays were immunostained for ERα, ERβ1, -2, -5, PR, PRA, PRB and AR, augmented by HER2, CK5/6, 14, 18 and 19 to assist typing. Hierarchical clustering determined differential nature of influences between genders. Luminal A was the most common phenotype in both sexes. Luminal B and HER2 were not seen in males. Basal phenotype was infrequent in both. No differences in overall survival at 5 or 10 years were observed between genders. Notably, AR-positive luminal A male breast cancer had improved overall survival over female breast cancer at 5 (P = 0.01, HR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.26-0.87) but not 10 years (P = 0.29, HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.46-1.26) and both 5 (P = 0.04, HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.07-0.97) and 10 years (P = 0.04, HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.12-0.97) in the unselected group. Hierarchical clustering revealed common clusters between genders including total PR-PRA-PRB and ERβ1/2 clusters. A striking feature was the occurrence of ERα on distinct clusters between genders. In female breast cancer, ERα clustered with PR and its isoforms; in male breast cancer, ERα clustered with ERβ isoforms and AR. Our data supports the hypothesis that breast cancer is biologically different in males and females suggesting implications for clinical management. With the incidence of male breast cancer increasing this provides impetus for further study.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of primary tumors and metastases in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Garnier, Séverine; Carbuccia, Nadine; Monneur, Audrey; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Goncalves, Anthony; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2016-05-10

    Personalized medicine uses genomic information for selecting therapy in patients with metastatic cancer. An issue is the optimal tissue source (primary tumor or metastasis) for testing. We compared the DNA copy number and mutational profiles of primary breast cancers and paired metastases from 23 patients using whole-genome array-comparative genomic hybridization and next-generation sequencing of 365 "cancer-associated" genes. Primary tumors and metastases harbored copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations common in breast cancer and showed concordant profiles. The global concordance regarding CNAs was shown by clustering and correlation matrix, which showed that each metastasis correlated more strongly with its paired tumor than with other samples. Genes with recurrent amplifications in breast cancer showed 100% (ERBB2, FGFR1), 96% (CCND1), and 88% (MYC) concordance for the amplified/non-amplified status. Among all samples, 499 mutations were identified, including 39 recurrent (AKT1, ERBB2, PIK3CA, TP53) and 460 non-recurrent variants. The tumors/metastases concordance of variants was 75%, higher for recurrent (92%) than for non-recurrent (73%) variants. Further mutational discordance came from very different variant allele frequencies for some variants. We showed that the chosen targeted therapy in two clinical trials of personalized medicine would be concordant in all but one patient (96%) when based on the molecular profiling of tumor and paired metastasis. Our results suggest that the genotyping of primary tumor may be acceptable to guide systemic treatment if the metastatic sample is not obtainable. However, given the rare but potentially relevant divergences for some actionable driver genes, the profiling of metastatic sample is recommended.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of primary tumors and metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, François; Carbuccia, Nadine; Monneur, Audrey; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Goncalves, Anthony; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2016-01-01

    Personalized medicine uses genomic information for selecting therapy in patients with metastatic cancer. An issue is the optimal tissue source (primary tumor or metastasis) for testing. We compared the DNA copy number and mutational profiles of primary breast cancers and paired metastases from 23 patients using whole-genome array-comparative genomic hybridization and next-generation sequencing of 365 “cancer-associated” genes. Primary tumors and metastases harbored copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations common in breast cancer and showed concordant profiles. The global concordance regarding CNAs was shown by clustering and correlation matrix, which showed that each metastasis correlated more strongly with its paired tumor than with other samples. Genes with recurrent amplifications in breast cancer showed 100% (ERBB2, FGFR1), 96% (CCND1), and 88% (MYC) concordance for the amplified/non-amplified status. Among all samples, 499 mutations were identified, including 39 recurrent (AKT1, ERBB2, PIK3CA, TP53) and 460 non-recurrent variants. The tumors/metastases concordance of variants was 75%, higher for recurrent (92%) than for non-recurrent (73%) variants. Further mutational discordance came from very different variant allele frequencies for some variants. We showed that the chosen targeted therapy in two clinical trials of personalized medicine would be concordant in all but one patient (96%) when based on the molecular profiling of tumor and paired metastasis. Our results suggest that the genotyping of primary tumor may be acceptable to guide systemic treatment if the metastatic sample is not obtainable. However, given the rare but potentially relevant divergences for some actionable driver genes, the profiling of metastatic sample is recommended. PMID:27028851

  6. Accuracy of MRI for prediction of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer compared to other subtypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Gaurav J; Santosh, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the prediction of response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative (TN) breast cancer, with respect to other subtypes. Materials and Methods: There were a total of 1610 breast cancers diagnosed between March 2009 and August 2014, out of which 82 patients underwent MRI before and after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy but just before surgery. TN cancers were analyzed with respect to others subtypes. Accuracy of MRI for prediction of pathological complete response was compared between different subtypes by obtaining receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21 was used for all data analysis, with P value of 0.05 as statistically significant. Results: Out of 82 patients, 29 were luminal (HR+/HER2−), 23 were TN (HR−, HER2−), 11 were HER2 positive (HR−, HER2+), and 19 were of hybrid subtype (HR+/HER2+). TN cancers presented as masses on the pre-chemotherapy MRI scan, were grade 3 on histopathology, and showed concentric shrinkage following chemotherapy. TN cancers were more likely to have both imaging and pathological complete response following chemotherapy (P = 0.055) in contrast to luminal cancers, which show residual cancer. ROC curves were constructed for the prediction of pathological complete response with MRI. For the TN subgroup, MR had a sensitivity of 0.745 and specificity of 0.700 (P = 0.035), with an area under curve of 0.745 (95% confidence interval: 0.526–0.965), which was significantly better compared to other subtypes. Conclusion: TN breast cancers present as masses and show concentric shrinkage following chemotherapy. MRI is most accurate in predicting response to chemotherapy in the TN group, compared to others subtypes. MRI underestimates residual disease in luminal cancers. PMID:28104942

  7. Comparing Mammography Abnormality Features to Genetic Variants in the Prediction of Breast Cancer in Women Recommended for Breast Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Elizabeth S; Liu, Jie; Wu, Yirong; Onitilo, Adedayo A; McCarty, Catherine A; Page, C David; Peissig, Peggy L; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Kitchner, Terrie; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of germline genetic variants associated with breast cancer has engendered interest in risk stratification for improved, targeted detection and diagnosis. However, there has yet to be a comparison of the predictive ability of these genetic variants with mammography abnormality descriptors. Our institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study utilized a personalized medicine registry in which participants consented to provide a DNA sample and to participate in longitudinal follow-up. In our retrospective, age-matched, case-controlled study of 373 cases and 395 controls who underwent breast biopsy, we collected risk factors selected a priori based on the literature, including demographic variables based on the Gail model, common germline genetic variants, and diagnostic mammography findings according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). We developed predictive models using logistic regression to determine the predictive ability of (1) demographic variables, (2) 10 selected genetic variants, or (3) mammography BI-RADS features. We evaluated each model in turn by calculating a risk score for each patient using 10-fold cross-validation, used this risk estimate to construct Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) curves, and compared the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of each using the DeLong method. The performance of the regression model using demographic risk factors was not statistically different from the model using genetic variants (P = 0.9). The model using mammography features (AUC = 0.689) was superior to both the demographic model (AUC = .598; P < 0.001) and the genetic model (AUC = .601; P < 0.001). BI-RADS features exceeded the ability of demographic and 10 selected germline genetic variants to predict breast cancer in women recommended for biopsy. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting.

    PubMed

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Schuur, Klaas H; Timmers, Johanna M H; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation. Digital mammographic exams (N = 992) of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50-75y) in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition) and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density). BI-RADS density (ordinal scale) was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3) and Volpara (v1.5.0) provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had 'heterogeneously or extremely dense' breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6-16.5) for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4-10.9). The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04-5.34) (ICC: 0.64). There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense) was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra. Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized.

  9. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    PubMed Central

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, André L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation. Materials and Methods Digital mammographic exams (N = 992) of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50–75y) in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition) and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density). BI-RADS density (ordinal scale) was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3) and Volpara (v1.5.0) provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). Results Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had ‘heterogeneously or extremely dense’ breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6–16.5) for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4–10.9). The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04–5.34) (ICC: 0.64). There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense) was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra. Conclusion Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized. PMID:26335569

  10. Breast cancer recurrence following postmastectomy reconstruction compared to mastectomy with no reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sashank; Colakoglu, Salih; Curtis, Michael S; Yueh, Janet H; Ogunleye, Adeyemi; Tobias, Adam M; Lee, Bernard T

    2011-05-01

    Continuing advances in breast reconstruction have provided surgeons with a multitude of reconstructive options. Concerns remain, however, about the effects of the various reconstructive methods on ultimate oncologic outcome. This study compares incidence, detection, and management of recurrent breast cancer in a large series of patients treated with mastectomy alone or with mastectomy and various forms of reconstruction. A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients who underwent mastectomy and/or immediate reconstruction for breast cancer at our institution between January 1999 and December 2006. The 921 patients were divided into 2 groups: mastectomy and reconstruction (n = 494) and mastectomy alone (n = 427). All modern reconstructive methods were included. Patients were followed for a mean of 4.5 years. The total incidence of recurrence-locoregional and/or distant-was 5.9% in patients who had mastectomy with reconstruction and 11.5% in patients who had mastectomy alone (P < 0.0023). The incidence of locoregional recurrence only was 2.2% in patients who had mastectomy with reconstruction and 4.0% in patients who had mastectomy alone (P = 0.1220). Of the 11 reconstructed patients with a locoregional recurrence, all recurrences were detected by self or clinical examination. Median time to detection was the same in both groups: 1.6 years (P = 0.5471). Reconstruction with a variety of methods does not adversely affect the incidence or time to detection of recurrent breast cancer. Further, our data point to an important role for physical examination in tumor surveillance after mastectomy and reconstruction.

  11. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel resistance-related proteins in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroya; Sakai, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoru; Kimura, Kosei; Miyamoto, Akiko; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used to treat various cancers; however, resistance to this drug is a major obstacle to breast cancer chemotherapy. To identify the proteins involved in paclitaxel resistance, the present study compared the proteomes of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and its paclitaxel-resistant subclone MCF-7/PTX. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, 11 upregulated and 12 downregulated proteins were identified in MCF-7/PTX cells compared with the parental cell line. These 23 proteins were functionally classified as stress-induced chaperones, metabolic enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. The anti-apoptotic proteins, stress-70 protein, 78-kD glucose-regulated protein, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H3, were also upregulated in MCF-7/PTX cells. Notably, knockdown of the stress-response chaperone PPIA using small interfering RNA in MCF-7/PTX cells restored their sensitivity to paclitaxel. These findings indicated that PPIA may have an important role in paclitaxel resistance in MCF-7/PTX cells. PMID:28123557

  13. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  14. Higher breast cancer conspicuity on dbPET compared to WB-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, Kayo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Miyake, Kanae K; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kanao, Shotaro; Toi, Masakazu; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate lesion detectability of a dedicated breast positron-emission tomography (dbPET) scanner for breast cancers with an updated reconstruction mode, comparing it to whole-body positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (WB-PET/CT). A total of 179 histologically-proven breast cancer lesions in 150 females who underwent both WB-PET/CT and dbPET with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose were retrospectively analyzed. The patient/breast/lesion-based sensitivities based on visual analysis were compared between dbPET and WB-PET/CT. For lesions visible on both PET images, SUVmax values of the tumors were measured, and tumor-to-background ratios (T/B ratios) of SUVmax were compared between the two scans. Subgroup analyses according to clinical tumor stage, histopathology and histological grade were also performed. Patient/breast/lesion-based sensitivities were 95%, 95%, and 92%, respectively, for dbPET, and 95%, 94%, and 88%, respectively, for WB-PET/CT. Mean±standard deviation SUVmax values of FDG-avid tumors were 13.0±9.7 on dbPET and 6.4±4.8 on WB-PET. T/B ratios were also significantly higher in dbPET than in WB-PET/CT (8.1±7.1 vs. 5.1±4.5). In the subgroup analysis, no significant differences in sensitivities between dbPET and WB-PET/CT were found. However, T/B ratios of dbPET were significantly higher than those of WB-PET/CT in cT1c, cT2, cT3, invasive cancer, invasive carcinoma of no special type, mucinous carcinoma and Grades 1-3. No significant differences in sensitivities were identified between dbPET using an updated reconstruction mode and WB-PET/CT; however, T/B ratios of dbPET were significantly higher than those of WB-PET/CT, indicating higher tumor conspicuity on dbPET. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast cancer in Latinas: gene expression, differential response to treatments, and differential toxicities in Latinas compared with other population groups.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejal A; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Bueno Hume, Celyne; Copland, John A; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    Disparities in clinical outcomes of breast cancer have been described among different racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. Convincing data exist showing that Latina women have a lower incidence of breast cancer but a higher breast cancer-related mortality rate compared with white women. Noticeable differences in breast cancer incidence are present even within different Latina subsets with a higher incidence in second- and third-generation women compared with foreign born. An increasing amount of data exists pointing to significant differences in the genetics and biology of breast cancer in Latinas as a significant contributor to the higher mortality, including a higher incidence of triple-negative breast cancers (which do not overexpress HER-2 protein and are negative for estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors). Other social and environmental factors are likely to play a significant role as well, including a lower rate of screening mammography, variable access to medical care, among others. Recent data are inconclusive regarding differences among racial/ethnic groups in the response to chemotherapy. Data on racial/ethnic variations in the pharmacogenomics of chemotherapy, endocrine treatments, and toxicity are more limited, with some data suggesting differences in frequencies of polymorphisms of genes involved in the metabolism of some of these agents. Further studies are needed on this subject.

  16. Comparing screening mammography for early breast cancer detection in Vermont and Norway.

    PubMed

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L; Geller, Berta M

    2008-08-06

    Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of MRI compared to mammography for breast cancer screening in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Susan G; Shenoy, Pareen J; Fanucchi, Laura; Tumeh, John W; Flowers, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive method of breast imaging virtually uninfluenced by breast density. Because of the improved sensitivity, breast MRI is increasingly being used for detection of breast cancer among high risk young women. However, the specificity of breast MRI is variable and costs are high. The purpose of this study was to determine if breast MRI is a cost-effective approach for the detection of breast cancer among young women at high risk. Methods A Markov model was created to compare annual breast cancer screening over 25 years with either breast MRI or mammography among young women at high risk. Data from published studies provided probabilities for the model including sensitivity and specificity of each screening strategy. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates for hospital and physician services while medication costs were obtained from the Federal Supply Scale. Utilities from the literature were applied to each health outcome in the model including a disutility for the temporary health state following breast biopsy for a false positive test result. All costs and benefits were discounted at 5% per year. The analysis was performed from the payer perspective with results reported in 2006 U.S. dollars. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses addressed uncertainty in all model parameters. Results Breast MRI provided 14.1 discounted quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) at a discounted cost of $18,167 while mammography provided 14.0 QALYs at a cost of $4,760 over 25 years of screening. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of breast MRI compared to mammography was $179,599/QALY. In univariate analysis, breast MRI screening became < $50,000/QALY when the cost of the MRI was < $315. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, MRI screening produced a net health benefit of -0.202 QALYs (95% central range: -0.767 QALYs to +0.439 QALYs) compared to mammography at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50

  18. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of triple negative breast cancer in Kuwait: A comparative/perspective analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Fayaz, Mohammed S.; El-Sherify, Mustafa S.; El-Basmy, Amany; Zlouf, Sadeq A.; Nazmy, Nashwa; George, Thomas; Samir, Susan; Attia, Gerges; Eissa, Heba

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of TNBC in Kuwait, to analyze the clinicopathologic features and prognosis of this type of breast cancer, and compare it with reports from other regions of the world. Background Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a subtype that is negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). There is a growing evidence of the heterogeneity of such entity on the molecular level that may cause discrete outcomes. Methods We analyzed the clinicopathologic features of 363 TNBC cases which were diagnosed in Kuwait from July 1999 to June 2009. The disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by Kaplan–Meier method. Comparison was done with reports from USA, Europe, Middle and Far East. Results Among 2986 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in Kuwait, 363 patients (12.2%) were TNBC. The median age was 48 years, 57.2% had lymph nodes (LN) metastasis, 56.9% were of grade III tumor and 41.9% had stage II disease. 81% developed recurrences and 75% of deaths occurred by 2.5 years after treatment. There is marked variation of clinicopathologic features according to country of patients’ cohort. Conclusion The incidence of TNBC in our study is similar to other studies. TNBC patients showed an early major recurrence surge peaking at approximately year 2.5. Regional variation of clinicopathologic features indicates a need for molecular studies to define underlying molecular features and its impact on survival. PMID:24936335

  19. A Randomized Prospective Trial Comparing Paravertebral Block and General Anesthesia for Operative Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Treatment of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Christina R. Weltz Roy Greengrass , M.D. Stephen Klein, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Mount...General Anesthesia for Operative Treatment of Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Christina R. Weltz Roy Greengrass , M.D. Stephen Klein, M.D. 5...Medical Center to study the paravertebral block technique. Under the supervision of Dr. Roy Greengrass , Dr. Moreno attained preliminary proficiency

  20. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  1. Comparative Study of Breast Normal and Cancer Cells Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Cho, Eun Hee; Shin, Sang-Mo; Oh, Myoung-kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2012-08-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy imaging system was developed using a femtosecond laser and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We separated resonant and non-resonant CARS signals in the time domain by the chirp of the PCF, and applied this system to compare live human breast normal and cancer cells. The CARS image and spectrum at C-H stretch vibration in lipid droplets could subsequently be used to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells, thereby confirming the potential of the CARS microspectroscopy imaging system as a diagnostic tool that allows the high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and fast detection of breast cancer.

  2. A Phase III Trial Comparing Two Dose-dense, Dose-intensified Approaches (ETC and PM(Cb)) for Neoadjuvant Treatment of Patients With High-risk Early Breast Cancer (GeparOcto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-14

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; HER2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  3. Comparing medical cost of care for patients with metastatic breast cancer receiving taxane therapy: claims analysis.

    PubMed

    Force, Rex W; Pugmire, Brooke A; Culbertson, Vaughn L

    2010-07-01

    It has been estimated that more than $8 billion is spent annually on the management of breast cancer in the United States. The taxane chemotherapeutic agents are cornerstones in the treatment of breast cancer, yet no study has assessed whether the choice of a taxane affects the economic outcomes of metastatic breast cancer treatment. To determine if differences exist in the medical cost of care in patients receiving taxane-based chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer, and to compare the use of ancillary medications (for neutropenia, anemia, and nausea and vomiting) and their associated costs among taxanes. We identified women with metastatic breast cancer based on diagnosis codes and the women's previous adjuvant chemotherapeutic regimens. Paid medical insurance claims were captured for the 24-month study period, from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2007. The groups were determined according to the specific taxane administered. Total medical costs were captured from the date of first taxane administration to the end of data availability. Outpatient pharmacy costs were not available. A multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the total medical costs in each group. Median total medical costs per patient per month during the study period were adjusted using a multiple regression analysis. Utilization and cost of medications administered in the office or hospital for chemotherapy-induced adverse effects were captured and adjusted with Tobit models. Of the 2245 study participants, 1035 received docetaxel, 997 received generic paclitaxel, and 213 received nab-paclitaxel. On average, patients in the nab-paclitaxel group received more doses (9.6) than those in the generic paclitaxel (6.0) or docetaxel (4.8) groups. The multivariate analysis was robust, explaining 72% of the variability in total medical costs across the 3 taxane groups. Median per-patient per-month total medical costs for study participants were within approximately $800 of each other among the

  4. Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Skaane, Per

    2017-01-01

    To give an overview of studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in breast cancer screening. The implementation of tomosynthesis in breast imaging is rapidly increasing world-wide. Experimental clinical studies of relevance for DBT screening have shown that tomosynthesis might have a great potential in breast cancer screening, although most of these retrospective reading studies are based on small populations, so that final conclusions are difficult to draw from individual reports. Several retrospective studies and three prospective trials on tomosynthesis in breast cancer screening have been published so far, confirming the great potential of DBT in mammography screening. The main results of these screening studies are presented. The retrospective screening studies from USA have all shown a significant decrease in the recall rate using DBT as adjunct to mammography. Most of these studies have also shown an increase in the cancer detection rate, and the non-significant results in some studies might be explained by a lack of statistical power. All the three prospective European trials have shown a significant increase in the cancer detection rate. The retrospective and the prospective screening studies comparing FFDM and DBT have all demonstrated that tomosynthesis has a great potential for improving breast cancer screening. DBT should be regarded as a better mammogram that could improve or overcome limitations of the conventional mammography, and tomosynthesis might be considered as the new technique in the next future of breast cancer screening.

  5. Breast cancer screening in women with mental illness: comparative meta-analysis of mammography uptake.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Alex J; Pereira, Isabel Espirito Santo; Yadegarfar, Motahare; Pepereke, Shingai; Mugadza, Vongai; Stubbs, Brendon

    2014-12-01

    There is a higher mortality rate due to cancer in people with mental illness and previous work suggests suboptimal medical care in this population. It remains unclear if this extends to breast cancer population screening. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish if women with a mental health condition are less likely to receive mammography screening compared with those without mental ill health. Major electronic databases were searched from inception until February 2014. We calculated odds ratios (OR) with a random effects meta-analysis comparing mammography screening rates among women with and without a mental illness. Results were stratified according to primary diagnosis including any mental illness, mood disorders, depression, severe mental illness (SMI), distress and anxiety. We identified 24 publications reporting breast cancer screening practices in women with mental illness (n = 715,705). An additional 5 studies investigating screening for those with distress (n = 21,491) but no diagnosis of mental disorder were identified. The pooled meta-analysis showed significantly reduced rates of mammography screening in women with mental illness (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.66-0.77), mood disorders (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.76-0.90) and particularly SMI (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.65). No disparity was evident among women with distress alone. Rates of mammography screening are lower in women with mental illness, particularly women with SMI, and this is not explained by the presence of emotional distress. Disparities in medical care due to mental illness clearly extend into preventive population screening. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  6. Anxiety, depression and quality of life in Chinese women with breast cancer during and after treatment: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simone S M; So, Winnie K W; Leung, Doris Y P; Lai, Eve T L; Chan, Carmen W H

    2013-12-01

    To compare the psychological health and quality of life (QoL) of women with breast cancer, and to determine the relationship between anxiety, depression and QoL during treatment and one year afterwards. For this secondary analysis, 269 women undergoing adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, and 148 women with breast cancer who had completed all treatment within the last year completed a self-report questionnaire covering the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Cantonese/Chinese version, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, and demographic and clinical characteristics. The ongoing-therapy group showed higher levels of anxiety and depression and lower levels of all QoL dimensions than the post-therapy group. Linear regression results showed that both anxiety and depression were significantly related to physical and functional well-being, while depression was associated with social/family well-being in both groups. In the case of emotional well-being, anxiety had a strong significant association in both groups and depression a significant relationship only in the ongoing-therapy group. The psychological health of women with breast cancer is affected during and after treatment. Psychological distress in these patients, including anxiety and depression, has independent associations with impaired emotional, functional, physical and social well-being. The results highlight the importance of timely detection of anxiety and depression, and their proper management, during the treatment and survivorship phases of the breast cancer trajectory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V5). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparing the benefits of screening for breast cancer and lung cancer using a novel natural history model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ray S; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the impact of early detection of cancer, knowledge of how quickly primary tumors grow and at what size they shed lethal metastases is critical. We developed a natural history model of cancer to estimate the probability of disease-specific cure as a function of tumor size, the tumor volume doubling time (TVDT), and disease-specific mortality reduction achievable by screening. The model was applied to non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), separately. Model parameter estimates were based on Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry datasets and validated on screening trials. Compared to IDC, NSCLC is estimated to have a lower probability of disease-specific cure at the same detected tumor size, shed lethal metastases at smaller sizes (median: 19 mm for IDC versus 8 mm for NSCLC), have a TVDT that is almost half as long (median: 252 days for IDC versus 134 days for NSCLC). Consequently, NSCLC is associated with a lower mortality reduction from screening at the same screen detection threshold and screening interval. In summary, using a similar natural history model of cancer, we quantify the disease-specific curability attributable to screening for breast cancer, and separately lung cancer, in terms of the TVDT and onset of lethal metastases.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers . A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary ... will develop breast cancer . Some breast cancers that cluster in families are associated with inherited mutations in ...

  11. Does the prediction of breast cancer improve using a combination of mammographic density measures compared to individual measures alone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Sik Hee, Joseph Ryan; Harkness, Elaine F.; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, D. Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Astley, Susan M.

    2017-03-01

    High mammographic density is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, however whether the association is stronger when there is agreement across measures is unclear. This study investigates whether a combination of density measures is a better predictor of breast cancer risk than individual methods alone. Women recruited to the Predicting Risk of Cancer At Screening (PROCAS) study and with mammographic density assessed using three different methods were included (n=33,304). Density was assessed visually using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and by two fully automated methods, Quantra and Volpara. Percentage breast density was divided into (high, medium and low) and combinations of measures were used to further categorise individuals (e.g. `all high'). A total of 667 breast cancers were identified and logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between breast density and breast cancer risk. In total, 44% of individuals were in the same tertile for all three measures, 8.6% were in non-adjacent (high and low) or mixed categories (high, medium and low). For individual methods the strongest association with breast cancer risk was for medium and high tertiles of VAS with odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age and BMI of 1.63 (95% CI 1.31-2.03) and 2.33 (1.87-2.90) respectively. For the combination of density methods the strongest association was for `all high' (OR 2.42, 1.77-3.31) followed by "two high" (OR 1.90, 1.35-3.31) and "two medium" (OR 1.88, 1.40-2.52). Combining density measures did not affect the magnitude of risk compared to using individual methods.

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to other parts of the body. Where breast cancer begins in men Everyone is born with a ... skin around the nipple. Inherited genes that increase breast cancer risk Some men inherit abnormal (mutated) genes from ...

  13. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  14. Comparing Screening Mammography for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Vermont and Norway

    PubMed Central

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M.; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. Methods We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50–69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. Results The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Conclusion Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women. PMID:18664650

  15. Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis Breast cancer is sometimes ... cancer screening is so important. Learn more. Can Breast Cancer Be Found Early? Breast cancer is sometimes found ...

  16. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Prevention en español Cáncer de mama You may have heard about special events, like walks or races, to raise money for breast cancer research. Or maybe you've seen people wear ...

  17. Breast cancer and pregnancy: a comparative analysis of a Chilean cohort.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, César; Acevedo, Francisco; Medina, Lidia; Ibáñez, Carolina; Razmilic, Dravna; Elena Navarro, M; Camus, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports show that pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) survival is similar to that of non-pregnant young patients. We evaluate the characteristics and prognosis of PABC patients treated in our cancer centre. We identified patients with invasive PABC who were treated between 1999 and May 2013 and compared their characteristics with a no PABC cohort of similar age. The prevalence of PABC was 1% (n = 17). The median age was 35 years (range: 29- 42 years). The initial tumour was suspected clinically in 93% of the cases. Total mastectomy rates were higher in women with PABC (78.6% versus 40.5%, p = 0.02), and more tumours in the PABC group were triple negative, epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER2)-positive, and at advanced stages; however, these differences were not statistically significant. While estimated overall survival at ten years was higher in the non-PABC group (75.5% versus 80.5%, p = 0.043), disease-specific survival (DSS) rate at ten years was not statistically different between groups (83.9% for PABC and 75.5% for unrelated pregnancy BC, p = 0.37). PABC is a rare event. In our cohort, it tended to be more aggressive. Compared with a similar age cohort, the DSS was not worse.

  18. Comparing Relaxation Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Miri; Fried, Georgeta

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior (CB) group intervention versus relaxation and guided imagery (RGI) group training. Method: A total of 114 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to CB, RGI, or control groups, and instruments were completed at pre- and postintervention and 4 months later. Results:…

  19. Comparing Relaxation Training and Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Women with Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Miri; Fried, Georgeta

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior (CB) group intervention versus relaxation and guided imagery (RGI) group training. Method: A total of 114 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to CB, RGI, or control groups, and instruments were completed at pre- and postintervention and 4 months later. Results:…

  20. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  1. Diurnal variation of testosterone and estradiol: a source of bias in comparative studies on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panico, S; Pisani, P; Muti, P; Recchione, C; Cavalleri, A; Totis, A; Berrino, F

    1990-05-01

    In this paper we present a study of the diurnal variation of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) in women, carried out as part of the design of a prospective study on the hormonal and nutritional etiology of breast cancer. Blood samples were obtained 5 times on the same day, in the morning and early afternoon, from 23 women aged between 25 and 63 yr. Twelve were sampled within the first days following daylight-saving time (SUMTI) introduction. In postmenopause, T mean values decreased from 08:00 h to 15:00 h and the effect of blood drawing time was statistically significant (p less than 0.01), with no significant effects of SUMTI. For E2 mean values, no significant effect was found for either blood drawing time or SUMTI. In premenopause, T mean values decreased from morning to afternoon (p less than 0.01), while no effect of SUMTI was found. A significant decrease was observed for E2 during the day (p less than 0.01), with no significant influence of SUMTI. These results indicate that diurnal variation of T and E2 are such, that one must not neglect the possible effects of timing procedures on hormonal measurements, when hormonal hypotheses are tested in comparative studies on cancer etiology.

  2. A multi-centre randomised trial comparing ultrasound vs mammography for screening breast cancer in high-risk Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Shen, S; Zhou, Y; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Duan, X; Huang, R; Li, B; Shi, Y; Shao, Z; Liao, H; Jiang, J; Shen, N; Zhang, J; Yu, C; Jiang, H; Li, S; Han, S; Ma, J; Sun, Q

    2015-03-17

    Chinese women tend to have small and dense breasts and ultrasound is a common method for breast cancer screening in China. However, its efficacy and cost comparing with mammography has not been evaluated in randomised trials. At 14 breast centres across China during 2008-2010, 13 339 high-risk women aged 30-65 years were randomised to be screened by mammography alone, ultrasound alone, or by both methods at enrollment and 1-year follow-up. A total of 12 519 and 8692 women underwent the initial and second screenings, respectively. Among the 30 cancers (of which 15 were stage 0/I) detected, 5 (0.72/1000) were in the mammography group, 11 (1.51/1000) in the ultrasound group, and 14 (2.02/1000) in the combined group (P=0.12). In the combined group, ultrasound detected all the 14 cancers, whereas mammography detected 8, making ultrasound more sensitive (100 vs 57.1%, P=0.04) with a better diagnostic accuracy (0.999 vs 0.766, P=0.01). There was no difference between mammography and ultrasound in specificity (100 vs 99.9%, P=0.51) and positive predictive value (72.7 vs 70.0%; P=0.87). To detect one cancer, the costs of ultrasound, mammography, and combined modality were $7876, $45 253, and $21 599, respectively. Ultrasound is superior to mammography for breast cancer screening in high-risk Chinese women.

  3. Overall survival according to type of surgery in young (≤40 years) early breast cancer patients: A systematic meta-analysis comparing breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Vila, Jose; Gandini, Sara; Gentilini, Oreste

    2015-06-01

    Young age is an independent risk factor for local recurrence after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic meta-analysis to address the issue as to whether type of surgery might have an impact on overall survival (OS) of young patients with early breast cancer. We summarized six studies comparing OS between BCS + WBRT vs. mastectomy in young patients (≤40 years) with T1-T2 N0-N + M0 breast cancer. Primary endpoint was OS or distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Only studies with fully adjusted Hazard Ratios (HR) were analyzed. Summary HRs were calculated through random effects models. We investigated publication bias and heterogeneity by means of sensitivity analyses and meta-regression models. Five population-based studies and a pooled study of two clinical trials, for a total of 22598 patients 40 years old or younger, were considered: 10898 patients underwent BCS and 11700 underwent mastectomy. After all the adjustments, including nodal status and tumor size, no difference in risk of death was found between the two groups (10% not significant risk reduction in patients who underwent BCS compared to mastectomy; summary HR = 0·90; 95%CI: 0·81 to 1·00). Between-study heterogeneity was not statistically significant (I(2) = 34% and Chi-square P = 0·15). Heterogeneity investigation did not find any variable influencing results. No indication for publication bias was found (P-value = 0·37). Excluding the only study presenting DMFS the results did not change (HR = 0·88; 95%CI: 0·78 to 1·01). Considering all the limitations, from the present meta-analysis carried out on 22598 patients it appears unlikely that mastectomy provides better OS compared to BCS + WBRT in early breast cancer patients aged 40 years or younger. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Comparative effects of boric acid and calcium fructoborate on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Scorei, R; Ciubar, Raluca; Ciofrangeanu, Cristina M; Mitran, Valentina; Cimpean, Anisoara; Iordachescu, Dana

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies suggested that boron has a chemo-preventive role in prostate cancer. In the present report, we investigated the effects of calcium fructoborate (CF) and boric acid (BA) on activation of the apoptotic pathway in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Exposure to BA and CF inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with CF but not BA resulted in a decrease in p53 and bcl-2 protein levels. Furthermore, after the treatment with CF, augmentation of pro-caspase-3 protein expression, cytosolic cytochrome c level, and caspase-3 activity were observed, indicating apoptotic cell death induction. This was also demonstrated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick-end-labeling assay. In conclusion, our data provide arguments to the fact that both BA and CF inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells, while only CF induced apoptosis. Additional studies will be needed to identify the underlying mechanism responsible for the observed cellular responses to these compounds and to determine if BA and CF may be further evaluated as chemotherapeutic agents for human cancer.

  6. Effects of multidisciplinary team working on breast cancer survival: retrospective, comparative, interventional cohort study of 13 722 women

    PubMed Central

    Allardice, Gwen M; George, W David; Burns, Harry J G; Morrison, David S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effect of multidisciplinary care on survival in women treated for breast cancer. Design Retrospective, comparative, non-randomised, interventional cohort study. Setting NHS hospitals, health boards in the west of Scotland, UK. Participants 14 358 patients diagnosed with symptomatic invasive breast cancer between 1990 and 2000, residing in health board areas in the west of Scotland. 13 722 (95.6%) patients were eligible (excluding 16 diagnoses of inflammatory cancers and 620 diagnoses of breast cancer at death). Intervention In 1995, multidisciplinary team working was introduced in hospitals throughout one health board area (Greater Glasgow; intervention area), but not in other health board areas in the west of Scotland (non-intervention area). Main outcome measures Breast cancer specific mortality and all cause mortality. Results Before the introduction of multidisciplinary care (analysed time period January 1990 to September 1995), breast cancer mortality was 11% higher in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (hazard ratio adjusted for year of incidence, age at diagnosis, and deprivation, 1.11; 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.20). After multidisciplinary care was introduced (time period October 1995 to December 2000), breast cancer mortality was 18% lower in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (0.82, 0.74 to 0.91). All cause mortality did not differ significantly between populations in the earlier period, but was 11% lower in the intervention area than in the non-interventional area in the later period (0.89, 0.82 to 0.97). Interrupted time series analyses showed a significant improvement in breast cancer survival in the intervention area in 1996, compared with the expected survival in the same year had the pre-intervention trend continued (P=0.004). This improvement was maintained after the intervention was introduced. Conclusion Introduction of multidisciplinary care was associated with

  7. Routine use of standard breast MRI compared to axillary ultrasound for differentiating between no, limited and advanced axillary nodal disease in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van Nijnatten, T J A; Ploumen, E H; Schipper, R J; Goorts, B; Andriessen, E H; Vanwetswinkel, S; Schavemaker, M; Nelemans, P; de Vries, B; Beets-Tan, R G H; Smidt, M L; Lobbes, M B I

    2016-12-01

    To compare standard breast MRI to dedicated axillary ultrasound (with or without tissue sampling) for differentiating between no, limited and advanced axillary nodal disease in breast cancer patients. All patients who underwent breast MRI and dedicated axillary ultrasound between 2009 and 2014 were eligible. Exclusion criteria were recurrent disease, neoadjuvant systemic therapy and not receiving completion axillary lymph node dissection after positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). Two radiologists independently reassessed all MRI exams. Axillary ultrasound findings were retrospectively collected. Probability of advanced axillary nodal disease (pN2-3) given clinically node negative (cN0) or limited (cN1) findings was calculated, with corresponding negative predictive value (NPV) to exclude pN2-3 and positive predictive value (PPV) to identify axillary nodal disease. Histopathology served as gold standard. A total of 377 cases resulted in 81.4% no, 14.4% limited and 4.2% advanced axillary nodal disease at final histopathology. Probability of pN2-3 given cN0 for breast MRI and axillary ultrasound was 0.7-0.9% versus 1.5% and probability of pN2-3 given cN1 was 11.6-15.4% versus 29.0%. When cN1 on breast MRI was observed, PPV to identify positive axillary nodal disease was 50.7% and 59.0%. Evaluation of axillary nodal status on standard breast MRI is comparable to dedicated axillary ultrasound in breast cancer patients. In patients who underwent preoperative standard breast MRI, axillary ultrasound is only required in case of suspicious nodal findings on MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  9. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  10. Hereditary breast cancer in Jews.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Wendy S

    2004-01-01

    A family history of breast cancer poses higher risks for Jewish versus non-Jewish women, particularly for early-onset breast cancer. This appears to be due in large part to the high prevalence (2.5%) of three BRCA1 and BRCA2 founder mutations in Ashkenazi Jews. About 4 to 8% of non-Jewish male breast cancer cases versus 19% of Jewish male breast cancer cases carry germline BRCA mutations. Jewish women are disproportionately impacted by BRCA mutations throughout life, with a 10% carrier rate for breast cancer diagnosed at any age and a 21 to 30% carrier rate for breast cancer diagnosed by age 40. Comparable rates in non-Jewish populations are 6.1% for breast cancer diagnosed before age 50. Lifetime penetrance estimates based on genotyping of probands have ranged widely in Jewish and non-Jewish populations. However, a study of 1008 Jewish women with breast cancer which extended genotyping to relatives found high penetrance rates with considerably smaller standard errors. This study and studies of early-onset incident breast cancer in non-Jews have found that at least half of high-risk cases would be missed by family history screening alone. While the carrier rate in non-Jewish populations is too low to consider genetic screening, the carrier rate in Ashkenazi Jews is high and genetic screening poses fewer technical barriers. The high genetic attributable cancer risks of Ashkenazi BRCA founder mutations, the sobering lethality of ovarian and early onset breast cancers, and the increasing clarity about effectiveness of medical interventions make imperative further dialogue and research to keep guidelines for genetic screening up to date.

  11. A comparative study of Ki-67 antigen expression between luminal A and triple-negative subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borges, Umbelina Soares; Costa-Silva, Danylo Rafhael; da Silva-Sampaio, João Paulo; Escórcio-Dourado, Carla Solange; Conde, Airton Mendes; Campelo, Viriato; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique; da Silva, Benedito Borges; Lopes-Costa, Pedro Vitor

    2017-09-01

    Tumor biomarkers such as hormone receptors, HER-2 and Ki-67 are used routinely in clinical practice for classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Cell proliferation evaluated by Ki-67 antigen expression is important to determine tumor aggressiveness. However, there is a paucity of studies comparing Ki-67 expression in an expressive number of cells among molecular subtypes of breast cancer, particularly among less and more aggressive tumors, such as luminal A and triple-negative, which have led us to the present study. The current study included invasive ductal carcinoma samples of 59 patients, which were divided into two groups: luminal A (n = 29) and triple-negative (n = 30). For immunohistochemical reaction, the samples were incubated with monoclonal anti-Ki-67 antibody (clone MIB1) and cells expressing Ki-67 protein were identified by dark brown staining of the nuclei, counting at least 600 cells per slide. The mean percentages of stained nuclei were analyzed by Student's t test (p < 0.05). The mean percentage of nuclei stained with anti-ki-67 was 10.14 and 77.22 in luminal A and triple-negative breast cancers, respectively (p < 0.0001). Our study showed a high cell proliferation of triple-negative breast cancer in comparison with luminal A, justifying its aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Nimesulide-Loaded Nanoparticles for Anticancer Activity Against Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sengel-Turk, Ceyda Tuba; Hascicek, Canan; Bakar, Filiz; Simsek, Elif

    2017-02-01

    Recent clinical and epidemiological researches have declared that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents may display as antineoplastic agents and indicate pro-apoptotic and antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The major purpose of this research was to develop a novel poly(ethyleneglycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) nano-sized particles encapsulated with nimesulide (NMS), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and to evaluate its anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. NMS-encapsulated PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles were fabricated using three different production techniques: (i) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using a high shear homogenizer, (ii) by emulsion-solvent evaporation using an ultrasonicator, and (iii) by nanoprecipitation. Nanoparticles were evaluated with respect to the entrapment efficiency, size characteristics, drug release rates, thermal behavior, cell viability assays, and apoptosis. The resulting nanoparticles were found to be spherical shapes with negative surface charges. The average diameter of all nanoparticles ranged between 148.5 and 307.2 nm. In vitro release profiles showed that all nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic release pattern. NMS-loaded PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles demonstrated significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the effects of nanoparticles on cell proliferation were significantly affected by the preparation techniques. The nanoparticles developed in this work displayed higher potential for the NMS delivery against breast cancer treatment for the future.

  13. Molecular characteristics and prognostic features of breast cancer in Nigerian compared with UK women.

    PubMed

    Agboola, A J; Musa, A A; Wanangwa, N; Abdel-Fatah, T; Nolan, C C; Ayoade, B A; Oyebadejo, T Y; Banjo, A A; Deji-Agboola, A M; Rakha, E A; Green, A R; Ellis, I O

    2012-09-01

    Although breast cancer (BC) incidence is lower in African-American women compared with White-American, in African countries such as Nigeria, BC is a common disease. Nigerian women have a higher risk for early-onset, with a high mortality rate from BC, prompting speculation that risk factors could be genetic and the molecular portrait of these tumours are different to those of western women. In this study, 308 BC samples from Nigerian women with complete clinical history and tumour characteristics were included and compared with a large series of BC from the UK as a control group. Immunoprofile of these tumours was characterised using a panel of 11 biomarkers of known relevance to BC. The immunoprofile and patients' outcome were compared with tumour grade-matched UK control group. Nigerian women presenting with BC were more frequently premenopausal, and their tumours were characterised by large primary tumour size, high tumour grade, advanced lymph node stage, and a higher rate of vascular invasion compared with UK women. In the grade-matched groups, Nigerian BC showed over representation of triple-negative and basal phenotypes and BRCA1 deficiency BC compared with UK women, but no difference was found regarding HER2 expression between the two series. Nigerian women showed significantly poorer outcome after development of BC compared with UK women. This study demonstrates that there are possible genetic and molecular differences between an indigenous Black population and a UK-based series. The basal-like, triple negative and BRCA1 dysfunction groups of tumours identified in this study may have implications in the development of screening programs and therapies for African patients and families that are likely to have a BRCA1 dysfunction, basal like and triple negative.

  14. Family History of Breast Cancer, Breast Density, and Breast Cancer Risk in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Population.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Sprague, Brian L; Bissell, Michael C S; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana S M; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-06-01

    Background: The utility of incorporating detailed family history into breast cancer risk prediction hinges on its independent contribution to breast cancer risk. We evaluated associations between detailed family history and breast cancer risk while accounting for breast density.Methods: We followed 222,019 participants ages 35 to 74 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, of whom 2,456 developed invasive breast cancer. We calculated standardized breast cancer risks within joint strata of breast density and simple (1(st)-degree female relative) or detailed (first-degree, second-degree, or first- and second-degree female relative) breast cancer family history. We fit log-binomial models to estimate age-specific breast cancer associations for simple and detailed family history, accounting for breast density.Results: Simple first-degree family history was associated with increased breast cancer risk compared with no first-degree history [Risk ratio (RR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.1 at age 40; RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.7 at age 50; RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6 at age 60; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5 at age 70). Breast cancer associations with detailed family history were strongest for women with first- and second-degree family history compared with no history (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2 at age 40); this association weakened in higher age groups (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.88-1.5 at age 70). Associations did not change substantially when adjusted for breast density.Conclusions: Even with adjustment for breast density, a history of breast cancer in both first- and second-degree relatives is more strongly associated with breast cancer than simple first-degree family history.Impact: Future efforts to improve breast cancer risk prediction models should evaluate detailed family history as a risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 938-44. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. [Life expectancy of clinically occult breast cancer. Study of a comparative patient sample since 1975].

    PubMed

    Paterok, E M; Neudert, M; Rosenthal, H; Richter, S; Säbel, N

    1993-05-01

    We have been observing 2 groups of 50 female patients with occult or clinical breast cancer each of whom was initially treated at the Gynaecologic Hospital of the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg between 1975 and 1978. During the follow-up period, 2 patients out of the group of occult cancer and 13 out of the group of clinical carcinoma died of their primary disease. Four women out of the group of occult cancer and 3 from the group of "clinical carcinoma" have developed recurrences. The differences in survival times according to Kaplan-Meier are immense, even if they are not significant owing to the small number of patients. But it is difficult to obtain and to evaluate larger groups of patients and longer follow-up periods due to the low percentage of occult cancer (7.7 to 10.5% only). There are 30 women out of the group of occult breast cancer living without relapse after an observation period up to 15 years. 27 patients out of the group of "clinical cancer" have not shown any evidence of recurrence up to now. This small difference after such a long follow-up period can be explained by the general life expectancy and by the age at initial treatment.

  16. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red, or inflamed. Inflammatory breast cancer is rare, accounting for 1 to 5 percent of all breast ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  17. Comparative study of the immunohistochemical phenotype in breast cancer and its lymph node metastatic location.

    PubMed

    De la Haba-Rodríguez, Juan R; Ruiz Borrego, Manuel; Gómez España, Auxiliadora; Villar Pastor, Carlos; Japón, Miguel A; Travado, Paulino; Moreno Nogueira, José Andrés; López Rubio, Fernando; Aranda Aguilar, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    At present, an important part of prognostic information, together with particular treatment strategies in breast cancer, take into account the immunohistochemical phenotype of the primary tumor location. However, the changing heterogeneity intrinsic to neoplastic cells in general leads us to consider the possibility that the expression of these proteins is modified during tumoral development and dissemination. With this hypothesis as a starting point, 60 patients with breast cancer were studied with immunohistochemistry, the expression of estrogen and progestagenic receptors, proliferation through the Ki-67 expression, and the overexpression of HER-2 and p53 in both the primary location and the lymph node metastases. If we consider significant change to be loss (from positive to negative) or gain (negative to positive) of expression in some of the studied determinations, we find that this is produced in 60% of the tumors studied. These results demonstrate the modification of immunohistochemical expression of the proteins studied between the primary tumor location and the lymph node metastases.

  18. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Breast Cancer Survivor Follow up Care After Breast Cancer Treatment Many women are relieved or excited to ... Menopausal Hormone Therapy After Breast Cancer More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  19. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Treatment of Breast Cancer in Men, by Stage Because there have been ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  20. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  1. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer How Does Breast Cancer Form? Changes or mutations in DNA can cause ... please see our Content Usage Policy . More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  2. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men The thought of surgery can be ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation compared with whole breast radiation therapy: a breast cancer cohort study measuring change in radiation side-effects severity and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Schootman, M; Hall, L E; Jeffe, D B

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer patients has similar survival benefits with whole breast RT (WBRT) or accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, the impact of RT type and side-effects severity on change in quality of life (QOL) is unknown. We examined changes in RT side-effects severity and QOL by RT type. We analyzed data from a cohort of 285 newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer patients with tumor size ≤3.0 cm and lymph node-negative disease. Patients (93 [32.6%] stage 0; 49 [17.2%] non-white; mean age = 59.3 years) completed four interviews (6 weeks, 6, 12, and 24 months) after definitive surgical treatment. We measured severity of RT side effects, fatigue and skin irritation, using a 5-point scale (1 "not at all" to 5 "all the time") and measured QOL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) and RAND 36-item Health Survey Vitality subscale. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance of each outcome controlled for demographic, clinical/treatment, and psychosocial factors. Patients initiated RT by 6 months (113 received APBI; 172 received WBRT) and completed RT by 12 months. Patients receiving WBRT (vs. APBI) reported greater increase in fatigue and skin irritation severity from 6-week to 6-month interviews (each P < 0.001). Improvement in neither total FACT-B nor Vitality differed significantly by RT type over 2-year follow-up. Findings suggest that early-stage breast cancer patients can benefit from less-severe, short-term side effects of APBI with no differential impact on QOL change within 2-year follow-up.

  4. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  5. Comparative study of receptor discordance between primary and corresponding metastatic lesions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Gokmen U; Altundag, Kadri; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y; Sahin, Suleyman; Demirci, Nebi S; Karatas, Fatih; Bozkaya, Yakup; Aytekin, Aydin; Tasdemir, Vildan; Aslan, Alma C; Sever, Ali R; Zengin, Nurullah

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that tumor phenotype may change during the progression of breast cancer (BC). The purpose in this study was to compare the discordance in estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) between primary and recurrent/metastatic lesions (RML) and also to evaluate the prognostic significance of change in tumor phenotype on survival in patients with metastatic BC. The medical records of 6638 patients with BC from two breast centers treated between 1992 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 6638 patients, 549 cases in whom recurrence was histologically proven by biopsy or by surgical resection were enrolled into this study. Our presentation 13.5% of the patients had metastatic disease. Biopsy on recurrence was obtained from distant metastasis sites in 250 (63.6%) patients or from locoregional soft tissues/lymph-nodes in 143 (36.4%). Receptor discordance in ER, PgR and HER2 expressions between primary and RML were 27.2% (p=0.32), 38.6% (p<0.001) and 14.4% (p=0.007), respectively. Subsequent gain of ER and PgR showed significantly higher overall survival (OS) and post-recurrence survival (PRS) compared to the corresponding concordant-negative patients (119 vs 57 months, p=0.001 and 56 vs 31 months, p=0.03 for ER, 148 vs 58 months, p=0.003 and 64 vs 31 months, p=0.01 for PgR, respectively), hormone receptor (HR) loss was associated with worse OS. Similarly, HER2-loss cases experienced poorer PRS and OS outcomes, compared with those having stable HER2 expression (median 26 vs 60 months, p=0.009 for PRS and median 60 vs 111 months, p=0.06 for OS, respectively). This study confirmed the receptor discordance in ER/PgR and HER2 receptor expressions between primary and RML in patients with metastatic BC. As the loss of receptor expression is the most responsible factor for the discordance, treatments of recurrent/metastatic tumors should be individualized on the basis of molecular and genomic

  6. A Comparative Study of Daily 3-Gy Hypofractionated and 1.8-Gy Conventional Breast Irradiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sea-Won; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Han, Wonshik; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Lee, Eun Sook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We retrospectively compared accelerated hypofractionation (AHF) with conventional fractionation (CF) in the radiation therapy (RT) for early-stage breast cancer patients. Three hundred seventy-nine early-stage (pT1–2 and pN0–1a) breast cancer patients who received RT with AHF after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. These patients were matched with 379 corresponding patients who received BCS and RT with CF at a different center with respect to the year BCS was performed, patient age (±3 years), and cancer stage. The AHF regimen consisted of 39 Gy in 13 fractions to the whole breast and a consecutive boost of 9 to 12 Gy in 3 to 4 fractions to the tumor bed. CF comprised whole-breast irradiation up to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and a boost of 9 to 14 Gy in 5 to 7 fractions to the tumor bed. The median follow-up period was 75 months (range, 3.8–110.8 months). There was no statistically significant difference between the AHF and CF groups in terms of age distribution, T and N stage, resection margin, and histologic grade. There were 5 ipsilateral breast tumor relapse (IBTR) cases in the AHF group compared with 7 cases in the CF group. Seven and eight locoregional relapse (LRR) cases were observed in the AHF and CF groups, respectively. The 7-year rates of IBTR-free survival, LRR-free survival, and disease-free survival were 98.9%, 98.4%, and 97.1% in the AHF group and 98.1%, 97.9%, and 96.0% in the CF group, respectively (P > 0.05). The incident rates of grade 3 edema, hyperpigmentation, or wet desquamation at the end of RT were higher in the CF group than in the AHF group (16.4% vs 0.2%, respectively; P < 0.01). AHF RT of 39 Gy to the whole breast plus a 9-Gy boost in 16 fractions showed excellent tumor control and tolerable skin toxicity, a finding that is comparable to CF RT in patients with early-stage breast cancer. PMID:27175630

  7. Efficacy and safety of balugrastim compared with pegfilgrastim in patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Volovat, Constantin; Gladkov, Oleg A; Bondarenko, Igor M; Barash, Steve; Buchner, Anton; Bias, Peter; Adar, Liat; Avisar, Noa

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) reduce the incidence and duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia when given as adjunct therapy to patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Balugrastim is a long-acting G-CSF composed of a genetic fusion between recombinant human serum albumin and G-CSF. We compared the efficacy and safety of balugrastim and pegfilgrastim, a long-acting pegylated recombinant G-CSF, in patients with breast cancer who were scheduled to receive chemotherapy. In this double-blind randomized phase III trial, patients with ≥ 1.5 × 10(9) neutrophils/L were randomly assigned to subcutaneous injections of balugrastim 40 mg (n = 153) or pegfilgrastim 6 mg (n = 151). The primary efficacy end point was the duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) (days with an absolute neutrophil count [ANC] < 0.5 × 10(9) cells/L) during cycle 1. Efficacy analyses were performed in the per-protocol (PP) population. In a separate open-label single-arm study, newly recruited patients (n = 77) received balugrastim 40 mg and were included in the safety analysis. The mean DSN in cycle 1 was 1.1 days in the balugrastim group and 1.0 days in the pegfilgrastim group (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.13-0.37). Two and 4 patients, respectively, had febrile neutropenia during cycle 1. Twenty percent of patients in the balugrastim group and 19% in the pegfilgrastim group had adverse events (AEs) considered to be related to study medication; 3.9% and 4.7% of patients, respectively, experienced serious AEs. This study demonstrates the comparable safety and efficacy profile of balugrastim and pegfilgrastim and the noninferiority of balugrastim for reduction in DSN. There were no unexpected safety events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High-Resolution Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Inflammatory Breast Cancer and Identification of Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Adelaïde, José; Ferrari, Anthony; Tarpin, Carole; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Charpin, Colette; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Bidaut, Ghislain; Birnbaum, Daniel; Viens, Patrice; Chaffanet, Max; Bertucci, François

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive form of BC poorly defined at the molecular level. We compared the molecular portraits of 63 IBC and 134 non-IBC (nIBC) clinical samples. Methodology/Findings Genomic imbalances of 49 IBCs and 124 nIBCs were determined using high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization, and mRNA expression profiles of 197 samples using whole-genome microarrays. Genomic profiles of IBCs were as heterogeneous as those of nIBCs, and globally relatively close. However, IBCs showed more frequent “complex” patterns and a higher percentage of genes with CNAs per sample. The number of altered regions was similar in both types, although some regions were altered more frequently and/or with higher amplitude in IBCs. Many genes were similarly altered in both types; however, more genes displayed recurrent amplifications in IBCs. The percentage of genes whose mRNA expression correlated with CNAs was similar in both types for the gained genes, but ∼7-fold lower in IBCs for the lost genes. Integrated analysis identified 24 potential candidate IBC-specific genes. Their combined expression accurately distinguished IBCs and nIBCS in an independent validation set, and retained an independent prognostic value in a series of 1,781 nIBCs, reinforcing the hypothesis for a link with IBC aggressiveness. Consistent with the hyperproliferative and invasive phenotype of IBC these genes are notably involved in protein translation, cell cycle, RNA processing and transcription, metabolism, and cell migration. Conclusions Our results suggest a higher genomic instability of IBC. We established the first repertory of DNA copy number alterations in this tumor, and provided a list of genes that may contribute to its aggressiveness and represent novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21339811

  9. Changing molecular profile of brain metastases compared with matched breast primary cancers and impact on clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A H; McGrane, J; Mathew, J; Palmer, J; Hilton, D A; Purvis, G; Jenkins, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer commonly metastasises to the brain, but little is known about changes in the molecular profile of the brain secondaries and impact on clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients with samples from brain metastases and matched breast cancers were included. Immunohistochemical analysis for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, p27kip1, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin like growth factor 1, insulin like growth factor 1 receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor A, transforming growth factor-β and HER2 receptor was performed. Borderline HER2 results were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation. Levels of expression were compared, with review of effect on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 41 patients were included. Of the patients, 20% had a change in oestrogen receptor or HER2 in their brain metastasis that could affect therapeutic decisions. There were statistically significant rises in brain metastases for p27kip1 (P=0.023) and cyclin D1 (P=0.030) and a fall in vascular endothelial growth factor A (P=0.012). Overall survival from the time of metastasis increased significantly with oestrogen receptor-positive (P=0.005) and progesterone receptor-positive (P=0.013) brain lesions and with a longer duration from diagnosis of the breast primary (P<0.001). Conclusions: In this cohort there were phenotypic differences in metastatic brain tumours compared with matched primary breast tumours. These could be relevant for aetiology, and have an impact on prognostication, current and future therapies. PMID:26908328

  10. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Randomized, double-blind study comparing proposed biosimilar LA-EP2006 with reference pegfilgrastim in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Nadia; Lipatov, Oleg; Frolova, Mona; Udovitsa, Dmitry; Topuzov, Eldar; Ganea-Motan, Doina Elena; Nakov, Roumen; Singh, Pritibha; Rudy, Anita; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2016-06-01

    This randomized, double-blind trial compared proposed biosimilar LA-EP2006 with reference pegfilgrastim in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer (PROTECT-1). Women (≥18 years) were randomized to receive LA-EP2006 (n = 159) or reference (n = 157) pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®), Amgen) for ≤6 cycles of (neo)-adjuvant TAC chemotherapy. Primary end point was duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) during cycle 1 (number of consecutive days with absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9)/l) with equivalence confirmed if 90% and 95% CIs were within a ±1 day margin. For DSN, LA-EP2006 was equivalent to reference (difference: 0.07 days; 90% CI: -0.09-0.23; 95% CI: -0.12-0.26). LA-EP2006 and reference pegfilgrastim showed no clinically meaningful differences regarding efficacy and safety in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

  12. Comparing paraffined and deparaffinized breast cancer tissue samples and an analysis of Raman spectroscopy and infrared methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depciuch, J.; Kaznowska, E.; Szmuc, K.; Zawlik, I.; Cholewa, M.; Heraud, P.; Cebulski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer makes up a quarter of all cancer in women, which is why research into new diagnostic methods and sample preparations need to be developed at an accelerated pace. Researchers are looking for diagnostic tools to detect when an individual has cancer cells and use that information to see what measurements and approaches can be used to take further diagnostic steps. The most common method of sample preparation is the imbibing of tumor tissue in paraffin, which can produce a background for spectroscopic measurements in the range of 500-3500 cm-1. In this study we demonstrated that proper preparation of paraffin-embedded specimens and the measurement methodology can eliminate paraffin vibration, as was done in the work Depciuch et al. 2015. Thanks to this spectroscopic technique there may become a reliable and accurate method of diagnosing breast cancer based on the evidence found from the prepared samples. The study compared the results obtained through Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) measurements of healthy and cancerous breast tissues that were either embedded in paraffin or deparaffinized. The resulting spectrum and accurate analysis led to the conclusion that the appropriate measurement of the background and the elimination of peaks from the paraffin had the greatest impact on the reliability of results. Furthermore, after the accurate, detailed studies FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on samples of breast tissue that were deparaffinized or embedded in paraffin, including a complete analysis of the peak after transformation Kramers-Kröning (KK), it was found that sample preparation did not affect the result obtained by measuring the reflectance in the mid-infrared range, and that this only had a minimal effect relating to the intensity obtained by the measurement of the Raman peak. Only in special cases, when Raman spectroscopic methods are used for research to find the peculiarities of the spectra, are deparaffinization recommended

  13. A multi-centre randomised trial comparing ultrasound vs mammography for screening breast cancer in high-risk Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Shen, S; Zhou, Y; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Duan, X; Huang, R; Li, B; Shi, Y; Shao, Z; Liao, H; Jiang, J; Shen, N; Zhang, J; Yu, C; Jiang, H; Li, S; Han, S; Ma, J; Sun, Q

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese women tend to have small and dense breasts and ultrasound is a common method for breast cancer screening in China. However, its efficacy and cost comparing with mammography has not been evaluated in randomised trials. Methods: At 14 breast centres across China during 2008–2010, 13 339 high-risk women aged 30–65 years were randomised to be screened by mammography alone, ultrasound alone, or by both methods at enrolment and 1-year follow-up. Results: A total of 12 519 and 8692 women underwent the initial and second screenings, respectively. Among the 30 cancers (of which 15 were stage 0/I) detected, 5 (0.72/1000) were in the mammography group, 11 (1.51/1000) in the ultrasound group, and 14 (2.02/1000) in the combined group (P=0.12). In the combined group, ultrasound detected all the 14 cancers, whereas mammography detected 8, making ultrasound more sensitive (100 vs 57.1%, P=0.04) with a better diagnostic accuracy (0.999 vs 0.766, P=0.01). There was no difference between mammography and ultrasound in specificity (100 vs 99.9%, P=0.51) and positive predictive value (72.7 vs 70.0% P=0.87). To detect one cancer, the costs of ultrasound, mammography, and combined modality were $7876, $45 253, and $21 599, respectively. Conclusions: Ultrasound is superior to mammography for breast cancer screening in high-risk Chinese women. PMID:25668012

  14. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Inherited Susceptibility to Cancer: Comparing Breast and Ovarian Cancers to Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; DeRienzo, Christopher; Carbone, Julia; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Conover, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer can be compared to similar testing for colorectal cancer as a “natural experiment.” Inherited susceptibility accounts for a similar fraction of both cancers and genetic testing results guide decisions about options for prophylactic surgery in both sets of conditions. One major difference is that in the United States, Myriad Genetics is the sole provider of genetic testing, because it has sole control of relevant patents for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes whereas genetic testing for familial colorectal cancer is available from multiple laboratories. Colorectal cancer-associated genes are also patented, but they have been nonexclusively licensed. Prices for BRCA1 and 2 testing do not reflect an obvious price premium attributable to exclusive patent rights compared to colorectal cancer testing, and indeed Myriad’s per unit costs are somewhat lower for BRCA1/2 testing than testing for colorectal cancer susceptibility. Myriad has not enforced patents against basic research, and negotiated a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Cancer Institute in 1999 for institutional BRCA testing in clinical research. The main impact of patenting and licensing in BRCA compared to colorectal cancer is the business model of genetic testing, with a sole provider for BRCA and multiple laboratories for colorectal cancer genetic testing. Myriad’s sole provider model has not worked in jurisdictions outside the United States, largely because of differences in breadth of patent protection, responses of government health services, and difficulty in patent enforcement. PMID:20393305

  15. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, E.; Curtis, R.; Hoffman, D. A.; Flannery, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features. PMID:6691901

  16. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ron, E; Curtis, R; Hoffman, D A; Flannery, J T

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features.

  17. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization to define molecular portraits of primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Chin, S-F; Wang, Y; Thorne, N P; Teschendorff, A E; Pinder, S E; Vias, M; Naderi, A; Roberts, I; Barbosa-Morais, N L; Garcia, M J; Iyer, N G; Kranjac, T; Robertson, J F R; Aparicio, S; Tavaré, S; Ellis, I; Brenton, J D; Caldas, C

    2007-03-22

    We analysed 148 primary breast cancers using BAC-arrays containing 287 clones representing cancer-related gene/loci to obtain genomic molecular portraits. Gains were detected in 136 tumors (91.9%) and losses in 123 tumors (83.1%). Eight tumors (5.4%) did not have any genomic aberrations in the 281 clones analysed. Common (more than 15% of the samples) gains were observed at 8q11-qtel, 1q21-qtel, 17q11-q12 and 11q13, whereas common losses were observed at 16q12-qtel, 11ptel-p15.5, 1p36-ptel, 17p11.2-p12 and 8ptel-p22. Patients with tumors registering either less than 5% (median value) or less than 11% (third quartile) total copy number changes had a better overall survival (log-rank test: P=0.0417 and P=0.0375, respectively). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering based on copy number changes identified four clusters. Women with tumors from the cluster with amplification of three regions containing known breast oncogenes (11q13, 17q12 and 20q13) had a worse prognosis. The good prognosis group (Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) breast cancer based on copy number profiling using tumor DNA, which may be more generally applicable than expression microarray analysis.

  18. Role of E542 and E545 missense mutations of PIK3CA in breast cancer: a comparative computational approach.

    PubMed

    Thirumal Kumar, D; George Priya Doss, C

    2017-09-01

    Recent statistics describe breast cancer as the leading cause of death among women across the world with varied causes and reasons. Lifestyle, diet, genetic and environmental factors introduce their generous contributions towards breast cancer, among which genetic factors have lately become one of the most important aspects in understanding the mechanism. Although various genes have already been reported in causing breast cancer, PIK3CA stands second on the list. Mutations observed in this gene have the ability to trigger the different activities of the cell, thereby bypassing the regular cellular cycle. Among the mutations in PIK3CA, three hotspot mutations were commonly reported, one in the catalytic domain (position HIS1047) and other two in the helical domain (position GLU542 and GLU545). In the helical domain of PIK3CA, the lysine substitution at 542-545 positions was significantly studied in causing breast cancer. To compare the deleterious effect of these mutations, in silico prediction tools along with molecular dynamics simulations and molecular docking approach was initiated to analyse the change in binding landscape upon mutation. In this comparative analysis, we report that the mere existence of mutant E545K can trigger the function of the protein but may not be as harmful as H1047R. Among the two mutations E542K and E545K, the latter shows the most deleterious effect that correlates with the previous reported experimental studies. We assume the results observed in this combinatorial computational study might further pave a better way for providing better treatment procedures.

  19. Retrospective and comparative analysis of (99m)Tc-Sestamibi breast specific gamma imaging versus mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of breast cancer in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuyan; Hu, Guoming; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiu, Fuming; Shao, Xuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhan, Hongwei; Chen, Yiding; Deng, Yongchuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-07-11

    Diagnosing breast cancer during the early stage may be helpful for decreasing cancer-related mortality. In Western developed countries, mammographies have been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, Chinese women usually have denser and smaller-sized breasts compared to Caucasian women, which decreases the diagnostic accuracy of mammography. However, breast specific gamma imaging, a type of molecular functional breast imaging, has been used for the accurate diagnosis of breast cancer and is not influenced by breast density. Our objective was to analyze the breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI) diagnostic value for Chinese women. During a 2-year period, 357 women were diagnosed and treated at our oncology department and received BSGI in addition to mammography (MMG), ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnostic assessment. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of each method of detection and compared the biological profiles of the four imaging methods. A total of 357 women received a final surgical pathology diagnosis, with 168 malignant diseases (58.5 %) and 119 benign diseases (41.5 %). Of these, 166 underwent the four imaging tests preoperatively. The sensitivity of BSGI was 80.35 and 82.14 % by US, 75.6 % by MMG, and 94.06 % by MRI. Furthermore, the breast cancer diagnosis specificity of BSGI was high (83.19 % vs. 77.31 % vs. 66.39 % vs. 67.69 %, respectively). The BSGI diagnostic sensitivity for mammographic breast density in women was superior to mammography and more sensitive for non-luminal A subtypes (luminal A vs. non-luminal A, 68.63 % vs. 88.30 %). BSGI may help improve the ability to diagnose early stage breast cancer for Chinese women, particularly for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), mammographic breast density and non-luminal A breast cancer.

  20. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  1. Global breast cancer seasonality.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Nawaz, Hamayun; Yang, Chul-Ho; Wood, Patricia A; Hrushesky, William J M

    2010-08-01

    Human breast cancer incidence has seasonal patterns that seem to vary among global populations. The aggregate monthly frequency of breast cancer diagnosis was collected and examined for 2,921,714 breast cancer cases diagnosed across 64 global regions over spans from 2 to 53 years. Breast cancer is consistently diagnosed more often in spring and fall, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, regardless of presumable menopausal status (50). This seasonality is increasingly more prominent as population distance from the equator increases and this latitude dependence is most pronounced among women living in rural areas. Moreover, the overall annual incidence (2005-2006), per 100,000 population, of breast cancer increased as the latitude of population residence increased. These data make it clear that human breast cancer discovery occurs non-randomly throughout each year with peaks near both equinoxes and valleys near both solstices. This stable global breast cancer seasonality has implications for better prevention, more accurate screening, earlier diagnosis, and more effective treatment. This complex latitude-dependent breast cancer seasonality is clearly related to predictable local day/night length changes which occur seasonally. Its mechanism may depend upon seasonal sunlight mediation of vitamin D and seasonal mediation of nocturnal melatonin peak level and duration.

  2. Color model comparative analysis for breast cancer diagnosis using H and E stained images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyu; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital cancer diagnosis is a research realm where signal processing techniques are used to analyze and to classify color histopathology images. Different from grayscale image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging or X-ray, colors in histopathology images convey large amount of histological information and thus play significant role in cancer diagnosis. Though color information is widely used in histopathology works, as today, there is few study on color model selections for feature extraction in cancer diagnosis schemes. This paper addresses the problem of color space selection for digital cancer classification using H and E stained images, and investigates the effectiveness of various color models (RGB, HSV, CIE L*a*b*, and stain-dependent H and E decomposition model) in breast cancer diagnosis. Particularly, we build a diagnosis framework as a comparison benchmark and take specific concerns of medical decision systems into account in evaluation. The evaluation methodologies include feature discriminate power evaluation and final diagnosis performance comparison. Experimentation on a publicly accessible histopathology image set suggests that the H and E decomposition model outperforms other assessed color spaces. For reasons behind various performance of color spaces, our analysis via mutual information estimation demonstrates that color components in the H and E model are less dependent, and thus most feature discriminate power is collected in one channel instead of spreading out among channels in other color spaces.

  3. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  4. Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlan David, Shannon; Salzillo, Sandra; Bowe, Patrick; Scuncio, Sandra; Malit, Bridget; Raker, Christina; Gass, Jennifer S; Granai, C O; Dizon, Don S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial comparing a drug with a complementary or alternative method (CAM). Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting Breast health centre of a tertiary care centre. Participants 15 women with a personal history of breast cancer or an increased risk of breast cancer who reported at least one daily hot flash. Interventions Gabapentin 900 mg daily in three divided doses (control) compared with standardised hypnotherapy. Participation lasted 8 weeks. Outcome measures The primary endpoints were the number of daily hot flashes and hot flash severity score (HFSS). The secondary endpoint was the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS). Results 27 women were randomised and 15 (56%) were considered evaluable for the primary endpoint (n=8 gabapentin, n=7 hypnotherapy). The median number of daily hot flashes at enrolment was 4.5 in the gabapentin arm and 5 in the hypnotherapy arm. HFSS scores were 7.5 in the gabapentin arm and 10 in the hypnotherapy arm. After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm. The median HFSS was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 85% in the hypnotherapy arm. HFRDIS scores improved by 51.6% in the gabapentin group and by 55.2% in the hypnotherapy group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Hypnotherapy and gabapentin demonstrate efficacy in improving hot flashes. A definitive trial evaluating traditional interventions against CAM methods is feasible, but not without challenges. Further studies aimed at defining evidence-based recommendations for CAM are necessary. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00711529). PMID:24022390

  5. Comparative Analysis of Breast Cancer Phenotypes in African American, White American, and West Versus East African patients: Correlation Between African Ancestry and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiagge, Evelyn; Jibril, Aisha Souleiman; Chitale, Dhananjay; Bensenhaver, Jessica M; Awuah, Baffour; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Adjei, Ernest; Bekele, Mahteme; Abebe, Engida; Nathanson, S David; Gyan, Kofi; Salem, Barbara; Oppong, Joseph; Aitpillah, Francis; Kyei, Ishmael; Bonsu, Ernest Osei; Proctor, Erica; Merajver, Sofia D; Wicha, Max; Stark, Azadeh; Newman, Lisa A

    2016-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is more common among African American (AA) and western sub-Saharan African breast cancer (BC) patients compared with White/Caucasian Americans (WA) and Europeans. Little is known about TNBC in east Africa. Invasive BC diagnosed 1998-2014 were evaluated: WA and AA patients from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan; Ghanaian/west Africans from the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana; and Ethiopian/east Africans from the St. Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2/neu expression was performed in Michigan on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples from all cases. A total of 234 Ghanaian (mean age 49 years), 94 Ethiopian (mean age 43 years), 272 AA (mean age 60 years), and 321 WA (mean age 62 years; p = 0.001) patients were compared. ER-negative and TNBC were more common among Ghanaian and AA compared with WA and Ethiopian cases (frequency ER-negativity 71.1 and 37.1 % vs. 19.8 and 28.6 % respectively, p < 0.0001; frequency TNBC 53.2 and 29.8 % vs. 15.5 and 15.0 %, respectively, p < 0.0001). Among patients younger than 50 years, prevalence of TNBC remained highest among Ghanaians (50.8 %) and AA (34.3 %) compared with WA and Ethiopians (approximately 16 % in each; p = 0.0002). This study confirms an association between TNBC and West African ancestry; TNBC frequency among AA patients is intermediate between WA and Ghanaian/West Africans consistent with genetic admixture following the west Africa-based trans-Atlantic slave trade. TNBC frequency was low among Ethiopians/East Africans; this may reflect less shared ancestry between AA and Ethiopians.

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  7. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread outside the breast . In stage IB , small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ... centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ...

  8. Cell Proliferation (KI-67) Expression Is Associated with Poorer Prognosis in Nigerian Compared to British Breast Cancer Women.

    PubMed

    Agboola, Ayodeji O J; Banjo, Adekumbiola A F; Anunobi, Charles C; Salami, Babatunde; Agboola, Mopelola Deji; Musa, Adewale A; Nolan, Christopher C; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Background. Black women with breast cancer (BC) in Nigeria have higher mortality rate compared with British women. This study investigated prognostic features of cell proliferation biomarker (Ki-67) in Nigerian breast cancer women. Materials and Methods. The protein expression of Ki-67 was investigated in series of 308 Nigerian women, prepared as a tissue microarray (TMA), using immunohistochemistry. Clinic-pathological parameters, biomarkers, and patient outcome of tumours expressing Ki-67 in Nigerian women were correlated with UK grade-matched series. Results. A significantly larger proportion of breast tumours from Nigerian women showed high Ki-67 expression. Those tumours were significantly correlated with negative expression of the steroid hormone receptors (ER and PgR), p21, p27, E-cadherin, BRCA-1, and Bcl-2 (all P < 0.001), but positively associated with EGFR (P = 0.003), p53, basal cytokeratins: CK56, CK14, triple negative, and basal phenotype using Nielsen's classification (all P < 0.001) compared to UK women. Multivariate analyses showed that race was also associated with BCSS independent of tumour size, lymph node status, and ER status. Conclusion. Ki-67 expression was observed to have contributed to the difference in the BCSS in Nigerian compared with British BC women. Therefore, targeting Ki-67 in the indigenous black women with BC might improve the patient outcome in the black women with BC.

  9. Increasing the Efficiency on Producing Radiology Reports for Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Means of Structured Reports. A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Segrelles, J Damian; Medina, Rosana; Blanquer, Ignacio; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2017-05-18

    Radiology reports are commonly written on free-text using voice recognition devices. Structured reports (SR) have a high potential but they are usually considered more difficult to fill-in so their adoption in clinical practice leads to a lower efficiency. However, some studies have demonstrated that in some cases, producing SRs may require shorter time than plain-text ones. This work focuses on the definition and demonstration of a methodology to evaluate the productivity of software tools for producing radiology reports. A set of SRs for breast cancer diagnosis based on BI-RADS have been developed using this method. An analysis of their efficiency with respect to free-text reports has been performed. The methodology proposed compares the Elapsed Time (ET) on a set of radiological reports. Free-text reports are produced with the speech recognition devices used in the clinical practice. Structured reports are generated using a web application generated with TRENCADIS framework. A team of six radiologists with three different levels of experience in the breast cancer diagnosis was recruited. These radiologists performed the evaluation, each one introducing 50 reports for mammography, 50 for ultrasound scan and 50 for MRI using both approaches. Also, the Relative Efficiency (REF) was computed for each report, dividing the ET of both methods. We applied the T-Student (T-S) test to compare the ETs and the ANOVA test to compare the REFs. Both tests were computed using the SPSS software. The study produced three DICOM-SR templates for Breast Cancer Diagnosis on mammography, ultrasound and MRI, using RADLEX terms based on BIRADs 5th edition. The T-S test on radiologists with high or intermediate profile, showed that the difference between the ET was only statistically significant for mammography and ultrasound. The ANOVA test performed grouping the REF by modalities, indicated that there were no significant differences between mammograms and ultrasound scans, but both

  10. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  11. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    the Witness model will be tailored for breast cancer survivors and the peer interventionists (breast cancer survivors and lay health advisors) will be...by a lay health advisor; 4) discussion of concerns and myths about breast cancer and screening /surveillance that are prevalent among AAW; 5) review...Breast cancer screening surveillance Breast cancer screening Treatment/Time of Treatment intention /adherence & physician recommendation

  12. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  13. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk: 2003 Workshop In February 2003, the National ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  14. Comparative Study of Alterations in Tri-iodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) Hormone Levels in Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Zaigham, Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Riaz, Naila; Alam, Rabail; Manan, Abdul; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed; Asif, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective : The present study was designed to investigate variations in the levels of thyroid hormones (T3, T4) in breast and ovarian cancers patients. Methods : A total 120 subjects were recruited (without thyroid history) divided into three groups; A, B and C. Group A as control with healthy individuals. While group B and group C were consisting of breast cancer and ovarian cancer patient respectively. Blood samples (5 ml) were taken and analyzed to estimate the levels of serum T3 (tri-iodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxin) hormones. R esults : Statistically significant difference (P=0.000* and P=0.017*) was obtained among all groups. A significant increase in T3 (P=0.000*) and T4 (0.005*) levels was observed among breast cancer patients as compared to healthy controls. While for ovarian cancer patients conflicting results were found for T3 and T4 levels in the serum i.e. insignificant difference was found in T3 (P=0.209) and T4 (P=0.050) as compared to control. Our results showed that in the breast cancer and ovarian cancer patients the thyroid hormone (T3 and T4) level has been altered from the normal ranges as compared to the normal healthy individuals. Conclusion : We conclude that hyperthyroidism has profound effects on breast cancer and ovarian cancer cells proliferation.

  15. Breast cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Wendy; Stout, Steven C; Miller, Andrew H; Musselman, Dominique

    2004-07-01

    Major depression and depressive symptoms, although commonly encountered in patients with medical illnesses, are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated in women with breast cancer. Depression and its associated symptoms diminish quality of life, adversely affect compliance with medical therapies, and reduce survival. Treatment of depression in women with breast cancer improves their dysphoria and other depressive symptoms, enhances quality of life, and may increase longevity. In this review, studies that investigate pathophysiologic alterations in patients with cancer and comorbid depression are discussed, and the few studies on treatment of depression and related symptoms in women with breast cancer are examined.

  16. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Methods Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. Results The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Conclusions Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide a

  17. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-12-07

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A

  18. Comparative adherence to oral hormonal agents in older women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y; Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Ruan, Jenny Y; Chang, Jennifer T; Setoguchi, Soko

    2015-07-01

    We aim to (1) compare compliance of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, and tamoxifen in women and (2) identify clinical factors associated with medication non-adherence and non-persistence. Female Medicare beneficiaries who were new users of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, or tamoxifen between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed. Multivariate-modified Poisson and Cox regression models were constructed to compare non-adherence and non-persistence, respectively, across the different oral agents. A total of 5,150 women were included: mean age was 76.4 years, 2352 initiated anastrozole, 1401 letrozole, 248 exemestane, and 1149 tamoxifen. Non-adherence and non-persistence were 41 and 49% respectively, with exemestane being associated with the worst non-adherence and non-persistence (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.37-1.80, p < 0.001; HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.63-2.30, respectively, p < 0.001), followed by letrozole (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.26-1.53, p < 0.001; HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.32-1.64, respectively, p < 0.001), and anastrozole (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.05-1.27, p = 0.003; HR 1.14, 95%CI 1.03-1.27, respectively, p = 0.011), whereas tamoxifen was associated with the best compliance. Use of statins and osteoporosis medications was correlated with improved adherence (RR 0.89, 95 % CI 0.82-0.96, p = 0.002 and RR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.76-0.92, p < 0.001, respectively, for non-adherence) and persistence (HR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.79-0.94, p < 0.001 and HR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.78-0.96, p = 0.005, respectively, for non-persistence), but chronic kidney disease was correlated with worse non-persistence (HR 1.15, 95 % CI 1.04-1.33, p = 0.04). Age ≥ 70 years was also associated with worse compliance. Compliance to oral hormonal therapy varied depending on the type of agent, age, and concurrent medications, highlighting specific opportunities to improve adherence and persistence in older women with breast cancer.

  19. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  20. Outcome of Breast Cancer in Moroccan Young Women Correlated to Clinic-Pathological Features, Risk Factors and Treatment: A Comparative Study of 716 Cases in a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Mouh, Fatima Zahra; Ghanname, Imane; Razine, Rachid; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Amrani, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer in young women is quite uncommon and shows more aggressive characteristics with major disparities between worldwide populations. Prognosis and outcome of breast cancer in young patients are widely studied, but still no consensus is available. Methods We retrospectively included 716 cases of breast cancer women diagnosed in 2009 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their age: women aged ≤40 years (Group 1) and women aged >40 years (Group 2). Data were recorded from patients’ medical files and analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software (IBM). Results Young patients represent 24.9% of all patients with breast cancer. The comparison between the two groups displayed significant differences regarding nulliparity (p = 0.001) and progesterone receptor negativity (p = 0.01). Moreover, more progression (Metastases/Relapse) was registered in young women as compared to older women with breast cancer (p = 0.03). The estimated median follow-up period was 31 months. The 5-years Event-Free Survival (EFS) of patients with local disease was 64.6% in young women and 71.5% in older women with breast cancer (p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis in young women showed that nulliparity (HR: 7.2; 95%CI: 1.16–44.54; p = 0.03), T3 tumors (HR: 17.39; 95%CI: 1.74–173.34; p = 0.01) and negative PgR status (HR: 19.85; 95%CI: 1.07–366.54; p = 0.04) can be considered as risk factors for poorer event free survival while hormone therapy was associated with better EFS (HR: 0.11; 95%CI: 0.00–0.75; p = 0.03). In Group 2, multivariate analysis showed that patients with inflammatory breast cancer, N+ status, absence of radiotherapy, absence of chemotherapy, and absence of hormone therapy are at increased risk of recurrence. Conclusions In Morocco, breast cancer is more frequent in young women as compared to western countries. Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive and is diagnosed late, leading to an intensive

  1. Outcome of Breast Cancer in Moroccan Young Women Correlated to Clinic-Pathological Features, Risk Factors and Treatment: A Comparative Study of 716 Cases in a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Slaoui, Meriem; Mouh, Fatima Zahra; Ghanname, Imane; Razine, Rachid; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Amrani, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is quite uncommon and shows more aggressive characteristics with major disparities between worldwide populations. Prognosis and outcome of breast cancer in young patients are widely studied, but still no consensus is available. We retrospectively included 716 cases of breast cancer women diagnosed in 2009 at the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat. Patients were divided into two groups according to their age: women aged ≤40 years (Group 1) and women aged >40 years (Group 2). Data were recorded from patients' medical files and analyzed using SPSS 13.0 software (IBM). Young patients represent 24.9% of all patients with breast cancer. The comparison between the two groups displayed significant differences regarding nulliparity (p = 0.001) and progesterone receptor negativity (p = 0.01). Moreover, more progression (Metastases/Relapse) was registered in young women as compared to older women with breast cancer (p = 0.03). The estimated median follow-up period was 31 months. The 5-years Event-Free Survival (EFS) of patients with local disease was 64.6% in young women and 71.5% in older women with breast cancer (p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis in young women showed that nulliparity (HR: 7.2; 95%CI: 1.16-44.54; p = 0.03), T3 tumors (HR: 17.39; 95%CI: 1.74-173.34; p = 0.01) and negative PgR status (HR: 19.85; 95%CI: 1.07-366.54; p = 0.04) can be considered as risk factors for poorer event free survival while hormone therapy was associated with better EFS (HR: 0.11; 95%CI: 0.00-0.75; p = 0.03). In Group 2, multivariate analysis showed that patients with inflammatory breast cancer, N+ status, absence of radiotherapy, absence of chemotherapy, and absence of hormone therapy are at increased risk of recurrence. In Morocco, breast cancer is more frequent in young women as compared to western countries. Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive and is diagnosed late, leading to an intensive treatment. Moreover, the main factors associated

  2. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    which is a study of 3131 human tumor samples and cancer cell lines including 243 breast samples. Tumorscape showed that PAK1 is located in an...chromosome 11q of human tumor samples and cancer cell lines that exhibit highest level of PAK1 amplification divided according to cancer type...breast, non-small cell (NSC) lung, ovarian (Ov), small cell lung (SCL), melanoma (Mel) and esophageal squamous (Esq). PAK1 and CCND1 1oci are marked . B

  3. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  4. Urinary rubidium in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Chen, Li-Juan; He, Jian-Rong; Yuan, Xue-Jiao; Cen, Yu-Ling; Su, Feng-Xi; Tang, Lu-Ying; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Chen, Wei-Qing; Lin, Ying; Wang, Shen-Ming; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2011-11-20

    Rubidium is a putative anticancer agent, but no studies have been performed on the association of rubidium levels in biospecimen with breast cancer risk and the potential as a biomarker of the risk assessment. Survey data and urine specimens were collected from 240 women with incident invasive breast cancer before their treatments and 246 age-matched female controls between October 2009 and July 2010. Urinary concentrations of rubidium were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) ug/g] of rubidium in cases [2253.01(1606.81, 3110.46)] were significantly lower than that in the controls [2921.85 (2367.94, 4142.04)]. After adjustment for potential risk factors of breast cancer, women in the second and highest tertile decreased risk of breast cancer in a dose-dependent manner as compared with those in the lowest tertile [ORs and 95% CIs were 0.45 (0.27-0.73) and 0.22 (0.13-0.38), respectively]. The area under the receive-operating-characteristic curve for urinary rubidium level was 0.697 (95% CI: 0.650-0.743). The urinary levels of rubidium were significantly and inversely associated with risk of breast cancer and had potential to be a biomarker for breast cancer risk assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Is a comparative clinical trial for breast cancer tumor markers to monitor disease recurrence warranted? A value of information analysis.

    PubMed

    Thariani, Rahber; Henry, Norah Lynn; Ramsey, Scott D; Blough, David K; Barlow, Bill; Gralow, Julie R; Veenstra, David L

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer tumor markers are used by some clinicians to screen for disease recurrence risk. Since there is limited evidence of benefit, additional research may be warranted. To assess the potential value of a randomized clinical trial of breast tumor marker testing in routine follow-up of high-risk, stage II-III breast cancer survivors. We developed a decision-analytic model of tumor marker testing plus standard surveillance every 3-6 months for 5 years. The expected value of sample information was calculated using probabilistic simulations and was a function of: the probability of selecting the optimal monitoring strategy with current versus future information; the impact of choosing the nonoptimal strategy; and the size of the population affected. The value of information for a randomized clinical trial involving 9000 women was US$214 million compared with a cost of US$30-60 million to conduct such a trial. The probability of making an alternate, nonoptimal decision and choosing testing versus no testing was 32% with current versus future information from the trial. The impact of a nonoptimal decision was US$2150 and size of population impacted over 10 years was 308,000. The value of improved information on overall survival was US$105 million, quality of life US$37 million and test performance US$71 million. Conducting a randomized clinical trial of breast cancer tumor markers appears to offer a good societal return on investment. Retrospective analyses to assess test performance and evaluation of patient quality of life using tumor markers may also offer valuable areas of research. However, alternative investments may offer even better returns in investments and, as such, the trial concept deserves further study as part of an overall research-portfolio evaluation.

  6. Return to work after treatment for primary breast cancer over a 6-year period: results from a prospective study comparing patients with the general population.

    PubMed

    Noeres, Dorothee; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Grabow, Jördis; Sperlich, Stefanie; Koch-Gießelmann, Heike; Jaunzeme, Jelena; Geyer, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Only little research has been conducted on breast cancer survivors returning to work in Germany. This paper explores two questions: (1) Does breast cancer lead to an increased drop-out of paid work? (2) Do other factors, apart from their illness, help explain breast cancer survivors' (temporary) retirement from work? To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative and prospective study on breast cancer survivors returning to work in Germany. We consider this work to be a relevant research for three reasons: (1) It exceeds the observation period of previous international studies by another 3 years. (2) By including the comparison with a population sample, it allows to take the specific situation of breast cancer patients into account. This refers to their illness as well as to the socio-economic context. (3) It combines qualitative and quantitative methods in order to receive patients' individual interpretations. The analysis is based on a sample of 227 breast cancer patients, participating in a prospective study on the role of psychosocial factors in the long-term course of breast cancer and a random sample of 647 age-matched women living in northern Germany. Employment and demographic data were observed directly before primary surgery (2002-2004), 1 year later (2003-2005) and again 5 years later (2008-2010). In addition, qualitative interviews at the three different observations served as a basis for quantitative data analyses, which were mainly performed by logistic regression models. One year after primary surgery, nearly three times as many cancer survivors had left their job as compared to the women in the reference group. For breast cancer survivors, a lower level of education, part-time employment, the severity of work-related difficulties and participation in inpatient rehabilitation correlated significantly with the failure to return to work. Six years after surgery, the probability of returning to work was still only half as high among breast

  7. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  9. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPCR 2017 CDC National Cancer Conference Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  10. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  11. Breast Cancer In Women

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  12. The management of screen-detected breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneer; Douek, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of mammography and introduction of breast screening programmes have resulted in a rise in clinically-occult breast cancer, with one-third of all breast carcinomata diagnosed being non-palpable. These types of cancer have a unique natural history and biology compared to symptomatic breast cancer and this needs to be taken into account when considering surgery and adjuvant treatment. The majority of studies demonstrating efficacy of adjuvant treatments are largely based on patients with symptomatic breast cancer. The current evidence for the role of surgery and adjuvant therapy for screen-detected breast cancer was reviewed in light of their improved prognosis, compared to symptomatic breast cancer.

  13. Quiz: How much do you know about breast cancer? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer late stage breast cancer locally advanced breast cancer Stage III breast cancer is early stage breast cancer late stage breast cancer locally advanced breast cancer Stage IV breast cancer is early stage breast cancer ...

  14. A cost--utility analysis comparing second-line chemotherapy schemes in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, N; van Agthoven, M; Willemse, P; Uyl-de Groot, C

    2001-07-01

    A cost-utility analysis has been performed comparing taxanes, vinorelbine and standard therapy for metastatic breast cancer considering clinical efficacy, quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and costs. A decision model has been built. Clinical efficacy data were collected by literature review. Utility data and cost data were collected from previous studies and Dutch wholesale prices. Except for the MV standard therapy, VM has the lowest C/E ratio of $17,114/QALY, followed by paclitaxel ($30,270/QALY) and docetaxel ($49,739/QALY). VM yields the highest number of QALYs (0.47), compared to paclitaxel (0.35), docetaxel (0.34) and MV (0.29). Compared to the MV standard therapy, the incremental C/E of VM is $23,046/QALY, which is the lowest of all alternatives. We conclude that compared to paclitaxel, docetaxel and MV standard chemotherapy, VM is the most cost-effective second-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer patients. There is a considerable variation in utility scores, depending on the methods or the data sources used. The C/E ratios were influenced most strongly by drug prices, utility and efficacy (in descending order of importance).

  15. Outcome of Patients With Early Breast Cancer Receiving Nitrogen-Containing Bisphosphonates: A Comparative Analysis From the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Nahleh, Zeina; Abrams, Judith; Bhargaval, Ashish; Nirmal, Kavita; Graff, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that bisphosphonates exhibit antitumor activity. However, clinical studies indicated conflicting results. In this study, we compared the overall survival (OS) of postmenopausal patients with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer who received any of the second-generation nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates for osteopenia or osteoporosis, with the survival of those who did not. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective study at the Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer institute (KCI) in Detroit, Michigan and extracted data from the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System (MDCSS), a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry. Patients > 50 years of age with stage I, II, or III invasive breast cancer between the years 2000 through 2003 were included. Information regarding medications was extracted from the patients’ medical records. Results A total of 696 women with stage I–III breast cancer were included. Ninety-seven women (14%) used nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. The difference in OS between bisphosphonate users and nonusers was not statistically significant (P = .32) at 3 years. After adjusting for differences between the groups in age, stage of disease, hormone receptor status, endocrine therapy, vitamin D, and calcium use, there was a marginally significant (P = .07) difference in survival; bisphosphonate users had poorer survival than nonusers. Conclusion Our results indicate that the use of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates is not associated with improved OS in patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer, even after adjusting for known prognostic factors, but with a marginally worse OS. Further research is awaited to clarify the role of bisphosphonates in the adjuvant setting. PMID:21147689

  16. Prevalence of Papillomaviruses, Polyomaviruses, and Herpesviruses in Triple-Negative and Inflammatory Breast Tumors from Algeria Compared with Other Types of Breast Cancer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Corbex, Marilys; Bouzbid, Sabiha; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Aouras, Hayette; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Carreira, Christine; Lankar, Abdelaziz; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    Background The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups. Materials and Methods One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria) to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses) using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology. Results Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9%) of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type) than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04). Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009). Conclusions Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative). While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings. PMID:25478862

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  18. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  19. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  20. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... men may have radiation after surgery. Since most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor-positive, hormone therapy (with tamoxifen) is often used depending on the stage. Chemotherapy may be given before tamoxifen. For men ...

  1. Obesity and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf

    The relationship between adiposity and breast cancer risk and prognosis is complex, with associations that differ depending on when body size is assessed (e.g., pre- vs. postmenopausal obesity) and when breast cancer is diagnosed (i.e., pre- vs. postmenopausal disease). Further, the impact of obesity on risk differs by tumor hormone receptor status (e.g., estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor) and, among postmenopausal women, use of exogenous hormones (i.e., hormone replacement therapy (HRT)). In the context of these complexities, this review focuses on associations between childhood and adolescent adiposity, general adiposity, weight changes (i.e., loss and gain), abdominal adiposity, and breast cancer risk and survival. Finally, we discuss potential mechanisms linking adiposity to breast cancer.

  2. The breast cancer conundrum.

    PubMed

    Adams, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    For decades, rates of breast cancer have been going up faster in rich countries than in poor ones. Scientists are beginning to understand more about its causes but unanswered questions remain. Patrick Adams reports.

  3. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Breast Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/breastcancer.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  4. Endocrine effects of adjuvant letrozole + triptorelin compared with tamoxifen + triptorelin in premenopausal patients with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Emanuela; Morabito, Alessandro; De Maio, Ermelinda; Di Rella, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Gravina, Adriano; Labonia, Vincenzo; Landi, Gabriella; Nuzzo, Francesco; Pacilio, Carmen; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Botti, Gerardo; Gallo, Ciro; Perrone, Francesco; de Matteis, Andrea

    2008-01-10

    To compare the endocrine effects of 6 months of adjuvant treatment with letrozole + triptorelin or tamoxifen + triptorelin in premenopausal patients with early breast cancer within an ongoing phase 3 trial (Hormonal Adjuvant Treatment Bone Effects study). Prospectively collected hormonal data were available for 81 premenopausal women, of whom 30 were assigned to receive tamoxifen + triptorelin and 51 were assigned letrozole + triptorelin +/- zoledronate. Serum 17-beta-estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Delta4-androstenedione, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, progesterone, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and cortisol were measured at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. For each hormone, 6-month values were compared between treatment groups by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney exact test. Median age was 44 years for both groups of patients. Letrozole + triptorelin (+/- zoledronate) induced a stronger suppression of median E2 serum levels (P = .0008), LH levels (P = .0005), and cortisol serum levels (P < .0001) compared with tamoxifen + triptorelin. Median FSH serum levels were suppressed in both groups, but such suppression was lower among patients receiving letrozole, who showed significantly higher median FSH serum levels (P < .0001). No significant differences were observed for testosterone, progesterone, ACTH, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone between the two groups of patients. Letrozole in combination with triptorelin induces a more intense estrogen suppression than tamoxifen + triptorelin in premenopausal patients with early breast cancer.

  5. Breast cancer among former college athletes compared to non-athletes: a 15-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Wyshak, G; Frisch, R E

    2000-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that physical activity is protective against breast cancer. In 1996–97, we conducted a 15-year follow-up of 5398 college alumnae comprised of former college athletes with their non-athletic classmates. Participants completed a detailed mailed questionnaire on their health history from 1981–82 to the present. Excluding women who had died and non-deliverable questionnaires, 84.7% (n = 3940) of the participants in our earlier study responded to the questionnaire; the response rate for former athletes was 86.6% (n = 1945), for non-athletes, 83.0% (n = 1995). Results confirmed our earlier findings. Based on self-reports, former college athletes had a significantly lower risk of breast cancer than the non-athletes. The OR for the 15-year incidence of breast cancer is 0.605 with 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.438–0.835); the 15-year incident breast cancers were 64 among the athletes and 111 among the non-athletes. Among women under 45 the protective effect of physical activity on the risk of breast cancer is considerably greater; odds ratio (OR) = 0.164, 95% CI (0.042–0.636). Athletic activity during the college and pre-college years is protective against breast cancer throughout the life span, and more markedly among women under 45. These results confirm our earlier findings and the findings of other investigators. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682689

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure compared with coronary artery disease: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Alis; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul

    2017-03-06

    To examine clinical outcomes and completion rates of cardiac rehabilitation in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure. Data for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure were compared with those for age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Retrospective data were obtained from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute database for dates between 1998 and 2011, for cardiopulmonary exercise test results at baseline and 6 months, body composition measures, and cardiac rehabilitation completion rates. A total of 29 women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure (mean 57 years (standard deviation (SD) 9.4)) and 29 age-matched women with coronary artery disease were identified. There was no significant difference between the proportion of women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure and those with coronary artery disease who completed the programme. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 16.2 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 3.4) to mean 18.5 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) ; p = 0.002) and in the coronary artery disease group (mean 18.9 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) to mean 20.8 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.9); p = 0.01). Body fat percentage increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 34.8% (SD 8.5) to mean 36.3% (SD 6.9); p = 0.04). Women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure participating in cardiac rehabilitation demonstrate similar significant gains in VO2peak and similar completion rates to those of age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Further research is needed to determine interventions that improve body composition in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure.

  7. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  8. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: A comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZHEYU; ZHANG, YEFEI; FRANZIN, LUISA; CORMIER, JANICE N.; CHAN, WENYAW; XU, HUA; DU, XIANGLIN L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute’s SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995–2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995–1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER. PMID:25672365

  9. Comparing cancer detection rates of patients undergoing short term follow-up vs routine follow-up after benign breast biopsies, is follow-up needed?

    PubMed

    Plecha, Donna M; Garlick, Courtney; Dubchuck, Christina; Thompson, Cheryl; Constantinou, Niki

    To compare cancer rates after benign breast biopsies between patients with short term imaging follow-up (STFU) and those with routine follow-up (RFU). Retrospective review of benign stereotactic, US or DCE-MRI breast biopsies. Of 580 lesions, 192 (33%) had STFU, and 388 (67%) had RFU. For US and mammographic detected lesions, there is no difference in cancer rates between the STFU (1 cancer, n=148) and the RFU group (0 cancer, n=365) (p=0.29). There were 2 cancers in the STFU group versus 0 in the RFU DCE-MRI group (p=0.54). Our results support RFU after benign ultrasound and stereotactic breast biopsies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Bilal; O’Regan, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies. PMID:28245550

  11. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Bilal; O'Regan, Ruth

    2017-02-24

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  12. Breast cancer characteristics at diagnosis and survival among Arab-American women compared to European- and African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Sharon Hensley; Schwartz, Kendra; Soliman, Amr; Johnson, Christine Cole; Gruber, Stephen B.; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Data from Arab world studies suggest that Arab women may experience a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. To investigate this finding, we focused on one of the largest settlements of Arabs and Iraqi Christians (Chaldeans) in the US, metropolitan Detroit- a SEER reporting site since 1973. Materials and Methods We identified a cohort of primary breast cancer cases diagnosed 1973–2003. Using a validated name algorithm, women were identified as being of Arab/Chaldean descent if they had an Arab last or maiden name. We compared characteristics at diagnosis (age, grade, histology, SEER stage, and marker status) and overall survival between Arab-, European-, and African-Americans. Results The cohort included 1,652 (2%) women of Arab descent, 13,855 (18%) African-American women, and 63,615 (80%) European-American. There were statistically significant differences between the racial groups for all characteristics at diagnosis. Survival analyses overall and for each SEER stage showed that Arab-American women had the best survival, followed by European-American women. African-American women had the poorest overall survival and were 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.23–1.52) times more likely to be diagnosed with an aggressive tumor (adjusting for age, grade, marker status, and year of diagnosis). Conclusion Overall, Arab-American women have a distribution of breast cancer histology similar to European-American women. In contrast, the stage, age, and hormone receptor status at diagnosis among Arab-Americans was more similar to African-American women. However, Arab-American women have a better overall survival than even European-American women. PMID:18415013

  13. Differences in pathological and clinical features of breast cancer in Arab as compared to Jewish women in Northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Jamal; Sikorsky, Natalya; Basher, Walid; Sharabi, Adi; Friedman, Eitan; Steiner, Mariana

    2012-08-15

    Breast cancer (BC) does not affect ethnic groups equally. BC mortality is higher in Israeli Palestinian Arab women than among Israeli Jewish women. This study aims to compare clinical, biological and pathological characteristics of breast cancer in the two populations. Records of 1,140 women with BC treated at Northern Israel between 2002 and 2007 were reviewed: 872 Jews and 268 Arabs. Age at diagnosis, tumor stage, pathological differentiation, estrogen receptor (ER) and HER-2 expression were evaluated. The main age at diagnosis was 49.9 years for Arabs and 59.4 years for Jews (p < 0.0001). Mean tumor size was < 2 cm in 25% of Arabs and 53% of Jews (p < 0.0001). Lymph node metastases presented in 64.6% of Arabs and 37.2% of Jews (p < 0.0001). Stage I disease was 19% in Arab and 49.2% in Jewish women while Stages III and IV disease was 42% and 11.3% respectively (p < 0.001). ER was positive in 69% of Arabs and in 78.5% of Jews (p < 0.001). Poorly differentiated tumors were found in 28.8% of Arabs vs. 12.8% in Jews (p < 0.0001). Overexpression of HER-2 was present in 35.4% of Arab and 22% of Jewish women (p < 0.001). We found that race is an important predictive factor for breast cancer. Arab women are diagnosed at younger age, with more advanced stage and biologically more aggressive disease than in Jewish women. Socioeconomic factors alone are not sufficient to explain significant effects of race on tumor characteristics. Findings suggest a different genetic susceptibility in the two populations which needs further research. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  14. A comparative study of nano-scale coatings on gold electrodes for bioimpedance studies of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaraghavan, Vaishnavi; Strobl, Jeannine; Wang, Dong; Heflin, James R; Agah, Masoud

    2014-10-01

    The relative sensitivity of standard gold microelectrodes for electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was compared with that of gold microelectrodes coated with gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, or electroplated gold to introduce nano-scale roughness on the surface of the electrodes. For biological solutions, the electroplated gold coated electrodes had significantly higher sensitivity to changes in conductivity than electrodes with other coatings. In contrast, the carbon nanotube coated electrodes displayed the highest sensitivity to MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. There was also a significant shift in the peak frequency of the cancer cell bioimpedance signal based on the type of electrode coating. The results indicate that nano-scale coatings which introduce varying degrees of surface roughness can be used to modulate the frequency dependent sensitivity of the electrodes and optimize electrode sensitivity for different bioimpedance sensing applications.

  15. A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study Comparing Breast Cancer Stage at Diagnosis between Immigrant and Canadian-Born Women in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javaid; Ginsburg, Ophira; Fischer, Hadas D; Austin, Peter C; Creatore, Maria I; Narod, Steven A; Rochon, Paula A

    2017-09-01

    There is limited information on stage at breast cancer diagnosis in Canadian immigrant women. We compared stage at diagnosis between immigrant women and Canadian-born women, and determined whether ethnicity was an independent factor associated with stage. 41,213 women with invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry. Women were classified as either immigrants or Canadian-born by linkage with the Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada's Permanent Resident database. Women's ethnicity was classified as Chinese, South Asian, or remaining women in Ontario. Logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of being diagnosed at stage I breast cancer (versus stage II-IV). 4,353 (10.6%) women were immigrants and 36,860 (89.4%) were Canadian-born women. The mean age at breast cancer diagnosis was 53.5 years for immigrants versus 62.3 years for Canadian-born women (p < 0.0001). Immigrant women were less likely than Canadian-born women to be diagnosed with stage I breast cancers (adjusted OR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.79-0.91; p < 0.0001). The adjusted OR of being stage I was 1.28 (95% CI: 1.14-1.43; p < 0.0001) for women of Chinese ethnicity and was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70-0.96; p = 0.01) for women of South Asian ethnicity, compared to the remaining women in Ontario. Canadian immigrant women were less likely than Canadian-born women to be diagnosed with early-stage breast cancers. Ethnicity was a greater contributor to the stage disparity than was immigrant status. South Asian women, regardless of immigration status, might benefit from increased breast cancer awareness programs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Population-Based Breast Cancer Screening With Risk-Based and Universal Mammography Screening Compared With Clinical Breast Examination: A Propensity Score Analysis of 1 429 890 Taiwanese Women.

    PubMed

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Tsau, Huei-Shian; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Lee, Yi-Chia; Pan, Shin-Liang; Chiu, Han-Mo; Kuo, Wen-Horng; Chang, King-Jen; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chuang, Shu-Lin; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Chang, Dun-Cheng; Koong, Shing-Lang; Wu, Chien-Yuan; Chia, Shu-Lih; Chen, Mei-Ju; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi; Chiou, Shu-Ti

    2016-07-01

    Different screening strategies for breast cancer are available but have not been researched in quantitative detail. To assess the benefits and the harms of risk-based and universal mammography screening in comparison with annual clinical breast examination (CBE). Population-based cohort study comparing incidences of stage II+ disease and death from breast cancer across 3 breast cancer screening strategies, with adjustment for a propensity score for participation based on risk factors for breast cancer and comparing the 3 strategies for overdetection between January 1999 and December 2009. Asymptomatic women attending outreach screening in the community or undergoing mammography in hospitals were enrolled in the 3 screening programs. Risk-based biennial mammography, universal biennial mammography, and annual CBE. Detection rates, stage II+ disease incidence, mortality from breast cancer, and overdiagnosis were compared using a time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression model. A total of 1 429 890 asymptomatic women attending outreach screening in the community or undergoing mammography in hospitals were enrolled in the 3 screening programs. Detection rates (prevalent screen and subsequent screens per 1000) were the highest for universal biennial mammography (4.86 and 2.98, respectively), followed by risk-based mammography (2.80 and 2.77, respectively), and lowest for annual CBE (0.97 and 0.70, respectively). Universal biennial mammography screening, compared with annual CBE, was associated with a 41% mortality reduction (risk ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48-0.73) and a 30% reduction of stage II+ breast cancer (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.66-0.74). Risk-based mammography screening was associated with an 8% reduction of stage II+ breast cancer (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.99) but was not associated with a statistically significant mortality reduction (risk ratio [RR], 0.86; 95% CI, 0.73-1.02). Estimates of overdiagnosis were no different from CBE for risk-based screening

  17. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  18. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Preinvasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sgroi, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Preinvasive breast cancer accounts for approximately one-third of all newly diagnosed breast cancer cases in the United States and constitutes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions with varying degrees of differentiation and clinical behavior. High-throughput genetic, epigenetic, and gene-expression analyses have enhanced our understanding of the relationship of these early neoplastic lesions to normal breast tissue, and they strongly suggest that preinvasive breast cancer develops and evolves along two distinct molecular genetic and biological pathways that correlate with tumor grade. Although unique epigenetic and gene-expression changes are not observed in the tumor epithelial compartment during the transition from preinvasive to invasive disease, distinct molecular alterations are observed in the tumor-stromal and myoepithelial cells. This suggests that the stromal and myoepithelial microenvironment of preinvasive breast cancer actively participates in the transition from preinvasive to invasive disease. An improved understanding of the transition from preinvasive to invasive breast cancer will pave the way for novel preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19824828

  20. Treatment choices in breast cancer: a comparative analysis of mastectomy patients and radiation patients

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.

    1985-01-01

    This descriptive-exploratory study identified factors that distinguished women on the basis of the treatment they chose for breast cancer. A semi-structured interview and questionnaire was administered to 30 respondents who received mastectomy and 31 who received lumpectomy with radiation. The variables investigated as potential predictors of treatment choice were (1) participation in treatment planning, (2) knowledge of illness and treatment alternatives, (3) health locus of control, (4) sex-role identification, (5) body image, (6) social support and (7) age. As perceptions of the outcome of treatment influence attitudes about treatment choice, five variables relating to perceived treatment consequences were also examined. These were (1) social support, (2) body image, (3) satisfaction with medical care, (4) satisfaction with treatment and (5) general well-being. The major findings in regard to the predictor variables included a profile of the characteristics of each group. The radiation group had more knowledge, participated in planning to a greater extent, investigated treatment options more often and typically made their own decisions about treatment. The mastectomy group was older, attributed locus of control to chance and demonstrated nonsignificant trends toward locus of control in powerful others and toward a feminine sex-role identification; 50% cited Surgeon's Advice as the basis of their choice.

  1. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  2. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  3. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions.

  4. Supraclavicular and infraclavicular lymph node delineation in breast cancer patients: a proposal deriving from a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cucciarelli, Francesca; Kirova, Youlia M; Palumbo, Isabella; Aristei, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in radiotherapy for breast cancer require knowledge of the anatomy of irradiated areas to minimize geographic miss and spare organs at risk. This study aimed at defining a contouring approach for supraclavicular (SC) and infraclavicular (IC) nodes after mastectomy or conservative surgery in patients with breast cancer. In 15 patients, SC and IC nodes were contoured on computed tomography slices according to Madu et al and Dijkema et al. After analyzing relapse sites, as reported by Reed et al, our approach was defined. The 3 methods were compared in all patients, quantifying differences in contours by percentage overlap (PO). In our approach, SC node delineation is similar to Madu et al in the ventral and medial landmarks, but includes the lateral SC nodes described by Dijkema et al. The lateral landmarks are the scalenus anterior and medius muscle lateral border and the clavicle. Dorsal boundaries are the scalenus anterior and medius muscle ventral and lateral surfaces and the subclavian artery ventral border. In IC node delineation, major differences emerged in cranial and dorsal limits which, in our approach, are the pectoralis minor muscle upper edge and the subclavian axillary artery ventral side. Our mean and median volumes and POs were between the other 2 methods. This study contributes to standardizing draining node contouring, so as to reduce variability and minimize geographic miss.

  5. Comparative Study on The Preventive Effect of Saffron Carotenoids, Crocin and Crocetin, in NMU-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Meysam; Bathaie, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Objective Crocin (Cro) and crocetin (Crt) are two widely known saffron carotenoids, which exert anticancer effects by different mechanisms. Here, we investigated and compared the preventive effect of Cro and Crt at the initiation and promotion stages of breast cancer induction in an animal model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, female Wistar albino rats were injected with three doses of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU). The preventive intervention was done at different times for the initiation and promotion stages. Thus, Cro/Crt was administered by gavage 20 days before, or one week after, the first NMU injection, for the prevention at the initiation or promotion stages respectively. The treatment was repeated every three days, and continued up to the end of experiment. Tumor appearance was checked by palpation and some parameters were determined after sacrifice. Results Tumor volume, latency period, and tumor number were significantly decreased in the rat groups treated with both saffron carotenoids for prevention at both the initiation and promotion stages. Tumor incidence was 77% due to NMU injection, which was decreased to 45 and 33% (on average) after Cro and Crt administration, respectively. In addition, enkephaline degrading aminopeptidase (EDA) was decreased significantly in the ovaries of the animals, however, changes in the brain were not significant. Conclusion Crt/Cro showed a significant protective effect against the NMU-induced breast cancer in rats. However, Crt was more effective than Cro and prevention at the initiation stage was more effective than at the promotion stage.

  6. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  7. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K H; Millard, P S

    1996-10-01

    The Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer conducted a meta-analysis of data from 10 cohort and 44 case-control studies of the association between combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer. 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women with no breast cancer from 25 countries worldwide were studied. Current OC users faced a 24% increased risk of developing breast cancer (confidence interval = 1.15-1.33). This risk fell steadily after cessation and reached 0 at 10 years and thereafter. Use of OCs with higher doses were associated with a greater risk of breast cancer than medium or low-dose OCs. The number of excess cancers in women while using OCs and up to 10 years after OC cessation stood at 0.5/10,000 women 16-19 years old, 1.5/10,000 women 20-24 years old, and 4.7/10,000 women 25-29 years old. The elevated risk of developing breast cancer did not differ by country of origin, ethnic background, reproductive history, or family history of breast cancer. OC users had less clinically advanced breast cancer than never-users who had breast cancer. This finding plus the moderate reduced risk of breast cancer more than 10 years after OC cessation suggest that OCs may effect earlier diagnosis of existing breast cancer instead of causing new breast cancers. The findings of this meta-analysis along with a plausible biologic mechanism (estrogen stimulates breast cancer cells) suggest a causal relationship between OC use and breast cancer. They also indicate that the risk is small, decreases with time, and is lower among low-dose OC users. It is reassuring that the breast cancers found among OC users is less clinically advanced than those found in never-users.

  8. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  9. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  10. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000830.htm Understanding your breast cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot ...

  11. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Do Women with Inoperable Breast Cancer Have a Psychological Profile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbar, Ora; Florian, Victor

    1991-01-01

    Compared psychological variables of 30 patients with inoperable breast cancer to matched group of 30 operable breast cancer patients. Found that women with inoperable breast cancer had higher scores in denial, exhaustion, hopelessness, worthlessness, depression, somatization, hostility, and psychoticism. Profile of inoperable cancer patients did…

  14. Breast cancer screening controversies: who, when, why, and how?

    PubMed

    Chetlen, Alison; Mack, Julie; Chan, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic screening is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The issue is not whether mammography is effective, but whether the false positive rate and false negative rates can be reduced. This review will discuss controversies including the reduction in breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, the ideal screening candidate, and the optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. The article will compare and contrast screening mammography, tomosynthesis, whole-breast screening ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging. Though supplemental imaging modalities are being utilized to improve breast cancer diagnosis, mammography still remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening.

  15. Protocol and Recruitment Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Group Phone-Based versus Newsletter Interventions for Weight Loss Maintenance among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Befort, Christie A.; Klemp, Jennifer R.; Fabian, Carol; Perri, Michael G.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Shireman, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and death. Women who reside in rural areas have higher obesity prevalence and suffer from breast cancer treatment-related disparities compared to urban women. The objective of this 5-year randomized controlled trial is to compare methods for delivering extended care for weight loss maintenance among rural breast cancer survivors. Group phone-based counseling via conference calls addresses access barriers, is more cost-effective than individual phone counseling, and provides group support which may be ideal for rural breast cancer survivors who are more likely to have unmet support needs. Women (n = 210) diagnosed with Stage 0 to III breast cancer in the past 10 years who are ≥ 3 months out from initial cancer treatments, have a BMI 27–45 kg/m2, and have physician clearance were enrolled from multiple cancer centers. During Phase I (months 0 to 6), all women receive a behavioral weight loss intervention delivered through group phone sessions. Women who successfully lose 5% of weight enter Phase II (months 6 to 18) and are randomized to one of two extended care arms: continued group phone-based treatment or a mail-based newsletter. During Phase III, no contact is made (months 18 to 24). The primary outcome is weight loss maintenance from 6 to 18 months. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, serum biomarkers, and cost-effectiveness. This study will provide essential information in how to reach rural survivors in future efforts to establish weight loss support for breast cancer survivors as a standard of care. PMID:24486636

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Hormones and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    OHE 1 hypothesis are cancer patients and lacto- vegetarians . The evidence is rather clear that certain sparse. Schneider and co-workers used a Both of... Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Giske Ursin, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles...TYPE AND DATES COVERED I October 1997 Final (30 Sep 94 - 29 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hormones and Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J

  18. Vasopressin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    receptors7:on-breast cancer cells represents a way in which these peptides might influence cancer cell pathophysiology. However, the expression of...National Institutes of Health . In the conduct of research utilIzing recombinant DNA, the nvestigator(s) adhered to the NIH G.idelines for Research...possible autocrine/paracrine role for this peptide in cancer cells. In support of this hypothesis vasopressin was shown to have a growth-promoting influence

  19. Are diet quality scores after breast cancer diagnosis associated with improved breast cancer survival?

    PubMed Central

    Izano, Monika A.; Fung, Teresa T.; Chiuve, Stephanie S; Hu, Frank B.; Holmes, Michelle D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are associated with reduced breast cancer mortality. However, these eating patterns do not necessarily reflect overall diet quality. The association of breast cancer mortality with a priori defined dietary scores, which are based on recommended dietary guidelines and reflect diet quality, has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that diet quality indices based on recommended guidelines are associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and non-breast cancer mortality in breast cancer survivors. Methods We examined the association between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score, and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, and the risk of breast cancer mortality and total mortality among women from the Nurses’ Health Study diagnosed with breast cancer. Results Adherence to DASH-style and AHEI-2010 diets were associated with reduced risk of non-breast cancer mortality (comparing the fifth quintile with the first quintile RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53–0.99, p-trend = 0.03 for DASH, and RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.42–0.77, p-trend <0.0001 for AHEI-2010). Diet scores were not significantly associated with breast cancer mortality. Conclusions Our findings suggest that adherence to a higher quality diet after breast cancer diagnosis does not considerably change the risk of breast cancer death and recurrence. However, healthy dietary choices after breast cancer were associated with reduced risk of non-breast cancer mortality in women with breast cancer. PMID:23909725

  20. The cancer genetics and pathology of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deb, Siddhartha; Lakhani, Sunil R; Ottini, Laura; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon and poorly understood disease. Recent molecular studies have shown important differences from female breast cancer which are likely to influence treatment strategies from the current female-based management towards a more tailored approach. Significantly more MBCs than female breast cancers arise with an underlying germline cancer predisposition, and display a vastly different penetrance compared with females. Furthermore, the genophenotypical association of basal-like cancer with BRCA1 present in female breast cancer is not observed in male breast cancer. Differences in somatic changes between male and female breast cancer have also been reported, with particular enrichment of PIK3CA mutations and a paucity of TP53 mutations. In general, chromosomal-based changes, in particular regions of gains, are seen more frequently in male than female breast cancer and methylation is seen less frequently. Clinically, several molecular subtypes with prognostic relevance have been described, including chromosomal complex high and methylation high groups, and subgroups with profiling signatures pertaining to epithelial mesenchymal transition and hormonal therapy insensitivity. As with female breast cancer, attention to male specific multicentre trials based on the individual characteristics are needed, together with establishment of reliable preclinical models to understand more clearly the pathogenesis of male breast cancer and improve the general poor outcome of this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Job Authority and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2014-01-01

    Using the 1957–2011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of women’s job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others’ pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which women’s occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions. PMID:25506089

  2. [Quality of life of women recovering from breast cancer after being subjected to mastectomies compared with those who had conservative surgery: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Majewski, Juliana Machado; Lopes, Aline Daniela Fernandes; Davoglio, Tárcia; Leite, José Carlos de Carvalho

    2012-03-01

    This study reviews the literature on the quality of life (QoL) of women with breast cancer who have been subjected to mastectomy, compared with those who had conservative surgery. Eight random controlled trials were selected. The studies were compared with respect to the moment quality of life was assessed (whether during or after treatment for breast cancer), the measurement tools of quality of life used, and also the methodology and results achieved. The results of four studies suggest a stronger negative impact in the QoL of mastectomized women; the other four studies showed no difference between the groups in terms of QoL. Objective measurements of quality of life may help identify potentially critical situations of daily life and assist in planning actions to promote health among women who have been subjected to breast cancer surgery.

  3. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Doğer, Emek; Calışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences.

  4. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  5. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Østvold, Anne Carine; Grundt, Kirsten; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Havaki, Sophia; Kollia, Panagoula; Kittas, Christos; Marinos, Evangelos; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki

    2009-01-01

    Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR), real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non malignant breast lesions and

  6. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    High income, high socioeconomic status, and affluence increase breast cancer incidence. Socioeconomic status in USA breast cancer studies has been assessed by block-group socioeconomic measures. A block group is a portion of a census tract with boundaries that segregate, as far as possible, socioeconomic groups. In this study, we used US Census income data instead of block groups to gauge socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients in relationship with incidence, prognostic markers, and survival. US state breast cancer incidence and mortality data are from the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2011. Three-Year-Average Median Household Income by State, 2010 to 2012, is from the U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2011 to 2013 Annual Social and Economic Supplements. County incomes are from the 2005-2009 American Community Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau. The American Community Survey is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population yearly. Its purpose is to provide communities the information they need to plan investments and services. Breast cancer county incidence and survival data are from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) data base. We analyzed SEER data from 198 counties in California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, New Mexico, Utah, and Washington. SEER uses the Collaborative Stage (CS) Data Collection System. We have retained the SEER CS variables. There was a significant relationship of income with breast cancer incidence in 50 USA states and the District of Columbia in White women (r = 0.623, p < 0.001). There was a significant relationship between node involvement and income in Whites in 198 USA counties. Income was significantly correlated with 5-year relative survival in Whites with localized breast cancer. Income was not correlated with 5-year survival of Black race (p = 0.364) or other races (p = 0

  7. Aromatase and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Sabnis, G; Jelovac, D

    2006-12-01

    Several aromatase inhibitors and also new antiestrogens are now available for treating breast cancer. We have developed a model to compare the antitumor efficacy of these agents and to explore strategies for their optimal use. Results from the model have been predictive of clinical outcome. In this model, tumors are grown in ovariectomized, immunodeficient mice from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with the aromatase gene (MCF-7Ca). The possibility that blockade of estrogen action and estrogen synthesis may be synergistic was explored by treating mice with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and the antiestrogen tamoxifen alone and in combination. The results indicated that letrozole alone was better than all other treatments. In addition, when tamoxifen treatment was no longer effective, tumor growth was significantly reduced in mice switched to letrozole treatment. However, tumors ultimately began to grow during continued treatment. To investigate the mechanisms by which tumors eventually adapt and grow during letrozole treatment, we determined the expression of signaling proteins in tumors during the course of letrozole treatment compared to the tumors of control mice. Tumors initially up-regulated the ER while responding to treatment, but subsequently receptor levels decreased in tumors unresponsive to letrozole. Also, Her-2 and adapter proteins (p-Shc and Grb-2) as well as all of the signaling proteins in the MAPK cascade (p-Raf, p-Mekl/2, and p-MAPK), but not in the Pl3/Akt pathway, were increased in tumors no longer responsive to letrozole. To investigate whether sensitivity to letrozole could be regained, cells were isolated from the letrozole resistant tumors (LTLT) and treated with inhibitors of the MAPKinase pathway (PD98059 and UO126). These compounds reduced MAPK activity and increased ER expression. EGFR/Her-2 inhibitors, gefitinib and AEE78S although not effective in the parental MCF-70a cells, restored the sensitivity of LTLT cells to

  8. Coping with breast cancer: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Doumit, Myrna A A; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Kelley, Jane H; El Saghir, Nagi; Nassar, Nada

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women worldwide. In Lebanon, a country of 4 million people, breast cancer is also the most prevalent type of cancer among Lebanese women. The purpose of this study was to gain a more in-depth understanding of the coping strategies espoused by Lebanese women with breast cancer. The study followed purposeful sampling and saturation principles in which 10 female participants diagnosed as having breast cancer were interviewed. Data were analyzed following a hermeneutical process as described by Diekelmann and Ironside (Encyclopedia of Nursing Research. 1998:50-68). Seven main themes and 1 constitutive pattern emerged from the study describing the Lebanese women's coping strategies with breast cancer. The negative stigma of cancer in the Lebanese culture, the role of women in the Lebanese families, and the embedded role of religion in Lebanese society are bases of the differences in the coping strategies of Lebanese women with breast cancer as compared to women with breast cancer from other cultures. These findings cannot be directly generalized, but they could act as a basis for further research on which to base a development of a framework for an approach to care that promotes coping processes in Lebanese women living with breast cancer. Nursing and medical staff need to have a better understanding of the individual coping strategies of each woman and its impact on the woman's well being; the creation of informal support group is indispensable in helping these women cope with their conditions.

  9. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  10. Breast Cancer Surgery: Comparing Surgical Groups and Determining Individual Differences in Postoperative Sexuality and Body Change Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yurek, Debora; Farrar, William; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2007-01-01

    Women diagnosed and surgically treated for regional breast cancer (N = 190) were studied to determine the sexual and body change sequelae for women receiving modified radical mastectomy (MRM) with breast reconstruction in comparison with the sequelae for women receiving breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or MRM without breast reconstruction. The sexuality pattern for women receiving reconstructive surgery was one that was significantly different—with lower rates of activity and fewer signs of sexual responsiveness—than that for women in either of the other groups. Significantly higher levels of traumatic stress and situational distress regarding the breast changes were reported by the women receiving an MRM in contrast to the women treated with BCT. Using a model to predict sexual morbidity, regression analyses revealed that individual differences in sexual self-schema were related to both sexual and body change stress outcomes. PMID:10965644

  11. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated.

  12. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L.; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000–2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07–5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11–7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03–9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95–6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88–7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. Conclusions We found no

  14. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  15. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  16. Early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nettles-Carlson, B

    1989-01-01

    Timely, comprehensive screening for breast cancer is a major, though often overlooked, component of primary health care for women. This article reviews the scientific rationale for screening and outlines the current recommendations of the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force regarding the use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE). Nursing interventions to decrease barriers to effective screening are discussed, and an expanded role of nurses in breast cancer screening is proposed.

  17. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-01-01

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT–PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  18. Breast cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Berkowitz, G S

    1988-10-15

    The various risk factors for breast cancer have been recognized for many years. A table lists these established breast cancer risk factors together with the approximate magnitude of the increase in risk associated with them. Breast cancer incidence rates increase with age throughout the life span in Western countries, although the rate of increase is greater up to age 50 years than after 50 years. Breast cancer is more common among women in upper rather than lower social classes, among women who never have been married, among women living in urban areas, among women living in the northern US than in the southern US, and among whites than blacks, at least among those over age 50. Women in North American and Northern European countries have the highest risk for breast cancer, women in Southern European and Latin American countries are at intermediate risk, and women in Africa and Asian countries have the lowest risk. Yet, rapid rates of increase in incident rates have been noted in recent years in many Asian, Central European, and some South American countries. The later the age at which a woman has her 1st full-term pregnancy, the higher her risk for breast cancer; the earlier the age at menarche and the later the age at menopause the higher the risk; and among women who have a premenopausal oophorectomy, the earlier the age at which this occurs the lower the risk. Among postmenopausal women, obesity is associated with an increase in risk. Lactation is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer risk. Some current research is considering potential risk factors that have not been well studied in the past, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, caffeine consumption, exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), emotional stress, exposure to electric power, and lack of physical activity. Other areas of current research reviewed here include radiation, mammographic parenchymal patterns, a high-fat diet, use of oral contraceptives (OCs), use of estrogen

  19. Depression in older breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women .The 5-year survival rate for this tumour is nowadays 85%, and the 61% of these women are still alive at 15 years. When depression symptoms are present as a consequence of breast cancer treatments, they may interfere negatively with patients’ quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of breast cancer treatment on the quality of life and the impact of depression on the health-related life. Methods We enrolled 173 women aged 65-75 years with early stage breast cancer diagnosed over the last 10 years, initially recruited to participate in a study examining heath-related quality of life in the first 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Participants were divided into four groups: 1) 46 breast cancer survivors (aged 65-70); 2) 62 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 65-69); 3) 32 women with recurrent breast cancer after 10 years (aged 66-75); 4) 30 women in good health status (aged 60-70). The Geriatric Depression Scale was used as a routine part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Collection of data for the application of instruments, such as sociodemographic variables (age, educational level, social state) and clinical date (stage and time of the disease and treatment), was carried out by trained researcher assistants. Results Our results demonstrated the correlation between depression and previous cancer experiences. In fact, in patients with cancer experience, the grade of depression was significantly higher compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the patients with recurrent breast cancer were severely depressed compared to other groups. Conclusions A high percentage of participants were identified as having emotional and/or well being problems. Further investigations on the cause of depression problems cancer-related are needed. PMID:23173836

  20. Worse quality of life in young and recently diagnosed breast cancer survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Eriksson, Mikael; Dar, Huma; Brandberg, Yvonne; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Literature focusing on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by cancer site among women only is scarce. This study examines HRQoL of breast cancer (BC) survivors compared with female survivors of other cancers, and to understand which subgroups of BC survivors were particularly at risk of reduced HRQoL. We placed emphasis on young (<50 years) and recently diagnosed (≤5 years) survivors, where the deficits in HRQoL were most pronounced. The cross-sectional study consisted of 2,224 BC survivors, 8,504 non-cancer controls and 2,205 other cancer survivors in the Karma study. We examined HRQoL differences using linear regression analyses in the whole cohort and in a subset of young and recently diagnosed BC survivors (n = 242) and female survivors of other cancers (n = 140) with comparable ages at diagnosis (43.6 vs 43.6, p = 0.917) and time since diagnosis (2.3 vs 2.8 years, p < 0.001). HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. While only cognitive functioning was significantly compromised in BC survivors compared with survivors of other cancers when women of all ages were included, young BC survivors reported significantly lower HRQoL on multiple functional scales (global quality of life, emotional, role, social and cognitive functioning) and experienced more fatigue and insomnia. BC survivors with any prior medical history of mental disorders reported poorer HRQoL than those without such a history. We also observed a close-knit relationship between tumor and treatment characteristics. BC survivors perform poorly in HRQoL in comparison with female survivors of other cancers. Our results emphasize the importance of age- and gender-appropriate comparison groups.

  1. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  2. SWOG S0221: A Phase III Trial Comparing Chemotherapy Schedules in High-Risk Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Budd, George T.; Barlow, William E.; Moore, Halle C.F.; Hobday, Timothy J.; Stewart, James A.; Isaacs, Claudine; Salim, Muhammad; Cho, Jonathan K.; Rinn, Kristine J.; Albain, Kathy S.; Chew, Helen K.; Burton, Gary V.; Moore, Timothy D.; Srkalovic, Gordan; McGregor, Bradley A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Livingston, Robert B.; Lew, Danika L.; Gralow, Julie R.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the optimal dose and schedule of anthracycline and taxane administration as adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Patients and Methods A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to test two hypotheses: (1) that a novel continuous schedule of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide was superior to six cycles of doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks and (2) that paclitaxel once per week was superior to six cycles of paclitaxel once every 2 weeks in patients with node-positive or high-risk node-negative early-stage breast cancer. With 3,250 patients, a disease-free survival (DFS) hazard ratio of 0.82 for each randomization could be detected with 90% power with two-sided α = .05. Overall survival (OS) was a secondary outcome. Results Interim analyses crossed the futility boundaries for demonstrating superiority of both once-per-week regimens and once-every-2-weeks regimens. After a median follow-up of 6 years, a significant interaction developed between the two randomization factors (DFS P = .024; OS P = .010) in the 2,716 patients randomly assigned in the original design, which precluded interpretation of the two factors separately. Comparing all four arms showed a significant difference in OS (P = .040) but not in DFS (P = .11), with all treatments given once every 2 weeks associated with the highest OS. This difference in OS seemed confined to patients with hormone receptor–negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –negative tumors (P = .067), with no differences seen with hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative (P = .90) or HER2-positive tumors (P = .40). Conclusion Patients achieved a similar DFS with any of these regimens. Subset analysis suggests the hypothesis that once-every-2-weeks dosing may be best for patients with hormone receptor–negative/HER2-negative tumors. PMID:25422488

  3. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  <  1), dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  <  0.05). For the patient cohort in this study, which is comprised of non-high-grade ER+  tumors, K i outperformed SUV in an ROC analysis of the parameter uncertainty distributions pre- and post-therapy. This methodology can be applied to different scenarios with the ability to inform the design of clinical trials using PET imaging.

  4. Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

    2014-05-01

    Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, α-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer. Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (P< .05) and decreased HER2 expression (P< .05) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 index; NS) among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients when compared with placebo. Uncontrolled and biomarker studies suggest beneficial effects on hot flashes, cell proliferation, atypical cytomorphology, and mammographic density, as well as possible anti-angiogenic activity at doses of 25 g ground flax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients. Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast

  5. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  6. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease.

  7. Ultrasound in Detecting Taxane-Induced Neuropathy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-15

    Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Who Should Bear the Cost of Convenience? A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing External Beam and Brachytherapy Radiotherapy Techniques for Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, M; Merino, T; Keller, B; Pignol, J-P

    2017-03-01

    Standard treatment for early breast cancer includes whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast-conserving surgery. Recently, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been proposed for well-selected patients. A cost and cost-effectiveness analysis was carried out comparing WBI with two APBI techniques. An activity-based costing method was used to determine the treatment cost from a societal perspective of WBI, high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) and permanent breast seed implants (PBSI). A Markov model comparing the three techniques was developed with downstream costs, utilities and probabilities adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for a wide range of variables, including treatment costs, patient costs, utilities and probability of developing recurrences. Overall, HDR was the most expensive ($14 400), followed by PBSI ($8700), with WBI proving the least expensive ($6200). The least costly method to the health care system was WBI, whereas PBSI and HDR were less costly for the patient. Under cost-effectiveness analyses, downstream costs added about $10 000 to the total societal cost of the treatment. As the outcomes are very similar between techniques, WBI dominated under cost-effectiveness analyses. WBI was found to be the most cost-effective radiotherapy technique for early breast cancer. However, both APBI techniques were less costly to the patient. Although innovation may increase costs for the health care system it can provide cost savings for the patient in addition to convenience. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparing determinants of physical activity in Puerto Rican, Mexican-American, and non-Hispanic white breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Daniel C; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Vallejo, Liliana; Gonzalez, Velda; Treviño-Whitaker, Rose A; Villanueva, Gabriela; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has a myriad of benefits for breast cancer survivors, including a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. Latinas are less physically active than are women in the general population and little is known about Latina breast cancer survivors' levels of PA or their beliefs related to PA. We conducted a survey of 50 Puerto Rican (PR), 50 Mexican-American (MA) and 50 non-Hispanic white (NHW) breast cancer survivors to investigate similarities and differences in PA and social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs associated with PA. We collected information on current PA using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ); comorbidities; anthropometric measures of body mass index [BMI (kg/m(2))] and waist-to-hip (W:H) ratio; and SCT measures, including exercise self-efficacy, exercise barriers self-efficacy, modeling and social support from friends and family. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance of differences between groups and regression models of the predictors of PA were performed. Survivors from the three groups were similar in age (M = 56.8, SD = 11.0), BMI (M = 29.0, SD = 5.7) and co-morbidity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.69). Survivors differed in PA (p < 0.001), self-efficacy (p = 0.05), modeling (p = 0.03) and social support from family (p = 0.05). Social support from family member and exercise barriers self-efficacy were predictors of PA. Consistent with published studies, Hispanic breast cancer survivors self-report that they are less physically active than are non-Hispanic whites. SCT variables associated with PA differ among Hispanic subgroups and non-Hispanic whites. Further research is warranted in order to understand determinants of physical activity for specific ethnic breast cancer survivors.

  10. Breast cancer in systemic lupus.

    PubMed

    Bernatsky, S; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Petri, M; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Fortin, P F; Ginzler, E; Romero-Diaz, J; Peschken, C; Jacobsen, S; Hanly, J G; Gordon, C; Nived, O; Yelin, E H; Isenberg, D; Rahman, A; Bae, S-C; Joseph, L; Witte, T; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Aranow, C; Kamen, D; Sturfeldt, G; Foulkes, W D; Hansen, J E; St Pierre, Y; Raymer, P Chrétien; Tessier-Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E

    2017-03-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug exposures over time. In univariate and multivariate models, the principal factor associated with breast cancers was older age at cohort entry. Conclusions There was little evidence that breast cancer risk in this SLE sample was strongly driven by any of the clinical factors that we studied. Further search for factors that determine the lower risk of breast cancer in SLE may be warranted.

  11. Breast cancer screening and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mai

    2009-01-01

    Annual screening mammograms have been shown to be cost-effective and are credited for the decline in mortality of breast cancer. New technologies including breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may further improve early breast cancer detection in asymptomatic women. Serum tumor markers such as CA 15-3, carcinoembyonic antigen (CEA), and CA 27-29 are ordered in the clinic mainly for disease surveillance, and not useful for detection of localized cancer. This review will discuss blood-based markers and breast-based markers, such as nipple/ductal fluid, with an emphasis on biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. In the future, it is likely that a combination approach to simultaneously measure multiple markers would be most successful in detecting early breast cancer. Ideally, such a biomarker panel should be able to detect breast cancer in asymptomatic patients, even in the setting of normal mammogram and physical examination results.

  12. Superparamagnetic iron oxide as a tracer for sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer: A comparative non-inferiority study.

    PubMed

    Piñero-Madrona, A; Torró-Richart, J A; de León-Carrillo, J M; de Castro-Parga, G; Navarro-Cecilia, J; Domínguez-Cunchillos, F; Román-Santamaría, J M; Fuster-Diana, C; Pardo-García, R

    2015-08-01

    The gold standard for detection of Sentinel Lymph Nodes (SLN) is a combined radioisotope and blue dye breast injection, using a gamma probe (GP). A new, non-radioactive method was developed, using a tracer (Sienna+(®)) of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and a manual magnetometer (SentiMag(®)) (SM). The IMAGINE study was designed to show the non-inferiority of SM compared to GP, for the detection of SLN in breast cancer patients with SLN biopsy indication. From November 2013 to June 2014, 181 patients were recruited, and 321 nodes were excised and assessed ex-vivo. Readings from both SM and GP devices were recorded during transcutaneous, intraoperative, and ex-vivo detection attempts. At the patient level, ex-vivo detection rates (primary variable) with SM and GP were 97.8% and 98.3% (concordance rate 99.4%). Transcutaneous and intraoperative detection rates were 95.5% vs 97.2%, and 97.2% vs 97.8% for SM and GP respectively (concordance rates > 97%). At the node level, intraoperative and ex-vivo detection rates were 92.5% vs 89.3% and 91.0% vs 86.3% for SM and GP respectively. In all cases the non-inferiority of SM compared to SM was shown by ruling out a predefined non-inferiority margin of 5%. Our study showed the non-inferiority of SM as compared to GP. Moreover, the ex-vivo and intraoperative detection rates at the node level were slightly higher with SM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Early breast cancer in the older woman

    PubMed Central

    VanderWalde, Ari; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Breast cancer is a disease associated with aging; there is a rise in both breast cancer incidence and mortality with increasing age. With the aging of the US population, the number of older adults diagnosed with breast cancer and the number of breast cancer survivors is on the rise. The majority of cases of breast cancer are diagnosed with early stage (non-metastatic) potentially curable disease. This article will review the treatment of early stage breast cancer in older adults including a focus on the risks and benefits of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and trastuzumab. Although the majority of studies to date demonstrate that older adults experience similar benefits from most multimodality treatments for breast cancer as compared to younger adults, these studies have primarily been performed in healthy and fit older adults. There are limited data at the extremes of age or in those patients with significant comorbidity or functional decline. A primary question facing the doctor and patient is whether the breast cancer is likely to impact the patient’s life expectancy or quality of life. If so, then the risks and benefits of treatment must be considered with a final decision regarding therapy made in the context of the patient’s preferences. This article will review the toxicities (both short- and long-term) from common cancer therapies in early breast cancer. Finally, the decision as to type of secondary screening and prevention of future breast cancers must also be weighed against the life expectancy of the older adult. PMID:22326036

  16. Novel Approaches to Breast Cancer Prevention and Inhibition of Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Using mouse genetics, we showed that RANKL and its receptor RANK are critical regulators of sex hormone and BRCA1 mutation-driven breast cancer...cancer-free individuals or those with new onset prostate cancer, which is also related to sex hormones, or other types of cancer. Our data in two...that sex steroid hormone levels well in advance of breast cancer diagnosis are more significantly associated with breast cancer risk compared with

  17. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D

    1994-07-01

    It has been recognized for some time that a family history of breast cancer is associated rather strongly with a woman's own risk of developing the disease. Recent segregation analyses of population-based data on familial patterns provide evidence for a rare autosomal dominant allele that increases a carrier's susceptibility to breast cancer. The estimated proportion of breast cancer patients who carry this allele declines sharply with age at diagnosis. Empirical estimates of the risk associated with particular patterns of family history of breast cancer indicate the following: (1) having any first-degree relative with breast cancer increases a woman's risk of breast cancer 1.5-3-fold, depending on age, (2) having multiple first degree relatives affected is associated with particularly elevated risks, (3) having a second-degree relative affected increases the risk by approximately 50%, (4) affected family members on the maternal side and the paternal side contribute similarly to the risk, (5) a family history of breast cancer is associated with bilateral disease, and (6) breast cancer in males is associated with breast cancer in female relatives in much the same way as is breast cancer in women. Ovarian cancer clearly has been shown to be associated with breast cancer in families, and genetic linkage has provided strong evidence for a breast-ovarian cancer gene located somewhere on chromosome 17q. At the population level, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer may be at least as predictive of a woman's risk for developing breast cancer as is having a second-degree relative with breast cancer. Considerably weaker evidence points to a possible familial relationship between breast and endometrial cancer and between breast cancer in women and prostatic cancer in males. The clinical applications of the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer are complicated by uncertainty as to the efficacy of mammographic screening in women under the age of 50. For the vast

  18. The efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for severely fatigued survivors of breast cancer compared with care as usual: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Harriët J G; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Donders, Rogier R T; Goedendorp, Martine M; van der Wouw, Agnes J; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Knoop, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Severe fatigue is a common and distressing symptom affecting approximately one in four survivors of breast cancer. The current study examined the efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for severe fatigue in survivors of breast cancer compared with care as usual (CAU). The authors conducted a parallel-group randomized controlled trial. Severely fatigued, disease-free survivors of breast cancer who had completed cancer treatment at least 3 months previously were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated to ICBT or CAU using computer-generated stratified block randomization. The primary outcome of fatigue severity was assessed at baseline and after 6 months, as were the secondary outcomes of functional impairment, psychological distress, and quality of life. Statistical effects were tested with analyses of covariance (intention-to-treat analysis). Participants were recruited between January 2014 and March 2016 and assigned to ICBT (66 patients) or CAU (66 patients). Compared with the participants who had received CAU, those who had received ICBT reported lower fatigue scores at 6 months (mean difference [Δ], 11.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 7.7-15.3) and a large effect size (Cohen d = 1.0), with the majority of patients (73%) demonstrating clinically significant improvement. ICBT also was found to lead to lower functional impairment (Δ, 297.8; 95% CI, 145.5-450.1) and psychological distress scores (Δ, 5.7; 95% CI, 3.4-7.9) and higher quality-of-life scores (Δ, 11.7; 95% CI, 5.8-17.7) compared with CAU, with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen d = 0.6-0.8). ICBT appears to be effective in reducing severe fatigue and related symptoms and meets the current need for easy accessible and more efficient evidence-based treatment options for severely fatigued survivors of breast cancer. Cancer 2017;123:3825-34. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  20. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Pre-Chemotherapy Differences in Visuospatial Working Memory in Breast Cancer Patients Compared to Controls: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Scherling, Carole; Collins, Barbara; MacKenzie, Joyce; Bielajew, Catherine; Smith, Andra

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cognitive deficits are a side-effect of chemotherapy, however pre-treatment research is limited. This study examines neurofunctional differences during working memory between breast cancer (BC) patients and controls, prior to chemotherapy. Methods: Early stage BC females (23), scanned after surgery but before chemotherapy, were individually matched to non-cancer controls. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a Visuospatial N-back task and data was analyzed by multiple group comparisons. fMRI task performance, neuropsychological tests, hospital records, and salivary biomarkers were also collected. Results: There were no significant group differences on neuropsychological tests, estrogen, or cortisol. Patients made significantly fewer commission errors but had less overall correct responses and were slower than controls during the task. Significant group differences were observed for the fMRI data, yet results depended on the type of analysis. BC patients presented with increased activations during working memory compared to controls in areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, thalamus, and midbrain. Individual group regressions revealed a reverse relationship between brain activity and commission errors. Conclusion: This is the first fMRI investigation to reveal neurophysiological differences during visuospatial working memory between BC patients pre-chemotherapy and controls. These results also increase the knowledge about the effects of BC and related factors on the working memory network. Significance: This highlights the need to better understand the pre-chemotherapy BC patient and the effects of associated confounding variables. PMID:22053153

  2. Comparative antiproliferative effects of iniparib and olaparib on a panel of triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Aisling; McGowan, Patricia M; Cotter, Maura; Mullooly, Maeve; O'Donovan, Norma; Rani, Sweta; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Crown, John; Duffy, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    PARP inhibitors, both as monotherapy and in combination with cytotoxic drugs, are currently undergoing clinical trials in several different cancer types. In this investigation, we compared the antiproliferative activity of two PARP/putative PARP inhibitors, i.e., olaparib and iniparib, in a panel of 14 breast cancer cell lines (seven tripe-negative and seven non-triple-negative). In almost all cell lines investigated, olaparib was a more potent inhibitor of cell growth than iniparib. Inhibition by both drugs was cell line-dependent and independent of the molecular subtype status of the cells, i.e., whether cells were triple-negative or non-triple negative. Although the primary target of PARP inhibitors is PARP1, no significant association was found between baseline levels of PARP1 activity and inhibition with either agent. Similarly, no significant correlation was evident between sensitivity and levels of CDK1, BRCA1 or miR-182. Combined addition of olaparib and either the CDK1 inhibitor, RO-3306 or a pan HER inhibitor (neratinib, afatinib) resulted in superior growth inhibition to that obtained with olaparib alone. We conclude that olaparib, in contrast to iniparib, is a strong inhibitor of breast cancer cell growth and may have efficacy in breast cancer irrespective of its molecular subtype, i.e., whether HER2-positive, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or triple-negative. Olaparib, in combination with a selective CDK1 inhibitor or a pan HER inhibitor, is a potential new approach for treating breast cancer.

  3. Mortality and recurrence patterns of breast cancer patients diagnosed under a screening programme versus comparable non-screened breast cancer patients from the same population: analytical survey from 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    García Fernández, A; Chabrera, C; García Font, M; Fraile, M; Lain, J M; Gónzalez, S; Corral, C; Torras, M; Torres, J; Teixido, M; Barco, I; López, R; Gónzalez, C; Pessarrodona, A; Giménez, N

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer screening programmes seem to bring about significant benefits, including decreased mortality, although they may also have some drawbacks such as false-negative and false-positive results. This study aims to compare the clinical outcome of a group of patients undergoing a breast cancer screening programme with that of a synchronous non-screened group of patients matched for age and follow-up period. We studied basic characteristics of epidemiology, immunohistochemistry, loco-regional relapse, distant metastases, disease-free interval and overall and specific mortality. We compared 510 patients in the screened group with 394 non-screened patients, along the period of 2002-2012. Screening was applied on a target population of 49,847 and was based on double-projection, double-read mammograms. Two years were allowed per round. Overall participation for the five rounds considered was 75.2%, with 86.5% coverage, and a total cumulative population of 123,445. The non-participant women amounted 40,794. Tumour detection rate for the screened women was 3.8 per thousand (475/123,445), while the corresponding rate for non-participants was 9.4 per thousand (382/40,797). Incidence of luminal A subtype was 15% higher in screened than that in non-screened patients (95% confidence interval (CI) 8-22%). Conversely, the triple-negative subtype was 6% higher in the non-screened group (95% CI 2-10%). Incidence of breast conservative treatments and sentinel node biopsies was significantly higher in the screened group. Overall mortality was 2.6 times higher in non-screened than that in screened group (95% CI 1.2-5.6) After 10 years of experience with our own screening programme, we believe that included patients receive a benefit versus comparable non-screened breast cancer patients, with acceptable benefit-risk relation.

  4. Heterogeneity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. There is a high degree of diversity between and within tumors as well as among cancer-bearing individuals, and all of these factors together determine the risk of disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Advances in technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and functional viability screens now allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. However, translating this increasing knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge in part due to tumor evolution driven by the diversity of cancer cell populations and their microenvironment. The articles in this Review series discuss recent advances in our understanding of breast tumor heterogeneity, therapies tailored based on this knowledge, and future ways of assessing and treating heterogeneous tumors.

  5. Preventable breast cancer is postmenopausal.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence has markedly increased in Western countries for reasons that are not entirely understood. We characterized periodic and age-specific incidence trends of breast cancer in immigrants who migrated from low incidence areas to Sweden. The incidence in immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Age-specific incidence data for low and high incidence populations were obtained from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents IX and NORDCAN. For immigrants from the seven lowest countries/regions 535 breast cancers were identified; the SIRs ranging from 0.45 for Turkish to 0.70 for Greek women. The SIR increased somewhat with the length of stay in Sweden, from 0.55 for stay between 0 and 10 years to 0.59 for a stay of 20+ years. The age-specific incidence curves for these immigrants were superimposable upon the earliest Swedish (year 1960) or Danish (1943) rates. These rates differed from the current Swedish rates by a much lower postmenopausal component. Large incidence differences were also observed between white Californians and immigrants from China and Korea. Our results show that the main difference between high and low incidence areas is in postmenopausal cancer which has increased preferentially during the past century. Immigrants from low risk areas to Sweden show age-specific incidence patterns of Swedes half a century ago. These differences offer opportunities for the identification of factors underlying breast cancer etiology and tools for prevention.

  6. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed? The most common way to find breast cancer is through a breast exam or mammogram (x-ray). Some women at high risk may need a screening MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan, which is more sensitive than a mammogram. ...

  7. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  8. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  9. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Imran Haruna

    2013-01-01

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease. PMID:24665149

  10. Observer agreement comparing the use of virtual slides with glass slides in the pathology review component of the POSH breast cancer cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Emily Clare; Hanby, Andrew M; Wheeler, Kevin; Shaaban, Abeer M; Poller, David; Barton, Sheila; Treanor, Darren; Fulford, Laura; Walker, Rosemary A; Ryan, Deirdre; Lakhani, Sunil R; Wells, Clive A; Roche, Heather; Theaker, Jeffrey M; Ellis, Ian O; Jones, J Louise; Eccles, Diana M

    2012-05-01

    (1) To compare the use of scanned virtual slide images (virtual microscopy) with glass slides (conventional microscopy) in the assessment of morphological characteristics of breast cancers within the setting of the Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH), involving a cohort of women under 40 years of age, presenting with breast cancer. (2) To assess the acceptability to histopathologists of the use of virtual slide images. 13 histopathologists from the UK and Australia participated in the POSH pathology review. The observers were asked to assess multiple morphological features such as tumour grade and type. Comparisons were made for a single observer using both virtual images and glass slides. Intra- and inter-observer variability was calculated using the κ statistic and a comparison was made between the use of each image modality. Diagnostic performance with virtual slides was comparable to conventional microscopic assessment, with the measurement of agreement best for vascular invasion, necrosis and the presence of a central scar (κ=0.37-0.78), and poor for more subjective parameters such as pleomorphism, stroma, the nature of the tumour border and the degree of lymphocytic infiltrate (κ=0.1). Virtual slides represent an acceptable methodology for central review of breast cancer histopathology and can circumvent the need for either travel to view material, or the potential problems of sending it by post.

  11. [Occult multicentric breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Vtorushin, S V; Zab'ialova, M V; Glushchenko, S A; Perel'muter, V M; Slonimskaia, E M

    2009-01-01

    The study included 92 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer (T2-4N0-2M0-1). In 38 cases, tumor growth was unicentric while histologically identifiable ones as multicentric in 44. Multicentricity mostly occurred in cases of macroscopically-identifiable nodes located in the central segments of the breast. Clinically-identifiable nodes of multicentric tumor growth measured more than 3 cm. Multicentric tumors were mostly grade III, featured lower expression of sex hormone receptors and positive Her2 status.

  12. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men? For many men with breast cancer, ... Breast Cancer in Men Stops Working More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  13. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    predictors of surveillance and follow-up care is Baldwin’s Afrocentric model for describing AA women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer screening...African American women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer early detection and screening. Adv Nurs Sci. 1996;19(2):27Y42. 28. Marin G. Subjective...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  14. ALND for Women with Breast Cancer Micrometastases

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a randomized clinical trial that compared axillary lymph node dissection versus no axillary lymph node dissection in women with breast cancer and only micrometastases in their sentinel lymph nodes.

  15. Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0059 TITLE: Educating normal breast mucosa to prevent breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith L Knutson...SUBTITLE Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5c...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer develops from breast mucosa and breast mucosa has intact immune system to

  16. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  17. Perceived stress and sexual orientation among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Bowen, Deborah J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the cancer survivorship experiences of sexual minority women (SMW). SMW breast cancer survivors are hypothesized to experience more stress compared to heterosexual breast cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 211 breast cancer survivors (68 SMW, 143 heterosexual women) participated in this cross-sectional online investigation of perceived stress. Regression analyses indicated significant differences in reported stress between heterosexual and SMW breast cancer survivors (β= -.15, p = .03). Our findings may reflect unique experiences had by sexual minority breast cancer survivors. Future research should explore the factors that contribute to elevated perceived stress in this group.

  18. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  19. How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed? Medical history and physical exam ... in Men Survival Rates, by Stage More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  20. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  1. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nodes . The axillary nodes are the first place breast cancer is likely to spread. During breast surgery, some ... if cancer cells are present. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. So, it is more ...

  2. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy of Breast Cancer Metastases with Alpha-Particle-emitter 225Ac: Comparing Efficacy with 213Bi, 90Y

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F.; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L.; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. Alpha-particle-emitter 213Bi based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, prostate cancer and leukemia. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of 225Ac, the high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T1/2=45.6 mins) on site and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle-emitter 225Ac, parent of 213Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of 225Ac (400 nCi) labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in about 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to one year. Treatment with 225Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than 213Bi-7.16.4 (120 μCi) (median survival = 61 days, P=0.001), and 90Y-7.16.4 (120 μCi) (median survival = 50 days, P<0.001), as well as untreated control (median survival = 41 days, P=0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that 225Ac treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from 213Bi and 2.4 Gy from 90Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that 225Ac daughters, 221Fr and 213Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest 225Ac labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

  4. Breast cancer fear in African American breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Lynette M; Thomas, Sheila; Parker, Veronica; Mayo, Rachel; Wetsel, Margaret Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe breast cancer fear according to phase of survivorship, determine whether breast cancer fear levels differed among survivorship phases, and determine the relationship between fear and age in African-American breast cancer survivors. The study utilized secondary data analysis from the study, Inner Resources as Predictors of Psychological Well-Being in AABCS. A new subscale entitled, "Breast Cancer Fear" was adapted from the Psychological Well Being Subscale by Ferrell and Grant. There was no significant difference between fear and phase of survivorship. There was a significant positive relationship between age and fear.

  5. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  6. Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Stevens, June; Khankari, Nikhil; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is of increasing concern among breast cancer survivors. However the burden of this comorbidity in this group relative to the general population, and its temporal pattern, remains unknown. Methods We compared deaths due to CVD in a population-based sample of 1,413 women with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 1996-1997, and 1,411 age-matched women without breast cancer. Date and cause of death through December 31, 2009 were assessed through the National Death Index and covariate data was gathered through structured interviews and medical record abstraction. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox regression for overall mortality (HR) and CVD-specific death (cause-specific HR). Subdistribution hazard ratios (sHR) for CVD death were estimated from the Fine-Gray model. Results Risk of death was greater among breast cancer survivors compared to women without breast cancer [HR: 1.8 (1.5, 2.1)]. An increase in CVD-related death among breast cancer survivors was evident only 7 years after diagnosis [years 0-7, cause-specific HR: 0.80 (0.53, 1.2), subdistribution HR: 0.59 (0.40, 0.87)]; years 7+, cause-specific HR: 1.8 (1.3, 2.5), subdistribution HR: 1.9 (1.4, 2.7); p-interaction: 0.001]. An increase in CVD-related mortality was observed among breast cancer survivors receiving chemotherapy. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors are at greater risk for CVD-related mortality compared to women without breast cancer and this increase in risk is manifest approximately 7 years after diagnosis. Efforts should be made to identify risk factors and interventions that can be employed during this brief window to reduce the excess burden of CVD in this vulnerable population. PMID:26414938

  8. Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer With One to Three Positive Nodes Have Higher Local and Regional Recurrence Risks Compared With Node-Negative Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T. Jones, Stuart O.; Kader, Hosam A.; Wai, Elaine S.; Speers, Caroline H.; Alexander, Abraham S.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence according to nodal status in women with T1 to T2 breast cancer and zero to three positive nodes (0-3N+) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: The study subjects comprised 5,688 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1999 with pT1 to T2, 0-3N+, M0 breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with clear margins and radiotherapy (RT) of the whole breast. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier local, regional, and locoregional recurrence (LR, RR, and LRR, respectively) were compared between the N0 (n = 4,433) and 1-3N+ (n = 1,255) cohorts. The LRR was also examined in patients with one to three positive nodes (1-3N+) treated with and without nodal RT. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Results: Median follow-up was 8.6 years. Systemic therapy was used in 97% of 1-3N+ and 41% of N0 patients. Nodal RT was used in 35% of 1-3N+ patients. The 10-year recurrence rates in N0 and 1-3N+ cohorts were as follows: LR 5.1% vs. 5.8% (p = 0.04); RR 2.3% vs. 6.1% (p < 0.001), and LRR 6.7% vs. 10.1% (p < 0.001). Among 817 1-3N+ patients treated without nodal RT, 10-year LRR were 13.8% with age <50 years, 20.3% with Grade III, and 23.4% with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative disease. On multivariate analysis, 1-3N+ status was associated with significantly higher LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.55, p < 0.001), whereas nodal RT significantly reduced LRR (HR, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with 1-3N+ and young age, Grade III, or ER-negative disease have high LRR risks approximating 15% to 20% despite BCS, whole-breast RT and systemic therapy. These patients may benefit with more comprehensive RT volume encompassing the regional nodes.

  9. [Immediate breast reconstruction for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Endo, Kayoko; Ogura, Tsunetaka; Nagumo, Yoshinori; Kwon, A-Hon

    2014-11-01

    We performed immediate breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy or skin-sparing mastectomy and evaluated the reconstruction procedure, cosmesis, and complications. Among the 30 patients included in the study, 6 received latissimus dorsi flaps, 1 received a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, 7 received deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps, 1 received an implant, and 15 received tissue expanders. In addition, the results were excellent in 25 patients, good in 3 patients, and poor in 2 patients. As the number of patients with breast cancer is increasing, the demand for breast reconstruction will increase. Therefore, it is essential to choose an appropriate method of breast reconstruction for each case.

  10. Breast cancer screening using tomosynthesis in combination with digital mammography compared to digital mammography alone: a cohort study within the PROSPR consortium.

    PubMed

    Conant, Emily F; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Sprague, Brian L; Herschorn, Sally D; Weaver, Donald L; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; McCarthy, Anne Marie; Poplack, Steven P; Haas, Jennifer S; Armstrong, Katrina; Schnall, Mitchell D; Barlow, William E

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is emerging as the new standard of care for breast cancer screening based on improved cancer detection coupled with reductions in recall compared to screening with digital mammography (DM) alone. However, many prior studies lack follow-up data to assess false negatives examinations. The purpose of this study is to assess if DBT is associated with improved screening outcomes based on follow-up data from tumor registries or pathology. Retrospective analysis of prospective cohort data from three research centers performing DBT screening in the PROSPR consortium from 2011 to 2014 was performed. Recall and biopsy rates were assessed from 198,881 women age 40-74 years undergoing screening (142,883 DM and 55,998 DBT examinations). Cancer, cancer detection, and false negative rates and positive predictive values were assessed on examinations with one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare DBT to DM adjusting for research center, age, prior breast imaging, and breast density. There was a reduction in recall with DBT compared to DM (8.7 vs. 10.4 %, p < 0.0001), with adjusted OR = 0.68 (95 % CI = 0.65-0.71). DBT demonstrated a statistically significant increase in cancer detection over DM (5.9 vs. 4.4/1000 screened, adjusted OR = 1.45, 95 % CI = 1.12-1.88), an improvement in PPV1 (6.4 % for DBT vs. 4.1 % for DM, adjusted OR = 2.02, 95 % CI = 1.54-2.65), and no significant difference in false negative rates for DBT compared to DM (0.46 vs. 0.60/1000 screened, p = 0.347). Our data support implementation of DBT screening based on increased cancer detection, reduced recall, and no difference in false negative screening examinations.

  11. Comparing GIS-based measures in access to mammography and their validity in predicting neighborhood risk of late-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Struthers, James; Schootman, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Assessing neighborhood environment in access to mammography remains a challenge when investigating its contextual effect on breast cancer-related outcomes. Studies using different Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based measures reported inconsistent findings. We compared GIS-based measures (travel time, service density, and a two-Step Floating Catchment Area method [2SFCA]) of access to FDA-accredited mammography facilities in terms of their Spearman correlation, agreement (Kappa) and spatial patterns. As an indicator of predictive validity, we examined their association with the odds of late-stage breast cancer using cancer registry data. The accessibility measures indicated considerable variation in correlation, Kappa and spatial pattern. Measures using shortest travel time (or average) and service density showed low correlations, no agreement, and different spatial patterns. Both types of measures showed low correlations and little agreement with the 2SFCA measures. Of all measures, only the two measures using 6-timezone-weighted 2SFCA method were associated with increased odds of late-stage breast cancer (quick-distance-decay: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.32; slow-distance-decay: OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.03-1.37) after controlling for demographics and neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation. Various GIS-based measures of access to mammography facilities exist and are not identical in principle and their association with late-stage breast cancer risk. Only the two measures using the 2SFCA method with 6-timezone weighting were associated with increased odds of late-stage breast cancer. These measures incorporate both travel barriers and service competition. Studies may observe different results depending on the measure of accessibility used.

  12. [Breast cancer and diabetes mellitus: Complex interactions].

    PubMed

    Bernard, L; Reix, N; Benabu, J-C; Gabriele, V; Mathelin, C

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this literature review was to quantify the incidence and mortality of breast cancer for women treated for a diabetes mellitus and to analyze the complex relationship between these two common diseases. The articles analyzed were extracted from the PubMed database from 2000 to 2015. A total of 22 case/control studies or cohorts were retained, allowing the realization of a meta-analysis. The incidence of breast cancer for women with diabetes is significantly increased for cohorts (RR=1.32; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.65) and not significantly for case/control studies (RR=1.46; 95% CI: 0.99 to 2.26). Overall, mortality of women with breast cancer is significantly increased for diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic patients (RR=1.53; 95% CI: 1.23 to 1.90). The links between diabetes and breast cancer are explained by common risk factors (overweight/obesity, qualitative and quantitative dietary errors, physical inactivity), biological changes and the impact of some anti-diabetic treatments or hormonotherapy. Physicians facing a diabetic patient treated for breast cancer have a role in choosing the best anti-diabetic treatment and implementing lifestyle modifications. Diabetic women without breast cancer should participate in organized breast screening programs and have an annual breast clinical examination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  20. Genistein Programming Against Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, *GENES, *DIET, *ESTROGENS, *SOY PROTEIN, *BREAST CANCER, RATS , CHEMICALS, MOLECULES, ENZYMES, PROTEINS, SENSITIVITY, WOMEN, SENSE ORGANS, ASIA, MAMMARY GLANDS, METHYLATION, ANDROGENS, TRANSFERASES.

  1. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  2. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  3. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Kelli A; Read, Paul W; Morris, Monica M; Reardon, Michael A; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  4. Partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Brigid E; Lehman, Margot; Francis, Daniel P; See, Adrienne M

    2016-07-18

    Breast-conserving therapy for women with breast cancer consists of local excision of the tumour (achieving clear margins) followed by radiotherapy (RT). RT is given to sterilize tumour cells that may remain after surgery to decrease the risk of local tumour recurrence. Most true recurrences occur in the same quadrant as the original tumour. Whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) may not protect against the development of a new primary cancer developing in other quadrants of the breast. In this Cochrane review, we investigated the delivery of radiation to a limited volume of the breast around the tumour bed (partial breast irradiation (PBI)) sometimes with a shortened treatment duration (accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)). To determine whether PBI/APBI is equivalent to or better than conventional or hypo-fractionated WBRT after breast-conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialized Register (4 May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 4 May 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 4 May 2015), CINAHL (4 May 2015) and Current Contents (4 May 2015). We searched the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (5 May 2015), the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (4 May 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (17 June 2015). We searched for grey literature: OpenGrey (17 June 2015), reference lists of articles, several conference proceedings and published abstracts, and applied no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) without confounding, that evaluated conservative surgery plus PBI/APBI versus conservative surgery plus WBRT. Published and unpublished trials were eligible. Two review authors (BH and ML) performed data extraction and used Cochrane's 'Risk of bias' tool, and resolved any disagreements through discussion. We entered data into Review Manager 5 for analysis. We included

  5. Mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk driven by breast anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Oustimov, Andrew; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2017-03-01

    Image-derived features of breast parenchymal texture patterns have emerged as promising risk factors for breast cancer, paving the way towards personalized recommendations regarding women's cancer risk evaluation and screening. The main steps to extract texture features of the breast parenchyma are the selection of regions of interest (ROIs) where texture analysis is performed, the texture feature calculation and the texture feature summarization in case of multiple ROIs. In this study, we incorporate breast anatomy in these three key steps by (a) introducing breast anatomical sampling for the definition of ROIs, (b) texture feature calculation aligned with the structure of the breast and (c) weighted texture feature summarization considering the spatial position and the underlying tissue composition of each ROI. We systematically optimize this novel framework for parenchymal tissue characterization in a case-control study with digital mammograms from 424 women. We also compare the proposed approach with a conventional methodology, not considering breast anatomy, recently shown to enhance the case-control discriminatory capacity of parenchymal texture analysis. The case-control classification performance is assessed using elastic-net regression with 5-fold cross validation, where the evaluation measure is the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic. Upon optimization, the proposed breast-anatomy-driven approach demonstrated a promising case-control classification performance (AUC=0.87). In the same dataset, the performance of conventional texture characterization was found to be significantly lower (AUC=0.80, DeLong's test p-value<0.05). Our results suggest that breast anatomy may further leverage the associations of parenchymal texture features with breast cancer, and may therefore be a valuable addition in pipelines aiming to elucidate quantitative mammographic phenotypes of breast cancer risk.

  6. Amphiphysin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    condition appears to represent a novel entity within the emerging family of neurological autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes , conditions in which...We have recently identified a new human syndrome characterized by breast cancer, autoimmunity directed against the neuronal protein in amphiphysin...and Stiff-Man syndrome (SMS). SMS is a rare disease of the central nervous system characterized by progressive rigidity of the body musculature. This

  7. Erythropoietin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position...CONTRACT NUMBER Erythropoietin and Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0737 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER Arthur J. Sytkowski, MD 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING

  8. Dietary Isoflavones and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ziaei, Samira; Halaby, Reginald

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the deadliest neoplasm in women globally, resulting in a significant health burden. In many cases, breast cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapies. It is believed that genetics is not the major cause of breast cancer. Other contributing risk factors include age at first childbirth, age at menarche, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives, race and ethnicity, and diet. Diet has been shown to influence breast cancer incidence, recurrence, and prognosis. Soy isoflavones have long been a staple in Asian diets, and there appears to be an increase, albeit modest, compared to Asian populations, in soy consumption among Americans. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens that have antiestrogenic as well as estrogenic effects on breast cancer cells in culture, in animal models, and in clinical trials. This study will investigate anticancer and tumor promoting properties of dietary isoflavones and evaluate their effects on breast cancer development. Furthermore, this work seeks to elucidate the putative molecular pathways by which these phytochemicals modulate breast cancer risk by synergizing or antagonizing the estrogen receptor (ER) and in ER-independent signaling mechanisms. PMID:28930233

  9. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  10. Breast cancer prognosis predicted by nuclear receptor-coregulator networks.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tram B; Eriksson, Natalie A; Graham, Dinny; Funder, John W; Simpson, Evan R; Kuczek, Elizabeth S; Clyne, Colin; Leedman, Peter J; Tilley, Wayne D; Fuller, Peter J; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L

    2014-07-01

    Although molecular signatures based on transcript expression in breast cancer samples have provided new insights into breast cancer classification and prognosis, there are acknowledged limitations in current signatures. To provide rational, pathway-based signatures of disrupted physiology in cancer tissues that may be relevant to prognosis, this study has directly quantitated changed gene expression, between normal breast and cancer tissue, as a basis for signature development. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors, and their coregulators, are fundamental regulators of every aspect of metazoan life, and were rigorously quantified in normal breast tissues and ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancers. Coregulator expression was highly correlated with that of selected NR in normal breast, particularly from postmenopausal women. These associations were markedly decreased in breast cancer, and the expression of the majority of coregulators was down-regulated in cancer tissues compared with normal. While in cancer the loss of NR-coregulator associations observed in normal breast was common, a small number of NR (Rev-ERBβ, GR, NOR1, LRH-1 and PGR) acquired new associations with coregulators in cancer tissues. Elevated expression of these NR in cancers was associated with poorer outcome in large clinical cohorts, as well as suggesting the activation of ERα -related, but ERα-independent, pathways in ERα negative cancers. In addition, the combined expression of small numbers of NR and coregulators in breast cancer was identified as a signature predicting outcome in ERα negative breast cancer patients, not linked to proliferation and with predictive power superior to existing signatures containing many more genes. These findings highlight the power of predictive signatures derived from the quantitative determination of altered gene expression between normal breast and breast cancers. Taken together, the findings of this study identify networks

  11. Long-term results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII: adjuvant chemotherapy plus goserelin compared with either therapy alone for premenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, P.; Sun, Z.; Braun, D.; Price, K. N.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Rabaglio, M.; Gelber, R. D.; Crivellari, D.; Collins, J.; Murray, E.; Zaman, K.; Colleoni, M.; Gusterson, B. A.; Viale, G.; Regan, M. M.; Coates, A. S.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII compared long-term efficacy of endocrine therapy (goserelin), chemotherapy [cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF)], and chemoendocrine therapy (CMF followed by goserelin) for pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative breast cancer. Patients and methods: From 1990 to 1999, 1063 patients were randomized to receive (i) goserelin for 24 months (n = 346), (ii) six courses of ‘classical’ CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy (n = 360), or (iii) six courses of CMF plus 18 months goserelin (CMF→ goserelin; n = 357). Tumors were classified as estrogen receptor (ER) negative (19%), ER positive (80%), or ER unknown (1%); 19% of patients were younger than 40. Median follow-up was 12.1 years. Results: For the ER-positive cohort, sequential therapy provided a statistically significant benefit in disease-free survival (DFS) (12-year DFS = 77%) compared with CMF alone (69%) and goserelin alone (68%) (P = 0.04 for each comparison), due largely to the effect in younger patients. Patients with ER-negative tumors whose treatment included CMF had similar DFS (12-year DFS CMF = 67%; 12-year DFS CMF→ goserelin = 69%) compared with goserelin alone (12-year DFS = 61%, P= NS). Conclusions: For pre/perimenopausal women with lymph-node-negative ER-positive breast cancer, CMF followed by goserelin improved DFS in comparison with either modality alone. The improvement was the most pronounced in those aged below 40, suggesting an endocrine effect of prolonged CMF-induced amenorrhea. PMID:21325445

  12. Comparing Self-Injection Teaching Strategies for Patients With Breast Cancer and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; Romanoff, Sonya; Thom, Bridgette; Burrows Walters, Chasity

    2016-10-01

    A prospective, quasiexperimental pilot study with a sequential design was performed to compare two methods of teaching self-injection. The study examined 50 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment and their caregivers to determine if simulation during the teaching experience affects patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, and self-confidence, as well as nurse satisfaction. Structured questionnaires were administered before the teaching, immediately after the teaching, and after the injection was performed at home. Nurses who performed the teaching also completed a questionnaire after the teaching. Use of simulation did not affect patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, or self-confidence. The largest impact on learner worry was the actual teaching experience, regardless of the methodology used. Nurses reported greater levels of satisfaction when simulation was part of the teaching. Patient/caregiver satisfaction with the teaching experience decreased after performing the injection at home. Additional research is needed to identify the best methodology for teaching patients and caregivers self-injection. Data from this study revealed that the addition of simulation during teaching does not always translate to better education. In addition, based on patient/caregiver reports, no substitution exists for actual injection administration.

  13. Breast-feeding after breast cancer in childbearing women.

    PubMed

    Camune, Barbara; Gabzdyl, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society in 2007, about 178,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the United States. Of these, 25% have tumors in their childbearing years and may desire future opportunities for pregnancy and lactation. Although there is a multitude of options related to preserving fertility, little is known about the residual effects of breast cancer treatment and the ability to breast-feed afterward. This article describes the epidemiological relationship between breast cancer and pregnancy and lactation. Basic types of treatment for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are reviewed. Practical information on how to support breast-feeding after breast cancer is included.

  14. Automated diagnosis of mammogram images of breast cancer using discrete wavelet transform and spherical wavelet transform features: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Karthikeyan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chua, Chua Kuang; Min, Lim Choo; Abraham, Thomas K

    2014-12-01

    Mammograms are one of the most widely used techniques for preliminary screening of breast cancers. There is great demand for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer using mammograms. Texture based feature extraction techniques are widely used for mammographic image analysis. In specific, wavelets are a popular choice for texture analysis of these images. Though discrete wavelets have been used extensively for this purpose, spherical wavelets have rarely been used for Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) of breast cancer using mammograms. In this work, a comparison of the performance between the features of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Spherical Wavelet Transform (SWT) based on the classification results of normal, benign and malignant stage was studied. Classification was performed using Linear Discriminant Classifier (LDC), Quadratic Discriminant Classifier (QDC), Nearest Mean Classifier (NMC), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Parzen Classifier (ParzenC). We have obtained a maximum classification accuracy of 81.73% for DWT and 88.80% for SWT features using SVM classifier.

  15. A Randomized Study Comparing Digital Imaging to Traditional Glass Slide Microscopy for Breast Biopsy and Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Joann G; Longton, Gary M; Pepe, Margaret S; Carney, Patricia A; Nelson, Heidi D; Allison, Kimberly H; Geller, Berta M; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Mercan, Ezgi; Shapiro, Linda G; Brunyé, Tad T; Morgan, Thomas R; Weaver, Donald L

    2017-01-01

    Digital whole slide imaging may be useful for obtaining second opinions and is used in many countries. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires verification studies. Pathologists were randomized to interpret one of four sets of breast biopsy cases during two phases, separated by ≥9 months, using glass slides or digital format (sixty cases per set, one slide per case, n = 240 cases). Accuracy was assessed by comparing interpretations to a consensus reference standard. Intraobserver reproducibility was assessed by comparing the agreement of interpretations on the same cases between two phases. Estimated probabilities of confirmation by a reference panel (i.e., predictive values) were obtained by incorporating data on the population prevalence of diagnoses. Sixty-five percent of responding pathologists were eligible, and 252 consented to randomization; 208 completed Phase I (115 glass, 93 digital); and 172 completed Phase II (86 glass, 86 digital). Accuracy was slightly higher using glass compared to digital format and varied by category: invasive carcinoma, 96% versus 93% (P = 0.04); ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 84% versus 79% (P < 0.01); atypia, 48% versus 43% (P = 0.08); and benign without atypia, 87% versus 82% (P < 0.01). There was a small decrease in intraobserver agreement when the format changed compared to when glass slides were used in both phases (P = 0.08). Predictive values for confirmation by a reference panel using glass versus digital were: invasive carcinoma, 98% and 97% (not significant [NS]); DCIS, 70% and 57% (P = 0.007); atypia, 38% and 28% (P = 0.002); and benign without atypia, 97% and 96% (NS). In this large randomized study, digital format interpretations were similar to glass slide interpretations of benign and invasive cancer cases. However, cases in the middle of the spectrum, where more inherent variability exists, may be more problematic in digital format. Future studies evaluating the effect these findings exert on

  16. Biomechanical Properties of the Skin in Patients with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema Compared to Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Killaars, R C; Penha, T R Lopez; Heuts, E M; van der Hulst, R R J W; Piatkowski, A A

    2015-09-01

    Biomechanical skin changes in breast cancer-related lymphedema (BRCL) have barely been described and objectively tested. This study aims to compare the skin of upper limb lymphedema with skin of the healthy contralateral arm, in order to demonstrate changes of elasticity, viscoelasticity, and level of hydration of the skin in BCRL. The secondary aim is to investigate the correlation between biomechanical skin changes and measurements that are currently used in clinical practice, such as volume measurement and lymph-ICF score. Eighteen patients with BCRL and 18 healthy individuals were included in the study. A Cutometer® was used for measurements for skin elasticity and viscoelasticity on both arms of each subject. A Corneometer® was used for measurements of skin hydration. Measurements of both test groups were compared. In BCRL patients, there was a significant difference (p = < 0.028) between the elasticity of the skin of the lymphedema arm compared to the healthy contralateral arm. There were no significant differences for level of skin hydration or viscoelasticity in lymphedema patients between the measurements on the skin of the lymphedematous and healthy arm. In healthy individuals, there were no significant differences for all measurements between skin of both arms. Spearman's correlation was significant (p = < 0.01) for difference in volume and difference in elasticity in BCRL patients. This study shows an impaired elasticity for the skin of the lower arm in patients with lymphedema compared to the contralateral healthy arm. Promising evidence is suggested for the use of the Cutometer device in the diagnostic evaluation of BCRL.

  17. Tissue factor over-expression by human pancreatic cancer cells BXPC3 is related to higher prothrombotic potential as compared to breast cancer cells MCF7.

    PubMed

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Galea, Vassiliki; Mbemba, Elisabeth; Khaterchi, Amir; Sassi, Mouna; Baccouche, Hela; Prengel, Claudie; van Dreden, Patrick; Hatmi, Mohamed; Bernaudin, Jean François; Elalamy, Ismail

    2012-06-01

    Cancer histology influences the risk of venous thromboembolism and tissue factor (TF) is the key molecule in cancer-induced hypercoagulability. We investigated the relation between TF expression by pancreatic and breast cancer cells (BXPC3 and MCF7 respectively) and their capacity to trigger in vitro thrombin generation in normal human plasma. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis for TF expression were performed using murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody against human TF. Real-time PCR for TFmRNA was also performed. Activity of TF expressed by cancer cells was measured with a specific chromogenic assay. Thrombin generation in PPP was assessed using calibrated automated thrombogram. Cancer cells were added to platelet poor plasma from healthy volunteers. In separate experiments cells were incubated with the anti-TF antibody at concentration that completely neutralized the activity of recombinant human TF on thrombin generation. BXPC3 cells expressed significantly higher amounts of functional TF as compared to MCF7 cells. Incubation of BXPC3 and MCF7 cells with PPP resulted in acceleration of the initiation phase of thrombin generation. BXPC3 cells manifested higher procoagulant potential than MCF7 cells. The incubation of BXPC3 or MCF7 cells with the anti-TF monoclonal antibody which resulted in reversal of their effect on thrombin generation. The present study establishes a link between the amount of TF expressed by cancer cells with their procoagulant activity. Both studied types of cancer cells trigger thrombin generation but they have different procoagulant potential. The procoagulant activity of BXPC3 and MCF7 cells is related to the amount of TF expressed. Kinetic parameters of thrombogram are the most relevant for the detection of the TF-dependent procoagulant activity of cancer cells. TF expression is one of the mechanisms by which cancer cells manifest their procoagulant potential but it is not the unique one. The present experimental model will allow the

  18. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G; Conway, Kathleen; Dressler, Lynn G; Smith, Lisa V; Labbok, Miriam H; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H Shelton; Perou, Charles M

    2008-05-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified "intrinsic" breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case-control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common subtype, exhibited risk factors typically reported for breast cancer in previous studies, including inverse associations for increased parity and younger age at first full-term pregnancy. Basal-like cases exhibited several associations that were opposite to those observed for luminal A, including increased risk for parity and younger age at first term full-term pregnancy. Longer duration breastfeeding, increasing number of children breastfed, and increasing number of months breastfeeding per child were each associated with reduced risk of basal-like breast cancer, but not luminal A. Women with multiple live births who did not breastfeed and women who used medications to suppress lactation were at increased risk of basal-like, but not luminal A, breast cancer. Elevated waist-hip ratio was associated with increased risk of luminal A in postmenopausal women, and increased risk of basal-like breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women. The prevalence of basal-like breast cancer was highest among premenopausal African-American women, who also showed the highest prevalence of basal-like risk factors. Among younger African-American women, we estimate that up to 68% of basal-like breast cancer could be prevented by promoting breastfeeding and reducing abdominal adiposity.

  19. Breast cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Radecka, Barbara; Litwiniuk, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) in young women is rare, affecting only 4-6% of women under the age of 40. Regardless, BC remains the most common malignancy among younger patients. Recently, a significant increase in BC rates has been observed among pre-menopausal subjects. Breast cancer in young women requires special attention due to its specific morphologic and prognostic characteristics and unique aspects, including fertility preservation and psychosocial issues (e.g. its impact on family life and career). Young women are more likely to have tumors with higher incidence of negative clinicopathologic features (higher histological grade, more lymph node positivity, lower estrogen receptor (ER) positivity, higher rates of Her2/neu overexpression). Also, they tend to be diagnosed at more advanced stages of the disease. That, in turn, contributes to less favorable prognosis as compared to older women. Young women are generally treated similarly to older patients. Surgical management includes mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery, followed by radiation therapy (younger women have higher local recurrence rates than older women, especially after breast-conserving therapy). Although the basics of chemotherapy are the same for patients of all ages, younger women have some special considerations. It is important to consider options for fertility preservation before starting systemic treatment. Patients should have access to genetic testing as their results may affect the choice of therapy. Younger women and their families should receive adequate psychological support and counselling.

  20. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-25

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Pharmacologic Unmasking of Epigenetically Silenced Genes in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Park, Hannah Lui; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Kim, Myoung Sook; Liu, Junwei; Argani, Pedram; Westra, William; Van Criekinge, Wim; Sidransky, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of several known or putative tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during the pathogenesis of various cancers including breast cancer. Many epigenetically inactivated genes involved in breast cancer development remain to be identified. Therefore, in this study we used a pharmacologic unmasking approach in breast cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) followed by microarray expression analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. Experimental Design Breast cancer cell lines were treated with 5-aza-dC followed by microarray analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. We then used bisulfite DNA sequencing, conventional methylation-specific PCR, and quantitative fluorogenic real-time methylation-specific PCR to confirm cancer-specific methylation in novel genes. Results Forty-nine genes were up-regulated in breast cancer cells lines after 5-aza-dC treatment, as determined by microarray analysis. Five genes (MAL, FKBP4, VGF, OGDHL, and KIF1A) showed cancer-specific methylation in breast tissues. Methylation of at least two was found at high frequency only in breast cancers (40 of 40) as compared with normal breast tissue (0 of 10; P < 0.0001, Fisher’s exact test). Conclusions This study identified new cancer-specific methylated genes to help elucidate the biology of breast cancer and as candidate diagnostic markers for the disease. PMID:19228724

  3. Pharmacologic unmasking of epigenetically silenced genes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Park, Hannah Lui; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Kim, Myoung Sook; Liu, Junwei; Argani, Pedram; Westra, William; Van Criekinge, Wim; Sidransky, David

    2009-02-15

    Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of several known or putative tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during the pathogenesis of various cancers including breast cancer. Many epigenetically inactivated genes involved in breast cancer development remain to be identified. Therefore, in this study we used a pharmacologic unmasking approach in breast cancer cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) followed by microarray expression analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with 5-aza-dC followed by microarray analysis to identify epigenetically inactivated genes in breast cancer. We then used bisulfite DNA sequencing, conventional methylation-specific PCR, and quantitative fluorogenic real-time methylation-specific PCR to confirm cancer-specific methylation in novel genes. Forty-nine genes were up-regulated in breast cancer cells lines after 5-aza-dC treatment, as determined by microarray analysis. Five genes (MAL, FKBP4, VGF, OGDHL, and KIF1A) showed cancer-specific methylation in breast tissues. Methylation of at least two was found at high frequency only in breast cancers (40 of 40) as compared with normal breast tissue (0 of 10; P<0.0001, Fisher's exact test). This study identified new cancer-specific methylated genes to help elucidate the biology of breast cancer and as candidate diagnostic markers for the disease.

  4. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

  5. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy shows similar response in patients with inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer when compared with operable breast cancer: a secondary analysis of the GeparTrio trial data.

    PubMed

    Costa, Serban Dan; Loibl, Sibylle; Kaufmann, Manfred; Zahm, Dirk-Michael; Hilfrich, Jörn; Huober, Jens; Eidtmann, Holger; du Bois, Andreas; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Ataseven, Beyhan; Weiss, Erich; Tesch, Hans; Gerber, Bernd; Baumann, Klaus H; Thomssen, Christoph; Breitbach, Georg Peter; Ibishi, Shaip; Jackisch, Christian; Mehta, Keyur; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by mastectomy is the treatment of choice in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) or locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but it is considered less effective in these diseases than in operable breast cancer (OBC). We report a prospective comparison of the GeparTrio trial of patients with IBC (cT4 days) or LABC (cT4a-c or cN3; stage IIIB or IIIC) and patients with OBC (cT2-3). PATIENTS AND METHODS Participants were stratified by stage and were randomly assigned to six or eight cycles of docetaxel/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (TAC) or to two cycles of TAC followed by four cycles of vinorelbine/capecitabine. We present results of a secondary aim of the study, which was to compare pathologic complete response (pCR; ie, no remaining invasive/noninvasive tumor in breast and lymph nodes) in different stage groups. Results A total of 287 patients with IBC (n = 93) or LABC (n = 194) and 1,777 patients with OBC were entered onto the trial. At baseline, parameters were as follows for the three types of cancer, respectively: median tumor sizes: 8.0 cm, 7.0 cm, and 4.0 cm (P < .001); multiple lesions: 31.2%, 27.3%, and 19.6% (P < .001); nodal involvement: 86.6%, 71.2%, and 51.6% (P < .001); grade 3: 44.4%, 30.4%, and 39.9% (P = .178); lobular-invasive type: 7.5%, 17.5%, and 13.3% (P = .673); negative hormone receptor status: 38.0%, 20.0%, and 36.4% (P = .008); and positive human growth factor receptor 2 status: 45.1%, 38.9%, and 35.7% (P = .158). Response rates for IBC, LABC, and OBC, respectively, were 8.6%, 11.3%, and 17.7% for pCR (P = .002); 71.0%, 69.6%, and 83.4% for overall response by physical or sonographic examination (P < .001); and 12.9%, 33.0%, and 69.9% for breast conservation (P < .001). All P values were for IBC and LABC versus OBC. However, tumor stage itself was not an independent predictor for pCR in multivariable analysis (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.59; P = .13). CONCLUSION No evidence of a

  7. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  8. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  9. Tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer control worldwide.

    PubMed Central

    Love, R. R.; Koroltchouk, V.

    1993-01-01

    In most developed and many developing countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among women. At least 50% of all breast cancer patients worldwide would survive longer, however, if public awareness about and early detection of the condition were increased and greater use were made of efficient treatment of proven value. With early-stage, localized breast cancer, local treatment combined with adjuvant hormonal therapy with tamoxifen, a synthetic estrogen, could save the lives of 6 women out of 100 compared with local treatment alone. Tamoxifen has anti-estrogenic effects not only on breast cancer cells but also on liver metabolism and bone, with concomitant decreases in risk factors for chronic skeletal and vascular system diseases. Long-term tamoxifen treatment causes major adverse clinical effects in < 5% of women; menopausal and vasomotor symptoms occur in the majority of treated women, but their severity lessens over time. Tamoxifen is being considered as a standard therapy and is included in the WHO list of essential drugs for the treatment of breast cancer patients in both developing and developed countries. For the control of breast cancer more successfully worldwide, one challenge is to make tamoxifen therapy available to greater numbers of women. PMID:8313498

  10. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  12. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes: the NSABP Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 trial. JAMA 2006; 295(23):2727– ... and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing breast cancer. Cancer Prevention ...

  13. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer - Assessment of Causality.

    PubMed

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case-control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is "specificity." HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers.

  14. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  15. DNA methylation profile of triple negative breast cancer-specific genes comparing lymph node positive patients to lymph node negative patients

    PubMed Central

    Mathe, Andrea; Wong-Brown, Michelle; Locke, Warwick J.; Stirzaker, Clare; Braye, Stephen G.; Forbes, John F.; Clark, Susan J.; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A.; Scott, Rodney J.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype with no targeted treatment available. Our previous study identified 38 TNBC-specific genes with altered expression comparing tumour to normal samples. This study aimed to establish whether DNA methylation contributed to these expression changes in the same cohort as well as disease progression from primary breast tumour to lymph node metastasis associated with changes in the epigenome. We obtained DNA from 23 primary TNBC samples, 12 matched lymph node metastases, and 11 matched normal adjacent tissues and assayed for differential methylation profiles using Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 70 primary TNBC samples. The expression of 16/38 TNBC-specific genes was associated with alteration in DNA methylation. Novel methylation changes between primary tumours and lymph node metastases, as well as those associated with survival were identified. Altered methylation of 18 genes associated with lymph node metastasis were identified and validated. This study reveals the important role DNA methylation plays in altered gene expression of TNBC-specific genes and lymph node metastases. The novel insights into progression of TNBC to secondary disease may provide potential prognostic indicators for this hard-to-treat breast cancer subtype. PMID:27671774

  16. DNA methylation profile of triple negative breast cancer-specific genes comparing lymph node positive patients to lymph node negative patients.

    PubMed

    Mathe, Andrea; Wong-Brown, Michelle; Locke, Warwick J; Stirzaker, Clare; Braye, Stephen G; Forbes, John F; Clark, Susan J; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-09-27

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype with no targeted treatment available. Our previous study identified 38 TNBC-specific genes with altered expression comparing tumour to normal samples. This study aimed to establish whether DNA methylation contributed to these expression changes in the same cohort as well as disease progression from primary breast tumour to lymph node metastasis associated with changes in the epigenome. We obtained DNA from 23 primary TNBC samples, 12 matched lymph node metastases, and 11 matched normal adjacent tissues and assayed for differential methylation profiles using Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 70 primary TNBC samples. The expression of 16/38 TNBC-specific genes was associated with alteration in DNA methylation. Novel methylation changes between primary tumours and lymph node metastases, as well as those associated with survival were identified. Altered methylation of 18 genes associated with lymph node metastasis were identified and validated. This study reveals the important role DNA methylation plays in altered gene expression of TNBC-specific genes and lymph node metastases. The novel insights into progression of TNBC to secondary disease may provide potential prognostic indicators for this hard-to-treat breast cancer subtype.

  17. Evidence That Breast Tissue Stiffness Is Associated with Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Norman F.; Li, Qing; Melnichouk, Olga; Huszti, Ella; Martin, Lisa J.; Gunasekara, Anoma; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J.; Minkin, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. Methods Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases) and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls). Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. Results After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02) and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. Conclusion An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement. PMID:25010427

  18. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, N.

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants’ ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants’ opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants’ responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  19. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care.

  20. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  1. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-29

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  3. Benign Breast Disease: Toward Molecular Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    cancer risk in women with radial scars in benign breast biopsies. Breast cancer Research and Treatment . Published online May 22, 2007... scars and involution. We explored the link between centrosome amplification, COX-2 expression and breast cancer outcomes and are currently exploring...5. Radial Scars The significance of radial scars to subsequent risk of breast cancer has been debated. Radial scars (RS) are benign breast

  4. Breast cancer patient stories project.

    PubMed

    Tanna, Nuttan; Buijs, Helene; Pitkin, Joan; Reichert, Robert

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are almost half a million women living with or beyond a breast cancer diagnosis in the UK, often referred to as the breast cancer survivor population. We report on the setting up of a dedicated breast cancer and menopause symptoms service (BCMS), and present results from research undertaken with breast cancer survivors with the aim of obtaining their perspectives on the BCMS service. An action-oriented approach incorporating improvement science methodology has been used to help develop and drive changes to support a high standard of NHS patient care delivery for women with breast cancer within the BCMS setting. Evaluation was undertaken of this innovative service using qualitative methodology, and included discussion within a focus group setting, patient consent to record discussion, followed by thematic analysis of transcription. Women who have survived breast cancer identified a need for specialist support to help improve their quality of life, which is also affected by menopause type symptomology. This support can be provided within the BCMS service setting. Our recommendations are that the BCMS service model is incorporated into any regional or national breast cancer patient pathway and service redesign work in place. Breast cancer survivors would support the setting up of a BCMS service, and would actively help raise awareness and market this service.

  5. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models

    PubMed Central

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions. PMID:26259240

  6. A comparative analysis of inhibitors of the glycolysis pathway in breast and ovarian cancer cell line models.

    PubMed

    Xintaropoulou, Chrysi; Ward, Carol; Wise, Alan; Marston, Hugh; Turnbull, Arran; Langdon, Simon P

    2015-09-22

    Many cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy production and targeting of this pathway is a potential strategy to inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, inhibition of five glycolysis pathway molecules (GLUT1, HKII, PFKFB3, PDHK1 and LDH) using 9 inhibitors (Phloretin, Quercetin, STF31, WZB117, 3PO, 3-bromopyruvate, Dichloroacetate, Oxamic acid, NHI-1) was investigated in panels of breast and ovarian cancer cell line models. All compounds tested blocked glycolysis as indicated by increased extracellular glucose and decreased lactate production and also increased apoptosis. Sensitivity to several inhibitors correlated with the proliferation rate of the cell lines. Seven compounds had IC50 values that were associated with each other consistent with a shared mechanism of action. A synergistic interaction was revealed between STF31 and Oxamic acid when combined with the antidiabetic drug metformin. Sensitivity to glycolysis inhibition was also examined under a range of O2 levels (21% O2, 7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) and greater resistance to the inhibitors was found at low oxygen conditions (7% O2, 2% O2 and 0.5% O2) relative to 21% O2 conditions. These results indicate growth of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines is dependent on all the targets examined in the glycolytic pathway with increased sensitivity to the inhibitors under normoxic conditions.

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  8. A Randomized Trial Comparing Live and Telemedicine Delivery of an Imagery-based Behavioral Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors: Reducing Symptoms and Barriers to Care

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Lyn W.; White, Rebecca; Ratcliff, Chelsea G.; Sutton, Sue; Stewart, Mary; Palmer, J. Lynn; Link, Judith; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Objective This multi-site randomized trial evaluates the quality of life (QOL) benefits of an imagery-based group intervention titled “Envision the Rhythms of Life” (ERL). Methods Breast cancer survivors >6 weeks post-treatment were randomized to attend five weekly 4-hour group sessions at a community center with therapist present (live-delivery; LD, n=48); therapist streamed via telemedicine (telemedicine-delivery; TD, n=23); or to a waitlist control group (WL, n=47). Weekly individual phone calls to encourage at-home practice began at session one and continued until the 3-month follow-up. Seven self-report measures of QOL were examined at baseline, 1 and 3 months post-treatment including health-related and breast cancer-specific QOL, fatigue, cognitive function, spirituality, distress, and sleep. Results The Bonferroni method was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and alpha was adjusted to 0.01. LMM analyses revealed less fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disturbance for LD and TD compared to WL across the follow-up (p’s <0.01). Changes in fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, and health-related and breast cancer-related QOL were clinically significant. There were no differences between LD and TD. Conclusions Both the live and telemedicine delivered ERL intervention resulted in improvements in multiple QOL domains for breast cancer survivors compared to a waitlist control. Further, there were no significant differences between live- and telemedicine-delivery, suggesting telemedicine delivered ERL intervention may represent an effective and viable option for cancer survivors in remote areas. PMID:25146413

  9. A randomized trial comparing live and telemedicine deliveries of an imagery-based behavioral intervention for breast cancer survivors: reducing symptoms and barriers to care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lyn W; White, Rebecca; Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Sutton, Sue; Stewart, Mary; Palmer, J Lynn; Link, Judith; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    This multi-site randomized trial evaluates the quality of life (QOL) benefits of an imagery-based group intervention titled 'Envision the Rhythms of Life'(ERL). Breast cancer survivors >6 weeks post-treatment were randomized to attend five weekly 4-h group sessions at a community center with therapist present (live delivery (LD), n = 48), therapist streamed via telemedicine (telemedicine delivery (TD), n = 23), or to a waitlist control (WL) group (n = 47). Weekly individual phone calls to encourage at-home practice began at session one and continued until the 3-month follow-up. Seven self-report measures of QOL were examined at baseline, 1-month and 3-month post-treatments including health-related and breast cancer-specific QOL, fatigue, cognitive function, spirituality, distress, and sleep. The Bonferroni method was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and alpha was adjusted to 0.01. Linear multilevel modeling analyses revealed less fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disturbance for LD and TD compared with WL across the follow-up (p's < 0.01). Changes in fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, and health-related and breast cancer-related QOL were clinically significant. There were no differences between LD and TD. Both the live and telemedicine delivered ERL intervention resulted in improvements in multiple QOL domains for breast cancer survivors compared with WL. Further, there were no significant differences between LD and TD, suggesting telemedicine delivered ERL intervention may represent an effective and viable option for cancer survivors in remote areas. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Comparative analysis of the post-lumpectomy target volume versus the use of pre-lumpectomy tumor volume for early-stage breast cancer: implications for the future.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Elizabeth M; Dhople, Anil A; Mohiuddin, Majid M; Flannery, Todd W; Yu, Cedric X; Regine, William F

    2010-05-01

    Three-dimensional conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI-3D-CRT) is commonly associated with the treatment of large amounts of normal breast tissue. We hypothesized that a planning tumor volume (PTV) generation based on an expansion of the pre-lumpectomy (pre-LPC) intact tumor volume would result in smaller volumes of irradiated normal breast tissue compared with using a PTV based on the post-lumpectomy cavity (post-LPC). Use of PTVs based on the pre-LPC might also result in greater patient eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT. Forty-one early-stage breast cancers were analyzed. Preoperative imaging was used to determine a pre-LPC tumor volume. PTVs were developed in the pre- and post-LPC settings as per National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP)-B39 guidelines. The pre- and post-LPC PTV volumes were compared and eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT determined using NSABP-B39 criteria. The post-LPC PTV exceeded the pre-LPC PTV in all cases. The median volume for the pre- and post-LPC PTVs were 93 cm(3) (range, 24-570 cm(3)) and 250 cm(3) (range, 45-879 cm(3)), respectively, p <0.001. The difference between pre- and post-LPC PTVs represented a median of 165 cc (range, 21-482 cc) or 16% (range, 3%-42%) of the whole breast volume. Three of 41 vs. 13 of 41 cases were ineligible for APBI-3D-CRT when using the pre- and post-LPC PTVs, respectively. PTVs based on pre-LPC tumor expansion are likely associated with reduced amounts of irradiated normal breast tissue compared with post-LPC PTVs, possibly leading to greater patient eligibility for APBI-3D-CRT. These findings support future investigation as to the feasibility of neoadjuvant APBI-3D-CRT.

  11. Can Smog Raise Breast Cancer Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164495.html Can Smog Raise Breast Cancer Risk? Exposure to fine-particle air pollution linked ... have dense breasts, a known risk factor for breast cancer, new research suggests. "It appears that women who ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread outside the breast . In stage IB , small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ... centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ...

  13. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread outside the breast . In stage IB , small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ... centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ...

  14. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread outside the breast . In stage IB , small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ... centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ...

  15. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

  16. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Finnerty, N.A.; Buzdar, A.U.; Blumenschein, G.R.

    1984-06-01

    Between 1975 and 1983, sixteen patients with a history of irradiation at an early age to the head, neck, or chest areas for a variety of conditions in whom breast cancer subsequently developed were seen at out institute. The median latent period between the irradiation and the development of breast cancer was 420 months. The distribution of patients by stage of the disease and the median age at diagnosis of this subgroup was similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. The subsequent course of this disease was also similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. A substantial number of women have been exposed to irradiation at a young age, and these women are at a higher risk of having breast cancer develop. These women should be closely observed to discover the disease in an early curable stage.

  17. [Can breast cancer be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Vatten, L J

    1991-05-30

    More than six-fold variation in incidence between countries, an increasing incidence among immigrants to high incidence areas, and a general increase in the incidence of breast cancer within countries, are factors which suggest a potential for prevention. Reproductive factors such as early menarche, late age at first full term birth, nulliparity, and late age at menopause increase risk of breast cancer, but manipulation of any one of these factors does not seem to be a realistic preventive tool. Nevertheless, the future possibility of using tamoxifen as a chemopreventive agent against breast cancer is discussed, particularly in relation to women at increased risk due to familial clustering. Alcohol consumption by young women, and overweight among postmenopausal women may also increase the incidence of breast cancer. Consequently, reduced alcohol intake by young women, and weight reduction among overweight women after menopause may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  18. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  19. Epidemiology of breast cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Yankaskas, Bonnie C

    Breast cancer is a rare disease in young women, yet is the leading cause of cancer deaths in all ethnic groups in the United States and many parts of the world. The epidemiology for breast cancer in young women is reviewed, focusing on women under 40, prior to the recommended screening age. Specific age comparison groups used and results for young women vary in the literature, yet there are some common results. Young women have low incidence rates of breast cancer compared to older women. However, cancer incidence increases at a faster rate with increasing age in young women. Their cancers tend to be larger and higher grade with poorer prognostic characteristics, resulting in a higher risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer when compared to older women. Many of the usual risk factors for breast cancer in older women also increase risk in younger women including increasing age, Black race, family history, later age at first birth and menarche, radiation exposure and lack of physical activity. Risk factors that have specific relevance to young women include reproductive factors, history of induced abortion or miscarriage, oral contraceptive use, smoking, and radiation exposure, most specifically for treatment of Hodgkin Disease.

  20. Imaging Surveillance After Primary Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Diana L.; Houssami, Nehmat; Lee, Janie M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Current clinical guidelines are consistent in supporting annual mammography for women after treatment of primary breast cancer. Surveillance imaging beyond standard digital mammography, including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), breast ultrasound, and MRI, may improve outcomes. This article reviews the evidence on the performance and effectiveness of breast imaging modalities available for surveillance after treatment of sporadic unilateral primary breast cancer and identifies additional factors to be considered when selecting an imaging surveillance regimen. CONCLUSION Evidence review supports the use of mammography for surveillance after primary breast cancer treatment. Variability exists in guideline recommendations for surveillance initiation, interval, and cessation. DBT offers the most promise as a potential modality to replace standard digital mammography as a front-line surveillance test; a single published study to date has shown a significant decrease in recall rates compared with standard digital mammography alone. Most guidelines do not support the use of whole-breast ultrasound in breast cancer surveillance, and further studies are needed to define the characteristics of women who may benefit from MRI surveillance. The emerging evidence about surveillance imaging outcomes suggests that additional factors, including patient and imaging characteristics, tumor biology and gene expression profile, and choice of treatment, warrant consideration in selecting personalized posttreatment imaging surveillance regimens. PMID:28075622

  1. Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

    2014-11-15

    Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR=0.69; 95% CI=0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  2. Evaluation of Curcumin Capped Copper Nanoparticles as Possible Inhibitors of Human Breast Cancer Cells and Angiogenesis: a Comparative Study with Native Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Sonali; Utage, Bhimashankar; Mogle, Pratima; Kamble, Rahul; Hese, Shrikant; Dawane, Bhaskar; Gacche, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Synthesis of metal nanoparticles for improving therapeutic index and drug delivery is coming up as an attractive strategy in the mainstream of cancer therapeutic research. In the present study, curcumin-capped copper nanoparticles (CU-NPs) were evaluated as possible inhibitors of in vivo angiogenesis, pro-angiogenic cytokines involved in promoting tumor angiogenesis along with inhibition of cell proliferation and migration of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The antiangiogenic potential was assessed using in vivo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the effect of CU-NPs against proliferation of breast cancer cell line. The wound healing migration assay was used to evaluate the effects of CU-NPs on the migration ability of breast cancer cell line. Native curcumin (CU) was used as a reference compound for comparison purpose. The result of the present investigation indicates that CU-NPs could not demonstrate impressive antiangiogenic or anticancer activities significantly as compared to native CU. The possible mechanisms of experimental outcomes are discussed in the light of the methods of nanoparticle synthesis in concert with the current state of the art literature.

  3. Evaluation of the Clinical Utility of the ICG Fluorescence Method Compared with the Radioisotope Method for Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Tomoharu; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Masuda, Norikazu; Sawada, Terumasa; Yamauchi, Akira; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Bando, Hiroko; Yamashiro, Hiroyasu; Lee, Tecchuu; Shinkura, Nobuhiko; Kato, Hironori; Ikeda, Takafumi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Ueyama, Hanae; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the clinical utility of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence and radioisotope (RI) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in breast cancer. Women with node-negative breast cancer underwent SLN biopsy using ICG fluorescence and RI. The primary end point was the sensitivity of ICG fluorescence compared with RI in the patients with tumor-positive SLNs. Secondary end points included detection rates for SLN, the additive effect of ICG fluorescence to RI, signature of positive SLNs according to tier, and adverse events related to ICG administration. A total of 847 women with clinical node-negative breast cancer underwent SLN biopsy, and 821 patients were included in the per-protocol analysis. SLN mapping was performed using ICG fluorescence and RI. The overall detection of SLNs using ICG fluorescence was identical to RI (97.2 vs. 97.0 %, P = 0.88), and the combination of both methods achieved a significant improvement compared with RI alone (99.8 vs. 97.0 %, P < 0.001). The detection rate for tumor-positive SLN was 93.3 % for ICG fluorescence and 90.0 % for RI, and the sensitivity of the ICG fluorescence method was 95.7 % (95 % CI 91.3-98.3, P = 0.11). The additional use of ICG significantly improved positive SLN detection for RI (97.2 vs. 90.0 %, P < 0.001). There were no serious adverse events related to hypersensitivity to ICG. The ICG fluorescence method may be an acceptable alternative to SLN detection using RI in breast cancer.

  4. African American women's breast memories, cancer beliefs, and screening behaviors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Eileen C

    2004-01-01

    African American women experience higher breast cancer mortality and lower survival rates compared with white women of comparable age and cancer stage. The literature is lacking in studies that address the influence of past events on current health behaviors among women of diverse cultural groups. This qualitative exploratory study used participant narratives to examine associations between women's memories and feelings concerning their breasts and current breast cancer screening behaviors. Twelve professional African American women, aged 42 to 64 years, shared stories about memories and feelings regarding their breasts. Codes grouped together with related patterns and recurrences revealed categories that encompassed the language and culture of the participants. The categories identified were Seasons of Breast Awareness, Womanhood, Self-Portraits, Breast Cancer and Cancer Beliefs, Breast Cancer Screening Experiences, and Participants' Advice for Change. These categories provide direction for further exploration of barriers to health promotion practices among African American women and women in general.

  5. Family history of cancer and its association with breast cancer risk perception and repeat mammography.

    PubMed

    Haber, Gillian; Ahmed, Nasar U; Pekovic, Vukosava

    2012-12-01

    We examined the strength of association between family history of breast cancer and family history of other cancers with breast cancer risk perception and repeat mammography. The sample included 6706 women, aged 46 to 74 years, with no breast cancer history. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the association between family history of cancer and breast cancer risk perception. Structural equation modeling estimated the relationship between family history of cancer and repeat mammography. Breast cancer risk perception was strongly associated with family history of breast cancer in the mother or mother and sister (odds ratio [OR] = 32.15; P < .001); family history of breast cancer in the sister, daughter, or male first-degree relative (OR = 6.6-8.4; P < .001); and maternal history of other cancers (OR = 1.38-2.73; P < .001). For repeat mammography, women with maternal history of breast cancer had a mean increase of 0.50 more mammograms in the past 6 years compared with women without maternal history of breast cancer (P < .001). Breast cancer risk perception was associated with the type of cancer found in first-degree relatives and with the person's relationship to the family member with cancer. Family history of breast cancer affected repeat mammography behavior.

  6. The risk of contralateral breast cancer in patients from BRCA1/2 negative high risk families as compared to patients from BRCA1 or BRCA2 positive families: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While it has been reported that the risk of contralateral breast cancer in patients from BRCA1 or BRCA2 positive families is elevated, little is known about contralateral breast cancer risk in patients from high risk families that tested negative for BRCA1/2 mutations. Methods A retrospective, multicenter cohort study was performed from 1996 to 2011 and comprised 6,235 women with unilateral breast cancer from 6,230 high risk families that had tested positive for BRCA1 (n = 1,154) or BRCA2 (n = 575) mutations or tested negative (n = 4,501). Cumulative contralateral breast cancer risks were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and were compared between groups using the log-rank test. Cox regression analysis was applied to assess the impact of the age at first breast cancer and the familial history stratified by mutation status. Results The cumulative risk of contralateral breast cancer 25 years after first breast cancer was 44.1% (95%CI, 37.6% to 50.6%) for patients from BRCA1 positive families, 33.5% (95%CI, 22.4% to 44.7%) for patients from BRCA2 positive families and 17.2% (95%CI, 14.5% to 19.9%) for patients from families that tested negative for BRCA1/2 mutations. Younger age at first breast cancer was associated with a higher risk of contralateral breast cancer. For women who had their first breast cancer before the age of 40 years, the cumulative risk of contralateral breast cancer after 25 years was 55.1% for BRCA1, 38.4% for BRCA2, and 28.4% for patients from BRCA1/2 negative families. If the first breast cancer was diagnosed at the age of 50 or later, 25-year cumulative risks were 21.6% for BRCA1, 15.5% for BRCA2, and 12.9% for BRCA1/2 negative families. Conclusions Contralateral breast cancer risk in patients from high risk families that tested negative for BRCA1/2 mutations is similar to the risk in patients with sporadic breast cancer. Thus, the mutation status should guide decision making for contralateral mastectomy. PMID

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Men What Are the Key Statistics About Breast Cancer in Men? The American Cancer Society estimates for ... Treatment in Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  8. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  9. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  12. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  13. Comparative antiproliferative effects of iniparib and olaparib on a panel of triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Aisling; McGowan, Patricia M.; Cotter, Maura; Mullooly, Maeve; O’Donovan, Norma; Rani, Sweta; O’Driscoll, Lorraine; Crown, John; Duffy, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    PARP inhibitors, both as monotherapy and in combination with cytotoxic drugs, are currently undergoing clinical trials in several different cancer types. In this investigation, we compared the antiproliferative activity of two PARP/putative PARP inhibitors, i.e., olaparib and iniparib, in a panel of 14 breast cancer cell lines (seven tripe-negative and seven non-triple-negative). In almost all cell lines investigated, olaparib was a more potent inhibitor of cell growth than iniparib. Inhibition by both drugs was cell line-dependent and independent of the molecular subtype status of the cells, i.e., whether cells were triple-negative or non-triple negative. Although the primary target of PARP inhibitors is PARP1, no significant association was found between baseline levels of PARP1 activity and inhibition with either agent. Similarly, no significant correlation was evident between sensitivity and levels of CDK1, BRCA1 or miR-182. Combined addition of olaparib and either the CDK1 inhibitor, RO-3306 or a pan HER inhibitor (neratinib, afatinib) resulted in superior growth inhibition to that obtained with olaparib alone. We conclude that olaparib, in contrast to iniparib, is a strong inhibitor of breast cancer cell growth and may have efficacy in breast cancer irrespective of its molecular subtype, i.e., whether HER2-positive, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or triple-negative. Olaparib, in combination with a selective CDK1 inhibitor or a pan HER inhibitor, is a potential new approach for treating breast cancer. PMID:23760496

  14. Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

  15. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. [Breast cancer in elderly].

    PubMed

    Diab, Sami G

    2007-10-01

    The question of the breast cancer in elderly is enlightened by two constituted epidemiological data bases in the United-States: the data basis of San Antonio and the SEER (Surveillance Epidemology and End Results) which represent a follow-up of 26% of the American population. The listed data allow an approach of the clinical and biological constituents according to the age of the disease as well as the factors of comorbidity. The informations relative to the therapeutic choices are more fragmentary and must be developed first and foremost during the programs. double dagger.

  19. Breast Cancer: Epidemiology and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZiQi; Shi, Aimin; Lu, Cuntao; Song, Tao; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequently occurring cancer in women, is a major public health problem, with 1,384,155 estimated new cases worldwide with nearly 459,000 related deaths. Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous in its pathological characteristics, some cases showing slow growth with excellent prognosis, while others being aggressive tumors. Current predictions and statistics suggest that both worldwide incidence of breast cancer and related mortality are on the rise. According to 2012 GLOBOCAN statistics, nearly 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer with 522,000 related deaths-an increase in breast cancer incidence and related mortality by nearly 18 % from 2008. According to American Cancer Society, one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It has been predicted that the worldwide incidence of female breast cancer will reach approximately 3.2 million new cases per year by 2050. These numbers reflect the magnitude of breast cancer incidence, its effect on society worldwide and the need for urgency for preventive and treatment measures. While technological advances in medical sciences and health care have made it possible to detect the disease early and to start the treatment early on to prevent the progress of the disease into a metastatic state, there are several unanswered questions with regard to the molecular mechanisms that underlie the aggressiveness of certain forms of this disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that addressing socio economical issues is utmost important, so that all women have equal access to medical care from screening to advanced treatment, and only such decisive action can help reduce the worldwide burden of breast cancer.

  20. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  1. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  2. Features of aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arpino, Grazia; Milano, Monica; De Placido, Sabino

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive breast cancer is a term commonly used in literature to describe breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Identifying and understanding the factors associated with aggressiveness could be helpful to the management of patients with breast cancer. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, both clinically and biologically, which may be responsible for the wide range of survival durations for patients with metastatic disease. The goal of this study was to identify the factors most often described in association with aggressive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). A systematic review was performed by querying PubMed from January 1, 2012 to June 1, 2014 for "metastatic breast cancer" ("aggressive" or "poor prognosis" or "high risk"). The level of evidence to support each potential prognostic factor of aggressive MBC was also reviewed. The identified factors were grouped into 3 principle categories: clinical, biological, and patient related. Because patient-related factors may not be indicative of inherent cancer aggressiveness, this review focused only on clinical and biological factors. The factors with the highest levels of evidence to support associations with survival in metastatic breast cancer were visceral metastases, number of metastatic sites, disease-free interval, presence of CTCs, triple-negative disease, and tumour grade. Identification of these factors and understanding their contribution to the aggressiveness of MBC and disease progression may lead to more personalized treatment in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Oncolytic virotherapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartkopf, Andreas D; Fehm, Tanja; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2011-10-01

    The use of replication competent viruses that selectively target and destroy cancer cells has rapidly evolved over the past decade and numerous innovative oncolytic viruses have been created. Many of these promising anti-cancer agents have recently entered into clinical trials (including those on breast cancer) and demonstrated encouraging safety and efficacy. Virotherapeutic strategies are thus of considerable interest to combat breast cancer in both (i) the primary disease situation in which relapse should be avoided as good as possible and (ii) in the metastatic situation which remains incurable to date. Here, we summarize data from preclinical and clinical trials using oncolytic virotherapy to treat breast cancer. This includes strategies to specifically target breast cancer cells, to arm oncolytic viruses with additional therapeutic transgenes and an outlining of future challenges when translating these promising therapeutics "from bench to bedside".

  4. Molecular basis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Mansouri, Layla J; Alokail, Majed S

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women and represents the second leading cause of cancer death among women after lung cancer. A common phenotypic abnormality of breast cancer cells is dysregulation of cell cycle control. The transformation of normal cell to a cancer cell appears to depend on mutation in genes that normally control cell cycle progression, thus leading to loss of the regulatory cell growth. We summarize here the molecular regulation of mammary carcinoma with regards to the most prominent oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and their outcome in terms of cellular prognosis, and tumor development.

  5. Poor physical health predicts time to additional breast cancer events and mortality in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Nazmus; Pierce, John P; Saquib, Juliann; Flatt, Shirley W; Natarajan, Loki; Bardwell, Wayne A; Patterson, Ruth E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Thomson, Cynthia A; Rock, Cheryl L; Jones, Lovell A; Gold, Ellen B; Karanja, Njeri; Parker, Barbara A

    2011-03-01

    Health-related quality of life has been hypothesized to predict time to additional breast cancer events and all-cause mortality in breast cancer survivors. Women with early-stage breast cancer (n=2967) completed the SF-36 (mental and physical health-related quality of life) and standardized psychosocial questionnaires to assess social support, optimism, hostility, and depression prior to randomization into a dietary trial. Cox regression was performed to assess whether these measures of quality of life and psychosocial functioning predicted time to additional breast cancer events and all-cause mortality; hazard ratios were the measure of association. There were 492 additional breast cancer events and 301 deaths occurred over a median 7.3 years (range: 0.01-10.8 years) of follow-up. In multivariate models, poorer physical health was associated with both decreased time to additional breast cancer events and all-cause mortality (p trend=0.005 and 0.004, respectively), while greater hostility predicted additional breast cancer events only (p trend=0.03). None of the other psychosocial variables predicted either outcome. The hazard ratios comparing persons with poor (bottom two quintiles) to better (top three quintiles) physical health were 1.42 (95% CI: 1.16, 1.75) for decreased time to additional breast cancer events and 1.37 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.74) for all-cause mortality. Potentially modifiable factors associated with poor physical health included higher body mass index, lower physical activity, lower alcohol consumption, and more insomnia (p<0.05 for all). Interventions to improve physical health should be tested as a means to increase time to additional breast cancer events and mortality among breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  7. Intrinsic breast tumor subtypes, race, and long-term survival in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Perou, Charles M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Foulkes, William D.; Dressler, Lynn G.; Geradts, Joseph; Millikan, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous research identified differences in breast cancer-specific mortality across four "intrinsic" tumor subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive/estrogen receptor negative (HER2+/ER−). Experimental Design We used immunohistochemical markers to subtype 1149 invasive breast cancer patients (518 African American, 631 white) in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based study of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Vital status was determined through 2006 using the National Death Index, with median follow-up of 9 years. Results Cancer subtypes luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and HER2+/ER- were distributed as 64%, 11%, 11% and 5% for whites, and 48%, 8%, 22% and 7% for African Americans, respectively. Breast cancer mortality was higher for patients with HER2+/ER- and basal-like breast cancer compared to luminal A and B. African Americans had higher breast-cancer specific mortality than whites, but the effect of race was statistically significant only among women with luminal A breast cancer. However, when compared to the luminal A subtype within racial categories, mortality for patients with basal-like breast cancer was higher among whites (HR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.4) than African Americans (HR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4), with the strongest effect seen in postmenopausal white women (HR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 10.0). Conclusions Our results confirm the association of basal-like breast cancer with poor prognosis, and suggest that basal-like breast cancer is not an inherently more aggressive disease in African American women compared to whites. Additional analyses are needed in populations with known treatment profiles to understand the role of tumor subtypes and race in breast cancer mortality, and in particular our finding that among women with luminal A breast cancer, African Americans have higher mortality than whites. PMID:21169259

  8. Approach to inflammatory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molckovsky, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Barbara; Freedman, Orit; Heisey, Ruth; Clemons, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the definition, clinical presentation, and management of inflammatory breast cancer in primary care. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Relevant research and review articles, as well as personal experience of the authors practising in a specialized locally advanced breast cancer program at a comprehensive cancer centre. Evidence is levels II and III. MAIN MESSAGE Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare disease that typically presents with a rapidly enlarging erythematous breast, often with no discernable breast mass. Identification of warning signs and recognition of clinical symptoms are crucial to prompt diagnosis and appropriate referral. Management in the primary care setting includes treatment of symptoms, psychosocial support, regular surveillance and follow-up, as well as palliative care. CONCLUSION Family physicians are usually the entry point to the health care system and are well positioned to assess inflammation of the breast and recognize the warning signs of an underlying inflammatory breast cancer. They are also important members of the team that provides support for breast cancer patients and their families during treatment, follow-up, and end-of-life care. PMID:19155362

  9. PRC2/EED-EZH2 Complex Is Up-Regulated in Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis Compared to Primary Tumor and Correlates with Tumor Proliferation In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongxiang; Simons, Diana L.; Segall, Ilana; Carcamo-Cavazos, Valeria; Schwartz, Erich J.; Yan, Ning; Zuckerman, Neta S.; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Johnson, Denise L.; Holmes, Susan P.; Lee, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymph node metastasis is a key event in the progression of breast cancer. Therefore it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms which facilitate regional lymph node metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed gene expression profiling of purified tumor cells from human breast tumor and lymph node metastasis. By microarray network analysis, we found an increased expression of polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2) core subunits EED and EZH2 in lymph node metastatic tumor cells over primary tumor cells which were validated through real-time PCR. Additionally, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and quantitative image analysis of whole tissue sections showed a significant increase of EZH2 expressing tumor cells in lymph nodes over paired primary breast tumors, which strongly correlated with tumor cell proliferation in situ. We further explored the mechanisms of PRC2 gene up-regulation in metastatic tumor cells and found up-regulation of E2F genes, MYC targets and down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin targets in lymph node metastasis through GSEA analyses. Using IHC, the expression of potential EZH2 target, E-cadherin was examined in paired primary/lymph node samples and was found to be significantly decreased in lymph node metastases over paired primary tumors. Conclusions/Significance This study identified an over expression of the epigenetic silencing complex PRC2/EED-EZH2 in breast cancer lymph node metastasis as compared to primary tumor and its positive association with tumor cell proliferation in situ. Concurrently, PRC2 target protein E-cadherin was significant decreased in lymph node metastases, suggesting PRC2 promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lymph node metastatic process through repression of E-cadherin. These results indicate that epigenetic regulation mediated by PRC2 proteins may provide additional advantage for the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in lymph nodes. This opens

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  11. Breast Cancer Center Support Grant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    may make potential referral candidates more receptive when medical professionals approach them about being tested. Currently, there are barriers to...1985;253:1908-13. (39) Parazzini F, La Vecchia C, Negri E, Franceschi S, Tozzi L. Family history of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer and risk of...Raloxifene reduces the risk of breast cancer and may decrease the risk of endometrial cancer in post- menopausal women. Two year findings from the

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Karunakaran; Subramanian, Balaji; Yadav, Poonam; Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2016-01-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  15. The Biology of Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases, diagnosed in 10 to 15% of breast cancer patients and found at autopsy in 20 to 30...Relatively little is known about how breast cancer cells metastasize to the brain , and what phenotypes characterize these cells. This is due in...breast cancer brain metastases, using intra-carotid artery injection of breast cancer cells into nude mice.

  16. A Randomized Study Comparing Digital Imaging to Traditional Glass Slide Microscopy for Breast Biopsy and Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joann G.; Longton, Gary M.; Pepe, Margaret S.; Carney, Patricia A.; Nelson, Heidi D.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Geller, Berta M.; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Mercan, Ezgi; Shapiro, Linda G.; Brunyé, Tad T.; Morgan, Thomas R.; Weaver, Donald L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Digital whole slide imaging may be useful for obtaining second opinions and is used in many countries. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires verification studies. Methods: Pathologists were randomized to interpret one of four sets of breast biopsy cases during two phases, separated by ≥9 months, using glass slides or digital format (sixty cases per set, one slide per case, n = 240 cases). Accuracy was assessed by comparing interpretations to a consensus reference standard. Intraobserver reproducibility was assessed by comparing the agreement of interpretations on the same cases between two phases. Estimated probabilities of confirmation by a reference panel (i.e., predictive values) were obtained by incorporating data on the population prevalence of diagnoses. Results: Sixty-five percent of responding pathologists were eligible, and 252 consented to randomization; 208 completed Phase I (115 glass, 93 digital); and 172 completed Phase II (86 glass, 86 digital). Accuracy was slightly higher using glass compared to digital format and varied by category: invasive carcinoma, 96% versus 93% (P = 0.04); ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 84% versus 79% (P < 0.01); atypia, 48% versus 43% (P = 0.08); and benign without atypia, 87% versus 82% (P < 0.01). There was a small decrease in intraobserver agreement when the format changed compared to when glass slides were used in both phases (P = 0.08). Predictive values for confirmation by a reference panel using glass versus digital were: invasive carcinoma, 98% and 97% (not significant [NS]); DCIS, 70% and 57% (P = 0.007); atypia, 38% and 28% (P = 0.002); and benign without atypia, 97% and 96% (NS). Conclusions: In this large randomized study, digital format interpretations were similar to glass slide interpretations of benign and invasive cancer cases. However, cases in the middle of the spectrum, where more inherent variability exists, may be more problematic in digital format. Future studies

  17. Quantifying the natural history of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, K H X; Simonella, L; Wee, H L; Roellin, A; Lim, Y-W; Lim, W-Y; Chia, K S; Hartman, M; Cook, A R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Natural history models of breast cancer progression provide an opportunity to evaluate and identify optimal screening scenarios. This paper describes a detailed Markov model characterising breast cancer tumour progression. Methods: Breast cancer is modelled by a 13-state continuous-time Markov model. The model differentiates between indolent and aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ tumours, and aggressive tumours of different sizes. We compared such aggressive cancers, that is, which are non-indolent, to those which are non-growing and regressing. Model input parameters and structure were informed by the 1978–1984 Ostergotland county breast screening randomised controlled trial. Overlaid on the natural history model is the effect of screening on diagnosis. Parameters were estimated using Bayesian methods. Markov chain Monte Carlo integration was used to sample the resulting posterior distribution. Results: The breast cancer incidence rate in the Ostergotland population was 21 (95% CI: 17–25) per 10 000 woman-years. Accounting for length-biased sampling, an estimated 91% (95% CI: 85–97%) of breast cancers were aggressive. Larger tumours, 21–50 mm, had an average sojourn of 6 years (95% CI: 3–16 years), whereas aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ took around half a month (95% CI: 0–1 month) to progress to the invasive ⩽10 mm state. Conclusion: These tumour progression rate estimates may facilitate future work analysing cost-effectiveness and quality-adjusted life years for various screening strategies. PMID:24084766

  18. Occupational sedentariness and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Anna; Broberg, Per; Johnsson, Anders; Tornberg, Åsa B; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that physical activity reduces the risk of developing breast cancer. More recently, sedentary behavior has been suggested as a risk factor independent of physical activity level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate occupational sedentariness and breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women. In a population-based prospective cohort study (n = 29 524), working history was assessed by a questionnaire between 1990 and 1992. Participants were classified as having: (1) sedentary occupations only; (2) mixed occupations or (3) non-sedentary occupations only. The association between occupational sedentariness and breast cancer incidence was analyzed by Cox regression, adjusted for known risk factors and participation in competitive sports. Women with a working history of occupational sedentariness had a significantly increased risk of breast cancer (adjusted HR 1.20; 95% CI 1.05, 1.37) compared with those with mixed or non-sedentary occupations. The association was stronger among women younger than 55 years (adjusted HR 1.54; 95% CI 1.20, 1.96), whereas no association was seen in women 55 years or older. Adjustment for participation in competitive sports did not change the association. We found that occupational sedentariness was associated with increased breast cancer risk, especially in women younger than 55 years. This may be a modifiable risk factor by planning breaks during the working day. Whether this reduces the risk of breast cancer needs to be further studied.

  19. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Insua-Rodríguez, Jacob; Oskarsson, Thordur

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is increasingly recognized as an important regulator in breast cancer. ECM in breast cancer development features numerous changes in composition and organization when compared to the mammary gland under homeostasis. Matrix proteins that are induced in breast cancer include fibrillar collagens, fibronectin, specific laminins and proteoglycans as well as matricellular proteins. Growing evidence suggests that many of these induced ECM proteins play a major functional role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. A number of the induced ECM proteins have moreover been shown to be essential components of metastatic niches, promoting stem/progenitor signaling pathways and metastatic growth. ECM remodeling enzymes are also markedly increased, leading to major changes in the matrix structure and biomechanical properties. Importantly, several ECM components and ECM remodeling enzymes are specifically induced in breast cancer or during tissue regeneration while healthy tissues under homeostasis express exceedingly low levels. This may indicate that ECM and ECM-associated functions may represent promising drug targets against breast cancer, providing important specificity that could be utilized when developing therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Copanlisib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Hormone Receptor Positive HER2 Negative Stage I-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Multifocal Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Application of multispectral imaging in quantitative immunohistochemistry study of breast cancer: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Lou; Wang, Lin-Wei; Chen, Jia-Mei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Qing-Ming; Yang, Gui-Fang; Qu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) based on imaging and spectroscopy, as relatively novel to the field of histopathology, has been used in biomedical multidisciplinary researches. We analyzed and compared the utility of multispectral (MS) versus conventional red-green-blue (RGB) images for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining to explore the advantages of MSI in clinical-pathological diagnosis. The MS images acquired of IHC-stained membranous marker human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytoplasmic marker cytokeratin5/6 (CK5/6), and nuclear marker estrogen receptor (ER) have higher resolution, stronger contrast, and more accurate segmentation than the RGB images. The total signal optical density (OD) values for each biomarker were higher in MS images than in RGB images (all P < 0.05). Moreover, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that a greater area under the curve (AUC), higher sensitivity, and specificity in evaluation of HER2 gene were achieved by MS images (AUC = 0.91, 89.1 %, 83.2 %) than RGB images (AUC = 0.87, 84.5, and 81.8 %). There was no significant difference between quantitative results of RGB images and clinico-pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). However, by quantifying MS images, the total signal OD values of HER2 positive expression were correlated with lymph node status and histological grades (P = 0.02 and 0.04). Additionally, the consistency test results indicated the inter-observer agreement was more robust in MS images for HER2 (inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.95, r s = 0.94), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.88), and ER (ICC = 0.94, r s = 0.94) (all P < 0.001) than that in RGB images for HER2 (ICC = 0.91, r s = 0.89), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.85, r s = 0.84), and ER (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.89) (all P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the application of MS images in quantitative IHC analysis could obtain higher accuracy, reliability, and more

  2. Risk Factors for Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer: A Report from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ningqi; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Zheng, Yonglan; Fackenthal, James; Adebamowo, Clement; Anetor, Imaria; Akinleye, Stella; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huo, Dezheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about risk factors for pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), diagnosed during pregnancy or postpartum. Methods 1,715 premenopausal women were enrolled from the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study, 1998-2011. Based on recency of last pregnancy from diagnosis, breast cancer cases were categorized as: 1) PABC diagnosed ≤2-year postpartum, 2) PABC diagnosed 3-5 year postpartum, and 3) non-PABC diagnosed >5-year postpartum. Controls were matched to cases on recency of last pregnancy. Multiple logistic regressions were performed comparing cases and controls within each group. Results Of the 718 cases, 152 (21.2%) had PABC ≤2-year postpartum, and 145 (20.2%) 3-5 years postpartum. Although not statistically significant, women with higher parity tend to have an elevated risk of PABC but reduced risk of non-PABC (P-for-heterogeneity=0.097). Family history of breast cancer might be a strong predictor particularly for PABC ≤2-year postpartum (OR=3.28, 95% CI: 1.05-10.3). Compared to non-PABC cases, PABC ≤2 year postpartum cases were more likely to carry BRCA1/2 mutations (P=0.03). Conclusions Parity may have different roles in the development of PABC versus other premenopausal breast cancer in Nigerian women. Prospective mothers with multiple births and a family history of breast cancer may have elevated risk of breast cancer during their immediate postpartum. PMID:23880155

  3. SHARE: a French multicenter phase III trial comparing accelerated partial irradiation versus standard or hypofractionated whole breast irradiation in breast cancer patients at low risk of local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Bourgier, Céline; Kramar, Andrew; Auzac, Guillaume; Dumas, Isabelle; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mége, Jean-Pierre; Mijonnet, Sylvie; Lemonnier, Jerôme; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The standard treatment for breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence is based on conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy delivered to the whole breast. The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) concept, developed more than 15 years ago, could be an option in selected patients. However, the ideal patient profile for APBI is still not clearly identified. Recent reports from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) have suggested selection criteria for "suitable patients" who could receive APBI outside of clinical trials. Currently, there are 6 ongoing phase III trials. All are characterized by a significant heterogeneity regarding inclusion criteria and stratification factors. The French UNICANCER trial (SHARE; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01247233) will randomize 2,800 patients in 3 arms: APBI (1 week) using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy, standard radiotherapy (6.5 weeks), and hypofractionated radiotherapy (3 weeks). In this article, we review the reported retrospective studies as well as older randomized trials. We will also describe the differences between the 6 ongoing phase III trials and the particularities of the French SHARE trial.

  4. The Adjunctive Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tsung-Lung; Liang, Huei-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) for breast cancers. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications) and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. Result. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8%) mass lesions, 12 (20.3%) focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2%) architecture distortion, 23 (39.0%) calcifications, and 1 (1.7%) intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (<0.001) between the BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Conclusion. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography. PMID:23844366

  5. The adjunctive digital breast tomosynthesis in diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Lung; Liang, Huei-Lung; Chou, Chen-Pin; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) for breast cancers. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications) and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8%) mass lesions, 12 (20.3%) focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2%) architecture distortion, 23 (39.0%) calcifications, and 1 (1.7%) intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (<0.001) between the BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography.

  6. White matter changes in breast cancer brain metastases patients who undergo radiosurgery alone compared to whole brain radiation therapy plus radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Timothy B; Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Choi, Phillip A; Kondziolka, Douglas; Dade Lunsford, L; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    Delayed toxicity after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is of increasing concern in patients who survive more than one year with brain metastases from breast cancer. Radiation-related white matter toxicity is detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has been correlated with neurocognitive dysfunction. This study assessed the risk of developing white matter changes (WMC) in breast cancer patients who underwent either WBRT plus stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or SRS alone. We retrospectively compared 35 patients with breast cancer brain metastases who received WBRT and SRS to 30 patients who only received SRS. All patients had evaluable imaging at a median of one year after their initial management. The development of white matter T2 prolongation as detected by T2 or FLAIR imaging was graded: grade 1 = little or no white matter T2 hyperintensity; grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity; and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. After WBRT plus SRS, patients demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of WMC (p < 0.0001). After one year, 71.5 % of patients whose treatment included WBRT demonstrated WMC (42.9 % grade 2; 28.6 % grade 3). Only one patient receiving only SRS developed WMC. In long-term survivors of breast cancer, the risk of WMC was significantly reduced when SRS alone was used for management. Further prospective studies are necessary to determine how these findings correlate with neurocognitive toxicity. WBRT usage as initial management of limited brain disease should be replaced by SRS alone to reduce the risk of delayed white matter toxicity.

  7. Non-protein bound oestradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, breast cancer and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, P. F.; Bonfrèr, J. M.; Hart, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been found by various authors that despite a normal serum concentration of oestradiol (E2), the percentage of non-protein-bound or free E2 is abnormally high in breast cancer patients. Since it is the free E2 which is considered to be biologically active, confirmation of this finding would be most relevant to the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Using Hammond's centrifugal ultrafiltration dialysis method we have measured free E2 in heparinized plasma from 68 premenopausal women (a) at high familial risk of breast cancer (n = 18), (b) with benign breast disease (n = 17), (c) cured of T1N0M0 breast cancer at least 6 months previously (n = 17) and (d) normal controls matched for age, parity and Quetelet index (n = 16). Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was measured as [3H]-dihydrotestosterone binding capacity. Free E2 and SHBG were also measured in the serum of (e) postmenopausal patients having breast cancer (n = 38) and (f) matched control cancer patients (n = 67). We confirmed a very good inverse correlation between log free E2 per cent and log SHBG (P less than 0.0001). The regression lines for groups (a)-(d) were not statistically different. The regression lines for groups (e) and (f) were identical and ran nearly parallel to those for groups (a)-(d) though somewhat lower. This small difference may be ascribed to menopausal status. Therefore, we found no difference in free E2 percentage, calculated free E2 concentration or SHBG between premenopausal women at risk, women with benign breast disease, patients cured for early breast cancer or having breast cancer and matched controls. However, postmenopausal breast cancer patients had a significantly higher total serum E2 concentration and, by consequence a higher calculated free E2 concentration compared to the carefully matched control group. PMID:4038881

  8. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  10. Posttraumatic Stress in Women with Breast Cancer and Their Daughters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Bret A.; Bubel, Denise; Jacobs, Sheri R.; Knolls, Michelle L.; Harwell, Valerie D.; Goscicka, Magdalena; Keegan, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-one percent of the surveyed women (N=133) with cancer and 13% of their daughters (N=64) reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prevalence of PTSD symptoms in daughters appears comparable to women with breast cancer. Discusses intergenerational patterns in reaction to breast cancer. (JDM)

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  13. Adjuvant therapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, N E; Abeloff, M D

    1994-01-01

    About 180,000 American women will be diagnosed with early stage breast cancer during 1993. In many of these patients breast cancer is a systemic disease at diagnosis and thus not curable by local treatment alone. The development of optimal forms of systemic adjuvant therapy has been a major area of research for more than 30 years. The two most widely employed types of adjuvant therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy and tamoxifen, have been shown to improve relapse-free and overall survival in certain patient subsets. This review highlights recent advances in adjuvant therapy of early stage breast cancer and discusses current treatment guidelines.

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  16. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed. ©2013 AACR.

  17. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Is there a link between antiperspirants or deodorants and breast cancer? What is known about the ingredients in antiperspirants ...

  18. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  19. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  20. Perceptions and opinions about male breast cancer and male breast self-examination: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Al-Naggar, Dhekra Hamoud

    2012-01-01

    While the relatively common nature of female breast cancer has resulted in a high level of general awareness, male breast cancer is still comparatively unknown to the general public and to healthcare professionals. The objective of this study is to explore the perceptions and opinions about male breast cancer and male breast self-examination among male university students. In-depth interviews were conducted among 36 male university students from the Management and Science University, Malaysia, selected by simple random sampling. The themes of the interview were: knowledge of male breast cancer and male breast self-examination, sources of knowledge and attitudes towards male BSE. The data obtained were classified into various categories and analyzed manually. The majority of participants mentioned that there is a low possibility for males to get breast cancer. They also believed that the cause of breast cancer among men is due to the carcinogens from cigarettes. The majority of participants mentioned that they know about breast self-examination from the mass media and that the presence of a lump in the breast is the main symptom of breast cancer in men. The majority of participants mentioned that they encourage their family members to practice breast self-examination but considered that BSE is not important for men because they have a low probability of getting breast cancer. Misconceptions regarding male breast cancer and breast self-examination among men still exist among male university students. Therefore special attention should be given to educate men about male breast cancer and male BSE.

  1. Chemoendocrine compared with endocrine adjuvant therapies for node-negative breast cancer: predictive value of centrally reviewed expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors--International Breast Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Viale, Giuseppe; Regan, Meredith M; Maiorano, Eugenio; Mastropasqua, Mauro G; Golouh, Rastko; Perin, Tiziana; Brown, Robert W; Kovács, Anikó; Pillay, Komala; Ohlschlegel, Christian; Braye, Stephen; Grigolato, Piergiovanni; Rusca, Tiziana; Gelber, Richard D; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gusterson, Barry A; Coates, Alan S

    2008-03-20

    To centrally assess estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) levels by immunohistochemistry and investigate their predictive value for benefit of chemo-endocrine compared with endocrine adjuvant therapy alone in two randomized clinical trials for node-negative breast cancer. International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VIII compared cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy for 6 cycles followed by endocrine therapy with goserelin with either modality alone in pre- and perimenopausal patients. Trial IX compared three cycles of CMF followed by tamoxifen for 5 years versus tamoxifen alone in postmenopausal patients. Central Pathology Office reviewed 883 (83%) of 1,063 patients on Trial VIII and 1,365 (82%) of 1,669 on Trial IX and determined ER and PgR by immunohistochemistry. Disease-free survival (DFS) was compared across the spectrum of expression of each receptor using the Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot methodology. Both receptors displayed a bimodal distribution, with substantial proportions showing no staining (receptor absent) and most of the remainder showing a high percentage of stained cells. Chemo-endocrine therapy yielded DFS superior to endocrine therapy alone for patients with receptor-absent tumors, and in some cases also for those with low levels of receptor expression. Among patients with ER-expressing tumors, additional prediction of benefit was suggested in absent or low PgR in Trial VIII but not in Trial IX. Low levels of ER and PgR are predictive of the benefit of adding chemotherapy to endocrine therapy. Low PgR may add further prediction among pre- and perimenopausal but not postmenopausal patients whose tumors express ER.

  2. Mammographic Breast Density and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women According to Tumor Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Colditz, Graham A.; Collins, Laura C.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Rosner, Bernard; Vachon, Celine

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies that investigated the associations between breast density and subsequent breast cancer according to tumor characteristics have produced inconclusive findings. We aimed to determine whether the associations between breast density and subsequent breast cancer varied by tumor characteristics. Methods We included 1042 postmenopausal women diagnosed with breast cancer between June 1, 1989, and June 30, 2004, and 1794 matched control subjects from the Nurses’ Health Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of 121 701 registered female nurses across the United States. Breast density was estimated from digitized images using computerized techniques. Information on breast cancer risk factors was obtained prospectively from biennial questionnaires before the date of cancer diagnosis for case subjects and matched control subjects. Polychotomous logistic regression was used to assess associations of breast density with tumor subtypes based on invasiveness, histology, size, grade, receptor status, and involvement of lymph nodes. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Results The risk of breast cancer increased progressively with increase in percent breast density (Ptrend < .001). Women with higher breast density (≥50%) showed a 3.39-fold (odds ratio = 3.39, 95% confidence interval = 2.46 to 4.68) increased risk of breast cancer compared with women with lower breast density (<10%). The associations between breast density and breast cancer risk were stronger for in situ compared with invasive tumors (Pheterogeneity < .01), high-grade compared with low-grade tumors (Pheterogeneity = .02), larger (>2 cm) compared with smaller (≤2 cm) tumors (Pheterogeneity < .01), and estrogen receptor–negative compared with estrogen receptor–positive tumors (Pheterogeneity = .04). There were no differences in associations by tumor histology, involvement of lymph nodes, and progesterone receptor and HER2 status (Pheterogeneity > .05). Conclusions

  3. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells In Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    breast cancer (TNBC) and drug resistance. We hypothesize that obesity effects on TNBC occur via leptin -signaling stimulation of breast cancer stem...human TNBC cell lines treated with leptin , and novel leptin receptor inhibitor bound to nanoparticles (IONPs-LPrA) alone, and combined with cisplatin...a chemotherapeutic) and Sunitinib (an inhibitor of VEGFR-2 kinase). Our data show that leptin increased cell proliferation and expression of BCSC

  4. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Hospitalized Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Galea, Sandro; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To document the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders, and their associations with mortality among hospitalized breast cancer patients. Methods We examined the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and the diagnoses of anxiety or depression among 4,164 hospitalized breast cancer cases matched with 4,164 non-breast cancer controls using 2006-2009 inpatient data obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Conditional logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between breast cancer diagnosis and diagnoses of anxiety or depression. We also used binary logistic regression models to examine the association between diagnoses of depression or anxiety, and in-hospital mortality among breast cancer patients. Results We observed that breast cancer cases were less likely to have a diagnosis of depression (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.77), and less likely to have a diagnosis of anxiety (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90) compared with controls. This association remained after controlling for race/ethnicity, residential income, insurance and residential region. Breast cancer patients with a depression diagnosis also had lower mortality (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89) compared with those without a depression diagnosis, but there was no significant difference in mortality among those with and without anxiety diagnoses. Conclusion Diagnoses of depression and anxiety in breast cancer patients were less prevalent than expected based on our analysis of hospitalized breast cancer patients and matched non-breast cancer controls identified in the NIS dataset using ICD-9 diagnostic codes. Results suggest that under-diagnosis of mental health problems may be common among hospitalized women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work may fruitfully explore reasons for, and consequences of, inappropriate identification of the mental health needs of breast cancer patients. PMID

  6. Bosnian, Iraqi, and Somali Refugee Women Speak: A Comparative Qualitative Study of Refugee Health Beliefs on Preventive Health and Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Altaf; Bond, Barbara E; Percac-Lima, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The low uptake of preventive services in disadvantaged communities is a continuing challenge to public health. Women refugee communities are particularly vulnerable populations, and disparities in both preventive care and breast cancer screening have been documented sparsely. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore Bosnian, Iraqi, and Somali women refugees' beliefs about preventive care and breast cancer screening to inform future community interventions and best practices. In an urban community health center, 57 interviews with Bosnian, Somali, and Iraqi women refugees were conducted by native language speakers. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed according to best practices for thematic and content analysis. The responses of three groups were compared. Similarities across participants included barriers to care such as fear of pain and diagnosis, modesty, and work and childcare commitments; facilitative factors such as outreach efforts, appointment reminders, and personal contact from health providers; perceptions of how the American medical infrastructure compared with inadequacies in their home countries; and positive attitude toward U.S. health professionals. Differences that emerged among groups were: varying degrees of medical exposure to doctors in home countries, the impact of war on health systems; and understanding preventive breast care. Taken together, duration of time in United States and prior exposure to Western medicine account for differences in refugee women's knowledge of preventive care. Understanding population-specific health beliefs, health information, and behavior are crucial for designing tailored prevention programs for refugee women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-15

    Sadler M, Vollmer RT, Lobaugh B, Drezner MK, Vogelman JH, Orentreich N. Vitamin D and prostate cancer: a prediagnostic study with stored sera. Cancer ... Epidemiology , Biomarkers & Prevention 2:467-472,1993. 6. Blot WJ, Fraumeni JF, Stone BJ. Geographic patterns of breast cancer in the United States. J

  8. Breast cancer, genetics, and age at first pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H T; Albano, W A; Layton, M A; Kimberling, W J; Lynch, J F

    1984-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer shows a distinctive natural history characterised by an earlier age of onset, excess bilaterality, vertical transmission, heterogeneous tumour associations, and improved survival when compared to its sporadic counterpart. To date, very little attention has been given to interrelationships between breast cancer risk factors and genetics. In the general population, early age of first term pregnancy has been generally accepted as protective against breast cancer. In addition, recent findings suggest that an early age of first pregnancy may be associated with an earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis. We studied the age at first pregnancy and age at onset of breast cancer among 162 females at 50% genetic risk, 72 of whom had already developed the disease. We then compared them to 154 consecutively ascertained breast cancer patients from the Creighton Cancer Center. In the hereditary subset (1) early first term pregnancy did not alter the frequency of breast cancer; (2) early age at first term pregnancy was not associated with an earlier age at cancer diagnosis; and (3) age of breast cancer onset in nulliparous females was not significantly lower than that in females having at least one term pregnancy. We speculate, therefore, that in our hereditary population, pregnancy does not influence the natural history of breast cancer in the same way that it does in the population at large. PMID:6716424

  9. [Trisomy 21 and breast cancer: A genetic abnormality which protects against breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Martel-Billard, C; Cordier, C; Tomasetto, C; Jégu, J; Mathelin, C

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality and one of the main causes of intellectual disability. The tumor profile of T21 patients is characterized by the low frequency of solid tumors including breast cancer. The objective of this work was to analyze the literature to find possible clues for the low frequency of breast cancer in T21 persons with a focus on one hand to the various risks and protective factors against breast cancer for women T21, and on the other hand to changes in the expression of different genes located on chromosome 21. T21 women have hormonal and societal risk factors for breast cancer: frequent nulliparity, lack of breastfeeding, physical inactivity and high body mass index. The age of menopause, earlier in T21 women, has a modest protective effect against breast cancer. The low rate of breast tumors in T21 women is probably mainly linked to the reduced life expectancy compared to the general population (risk of death before the age of onset of the majority of breast cancers) and the presence of a third chromosome 21, characterizing the disease. It might lead to the increased expression of a number of genes contributing directly or undirectly to tumor suppression, decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, changes in the mammary stroma of persons T21 could have an inhibitory role on the development of breast tumors. The low frequency of breast cancers for T21 patients may not only be explained by hormonal and societal factors, but also by genetic mechanisms which could constitute an interesting axis of research in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer in Men? Although certain risk factors may increase ... Breast Cancer in Men Be Prevented? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  11. Feature Extraction and Analysis of Breast Cancer Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Robles, Rosslin John; Kim, Tai-Hoon; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar

    In this paper, we propose a method to identify abnormal growth of cells in breast tissue and suggest further pathological test, if necessary. We compare normal breast tissue with malignant invasive breast tissue by a series of image processing steps. Normal ductal epithelial cells and ductal / lobular invasive carcinogenic cells also consider for comparison here in this paper. In fact, features of cancerous breast tissue (invasive) are extracted and analyses with normal breast tissue. We also suggest the breast cancer recognition technique through image processing and prevention by controlling p53 gene mutation to some greater extent.

  12. A plasma metabolomic signature discloses human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quiles, José Luís; Ramírez-Tortosa, Mari-Carmen; Sol, Joaquim; Ruiz-Sanjuan, Maria; Fernandez, Mónica; de la Torre Cabrera, Capilla; Ramírez-Tortosa, Cesar; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Metabolomics is the comprehensive global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this retrospective pilot study we explored whether serum metabolomic profile can discriminate the presence of human breast cancer irrespective of the cancer subtype. Methods Plasma samples were analyzed from healthy women (n = 20) and patients with breast cancer after diagnosis (n = 91) using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest (RF) classifier were used to create a metabolomics panel for the diagnosis of human breast cancer. Results Metabolomics correctly distinguished between breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects. In the RF supervised class prediction analysis comparing breast cancer and healthy control groups, RF accurately classified 100% both samples of the breast cancer patients and healthy controls. So, the class error for both group in and the out-of-bag error were 0. We also found 1269 metabolites with different concentration in plasma from healthy controls and cancer patients; and basing on exact mass, retention time and isotopic distribution we identified 35 metabolites. These metabolites mostly support cell growth by providing energy and building stones for the synthesis of essential biomolecules, and function as signal transduction molecules. The collective results of RF, significance testing, and false discovery rate analysis identified several metabolites that were strongly associated with breast cancer. Conclusions In breast cancer a metabolomics signature of cancer exists and can be detected in patient plasma irrespectively of the breast cancer type. PMID:28076849

  13. A plasma metabolomic signature discloses human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Collado, Ricardo; Quiles, José Luís; Ramírez-Tortosa, Mari-Carmen; Sol, Joaquim; Ruiz-Sanjuan, Maria; Fernandez, Mónica; de la Torre Cabrera, Capilla; Ramírez-Tortosa, Cesar; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-03-21

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this retrospective pilot study we explored whether serum metabolomic profile can discriminate the presence of human breast cancer irrespective of the cancer subtype. Plasma samples were analyzed from healthy women (n = 20) and patients with breast cancer after diagnosis (n = 91) using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest (RF) classifier were used to create a metabolomics panel for the diagnosis of human breast cancer. Metabolomics correctly distinguished between breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects. In the RF supervised class prediction analysis comparing breast cancer and healthy control groups, RF accurately classified 100% both samples of the breast cancer patients and healthy controls. So, the class error for both group in and the out-of-bag error were 0. We also found 1269 metabolites with different concentration in plasma from healthy controls and cancer patients; and basing on exact mass, retention time and isotopic distribution we identified 35 metabolites. These metabolites mostly support cell growth by providing energy and building stones for the synthesis of essential biomolecules, and function as signal transduction molecules. The collective results of RF, significance testing, and false discovery rate analysis identified several metabolites that were strongly associated with breast cancer. In breast cancer a metabolomics signature of cancer exists and can be detected in patient plasma irrespectively of the breast cancer type.

  14. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-08

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  15. Onalespib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  16. Pembrolizumab and Binimetinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-27

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  17. Breast Cancer and Reconstruction: Normative Data for Interpreting the BREAST-Q.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Lily R; Homa, Karen; Klassen, Anne F; Pusic, Andrea L; Kerrigan, Carolyn L

    2017-05-01

    The BREAST-Q is a patient-reported outcome instrument used to evaluate outcomes in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery and reconstruction. Normative values for the BREAST-Q breast cancer modules have not been established, limiting data interpretation. Participants were recruited by means of the Army of Women, an online community of women (with and without breast cancer), to complete Mastectomy, Breast Conserving Therapy, and Reconstruction preoperative BREAST-Q scales. Inclusion criteria were women aged 18 years or older without a history of breast surgery or breast cancer. Analysis included descriptive statistics, a linear multivariate regression, and a comparison of the generated normative data to previously published BREAST-Q findings. The BREAST-Q was completed by 1201 women. The mean patient age was 54 ± 13 years, mean body mass index 26 ± 6 kg/m, and 38 percent (n = 455) had a bra cup size of D or greater. Mean ± SD scores for BREAST-Q scales were as follows: Satisfaction with Breasts (58 ± 18), Psychosocial Well-being (71 ± 18), Sexual Well-being (56 ± 18), Physical Well-being-Chest (93 ± 11), and Physical Well-being Abdomen (78 ± 20). Women with a body mass index of 30 kg/m or greater, cup size of D or greater, age younger than 40 years, and annual income less than $40,000 reported lower scores. Comparing normative scores to published data in breast cancer patients, Satisfaction with Breasts scores were higher after autologous reconstruction and lower after mastectomy; Sexual Well-being scores were lower after mastectomy and breast conserving therapy; and Physical Well-being Chest scores were lower after mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, and reconstruction. These are the first published normative scores for the BREAST-Q breast cancer modules and provide a clinical reference point for the interpretation of data.

  18. Quality of Life and Neutropenia in Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Randomized Pilot Study Comparing Additional Treatment with Mistletoe Extract to Chemotherapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Tröger, Wilfried; Jezdić, Svetlana; Ždrale, Zdravko; Tišma, Nevena; Hamre, Harald J.; Matijašević, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy for breast cancer often deteriorates quality of life, augments fatigue, and induces neutropenia. Mistletoe preparations are frequently used by cancer patients in Central Europe. Physicians have reported better quality of life in breast cancer patients additionally treated with mistletoe preparations during chemotherapy. Mistletoe preparations also have immunostimulant properties and might therefore have protective effects against chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized open label pilot study with 95 patients randomized into three groups. Two groups received Iscador® M special (IMS) or a different mistletoe preparation, respectively, additionally to chemotherapy with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and 5-fluoro-uracil (CAF). A control group received CAF with no additional therapy. Here we report the comparison IMS (n = 30) vs. control (n = 31). Quality of life including fatigue was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Neutropenia was defined as neutrophil counts <1,000/μl and assessed at baseline and one day before each CAF cycle. Results: In the descriptive analysis all 15 scores of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 showed better quality of life in the IMS group compared to the control group. In 12 scores the differences were significant (p < 0.02) and nine scores showed a clinically relevant and significant difference of at least 5 points. Neutropenia occurred in 3/30 IMS patients and in 8/31 control patients (p = 0.182). Conclusions: This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with IMS additionally to CAF. CAF-induced neutropenia showed a trend to lower frequency in the IMS group. PMID:21556248

  19. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  20. Triiodothyronine and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

  1. Triiodothyronine and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-08-10

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis.

  2. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  3. Breast cancer. Part 1: Awareness and common benign diseases.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer for women in the United Kingdom and topic on which there is much information. This article discusses the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases that cause disproportionate anxiety. The NHS Breast Screening Programme is celebrating 20 years of screening this year, and in all randomized controlled trials of women aged 50 and over, mortality from breast cancer is reduced in those offered screening compared with unscreened controls (although the reduction is not statistically significant in all trials). Once a breast cancer is diagnosed, the different characteristics and stage of the disease can be identified through histopathology and scans. These factors will be discussed later in this article, including illustrating if a cancer is hormone sensitive or HER-2 positive, for example. These factors enable clinicians to recommend a treatment pathway suitable for each individual.

  4. Association of Breast Cancer Risk loci with Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58–0.85; Ptrend=2.84×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55–0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31–0.76; P2DF=1.45×10−3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15; Ptrend=6.6×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90–1.03; HRhomozygotes= 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35; P2DF=1.25×10−4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  6. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  7. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  8. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target.

  9. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  10. Pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer--a population-based study on behalf of Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group.

    PubMed

    Kroman, Niels; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is an established growth factor in breast cancer and it has been hypothesized that pregnancy associated estrogens may increase the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. In 1997 we published a population-based Danish study indicating no negative prognostic effect of pregnancy after breast cancer treatment. The present study is a ten-year update. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group has since 1977 collected population-based data on tumour characteristics, treatment regimes, and follow-up status on Danish women with breast cancer. Pregnancy history was added from the Danish Civil Registration System, the National Birth Registry, and the National Induced Abortion registry. Cox regression was used to estimate the risk ratio of dying among women with a pregnancy after breast cancer treatment compared with women without such experience. In all, 10 236 women with primary breast cancer aged 45 years or less at the time of diagnosis were followed for 95 616 person years. Among these, 371 women experienced pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer. In a multivariate analysis that included age at diagnosis, stage of disease, and pregnancy history prior to diagnosis, women who had a full-term pregnancy subsequent to breast cancer treatment were found to have a reduced risk of dying (relative risk: 0.73; 95% confidence interval: 0.54-0.99) compared with other women with breast cancer. The effect was not significantly modified by age at diagnosis, tumour size, nodal status, or pregnancy history before diagnosis of breast cancer. Neither spontaneous abortions nor induced abortions subsequent to breast cancer treatment had a negative impact on prognosis. In line with our previous study, but based on more than twice the patient material, we found no evidence that a pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer has a negative influence the prognosis.

  11. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    SciTech Connect

    Rouesse, Jacques . E-mail: j.rouesse@stcloud-huguenin.org; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.

  12. Current and Future Methods for Measuring Breast Density: A Brief Comparative Review

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Mark A.; Littrup, Peter J.; Duric, Neb; Mullooly, Maeve; Sherman, Mark E.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2017-01-01

    Breast density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk. Women with the densest breasts are 4 to 6 times more likely to develop cancer compared with those with the lowest densities. Breast density is generally assessed using mammographic imaging; however, this approach has limitations. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound tomography are some alternative imaging modalities that can aid mammography in patient screening and the measurement of breast density. As breast density becomes more commonly discussed, knowledge of the advantages and limitations of breast density as a marker of risk will become more critical. This review article discusses the relationship between breast density and breast cancer risk, lists the benefits and drawbacks of using multiple different imaging modalities to measure density and briefly discusses how breast density will be applied to aid in breast cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:28943893

  13. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  14. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  15. [Comparative study of clinical and pathological features of breast cancer in women with 40 years old and younger vs 70 years old and older].

    PubMed

    Cuan Martínez, Juan Ramón; Mainero Ratchelous, Fernando Enrique; Aguilar Gallegos, Israel Uriban; Bernechea Miranda, Abel; Buenrostro Pineda, Marco Antonio; Burgos Portillo, Iván; Cortés Herrera, Ana Edelmira Angeles; Burguete Vera, José Juan

    2008-06-01

    Invasive breast cancer is the most common neoplasia in women attended at IMSS health system since 2004. To compare clinical and radiological characteristics on initial appraisal, as well as surgical treatment, pathological features and adjuvant treatment in women with primary breast cancer of 40 years old and younger vs 70 years old and older. Clinical, radiological and pathological data of 150 patients with breast cancer treated at Hospital de ginecoobstetricia Luis Castelazo Ayala, from January 2003 to June 2006 were collected, and after divided in two groups: 1) patients with 40 years old and younger (n = 50), and 2) patients with 70 years old and older (n = 100). Tumoral size and radiological characteristics were similar in both groups. Group 1 and group 2 had 22 and 13%, respectively, of family history of breast cancer. Fine needle biopsy has positive predictive value of 50% for group 1, and 36% for group 2. Conservative surgery was less common at group 2. Most frequent histological type in both groups was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, followed by infiltrating lobular carcinoma, most common in older women (19 vs 12%), and we found more well differentiated ductal carcinomas in the group of 70 years old and older (12 vs 4%). Seventy-six percent of group 1 and 75% of group 2 were classified as early stage breast cancer (stages I and II). Cytotoxic therapy was offered mostly to group 1, 92 vs 35%. Radiotherapy (80 vs 59%), and hormonal therapy was given only to 56% of group 1 vs 80% of group 2. Clinical and staging features were similar in both groups. Family history was more influential to group 1. Fine needle biopsy has a low positive predictive value for diagnostic. Well-differentiated carcinomas were higher in patients of group 2, and group 1 had more high-grade carcinomas. There was a trend to perform more conservative surgery at group 1, as well as they underwent more adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Use of hormonal therapy was more common at group 2.

  16. Epidemiology of breast cancer in Indian women.

    PubMed

    Malvia, Shreshtha; Bagadi, Sarangadhara Appalaraju; Dubey, Uma S; Saxena, Sunita

    2017-02-09

    Breast cancer has ranked number one cancer among Indian females with age adjusted rate as high as 25.8 per 100,000 women and mortality 12.7 per 100,000 women. Data reports from various latest national cancer registries were compared for incidence, mortality rates. The age adjusted incidence rate of carcinoma of the breast was found as high as 41 per 100,000 women for Delhi, followed by Chennai (37.9), Bangalore (34.4) and Thiruvananthapuram District (33.7). A statistically significant increase in age adjusted rate over time (1982-2014) in all the PBCRs namely Bangalore (annual percentage change: 2.84%), Barshi (1.87%), Bhopal (2.00%), Chennai (2.44%), Delhi (1.44%) and Mumbai (1.42%) was observed. Mortality-to-incidence ratio was found to be as high as 66 in rural registries whereas as low as 8 in urban registries. Besides this young age has been found as a major risk factor for breast cancer in Indian women. Breast cancer projection for India during time periods 2020 suggests the number to go as high as 1797900. Better health awareness and availability of breast cancer screening programmes and treatment facilities would cause a favorable and positive clinical picture in the country.

  17. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    obtained breast specimens from breast cancer patients treated with endocrine therapy (or not, i.e., surgery and radiation only in selected...motility in vitro (Hiscox et al., 2006). In models of lung cancer and CML, Dasatinib can reduce AKT activity and expression of the prosurvival protein...measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferse-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining (Wedam et al., 2006). In an in vitro model of lung

  18. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    breast cancers is whether an aromatase inhibitor, e.g., letrozole (LET) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy . Unfortunately...response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies , e.g., -40% of tumors...effective treatment for hormone receptor positive invasive breast cancer. Such therapy includes antiestrogens (tamoxifen, fulvestrant ) and aromatase

  19. Impact of preventive therapy on the risk of breast cancer among women with benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Jack; Sestak, Ivana; Thorat, Mangesh A

    2015-11-01

    There are three main ways in which women can be identified as being at high risk of breast cancer i) family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, which includes genetic factors ii) mammographically identified high breast density, and iii) certain types of benign breast disease. The last category is the least common, but in some ways the easiest one for which treatment can be offered, because these women have already entered into the treatment system. The highest risk is seen in women with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), but this is very rare. More common is atypical hyperplasia (AH), which carries a 4-5-fold risk of breast cancer as compared to general population. Even more common is hyperplasia of the usual type and carries a roughly two-fold increased risk. Women with aspirated cysts are also at increased risk of subsequent breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been shown to be particularly effective in preventing subsequent breast cancer in women with AH, with a more than 70% reduction in the P1 trial and a 60% reduction in IBIS-I. The aromatase inhibitors (AIs) also are highly effective for AH and LCIS. There are no published data on the effectiveness of tamoxifen or the AIs for breast cancer prevention in women with hyperplasia of the usual type, or for women with aspirated cysts. Improving diagnostic consistency, breast cancer risk prediction and education of physicians and patients regarding therapeutic prevention in women with benign breast disease may strengthen breast cancer prevention efforts.

  20. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  1. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention.

    PubMed

    Homan, Sherri G; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R; Armer, Jane M

    2015-08-06

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups' questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  2. [Breast Thermal Tomography and High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging in Predicting Breast Cancer: a Preliminary Study].

    PubMed

    He, Yu-shuang; Peng, Yu-lan; Jin, Ya; Zhao, Hai-na; Luo, Hon-hao; Yang, Pan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the clinical value of breast thermal tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging in diagnosing breast cancer. Breast thermal tomography and high frequency ultrasound imaging were performed in 298 patients with breast lumps. The results were compared with pathological diagnosis. The ultrasound imaging had a sensitivity, specificity and the area under the curve (AUC) of 99.02%, 62.78% and 0.814, respectively, compared with 83.33%, 83.16% and 0.830 of thermal tomography, for diagnosing breast cancer. The two imaging results showed statistical significance in the test of non-inferiority (P < 0.001). A combination of the two imaging results produced a sensitivity, specificity and AUC of 83.33%, 89.79% and 0.866, respectively. Thermal tomography is not inferior to ultrasonography in detecting breast cancer. The two combined can improve specificity and accuracy of the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  3. Reappraising antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    Phase III trials of antiangiogenic drugs for metastatic breast cancer have either had only limited success, e.g. the monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab when used with various conventional chemotherapy regimens, or have failed altogether, e.g. the small molecule oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sunitinib. No phase III trial has yet demonstrated an overall survival benefit and the progression free survival (PFS) benefits, when attained with bevacizumab are short, with perhaps one exception. Together, these results call for a reappraisal of using antiangiogenic drugs for breast cancer and possible strategies to improve their efficacy. Among the reasons to help explain the limited benefits observed thus far include the possibility that angiogenesis may not be a major driver of breast cancer growth, compared to some other types of cancer; that acquired resistance may develop rapidly to VEGF-pathway targeting antiangiogenic drugs, in part due to angiogenic growth factor redundancy; that optimal chemotherapy regimens have not been used in conjunction with an antiangiogenic drug; and that antiangiogenic drugs may secondarily aggravate biologic aggressiveness of the tumors, thereby reducing their overall efficacy after inducing an initial benefit. Several possible strategies are discussed for improving the efficacy of antiangiogenic drugs, including combination with different chemotherapy regimens, e.g. long term and less toxic metronomic chemotherapy protocols; validation of predictive biomarkers to individualize patient therapy; development of improved preclinical therapy models, e.g. involving advanced metastatic breast cancer, and combination with other types of anti-cancer agents especially biologies such as trastuzumab for Her2-positive breast cancer. Reasons for the current concern regarding use of antiangiogenic drug treatments for early stage cancers, including breast cancer, are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. BILATERAL BREAST CANCER: DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS.

    PubMed

    Ursaru, Manuela; Jari, Irma; Gheorghe, Liliana; Naum, A G; Scripcariu, V; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    To assess bilateral breast cancer patients, initially diagnosed with stage II unilateral breast cancer. 113 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer diagnosed between 1983 and 2011 were assessed. Of these, 8 patients had bilateral breast cancer: 7 patients with metachronous bilateral breast cancer and 1 patient with synchronous breast cancer. Breast ultrasound, mammography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to diagnose recurrence, loco regional and distant metastasis. Age at diagnosis ranged from 37 to 59 years, with a maximum age incidence in the 4th decade (age between: 31-40 years). The average time interval between the two breast cancers was 8.125 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma. All eight patients with bilateral breast cancer had at least one type of recurrence/metastasis, mostly in the liver, and statistically the pleuropulmonary and liver metastases were the most frequent causes of death. Patients in the 4th decade diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer are at risk of developing bilateral breast cancer. In metachronous breast cancer, the time interval between the detection of the second breast cancer and death is directly proportional to the time interval between the two breast cancers. TASTASES, DEATH.

  5. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  6. Breast cancer: origins and evolution.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-11-01

    Breast cancer is not a single disease, but rather is composed of distinct subtypes associated with different clinical outcomes. Understanding this heterogeneity is key for the development of targeted cancer-preventative and -therapeutic interventions. Current models explaining inter- and intratumoral diversity are the cancer stem cell and the clonal evolution hypotheses. Although tumor initiation and progression are predominantly driven by acquired genetic alterations, recent data implicate a role for microenvironmental and epigenetic changes as well. Comprehensive unbiased studies of tumors and patient populations have significantly advanced our molecular understanding of breast cancer, but translating these findings into clinical practice remains a challenge.