Science.gov

Sample records for breast cancer mastectomy

  1. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin sparing mastectomy; Simple mastectomy; Modified radical mastectomy; Breast cancer - mastectomy ... WOMAN DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER The most common reason for a mastectomy is breast cancer. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer, talk to ...

  2. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy at a comprehensive cancer center.

    PubMed

    Connors, Shahnjayla K; Goodman, Melody S; Myckatyn, Terence; Margenthaler, Julie; Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is an integral part of breast cancer treatment that positively impacts quality of life in breast cancer survivors. Although breast reconstruction rates have increased over time, African American women remain less likely to receive breast reconstruction compared to Caucasian women. National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, specialized institutions with more standardized models of cancer treatment, report higher breast reconstruction rates than primary healthcare facilities. Whether breast reconstruction disparities are reduced for women treated at comprehensive cancer centers is unclear. The purpose of this study was to further investigate breast reconstruction rates and determinants at a comprehensive cancer center in St. Louis, Missouri. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained for women who received mastectomy for definitive surgical treatment for breast cancer between 2000 and 2012. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the receipt of breast reconstruction. We found a breast reconstruction rate of 54 % for the study sample. Women who were aged 55 and older, had public insurance, received unilateral mastectomy, and received adjuvant radiation therapy were significantly less likely to receive breast reconstruction. African American women were 30 % less likely to receive breast reconstruction than Caucasian women. These findings suggest that racial disparities in breast reconstruction persist in comprehensive cancer centers. Future research should further delineate the determinants of breast reconstruction disparities across various types of healthcare institutions. Only then can we develop interventions to ensure all eligible women have access to breast reconstruction and the improved quality of life it affords breast cancer survivors.

  3. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients’ choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer who were treated by bilateral or unilateral mastectomy (BM or UM) at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between Jan. 2002 and Dec. 2010. In the BM group, only those with unilateral breast cancer who chose CPM were included in the analysis. Results: When compared with the UM group, the following factors were found to be associated with BM: younger age, pre-menopausal, a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, BRCA mutation, more breast biopsies, history of breast augmentation, having MRI study within 6 months before the surgery, more likely to have reconstruction and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and fewer had neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy/radiation. When patients with bilateral breast cancer were excluded, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated younger patients with negative nodes, SLNB as the only nodal surgery and positive family history were significant factors predicting CPM and immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders or implants. Conclusion: Younger age, lower TN stage, requiring only SLNB and high risk family history predict contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Tissue expander/implant-based reconstructions were more frequently chosen by patients with BM. PMID:26097557

  4. Association between unilateral or bilateral mastectomy and breast cancer death in patients with unilateral ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Pappas, Lisa; Agarwal, Jayant

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer is increasing despite cost and surgical risks with conflicting reports of survival benefit. Current studies evaluating death after bilateral mastectomy have included patients treated both with breast conservation therapy and unilateral mastectomy. In this study, we directly compared breast cancer-specific death of patients who underwent bilateral or unilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer using a matched cohort analysis. This was an observational study of women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer from 1998 through 2002, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. A 4-to-1 matched cohort of patients was selected including 14,075 patients. Mortality of the groups was compared using Cox proportional hazards models for cause-specific death. A total of 41,510 patients diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were included. Unilateral mastectomy was performed in 93% of patients, while bilateral mastectomy was performed in the remaining 7% of patients. When 4-to-1 matching was performed, 11,260 unilateral mastectomy and 2,815 bilateral mastectomy patients were included. Patients with bilateral mastectomy did not have a significantly lower hazard of breast cancer-specific death when compared with patients with unilateral mastectomy (hazard ratio: 0.92 vs 1.00, p =0.11). Bilateral mastectomy did not provide a clinically or statistically significant breast cancer-specific mortality benefit over unilateral mastectomy based on a matched cohort analysis of a nationwide population database. These findings should be interpreted in the context of patient preference and alternative benefits of bilateral mastectomy.

  5. Association between unilateral or bilateral mastectomy and breast cancer death in patients with unilateral ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Pappas, Lisa; Agarwal, Jayant

    2017-01-01

    Background Utilization of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer is increasing despite cost and surgical risks with conflicting reports of survival benefit. Current studies evaluating death after bilateral mastectomy have included patients treated both with breast conservation therapy and unilateral mastectomy. In this study, we directly compared breast cancer–specific death of patients who underwent bilateral or unilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer using a matched cohort analysis. Methods This was an observational study of women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer from 1998 through 2002, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. A 4-to-1 matched cohort of patients was selected including 14,075 patients. Mortality of the groups was compared using Cox proportional hazards models for cause-specific death. Results A total of 41,510 patients diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were included. Unilateral mastectomy was performed in 93% of patients, while bilateral mastectomy was performed in the remaining 7% of patients. When 4-to-1 matching was performed, 11,260 unilateral mastectomy and 2,815 bilateral mastectomy patients were included. Patients with bilateral mastectomy did not have a significantly lower hazard of breast cancer–specific death when compared with patients with unilateral mastectomy (hazard ratio: 0.92 vs 1.00, p=0.11). Conclusion Bilateral mastectomy did not provide a clinically or statistically significant breast cancer–specific mortality benefit over unilateral mastectomy based on a matched cohort analysis of a nationwide population database. These findings should be interpreted in the context of patient preference and alternative benefits of bilateral mastectomy. PMID:29180900

  6. The expected benefit of preventive mastectomy on breast cancer incidence and mortality in BRCA mutation carriers, by age at mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Giannakeas, Vasily; Narod, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    Preventive breast surgery is offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers to prevent breast cancer incidence and mortality. The clinical benefit of preventive mastectomy can be measured in several ways, including extension of life expectancy (mean years of life gained) and by estimating the probability of surviving until age 80. We sought to estimate the expected benefit of a preventive mastectomy at various ages, using these indices of mortality, by simulating hypothetical cohorts of women. The age-specific annual risks of developing breast cancer were used to estimate the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer by age 80 for women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The probability of developing breast cancer before age 80 was then modified to include competing causes of death, including from ovarian cancer. The mortality rate from breast cancer after a diagnosis of breast cancer was set at 2% annually for the first 10 years and then 1% annually for years ten to twenty. The incidence rate and mortality rate from ovarian cancer were based on published literature. We assumed that preventive mastectomy was associated with complete protection against subsequent breast cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) until age 80, according to the age at mastectomy. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer until age 80 was estimated to be 70.8%. The actual risk (incorporating competing risks) was 64.0%. The probability of being alive at age 80 by having a mastectomy at age 25 increased by 8.7% (from 42.7 to 51.3%). The estimated benefit declined with age at mastectomy; for surgery done at age 50 the improvement in survival to age 80 was much more modest (2.8% at age 80, from 42.7 to 45.5%). Among BRCA mutation carriers, the mortality benefit of preventive mastectomy at age 25 is substantial, but the expected benefit declines rapidly with increasing age at surgery.

  7. Nipple- and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mota, Bruna S; Riera, Rachel; Ricci, Marcos Desidério; Barrett, Jessica; de Castria, Tiago B; Atallah, Álvaro N; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B

    2016-11-29

    The efficacy and safety of nipple-sparing mastectomy and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer are still questionable. It is estimated that the local recurrence rates following nipple-sparing mastectomy are very similar to breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy. To assess the efficacy and safety of nipple-sparing mastectomy and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer in women. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group's Specialized Register, the Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase (via OVID) and LILACS (via Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde [BVS]) using the search terms "nipple sparing mastectomy" and "areola-sparing mastectomy". Also, we searched the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and ClinicalTrials.gov. All searches were conducted on 30th September 2014 and we did not apply any language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) however if there were no RCTs, we expanded our criteria to include non-randomised comparative studies (cohort and case-control studies). Studies evaluated nipple-sparing and areola-sparing mastectomy compared to modified radical mastectomy or skin-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer. Two review authors (BS and RR) performed data extraction and resolved disagreements. We performed descriptive analyses and meta-analyses of the data using Review Manager software. We used Cochrane's risk of bias tool to assess studies, and adapted it for non-randomised studies, and we evaluated the quality of the evidence using GRADE criteria. We included 11 cohort studies, evaluating a total of 6502 participants undergoing 7018 procedures: 2529 underwent a nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), 818 underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and 3671 underwent traditional mastectomy, also known as modified radical

  8. The Relationship between Body Esteem and Hope and Mental Health in Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer and its treatment, including mastectomy, can cause feelings of mutilation, depreciation in the value of the body, reduction in attractiveness, and lead to mental disorders and hopelessness. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between appreciating the body, hope and mental health in women with breast cancer after mastectomy. This study was a descriptive study of 100 breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy and referred to the Sayed Al-Shohada Medical Center in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were selected by convenient sampling. Data gathering tools were the Body Esteem Scale (BES), Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25) mental health questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Most of the patients had low body esteem. There was a significant direct linear relationship between body esteem and hope and mental health. This relationship was stronger between valuing the body and hope. Body esteem has a significant linear relationship with hope and mental health.

  9. Assessment of the use of latissimus dorsi restoration during modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Xinle; Zhang, Geng; Yang, Liu; Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xue; Song, Zhenchuan

    2017-01-01

    The incision area of modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients is associated with subcutaneous effusion and skin flap necrosis as the most common complications. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of latissimus dorsi restoration during modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients by evaluating 365 cases. Among these cases, 185 received modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration, while 180 received modified radical mastectomy alone. The flap tension, drainage fluid amount and extubation time were compared between the two methods. The flap tension in patients who received modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration was significantly lower and the blood supply was better. After surgery, the drainage fluid amount was also significantly lower in these patients compared with the control group. Furthermore, the mean time to drainage tube removal was significantly shorter in these patients and the postoperative cosmetic outcome was superior. Thus, it was concluded that modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration in breast cancer patients was associated with reduced drainage fluid effusion, shorter hospitalization time and decreased flap tension. Overall, this method appears to be potentially suitable for extensive application in the clinical setting. PMID:29285380

  10. Assessment of the use of latissimus dorsi restoration during modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Xinle; Zhang, Geng; Yang, Liu; Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xue; Song, Zhenchuan

    2017-12-01

    The incision area of modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients is associated with subcutaneous effusion and skin flap necrosis as the most common complications. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of latissimus dorsi restoration during modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer patients by evaluating 365 cases. Among these cases, 185 received modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration, while 180 received modified radical mastectomy alone. The flap tension, drainage fluid amount and extubation time were compared between the two methods. The flap tension in patients who received modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration was significantly lower and the blood supply was better. After surgery, the drainage fluid amount was also significantly lower in these patients compared with the control group. Furthermore, the mean time to drainage tube removal was significantly shorter in these patients and the postoperative cosmetic outcome was superior. Thus, it was concluded that modified radical mastectomy combined with intraoperative latissimus dorsi restoration in breast cancer patients was associated with reduced drainage fluid effusion, shorter hospitalization time and decreased flap tension. Overall, this method appears to be potentially suitable for extensive application in the clinical setting.

  11. Breast Cancer after Augmentation: Oncologic and Reconstructive Considerations among Women Undergoing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugenia H; Shammas, Ronnie L; Phillips, Brett T; Greenup, Rachel A; Hwang, E Shelley; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2017-06-01

    Breast augmentation with subglandular versus subpectoral implants may differentially impact the early detection of breast cancer and treatment recommendations. The authors assessed the impact of prior augmentation on the diagnosis and management of breast cancer in women undergoing mastectomy. Breast cancer diagnosis and management were retrospectively analyzed in all women with prior augmentation undergoing therapeutic mastectomy at the authors' institution from 1993 to 2014. Comparison was made to all women with no prior augmentation undergoing mastectomy in 2010. Subanalyses were performed according to prior implant placement. A total of 260 women with (n = 89) and without (n = 171) prior augmentation underwent mastectomy for 95 and 179 breast cancers, respectively. Prior implant placement was subglandular (n = 27) or subpectoral (n = 63) (For five breasts, the placement was unknown). Breast cancer stage at diagnosis (p = 0.19) and detection method (p = 0.48) did not differ for women with and without prior augmentation. Compared to subpectoral augmentation, subglandular augmentation was associated with the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer rather than ductal carcinoma in situ (p = 0.01) and detection by self-palpation rather than screening mammography (p = 0.03). Immediate two-stage implant reconstruction was the preferred reconstructive method in women with augmentation (p < 0.01). Breast cancer stage at diagnosis was similar for women with and without prior augmentation. Among women with augmentation, however, subglandular implants were associated with more advanced breast tumors commonly detected on palpation rather than mammography. Increased vigilance in breast cancer screening is recommended among women with subglandular augmentation. Therapeutic, III.

  12. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast…

  13. Geographic proximity to treatment for early stage breast cancer and likelihood of mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Henry, Kevin A; Goldberg, Daniel W; Shahabi, Kaveh; Elkin, Elena B; Ballas, Leslie K; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-08-01

    Women with early stage breast cancer who live far from a radiation therapy facility may be more likely to opt for mastectomy over breast conserving surgery (BCS). The geographic dimensions of this relationship deserve further scrutiny. For over 100,000 breast cancer patients in 10 states who received either mastectomy or BCS, a newly-developed software tool was used to calculate the shortest travel distance to the location of surgery and to the nearest radiation treatment center. The likelihood of receipt of mastectomy was modeled as a function of these distance measures and other demographic variables using multilevel logistic regression. Women traveling over 75 km for treatment are about 1.4 times more likely to receive a mastectomy than those traveling under 15 km. Geographic barriers to optimal breast cancer treatment remain a valid concern, though most women traveling long distances to receive mastectomies are doing so after bypassing local options. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Body image of Greek breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy or breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Myrgianni, Spyridoula

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the body image of breast cancer patients (n = 70) whom underwent breast conserving surgery or mastectomy, as well as to compare patients' scores with that of a sample of healthy control women (n = 70). A secondary objective of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the 10-item Greek version of the Body Image Scale, a multidimensional measure of body image changes and concerns. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on the items of this scale resulted in a two factor solution, indicating perceived attractiveness, and body and appearance satisfaction. Comparison of the two surgical groups revealed that women treated with mastectomy felt less attractive and more self-conscious, did not like their overall appearance, were dissatisfied with their scar, and avoided contact with people. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that more general body image concerns were associated with belonging to the mastectomy group, compared to the cancer-free group of women. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for future investigations are discussed.

  15. The relationship between the belief in a genetic cause for breast cancer and bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Keith J; Myrtveit, Solbjørg Makalani; Partridge, Ann H; Stephens, Melika; Stanton, Annette L

    2015-05-01

    Most women develop causal beliefs following diagnosis with breast cancer and these beliefs can guide decisions around their care and management. Bilateral mastectomy rates are increasing, although the benefits of this surgery are only established in a small percentage of women. In this study we investigated the relationship between causal beliefs and the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy. Women (N = 2,269) from the Army of Women's breast cancer research registry completed an online survey. Women were asked what they believed caused their cancer and responses were coded into 8 causal categories. Participants were also asked about the type of surgery they underwent following their breast cancer diagnosis. The odds ratios for having a double mastectomy were calculated for each causal category using random/bad luck as a referent category. Hormonal factors (22%) and genetics (19%) were the most common causal belief, followed by don't know (19%), environmental toxins (11%), negative emotions (9%), poor health behavior (8%), other (6%) and random/bad luck (6%). Compared with the referent category, the odds ratio of having a bilateral mastectomy was significantly higher in both the genetics and hormonal causal belief groups (OR = 2.36, 95% CI [1.38, 4.02] and OR = 1.98, 95% CI [1.16, 3.38], respectively). Beliefs in a genetic cause for breast cancer are common and are associated with high rates of bilateral mastectomy. This is despite evidence that the actual genetic contribution to breast cancer is much lower than perceived and that bilateral mastectomy is, in most cases, unlikely to improve survival. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Oncological safety of skin sparing mastectomy followed by immediate reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Woosung; Ko, Beom-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jong Won; Eom, Jin Sup; Son, Byung Ho; Lee, Taik Jong; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) has been demonstrated as an oncologically safe procedure for early breast cancer in several studies. But few studies concerned the safety of SSM for patients with locally advanced breast cancer; therefore, its safety for these patients is less clear. The purpose of this study is to examine the oncological safety of SSM followed by immediate reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 897 breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy for stage IIB (T3N0)-III between 1996 and 2005. Of 897, 87 underwent SSM (n = 73) or nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM, n = 14). We compared the local recurrence (LR) rate, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for SSM group with conventional mastectomy group. The 5-year DFS and OS of SSM group were not worse than those of CM group for all stages. LR rate was 3.0% (2/67) for IIB, 2.8% (1/36) for IIIA, 4.5% (1/22) for IIIC, and 5.0% (1/20) for T3 in SSM group. There was no difference in LR rates between SSM group and CM group for all stages. Our study demonstrates that SSM followed by immediate reconstruction is oncologically safe for locally advanced breast cancer. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. The association between complications and quality of life after mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Browne, John P; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Gulliver-Clarke, Carmel; Pereira, Jerome; Caddy, Christopher M; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2017-09-15

    Medical treatment for breast cancer is associated with substantial toxicity and patient burden. There is less known about the impact of surgical complications. Understanding this impact could provide important information for patients when they are considering surgical options. Between 2008 and 2009, the UK National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit recorded surgical complications for a prospective cohort of 17,844 women treated for breast cancer at 270 hospitals; 6405 of these women were surveyed about their quality of life 18 months after surgery. Breast appearance, emotional well-being, and physical well-being were quantified on 0- to 100-point scales. Linear multiple regression models, controlling for a range of baseline prognostic factors, were used to compare the scores of patients who had complications with the scores of those who did not. The overall complication rate was 10.2%. Complications were associated with little or no impairment in women undergoing mastectomy without reconstruction or with delayed reconstruction. The association was much larger for flap-related complications suffered during immediate reconstruction. The breast-appearance scores (adjusted mean difference, -23.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], -31.0 to -16.6) and emotional well-being scores (adjusted mean difference, -14.0; 95% CI, -22.0 to -6.0) of these patients were much lower than those of any other patient group. Implant-related complications were not associated with a lower quality of life in any surgical group. There is a strong case for prospectively collecting flap-complication rates at the surgeon and surgical unit level and for allowing patients to access these data when they make choices about their breast cancer surgery. Cancer 2017;123:3460-7. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Nipple- and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Bruna S; Riera, Rachel; Desidério Ricci, Marcos; Barrett, Jessica; de Castria, Tiago B; Atallah, Álvaro N; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B

    2018-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of nipple-sparing mastectomy and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer are still questionable. It is estimated that the local recurrence rates following nipple-sparing mastectomy are very similar to breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of nipple-sparing mastectomy and areola-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer in women. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group’s Specialized Register, the Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase (via OVID) and LILACS (via Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde [BVS]) using the search terms “nipple sparing mastectomy” and “areola-sparing mastectomy”. Also, we searched the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and ClinicalTrials.gov. All searches were conducted on 30th September 2014 and we did not apply any language restrictions. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) however if there were no RCTs, we expanded our criteria to include non-randomised comparative studies (cohort and case-control studies). Studies evaluated nipple-sparing and areola-sparing mastectomy compared to modified radical mastectomy or skin-sparing mastectomy for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors (BS and RR) performed data extraction and resolved disagreements. We performed descriptive analyses and meta-analyses of the data using Review Manager software. We used Cochrane’s risk of bias tool to assess studies, and adapted it for non-randomised studies, and we evaluated the quality of the evidence using GRADE criteria. Main results We included 11 cohort studies, evaluating a total of 6502 participants undergoing 7018 procedures: 2529 underwent a nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), 818 underwent

  19. Factors predictive of immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy for invasive breast cancer in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roder, D; Zorbas, H; Kollias, J; Pyke, C; Walters, D; Campbell, I; Taylor, C; Webster, F

    2013-12-01

    To investigate person, cancer and treatment determinants of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) in Australia. Bi-variable and multi-variable analyses of the Quality Audit database. Of 12,707 invasive cancers treated by mastectomy circa 1998-2010, 8% had IBR. This proportion increased over time and reduced from 29% in women below 30 years to approximately 1% in those aged 70 years or more. Multiple regression indicated that other IBR predictors included: high socio-economic status; private health insurance; being asymptomatic; a metropolitan rather than inner regional treatment centre; higher surgeon case load; small tumour size; negative nodal status, positive progesterone receptor status; more cancer foci; multiple affected breast quadrants; synchronous bilateral cancer; not having neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy or adjuvant hormone therapy; and receiving ovarian ablation. Variations in access to specialty services and other possible causes of variations in IBR rates need further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: Is preventive mastectomy warranted?

    PubMed

    McGee, Jacob; Giannakeas, Vasily; Karlan, Beth; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey; Sun, Ping; Foulkes, William D; Neuhausen, Susan L; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Preventive breast surgery and MRI screening are offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. The clinical benefit of these two modalities has not been evaluated among mutation carriers with a history of ovarian cancer. Thus, we sought to determine whether or not BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer would benefit from preventive mastectomy or from MRI screening. First, the annual mortality rate for ovarian cancer patients was estimated for a cohort of 178 BRCA mutation carriers from Ontario, Canada. Next, the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer was estimated using an international registry of 509 BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) associated with mastectomy and with MRI-based breast surveillance. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the impacts of mastectomy and MRI screening on breast cancer incidence as well as on all-cause mortality. Twenty (3.9%) of the 509 patients developed breast cancer within ten years following ovarian cancer diagnosis. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer at ten years post-diagnosis, conditional on survival from ovarian cancer and other causes of mortality was 7.8%. Based on our simulation results, among all BRCA mutation-carrying patients diagnosed with stage III/IV ovarian cancer at age 50, the chance of dying before age 80 was reduced by less than 1% with MRI and by less than 2% with mastectomy. Greater improvements in survival with MRI or mastectomy were observed for women who had already survived 10years after ovarian cancer, and for women with stage I or II ovarian cancer. Among BRCA mutation-carrying ovarian cancer patients without a personal history of breast cancer, neither preventive mastectomy nor MRI screening is warranted, except for those who have survived ovarian cancer without recurrence for ten years and for those with early stage ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017

  1. Male breast cancer: 20-year survival data for post-mastectomy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Eggemann, Holm; Ignatov, Atanas; Stabenow, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Röhl, Friedrich Wilhelm; Hass, Peter; Costa, Serban-Dan

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this population-based study was to determine the impact of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on long-term overall survival (OS) of male patients with breast cancer. We investigated 20-year OS rates of 664 patients diagnosed with primary stage I-III breast cancer in former East Germany between 1970 and 1989. Patients had a radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection without systemic adjuvant therapy. Median follow-up time was 26.2 years (range 19-38 years). 52.4% of the patients had post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Radiotherapy showed different effects in each stage group after 20 years. Whereas there was an OS trend for radiotherapy to harm patients with stage I disease (hazard ratio (HR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-2.15; p = 0.065), radiotherapy showed no benefit in patients with stage II disease (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.62-1.1; p = 0.15). There was a significant survival benefit for patients with stage III disease receiving radiotherapy (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.41-0.88; p = 0.008). Post-mastectomy radiotherapy is associated with longer OS in male patients with stage III breast cancer. Male breast cancer patients at stages I and II do not seem to benefit from radiotherapy, but obsolete irradiation techniques might explain adverse long-term effects in earlier stages.

  2. Complications After Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: A Claims-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Pierce, Lori J.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate complications after post-mastectomy breast reconstruction, particularly in the setting of adjuvant radiotherapy. Summary-Background Data Most studies of complications after breast reconstruction have been conducted at centers of excellence; relatively little is known about complication rates in radiated patients treated in the broader community. This information is relevant for breast cancer patients' decision-making. Methods Using the claims-based MarketScan database, we described complications in 14,894 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998-2007 who received immediate autologous reconstruction (n=2637), immediate implant-based reconstruction (n=3007), or no reconstruction within the first two postoperative years (n=9250). We used a generalized estimating equation to evaluate associations between complications and radiotherapy over time. Results Wound complications were diagnosed within the first two postoperative years in 2.3% of patients without reconstruction, 4.4% with implants, and 9.5% with autologous reconstruction (p<0.001). Infection was diagnosed within the first two postoperative years in 12.7% of patients without reconstruction, 20.5% with implants, and 20.7% with autologous reconstruction (p<0.001). 5219 (35%) women received radiation. Radiation was not associated with infection in any surgical group within the first six months but was associated with an increased risk of infection in months 7-24 in all three groups (each p<0.001). In months 7-24, radiation was associated with higher odds of implant removal in patients with implant reconstruction (OR 1.48, p<0.001) and fat necrosis in those with autologous reconstruction (OR=1.55; P=0.01). Conclusions Complication risks after immediate breast reconstruction differ by approach. Radiation therapy appears to modestly increase certain risks, including infection and implant removal. PMID:25876011

  3. Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy for Women with T4 Locally Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brittany L; Hoskin, Tanya L; Boughey, Judy C; Degnim, Amy C; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Hieken, Tina J

    2016-10-01

    The use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) for women with unilateral breast cancer is increasing. The authors were interested in assessing whether this trend extended to patients with T4 disease. We identified 92 patients from our prospective breast surgery registry with unilateral clinical T4 M0 disease who underwent mastectomy at our institution from October 2008 to July 2015. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were compared between patients who did and those who did not undergo CPM, and the reasons patients elected CPM were ascertained. Of the 92 patients, 33 (36 %) underwent a CPM, including 25 of 55 patients (45 %) with inflammatory breast cancer. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed for 11 of the 92 patients (12 %), including 4 CPM patients. Pathology showed benign findings in all 33 CPM cases, including 3 patients with atypical hyperplasia. The primary reason for CPM reported by the patients included fear of occult current or future breast cancer in 12 cases (36 %), symmetry in 11 cases (33 %), avoidance of future chemotherapy in 5 cases (15 %), deleterious BRCA mutation in 2 cases (6 %), contralateral benign breast disease in 2 cases (6 %), and medical oncologist recommendation in 1 cases (3 %). Patients selecting CPM were younger and more likely to have undergone BRCA testing. A substantial rate of CPM was observed among women undergoing mastectomy for unilateral T4 breast cancer despite the considerable risk of mortality from their index cancer. The reasons for selection of CPM paralleled those reported for patients with early-stage disease. The most common motivation was fear of occult current or future breast cancer and included the desire to avoid further chemotherapy.

  4. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: usama.mahmood@gmail.com; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women weremore » identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.« less

  5. Outcomes of multiple wire localization for larger breast cancers: when can mastectomy be avoided?

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Laurie J; Rafferty, Elizabeth; Specht, Michelle C; Moore, Richard H; Taghian, Alphonse G; Hughes, Kevin S; Gadd, Michele A; Smith, Barbara L

    2008-09-01

    Mastectomy is often recommended when mammography shows a breast cancer with extensive calcifications. We wished to determine whether the use of multiple localizing wires to guide lumpectomy in this setting was associated with increased rates of breast conservation. We also wanted to identify factors that predicted a poor chance of successful lumpectomy, to avoid multiple lumpectomy attempts in a patient who would ultimately require mastectomy. Records of 153 women with breast cancer who underwent lumpectomy for larger lesions that required multiple wire localization and 196 controls who required only single wire localization were reviewed retrospectively. The number of localizing wires, specimen volume, largest specimen dimension, number of surgical procedures, and rates of breast conservation were scored. Seventy-seven percent of patients requiring multiple wire localization had successful breast conservation, compared with 90% of those needing only single wire localization. Only 28% of multiple wire patients required more than 1 excision to achieve clear margins, compared with 36% of single wire patients (p < 0.01). Breast conservation is possible in the great majority of breast cancer patients whose mammographic lesions require multiple localizing wires for excision. The use of multiple wires can decrease the number of procedures required to obtain clear lumpectomy margins.

  6. Long-term outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy/skin-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap reconstruction: Comparison with conventional mastectomy in a single center study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Byul; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Ko, Beom Seok; Son, Byung Ho; Eom, Jin Sup; Lee, Taik Jong; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the oncological outcomes of patients with breast cancer after nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM)/skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), followed by immediate reconstruction, as compared to conventional mastectomy (CM).SSM/NSM has been increasingly used to treat women with breast cancer who wish to preserve the overlying breast skin, but concern exist regarding its oncological safety due to the potential for residual breast tissue. We report our experience performing SSM/NSM for breast cancer treatment compared to CM with a long follow-up period.All consecutive patients who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer at Asan Medical Center between January 1993 and December 2008 were identified by retrospective medical chart review. The patients who underwent NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction with a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (TRAM), were compared to the patients who underwent CM in terms of breast-cancer specific survival (BCSS) rate, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rate, and local recurrence (LR) rate.During the study period, 6028 patients underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. Of these, 1032 and 4996 underwent NSM/SSM with TRAM and CM, respectively. Their median follow-up durations were 94.4 (range, 8.1-220.2) and 110.8 (range, 6.1-262.0) months, respectively. Their 5 year BCSS rates were 95.4% and 88.1%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001). Their 5 year DMFS rates were 93.0% and 85.6%, respectively (log-rank, P < .001).Relative to CM, NSM/SSM, followed by immediate breast reconstruction, may be a viable and oncologically safe surgical treatment in selected patients with breast cancer.

  7. Women's expectations of breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Flitcroft, Kathy; Brennan, Meagan; Spillane, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Breast reconstruction (BR) makes an important positive contribution to the quality of life of many women who have undergone mastectomy for breast cancer. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the evidence for possible relationships between women's expectations of BR and their satisfaction with outcomes to inform and facilitate improved communication about BR options prior to initial surgery. A systematic review of the literature reporting expectations of BR published between 1 January 1994 and 6 March 2017 identified 2107 initial search results. Twenty-one publications, reporting 20 studies (2288 participants), satisfied the selection criteria. Information on study aim and time frame, participation rate, design/methods, limitations/bias, results and conclusions, as well as participant clinical and demographic information, was reported. An overall quality score was generated for each study. Four of five studies that quantified expectations and satisfaction found a positive relationship between the two. This may indicate a possible trend, but as 16 of the 21 included publications did not provide quantifiable data, no firm conclusions are possible. Our findings have important implications for policy and practice which are applicable to medical decision-making more broadly. There is a clear need to utilise accurate and consistent measures of patient-reported expectations and to educate both patients and health practitioners about the importance of informed discussion about treatment options. This is particularly salient for women facing a choice about BR, a major breast cancer survivorship decision. Routine use of an expectations checklist in pre-operative consultations may be useful.

  8. Subgroup Economic Evaluation of Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaomin; Peng, Liubao; Ma, Jinan; Chen, Gannong; Li, Yuanjian

    2015-11-01

    A recent meta-analysis by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group found significant improvements achieved by postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) for patients with breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive nodes (pN1-3). It is unclear whether PMRT is cost-effective for subgroups of patients with positive nodes. To determine the cost-effectiveness of PMRT for subgroups of patients with breast cancer with positive nodes. A semi-Markov model was constructed to estimate the expected lifetime costs, life expectancy, and quality-adjusted life-years for patients receiving or not receiving radiation therapy. Clinical and health utilities data were from meta-analyses by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group or randomized clinical trials. Costs were estimated from the perspective of the Chinese society. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The incremental cost-effective ratio was estimated as $7984, $4043, $3572, and $19,021 per quality-adjusted life-year for patients with positive nodes (pN+), patients with pN1-3, patients with pN1-3 who received systemic therapy, and patients with >4 positive nodes (pN4+), respectively. According to World Health Organization recommendations, these incremental cost-effective ratios were judged as cost-effective. However, the results of one-way sensitivity analyses suggested that the results were highly sensitive to the relative effectiveness of PMRT (rate ratio). We determined that the results were highly sensitive to the rate ratio. However, the addition of PMRT for patients with pN1-3 in China has a reasonable chance to be cost-effective and may be judged as an efficient deployment of limited health resource, and the risk and uncertainty of PMRT are relatively greater for patients with pN4+. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Relationship between Body Esteem and Hope and Mental Health in Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer and its treatment, including mastectomy, can cause feelings of mutilation, depreciation in the value of the body, reduction in attractiveness, and lead to mental disorders and hopelessness. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the relationship between appreciating the body, hope and mental health in women with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive study of 100 breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy and referred to the Sayed Al-Shohada Medical Center in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were selected by convenient sampling. Data gathering tools were the Body Esteem Scale (BES), Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25) mental health questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: Most of the patients had low body esteem. There was a significant direct linear relationship between body esteem and hope and mental health. This relationship was stronger between valuing the body and hope. Conclusion: Body esteem has a significant linear relationship with hope and mental health. PMID:26009674

  10. Impact of contra-lateral breast reshaping on mammographic surveillance in women undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nava, Maurizio B; Rocco, Nicola; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Falco, Giuseppe; Capalbo, Emanuela; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Spano, Andrea; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco

    2015-08-01

    The ultimate goal of breast reconstruction is to achieve symmetry with the contra-lateral breast. Contra-lateral procedures with wide parenchymal rearrangements are suspected to impair mammographic surveillance. This study aims to evaluate the impact on mammographic detection of mastopexies and breast reductions for contralateral adjustment in breast reconstruction. We retrospectively evaluated 105 women affected by uni-lateral breast cancer who underwent mastectomy and immediate two-stage reconstruction between 2002 and 2007. We considered three groups according to the contra-lateral reshaping technique: mastopexy or breast reduction with inferior dermoglandular flap (group 1); mastopexy or breast reduction without inferior dermoglandular flap (group 2); no contra-lateral reshaping (group 3). We assessed qualitative mammographic variations and breast density in the three groups. Statistically significant differences have been found when comparing reshaped groups with non reshaped groups regarding parenchymal distortions, skin thickening and stromal edema, but these differences did not affect cancer surveillance. The surveillance mammography diagnostic accuracy in contra-lateral cancer detection was not significantly different between the three groups (p = 0.56), such as the need for MRI for equivocal findings at mammographic contra-lateral breast (p = 0.77) and the need for core-biopsies to confirm mammographic suspect of contra-lateral breast cancer (p = 0.90). This study confirms previous reports regarding the safety of mastopexies and breast reductions when performed in the setting of contra-lateral breast reshaping after breast reconstruction. Mammographic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are not affected by the glandular re-arrangement. These results provide a further validation of the safety of current reconstructive paradigms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk-reducing mastectomy for the prevention of primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carbine, Nora E; Lostumbo, Liz; Wallace, Judi; Ko, Henry

    2018-04-05

    Recent progress in understanding the genetic basis of breast cancer and widely publicized reports of celebrities undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) have increased interest in RRM as a method of preventing breast cancer. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2004 and previously updated in 2006 and 2010. (i) To determine whether risk-reducing mastectomy reduces death rates from any cause in women who have never had breast cancer and in women who have a history of breast cancer in one breast, and (ii) to examine the effect of risk-reducing mastectomy on other endpoints, including breast cancer incidence, breast cancer mortality, disease-free survival, physical morbidity, and psychosocial outcomes. For this Review update, we searched Cochrane Breast Cancer's Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) on 9 July 2016. We included studies in English. Participants included women at risk for breast cancer in at least one breast. Interventions included all types of mastectomy performed for the purpose of preventing breast cancer. At least two review authors independently abstracted data from each report. We summarized data descriptively; quantitative meta-analysis was not feasible due to heterogeneity of study designs and insufficient reporting. We analyzed data separately for bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy (BRRM) and contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM). Four review authors assessed the methodological quality to determine whether or not the methods used sufficiently minimized selection bias, performance bias, detection bias, and attrition bias. All 61 included studies were observational studies with some methodological limitations; randomized trials were absent. The studies presented data on 15,077 women with a wide range of risk factors for breast cancer, who underwent RRM.Twenty-one BRRM studies looking at the incidence of breast cancer or disease-specific mortality, or

  12. A randomized prospective trial of radical (Halsted) mastectomy versus modified radical mastectomy in 311 breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, W A; Carpenter, J T; Laws, H L; Soong, S J; Cloud, G; Urist, M M; Balch, C M

    1983-01-01

    This study reports the results of a prospectively randomized trial for treatment of carcinoma of the breast comparing standard (Halsted) radical mastectomy to a modified radical mastectomy. Three hundred eleven patients with primary operable carcinoma of the breast were entered in a surgical and adjunctive chemotherapy trial in Alabama between 1975 and 1978. A total of 91 surgeons participated (all Diplomats of the American Board of Surgery and Members of the American College of Surgeons). All operative reports, pathology and therapy were reviewed by referees. Histologically node positive patients were randomized after operation to receive melphalan or C.M.F.(cytoxan, methotrexate, and 5-FU) for 1 year. After a median follow-up of 5.5 years, there was no significant difference in disease-free survival or in overall survival between the two groups. There was a trend toward improved 5-year survival rates in the radical mastectomy group compared to the modified radical mastectomy group (84% vs. 76%, p = 0.14). There was also an increased incidence of local wound recurrence in those patients receiving modified radical mastectomy, but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.09). Longer follow-up will be necessary to evaluate these results more fully. PMID:6870379

  13. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast

  14. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. Methods A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. Results A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Conclusion Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in

  15. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy rate stable at major Canadian breast cancer center.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Amanda; Sandhu, Lakhbir; Cil, Tulin D; Hofer, Stefan O P; Zhong, Toni

    2016-06-10

    To examine trends of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rates at a Canadian academic breast cancer center. A single-institution retrospective cohort study was completed. Women of any age who underwent at least a unilateral mastectomy (UM) for primary unilateral breast carcinoma between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2010 were included. Patients who underwent CPM on the same day as UM were isolated to create two distinct cohorts. Patient and procedure characteristics were compared across groups using R software (version 3.1.0). The percentage of CPMs per year was determined. The Cochrane-Armitage test was used to assess the trend of CPMs over time. A P value of < 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 811 women met the inclusions/exclusion criteria; 759 (93.6%) underwent UM alone and 52 (6.4%) underwent UM with immediate CPM. The absolute number of procedures (UM and UM + CPM) increased over time, from 83 in 2004 to 147 in 2010 reflecting an increase in mastectomy volume. Annual CPM rates did not increase over time (P = 0.7) and varied between 2.6% to 10.7%. Family history of breast cancer [OR 3.6 (1.8-7.3)] and immediate reconstruction [10.0 (5.2-19.3)] were both significantly associated with CPM. Women who underwent CPM were younger (median age CPM 49 years vs UM 52 years, P < 0.0001) but age less than 50 years was not statistically associated with increased rates of CPM. CPM rates from 2004 to 2010 at a high-volume Canadian breast cancer center did not increase over time, in contrast to trends observed in the United States.

  16. Trends and Variation in Use of Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Mastectomy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concerns exist regarding breast cancer patients' access to breast reconstruction, which provides important psychosocial benefits. Patients and Methods Using the MarketScan database, a claims-based data set of US patients with employment-based insurance, we identified 20,560 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998 to 2007. We evaluated time trends using the Cochran-Armitage test and correlated reconstruction use with plastic-surgery workforce density and other treatments using multivariable regression. Results Median age of our sample was 51 years. Reconstruction use increased from 46% in 1998 to 63% in 2007 (P < .001), with increased use of implants and decreased use of autologous techniques over time (P < .001). Receipt of bilateral mastectomy also increased: from 3% in 1998 to 18% in 2007 (P < .001). Patients receiving bilateral mastectomy were more likely to receive reconstruction (odds ratio [OR], 2.3; P < .001) and patients receiving radiation were less likely to receive reconstruction (OR, 0.44; P < .001). Rates of reconstruction receipt varied dramatically by geographic region, with associations with plastic surgeon density in each state and county-level income. Autologous techniques were more often used in patients who received both reconstruction and radiation (OR, 1.8; P < .001) and less frequently used in patients with capitated insurance (OR, 0.7; P < .001), patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy (OR, 0.5; P < .001), or patients in the highest income quartile (OR, 0.7; P = .006). Delayed reconstruction was performed in 21% of patients who underwent reconstruction. Conclusion Breast reconstruction has increased over time, but it has wide geographic variability. Receipt of other treatments correlates with the use of and approaches toward reconstruction. Further research and interventions are needed to ensure equitable access to this important component of multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24550418

  17. Mastectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 109. Read More Breast cancer Breast lump removal Breast reconstruction - implants Breast reconstruction - natural tissue Mastectomy Patient Instructions Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge Mastectomy and breast ...

  18. Hospital organizational factors affect the use of immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, K; van Bommel, A C M; de Ligt, K M; Maduro, J H; Vrancken Peeters, M T F D; Mureau, M A M; Siesling, S

    2017-08-01

    Significant hospital variation in the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy exists in the Netherlands. Aims of this study were to identify hospital organizational factors affecting the use of IBR after mastectomy for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast cancer (BC) and to analyze whether these factors explain the variation. Patients with DCIS or primary invasive BC treated with mastectomy between 2011 and 2013 were selected from the national NABON Breast Cancer Audit. Hospital and organizational factors were collected with an online web-based survey. Regression analyses were performed to determine whether these factors accounted for the hospital variation. In total, 78% (n = 72) of all Dutch hospitals participated in the survey. In these hospitals 16,471 female patients underwent a mastectomy for DCIS (n = 1,980) or invasive BC (n = 14,491) between 2011 and 2014. IBR was performed in 41% of patients with DCIS (hospital range 0-80%) and in 17% of patients with invasive BC (hospital range 0-62%). Hospital type, number of plastic surgeons available and attendance of a plastic surgeon at the MDT meeting increased IBR rates. For invasive BC, higher percentage of mastectomies and more weekly MDT meetings also significantly increased IBR rates. Adjusted data demonstrated decreased IBR rates for DCIS (average 35%, hospital range 0-49%) and invasive BC (average 15%, hospital range 0-18%). Hospital organizational factors affect the use of IBR in the Netherlands. Although only partly explaining hospital variation, optimization of these factors could lead to less variation in IBR rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of Factors Influencing Women's Choice of Mastectomy Versus Breast Conserving Therapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jeffrey; Groot, Gary; Boden, Catherine; Busch, Angela; Holtslander, Lorraine; Lim, Hyun

    2018-01-03

    We have performed a narrative synthesis. A literature search was conducted between January 2000 and June 2014 in 7 databases. The initial search identified 2717 articles; 319 underwent abstract screening, 67 underwent full-text screening, and 25 final articles were included. This review looked at early stage breast cancer in women only, excluding ductal carcinoma in situ and advanced breast cancer. A conceptual framework was created to organize the central constructs underlying women's choices: clinicopathologic factors, physician factors, and individual factors with subgroups of sociodemographic, geographic, and personal beliefs and preferences. This framework guided our review's synthesis and analysis. We found that larger tumor size and increasing stage was associated with increased rates of mastectomy. The results for age varied, but suggested that old and young extremes of diagnostic age were associated with an increased likelihood of mastectomy. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with higher breast conservation therapy (BCT) rates. Resident rural location and increasing distance from radiation treatment facilities were associated with lower rates of BCT. Individual belief factors influencing women's choice of mastectomy (mastectomy being reassuring, avoiding radiation, an expedient treatment) differed from factors influencing choice of BCT (body image and femininity, physician recommendation, survival equivalence, less surgery). Surgeon factors, including female gender, higher case numbers, and individual surgeon practice, were associated with increased BCT rates. The decision-making process for women with early stage breast cancer is complicated and affected by multiple factors. Organizing these factors into central constructs of clinicopathologic, individual, and physician factors may aid health-care professionals to better understand this process. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growing Use of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Despite no Improvement in Long-term Survival for Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stephanie M; Freedman, Rachel A; Sagara, Yasuaki; Aydogan, Fatih; Barry, William T; Golshan, Mehra

    2017-03-01

    To update and examine national temporal trends in contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) and determine whether survival differed for invasive breast cancer patients based on hormone receptor (HR) status and age. We identified women diagnosed with unilateral stage I to III breast cancer between 1998 and 2012 within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. We compared characteristics and temporal trends between patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery, unilateral mastectomy, and CPM. We then performed Cox proportional-hazards regression to examine breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) in women diagnosed between 1998 and 2007, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with radiation (breast-conserving therapy), unilateral mastectomy, or CPM, with subsequent subgroup analysis stratifying by age and HR status. Of 496,488 women diagnosed with unilateral invasive breast cancer, 59.6% underwent breast-conserving surgery, 33.4% underwent unilateral mastectomy, and 7.0% underwent CPM. Overall, the proportion of women undergoing CPM increased from 3.9% in 2002 to 12.7% in 2012 (P < 0.001). Reconstructive surgery was performed in 48.3% of CPM patients compared with only 16.0% of unilateral mastectomy patients, with rates of reconstruction with CPM rising from 35.3% in 2002 to 55.4% in 2012 (P < 0.001). When compared with breast-conserving therapy, we found no significant improvement in BCSS or OS for women undergoing CPM (BCSS: HR 1.08, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.16; OS: HR 1.08, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.14), regardless of HR status or age. The use of CPM more than tripled during the study period despite evidence suggesting no survival benefit over breast conservation. Further examination on how to optimally counsel women about surgical options is warranted.

  1. Early results of an endoscopic nipple-sparing mastectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Naomi; Fukuma, Eisuke; Higa, Kuniki; Ozaki, Shinji; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Satoko; Kurihara, Terumasa; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro

    2009-12-01

    Endoscopic mastectomy has been reportedly associated with smaller scars and greater patient satisfaction; however, few reports on this topic have been made. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the early results of endoscopic nipple-sparing mastectomy (E-NSM) and to investigate the safety of this procedure. Between January 2002 and December 2005, a total of 87 patients with breast cancer but without skin and nipple involvement, including two cases of bilateral breast cancer, underwent E-NSM. In case of bloody nipple discharge and suspicious extension near the nipple as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, the major ducts within the nipple were cored (nipple coring). In other cases, nipple coring was not performed. Of the 89 breasts in 87 patients, 42 had tumors of >2 cm and 80 were diagnosed as having invasive carcinoma. Lymph node involvement was observed in 36 procedures. The overall rate of nipple necrosis was 18% (16 of 89). The rate of nipple necrosis among the procedures with nipple coring was statistically higher than that among those without nipple coring (7 of 17, 41%, vs. 9 of 72, 13%) (P = .01). Nipple involvement was observed in 2.2% (2 of 89). After a median follow-up period of 52 months, distant metastasis was observed in nine cases; no local recurrences occurred in this series. E-NSM is an oncologically safe procedure and an acceptable method in selected patients requiring a mastectomy. The higher rate of nipple necrosis may have been the result of a technical problem, indicating the need for continued improvement in nipple coring procedures.

  2. [The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].

    PubMed

    López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain.

  3. Psychological Resilience as a Protective Factor for the Body Image in Post-Mastectomy Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta; Kwapniewska, Anna; Lizinczyk, Sebastian; Sitnik-Warchulska, Katarzyna

    2018-06-05

    European statistics confirm a rise in breast cancer among contemporary women. Those suffering from cancer and undergoing a surgery (mastectomy) are undoubtedly considered to be in difficult situations. The range of the numerous negative and/or positive emotions, thoughts, and behaviours depend on many psychological factors such as psychological resilience. The authors are currently drawing a report on their own studies where they are trying to determine factors that protect body image resilience in women suffering from breast cancer after mastectomies. The research group consisted of 120 women after a short (up to 2 years) or a long (over 2 years) duration having elapsed since their mastectomy. The results of the research groups show that psychological resilience is a significant protecting factor for the body image that prevents the excessive development of negative self-esteem in post-mastectomy women. Female patients ought to be provided aid in the short time immediately after the procedure and afterwards, when they are less capable of tolerating negative emotions. In order to significantly improve the general body image resilience to emotional and cognitive distortions in post-mastectomy women who experienced breast cancer, it is recommended that psychological interventions (from psychoeducation to psychological assistance and specialist psychotherapy) are conducted systematically throughout the course of treatment.

  4. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy followed by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction : An alternative treatment option for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Montserrat; Corradini, Stefanie; Dian, Darius; von Bodungen, Vera; Ditsch, Nina; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Schönecker, Stephan; Harbeck, Nadia; Scheithauer, Heike; Belka, Claus

    2017-04-01

    The optimal sequence of mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is still under debate. Increased rates of postoperative complications are described following postmastectomy RT. Neoadjuvant RT aims to improve the aesthetic results and simplify the reconstructive pathway. A total of 22 patients diagnosed with LABC and treated with neoadjuvant RT followed by mastectomy and IBR between 04/2012 and 03/2015 were retrospectively analyzed. RT consisted of external beam RT to the breast and the regional lymphatics, if indicated. Both implant-based and autologous tissue-transfer reconstruction techniques were used. At the time of RT, 10 patients had no prior surgery and 12 patients had previously undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with positive resection margins without the possibility to perform a second BCS. Additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 18 patients prior to RT. A complete pathological response was achieved in 55.0% of patients. The 2‑year overall survival rate was 89.3%, the 2‑year disease-free-survival 79.8% and the local-recurrence-free survival was 95.2%. The cosmetic result was excellent or good in 66% of the patients treated with upfront mastectomy and 37% of the patients who had previously undergone BCS. Among patients who received implant-based IBR, 4 patients developed serious wound-healing problems with implant loss. The most satisfactory results were achieved with autologous tissue reconstruction. A sequential neoadjuvant chemo-/radiotherapy to allow IBR following mastectomy in selected cases of LABC seems feasible and can be safely attempted. Careful patient selection, close monitoring, and continuous patient support is mandatory to ensure compliance in this treatment strategy.

  5. Nipple sparing mastectomy for breast cancer is associated with high patient satisfaction and safe oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mesdag, V; Régis, C; Tresch, E; Chauvet, M-P; Boulanger, L; Collinet, P; Giard, S

    2017-10-01

    The preservation of the nipple areolar complex (NAC) for cancer treatment is still a matter of debate because of suspected increase of local recurrence and surgery-specific complications. The aim of the study was to investigate both the relapse risk associated with nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) for breast cancer and women's satisfaction with preservation of the NAC. We included retrospectively all patients who had skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) or NSM from 2007 to 2012 for breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We compared NSM and SSM group for oncological and surgical outcomes. Patients' satisfaction and quality of life has been evaluated by a specifically designed questionnaire. We included 63NSM (41.5%) and 89SM (58.5%). Eighty-nine (58.6%) patients had DCIS, and the other had small invasive disease. Median follow-up was 42 (IQR: 18-58) months. Local recurrence rate was 1.7% (n=1) in the NSM group and 0% in the SSM group without recurrence in the preserved nipple. After NSM, one patient had complete NAC necrosis, and three patients suffered partial necrosis. Satisfaction with the NAC was higher in the NSM group compared to the SSM group with delayed reconstruction of the nipple (75% vs. 59%, P=0.14). Patients with NSM required less psychological support before (P=0.028) and immediately after surgery (P=0.14) than patients in the SSM group. NSM can successfully and safely be performed for pre-invasive and small invasive breast cancer. Besides esthetic aspects, preserving the nipple may ease the acceptance of these radical form of surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Preservation of the nipple-areola complex in skin-sparing mastectomy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ryo; Kinoshita, Satoki; Shimada, Naoko; Uchida, Ken; Takeyama, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Toshiaki

    2018-06-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) enables a radical cure of breast cancer while overcoming the cosmetic issues related to surgery. We review our experience of performing SSMs and assess whether preservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) could have been an option for some patients who underwent SSM. The subjects of this retrospective study were women who underwent SSM that utilized four incision types; namely, the so-called tennis racket incision, a periareolar and midaxillary incision, an areola-sparing and midaxillary incision, and a small transverse elliptical incision. We assessed whether preservation of the NAC would have been an option in SSM, based on histologic examination of three serial cut surfaces of the specimen around the nipple, ruling out the option when evidence of the malignant lesion/s was found in at least one of the following locations: in the nipple, within a 1-cm radius from the base of the nipple, or within 1 cm from the surface of the NAC. We performed 193 SSMs. The cumulative 10-year local disease-free survival rate was 98%, with 89% of patients reporting levels of satisfaction with the reconstructed breast, of excellent, very good, or good. We evaluated that 70 of the 193 procedures could have been performed as nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The outcomes of SSM in this series were excellent and NSM might have been an option for about one-third of the patients.

  7. Breast reconstruction following mastectomy: an update.

    PubMed

    Elliott, L F; Beegle, P H; Hartrampf, C R; Bennett, G K

    1991-11-01

    Breast reconstruction today is a realistic and vital part of total breast cancer treatment. All physicians should be well informed on current methods of reconstruction so that they can present the facts to their patients in an encouraging, yet realistic manner. Recent developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy have included the increase utilization of immediate breast reconstruction at the time of mastectomy, the improvement and refinement of the TRAM flap, the increased use of the "free" flap transfer of the TRAM flap which increases blood supply to the flap, texturing of implants which appears to increase their stability on the chest wall and reduce the incidence of capsular contracture or firmness, and the introduction of the newer autogenous tissue methods including the LTTF, gluteal, and latissimus dorsi flaps. Plastic surgeons are charged with the task of becoming proficient in breast reconstruction procedures in order to offer the mastectomy patient a safe, realistic facsimile breast that will be trouble free. Fortunately, there are several good options for restoring the breast after mastectomy. The method of reconstruction should be chosen by matching the desires of informed patients with the indications and contraindications in each case. In general, silicone reconstruction is expedient and satisfactory in most patients. However, it cannot compete with autogenous tissue transfer for severe chest wall defects, covering irradiated areas, creating a large, ptotic breast, or providing a natural appearing, soft breast mount.

  8. Preoperative dexamethasone reduces postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting following mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has been reported to reduce postoperative symptoms after different surgical procedures. We evaluated the efficacy of preoperative dexamethasone in ameliorating postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and pain after mastectomy. Methods In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 70 patients scheduled for mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection were analyzed after randomization to treatment with 8 mg intravenous dexamethasone (n = 35) or placebo (n = 35). All patients underwent standardized procedures for general anesthesia and surgery. Episodes of PONV and pain score were recorded on a visual analogue scale. Analgesic and antiemetic requirements were also recorded. Results Demographic and medical variables were similar between groups. The incidence of PONV was lower in the dexamethasone group at the early postoperative evaluation (28.6% vs. 60%; p = 0.02) and at 6 h (17.2% vs. 45.8%; p = 0.03). More patients in the placebo group required additional antiemetic medication (21 vs. 8; p = 0.01). Dexamethasone treatment significantly reduced postoperative pain just after surgery (VAS score, 4.54 ± 1.55 vs. 5.83 ± 2.00; p = 0.004), at 6 h (3.03 ± 1.20 vs. 4.17 ± 1.24; p < 0.0005) and at 12 h (2.09 ± 0.85 vs. 2.54 ± 0.98; p = 0.04). Analgesics were required in more patients of the control group (21 vs. 10; p = 0.008). There were no adverse events, morbidity or mortality. Conclusions Preoperative intravenous dexamethasone (8 mg) can significantly reduce the incidence of PONV and pain in patients undergoing mastectomy with axillary dissection for breast cancer. Trial registration number NCT01116713 PMID:21182781

  9. Patient Satisfaction and Nipple-Areola Sensitivity After Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomy and Immediate Implant Breast Reconstruction in a High Breast Cancer Risk Population: Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy Versus Skin-Sparing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    van Verschuer, Victorien M T; Mureau, Marc A M; Gopie, Jessica P; Vos, Elvira L; Verhoef, Cornelis; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E; Koppert, Linetta B

    2016-08-01

    Prophylactic skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) both are associated with major risk reduction in women with high breast cancer risk. Skin-sparing mastectomy followed by nipple-areola complex (NAC) reconstruction is standard of care, but NSM is increasingly being performed. Preservation of the NAC in NSM may increase patient satisfaction. Therefore, we measured NAC sensitivity after NSM and compared patient satisfaction as well as body image after SSM with NSM. Women who underwent prophylactic bilateral SSM or NSM and immediate implant breast reconstruction between 2002 and 2012 were eligible. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast-Q reconstruction questionnaire, body image using Hopwood's body image scale (BIS), and satisfaction with the (reconstructed) NAC using a study-specific questionnaire. In the NSM group, NAC sensitivity was assessed using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments with a 5-point scale and compared with NAC sensitivity in a nonoperated control group. The SSM group comprised 25 women (50 SSMs) and the NSM group 20 women (39 NSMs). Median follow-up was 65 months in the SSM group compared with 27 months in the NSM group (P < 0.01). In univariable analyses, Breast-Q scores were favorable in the SSM group compared with the NSM group with trends for higher "satisfaction with breasts" (66.2 vs 56.6; P = 0.06) and "satisfaction with outcome" (76.1 vs 61.5; P = 0.09). Mean BIS score of 7.1/30 in the SSM group and 9.3/30 in the NSM group (P = 0.35). Adjusted for follow-up, there were no significant differences in Breast-Q scores, nor in BIS scores. Interestingly, satisfaction with the (reconstructed) NAC was similar after SSM and NSM. Nipple-areola complex sensitivity was lower in the NSM group (mean score, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.3) compared with the control group (mean score, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 4.6-4.9; P < 0.01). Breast-Q scores regarding satisfaction with breasts and overall outcome were in

  10. Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Na; Dang, Shao-Nong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Surgical Department of Oncology Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from March to November 2009. A total of 120 breast cancer patients who received Personal Controlled Analgesia (PCA) following surgery (mastectomy) were randomly allocated to two groups, an intervention group and a control group (60 patients in each group). The intervention group accepted music therapy from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third admission to hospital for chemotherapy in addition to the routine nursing care, while the control group received only routine nursing care. Pain scores were measured at baseline and three post-tests using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Short-Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the change in the Pain Rating Index (PRI-total) score from baseline. Music therapy was found to reduce the PRI-total score in the intervention group significantly compared with the control group with a mean difference (95% CI) of -2.38 (-2.80, -1.95), -2.41 (-2.85, -1.96), and -1.87 (-2.33, -1.42) for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd post-tests, respectively. Similar results were found for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scores. The findings of the study provide some evidence that music therapy has both short- and long-term positive effects on alleviating pain in breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy.

  11. Use of and Mortality After Bilateral Mastectomy Compared With Other Surgical Treatments for Breast Cancer in California, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Allison W.; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Nelson, David O.; Clarke, Christina A.; Gomez, Scarlett L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Bilateral mastectomy is increasingly used to treat unilateral breast cancer. Because it may have medical and psychosocial complications, a better understanding of its use and outcomes is essential to optimizing cancer care. OBJECTIVE To compare use of and mortality after bilateral mastectomy, breast-conserving therapy with radiation, and unilateral mastectomy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Observational cohort study within the population-based California Cancer Registry; participants were women diagnosed with stages 0–III unilateral breast cancer in California from 1998 through 2011, with median follow-up of 89.1 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Factors associated with surgery use (from polytomous logistic regression); overall and breast cancer–specific mortality (from propensity score weighting and Cox proportional hazards analysis). RESULTS Among 189 734 patients, the rate of bilateral mastectomy increased from 2.0% (95% CI, 1.7%–2.2%) in 1998 to 12.3% (95% CI, 11.8%–12.9%) in 2011, an annual increase of 14.3% (95% CI, 13.1%–15.5%); among women younger than 40 years, the rate increased from 3.6% (95% CI, 2.3%–5.0%) in 1998 to 33% (95% CI, 29.8%–36.5%) in 2011. Bilateral mastectomy was more often used by non-Hispanic white women, those with private insurance, and those who received care at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)–designated cancer center (8.6% [95% CI, 8.1%–9.2%] among NCI cancer center patients vs 6.0% [95% CI, 5.9%–6.1%] among non-NCI cancer center patients; odds ratio [OR], 1.13 [95% CI, 1.04–1.22]); in contrast, unilateral mastectomy was more often used by racial/ethnic minorities (Filipina, 52.8% [95% CI, 51.6%–54.0%]; OR, 2.00 [95% CI, 1.90–2.11] and Hispanic, 45.6% [95% CI, 45.0%–46.2%]; OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.13–1.20] vs non-Hispanic white, 35.2% [95% CI, 34.9%–35.5%]) and those with public/Medicaid insurance (48.4% [95% CI, 47.8%–48.9%]; OR, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.05–1.11] vs private insurance, 36

  12. Mastectomy or breast conserving surgery? Factors affecting type of surgical treatment for breast cancer--a classification tree approach.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael A; Meyricke, Ramona; O'Neill, Terry; Roberts, Steven

    2006-04-20

    A critical choice facing breast cancer patients is which surgical treatment--mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (BCS)--is most appropriate. Several studies have investigated factors that impact the type of surgery chosen, identifying features such as place of residence, age at diagnosis, tumor size, socio-economic and racial/ethnic elements as relevant. Such assessment of "propensity" is important in understanding issues such as a reported under-utilisation of BCS among women for whom such treatment was not contraindicated. Using Western Australian (WA) data, we further examine the factors associated with the type of surgical treatment for breast cancer using a classification tree approach. This approach deals naturally with complicated interactions between factors, and so allows flexible and interpretable models for treatment choice to be built that add to the current understanding of this complex decision process. Data was extracted from the WA Cancer Registry on women diagnosed with breast cancer in WA from 1990 to 2000. Subjects' treatment preferences were predicted from covariates using both classification trees and logistic regression. Tumor size was the primary determinant of patient choice, subjects with tumors smaller than 20 mm in diameter preferring BCS. For subjects with tumors greater than 20 mm in diameter factors such as patient age, nodal status, and tumor histology become relevant as predictors of patient choice. Classification trees perform as well as logistic regression for predicting patient choice, but are much easier to interpret for clinical use. The selected tree can inform clinicians' advice to patients.

  13. Pattern of External Breast Prosthesis Use by Post Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients in India: Descriptive Study from Tertiary Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Ramu, D; Ramesh, Rakesh S; Manjunath, Suraj; Shivakumar; Goel, Vipin; Hemnath, G N; Alexander, Annie

    2015-12-01

    In India, Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in urban and 2nd most common in rural areas [1]. The incidence is rising, more younger women are getting affected and due to increase in survival rates there is an increase in the total number of women suffering from breast Cancer. So far there are no studies evaluating the pattern of breast prosthesis use in Indian scenario. The aim of this study is to address the patterns of external breast prosthesis used in India and view of Indian women on such prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This was a descriptive longitudinal study. In this study we interviewed (telephonic) 63 people, after three years of completing treatment under The Department of Surgical Oncology, St. Johns medical college, Bangalore. Among the study group, 27 members (40 %) were using various prosthesis, rest 36 women were not using any type of prosthesis. Among the users of prosthesis, silicon prosthesis was used by 6 women, padded cups by 8 women, cloth or cotton by 12 women and 1 woman used other type of prosthesis. Most women use simple items like cloth and cotton (44 %). Next most commonly used prosthesis are padded cups(). Only 22 % of women were found using silicon prosthesis in this study. Most of the well educated patients used external prosthesis either in the form of silicon prosthesis or padded cups. Most of women below age of 50 used external breast prosthesis. Use of prosthesis was more in urban compared to rural population (48 % vs 25 %). Prosthesis users worried more about the body image than women not using prosthesis. 25 % of women using prosthesis had body image issues where as only 5 % of non prosthesis users had such problems. Prosthesis users need improvement in terms of comfort, size, shape and affordability. Most common reasons for not using prosthesis are age, lack of motivation and awareness. Less than half of the women included in this study used external prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer

  14. Feasibility study of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy with breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients with BRCA mutations in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Akiyo; Okumura, Seiko; Sawaki, Masataka; Hattori, Masaya; Ishiguro, Junko; Adachi, Yayoi; Kotani, Haruru; Gondo, Naomi; Kataoka, Ayumi; Iwase, Madoka; Onishi, Sakura; Sugino, Kayoko; Terada, Mitsuo; Horisawa, Nanae; Mori, Makiko; Takaiso, Nobue; Hyodo, Ikuo; Iwata, Hiroji

    2018-03-08

    Contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) for breast cancer patients with BRCA mutations has been reported to not only reduce breast cancer incidence but also to improve survival. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend providing CRRM to women with BRCA mutations who desire CRRM after risk-reduction counseling. However, in Japan, CRRM cannot be performed generally because it is not covered by health insurance. Thus, we conducted a feasibility study to confirm the safety of CRRM. CRRM with bilateral breast reconstructions were performed for breast cancer patients with BRCA mutations. The primary endpoint was early adverse events within 3 months, and secondary endpoints were late adverse events. Between August 2014 and November 2016, ten patients were enrolled. The median age was 37.5 years, and five of the patients had the BRCA1 mutation while five had the BRCA2 mutation. Six patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Eight patients selected silicone breast implants, and two patients selected transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap reconstruction. Pathological findings showed no evidence of occult breast cancers in any of the patients. At a median of 25.5 months follow-up time, CRRM-related early adverse events were hematoma (subsequently removed by re-operation; grade 2, n = 1), wound infection (grade 2, n = 1), skin ulceration (grade 1, n = 2) and wound pain (grade 1, n = 1). Overall, there were no grade 3 or more severe adverse events. Our results confirm that CRRM with reconstruction could be performed safely.

  15. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy After Mastectomy in Preventing Recurrence in Patients With Stage IIa-IIIa Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-08

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Medullary Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  16. Surgeon Influence on Variation in Receipt of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy for Women With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma; Hofer, Timothy P

    2018-01-01

    Rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) have markedly increased but we know little about the influence of surgeons on variability of the procedure in the community. To quantify the influence of the attending surgeon on rates of CPM and clinician attitudes that explained it. In this population-based survey study, we identified 7810 women with stages 0 to II breast cancer treated in 2013 to 2015 through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County. Surveys were sent approximately 2 months after surgery. Surveys were also sent to 488 attending surgeons identified by the patients. We conducted multilevel analyses to examine the impact of surgeon influence on variations in patient receipt of CPM using information from patient and surgeon surveys merged to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. A total of 5080 women responded to the survey (70% response rate), and 377 surgeons responded (77% response rate). The mean (SD) age of responding women was 61.9 (11) years; 28% had an increased risk of second primary cancer, and 16% received CPM. Half of surgeons (52%) practiced for more than 20 years and 30% treated more than 50 new patients with breast cancer annually. Attending surgeon explained a large amount (20%) of the variation in CPM, controlling for patient factors. The odds of a patient receiving CPM increased almost 3-fold (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1-3.4) if she saw a surgeon with a practice approach 1 SD above a surgeon with the mean CPM rate (independent of age, diagnosis date, BRCA status, and risk of second primary). One-quarter (25%) of the surgeon influence was explained by attending attitudes about initial recommendations for surgery and responses to patient requests for CPM. The estimated rate of CPM was 34% for surgeons who least favored initial breast conservation and were least reluctant to perform CPM vs 4% for surgeons who most favored initial breast conservation and were most

  17. Quality of life in patients with recurrent breast cancer after second breast-conserving therapy in comparison with mastectomy: the German experience.

    PubMed

    Jendrian, Svenja; Steffens, Katharina; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Laakmann, Elena; Bergelt, Corinna; Witzel, Isabell

    2017-06-01

    Although some studies suggest that breast-conserving therapy (BCT) shows better psychosocial outcomes than mastectomy in patients with primary breast cancer, little is known about the outcomes of these surgical options in recurrent breast cancer. We investigated differences in overall survival and re-recurrence rates as well as psychosocial outcomes among patients who underwent BCT or mastectomy after the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer in a single-center setting. 124 of 186 eligible patients who underwent surgical treatment for breast cancer recurrence completed the questionnaires on quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 and -BR23), fear of progression (PA-F-KF), anxiety and depression (HADS), and body image (BIS). Women after breast-conserving surgery (n = 46) showed significantly better outcomes than women after mastectomy (n = 61) with respect to body image (P < 0.001 in BIS and p < 0.001 in BR23), social functioning (p = 0.016), emotional functioning (p = 0.028), and role functioning (p = 0.043). There were no significant group differences regarding anxiety, depression, and fear of progression as well as re-recurrence and survival rates. Predictors of good quality of life were partnership (OR 2.46), higher monthly family income (OR 3.54), and higher professional qualification (OR 4.3) in our group of patients. Our results indicate that patients treated with breast-conserving therapy after recurrent breast cancer perceive lower impairments in body image and several aspects of quality of life than patients treated with mastectomy.

  18. Whose Disease Will Recur After Mastectomy for Early Stage, Node-Negative Breast Cancer? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kent, Collin; Horton, Janet; Blitzblau, Rachel; Koontz, Bridget F

    2015-12-01

    Effective local control is associated with improved overall survival, particularly for women with early-stage cancers. No other local therapy is typically offered to women with T1-2 N0 breast cancer after mastectomy, although in select women the 5-year local recurrence rate can be as high as 20%. Therefore, accurately predicting the women who are at highest risk for recurrence after mastectomy will identify those who might benefit from more aggressive adjuvant treatment. A systematic search was conducted identifying risk factors associated with locoregional recurrence, including age, menopausal status, receptor status, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), margin status, use of systemic therapy, size, grade, and genomic classifer score. Although associations varied among studies, the risk factors most consistently identified were age ≤ 40 years, LVI, positive/close margin, and larger tumor size. In women with multiple high risk factors, risk of local recurrence was as high as 20% at 10 years. Additional multicenter studies are needed to investigate risk factors for locoregional recurrence after mastectomy without radiotherapy in T1-2N0 breast cancer. Consideration of additional adjuvant local therapy might be warranted in a subset of women at high risk of local recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  20. Patient Reactions to Surgeon Recommendations About Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy for Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Janz, Nancy K; Abrahamse, Paul; Wallner, Lauren P; Hawley, Sarah T; An, Lawrence C; Ward, Kevin C; Hamilton, Ann S; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma

    2017-07-01

    Guidelines assert that contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) should be discouraged in patients without an elevated risk for a second primary breast cancer. However, little is known about the impact of surgeons discouraging CPM on patient care satisfaction or decisions to seek treatment from another clinician. To examine the association between patient report of first-surgeon recommendation against CPM and the extent of discussion about it with 3 outcomes: patient satisfaction with surgery decisions, receipt of a second opinion, and receipt of surgery by a second surgeon. This population-based survey study was conducted in Georgia and California. We identified 3880 women with stages 0 to II breast cancer treated in 2013-2014 through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County. Surveys were sent approximately 2 months after surgery (71% response rate, n = 2578). In this analysis conducted from February to May 2016, we included patients with unilateral breast cancer who considered CPM (n = 1140). Patients were selected between July 2013 and September 2014. We examined report of surgeon recommendations, level of discussion about CPM, satisfaction with surgical decision making, receipt of second surgical opinion, and surgery from a second surgeon. The mean (SD) age of patients included in this study was 56 (10.6) years. About one-quarter of patients (26.7%; n = 304) reported that their first surgeon recommended against CPM and 30.1% (n = 343) reported no substantial discussion about CPM. Dissatisfaction with surgery decision was uncommon (7.6%; n = 130), controlling for clinical and demographic characteristics. One-fifth of patients (20.6%; n = 304) had a second opinion about surgical options and 9.8% (n = 158) had surgery performed by a second surgeon. Dissatisfaction was very low (3.9%; n = 42) among patients who reported that their surgeon did not recommend against CPM but

  1. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reconstruct the breast? In autologous tissue reconstruction, a piece of tissue containing skin, fat, blood vessels, and ... body and used to rebuild the breast. This piece of tissue is called a flap. Different sites ...

  2. Body image issues after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction in healthy women at risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gopie, Jessica P; Mureau, Marc A M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B E; Timman, Reinier; Tibben, Aad

    2013-09-01

    The outcome of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction (BPM-IBR) in healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers can be potentially burdensome for body image and the intimate relationship. Therefore, in the current analysis the impact on body image, sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was prospectively investigated in women opting for BPM-IBR as well as cancer distress and general quality of life. Healthy women undergoing BPM-IBR completed questionnaires preoperatively (T0, n = 48), at 6 months (T1, n = 44) and after finishing breast reconstruction (median 21 months, range 12-35) (T2, n = 36). With multi-level regression analyses the course of outcome variables was investigated and a statistically significant change in body image and/or sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was predicted by baseline covariates. Body image significantly decreased at T1. At T2 sexual relationship satisfaction and body image tended to be lower compared to baseline. The overall partner relationship satisfaction did not significantly change. At T2, 37 % of the women reported that their breasts felt unpleasantly, 29 % was not satisfied with their breast appearance and 21 % felt embarrassed for their naked body. Most body image issues remained unchanged in 30 % of the women. A negative body image was predicted by high preoperative cancer distress. BPM-IBR was associated with adverse impact on body image in a substantial subgroup, but satisfaction with the overall sexual and partner relationship did not significantly change in time. The psychosocial impact of BPM-IBR in unaffected women should not be underestimated. Psychological support should ideally be integrated both before and after BPM-IBR.

  3. Psychosexual and body image aspects of quality of life in Turkish breast cancer patients: a comparison of breast conserving treatment and mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Alicikus, Zumre Arican; Gorken, Ilknur Bilkay; Sen, Rachel Cooper; Kentli, Suleyman; Kinay, Munir; Alanyali, Hilmi; Harmancioglu, Omer

    2009-01-01

    Assessing psychosexual and body image aspects of quality of life in Turkish breast cancer patients treated by either mastectomy or breast conserving treatment (BCT). The study group consisted of 112 patients who had undergone all treatment at a single institution under the care of a multidisciplinary breast team. Following surgery, all patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and hormone therapy. At the time of this study all patients were disease free with at least 2 years' follow-up. Twenty percent of the patients were premenopausal and 80% postmenopausal. The patients completed a questionnaire consisting of 42 questions related to their sexual relations and body image. Forty-one percent of sexually active patients had experienced a deterioration of sexual functioning after treatment. This was mainly due to loss of libido (80%), loss of interest in partner (54%), and sexual dissatisfaction (59%). Problems tended to develop early in the course of treatment. Decreased sexual desire was significantly more frequent in patients undergoing mastectomy versus BCT (80% vs 61%; P = 0.043) and in premenopausal versus postmenopausal patients (P = 0.024). Although 80% of patients were satisfied with their appearance as a whole, only 54% liked their naked bodies. There was no significant difference in body image scores between patients undergoing mastectomy or BCT apart from a general feeling of physical unattractiveness in mastectomy patients (3.4 vs 2.8; P = 0.03). Significant, similar psychosexual and body image problems occur in patients treated for breast cancer with either mastectomy or BCT. Problems arise early in the course of the disease and therefore detection and treatment of these problems should be addressed during the patients' initial assessment and at the start of treatment. These findings are similar to those reported on similar groups of treated women in American and European populations.

  4. Comparison of Reconstructive Outcomes in Breast Cancer Patients With Preexisting Subpectoral Implants: Implant-Sparing Mastectomy With Delayed Implant Exchange Versus Immediate Tissue Expander Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Parabkaharan, Sangeetha; Melody, Megan; Trotta, Rose; Lleshi, Amina; Sun, Weihong; Smith, Paul D; Khakpour, Nazanin; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Women who have undergone prior augmentation mammoplasty represent a unique subset of breast cancer patients with several options available for breast reconstruction. We performed a single institution review of surgical outcomes of breast reconstruction performed in patients with breast cancer with prior history of subpectoral breast augmentation. Institutional review board-approved retrospective review was conducted among patients with previously mentioned criteria treated at our institution between 2000 and 2014. Reconstructions were grouped into 2 categories as follows: (1) removal of preexisting subpectoral implant during mastectomy with immediate tissue expander placement and (2) implant-sparing mastectomy followed by delayed exchange to a larger implant. We reviewed demographics, tumor features, and reconstruction outcomes of these groups. Fifty-three patients had preexisting subpectoral implants. Of the 63 breast reconstructions performed, 18 (28.6%) had immediate tissue expander placed and 45 (71.4%) had implant-sparing mastectomy followed by delayed implant exchange. The groups were comparable based on age, body mass index, cancer type, tumor grade, TNM stage at presentation, and hormonal receptor status. No significant difference was noted between tumor margins or subsequent recurrence, mastectomy specimen weight, removed implant volume, volume of implant placed during reconstruction, or time from mastectomy to final implant placement. Rates of complications were significantly higher in the tissue expander group compared to the implant-sparing mastectomy group 7 (38.9%) versus 4 (8.9%) (P = 0.005). Implant-sparing mastectomy with delayed implant exchange in patients with preexisting subpectoral implants is safe and has fewer complications compared to tissue expander placement. There was no difference noted in the final volume of implant placed, time interval for final implant placement, or tumor margins.

  5. Effects of music therapy on anxiety of patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhou, Kai-Na; Yan, Hong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2012-05-01

      This paper is a report of a clinical trial of the effects of music therapy on anxiety of female breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy.   There is insufficient evidence on the effects of music therapy on state anxiety of breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy.   A Hall's Core, Care, and Cure Model-based clinical trial was conducted in 120 female breast cancer patients from March to November 2009. A randomized controlled design was utilized. The patients were randomly allocated to the experimental group (n = 60) received music therapy in addition to routine nursing care, and the control group (n = 60) only received routine nursing care. A standardized questionnaire and the State Anxiety Inventory were applied. The primary endpoint was the state anxiety score measured at pretest (on the day before radical mastectomy) and at three post-tests (on the day before patients were discharged from hospital, the second and third time of admission to hospital for chemotherapy respectively).   The pretest score revealed that the majority of the patients had a moderate level (77·5%) and 15% had severe level of state anxiety. The repeated-measure ancova model analysis indicated that the mean state anxiety score was significantly lower in the experimental group than those in the control group at each of the three post-test measurements. The mean difference between the experimental and control group together with 95% confidence intervals were -4·57 (-6·33, -2·82), -8·91 (-10·75, -7·08) and -9·69 (-11·52, -7·85) at the 1st post-test, 2nd post-test and 3rd post-test respectively.   Music therapy is found to have positive effects on decreasing state anxiety score. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The Relationship Between Geographic Access to Plastic Surgeons and Breast Reconstruction Rates Among Women Undergoing Mastectomy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauder, Andrew R; Gross, Cary P; Killelea, Brigid K; Butler, Paris D; Kovach, Stephen J; Fox, Justin P

    2017-03-01

    Despite a national health care policy requiring payers to cover breast reconstruction, rates of postmastectomy reconstruction are low, particularly among minority populations. We conducted this study to determine if geographic access to a plastic surgeon impacts breast reconstruction rates. Using 2010 inpatient and ambulatory surgery data from 10 states, we identified adult women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. Data were aggregated to the health service area (HSA) level and hierarchical generalized linear models were used to risk-standardize breast reconstruction rates (RSRR) across HSAs. The relationship between an HSA's RSRR and plastic surgeon density (surgeons/100,000 population) was quantified using correlation coefficients. The final cohort included 22,997 patients across 134 HSAs. There was substantial variation in plastic surgeon density (median, 1.4 surgeons/100,000; interquartile range, [0.0-2.6]/100,000) and the use of breast reconstruction (median RSRR, 43.0%; interquartile range, [29.9%-62.8%]) across HSAs. Higher plastic surgeon density was positively correlated with breast reconstruction rates (correlation coefficient = 0.66, P < 0.001) and inversely related to time between mastectomy and reconstruction (correlation coefficient = -0.19, P < 0.001). Non-white and publicly insured women were least likely to undergo breast reconstruction overall. Among privately insured patients, racial disparities were noted in high surgeon density areas (white = 79.0% vs. non-white = 63.3%; P < 0.001) but not in low surgeon density areas (34.4% vs 36.5%; P = 0.70). The lack of geographic access to a plastic surgeon serves as a barrier to breast reconstruction and may compound disparities in care associated with race and insurance status. Future efforts to improve equitable access should consider strategies to ensure access to appropriate clinical expertise.

  7. Case-mix fails to explain variation in mastectomy rates: management of screen-detected breast cancer in a UK region 1997–2003

    PubMed Central

    Caldon, L J M; Walters, S J; Reed, J A; Murphy, A; Worley, A; Reed, M W R

    2004-01-01

    Wide variation in the surgical management of breast cancer exists at hospital, regional, national and international level. To demonstrate whether variation in surgical practice observed at aggregate level between breast units persists following adjustment for case-mix, individual patient-level data from the Trent Breast Screening Programme Quality Assurance database (1997–2003) was analysed. Expected case-mix adjusted mastectomy rates were derived by logistic regression using the variables tumour size, site and grade, patient age and year of presentation, employing the region's overall case-mix adjusted practice as the reference population. The region's 11 breast screening units detected 5109 (3989 invasive) surgically managed primary breast cancers over the 6-year period. A total of 1828 mastectomies (Mx) were performed (Mx rate 35.8%, 95% confidence interval: 34.5–37.1%). Significant variation in mastectomy rates were observed between units (range 25–45%, P<0.0001), and persists following case-mix adjustment (P<0.0001). Two-fold variation in observed to expected unit mastectomy rate coefficient is demonstrated overall (range 0.66–1.36), increasing to almost four-fold variation in cancers less than 15 mm diameter (range 0.55–1.95). Significant variation in surgery for screen-detected primary breast cancer is not explained by case-mix. Further research is required to investigate potential patient and professional causative factors. PMID:15611797

  8. Prospective Study of Surgical Decision-making Processes for Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Patricia A.; Peterson, Susan K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Crosby, Melissa A.; Shen, Yu; Black, Dalliah M.; Babiera, Gildy; Kuerer, Henry M.; Ying, Jun; Dong, Wenli; Cantor, Scott B.; Brewster, Abenaa M.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective We prospectively examined the psychosocial predictors and the decision-making process regarding contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with sporadic breast cancer. Summary Background Data Increasing numbers of women with breast cancer are seeking CPM. Data are limited about the surgical decision-making process and the psychosocial factors that influence interest in CPM. Methods Women with early stage unilateral breast cancer (n=117) were recruited before their first surgical visit at MD Anderson and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge of and interest in CPM and associated psychosocial factors. After the appointment, women and their surgeons completed questions about the extent that various surgical options (including CPM) were discussed; also, the women rated their perceived likelihood of having CPM and the surgeons rated the appropriateness of CPM. Results Before their first visit, 50% of women were moderately to extremely interested in CPM and 12 (10%) of women had CPM at the time of their primary breast cancer surgery. Less knowledge about breast cancer (P=0.02) and greater cancer worry (P=0.03) predicted interest in CPM. Greater cancer worry predicted who had CPM (P=0.02). Interest in CPM before surgical visit and the likelihood of having CPM after the visit differed (P =<0.001). Surgeons’ rating of the appropriateness of CPM and the patient’s reported likelihood of having CPM were not significantly different (P=0.49). Conclusions Interest in CPM is common among women with sporadic breast cancer. The informational and emotional aspects of CPM may affect the decision to have CPM and should be addressed when discussing surgical options. PMID:25822675

  9. Prospective Study of Surgical Decision-making Processes for Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in Women With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, Patricia A; Peterson, Susan K; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Crosby, Melissa A; Shen, Yu; Black, Dalliah M; Babiera, Gildy; Kuerer, Henry M; Ying, Jun; Dong, Wenli; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively examined the psychosocial predictors and the decision-making process regarding contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with sporadic breast cancer. Increasing numbers of women with breast cancer are seeking CPM. Data are limited about the surgical decision-making process and the psychosocial factors that influence interest in CPM. Women with early-stage unilateral breast cancer (n = 117) were recruited before their first surgical visit at MD Anderson and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge of and interest in CPM and associated psychosocial factors. After the appointment, women and their surgeons completed questions about the extent that various surgical options (including CPM) were discussed; also, the women rated their perceived likelihood of having CPM and the surgeons rated the appropriateness of CPM. Before their first visit, 50% of women were moderately to extremely interested in CPM and 12 (10%) of women had CPM at the time of their primary breast cancer surgery. Less knowledge about breast cancer (P = 0.02) and greater cancer worry (P = 0.03) predicted interest in CPM. Greater cancer worry predicted who had CPM (P = 0.02). Interest in CPM before surgical visit and the likelihood of having CPM after the visit differed (P ≤ 0.001). Surgeons' rating of the appropriateness of CPM and the patient's reported likelihood of having CPM were not significantly different (P = 0.49). Interest in CPM is common among women with sporadic breast cancer. The informational and emotional aspects of CPM may affect the decision to have CPM and should be addressed when discussing surgical options.

  10. Locoregional outcomes in clinical stage IIB breast cancer after neoadjuvant therapy and mastectomy with or without radiation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Dayssy A; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha; Takita, Cristiane; Zhao, Wei; Wright, Jean

    2014-12-01

    Low rates of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with clinical stage IIB breast cancer (cT2N1 or cT3N0) who undergo neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) and mastectomy have been reported. We aimed to quantify the risk of LRR and the relationship between LRR and potential risk factors in this subset of patients. We conducted a retrospective review of 116 patients with clinical IIB breast cancer who underwent NAT followed by mastectomy +/- postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) between 2000 and 2009. We estimated the rate of LRR by cumulative incidence. The effect of prognostic factors was examined by Gray's test and Fine and Gray's test. Median follow-up: 63 months. Median age: 49. 28.4% cT2N1 and 71.6% cT3N0. 62.1% of tumors were ER+, 22.6% HER2+, 19% triple negative (TN). All patients underwent NAT and mastectomy. The majority of patients (87%) received PMRT; 32.3% were treated to chest wall (CW) only, and 67.7% to CW plus supraclavicular (SCV) field. Compared to cT2N1, patients with cT3N0 disease were more likely to be pN0 (60% vs 27%, P = 0.005). There was no significant relationship between risk of LRR and pathologic complete response (pCR), use of PMRT, RT to SCV field, or TN status, but there was higher risk of LRR in cT2N1 than cT3N0 (HR 6.03, P = 0.015). LRR was more common in cT2N1 than in cT3N0 disease, emphasizing the negative prognostic implication of clinically node-positive presentation.

  11. Sexual functioning in women after mastectomy versus breast conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Aerts, L; Christiaens, M R; Enzlin, P; Neven, P; Amant, F

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) and/or its treatments may affect sexual functioning based on physiological and psychosocial mechanisms. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate sexual adjustment of BC patients during a follow-up period of one year after mastectomy (ME) or breast conserving therapy (BCT). In this prospective controlled study, women with BC and an age-matched control group of healthy women completed the Beck Depression Inventory Scale, World Health Organization 5 Well-being scale, Body Image Scale, EORTC QLQ questionnaire, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Short Sexual Functioning Scale and Specific Sexual Problems Questionnaire to assess various aspects of sexual and psychosocial functioning before surgery, six months and one year after surgical treatment. In total, 149 women with BC and 149 age-matched healthy controls completed the survey. Compared to the situation before surgery, significantly more BCT women reported problems with sexual arousal six months after surgery and significantly more women of the ME group reported problems with sexual desire, arousal and the ability to achieve an orgasm six months and one year after surgery. While in comparison with healthy controls, no significant differences in sexual functioning were found after BCT surgery, significantly more women who underwent ME reported problems with sexual desire, arousal, the ability to achieve an orgasm and intensity of the orgasm. Although little differences were seen in sexual functioning in the BCT group during prospective analyses and in comparison with healthy controls, analyses revealed that women who underwent a ME were at risk for post-operative sexual dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Socioeconomic Factors Associated with Post-Mastectomy Immediate Reconstruction in a Contemporary Cohort of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Jessica R; Taylor, Lauren J; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Poore, Samuel; Eggen, Amanda; Steiman, Jennifer; Wilke, Lee G; Greenberg, Caprice C; Neuman, Heather B

    2017-10-01

    Post-mastectomy reconstruction is a critical component of high-quality breast cancer care. Prior studies demonstrate socioeconomic disparity in receipt of reconstruction. Our objective was to evaluate trends in receipt of immediate reconstruction and examine socioeconomic factors associated with reconstruction in a contemporary cohort. Using the National Cancer Database, we identified women <75 years of age with stage 0-1 breast cancer treated with mastectomy (n = 297,121). Trends in immediate reconstruction rates (2004-2013) for the overall cohort and stratified by socioeconomic factors were examined using Join-point regression analysis, and annual percentage change (APC) was calculated. We then restricted our sample to a contemporary cohort (2010-2013, n = 145,577). Multivariable logistic regression identified socioeconomic factors associated with immediate reconstruction. Average adjusted predicted probabilities of receiving reconstruction were calculated. Immediate reconstruction rates increased from 27 to 48%. Although absolute rates of reconstruction for each stratification group increased, similar APCs across strata led to persistent gaps in receipt of reconstruction. On multivariable logistic regression using our contemporary cohort, race, income, education, and insurance type were all strongly associated with immediate reconstruction. Patients with the lowest predicted probability of receiving reconstruction were patients with Medicaid who lived in areas with the lowest rates of high-school graduation (Black 42.4% [95% CI 40.5-44.3], White 45.7% [95% CI 43.9-47.4]). Although reconstruction rates have increased dramatically over the past decade, lower rates persist for disadvantaged patients. Understanding how socioeconomic factors influence receipt of reconstruction, and identifying modifiable factors, are critical next steps towards identifying interventions to reduce disparities in breast cancer surgical care.

  13. Sexual and gender minority breast cancer patients choosing bilateral mastectomy without reconstruction: "I now have a body that fits me".

    PubMed

    Brown, Maria Teresa; McElroy, Jane A

    2018-04-01

    Sexual and gender minority (SGM) breast cancer patients have begun embracing the choice to "go flat" or opt out of reconstruction after bilateral mastectomy, though little is known about this population. SGM breast cancer survivors were identified through purposive and referral sampling and invited to participate in a web-based survey containing both closed- and open-ended items. Of the sixty-eight SGM breast cancer survivors aged 18-75 years who completed the survey between May 2015 and January 2016, 25 percent reported "going flat" (flattoppers®). Bivariate analyses revealed that flattoppers® were significantly more likely to have been diagnosed in the past five years, to identify as genderqueer, to have disclosed their sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI) to providers, and to report participating in lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender cancer support groups, compared to other participants. More flattoppers® believed that SOGI mattered in terms of getting the support they needed regarding their cancer; this difference was not statistically significant. Thematic analysis of qualitative comments from flattoppers® revealed themes related to reasons for making this treatment choice, interactions with health-care providers around treatment choice, and physical and emotional outcomes of treatment choice. Providers would benefit from training about SOGI as they relate to treatment choices.

  14. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L.; Oswald, Mary Jane

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite moremore » advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.« less

  15. What made her give up her breasts: a qualitative study on decisional considerations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy among breast cancer survivors undergoing BRCA1/2 genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie T W

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study retrospectively examined the experience and psychological impact of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among Southern Chinese females with unilateral breast cancer history who underwent BRCA1/2 genetic testing. Limited knowledge is available on this topic especially among Asians; therefore, the aim of this study was to acquire insight from Chinese females' subjective perspectives. A total of 12 semi-structured in-depth interviews, with 11 female BRCA1/BRCA 2 mutated gene carriers and 1 non-carrier with a history of one-sided breast cancer and genetic testing performed by the Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry, who subsequently underwent CPM, were assessed using thematic analysis and a Stage Conceptual Model. Breast cancer history, procedures conducted, cosmetic satisfaction, pain, body image and sexuality issues, and cancer risk perception were discussed. Retrieval of medical records using a prospective database was also performed. All participants opted for prophylaxis due to their reservations concerning the efficacy of surveillance and worries of recurrent breast cancer risk. Most participants were satisfied with the overall results and their decision. One-fourth expressed different extents of regrets. Psychological relief and decreased breast cancer risk were stated as major benefits. Spouses' reactions and support were crucial for post-surgery sexual satisfaction and long-term adjustment. Our findings indicate that thorough education on cancer risk and realistic expectations of surgery outcomes are crucial for positive adjustment after CPM. Appropriate genetic counseling and pre-and post-surgery psychological counseling were necessary. This study adds valuable contextual insights into the experiences of living with breast cancer fear and the importance of involving spouses when counseling these patients.

  16. SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Heins, D; Zhang, R; Hogstrom, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if bolus electron conformal therapy (Bolus-ECT) combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy (FFF-VMAT (6x and 10x)) can maintain equal or better dose coverage than standard volumetric modulated arc therapy (Std-VMAT) while reducing doses to organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Bolus-ECT with IMXT, FFF-VMAT, and Std-VMAT treatment plans were produced for ten post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patients previously treated at our clinic. The treatment plans were created on commercially available treatment planning system (TPS) and all completed treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a radiation oncologist. The plans weremore » evaluated based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, tumor control probability (TCP), dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (CI), and dose to organs at risk (OAR). Results: All techniques produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. Overall, Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited higher maximum dose compared to all VMAT techniques. Bolus-ECT with IMXT and FFF-VMAT10x had slightly improved TCP over FFF-VMAT6x and Std-VMAT. However, all VMAT techniques showed improved CI and DHI over Bolus-ECT with IMXT. All techniques showed very similar mean lung dose. Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited a reduced mean heart dose over Std-VMAT. Both FFF-VMAT techniques had higher mean heart dose compared to Std-VMAT. In addition, Bolus-ECT with IMXT was able to reduce mean dose to the contralateral breast compared to Std-VMAT and both FFF-VMAT techniques had comparable but slightly reduced dose compared to Std-VMAT. Conclusion: This work has shown that Bolus-ECT with IMXT produces clinically acceptable plans while reducing OAR doses. Both FFF-VMAT techniques are comparable to Std-VMAT with slight improvements. Even though all VMAT techniques produce more homogenous and conformal dose distributions, Bolus-ECT with IMXT is a viable option for treating post-mastectomy

  17. Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Decisions in a Population-Based Sample of Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Hawley, Sarah T; Griffith, Kent A; Janz, Nancy K; Kurian, Allison W; Ward, Kevin C; Hamilton, Ann S; Morrow, Monica; Katz, Steven J

    2017-03-01

    Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) use is increasing among women with unilateral breast cancer, but little is known about treatment decision making or physician interactions in diverse patient populations. To evaluate patient motivations, knowledge, and decisions, as well as the impact of surgeon recommendations, in a large, diverse sample of patients who underwent recent treatment for breast cancer. A survey was sent to 3631 women with newly diagnosed, unilateral stage 0, I, or II breast cancer between July 2013 and September 2014. Women were identified through the population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registries of Los Angeles County and Georgia. Data on surgical decisions, motivations for those decisions, and knowledge were included in the analysis. Logistic and multinomial logistic regression of the data were conducted to identify factors associated with (1) CPM vs all other treatments combined, (2) CPM vs unilateral mastectomy (UM), and (3) CPM vs breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Associations between CPM receipt and surgeon recommendations were also evaluated. All statistical models and summary estimates were weighted to be representative of the target population. Receipt of CPM was the primary dependent variable for analysis and was measured by a woman's self-report of her treatment. Of the 3631 women selected to receive the survey, 2578 (71.0%) responded and 2402 of these respondents who did not have bilateral disease and for whom surgery type was known constituted the final analytic sample. The mean (SD) age was 61.8 (12) years at the time of the survey. Overall, 1301 (43.9%) patients considered CPM (601 [24.8%] considered it very strongly or strongly); only 395 (38.1%) of them knew that CPM does not improve survival for all women with breast cancer. Ultimately, 1466 women (61.6%) received BCS, 508 (21.2%) underwent UM, and 428 (17.3%) received CPM. On multivariable analysis, factors associated with CPM included younger age

  18. Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Decisions in a Population-Based Sample of Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Hawley, Sarah T.; Griffith, Kent A.; Janz, Nancy K.; Kurian, Allison W.; Ward, Kevin C.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Morrow, Monica; Katz, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) use is increasing among women with unilateral breast cancer, but little is known about treatment decision making or physician interactions in diverse patient populations. Objective To evaluate patient motivations, knowledge, and decisions, as well as the impact of surgeon recommendations, in a large, diverse sample of patients who underwent recent treatment for breast cancer. Design/Setting/Participants A survey was sent to 3631 women with newly diagnosed, unilateral stage 0, I, or II breast cancer between July 2013 and September 2014. Women were identified through the population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registries of Los Angeles County and Georgia. Data on surgical decisions, motivations for those decisions, and knowledge were included in the analysis. Logistic and multinomial logistic regression of the data were conducted to identify factors associated with (1) CPM vs all other treatments combined, 2) CPM vs unilateral mastectomy (UM), and (3) CPM vs breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Associations between CPM receipt and surgeon recommendations were also evaluated. All statistical models and summary estimates were weighted to be representative of the target population. Main Outcome and Measures Receipt of CPM was the primary dependent variable for analysis and was measured by a woman’s self-report of her treatment. Results Of the 3631 women selected to receive the survey, 2578 (71.0%) responded and 2402 of these respondents who did not have bilateral disease and for whom surgery type was known constituted the final analytic sample. The mean (SD) age was 61.8 (12) years at the time of the survey. Overall, 1301 (43.9%) patients considered CPM (601[24.8%] considered it very strongly or strongly; only 395 (38.1%) of them knew that CPM does not improve survival for all women with breast cancer. Ultimately, 1466 women (61.6%) received BCS, 508 (21.2%) underwent UM, and 428 (17.3%) received

  19. The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Abshorshori, Narjes; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Hazrati, Maryam; Zare, Najaf; Masoumi, Sarah

    2010-07-23

    Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis were followed one year after modified radical mastectomy. To measure the quality of life an instrument designed by the European organization for research and treatment of cancer, known as the Quality of Life Question (QLQ-30) and its breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time (before, immediately and two months after intervention) for both groups were used. The participant selection was a convenient sampling method and women were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group was randomly assigned to five groups and peer educators conducted weekly educational programs for one month. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi square, t test, and repeated measurement multivariate to compare the quality of life differences over time. For the experimental group, the results showed statistically significant improvement in all performance aspects of life quality and symptom reduction (P < 0.001), while the control group had no significant differences in all aspects of life quality. The findings of this study suggest that peer led education is a useful intervention for post-mastectomy women to improve their quality of life.

  20. Quality of Patient Decisions About Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Clara Nan-Hi; Deal, Allison M; Huh, Ruth; Ubel, Peter Anthony; Liu, Yuen-Jong; Blizard, Lillian; Hunt, Caprice; Pignone, Michael Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Breast reconstruction has the potential to improve a person's body image and quality of life but has important risks. Variations in who undergoes breast reconstruction have led to questions about the quality of patient decisions. To assess the quality of patient decisions about breast reconstruction. A prospective, cross-sectional survey study was conducted from June 27, 2012, to February 28, 2014, at a single, academic, multidisciplinary oncology clinic among women planning to undergo mastectomy for stage I to III invasive ductal or lobular breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, or prophylaxis. Mastectomy only and mastectomy with reconstruction. Knowledge, as ascertained using the Decision Quality Instrument; preference concordance, based on rating and ranking of key attributes; and decision quality, defined as having knowledge of 50% or more and preference concordance. During the 20-month period, 214 patients were eligible, 182 were approached, and 32 missed. We enrolled 145 patients (79.7% enrollment rate), and received surveys from 131 patients (72.0% participation rate). Five participants became ineligible. The final study population was 126 patients. Among the 126 women in the study (mean [SD] age, 53.2 [12.1] years), the mean (SD) knowledge score was 58.5% (16.2%) and did not differ by treatment group (mastectomy only, 55.2% [15.0%]; mastectomy with reconstruction, 60.5% [16.5%]). A total of 82 of 123 participants (66.7%) had a calculated treatment preference of mastectomy only; 39 of these women (47.6%) underwent mastectomy only. A total of 41 participants (32.5%) had a calculated treatment preference of mastectomy with reconstruction; 36 of these women (87.8%) underwent mastectomy with reconstruction. Overall, 52 of 120 participants (43.3%) made a high-quality decision. In multivariable analysis, white race/ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.72; 95% CI, 1.00-7.38; P = .05), having private insurance (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.35-1.93; P < .001), having a

  1. Surgeon influence on receipt of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy: Does it matter who you see for breast cancer surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Steven J.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Ward, Kevin C.; Morrow, Monica; Jagsi, Reshma; Hofer, Timothy P.

    2018-01-01

    Importance Rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) have markedly increased but we know little about the influence of surgeons on variability of the procedure in the community. Objective To quantify the influence of attending surgeon on rates of CPM and clinician attitudes that explained it. Design and Setting Population-based survey study in Georgia and Los Angeles County. Participants We identified 7810 women with stages 0-II breast cancer treated in 2013–15 through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries of Georgia and Los Angeles County. Surveys were sent approximately 2 months after surgery, (70% response rate, n=5080). Surveys were also sent to 488 attending surgeons identified by the patients, of whom 377 responded (77% response rate). Main Outcomes and Measures We conducted multilevel analyses to examine the impact of surgeon influence on variations in patient receipt of CPM using information from patient and surgeon surveys merged to SEER data. Results The patient mean age was 62; 30% had an increased risk of 2nd primary cancer, and 16% received CPM. Half of surgeons (52%) practiced for >20 years and 30% treated >50 new breast cancer patients annually. Attending surgeon explained a large amount (20%) of the variation in CPM controlling for patient factors. The odds of a patient receiving CPM increased almost 3-fold (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1,3.4) if she saw a surgeon with a practice approach one standard deviation above a surgeon with the average CPM rate (independent of age, diagnosis date, BRCA status and risk of 2nd primary). One quarter (25%) of the surgeon influence was explained by attending attitudes about initial recommendations for surgery and responses to patient requests for CPM. The estimated rate of CPM was 34% for surgeons who least favored initial breast conservation and were least reluctant to perform CPM vs 4% for surgeons who most favored initial breast conservation and were most reluctant to perform CPM

  2. Ultrasonic dissection versus electrocautery in mastectomy for breast cancer - a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Currie, A; Chong, K; Davies, G L; Cummins, R S

    2012-10-01

    Electrocautery has advanced the practice of mastectomy but significant morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss, remains a concern. This has led to newer forms of dissection being introduced including the ultrasonic dissection devices, which are thought to reduce tissue damage. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the outcomes after mastectomy using novel ultrasonic dissection or standard electrocautery in published trials. Medline, Embase, trial registries, conference proceedings and reference lists were searched for comparative trials of ultrasonic dissection versus electrocautery for mastectomy. The primary outcomes were total postoperative drainage, seroma development and intra-operative blood loss. Secondary outcomes were operative time and wound complications. Odds ratios were calculated for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences for continuous outcomes. Six trials were included in the analysis of 287 mastectomies. There was no effect in total postoperative drainage (pooled analysis weight mean difference: -0.21 (95% CI: -0.70-0.29); p = 0.41) or seroma development (pooled analysis odds ratio: 0.77 (95% CIs 0.43-1.37); p = 0.37). Intra-operative blood was slightly less for ultrasonic dissection compared to standard electrocautery (pooled analysis weight mean difference: -1.04 (95% CI: -2.00 to -0.08); p = 0.03). Ultrasonic dissection and standard electrocautery had similar outcomes with regard to operative time and wound complications. Ultrasonic dissection and standard electrocautery appear to deliver similar results in the mastectomy setting. Further cost-effectiveness analysis may guide surgeon selection in the use of new technologies for mastectomy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast reconstruction following mastectomy: current status in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sandelin, Kerstin; King, Elizabeth; Redman, Sally

    2003-09-01

    Although breast reconstruction provides some advantages for women following mastectomy, few Australian breast cancer patients currently receive reconstruction. In Australia, the routine provision of breast reconstruction will require the development of specific health service delivery models. The present paper reports an analysis of the provision of breast reconstruction in eight sites in Australia. A semi-structured telephone interview was conducted with 10 surgeons offering breast reconstruction as part of their practice, including nine breast or general surgeons and one plastic surgeon. Surgeons reported offering breast reconstruction to all women facing mastectomy; the proportion of women deciding to have breast reconstruction varied between sites with up to 50% of women having a reconstruction at some sites. Most sites offered three types of reconstruction. Two pathways emerged: either the breast surgeon performed the breast surgery in a team with the plastic surgeon who undertook the breast reconstruction or the breast surgeon provided both the breast surgery and the reconstruction. Considerable waiting times for breast reconstruction were reported in the public sector particularly for delayed reconstruction. Surgeons reported receiving training in breast reconstruction from plastic surgeons or from a breast surgery team that performed reconstructions; a number had been trained overseas. No audits of breast reconstruction were being undertaken. Breast reconstruction can be offered on a routine basis in Australia in both the private and public sectors. Women may be more readily able to access breast reconstruction when it is provided by a breast surgeon alone, but the range of reconstruction options may be more limited. If access to breast reconstruction is to be increased, there will be a need to: (i) develop effective models for the rural sector taking account of the lack of plastic surgeons; (ii) address waiting times for reconstruction surgery in the

  4. Bone metastases from breast cancer at the time or radical mastectomy as detected by bone scan. Eight-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sklaroff, R B; Sklaroff, D M

    1976-07-01

    Sixty-four women with Stage II breast cancer who had Sr85 bone scans at the time of radical mastectomy were followed for 8 years in a prospective study. Those women with positive scans had a slight, but statistically significant, increased incidence of metastic disease, particularly for metastases to bone.However, 40% of those women with positive bone scans and negative roentgenograms survived 8 years without evidence of any metastatic disease. Therefore, it has not been shown at this time that bone scans should be obtained in order to exclude bone metastasis before regional therapy for breast cancer is instituted. Also, a significant percentage of women with negative bone scans developed both bone and soft tissue metastases. As many as 30% of asymptomatic women with a history of breast cancer and positive bone scans and negative bone roentgenograms may still harbor disease in bone after 8 years.

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao, E-mail: mashenglin@medmail.com.cn; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor controlmore » probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.« less

  6. Extent of regional lymph node surgery and impact on outcomes in patients with early-stage breast cancer and limited axillary disease undergoing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Picado, Omar; Khazeni, Kristina; Allen, Casey; Yakoub, Danny; Avisar, Eli; Kesmodel, Susan B

    2018-06-05

    Management of the axilla in patients with early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) has evolved. Recent trials support less extensive axillary surgery in patients undergoing mastectomy. We examine factors affecting regional lymph node (RLN) surgery and outcomes in patients with ESBC undergoing mastectomy. Women with clinical T1/2 N0 M0 invasive BC who underwent mastectomy with 1-2 positive nodes were selected from the National Cancer Database (2004-2015). Axillary surgery was defined by number of RLNs examined: 1-5 sentinel LN dissection (SLND), and ≥ 10 axillary LND (ALND). Binary logistic regression and survival analyses were performed to assess the association between axillary surgery and clinical characteristics, and overall survival (OS), respectively. 34,243 patients were included: 13,821 SLND (40%) and 20,422 ALND (60%). SLND significantly increased from 21% (2004) to 45% (2015) (p < .001). Independent factors associated with SLND were treatment year, non-Academic centers, geographic region, tumor histology, and postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Multivariable survival analysis showed that ALND was associated with better OS (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.72-0.83, p < .001) relative to SLND; however, there was no difference in patients with LN micrometastases treated without RT (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.73-1.05, p = .153) or patients receiving PMRT (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.76-1.13, p = .433). SLND has significantly increased in patients undergoing mastectomy with limited axillary disease and is influenced by patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Survival outcomes did not differ by axillary treatment for patients with LN micrometastases treated without RT or patients who received PMRT. SLND may be considered in select patients with ESBC and limited axillary disease undergoing mastectomy.

  7. How Well Informed Do Patients Feel about Their Breast Cancer Surgery Options? Findings from a Nationwide Survey of Women after Lumpectomy and/or Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sunny; Gass, Jennifer; Hanna, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer often describe the process of treatment decision making as bewildering and worrisome. Patients who do not feel completely informed about their surgical options might make choices that are suboptimal or regretted later. The Institute of Medicine has called for more research on why breast cancer patients are inadequately informed about treatment options. The aims of the study were to explore how women become informed about their breast cancer surgery treatment options and to identify improvement opportunities. A nationwide internet survey was conducted among women who reported being surgically treated by lumpectomy only (n = 215), mastectomy only (n = 140), or by both procedures (n = 132) for breast cancer. To improve generalizability, Census-based enrollment quotas were applied for geographic region, health insurance, and income. Only 47% (95% CI 41% to 54%) of lumpectomy-only patients, 67% (95% CI 59% to 75%) of mastectomy-only patients, and 28% (95% CI 21% to 35%) of patients having both procedures said they felt "completely informed" about treatment options before their operations. "Making a quick decision" was more important than "thoroughly researching all options" for 35% of lumpectomy-only patients, 31% of mastectomy-only patients, and 22% of patients having both procedures. Nearly all women used some other source of information to research treatment options. Lumpectomy-only and mastectomy-only patients who relied on their surgeon's recommendation without additional research were significantly less likely to report feeling "completely informed" (odds ratio 0.6; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.9; p < 0.02). Many women who had surgery for breast cancer did not feel completely informed about their surgical options. This appears to be due, in part, to a false sense of urgency and perhaps insufficient or misdirected information gathering by patients. The responsibility for fully informing patients about their treatment options must be better

  8. Influence of an Adapted Physical Activity Program on Self-Esteem and Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Landry, Sébastien; Chasles, Guillaume; Pointreau, Yoann; Bourgeois, Hugues; Boyas, Sébastien

    2018-05-30

    This study aimed to assess the influence of an adapted physical activity program on self-esteem and quality of life in breast cancer patients. Twenty-three women diagnosed with breast cancer and treated by mastectomy formed 2 groups. The experimental group practiced adapted physical activity for 12 weeks, while the control group did not. All participants answered questionnaires regarding their self-esteem and quality of life at the beginning of the program and 6 and 12 weeks after that. Self-esteem, physical self-perception, quality of life, global health status, pain, and breast symptoms were improved only in the group which practiced adapted physical activity. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The musculoskeletal consequences of breast reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi muscle for women following mastectomy for breast cancer: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, N E; Mc Veigh, J G; Mc Caughan, E; Wilson, I M

    2018-03-01

    Breast reconstruction using the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap following mastectomy is an important management option in breast cancer. However, one common, but often ignored, complication following LD flap is shoulder dysfunction. The aim of this critical review was to comprehensively assess the musculoskeletal impact of LD breast reconstruction and evaluate the functional outcome following surgery. Five electronic databases were searched including; Medline, Embase, CINAHL Plus (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health), PubMed and Web of Science. Databases were searched from 2006 to 2016, and only full text, English language articles were included. Twenty-two observational studies and two surveys were reviewed with sample sizes ranging from six to 206 participants. The majority of studies had small sample sizes and were retrospective in nature. Nevertheless, there is evidence to suggest that there is some degree of weakness and reduced mobility at the shoulder following LD muscle transfer. The literature demonstrates that there is considerable morbidity in the immediate post-operative period with functional recovery varying between studies. The majority of work tends to be limited and often gives conflicting results; therefore, further investigation is required in order to determine underlying factors that contribute to a reduction in function and activities of daily living. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone: a new therapeutic option for treatment of sequelae after radical mastectomy in women with breast cancer. Preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Eng, Rafael; Montiel-Jarquín, Alvaro; de la Rosa-Pérez, Raúl; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Zamudio-Huerta, Leticia

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 30% of women who undergo mastectomy without reconstructive treatment due to breast cancer present sequelae. These include paresthesias, keloid healing, hypoesthesia, lymphedema and limitation of the function of the ipsilateral upper extremity. We undertook this study to present the results using collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone (Clg- Pvp) as treatment for posmastectomy sequelae in women with breast cancer. We conducted a unicentric, longitudinal and prospective clinical trial between August 1, 2007 and July 31, 2008. Included variables were age, lymphedema, limitation of the function of the ipsilateral upper extremity, collapse of the wound, keloid healing, paresthesias, and appearance of the surgical area. The appearance of the surgical area (aesthetic aspect) was evaluated before and 6 months after treatment was initiated. Clg-Pvp was administered weekly for a 6-month period. Seven women were included with a median age of 49 years (range: 40-72 years). One patient (14.28%) presented lymphedema, two patients (28.57%) presented collapse of the wound, two patients (28.57%) had keloid healing, three patients (42.85%) experienced paresthesias, five patients (71.4%) reported pain, and five patients (71.4%) reported limitation of the function of the ipsilateral upper extremity. At the completion of the treatment, aesthetic improvement was statistically significant (p = 0.0020, Mann-Whitney U test). Clinical and aesthetic results are good after application of Clg-Pvp for treating sequelae in women with breast cancer who underwent mastectomy without reconstructive surgery.

  11. The pattern of prognostic and risk indicators among women with breast cancer undergoing modified radical mastectomy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwakigonja, Amos R; Rabiel, Happiness; Mbembati, Naboth A; Lema, Leonard E K

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest female malignancy globally and the second (after uterine cervix) in sub-Saharan Africa including Tanzania. Prognostic indicators reportedly influence post-mastectomy adjuvant therapy by predicting risks on survival and recurrence although in Tanzania this data is lacking. Here, we evaluate the pattern of prognostic and risk indicators among women with breast cancer undergoing modified-radical-mastectomy (MRM) at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) and Tumaini Hospital (TH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. This hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study included female patients undergoing MRM from April 2011 to January 2012. Clinical stage I-III patients were enrolled after being scheduled for mastectomy. Patients with evidence of distant metastasis (stage IV) were excluded. Mastectomy and axillary lymph nodes biopsies were submitted to the Histopathology laboratory for grade, type, nodal and margins status. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS. A total of 348 patients were admitted with breast cancer including 86 patients (with 16 from TH having similar demography and presentation) meeting inclusion criteria. Age-range at diagnosis was 28-79 years, mean 52.1 years. Most (89 %) attained menarche after 11 years. About 56 % were postmenopausal. The majority (78 %) were multiparous with positive family history in 14.1 and 37.6 % used hormonal contraceptives. About 27.1 % were social alcohol drinkers. The majority (61 %) had T4b disease, 75.6 % had positive axillary nodes including 42.7 % with 4-9 involved nodes (N2). The commonest (91.9 %) histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma. Lobular, medullary and mucinous carcinomas were rare. Most (83.7 %) of our patients presented with stage III and the rest stage II. Intermediate- and high-grade tumors accounted for 73.5 %. Following MRM, 25 % of our patients had positive surgical margins and similarly for the base. Most of our breast

  12. Risk of locoregional recurrence by receptor status in breast cancer patients receiving modern systemic therapy and post-mastectomy radiation.

    PubMed

    Panoff, J E; Hurley, J; Takita, C; Reis, I M; Zhao, W; Sujoy, V; Gomez, C R; Jorda, M; Koniaris, L; Wright, J L

    2011-08-01

    We assessed differences in locoregional outcome based on receptor status combinations in a cohort of stage II-III breast cancer patients treated with modern trimodality therapy. Medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients receiving post-mastectomy radiation (PMRT) between 1/1999 and 12/2009 were reviewed. Rate of local regional recurrence (LRR) was estimated by the method of cumulative incidence allowing for competing risks. The effect of prognostic factors was examined by Gray's test and by Fine and Gray's modeling approach. Median follow-up was 44.7 months. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 73.9% and overall survival (OS) was 84%. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2% (95% CI 4.2-8.7). Five-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 8.6 versus 4.4% for estrogen receptor (ER) negative versus ER positive (P = 0.017), 8.5 versus 3.4% for progesterone receptor (PR) negative versus PR positive (P = 0.011), and 1.7 versus 7.5% for HER2 positive (86% received trastuzamab) versus HER2 negative (P = 0.032). Five-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 11.8% for the triple negative subtype and 3.9% for other receptor combinations (P < 0.001). Among patients whose disease is ER positive, 5-year LRR rate was 7.8 versus 3.4% for PR negative versus PR positive (P = 0.130). The prognostic value of the triple negative and HER2 negative subtypes was maintained on multivariate analysis. In the era of HER-2 targeted therapy, tumors that are HER-2 over expressing and are treated with trastuzumab have a very low rate of LRR. ER negative, PR negative, and triple negative status are associated with increased risk of LRR.

  13. Patients opting for breast reconstruction following mastectomy: an analysis of uptake rates and benefit

    PubMed Central

    Howard-McNatt, Marissa M

    2013-01-01

    For women with breast cancer who undergo a mastectomy, breast reconstruction offers improved psychological and cosmetic outcomes. We analyzed the rates of breast reconstruction and potential benefits to these women. The review was based on a PubMed search using the terms “reconstruction,” “mastectomy,” “rates,” “benefits,” and “breast cancer.” Breast-reconstruction rates have continued to rise in recent years; however, there are definite barriers to widespread use of this procedure. These barriers include age, ethnicity, income, tumor characteristics, and the need for adjuvant radiation therapy. There are notable psychological advantages to women who receive breast reconstruction. These women also express an improved quality of life. Breast reconstruction is an acceptable technique for women undergoing mastectomy. It should be offered to all women in an immediate or delayed fashion, with guidance from their physician about the benefits and risks. PMID:24648753

  14. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%),more » IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.« less

  15. The impact of skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction in patients with Stage III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postmastectomy radiation.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-03-15

    The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com; Song Yongwen

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles:more » Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.« less

  17. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy rate and predictive factors among patients with breast cancer who underwent multigene panel testing for hereditary cancer.

    PubMed

    Elsayegh, Nisreen; Webster, Rachel D; Gutierrez Barrera, Angelica M; Lin, Heather; Kuerer, Henry M; Litton, Jennifer K; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Arun, Banu K

    2018-05-07

    Although multigene panel testing is increasingly common in patients with cancer, the relationship between its use among breast cancer patients with non-BRCA mutations or variants of uncertain significance (VUS) and disease management decisions has not been well described. This study evaluated the rate and predictive factors of CPM patients who underwent multigene panel testing. Three hundred and fourteen patients with breast cancer who underwent multigene panel testing between 2014 and 2017 were included in the analysis. Of the 314 patients, 70 elected CPM. Election of CPM by gene status was as follows: BRCA carriers (42.3%), non-BRCA carriers (30.1%), and VUS (10.6%). CPM election rates did not differ between non-BRCA carriers and BRCA carriers (P = 0.6205). Among non-BRCA carriers, negative hormone receptor status was associated with CPM (P = 0.0115). For those with a VUS, hormone receptor status was not associated with CPM (P = 0.1879). Although the rate of CPM between BRCA carriers and non-BRCA carriers was not significantly different, the predictors of CPM were different in each group. Our analyses shed the light on the increasing use of CPM among patients who are non-BRCA carriers as well those with a VUS. Our study elucidates the differing predictive factors of CPM election among BRCA carriers, non-BRCA carries, and those with a VUS. Our findings reveal the need for providers to be cognizant that non-BRCA genes and VUS drive women to elect CPM despite the lack of data for contralateral breast cancer risk associated with these genes. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org; Freilich, Jessica; Lin, Hui-Yi

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equalmore » to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.« less

  19. Breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy in T1-2N2 stage breast cancer: a population-based study on 10-year overall, relative, and distant metastasis-free survival in 3071 patients.

    PubMed

    van Maaren, M C; de Munck, L; Jobsen, J J; Poortmans, P; de Bock, G H; Siesling, S; Strobbe, L J A

    2016-12-01

    Our previous study demonstrated breast-conserving surgery with radiation therapy (BCT) to be at least equivalent to mastectomy in T1-2N0-1 breast cancer. Yet, 10-year survival rates after BCT and mastectomy with radiation therapy (MAST) in T1-2N2 breast cancer specifically have not been examined. Our study aimed to determine 10-year overall (OS), relative (RS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in T1-2N2 breast cancer after BCT and MAST, stratified for T category. All women diagnosed with primary invasive T1-2N2 breast cancer in 2000-2004, treated with BCT or MAST, both with axillary dissection and RT, were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Ten-year OS and DMFS were estimated using multivariable Cox regression. Excess mortality ratios (EMR) were calculated to estimate RS, using life tables of the general population. OS and RS were determined on the whole cohort, and DMFS on the 2003 cohort with completed follow-up. Missing data were imputed. Of 3071 patients, 1055 (34.4 %) received BCT and 2016 (65.7 %) MAST. BCT and MAST showed equal 10-year OS and RS. After stratification, BCT was significantly associated with improved 10-year OS [HR adjusted 0.82 (95 % CI 0.71-0.96)] and RS (EMR adjusted 0.81 (95 % CI 0.67-0.97]) in T2N2, but not in T1N2. Ten-year DMFS was equal for both treatments [HR adjusted 0.87 (95 % CI 0.64-1.18)] in the 2003 cohort (n = 594), which was representative for the full cohort. BCT showed at least equal 10-year OS, RS, and DMFS compared to MAST. These results confirm that BCT is a good treatment option in T1-2N2 breast cancer.

  20. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Jay P.; Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. Thesemore » patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).« less

  1. Psychosocial factors associated with the uptake of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy among BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers with newly-diagnosed breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Genoff, Margaux C.; Salerno, Melissa; Amoroso, Kimberly; Boyar, Sherry R.; Sheehan, Margaret; Fleischut, Megan Harlan; Siegel, Beth; Arnold, Angela G.; Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Women who are newly diagnosed with breast cancer may consider contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to reduce their future risk of cancer in their unaffected breast. Pre-surgical BRCA1/2 genetic testing can provide valuable risk information to guide this choice. However, little is understood about why BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers, who are generally not at substantially elevated risk of contralateral disease, select CPM. Methods We examined the uptake of CPM among breast cancer patients identified as BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers (n=92) as part of a larger prospective study of the impact of pre-surgical BRCA1/2 testing. Data obtained from self-report questionnaires and patient medical records were used to examine associations between theoretically-relevant background and psychosocial factors and BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers’ decisions to undergo CPM. Results Among BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers, 25% (n=23) elected to undergo CPM. Psychosocial factors including a self-reported physician recommendation for CPM, greater perceived contralateral breast cancer risk, and greater perceived benefits of CPM were all significantly associated with the uptake of CPM. Conclusions A sizeable minority of BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers choose to undergo CPM after learning their mutation status through pre-surgical genetic testing. BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers’ cognitive perceptions and social influences appear to be important in shaping their decisions regarding CPM. This work highlights the importance of several psychosocial factors in influencing patients’ surgical decisions. Future research is needed that examines the formation of BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers’ beliefs regarding their disease and available treatment options, and that characterizes the physician-patient communication that occurs in this complex decision-making context. PMID:28150129

  2. Psychosocial factors associated with the uptake of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy among BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers with newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jada G; Genoff, Margaux C; Salerno, Melissa; Amoroso, Kimberly; Boyar, Sherry R; Sheehan, Margaret; Fleischut, Megan Harlan; Siegel, Beth; Arnold, Angela G; Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Hay, Jennifer L; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark E

    2017-04-01

    Women who are newly diagnosed with breast cancer may consider contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to reduce their future risk of cancer in their unaffected breast. Pre-surgical BRCA1/2 genetic testing can provide valuable risk information to guide this choice. However, little is understood about why BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers, who are generally not at substantially elevated risk of contralateral disease, select CPM. We examined the uptake of CPM among breast cancer patients identified as BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers (n = 92) as part of a larger prospective study of the impact of pre-surgical BRCA1/2 testing. Data obtained from self-report questionnaires and patient medical records were used to examine associations between theoretically relevant background and psychosocial factors and BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers' decisions to undergo CPM. Among BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers, 25% (n = 23) elected to undergo CPM. Psychosocial factors including a self-reported physician recommendation for CPM, greater perceived contralateral breast cancer risk, and greater perceived benefits of CPM were all significantly associated with the uptake of CPM. A sizeable minority of BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers choose to undergo CPM after learning their mutation status through pre-surgical genetic testing. BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers' cognitive perceptions and social influences appear to be important in shaping their decisions regarding CPM. This work highlights the importance of several psychosocial factors in influencing patients' surgical decisions. Future research is needed that examines the formation of BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers' beliefs regarding their disease and available treatment options, and that characterizes the physician-patient communication that occurs in this complex decision-making context.

  3. Survival is Better After Breast Conserving Therapy than Mastectomy for Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Registry-Based Follow-up Study of Norwegian Women Primary Operated Between 1998 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Hartmann-Johnsen, Olaf Johan; Kåresen, Rolf; Schlichting, Ellen; Nygård, Jan F

    2015-11-01

    Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy (MTX) has been considered to have a similar long-time survival. However, better survival in women undergoing BCT compared with MTX is found in two recent register studies from the United States. The purpose of this study was to compare survival after BCT and MTX for women with early-stage breast cancer in Norway. Women with invasive, early-stage breast cancer (1998-2008) where BCT and MTX were considered as equally beneficial treatments were included for a total of 13,015 women. Surgery was divided in two main cohorts (primary BCT, primary MTX) and five subcohorts. Analyses were stratified into T1N0M0, T2N0M0, T1N1M0, T2N1M0, and age groups (<50, 50-69, ≥70). Overall survival and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) were calculated in life tables, hazard ratios by Cox regression, and sensitivity analyses. Five-year BCSS for women who underwent primary BCT or primary MTX was 97 and 88 %, respectively. Women who underwent primary MTX had a hazard ratio of 1.64 (95 % confidence interval 1.43-1.88) for breast cancer death compared with women who underwent primary BCT after adjusting for the year of diagnosis, age at diagnosis, stage, histology, and grade. Survival was better or equal after breast-conserving therapy than mastectomy in all early stages, surgical subcohorts, and age groups. This advantage could not only be attributed to differences in tumor biology.

  4. Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Women diagnosed with DCIS or breast cancer may face a decision about which surgery to have. The choices of breast-sparing surgery, mastectomy, or mastectomy with reconstruction are explained and compared.

  5. The association between patient attitudes and values and the strength of consideration for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in a population-based sample of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Sarah T; Griffith, Kent A; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Janz, Nancy K; Katz, Steven J; Jagsi, Reshma

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about how the individual decision styles and values of breast cancer patients at the time of treatment decision making are associated with the consideration of different treatment options and specifically with the consideration of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer who were treated in 2013-2014 were identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries of Los Angeles and Georgia and were surveyed approximately 7 months after surgery (n = 2578; response rate, 71%). The primary outcome was the consideration of CPM (strong vs less strong). The association between patients' values and decision styles and strong consideration was assessed with multivariate logistic regression. Approximately one-quarter of women (25%) reported strong/very strong consideration of CPM, and another 29% considered it moderately/weakly. Decision styles, including a rational-intuitive approach to decision making, varied. The factors most valued by women at the time of treatment decision making were as follows: avoiding worry about recurrence (82%) and reducing the need for more surgery (73%). In a multivariate analysis, patients who preferred to make their own decisions, those who valued avoiding worry about recurrence, and those who valued avoiding radiation significantly more often strongly considered CPM (P < .05), whereas those who reported being more logical and those who valued keeping their breast did so less often. Many patients considered CPM, and the consideration was associated with both decision styles and values. The variability in decision styles and values observed in this study suggests that formally evaluating these characteristics at or before the initial treatment encounter could provide an opportunity for improving patient clinician discussions. Cancer 2017;123:4547-4555. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Postmastectomy radiation therapy for lymph node-negative, locally advanced breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy: analysis of the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.

    PubMed

    Yu, James B; Wilson, Lynn D; Dasgupta, Tina; Castrucci, William A; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2008-07-01

    The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) for lymph node-negative locally advanced breast carcinoma (T3N0M0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM) with regard to improvement in survival remains an area of controversy. The 1973-2004 National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was examined for patients with T3N0M0 ductal, lobular, or mixed ductal and lobular carcinoma of the breast who underwent MRM, treated from 1988-2003. Patients who were men, who had positive lymph nodes, who survived < or =6 months, for whom breast cancer was not the first malignancy, who had nonbeam radiation, intraoperative or preoperative radiation were excluded. The average treatment effect of PMRT on mortality was estimated with a propensity score case-matched analysis. In all, 1777 patients were identified; 568 (32%) patients received PMRT. Median tumor size was 6.3 cm. The median number of lymph nodes examined was 14 (range, 1-49). Propensity score matched case-control analysis showed no improvement in overall survival with the delivery of PMRT in this group. Older patients, patients with ER- disease (compared with ER+), and patients with high-grade tumors (compared with well differentiated) had increased mortality. The use of PMRT for T3N0M0 breast carcinoma after MRM is not associated with an increase in overall survival. It was not possible to analyze local control in this study given the limitations of the SEER database. The impact of potential improvement in local control as it relates to overall survival should be the subject of further investigation. (Copyright) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  7. Skin sparing/skin reducing mastectomy (SSM/SRM) and the concept of oncoplastic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara; Dibo, Saad; Zgheib, Elias; Abbas, Jaber

    2014-10-01

    With the better understanding of breast cancer history and biology, improved diagnostic modalities and the shift towards minimally invasive surgeries, indications for prophylactic mastectomy, skin sparing or skin reducing mastectomies (SSM/SRM) with nipple areolar complex (NAC) preservation coupled with immediate breast reconstruction are gaining popularity. The authors share their experience and conception with mastectomy and immediate alloplastic breast reconstruction with the esthetic circumvertical mammoplasty pattern combined with the dermal barrier buttress flap. The described technique was performed for 28 patients presenting for mastectomy and immediate alloplastic breast reconstruction. With close collaboration between the oncologic and plastic surgeons, mastectomy was performed in all cases with the esthetic circumvertical mammoplasty pattern. To achieve safe excision and optimal reconstruction, the standard incisions could be custom designed to fit oncologic requirements and allow the creation of a dermal barrier flap used as a buttress separating the implant from the suture line. The circumvertical mastectomy pattern combined with the dermal barrier buttress flap is a versatile option allowing safe reconstruction regardless of the tumor and necessary skin excision location. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation Therapy Versus No Radiation Therapy to the Neo-breast Following Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Autologous Free Flap Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: Patient-Reported and Surgical Outcomes at 1 Year-A Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) Substudy.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Andrew L; Diaz-Abele, Julian; Hayakawa, Tom; Buchel, Ed; Dalke, Kimberly; Lambert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is associated with adverse patient-reported outcomes and surgical complications 1 year after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer. We compared 24 domains of patient-reported outcome measures 1 year after autologous reconstruction between patients who received adjuvant RT and those who did not. A total of 125 patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2015 at our institution were included from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study database. Adjusted multivariate models were created incorporating RT technical data, age, cancer stage, estrogen receptor, chemotherapy, breast size, body mass index, and income to determine whether RT was associated with outcomes. At 1 year after surgery, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire breast symptoms were significantly greater in 64 patients who received RT (8-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, P<.0001) versus 61 who did not receive RT in univariate and multivariate models. EORTC arm symptoms (20-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, P=.0200) differed on univariate analysis but not on multivariate analysis. All other outcomes-including Numerical Pain Rating Scale, BREAST-Q (Post-operative Reconstruction Module), Patient-Report Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile 29, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF) score, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-were not statistically different between groups. Surgical complications were uncommon and did not differ by treatment. RT to the neo-breast compared with no RT following immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer is well tolerated at 1 year following surgery despite patients undergoing RT also having a higher cancer stage and more intensive surgical and systemic treatment. Neo-breast

  9. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. Pmore » values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)« less

  10. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Andrew; University of Arizona School of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona; Allen, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxanemore » chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.« less

  11. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica, E-mail: chaumontjessica@yahoo.fr; Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRRmore » associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.« less

  12. Development and pilot testing of a Decision Aid (DA) for women with early-stage breast cancer considering contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Ager, B; Jansen, J; Porter, D; Phillips, K A; Glassey, R; Butow, P

    2018-05-22

    Describe the development, acceptability and feasibility of a Decision Aid (DA) for women with early-stage breast cancer (BC) at average contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk considering contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). The DA was developed using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) and the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. It provides evidence-based information about CPM in a booklet format combining text, graphs and images of surgical options. Twenty-three women with a history of early-stage breast cancer were interviewed in person or over the phone using a 'think aloud approach'. Framework analysis was used to code and analyse data. Twenty-three women participated in the study. Mean age of participants was 58.6 years and time since diagnosis ranged from 14 months to 21 years. Five women had CPM and eighteen had not. Women strongly endorsed the DA. Many felt validated by a section on appearance and found information on average risk of recurrence and metastases helpful, however, noted the importance of discussing personal risk with their surgeon. Many requested more information on surgery details (time taken, recovery) and costs of the different options. The DA was acceptable to women, including the format, content and proposed implementation strategies. Practical and financial issues are important to women in considering treatment options. Women appreciate information about CPM at diagnosis and emphasised the importance of discussing potential downsides of the procedure in addition to benefits. The DA was considered acceptable to facilitate such discussions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Half versus full vacuum suction drainage after modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer- a prospective randomized clinical trial[ISRCTN24484328

    PubMed Central

    Chintamani; Singhal, Vinay; Singh, JP; Bansal, Anju; Saxena, Sunita

    2005-01-01

    Background Suction drains are routinely used after modified radical mastectomy and are an important factor contributing to increased hospital stay as the patients are often discharged only after their removal. Amongst various factors that influence the amount of postoperative drainage, the negative suction pressure applied to the drain has been reported to be of great significance. While a high negative suction pressure is expected to drain the collection and reduce the dead space promptly, it may also prevent the leaking lymphatics from closing and lead to increased drainage from the wound. Against this background a prospective randomized clinical study was conducted to compare the amount and duration of drainage between a half negative suction and full vacuum suction drainage in patients following modified radical mastectomy. The associated postoperative morbidity was also compared between the two groups. Methods 85 FNAC (fine needle aspiration cytology) proven cases of locally advanced breast cancer were randomized. (Using randomly ordered sealed envelops, which were opened immediately before the closure of the wound) in to 50 patients with full vacuum suction (pressure = 700 g/m2) and 35 cases in to half vacuum suction drainage (pressure = 350 g/m2) groups. The two groups were comparable in respect of age, weight, and technique of operation and extent of axillary dissection. Surgery was performed by the same surgical team comprising of five surgeons (two senior and three resident surgeons) using a standardized technique with electrocautery. External compression dressing was provided over the axilla for first 48 hrs and following that patients were encouraged to do active and passive shoulder exercises. The outcomes measured were postoperative morbidity and the length of hospital stay. Statistical methods used: Descriptive studies were performed with SPSS version 10 and group characteristics were compared using student t-test. Results Half vacuum suction drains

  14. Patients' experience of breast reconstruction after mastectomy and its influence on postoperative satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jana L; Wetzel, Cordula M; Lange, Klaus W; Heine, Norbert; Ortmann, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer patients have the option to choose a breast reconstruction after mastectomy. A range of studies have postulated that patients' individually appraised significance of their breast is an important factor in the decision for or against breast reconstruction. This study explored the individually perceived significance of the breast among patients with and without breast reconstruction and its correlation with postoperative satisfaction. Ten patients without breast reconstruction, and ten patients with immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy participated in the study. The perceived importance of the breast and the pre-and postoperative esthetic satisfaction of the patients were obtained using an 11-point Likert scale. Qualitative interviews explored patients' views on the meaning of their breast and their experience after surgery. Patients who had decided for breast reconstruction rated the importance of their breast for femininity (p = 0.004) and attractiveness (p = 0.037) significantly higher than patients without reconstruction. The qualitative data provide evidence that the breast of a woman fulfills a variety of intrapsychic and interactional functions. Difficulties in integrating the reconstructed breast into the body image were reported. A high importance of the breast correlated significantly with a decrease in satisfaction with the breast after reconstruction (rs = -0.652, p = 0.041). Patients who found their breast to be highly important were more likely to decide for a reconstruction. Mastectomy has an impact on various psychosocial variables but impairments may also occur after breast reconstruction. Patients reporting a high significance of their breast showed the greatest decrease in satisfaction with their breast after reconstruction.

  15. External breast prostheses in post-mastectomy care: women's qualitative accounts.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, P; Buckmaster, A; O'Carroll, S; Kiernan, G; Geraghty, J

    2010-01-01

    A good-quality external breast prosthesis and prosthesis-fitting service is an integral part of the recovery process post-mastectomy. However, this is an area of care that has minimal information or research available. The aim of this research was to investigate women's experience of the provision, fitting, supply and use of breast prostheses in Ireland. To ascertain women's own personal and subjective experiences, five focus groups with 47 women recruited through national cancer advocacy/support organizations and four Follow-up Breast Clinics throughout Ireland were conducted. As a result, five main themes emerged: (1) The fitting experience--Fitting? (2) Post-mastectomy products--Having? (3) Cost--Affording? (4) Information--Knowing? and (5) Adaptation--Accepting? The emerging themes pinpointed the impact of the fitting experience, fitting environment and the qualities of a prosthesis fitter on a woman's experience in obtaining a first or replacement breast prosthesis; the importance of the physical characteristics of the prosthesis and mastectomy bras; cost, affordability and entitlements; a lack of and perceived difficulty in getting information; and the myriad of personal and social impacts of a breast prosthesis for the woman. These findings are integral for the development of standards of practice in the fitting and supply of external breast prostheses in post-mastectomy care.

  16. Identification of complications in mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders and permanent implants for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ota, Daisuke; Fukuuchi, Atsushi; Iwahira, Yoshiko; Kato, Takao; Takeuchi, Masashi; Okamoto, Joji; Nishi, Tsunehiro

    2016-05-01

    Since complications of postmastectomy breast reconstruction may reduce patient satisfaction, we investigated complications of reconstruction with tissue expanders (TEs), particularly surgical site infections requiring TE/permanent implant (PI) removal. A retrospective review was performed of 234 primary breast cancer patients undergoing 239 postmastectomy breast reconstructions with TEs/PIs from 1997 to 2009. Clinicopathological findings and postoperative complications, particularly infections, were analyzed. Data were analyzed by the Chi-square test and a multivariate logistic regression model. TE infection risk factors considered for model inclusion were excisional biopsy, (neo) adjuvant chemotherapy, lymph node resection, body mass index (BMI), simultaneous bilateral reconstructions, and seroma aspiration. Removal of TEs/PIs was observed in 15.5% (37/239) of reconstructions, and 18/37 underwent re-reconstructions. Of the 19/37 reconstructions that were not achieved completely, the most frequent reason was TE infection (11 reconstructions). The completion rate was 92% (220/239 reconstructions) and it was significantly higher in reconstructions without TE infection than with infection (96 vs. 54%, p < 0.0001). Patients with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m² and seroma aspiration were more likely to develop TE infections (p = 0.0019, p < 0.001, respectively). By multivariate logistic regression analysis, seroma aspiration was a significant independent risk factor for TE infection (odds ratio 28.75, 95% confidence interval 5.71-40.03, p < 0.0001). To improve completion rates of breast reconstruction, prevention of TE infection plays a key role. We should reduce unnecessary seroma aspirations and delay elevation/exercise of the ipsilateral arm.

  17. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com; First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and lymore » status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.« less

  18. Conservative treatment versus mastectomy in breast cancer tumors with macroscopic diameter of 20 millimeters or less. The experience of the Institut Gustave-Roussy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, D.; Le, M.; Roueesse, J.

    1984-03-01

    A clinical trial was conducted at the Institut Gustave Roussy between October 1972 and December 1980 to compare mastectomy with local excision plus Cobalt-irradiation, in patients with breast cancer tumors of 20 mm in diameter or less at macroscopic examination. Low-axillary dissection and extemporaneous histologic examination were carried out for all patients. If one or more positive nodes were found, complete axillary dissection was performed. The study included 179 patients. No significant difference was detected in either overall or relapse-free survival between the two groups, although the conservatively treated group showed slightly better results. The results of conservative treatment weremore » esthetically satisfactory in 92% of the cases. The trial included a second randomization for the patients with positive axillary nodes to assess the value of nodal area irradiation; 72 patients were studied in this part of the trial. No significant differences were found between the two groups after adjustment for the number of positive axillary nodes, although the no-nodal irradiation group showed better results and less complications than the nodal irradiation group.« less

  19. One-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following areola-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Ri; Lim, Jin Soo; Kim, Sue Min; Jung, Sung No; Yoo, Gyeol; Rha, Eun Young

    2013-09-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is increasingly becoming a proven surgical option for early-stage breast cancer patients. Areola-sparing mastectomy (ASM) has also recently become a popular procedure. The purpose of this article is to investigate the reconstructive and aesthetic issues experienced with one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction using ASM. Among the patients who underwent mastectomy between March 2008 and March 2010, 5 women with a low probability of nipple-areolar complex malignant involvement underwent ASM and immediate breast reconstruction with simultaneous nipple reconstruction using the modified C-V flap. The cosmetic outcomes of this series were reviewed by plastic surgeons and patient self-assessment and satisfaction were assessed via telephone interview. During the average 11-month follow-up period, there were no cases of cancer recurrence, the aesthetic outcomes were graded as excellent to very good, and all of the patients were satisfied. Two patients developed a gutter-like depression around the reconstructed nipple, and one patient developed skin erosion in a small area of the areola, which healed with conservative dressing. The other complications, such as necrosis of the skin flap or areola, seroma, hematoma, or fat necrosis did not occur. Since one-stage nipple and breast reconstruction following ASM is an oncologically safe, cost-effective, and aesthetically satisfactory procedure, it is a good surgical option for early breast cancer patients.

  20. Management of Mastectomy Skin Necrosis in Implant Based Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sue, Gloria R; Long, Chao; Lee, Gordon K

    2017-05-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis is a significant problem after breast reconstruction. This complication may lead to poor wound healing and need for implant removal, which may delay subsequent oncologic treatment. We sought to characterize factors associated with mastectomy skin necrosis and propose a management algorithm. A retrospective review was performed on consecutive patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction by the senior author from 2006 through 2015. Patient-level factors including age, race, body mass index, history of hypertension, history of diabetes, history of smoking, and history of radiation were collected. Surgical factors including type of mastectomy, location of implant placement, and immediate versus delayed reconstruction were collected. The incidence and treatment of mastectomy skin necrosis were analyzed. A total of 293 patients underwent either unilateral or bilateral implant-based breast reconstructions after mastectomy with a total of 471 reconstructed breasts. Mastectomy skin necrosis was observed in 8.1% of reconstructed breasts. Skin necrosis was not associated with age, hypertension, diabetes, prior radiation, or type of mastectomy. The incidence of skin necrosis was higher among smokers (17.9% vs 5.0%, P < 0.001), among patients with higher body mass index (11.4% vs 6.1%, P = 0.05), patients who underwent immediate reconstruction compared to delayed (9.6% vs 0%, P = 0.004), placement of expander under acellular dermal matrix compared with submuscular placement (12.0% vs 5.2%, P = 0.02), and use of higher initial expander fill volume compared with lower fill volume (11.4% vs 5.4%, P = 0.02).The median necrosis size was 8 cm. The median time to treatment was 15 days postoperatively. In 55% of patients minor necrosis was treated with clinic debridement, whereas 43% had larger areas of necrosis requiring operative debridement. The median size treated with clinic debridement was 5.5 cm, compared to 15 cm for operative debridement

  1. Treatment and outcome of patients with chest wall recurrence after mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chagpar, Anees; Langstein, Howard N; Kronowitz, Steven J; Singletary, S Eva; Ross, Merrick I; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hunt, Kelly K; Kuerer, Henry M

    2004-02-01

    Chest wall recurrence (CWR) in the setting of previous mastectomy and breast reconstruction can pose complex management dilemmas for clinicians. We examined the impact of breast reconstruction on the treatment and outcomes of patients who subsequently developed a CWR. Between 1988 and 1998, 155 breast cancer patients with CWR after mastectomy were evaluated at our center. Of these patients, 27 had previously undergone breast reconstruction (immediate in 20; delayed in 7). Clinicopathologic features, treatment decisions, and outcomes were compared between the patients with and without previous breast reconstruction. Nonparametric statistics were used to analyse the data. There were no significant differences between the reconstruction and no-reconstruction groups in time to CWR, size of the CWR, number of nodules, ulceration, erythema, and association of CWR with nodal metastases. In patients with previous breast reconstruction, surgical resection of the CWR and repair of the resulting defect tended to be more complex and was more likely to require chest wall reconstruction by the plastic surgery team rather than simple excision or resection with primary closure (26% [7 of 27] versus 8% [10 of 128], P = 0.013). Risk of a second CWR, risk of distant metastases, median overall survival after CWR, and distant-metastasis-free survival after CWR did not differ significantly between patients with and without previous breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy does not influence the clinical presentation or prognosis of women who subsequently develop a CWR. Collaboration with a plastic surgery team may be beneficial in the surgical management of these patients.

  2. Decreased contralateral breast volume after mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and anti-estrogen therapy, in particular in breasts with high density.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Naohiro; Ando, Jiro; Harao, Michiko; Takemae, Masaru; Kishi, Kazuo

    2017-10-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy and anti-estrogenic therapy can result in decreased volume of the contralateral breast, following mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer. However, no data on the effect of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast volume have previously been reported. We aimed to evaluate the extent to which adjuvant therapy and differences in breast density contribute to decreased breast volume. We conducted a prospective cohort study, selecting 40 nonconsecutive patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with mastectomy and expander insertion followed by expander replacement. We measured the contralateral breast volume before each procedure. The extent of the change was analyzed with respect to adjuvant therapy and breast density measured by preoperative mammography. The greatest decrease in breast volume was 135.1 cm 3 . The decrease in breast volume was significantly larger in the adjuvant therapy (+) group, particularly in patients with high breast density, than in the adjuvant therapy (-) group. Significant differences between the chemotherapy (+), tamoxifen (+) group and the chemotherapy (-), tamoxifen (+) group were not found. Breast density scores had a range of 2.0-3.3 (mean: 2.8). In breast reconstruction, particularly when performed in one stage, preoperative mammography findings are valuable to plastic surgeons, and possible decreases in the contralateral breast volume due to adjuvant therapy, particularly in patients with high breast density, should be considered carefully. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Male breast cancer in a young patient treated with nipple-sparing mastectomy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Luini, Alberto; Gatti, Giovanna; Brenelli, Fabricio; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Ivaldi, Giovanni; Vento, Anna Rita; Gentilini, Oreste

    2007-01-01

    Male breast carcinoma is an uncommon phenomenon, accounting for less than 1% of all malignancies of the breast. The approximate annual incidence in Europe is 1 in 100,000 cases. The highest incidence occurs 5-10 years later in men than in women, with a peak at 60 to 67 years of age. We here describe a case of male breast carcinoma in a young patient (44 years of age), which is quite unusual in the pattern of breast carcinoma presentation.

  4. Double Back Cut in Post-mastectomy Breast Skin (Fish-Shaped Skin Paddle) in Delayed Pedicled TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Alexander Bogdanov; Pagkalos, Vasileios A; Shoham, Yaron; Krieger, Yuval; Silberstein, Eldad

    2015-08-01

    Breast reconstruction has become standard of care for female patients with breast cancer. The transverse rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous flap (TRAMf) is the most common method of immediate or delayed autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy. We share our experience with modified, double back cut of post-mastectomy skin in delayed pedicled TRAMf breast reconstruction, resulting in fish-shaped skin paddle. This sort of back cut is a simple, reliable way to obtain a natural, esthetically pleasant breast mound with inconspicuous hidden scars.

  5. External breast prostheses. A survey of their use by women after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R; Abraham, S F; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1983-03-19

    Women who have had a mastectomy for breast cancer have to cope with two major problems: first, that they have cancer, and second, that they have lost their physical appearance. The provision of an appropriate prosthesis can reduce the sense of disfigurement. If women were to obtain the full psychological benefit of wearing a breast prosthesis, they need to be informed about the available breast forms, have an opportunity to choose between them, and to be satisfied with their choice. In this study of 49 women, only 44% had had the opportunity to choose a prosthesis, 28% were dissatisfied with their prostheses, and 17% were still using temporary prostheses.

  6. Life quality of patients who underwent breast reconstruction after prophylactic mastectomy: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aygin, Dilek; Cengiz, Hande

    2018-05-02

    Prophylactic mastectomy is used to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in women with genetic predisposition and family history of breast cancer, and the rate of application is increased nowadays. Chronic pain, body image, and sexuality may negatively affect quality of life, while patients generally have increased quality of life and satisfaction after prophylactic mastectomy. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the results of the studies about quality of life of patients who underwent breast reconstruction after prophylactic mastectomy. For the 1996-2016 literature, we searched the databases of Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, EBSCO, Cochrane, Medline Complete, Ovid, Springer Link, Google Academic, Taylor & Francis, PsychINFO databases. For the gray literature, National Thesis Center and ULAKBIM databases were searched. Seven studies complying with the criteria were included in the review. Seven studies included in this study aimed to investigate the effect of prophylactic mastectomy on breast pain, numbness, sexuality and quality of life. When the studies were reviewed, we were found that the majority of the patients were satisfied with the results of the procedure, although the body image perception and pain/ movement/ perception and sexual problems were experienced after the breast surgery. While overall satisfaction with cosmetic results was high, most women were not satisfied with the softness of the reconstructed breasts, and had problems with breast hardness, numbness and sex. Therefore, it is very important to inform the patients about the complications that may develop after the operation, while there is not enough data about the importance of informing the patients before the operation.

  7. Immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy--why do women choose this option?

    PubMed

    Shameem, Haque; Yip, Cheng Har; Fong, E

    2008-01-01

    Mastectomy is an essential but disfiguring operation in cancer treatment. The negative impact on body image can however be prevented by immediate reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine the reasons why patients choose to have or not to have immediate breast reconstruction. This is a cross sectional descriptive study of breast cancer patients post-mastectomy who had and had not undergone immediate breast reconstruction. The patients were asked a series of questions to ascertain the reasons why they chose or did not choose immediate breast reconstruction. 136 patients in total were interviewed of which 23 had undergone immediate breast reconstruction. 36.8% of the patients had been offered reconstruction. In the non-reconstructed group, the main reason for not having reconstruction were fear of additional surgery. In the group that had reconstruction done, the main reason was to feel whole again. Low on the list were reasons such as trying to improve marital or sexual relations. Only a third of patients undergoing mastectomy were offered immediate reconstruction. In public hospitals in developing countries, limited operating time and availability of plastic surgery services are major barriers to more women being offered the option.

  8. Risk reducing mastectomy, breast reconstruction and patient satisfaction in Norwegian BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Anne Irene; Mæhle, Lovise; Vedå, Nina; Vetti, Hildegunn Høberg; Stormorken, Astrid; Ludvigsen, Trond; Guntvedt, Bente; Isern, Anne Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ellen; Kleppe, Geir; Bofin, Anna; Gullestad, Hans Petter; Møller, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Uptake, methods of operation and reconstruction, complications, patient satisfaction and histopathological findings were registered at all five departments of genetics in Norway. Data from 267 affected and unaffected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were analyzed, including a study-specific questionnaire returned by 178 mutation carriers. There was a steady increase in the uptake of risk-reducing mastectomies during the study period. Complications were observed in 106/266 (39.7%) women. Patient satisfaction was high. The majority of women expressed great relief after risk-reducing mastectomy and would have chosen the same option again. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed fieldmore » of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.« less

  10. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reconstruction is a complex procedure performed by a plastic surgeon, also called a reconstructive surgeon. If you' ... as a mastectomy, you'll meet with the plastic surgeon before the surgery. Preparing for your surgery ...

  11. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with inherited risk of breast cancer--prevalence of pain and discomfort, impact on sexuality, quality of life and feelings of regret two years after surgery.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Jessica; Wickman, Marie; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2010-12-01

    Mastectomy due to breast cancer is associated with chronic pain and a negative impact on sexuality. The purposes of the study were to analyze the prevalence of pain and discomfort in the breasts, impact on sexuality, quality of life, and feelings of regret after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with implants. Fifty-nine women operated 2004-2006 were included. A questionnaire was sent out two years after the procedure. Complications and re-operations were recorded. Mean follow-up time was 29 months. 93% of patients answered the questionnaire. 69% reported pain and 71% discomfort in the breasts. Lost or much reduced sexual sensations were reported by 85% and enjoyment of sex was negatively impacted for 75% of patients. Quality of life was not affected and feelings of regret were almost non-existent. It is important to inform women approaching this prophylactic procedure about the risk of having unwanted secondary effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A clinical randomized controlled trial of music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training in female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results on depression, anxiety and length of hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaina; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Jin; Liu, Miao; Dang, Shaonong; Wang, Duolao; Xin, Xia

    2015-02-01

    To examine effects of music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training on depression, anxiety and length of hospital stay in Chinese female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. A total of 170 patients were randomly allocated to the intervention group (n = 85) receiving music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training plus routine nursing care and the control group (n = 85) receiving routine nursing care. Music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training were performed twice a day within 48 h after radical mastectomy, once in the early morning (6a.m.-8a.m.) and once in the evening (9p.m.-11p.m.), for 30 min per session until discharged from the hospital. A general linear model with univariate analysis showed that the intervention group patients had significant improvement in depression and anxiety in the effects of group (F = 20.31, P < 0.001; F = 5.41, P = 0.017), time (F = 56.64, P < 0.001; F = 155.17, P < 0.001) and group*time interaction (F = 6.91, P = 0.009; F = 5.56, P = 0.019). The intervention group patients had shorter length of hospital stay (12.56 ± 1.03) than that of the control group (17.01 ± 2.46) with statistical significance (F = 13.36, P < 0.001). Music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training can reduce depression, anxiety and length of hospital stay in female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Application of serratus anterior muscle flap combined with breast implants for breast reconstruction after modified radical mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Chai, Lijun; Zhang, Xuehui

    2017-09-01

    To investigate effectiveness of the combination of serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants for breast reconstruction after modified radical mastectomy. Between January 2015 and December 2015, 25 female patients with breast cancer were enrolled, aged 24-62 years (mean, 40.6 years). The tumor located at left side in 9 cases and right side in 16 cases; 14 cases were in the left upper quadrant, 4 cases were in the left lower quadrant, 7 cases were on the top of the breast. All cases were invasive ductal carcinoma. According to TNM staging, 14 cases were at stageⅠand 11 cases were at stageⅡA. The diameter of lumps were all less than 3 cm. All those lumps were solitary and without distant metastasis. The sentinel nodes were all negative. After modified radical mastectomy, the breasts were reconstructed by serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants. The nipples were spared in 22 cases. The operation time was 113-148 minutes (mean, 136 minutes). All breasts survived and incisions healed at stageⅠ. There was no complication such as hematoma, infection, etc . All patients were followed up 6-18 months (mean, 15 months). Except 1 case, the others were evaluated according to the criteria of the reconstructed breast at 12 months after operation. Among them, 23 cases were evaluated as good and 1 case as fair. There was no tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. The combination of serratus anterior muscle flap and breast implants after the modified radical mastectomy is a handy approach of breast reconstruction which is less harmful with few postoperative complications. It also gains a high degree of satisfaction from patients for good breast shape.

  14. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properlymore » estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)« less

  15. Breast Conservation Therapy Versus Mastectomy: Shared Decision-Making Strategies and Overcoming Decisional Conflicts in Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Margenthaler, Julie A; Ollila, David W

    2016-10-01

    Although breast-conserving therapy is considered the preferred treatment for the majority of women with early-stage breast cancer, mastectomy rates in this group remain high. The patient, physician, and systems factors contributing to a decision for mastectomy are complicated. Understanding the individual patient's values and goals when making this decision is paramount to providing a shared decision-making process that will yield the desired outcome. The cornerstones of this discussion include education of the patient, access to decision-aid tools, and time to make an informed decision. However, it is also paramount for the physician to understand that a significant majority of women with an informed and complete understanding of their surgical choices will still prefer mastectomy. The rates of breast conservation versus mastectomy should not be considered a quality measure alone. Rather, the extent by which patients are informed, involved in decision-making, and undergoing treatments that reflect their goals is the true test of quality. Here we explore some of the factors that impact the patient preference for breast conservation versus mastectomy and how shared decision-making can be maximized for patient satisfaction.

  16. Health insurance coverage and racial disparities in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Shippee, Tetyana P; Kozhimannil, Katy B; Rowan, Kathleen; Virnig, Beth A

    2014-01-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy offers clinical, cosmetic, and psychological benefits compared with mastectomy alone. Although reconstruction rates have increased, racial/ethnic disparities in breast reconstruction persist. Insurance coverage facilitates access to care, but few studies have examined whether health insurance ameliorates disparities. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2002 through 2006 to examine the relationships between health insurance coverage, race/ethnicity, and breast reconstruction rates among women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. We examined reconstruction rates as a function of the interaction of race and the primary payer (self-pay, private health insurance, government) while controlling for patient comorbidity, and we used generalized estimating equations to account for clustering and hospital characteristics. Minority women had lower breast reconstruction rates than White women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.57 for African American; AOR, 0.70 for Hispanic; AOR, 0.45 for Asian; p < .001). Uninsured women (AOR, 0.33) and those with public coverage were less likely to undergo reconstruction (AOR, 0.35; p < .001) than privately insured women. Racial/ethnic disparities were less prominent within insurance types. Minority women, whether privately or publicly insured, had lower odds of undergoing reconstruction than White women. Among those without insurance, reconstruction rates did not differ by race/ethnicity. Insurance facilitates access to care, but does not eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in reconstruction rates. Our findings-which reveal persistent health care disparities not explained by patient health status-should prompt efforts to promote both access to and use of beneficial covered services for women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Olver, Ian N

    2016-11-21

    Modifiable lifestyle factors may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. Obesity is associated particularly with post-menopausal breast cancer. Diet is important, and exercise equivalent to running for up to 8 hours each week reduces the risk of breast cancer, both in its own right and through reducing obesity. Alcohol consumption may be responsible for 5.8% of breast cancers in Australia and it is recommended to reduce this to two standard drinks per day. Drinking alcohol and smoking increases the risk for breast cancer and, therefore, it is important to quit tobacco smoking. Prolonged use of combined oestrogen and progesterone hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives may increase breast cancer risk and this must be factored into individual decisions about their use. Ionising radiation, either from diagnostic or therapeutic radiation or through occupational exposure, is associated with a high incidence of breast cancer and exposure may be reduced in some cases. Tamoxifen chemoprevention may reduce the incidence of oestrogen receptor positive cancer in 51% of women with high risk of breast cancer. Uncommon but serious side effects include thromboembolism and uterine cancer. Raloxifene, which can also reduce osteoporosis, can be used in post-menopausal women and is not associated with the development of uterine cancer. Surgical prophylaxis with bilateral mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy can reduce the risk of breast cancer in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. For preventive treatments, mammographic screening can identify other women at high risk.

  18. Effect of radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary surgery on 10-year recurrence and 20-year breast cancer mortality: meta-analysis of individual patient data for 8135 women in 22 randomised trials.

    PubMed

    McGale, P; Taylor, C; Correa, C; Cutter, D; Duane, F; Ewertz, M; Gray, R; Mannu, G; Peto, R; Whelan, T; Wang, Y; Wang, Z; Darby, S

    2014-06-21

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy was shown in previous meta-analyses to reduce the risks of both recurrence and breast cancer mortality in all women with node-positive disease considered together. However, the benefit in women with only one to three positive lymph nodes is uncertain. We aimed to assess the effect of radiotherapy in these women after mastectomy and axillary dissection. We did a meta-analysis of individual data for 8135 women randomly assigned to treatment groups during 1964-86 in 22 trials of radiotherapy to the chest wall and regional lymph nodes after mastectomy and axillary surgery versus the same surgery but no radiotherapy. Follow-up lasted 10 years for recurrence and to Jan 1, 2009, for mortality. Analyses were stratified by trial, individual follow-up year, age at entry, and pathological nodal status. 3786 women had axillary dissection to at least level II and had zero, one to three, or four or more positive nodes. All were in trials in which radiotherapy included the chest wall, supraclavicular or axillary fossa (or both), and internal mammary chain. For 700 women with axillary dissection and no positive nodes, radiotherapy had no significant effect on locoregional recurrence (two-sided significance level [2p]>0·1), overall recurrence (rate ratio [RR], irradiated vs not, 1·06, 95% CI 0·76-1·48, 2p>0·1), or breast cancer mortality (RR 1·18, 95% CI 0·89-1·55, 2p>0·1). For 1314 women with axillary dissection and one to three positive nodes, radiotherapy reduced locoregional recurrence (2p<0·00001), overall recurrence (RR 0·68, 95% CI 0·57-0·82, 2p=0·00006), and breast cancer mortality (RR 0·80, 95% CI 0·67-0·95, 2p=0·01). 1133 of these 1314 women were in trials in which systemic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil, or tamoxifen) was given in both trial groups and, for them, radiotherapy again reduced locoregional recurrence (2p<0·00001), overall recurrence (RR 0·67, 95% CI 0·55-0·82, 2p=0·00009), and

  19. Comparison of breast-conserving surgery with mastectomy in locally advanced breast cancer after good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yixuan; Liao, Mingjuan; He, Liu; Zhu, Chenfang

    2017-10-01

    The application of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) on patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) with good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) still remains controversial. The objective in this study is to analyze the safety of BCS in the management of LABC in patients with good response to NACT. We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed) and Cochrane Library for reports on local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), distant recurrence (DR), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) or 5-year overall survival (OS) in patients with LABC receiving BCS or mastectomy (MT) and with good response to NACT. Based on the research results, we conducted a meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3. Our study showed that 16 studies with a combined total of 3531 patients, of whom 1465 patients underwent BCS, whereas 2066 patients underwent MT. There was no significant heterogeneity among these studies (Q statistic: P = .88; I = 0%). Patients with good response to NACT showed no significant difference in LR and RR [odd ratio (OR) = 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.15; P = .26; OR = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.33-0.93; P = .03], while we figured out a lower DR (OR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.42-0.63; P < .01), a higher DFS (OR = 2.35; 95% CI: 1.84 to 3.01, P < .01) and a higher OS (OR = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.51 to 2.98, P < .01) in BCS compared with MT. This meta-analysis concluded that BCS was a safe surgery for patients with LABC and had good response to NACT.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Hannah; Carroll, Natalie; Renshaw, Derek; Turner, Andrew; Park, Alan; Skillman, Jo; McCarthy, Kate; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-01

    Breast reconstruction is associated with multiple psychological benefits. However, few studies have identified clinical and psychological factors associated with improved satisfaction and quality of life. This study examined factors, which predict satisfaction with breast appearance, outcome satisfaction and quality of life following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Women who underwent post-mastectomy breast reconstruction between 2010 and 2016 received a postal questionnaire consisting of The BREAST-Q Patient Reported Outcomes Instrument, The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-30 Questionnaire, The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, and a series of Visual-Analogue Scales. One hundredforty-eight women completed the questionnaire, a 56% response rate. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed psychosocial factors accounted for 75% of the variance in breast satisfaction, 68% for outcome satisfaction, and 46% forquality of life. Psychosocial well-being emerged as a significant predictor of satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .322) and outcome satisfaction (β = .406). Deep inferior epigastric perforator flap patients reported greater satisfaction with breast appearance (β = .120) and outcome satisfaction (β = .167). This study extends beyond the limited research by distinguishing between satisfaction with breast appearance and outcome satisfaction. The study provides evidence for the role of psychosocial factors predicting key patient reported outcomes and demonstrates the importance of psychosocial well-being and reconstruction type. The findings also highlight the need for healthcare providers to consider the psychosocial well-being of patients both preoperatively and post operatively and provide preliminary evidence for the use of deep inferior epigastric perforator reconstructions over other types of reconstructive procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. [Role of locoregional radiation therapy in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy. The Institut Curie-Hôpital René-Huguenin experience].

    PubMed

    Le Scodan, R; Bruant, S; Selz, J; Bollet, M-A; Daveau, C; de la Lande, B; Lerebours, F; Labib, A; Stevens, D

    2011-12-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy generally induces significant changes in the pathological extent of disease and challenges the standard indications of adjuvant postmastectomy radiation therapy. We retrospectively evaluated the impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among 1054 breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 patients had pN0 status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy. Demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors. Among 134 eligible patients, 78 patients (58.2%) received postmastectomy radiation therapy, and 56 patients (41.8%) did not. With a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival rates were 96.2% and 77.2% with postmastectomy radiation therapy and 86.8% and 87.7% without radiation therapy, respectively (no significant difference). In multivariate analysis, there was a trend towards poorer overall survival among patients who did not have a pathologically complete primary tumour response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 6.65; 95% CI, 0.82-54.12; P=0.076). Postmastectomy radiation therapy had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.09-1.61; P=0.18) or overall survival (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 0.71-6; P=0.18). There was a trend towards poorer overall survival among patients who did not have pathologically complete in-breast tumour response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR, 6.65; 95% CI, 0.82-54.12; P=0.076). This retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence or death when postmastectomy

  3. Evaluation of a mixed beam therapy for post-mastectomy breast cancer patients: bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated photon radiotherapy and volumetric modulated photon arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Sanders, Mary; Guo, Beibei; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2018-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential benefits and limitations of a mixed beam therapy, which combined bolus electron conformal therapy (BECT) with intensity modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated photon arc therapy (VMAT), for left-sided post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Mixed beam treatment plans were produced for nine post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT alone. The mixed beam plans consisted of 40 Gy to the chest wall area using BECT, 40 Gy to the supraclavicular area using parallel opposed IMRT, and 10 Gy to the total planning target volume (PTV) by optimizing VMAT on top of the BECT+IMRT dose distribution. The treatment plans were created in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), and all plans were evaluated based on PTV coverage, dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (CI), dose to organs at risk (OARs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). The standard VMAT alone planning technique was used as the reference for comparison. Both techniques produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans but with a few significant differences: VMAT showed significantly better CI (0.70 vs. 0.53, p < 0.001) and DHI (0.12 vs. 0.20, p < 0.001) over mixed beam therapy. For normal tissues, mixed beam therapy showed better OAR sparing and significantly reduced NTCP for cardiac mortality (0.23% vs. 0.80%, p = 0.01) and SCCP for contralateral breast (1.7% vs. 3.1% based on linear model, and 1.2% vs. 1.9% based on linear-exponential model, p < 0.001 in both cases), but showed significantly higher mean (50.8 Gy vs. 49.3 Gy, p < 0.001) and maximum skin doses (59.7 Gy vs. 53.3 Gy, p < 0.001) compared with VMAT. Patients with more tissue (minimum distance between the distal PTV surface and lung approximately > 0.5 cm and volume of tissue between the distal PTV surface and heart or lung approximately > 250 cm 3 ) between

  4. Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Risk factors for breast cancer are female sex and advancing age, inherited risk, breast density, obesity, alcohol consumption, and exposure to ionizing radiation. Interventions to prevent breast cancer include chemoprevention (e.g. SERMs, AIs), risk-reducing surgery (e.g. mastectomy, oophorectomy). Review the evidence on risk factors and interventions to prevent breast cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... it harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take ...

  6. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: patient satisfaction and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Salhab, Mohamed; Al Sarakbi, Wail; Joseph, Antony; Sheards, Susan; Travers, Joan; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-02-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) followed by immediate reconstruction has been advocated as an effective treatment option for patients with early-stage breast carcinoma. It minimizes deformity and improves cosmesis through preservation of the natural skin envelope of the breast. The purpose of this study was to evaluate postoperative morbidity, patients' satisfaction, and oncological safety for SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with a latissimus dorsi (LD) myocutaneous flap and/or breast prosthesis in patients with operable breast cancer. Twenty-one consecutive patients with operable breast cancer undergoing 25 SSM and immediate reconstruction with an LD flap plus implant (n = 14) or implant alone (n = 11) were retrospectively studied (from 2001 through 2005). The median patients' age was 44 years (range, 30-68). Patient satisfaction with the outcome of surgery was assessed using a detailed questionnaire including a linear visual analogue scale ranging from 0 (not satisfied) to 10 (most satisfied). Eight of 20 (40%) patients required adjuvant chemotherapy, and only 2 patients required post-mastectomy radiation. Reconstruction of the nipple-areola complex was performed in 7 patients (33%) using the trefoil local flap technique. Contralateral procedures to achieve symmetry were performed in 6 (28%) patients (5 augmentations and 1 reduction mammoplasty). Histological analysis showed pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in 4 patients and invasive carcinoma (+/- DCIS) in 20 cases, of which 5 (25%) were node positive. One prophylactic mastectomy in a BRCA-2 carrier was negative for malignancy. Tumor size ranged from 5 to 90 mm. The surgical margins were clear in all cases. There was no delay in time to commencement of adjuvant therapies. After a mean follow-up period of 13.5 months (range, 5-46 months), none of the patients developed locoregional recurrence. Only 1 patient (5%) developed systemic recurrence (bony metastases). Overall survival was 100%. The

  7. Quality of life in women following various surgeries of body manipulation: organ transplantation, mastectomy, and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, M Angeles; Fernández-Jiménez, Eduardo; Martín-Rodríguez, Agustín; Borda-Más, Mercedes; Rincón-Fernández, M Esther

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to determine biopsychosocial differences (anxious-depressive symptomatology and quality of life) among three groups of patients who underwent surgical interventions related to body manipulation, as well as to assess the clinical significance of these results versus reference values. Four groups were compared: women who underwent organ transplant (n = 26), mastectomy for breast cancer (n = 36), breast reconstruction (n = 36), and general population (n = 608). The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the EORTC QLQ-C30 were used. Women who underwent mastectomy showed the highest anxious-depressive symptomatology and quality-of-life impairment in comparison to the remaining groups, and they also displayed the most clinically significant deterioration in the majority of dimensions (large effect sizes). In contrast, the group with implantation of a healthy organ (transplantation) only showed higher biopsychosocial impairment than the group with reconstruction of an organ (breast reconstruction) in gastrointestinal dysfunctions and in the global self-perception of health.

  8. Mammographic findings after reshaping with autoprosthesis in women undergoing contralateral breast reconstruction and mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Capalbo, Emanuela; Ferranti, Claudio; Falco, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio B; Di Leo, Gianni; Marchesini, Monica; Suman, Laura; Panizza, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Breast reduction and mastopexy combined with inferior dermo-lipo-glandular flap (autoprosthesis) gives good breast shape, long-term projection, and upper pole fullness. We assess the impact on breast oncologic surveillance compared to other techniques. A total of 105 patients who underwent mastectomy and reconstruction were divided into 3 groups of 35 patients each: groups 1 and 2 include patients with contralateral breast symmetrization performed with and without autoprosthesis technique, respectively. Group 3 is a control group without contralateral breast reshaping. On mammography, edema, skin thickening, architectural distortion, and calcifications were recorded, as well as further diagnostic examinations, biopsies, and surgical treatments required. Statistically significant differences (p<0.001) in the first follow-up mammography between groups 1 and 2 were stromal edema (6% vs 51%) and architectural distortion (74% vs 63%). The latest findings meant architectural distortion also have significant difference (p<0.001) in the last mammography (79% vs 66%). Microcalcification has statistically significant difference (p<0.001) in the latest postsurgical mammography, increased in group 1. Skin thickening had a similar course in either group. Mammography follow-up was not impaired in most cases notwithstanding the parenchyma distortion as compared with mammography after breast-conserving surgery. Four core biopsies were performed in both groups: 3 new breast cancers and 1 benign epithelial hyperplasia were found. No difficulties were found impairing mammographic evaluation in patients treated with autoprosthesis as compared to other techniques.

  9. Long-term role of external breast prostheses after total mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Simone W; Carlson, Grant W

    2009-01-01

    After total mastectomy, many women choose to wear external breast prosthesis rather than undergo breast reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term satisfaction among external breast prosthesis wearers and the impact of satisfaction on prosthesis use. A questionnaire was designed to assess demographic information, prosthesis information provision, prosthesis use, and satisfaction with prosthesis. Fifty-nine women who had undergone total mastectomy without breast reconstruction completed the questionnaire. The majority of women (68%) were at least 5 years out from mastectomy. Approximately half (49%) of the women had received information about breast prostheses prior to mastectomy; 29% received information from the surgeon performing the operation. Frequent and prolonged prosthesis use was prevalent with 64% of participants reporting prosthesis use all the time, 6-7 days/week. Participants showed high rates (83%) of overall satisfaction. However, women who wore their prosthesis out in public only were less satisfied than more frequent wearers (50% versus 89%, chi(2) = 8.83, d.f. = 1, alpha = 0.05). Satisfaction increased over time, as women who were greater than 5 years out from mastectomy were more satisfied than women less that 5 years post-mastectomy (90% versus 67%, chi(2) = 4.43, d.f. = 1, alpha = 0.05). The vast majority of women are satisfied with their external breast prosthesis several years after mastectomy. Most women used their prosthesis all the time and overall satisfaction contributed to higher levels of prosthesis use. Given the long-term importance of external breast prostheses for women who have undergone mastectomy, a greater effort to inform patients about external breast prostheses prior to surgery is needed.

  10. Why Some Mastectomy Patients Opt to Undergo Delayed Breast Reconstruction: Results of a Long-Term Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Kelly A; Semple, John; Quan, May-Lynn; Holloway, Claire; Wright, Frances; Narod, Steven; Hofer, Stefan; Bagher, Shaghayegh; Zhong, Toni

    2017-02-01

    Delayed breast reconstruction is an option for women who have undergone mastectomy; however, uptake is low. The purpose of this study was to identify premastectomy and postmastectomy demographic, clinical, and psychosocial predictors of uptake of delayed breast reconstruction in the long-term survivorship period. This was a prospective longitudinal survey study of mastectomy patients in which a repeated measures design was used to evaluate uptake of delayed breast reconstruction. Demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables were collected before mastectomy and 1 year after mastectomy. Information regarding uptake of delayed breast reconstruction was collected at approximately 6 years after mastectomy. A predictive model was designed using a multivariate logistic regression model and Akiake information criterion stepwise algorithm. Ninety-six mastectomy patients were followed from before mastectomy to 75.2 months after mastectomy, and 35 women (36.5 percent) underwent delayed breast reconstruction. Women who elected for delayed breast reconstruction experienced worsening of body concerns from before mastectomy to 1 year after mastectomy, compared with women who did not elect to undergo delayed breast reconstruction (p = 0.03). Mean scores for psychological distress were significantly worse both before mastectomy and 1 year after mastectomy in women who went on to undergo delayed breast reconstruction compared with those who did not undergo delayed breast reconstruction (p = 0.034 and p = 0.022, respectively). A predictive model for the uptake of delayed breast reconstruction was developed using demographic, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 85 percent, indicating good precision. Women who are experiencing higher levels of distress, anxiety, and body concerns both before and after mastectomy appear to be significantly likely to select delayed breast reconstruction. This may have

  11. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with natural tissue ... it harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. The advantage of breast reconstruction with ...

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  13. Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Kubicky, Charlotte, E-mail: charlottedai@gmail.com; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specificmore » survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.« less

  14. Effects of nitroglycerin ointment on mastectomy flap necrosis in immediate breast reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gdalevitch, Perry; Van Laeken, Nancy; Bahng, Seokjae; Ho, Adelyn; Bovill, Esta; Lennox, Peter; Brasher, Penelope; Macadam, Sheina

    2015-06-01

    Mastectomy flap necrosis is a common complication of immediate breast reconstruction that impacts recovery time and reconstructive success. Nitroglycerin ointment is a topical vasodilator that has been shown to improve skin flap survival in an animal model. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the application of nitroglycerin ointment to the breast skin after mastectomy and immediate reconstruction causes a decrease in the rate of mastectomy flap necrosis compared with placebo. This study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial and included patients aged 21 to 69 years undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction at the University of British Columbia-affiliated hospitals (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada). Patients with a medical history that precluded the administration of nitroglycerin were excluded from the study. The target sample size was 400 patients. Nitroglycerin ointment (45 mg) or a placebo was applied to the mastectomy skin at the time of surgical dressing. The trial was stopped at the first interim analysis after 165 patients had been randomized (85 to the treatment group and 80 to the placebo group). Mastectomy flap necrosis developed in 27 patients (33.8 percent) receiving placebo and in 13 patients (15.3 percent) receiving nitroglycerin ointment; the between-group difference was 18.5 percent (p = 0.006; 95 percent CI, 5.3 to 31.0 percent). Postoperative complications were similar in both groups [nitroglycerin, 22.4 percent (19 of 85); placebo, 28.8 percent (23 of 80)]. In patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction, there was a marked reduction in mastectomy flap necrosis in patients who received nitroglycerin ointment. Nitroglycerin ointment application is a simple, safe, and effective way to help prevent mastectomy flap necrosis. Therapeutic, I.

  15. Influences on Satisfaction with Reconstructed Breasts and Intimacy in Younger Women Following Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomy: a Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Glassey, Rachael; O'Connor, Moira; Ives, Angela; Saunders, Christobel; Hardcastle, Sarah J

    2018-04-30

    The aim of this study was to explore the influences on satisfaction with reconstructed breasts and intimacy following bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM) in younger women (< 35) with a strong family history of breast cancer. Twenty-six women who had undergone BPM between 1 and6 years ago were recruited from New Zealand and Australia through a genetics clinic, registry, research cohort, and online (M age  = 31). Twenty-three were BRCA mutation carriers. Qualitative interviews guided by interpretative phenomenological analysis were conducted. Four themes were identified: satisfaction with breasts before surgery, outcome expectations, type of mastectomy, and open communication. Women who liked their breasts pre-BPM appeared less satisfied with their reconstructed breasts post-surgery, and women who disliked their breasts before BPM were more satisfied with their reconstructed breasts. Women with unrealistic expectations concerning the look and feel of reconstructed breasts were often unhappy with their reconstructed breasts and felt they did not meet their expectations. Unrealistic photos of breast reconstruction and satisfactory communication of realistic outcome expectations by surgeons or psychologists also appeared to influence satisfaction. Communication with partners prior to BPM appeared to improve satisfaction with intimacy post-BPM. The findings suggest that satisfaction with reconstructed breasts for younger women post-BPM appeared to be influenced by realistic outcome expectations and communication with others concerning reconstructed breast appearance and intimacy post-BPM. Implications for practice include discussion of realistic reconstructed breast appearance, referral to a psychologist to discuss sensitive issues, and accurate communication of surgical risks and consequences.

  16. Access to breast reconstruction after mastectomy and patient perspectives on reconstruction decision making.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Monica; Li, Yun; Alderman, Amy K; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S; Graff, John J; Hawley, Sarah T; Katz, Steven J

    2014-10-01

    Most women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer do not undergo breast reconstruction. To examine correlates of breast reconstruction after mastectomy and to determine if a significant unmet need for reconstruction exists. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries from Los Angeles, California, and Detroit, Michigan, for rapid case ascertainment to identify a sample of women aged 20 to 79 years diagnosed as having ductal carcinoma in situ or stages I to III invasive breast cancer. Black and Latina women were oversampled to ensure adequate representation of racial/ethnic minorities. Eligible participants were able to complete a survey in English or Spanish. Of 3252 women sent the initial survey a median of 9 months after diagnosis, 2290 completed it. Those who remained disease free were surveyed 4 years later to determine the frequency of immediate and delayed reconstruction and patient attitudes toward the procedure; 1536 completed the follow-up survey. The 485 who remained disease free at follow-up underwent analysis. Disease-free survival of breast cancer. Breast reconstruction at any time after mastectomy and patient satisfaction with different aspects of the reconstruction decision-making process. Response rates in the initial and follow-up surveys were 73.1% and 67.7%, respectively (overall, 49.4%). Of 485 patients reporting mastectomy at the initial survey and remaining disease free, 24.8% underwent immediate and 16.8% underwent delayed reconstruction (total, 41.6%). Factors significantly associated with not undergoing reconstruction were black race (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.16 [95% CI, 1.11-4.20]; P = .004), lower educational level (AOR, 4.49 [95% CI, 2.31-8.72]; P < .001), increased age (AOR in 10-year increments, 2.53 [95% CI, 1.77-3.61]; P < .001), major comorbidity (AOR, 2.27 [95% CI, 1.01-5.11]; P = .048), and chemotherapy (AOR, 1.82 [95% CI, 0.99-3.31]; P = .05). Only 13.3% of women were dissatisfied with the

  17. From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

  18. Factors associated with patients in the Scottish Highlands who chose mastectomy when suitable for breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Rosalyn; Rashid, Majid; Hubbard, Gill; Abbott, Nick; Daltrey, Ian; Mullen, Russell

    2016-08-01

    Despite being suitable for breast conservation surgery (BCS) a proportion of women choose mastectomy. This study aimed to assess the pre-operative pathological and geographic factors associated with choosing mastectomy rather than BCS in a single centre that serves a large geographical area encompassing urban, rural and remote island populations. A retrospective analysis of all patients suitable for BCS between January 2011 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pre-operative pathological features were compared using the Pearson chi squared test as was distance to the treatment centre from the patient's home. A questionnaire was sent to all those who chose mastectomy to identify the factors that influenced their decision. A total of 446 patients suitable for BCS were identified of which 46 (11%) chose to undergo mastectomy. Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to present symptomatically (P=0.009), have tumours larger than 20 mm at diagnostic imaging (P=0.001) and have positive axillary staging (P=0.004). Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to live remotely (P=0.051). Those patients who chose mastectomy felt this gave a better long-term outcome (18 patients, 44%) and peace of mind (14 patients, 34%). Adverse pre-operative pathological features were associated with patients choosing mastectomy rather than BCS. There was a trend for patients who chose mastectomy to live remotely from the treatment centre. Patients choosing mastectomy most commonly cited a better long-term outcome and peace of mind as the reason behind their decision. Understanding what influences a patient's surgical choice will allow clinicians and patients to engage in a fully informed pre-operative decision making process.

  19. Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a badmore » grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.« less

  20. Trends in Media Reports of Celebrities' Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Michael S; Dal Cin, Sonya

    2016-09-01

    Although the increasing use of bilateral mastectomies is multifaceted, one source of influence may be the media, including coverage of celebrity breast cancer treatment. We examined trends in media reporting that might impact decision making among women with breast cancer. We performed searches of two comprehensive online databases for articles from major U.S. print publications mentioning celebrities and terms related to the word "breast" and terms related to cancer treatment. Automated analysis using custom-created dictionaries was used to determine word frequencies over time. An analysis of net media tone was conducted using Lexicoder Sentiment Dictionaries. Celebrity breast cancer media reports significantly increased since 2004 (p < .05). Dramatic increases in bilateral mastectomy articles occurred in 2008-2009, with an increase in net positive tone. The surgical treatment was significantly more likely to be mentioned when a celebrity had bilateral mastectomies than unilateral mastectomy or breast conservation (44.8 vs 26.1 %, p < .001). The majority (60 %) of articles on celebrities undergoing bilateral mastectomy for cancer had no mention of genetics, family history, or risk. Media reports of celebrity breast cancer present a bias toward bilateral mastectomies in both frequency and tone. This may sway public opinion, particularly when factors such as risk and genetics are excluded. Surgeons need to work with the media to improve cancer reporting and identify methods to better educate patients prior to surgical consultations.

  1. Is mastectomy superior to breast-conserving treatment for young women?

    PubMed

    Coulombe, Geneviève; Tyldesley, Scott; Speers, Caroline; Paltiel, Chuck; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Bernstein, Vanessa; Truong, Pauline T; Keyes, Mira; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2007-04-01

    To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered "ideal" candidates for BCT: tumor size < or =2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered "ideal" for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered "ideal" BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  2. What are patients' goals and concerns about breast reconstruction after mastectomy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Clara N; Hultman, Charles Scott; Sepucha, Karen

    2010-05-01

    Discussions about breast reconstruction should include factual information and consideration of the patient's personal concerns. Providers are familiar with the relevant facts but may not know which personal concerns are important to patients. Experience with breast cancer patients has found that providers frequently do not know their patients' treatment preferences. To help reconstructive surgeons discuss personal preferences with their patients, we sought to identify women's key concerns related to breast reconstruction. We employed a qualitative design and convened a sample of 65 women in 7 focus groups and 15 semi-structured interviews. Women with a recent history of early-stage breast cancer who had a mastectomy with or without reconstruction were included. A variety of backgrounds, including underserved populations, low education levels, and various ages were represented. Qualitative content analysis was performed, and key themes were identified. Five key themes emerged. (1) Magnitude of surgery and recovery. Many women reported that concerns over the number of operations, duration of recovery, and risk of complications strongly affected their decision-making. (2) Using one's own tissue. Several women felt comforted by the notion of using their own tissue for reconstruction. (3) Looking natural in clothing. Many women pointed out the difference between how they look in clothing versus how they look naked. (4) Avoiding an external prosthesis. Several women stressed practical concerns and framed the reconstruction decision in terms of not having to use prosthesis. (5) Considering others' opinions. A few women reported that their partners' opinion strongly influenced their decision. Many women stated that they ultimately followed their doctor's recommendation. Women considering reconstruction have some unmet emotional and physical needs as well as important goals and concerns that can affect their decisions about and experience with reconstruction. In particular

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women (after skin cancer). The good news is that the rate of death from ... is removed during surgery. Surgery is the most common treatment for breast ... effects on your body. Take good care of yourself. Eat a healthy diet, get ...

  4. [Patient-reported outcome of their breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Robiolle, C; Quillet, A; Dagregorio, G; Huguier, V

    2015-06-01

    The overall care of patients with breast cancer is a major public health issue. Breast reconstruction is a part of it, and could be modulated by factors related to their personal life or surgical management. The aim of our study was to investigate a statistical link between these factors of variability, and overall satisfaction after breast reconstruction. We evaluated in a retrospective study patients' satisfaction in Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Department of the University Hospital, Poitiers, after breast reconstruction using different sources of variability: elements of life at the moment of reconstruction decision, reconstruction management and the feeling of involvement in decisions related to reconstruction. Satisfaction was quantified by modified BREAST-Q pre- and postoperative questionnaires ("reconstruction" module) complemented by an open question to address patients experience. From January 2005 to May 2011, 148 patients underwent surgery, 60.1% accepted to complete the survey (89 patients). Postoperative overall satisfaction was 89.1 out of 100. Satisfaction gradually decreased (P=0.022), postoperative overall satisfaction was non-significantly higher with autologous reconstruction, regardless of the variability factor studied. Secondary reconstruction with autologous reconstruction enhanced physical well-being (P<0.001). Patients expressed a high request for information about the different kinds of reconstruction, postoperative, as well as support groups. This study shows that patients are generally very satisfied, but do not explain the causes of dissatisfaction. It paves the way for development of satisfaction with breast reconstruction databases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. One-step breast reconstruction with polyurethane-covered implants after skin-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rancati, Alberto; Soderini, Alejandro; Dorr, Julio; Gercovich, Gustavo; Tessari, Luciano; Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and immediate one-step breast reconstruction with implants has become an increasingly popular, effective treatment for selected patients with breast carcinoma. However, it is associated with high complication rates. Breast augmentation with polyurethane-covered implants (PCIs) has consistently had optimal short-term and long-term results with low rates of capsular contracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and aesthetic outcomes of immediate one-step breast reconstruction with PCI after SSM in early breast cancer patients at a single institution. We reviewed the records of 221 consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent one-stage immediate reconstruction with PCI after SSM from 1995 through 2005. Patient and tumour characteristics, type of reconstruction, postoperative complications, aesthetic results and recurrence rate were analysed. The mean age of the patients was 52±11 years (range, 30-76; standard deviation (SD), 11). The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) pathologic stages were 0 (10%), I (63.3%) and II (26.7%). Thirty-nine (17.65%; confidence interval (CI)=13.04-23.1) of the 221 patients had complications; seven had prosthesis extrusion requiring an implant (five due to skin necrosis, one due to infection and one due to late haematoma). In six of these seven cases, the procedure was indicated for local recurrence after conservative breast surgery with adjunctive radiation therapy (rescue procedure). Thirty-two (14.4%) patients had minor complications: 12 had cutaneous rash, four had malpositioned implants and 16 had inadequate implant projection. At long-term follow-up, four (1.8%) patients had developed grade IV capsular contracture associated with postoperative radiation therapy. At a median follow-up of 98 months (range, 36-156), 14 (6.3%) patients had tumour recurrence and 12.2% had distant metastasis. Nineteen patients had died of cancer, and 192 (86.8%) remained disease free. One

  6. Modification of claims-based measures improves identification of comorbidities in non-elderly women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Warren, David K; Ball, Kelly E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Olsen, Margaret A

    2016-08-16

    Accurate identification of underlying health conditions is important to fully adjust for confounders in studies using insurer claims data. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of four modifications to a standard claims-based measure to estimate the prevalence of select comorbid conditions compared with national prevalence estimates. In a cohort of 11,973 privately insured women aged 18-64 years with mastectomy from 1/04-12/11 in the HealthCore Integrated Research Database, we identified diabetes, hypertension, deficiency anemia, smoking, and obesity from inpatient and outpatient claims for the year prior to surgery using four different algorithms. The standard comorbidity measure was compared to revised algorithms which included outpatient medications for diabetes, hypertension and smoking; an expanded timeframe encompassing the mastectomy admission; and an adjusted time interval and number of required outpatient claims. A χ2 test of proportions was used to compare prevalence estimates for 5 conditions in the mastectomy population to national health survey datasets (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Medical record review was conducted for a sample of women to validate the identification of smoking and obesity. Compared to the standard claims algorithm, use of the modified algorithms increased prevalence from 4.79 to 6.79 % for diabetes, 14.75 to 24.87 % for hypertension, 4.23 to 6.65 % for deficiency anemia, 1.78 to 12.87 % for smoking, and 1.14 to 6.31 % for obesity. The revised estimates were more similar, but not statistically equivalent, to nationally reported prevalence estimates. Medical record review revealed low sensitivity (17.86 %) to capture obesity in the claims, moderate negative predictive value (NPV, 71.78 %) and high specificity (99.15 %) and positive predictive value (PPV, 90.91 %); the claims algorithm for current smoking had relatively low sensitivity (62.50

  7. Relationship between preoperative breast MRI and surgical treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Weiss, Julie E; Goodrich, Martha E; Zhu, Weiwei; DeMartini, Wendy B; Kerlikowske, Karla; Ozanne, Elissa; Tosteson, Anna N A; Henderson, Louise M; Buist, Diana S M; Wernli, Karen J; Herschorn, Sally D; Hotaling, Elise; O'Donoghue, Cristina; Hubbard, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    More extensive surgical treatments for early stage breast cancer are increasing. The patterns of preoperative MRI overall and by stage for this trend has not been well established. Using Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium registry data from 2010 through 2014, we identified women with an incident non-metastatic breast cancer and determined use of preoperative MRI and initial surgical treatment (mastectomy, with or without contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), reconstruction, and breast conserving surgery ± radiation). Clinical and sociodemographic covariates were included in multivariable logistic regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 13 097 women, 2217 (16.9%) had a preoperative MRI. Among the women with MRI, results indicated 32% higher odds of unilateral mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery and of mastectomy with CPM compared to unilateral mastectomy. Women with preoperative MRI also had 56% higher odds of reconstruction. Preoperative MRI in women with DCIS and early stage invasive breast cancer is associated with more frequent mastectomy, CPM, and reconstruction surgical treatment. Use of more extensive surgical treatment and reconstruction among women with DCIS and early stage invasive cancer whom undergo MRI warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Defining the Relationship between Patient Decisions to Undergo Breast Reconstruction and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Kraft, Casey T.; Kozlow, Jeffrey H.; Sabel, Michael S.; Chung, Kevin C.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies suggest that the decision to undergo breast reconstruction and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) are closely related. Here we describe the relationship between method of reconstruction and decision to undergo CPM. We also evaluate recent trends in CPM use in the context of literature questioning its oncologic benefit. STUDY DESIGN Female patients with unilateral breast cancer were identified and data extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database from 2000 through 2010. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study the relationship between having CPM and key demographic, oncologic and reconstructive factors among women with unilateral breast cancer. RESULTS A total of 157,042 patients with unilateral breast cancer were included. CPM rate increased from 7.7% to 28.3% during the study period, and the proportion of reconstructed patients who underwent CPM increased from 19% to 46%. Reconstruction was associated with higher odds of CPM (odds ratio (OR) 2.79, 95% CI 2.70-2.88, p<0.0001) after controlling for oncologic and demographic factors. Among women who had reconstruction, implant-based reconstruction was associated with significantly higher odds of CPM than autologous tissue reconstruction (OR 1.38, p<0.0001). Over the study period Implant reconstruction rates increased from 28.2% to 43.5% while autologous reconstruction rates decreased from 32.2% to 27.3% in CPM patients. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of CPM continues to increase in spite of literature questioning its oncologic benefit. Our study confirms that reconstruction and the decision to undergo CPM are closely related, with implant reconstruction dominating in patients who undergo CPM. Given the relationship between reconstruction and the choice for CPM, plastic surgeons should play an active role in educating patients to avoid decisions made based on inaccurate information. PMID:25719688

  9. Mastectomy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: Quantitative analysis of shoulder function and strength after breast ... Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Mastectomy is the National Cancer Institute Disclaimers ...

  10. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  11. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance of being cured. Tamoxifen is approved for breast cancer prevention in women age 35 and older who are ... chance of getting cancer. This includes: Eating healthy foods Maintaining a healthy weight Limiting alcohol consumption to 1 drink per day

  12. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wallmore » in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.« less

  13. The Clinical Application of Mastectomy With Single Incision Followed by Immediate Laparoscopic-Assisted Breast Reconstruction With Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huozhong; Xie, Donghua; Xiao, Xigang; Huang, Xingwei

    2017-08-01

    To explore the clinical application of mastectomy with single incision followed by immediate laparoscopic-assisted breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap. Fifteen women with primary early breast cancer, 3 women with breast ductal carcinoma in situ, and 7 women with severe plasma cell mastitis were treated with partial mastectomy or total mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, or axillary lymph node dissection through a breast lateral transverse incision. Subsequent breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap was assisted by laparoscopy. The patient's position, time used in dissecting latissimus dorsi muscle flap, size of latissimus dorsi muscle flap, postoperative complications, and the cosmetic results after reconstruction were assessed. All the operations were well done through the breast lateral transverse incision and assistance of laparoscopy. The patient's position was changed only once during the operation. It took 1.5 to 2 hours to dissect latissimus dorsi muscle flap. The sizes of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap were 5 to 8 × 12 to 16 cm. There were no serious postoperative complications noted. The patients were satisfied with the appearance of the breasts and the small surgical scar. The surgical approach introduced is minimally invasive with concealed scar and outstanding cosmetic results. It is worth promoting in clinical application.

  14. Impact of sentinel lymph node biopsy on immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Benjamin C; David, Lisa R; Defranzo, Anthony J; Stewart, John H; Shen, Perry; Geisinger, Kim R; Marks, Malcolm W; Levine, Edward A

    2009-07-01

    Traditionally, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is performed at the time of mastectomy and reconstruction. However, several groups have advocated SLNB as a separate outpatient procedure before mastectomy, when immediate reconstruction is planned, to allow for complete pathologic evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative analysis of SLNB on the reconstructive plan when performed at the same time as definitive surgery. A retrospective review was conducted of all mastectomy cases performed at a single institution between September 1998 and November 2007. Of the 747 mastectomy cases reviewed, SLNB was conducted in 344 cases, and there was immediate breast reconstruction in 193 of those cases. There were 27 (7.8%) false negative and three (0.9%) false positive intraoperative analysis of SLNB. Touch preparation analysis from the SLNB changed the reconstructive plan in four (2.1%) cases. In our experience, SLNB can be performed at the time of mastectomy with minimal impact on the reconstructive plan. A staged approach incurs significant additional expense, increases the delay in initiation of systemic therapy and the propensity of procedure-related morbidity; therefore, SLNB should not be performed as a separate procedure before definitive surgery with immediate breast reconstruction.

  15. Personality Traits and Decision on Breast Reconstruction in Women after Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Miśkiewicz, Halina; Antoszewski, Bogusław; Iljin, Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was evaluation of the correlation between selected personality traits in women after mastectomy and their decision on breast reconstruction. The study was conducted between 2013‑2015, in the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, and Department of Oncological and Breast Surgery, CZMP. Comparative analysis comprised 40 patients, in whom mastectomy and breast reconstruction was done, and 40 women after breast amputation, who did not undergo reconstructive surgery. Basing on self-constructed questionnaire, five features of personality were evaluated in these women: pursue of success in life, ability to motivate others, openness to other people, impact of belonging to a social group on sense of security and the importance of opinion of others about the respondent. Apart from the questionnaire, in both groups of women a psychologic tool was used (SUPIN S30 and C30 tests) to determine the intensity of positive and negative emotions. Women who did not choose the reconstructive option were statistically significantly older at mastectomy than women who underwent breast reconstruction. There were statistically significant differences between both groups in response to question on being open to other people and value of other people's opinion. The differences in responses to question on the impact of belonging to a social group on personal sense of safety were hardly statistically significant. In psychometric studies there were significant differences in responses to SUPIN C30 test for negative emotions and S-30 for positive emotions. The level of negative emotions - feature of group A was in 47.5% in the range of high scores and in 47.5% within low and low-average scores. Among women from group B 57.5% had high scores, while 37.5% low and average scores. There were significant differences in the results of positive emotions evaluation in S-30. Women who did not undergo breast reconstruction usually had

  16. Breast Cancer Lymphatic Dissemination - Influence of Estrogen and Progesterone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    illustrative cases. Lancet 1896;2:104–7. 32. Koda M, Sulkowski S, Kanczuga- Koda L, Surmacz E, Sulkowska M. Expression of ERa, ERh and Ki-67 in primary tumors...10801, breast conservation compared with mastectomy in TNM stage I and II breast cancer. Eur J Cancer 1992;28A: 801–5. 36. Koda M, Lenczewski A

  17. Breast Cancer Lymphatic Dissemination-Influence of Estrogen and Progesterone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    illustrative cases. Lancet 1896;2:104–7. 32. Koda M, Sulkowski S, Kanczuga- Koda L, Surmacz E, Sulkowska M. Expression of ERa, ERh and Ki-67 in primary...trial 10801, breast conservation compared with mastectomy in TNM stage I and II breast cancer. Eur J Cancer 1992;28A: 801–5. 36. Koda M, Lenczewski A

  18. An unexpected metastasis of breast cancer mimicking wheal rush.

    PubMed

    Damaskos, C; Dimitroulis, D; Pergialiotis, V; Doula, C; Koulermou, G; Antoniou, E A; Frangoulis, M; Stergios, K; Kontzoglou, K

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and ranks second in cancer deaths worldwide. Breast cancer can metastasize to the skin but rarely, cutaneous metastases may be the first indication of the cancer. Skin metastases of breast cancer are usually found on the chest and close to the point of the mastectomy. We present the rare clinical entity of a breast cancer which was first diagnosed due to the skin metastasis away from the breast tumor. This is a rare case because the skin lesions usually appear simultaneously or secondary. Also, while the existing metastasis; the only symptom was the wheal rash.

  19. An unexpected metastasis of breast cancer mimicking wheal rush

    PubMed Central

    DAMASKOS, C.; DIMITROULIS, D.; PERGIALIOTIS, V.; DOULA, C.; KOULERMOU, G.; ANTONIOU, E.A.; FRANGOULIS, M.; STERGIOS, K.; KONTZOGLOU, K.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and ranks second in cancer deaths worldwide. Breast cancer can metastasize to the skin but rarely, cutaneous metastases may be the first indication of the cancer. Skin metastases of breast cancer are usually found on the chest and close to the point of the mastectomy. We present the rare clinical entity of a breast cancer which was first diagnosed due to the skin metastasis away from the breast tumor. This is a rare case because the skin lesions usually appear simultaneously or secondary. Also, while the existing metastasis; the only symptom was the wheal rash. PMID:27734799

  20. Quality of life of patients who undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy: effects of personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bellino, Silvio; Fenocchio, Marina; Zizza, Monica; Rocca, Giuseppe; Bogetti, Paolo; Bogetto, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction after mastectomy has become an integral part of breast cancer treatment. The effects of psychological factors on quality of life after reconstruction have been poorly investigated. The authors examined clinical and personality characteristics related to quality of life in patients receiving reconstructive surgery. All patients received immediate reconstruction and were evaluated in the week before tissue expander implantation (T0) with a semistructured interview for demographic and clinical characteristics, the Temperament and Character Inventory, the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, the Short Form Health Survey, the Severity Item of the Clinical Global Impression, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. Assessment with the Short Form was repeated 3 months after expander placement (T1). Statistics were calculated with univariate regression and analysis of variance. Significant variables were included in a multiple regression analysis to identify factors related to the change T1-T0 of the mean of the Short Form-transformed scores. Results were significant when p was less than or equal to 0.05. Fifty-seven women were enrolled. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that the Temperament and Character Inventory personality dimension harm avoidance and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems domain vindictive/self-centered were significantly and independently related to the change in Short Form mean score. Personality dimensions and patterns of interpersonal functioning produce significant effects on patients' quality of life during breast reconstruction. Patients with high harm avoidance are apprehensive and doubtful. Restoration of body image could help them to reduce social anxiety and insecurity. Vindictive/self-centered patients are resentful and aggressive. Breast reconstruction could symbolize the conclusion of a reparative process and fulfill the desire of revenge on cancer.

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  2. Trends and clinical implications of preoperative breast MRI in Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Brigid K; Long, Jessica B; Chagpar, Anees B; Ma, Xiaomei; Soulos, Pamela R; Ross, Joseph S; Gross, Cary P

    2013-08-01

    While there has been increasing interest in the use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for women with breast cancer, little is known about trends in MRI use, or the association of MRI with surgical approach among older women. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database, we identified a cohort of women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2000 to 2009 who underwent surgery. We used Medicare claims to identify preoperative breast MRI and surgical approach. We evaluated temporal trends in MRI use according to age and type of surgery, and identified factors associated with MRI. We assessed the association between MRI and surgical approach: breast-conserving surgery (BCS) versus mastectomy, bilateral versus unilateral mastectomy, and use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Among the 72,461 women in our cohort, 10.1 % underwent breast MRI. Preoperative MRI use increased from 0.8 % in 2000-2001 to 25.2 % in 2008-2009 (p < 0.001). Overall, 43.3 % received mastectomy and 56.7 % received BCS. After adjustment for clinical and demographic factors, MRI was associated with an increased likelihood of having a mastectomy compared to BCS (adjusted odds ratio = 1.21, 95 % CI 1.14-1.28). Among women who underwent mastectomy, MRI was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having bilateral cancer diagnosed (9.7 %) and undergoing bilateral mastectomy (12.5 %) compared to women without MRI (3.7 and 4.1 %, respectively, p < 0.001 for both). In conclusion, the use of preoperative breast MRI has increased substantially among older women with breast cancer and is associated with an increased likelihood of being diagnosed with bilateral cancer, and more invasive surgery.

  3. Association Between Hospital Financial Distress and Immediate Breast Reconstruction Surgery After Mastectomy Among Women With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.

    PubMed

    Richards, Catherine A; Rundle, Andrew G; Wright, Jason D; Hershman, Dawn L

    2018-04-01

    Hospital financial distress (HFD) is a state in which a hospital is at risk of closure because of its financial condition. Hospital financial distress may reduce the services a hospital can offer, particularly unprofitable ones. Few studies have assessed the association of HFD with quality of care. To examine the association between HFD and receipt of immediate breast reconstruction surgery after mastectomy among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). This retrospective cohort study assessed data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of 5760 women older than 18 years (mean [SD] age: 57.5 [13.2]) with DCIS who underwent mastectomy in 2008-2012 at hospitals categorized by financial distress. Women treated at 1156 hospitals located in 538 different counties across Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, West Virginia, and Wyoming were included. Of these, 2385 women (41.4%) underwent immediate breast reconstruction surgery. Women with invasive cancer were excluded. The database included unique hospital identification variables, and participants were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Data were analyzed from January 1, 2012, to February 28, 2014. The primary outcome was the adjusted association between HFD and receipt of immediate breast reconstruction surgery after mastectomy. In this analysis of database information, 2385 of 5760 women (41.4%) received immediate breast reconstruction surgery. Of these, 693 (36.7%) were treated at a hospital under high HFD and received immediate breast reconstruction surgery compared with 863 (44.0%) treated at a hospital under low HFD (P < .001). Reconstruction surgery was associated with younger age, white race, private insurance

  4. Minimally invasive therapy of primary breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David S.

    2000-01-01

    Treating disease with little alteration has long been a goal of medical science. During the past quarter century, technological advances have brought forth minimally invasive approaches to the surgical diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the domain of breast cancer, a less invasive sentinel lymph node biopsy may replace axillary lymphadenectomy for many patients, and image guided core biopsies have minimalized the degree of surgical intervention needed for tissue diagnosis. This mirrors the primary treatment of breast cancer that over the past century has progressed from mastectomy to breast preservation with a progressively diminishing operative field.

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis of the breast: a case managed without mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, M O; Ayyash, E H; Aldahham, A; Asfar, S

    2011-01-01

    To report a rare presentation of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in the breast and its management. A 61-year-old non-diabetic lady presented with a painful swollen right breast and yellowish discharge associated with fever for the last few days. Based on clinical examination and haematological parameters, a provisional diagnosis of breast abscess was made that later proved to be a case of NF. She was managed conservatively with repeated debridement followed by split-skin grafting with preservation of the breast. This case showed that NF of the breast can present as a simple breast abscess which was managed conservatively. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: the influence of comorbidities on choice of surgical operation in the Department of Defense health care system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Enewold, Lindsey; Zahm, Shelia H; Jatoi, Ismail; Shriver, Craig; Anderson, William F; Jeffery, Diana D; Andaya, Abegail; Potter, John F; McGlynn, Katherine A; Zhu, Kangmin

    2013-09-01

    Studies on the effect of comorbidities on breast cancer operation have been limited and inconsistent. This study investigated whether pre-existing comorbidities influenced breast cancer surgical operation in an equal access health care system. This study was based on linked Department of Defense cancer registry and medical claims data. The study subjects were patients diagnosed with stage I to III breast cancer during 2001 to 2007. Logistic regression was used to determine if comorbidity was associated with operation type and time between diagnosis and operation. Breast cancer patients with comorbidities were more likely to receive mastectomy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 1.42) than breast conserving surgery plus radiation. Patients with comorbidities were also more likely to delay having operation than those without comorbidities (OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.41). In an equal access health care system, comorbidity was associated with having a mastectomy and with a delay in undergoing operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hideko; Takei, Junko

    2018-02-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome represents 5-10% of all breast cancers. In Japan, the HBOC syndrome is frequently diagnosed in patients with breast cancer. Therefore, a treatment strategy combining a plan for existing breast cancer and for reduction of future breast and ovarian cancer risk is necessary. Breast cancer risk-reducing management involves three options-surveillance, chemoprevention, and risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). RRM can prevent >90% of new breast cancers. Ovarian cancer risk management options are more limited, and risk-reduction salpingo-oophorectomy is the only option since there is no proven effective early detection method available. The local recurrence rate following breast-conserving surgery in BRCA1/2 mutation-associated breast cancer is not significantly higher than that in sporadic breast cancer. Furthermore, there is no difference in prognosis between surgical methods. Clinicians should inform patients that there are no data on long-term monitoring and fully discuss risks of re-developing breast cancer with patients when choosing the surgical method. In HBOC, BRCA1/2 mutations lead to failure of double-strand DNA break repair, with poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) playing an important role in single-strand DNA nick repair. Use of PARP inhibitors in HBOC prevents DNA repair (synthetic lethality) leading to cell death. This review summarizes management of the HBOC syndrome based on recent evidence.

  8. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  9. Adherence to Guidelines for Breast Surveillance in Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Kathryn J; Sangaralingham, Lindsey; Freedman, Rachel A; Mougalian, Sarah; Neuman, Heather; Greenberg, Caprice; Jemal, Ahmedin; Duma, Narjust; Haddad, Tufia C; Lemaine, Valerie; Ghosh, Karthik; Hieken, Tina J; Hunt, Katie; Vachon, Celine; Gross, Cary; Shah, Nilay D

    2018-05-01

    Background: Guidelines recommend annual mammography after curative-intent treatment for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to assess contemporary patterns of breast imaging after breast cancer treatment. Methods: Administrative claims data were used to identify privately insured and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries with nonmetastatic breast cancer who had residual breast tissue (not bilateral mastectomy) after breast surgery between January 2005 and May 2015. We calculated the proportion of patients who had a mammogram, MRI, both, or neither during each of 5 subsequent 13-month periods. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics, healthcare use, and breast imaging in the first and fifth years after surgery. Results: A total of 27,212 patients were followed for a median of 2.9 years (interquartile range, 1.8-4.6) after definitive breast cancer surgery. In year 1, 78% were screened using mammography alone, 1% using MRI alone, and 8% using both tests; 13% did not undergo either. By year 5, the proportion of the remaining cohort (n=4,790) who had no breast imaging was 19%. Older age was associated with an increased likelihood of mammography and a decreased likelihood of MRI during the first and fifth years. Black race, mastectomy, chemotherapy, and no MRI at baseline were all associated with a decreased likelihood of both types of imaging. Conclusions: Even in an insured cohort, a substantial proportion of breast cancer survivors do not undergo annual surveillance breast imaging, particularly as time passes. Understanding factors associated with imaging in cancer survivors may help improve adherence to survivorship care guidelines. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  10. How Informed is the Decision about Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy? A Prospective, Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clara Nan-hi; Ubel, Peter Anthony; Deal, Allison M; Blizard, Lillian Burdick; Sepucha, Karen R; Ollila, David W.; Pignone, Michael Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Objective to assess how informed patients are about breast reconstruction, and how involved they are in decision making. Summary Background Data Breast reconstruction is an important treatment option for patients undergoing mastectomy. Wide variations in who gets reconstruction, however, have led to concerns about decision making. Methods We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of patients planning mastectomy at a single site, over 20 months. Before surgery, patients completed a survey with validated scales to assess knowledge about breast reconstruction and involvement in decision making. Factors associated with knowledge were examined in a multivariable linear regression model. Results 145 patients enrolled (77% enrollment rate), and 126 remained eligible. The overall knowledge score was 58.5% (out of 100%). Knowledge about risk of complications was especially low at 14.3%. Knowledge did not differ by treatment (reconstruction or not). On multivariable analysis, non-white race was independently associated with lower knowledge. Most patients (92.1%) reported some discussion with a provider about reconstruction, and most (90.4%) reported being asked their preference. More patients reported discussing the advantages of reconstruction (57.9%) than the disadvantages (27.8%). Conclusions Women undergoing mastectomy in this sample were highly involved in decision making but had major deficits in knowledge about the procedure. Knowledge about the risk of complications was particularly low. Providers appeared to have discussed the advantages of reconstruction more than its disadvantages. PMID:26727092

  11. Meta-analysis for psychological impact of breast reconstruction in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanjing; Lv, Xiaoai; Xu, Xiaohong; Gao, Xiufei; Wang, Bei

    2018-07-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the impact of breast reconstruction on the psychological aspects in patients with breast cancer. A literature search on PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect and Google scholar databases was conducted up to September 2017. The pooled risk radio (RR) or standard mean difference (SMD) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 5 studies were included in this meta-analysis. There were 551 breast cancer patients receiving mastectomy plus breast reconstruction and 574 breast cancer patients receiving mastectomy alone. The results showed that breast reconstruction can significantly decrease the incidence of anxiety (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.47-0.82, P = 0.0006)/depression (RR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.93, P = 0.02) and scale score for evaluating anxiety (SMD = - 0.20, 95% CI - 0.37 to - 0.03, P = 0.02)/depression (SMD = - 0.22, 95% CI - 0.39 to - 0.66, P = 0.007) compared with mastectomy alone. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy was benefit for improving the psychological damages in patients with breast cancer.

  12. Localized morphea after breast implant for breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Moretti, A; Bianchi, F; Abbate, I V; Gherardi, G; Bonavita, M; Passoni, E; Nazzaro, G; Bramati, A; Dazzani, M C; Piva, S; Paternò, E; Frungillo, N; Farina, G; La Verde, N

    2018-03-01

    Early breast cancer follow-up guidelines for patients who underwent surgery suggest a regular and accurate clinical examination of the breast area, for an early identification of cutaneous or subcutaneous breast cancer relapse. Nonetheless, breast skin lesions arising in patients treated with mastectomy for breast cancer can be caused by several diseases. A series of diagnostic hypotheses should be considered, not only focusing on cutaneous metastasis, but also on dermatologic and systemic diseases. In February 2015, a 37-year-old patient underwent a right subcutaneous mastectomy for stage IIA breast cancer. Five months after beginning adjuvant chemotherapy, she noted hyperpigmentation and thickening of the skin on the right breast. Differential diagnosis included local relapse, skin infection, lymphoma, or primary cutaneous disease, and a skin biopsy was performed. The histopathologic specimen showed full-thickness sclerosis, with features of localized morphea. Therapy with clobetasol was prescribed, with progressive resolution of the thickness. The collaboration between many professionals in a multidisciplinary team (oncologist, dermatologist, plastic surgeon, and pathologist) was crucial to achieving the diagnosis. In the literature, some articles describe correlation between connective tissue diseases and silicone breast implants, but the pathogenetic mechanisms are unknown. We report a rare case of breast morphea after positioning a silicone implant in a patient who had undergone mastectomy. This clinical report represents an interesting model of multidisciplinary management of a patient with breast cancer who developed an uncommon dermatologic disease. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between silicone implants and breast morphea.

  13. Cancer information seeking in the digital age: effects of Angelina Jolie's prophylactic mastectomy announcement.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Althouse, Benjamin M; Ayers, John W; Francis, Diane B; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2015-01-01

    . This study used digital surveillance to examine the impact of Angelina Jolie's prophylactic mastectomy announcement on cancer information seeking. . We analyzed 4 categories of breast cancer-related Internet search queries from 2010 to 2013 in the United States. . Compared with the preceding 6 weeks, general information queries were 112% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79-146) higher the day of the announcement and remained 35% (95% CI, 22-49) higher over the week after the editorial. Risk assessment queries were 165% (95% CI, 110-222) higher the day of the announcement and 52% (95% CI, 31-75) higher across the week. Genetics and treatment queries showed little volume before the announcement but increased 2154% (95% CI, 1550-7076) and 9900% (95% CI, 3196-1,064,000) the day of, respectively, and remained higher across the week (812% [95% CI, 402-3913] and 2625% [95% CI, 551-317,000]). All query categories returned to normal volumes by the beginning of the second week. . Jolie's unique announcement spurred significant information seeking about breast cancer genetic testing and treatment procedures, although the surge in queries returned to preannouncement levels after 1 week. Future research should apply digital methods to advance our understanding of cancer information seeking in the digital age. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... I have a nipple also? Will I have feeling in my new breast? What are the risks of each type of breast reconstruction? If I do not have reconstruction, what are my options? Can I wear a prosthesis? How can I get my home ready before ...

  16. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  17. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  18. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  20. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to other parts of the body. Where breast cancer begins in men Everyone is born with a ... and inflammatory breast cancer. Inherited genes that increase breast cancer risk Some men inherit abnormal (mutated) genes from ...

  1. Prospective hospital-based survey of attitudes of Southern women toward surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, J P; Sherry, R M; Baisden, B L; Peckel, J; Lala, G

    1995-07-01

    Breast-conserving surgery is equivalent to total mastectomy in the treatment of breast cancer. The Southern part of the United States has a low rate of breast conservation. We surveyed 300 women: 100 hospital personnel, 100 cancer clinic patients, and 100 non-cancer clinic patients. The women were asked about their attitudes toward breast cancer, surgery preferences, and factors that might influence their decisions. One hundred eighty-nine chose mastectomy as the best operation, 106 women chose lumpectomy, and five women were undecided. There was no difference in mean age, racial distribution, education level, income level, percentage of women who considered themselves Southern women, concerns about breast cancer, recent mammograms, previous breast surgery, previous breast cancer treatment, or acquaintances with breast cancer between the mastectomy and the lumpectomy groups. Women interested in saving the breast were more likely to pick lumpectomy (35 vs. 84%, p = 0.001). A fear of cancer recurrence played a role in the decision (88 vs. 40%, p = 0.001). Fear of radiation therapy (76 vs. 57%, p = 0.002) and of the side effects (80 vs. 63%, p = 0.005) was a significant factor. The choice of surgery for breast cancer is an individual process between a woman and her surgeon. Attitudes and fears regarding cancer recurrence and radiation therapy may make women select mastectomy over lumpectomy.

  2. MRI evaluation of post-mastectomy irradiated breast implants: prevalence and analysis of complications.

    PubMed

    Rella, L; Telegrafo, M; Nardone, A; Milella, A; Stabile Ianora, A A; Lioce, M; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (RT) on breast implants as detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) searching for short-term complications. One hundred and forty patients (total of 144 implants) were evaluated by MRI; 80 (group 1) had undergone RT, whereas the remaining 60 patients (group 2) underwent mastectomy with implant reconstruction without RT. Two radiologists evaluated MRI images searching for implant rupture signs, sub-capsular seromas, capsular contracture, soft-tissue oedema, peri-implant fluid collections. Implant ruptures were classified as severe complications; seromas and capsular contractures as moderate complications; oedema and fluid collections as mild complications. The prevalence of MRI findings in the two groups was calculated and compared by unpaired t-test. Cohen's kappa statistics was used to assess interobserver agreement. Sixty-nine out of 144 (48%) implants presented pathological findings at MRI with complication rates of 47.5 and 48.4 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Two (5%) severe complications, 10 (26%) moderate complications, and 26 (69%) mild complications occurred in group 1 and surgical treatment was performed in 10 cases. Two (6%) severe complications, seven (23%) moderate complications, and 22 (71%) mild complications occurred in group 2 and surgical treatment was performed in eight cases. No significant difference between the two groups was found (p>0.1). Almost perfect agreement between the two radiologists was found for MRI image detection (k=0.86). RT does not seem to cause a significant effect on breast implants in terms of complication rate in patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction. One-stage immediate implant-based breast reconstruction performed at the same time as mastectomy could be proposed. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer in Men Do men get breast cancer? Since men have breast tissue, they can get breast cancer, but it’s rare. About 1 percent of ... breast cancer cases in the U.S. occur in men. It may sound like a small number, but ...

  4. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Breast Requiring Emergent Radical Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Nicholas D; Harris, Jennifer W; Sloan, David A

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, aggressive, soft-tissue infection that results in necrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia. It spreads rapidly and may progress to sepsis, multi-organ failure, and death. Predisposing conditions include diabetes, chronic alcoholism, advanced age, vascular disease, and immunosuppression and many cases are preceded by an injury or invasive procedure. Necrotizing soft-tissue infection of the breast is uncommon, with only a few reported cases in the literature. We present a 53-year-old diabetic woman who presented to the emergency room with several weeks of worsening breast and shoulder pain, swelling, and erythema. Upon formal evaluation by the surgical service, a necrotizing soft-tissue infection was suspected, and the patient was scheduled for emergent, surgical debridement. Because of the aggressive nature and high mortality of this disease, immediate surgical intervention, coupled with antibiotic therapy and physiologic support, is necessary to prevent complications and death. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Differences Among a Modern Cohort of BRCA Mutation Carriers Choosing Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomies Compared to Breast Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Elizabeth; Zabor, Emily C; Stempel, Michelle; Mangino, Debra; Heerdt, Alexandra; Pilewskie, Melissa

    2017-10-01

    Women with a BRCA mutation have significantly elevated breast cancer risk, which can be reduced by >90% with bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM). We sought to compare a cohort of BRCA mutation carriers choosing BPM versus breast surveillance to better elucidate factors that may impact decision making. Women with a BRCA mutation were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained database. The surveillance cohort (n = 313) consisted of women seen in a high-risk clinic between 2014 and 2016, while the surgery cohort (n = 142) consisted of women who underwent BPM between 2010 and 2016. Clinical and familial factors were compared between the groups. Women choosing BPM were more likely to have a BRCA1 than BRCA2 mutation compared with the surveillance group (57 vs. 45%, p = 0.02) and were less likely to have a personal history of ovarian cancer (10 vs. 20%, p = 0.01). Furthermore, women undergoing BPM were more likely to be married (78 vs. 62%, p = 0.01), to have more children (median 2 vs. 1, p < 0.001), and to have undergone a prophylactic oophorectomy (61 vs. 37%, p < 0.001). Women choosing BPM had more first-degree relatives (63 vs. 48%, p = 0.01) or a sister (23 vs. 14%, p = 0.02) with a history of breast cancer and were more likely to have a family member with ovarian cancer under the age of 40 years (9 vs. 4%, p = 0.03). There was no difference in the number of prior breast biopsies or history of atypia/lobular carcinoma in situ. The decision to undergo BPM appears multifactorial, with gene mutation, family history, and relationships appearing to have the strongest influence on decision making.

  7. Clinical outcomes of percutaneous drainage of breast fluid collections following mastectomy with expander-based breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine clinical outcomes of patients who underwent imaging-guided percutaneous drainage of breast fluid collections following mastectomy and breast reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS Retrospective review included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous drainage of fluid collections following mastectomy with tissue expander-based reconstruction between January 2007 and September 2012. A total of 879 mastectomies (563 patients) with expander-based breast reconstruction were performed during this period. 28 patients (5%) developed fluid collections, which led to 30 imaging-guided percutaneous drainage procedures. The median follow up time was 533 days. Patient characteristics, surgical technique, microbiology analysis, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS The mean age was 51.5 years (range 30.9 to 69.4 years) and the median time between breast reconstruction and drainage was 35 days (range 4 to 235 days). Erythema and swelling were the most common presenting symptoms. The median volume of fluid evacuated at the time of drain placement was 70 mL. Drains were left in place for a median 14 days (range 6 to 34 days). Microorganisms were detected in the fluid in 12 of 30 drainage procedures, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common microorganism. No further intervention was needed in 21 of 30 drainage procedures (70%). However, surgical intervention (removal of expanders) was needed following 6 (20%) drainages, and additional percutaneous drainage procedures were performed following 3 (10%) drainages. CONCLUSION Percutaneous drainage is an effective means of treating post operative fluid collections after expander-based breast reconstruction and can obviate the need for repeat surgery in most cases. PMID:23810309

  8. Breast reconstruction post mastectomy- Let's Google it. Accessibility, readability and quality of online information.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Noel P; Lang, Bronagh; Angelov, Sophia; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Boyle, Terence J; Al-Azawi, Dhafir; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the readability, accessibility and quality of information pertaining to breast reconstruction post mastectomy on the Internet in the English language. Using the Google © search engine the keywords "Breast reconstruction post mastectomy" were searched for. We analyzed the top 75 sites. The Flesch Reading Ease Score and Gunning Fog Index were calculated to assess readability. Web site quality was assessed objectively using the University of Michigan Consumer Health Web site Evaluation Checklist. Accessibility was determined using an automated accessibility tool. In addition, the country of origin, type of organisation producing the site and presence of Health on the Net (HoN) Certification status was recorded. The Web sites were difficult to read and comprehend. The mean Flesch Reading Ease scores were 55.5. The mean Gunning Fog Index scores was 8.6. The mean Michigan score was 34.8 indicating weak quality of websites. Websites with HoN certification ranked higher in the search results (p = 0.007). Website quality was influenced by organisation type (p < 0.0001) with academic/healthcare, not for profit and government sites having higher Michigan scores. 20% of sites met the minimum accessibility criteria. Internet information on breast reconstruction post mastectomy and procedures is poorly written and we suggest that Webpages providing information must be made more readable and accessible. We suggest that health professionals should recommend Web sites that are easy to read and contain high-quality surgical information. Medical information on the Internet should be readable, accessible, reliable and of a consistent quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sentinel lymph node biopsy before mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction may predict post-mastectomy radiotherapy, reduce delayed complications and improve the choice of reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mannu, G S; Navi, A; Morgan, A; Mirza, S M; Down, S K; Farooq, N; Burger, A; Hussien, M I

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant post-mastectomy radiotherapy (RT), which is often unpredicted, is known to increase complications following immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). To investigate the role of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLN) in predicting RT and improving the choice of IBR. All patients who had mastectomy and IBR between January 2004 and January 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. Axillary staging (clearance or SLN) was performed at the same time until October 2005 (Group 1), when the Unit's protocol was updated to perform SLN initially prior to mastectomy and IBR (Group 2). Patients in Group 2 with positive SLN were offered either a delayed reconstruction or a temporary subpectoral immediate tissue expander, while all options were offered if SLN was negative and in Group 1 patients. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were reviewed. 20 patients received unexpected RT in Group 1 (14 tissue expander, 4 Latissimus Dorsi flap with an implant and 2 DIEP flaps) compared to 11 patients in Group 2 who had a temporary tissue expander due to expected RT (P=0.03). Unexpected RT caused delayed complications in 14 patients (70%) compared to no delayed complications in patients who received expected RT in Group 2. SLN biopsy before IBR helps to predict RT and avoids its complications on breast reconstruction. Patients with positive SLN biopsy are best offered a temporary subpectoral tissue expander for IBR. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Accurate assessment of breast volume: a study comparing the volumetric gold standard (direct water displacement measurement of mastectomy specimen) with a 3D laser scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jia Miin; Mouratova, Naila; Jeffery, Rebecca M; Veitch, Daisy E; Woodman, Richard J; Dean, Nicola R

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative assessment of breast volume could contribute significantly to the planning of breast-related procedures. The availability of 3D scanning technology provides us with an innovative method for doing this. We performed this study to compare measurements by this technology with breast volume measurement by water displacement. A total of 30 patients undergoing 39 mastectomies were recruited from our center. The volume of each patient's breast(s) was determined with a preoperative 3D laser scan. The volume of the mastectomy specimen was then measured in the operating theater by water displacement. There was a strong linear association between breast volumes measured using the 2 different methods when using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.001). The mastectomy mean volume was defined by the equation: mastectomy mean volume = (scan mean volume × 1.03) -70.6. This close correlation validates the Cyberware WBX Scanner as a tool for assessment of breast volume.

  11. Mastectomy Skin Necrosis After Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Analysis Between Autologous Reconstruction and Implant-Based Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sue, Gloria R; Lee, Gordon K

    2018-05-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis is a significant problem after breast reconstruction. We sought to perform a comparative analysis on this complication between patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction and patients undergoing 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed on consecutive patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction or 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction by the senior author from 2006 through 2015. Patient demographic factors including age, body mass index, history of diabetes, history of smoking, and history of radiation to the breast were collected. Our primary outcome measure was mastectomy skin necrosis. Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis between the 2 patient cohorts. The treatment patterns of mastectomy skin necrosis were then analyzed. We identified 204 patients who underwent autologous breast reconstruction and 293 patients who underwent 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. Patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction were older, heavier, more likely to have diabetes, and more likely to have had prior radiation to the breast compared with patients undergoing implant-based reconstruction. The incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis was 30.4% of patients in the autologous group compared with only 10.6% of patients in the tissue expander group (P < 0.001). The treatment of this complication differed between these 2 patient groups. In general, those with autologous reconstructions were treated with more conservative means. Although 37.1% of patients were treated successfully with local wound care in the autologous group, only 3.2% were treated with local wound care in the tissue expander group (P < 0.001). Less than half (29.0%) of patients in the autologous group were treated with an operative intervention for this complication compared with 41.9% in the implant-based group (P = 0.25). Mastectomy skin necrosis is significantly more likely to occur after

  12. Equivalent survival after nipple-sparing compared to non-nipple-sparing mastectomy: data from California, 1988-2013.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Canchola, Alison J; Gomez, Scarlett L; Clarke, Christina A

    2016-11-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy, which may improve cosmesis, body image, and sexual function in comparison to non-nipple-sparing mastectomy, is increasingly used to treat early-stage breast cancer; however, long-term survival data are lacking. We evaluated survival after nipple-sparing mastectomy versus non-nipple-sparing mastectomy in a population-based cancer registry. We conducted an observational study using the California Cancer Registry, considering all stage 0-III breast cancers diagnosed in California from 1988 to 2013. We compared breast cancer-specific and overall survival time after nipple-sparing versus non-nipple-sparing mastectomy, using multivariable analysis. Among 157,592 stage 0-III female breast cancer patients treated with unilateral mastectomy from 1988-2013, 993 (0.6 %) were reported as having nipple-sparing and 156,599 (99.4 %) non-nipple-sparing mastectomies; median follow-up was 7.9 years. The proportion of mastectomies that were nipple-sparing increased over time (1988, 0.2 %; 2013, 5.1 %) and with neighborhood socioeconomic status, and decreased with age and stage. On multivariable analysis, nipple-sparing mastectomy was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer-specific mortality compared to non-nipple-sparing mastectomy [hazard ratio (HR) 0.71, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.51-0.98]. However, when restricting to diagnoses 1996 or later and adjusting for a larger set of covariates, risk was attenuated (HR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.52-1.42). Among California breast cancer patients diagnosed from 1988-2013, nipple-sparing mastectomy was not associated with worse survival than non-nipple-sparing mastectomy. These results may inform the decisions of patients and doctors deliberating between these surgical approaches for breast cancer treatment.

  13. Surgical treatment of gynecomastia: mastectomy compared to liposuction technique.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan-Ni; Wang, Yan-Bo; Huang, Rui; He, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Ren, Yan-Lv; Pang, Jian-Hua; Pang, Da

    2014-09-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast. Yet enlarged breasts cause anxiety, embarrassment, psychosocial discomfort, and fear of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the experience of gynecomastia patients undergoing mastectomy and liposuction surgery. Seven hundred thirty-three patients were analyzed for age, chief complaint, position, grade, operation approach, biopsy, and complication between mastectomy group and liposuction group, from 1990 to 2010. Four hundred two patients (436 breasts) were treated with mastectomy and 331 patients (386 breasts) were treated with liposuction techniques. Three hundred thirty (82%) patients complained of breast lump and lump with pain in mastectomy group, and 204 (61%) patients complained of enlargement breast and enlargement with pain in liposuction group (P < 0.05). All excision specimens were performed for routine histological analysis which showed pathologic diagnosis in patients with mastectomy (100%). One hundred fifty-nine (41%) patients with liposuction acquired pathologic diagnosis through fine needle aspiration and/or core biopsy (P < 0.05). The reoperation rates in mastectomy group and liposuction group were 1.4% and 0.5%, respectively. There were no nipple/areola necrosis and scars in liposuction group. The surgical treatment of gynecomastia required an individual approach, depending on symptoms (lump or enlargement) and requirements of patients. Patients who chose mastectomy were looking for reassurance that their pathologic diagnosis was benign. The increase in the number of liposuction patients was reflected in our study because it was associated with superior esthetic results and few complications.

  14. A Woman's Decision to Choose Bilateral Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Suplee, Patricia D; Boiler, Jennifer L K; D'Emilia, John C

    2015-01-01

    Rates of bilateral mastectomy as treatment for unilateral breast cancer have been rising. Quantitative analyses have resulted in assumptions about why women choose this procedure, without confirmation from the women. The objective of this study was to explore a woman's decision making in the choice of bilateral mastectomy as a treatment for unilateral breast cancer, regardless of stage. A qualitative descriptive design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted by 2 researchers using a semistructured interview guide to elicit data, which were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Twenty-three women were interviewed. Five themes were identified that address specific determinants of the decision-making process: finding something, collecting evidence, perceived level of risk, identifying priorities, and making the decision. Nine women reported that their physicians recommended bilateral mastectomy. Women who recalled being advised of their risk of recurrence reported overestimates of that risk. The reasons women chose bilateral mastectomy were to avoid a lifetime of follow-up screenings with the subsequent fear of hearing that the breast cancer had returned and wanting to stay alive and well for their children and families. Except for women carrying genetic susceptibility to breast cancer, bilateral mastectomy is not considered the standard of care. Yet women are being offered or choosing this procedure. Nurses can be advocates for women by speaking positively about how women have the right to choose their treatment based on best evidence and personal choice. This evidence should include benefits and risks of the treatment.

  15. [Decision Making Experience on Breast Reconstruction for Women with Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yi, Myungsun; Joung, Woo Joung; Park, Eun Young; Kwon, Eun Jin; Kim, Haejin; Seo, Ji Young

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore decision making experiences of Korean women with breast cancer who underwent breast reconstruction with/after a mastectomy. Data were collected during 2015-2016 through individual in-depth interviews with 10 women who had both mastectomy and breast reconstruction, and analyzed using phenomenological method to identify essential themes on experiences of making a decision to have breast reconstruction. Five theme clusters emerged. First, "expected loss of sexuality and discovery of autonomy" illustrates various aims of breast reconstruction. Second, "holding tight to the reputation of doctors amid uncertainty" specifies the importance of a trust relationship with their physician despite a lack of information. Third, "family members to step back in position" describes support or opposition from family members in the decision making process. Fourth, "bewilderment due to the paradox of appearance-oriented views" illustrates paradoxical environment, resulting in confusion and anger. Lastly, "decision to be made quickly with limited time to oneself" describes the crazy whirling process of decision making. Findings highlight aims, worries, barriers, and facilitators that women with breast cancer experience when making a decision about breast reconstruction. Deciding on breast reconstruction was not only a burden for women in a state of shock with a diagnosis of breast cancer, but also an opportunity to decide to integrate their body, femininity, and self which might be wounded from a mastectomy. These findings will help oncology professionals provide effective educational counselling before the operation to promote higher satisfaction after the operation.

  16. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  17. Lifetime Costs of Prophylactic Mastectomies and Reconstruction versus Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Mattos, David; Gfrerer, Lisa; Reish, Richard G; Hughes, Kevin S; Cetrulo, Curtis; Colwell, Amy S; Winograd, Jonathan M; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2015-12-01

    The past decade has seen an increasing prevalence of prophylactic mastectomy with decreasing ages of patients treated for breast cancer. Data are limited on the fiscal impacts of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy trends, and no study has compared bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with reconstruction to surveillance in high-risk patients. Lifetime third-party payer costs over 30 years were estimated with 2013 Medicare reimbursement rates. Costs were estimated for patients choosing contralateral or bilateral prophylactic mastectomy versus surveillance, with immediate reconstructions using a single-stage implant, tissue expander, or perforator-based free flap approach. Published cancer incidence rates predicted the percentage of surveillance patients that would require mastectomies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted that varied cost growth, discount rate, cancer incidence rate, and other variables. Lifetime costs and present values (3 percent discount rate) were estimated. Lifetime prophylactic mastectomy costs were lower than surveillance costs, $1292 to $1993 lower for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and $15,668 to $21,342 lower for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, depending on the reconstruction. Present value estimates were slightly higher for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy over contralateral surveillance but still cost saving for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy compared with bilateral surveillance. Present value estimates are also cost saving for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy when the modeled contralateral breast cancer incidence rate is increased to at least 0.6 percent per year. These findings are consistent with contralateral and bilateral prophylactic mastectomy being cost saving in many scenarios, regardless of the reconstructive option chosen. They suggest that physicians and patients should continue to receive flexibility in deciding how best to proceed clinically in each case.

  18. Coping after Mastectomy: Antecedents and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    Psychological well-being following mastectomy is a concern of rehabilitation psychologists as the life expectancy of women treated for breast cancer is increasing. Well-being can be threatened by stress that these women may suffer from the diagnosis of cancer and amputation of a significant body part. A study was conducted to examine the…

  19. Implementation of a Breast/Reconstruction Surgery Coordinator to Reduce Preoperative Delays for Patients Undergoing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Losk, Katya; Mallory, Melissa A.; Camuso, Kristen; Cutone, Linda; Caterson, Stephanie; Bunnell, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction (MIR) requires coordination between breast and reconstructive surgical teams, leading to increased preoperative delays that may adversely impact patient outcomes and satisfaction. Our cancer center established a target of 28 days from initial consultation with the breast surgeon to MIR. We sought to determine if a centralized breast/reconstructive surgical coordinator (BRC) could reduce care delays. Methods: A 60-day pilot to evaluate the impact of a BRC on timeliness of care was initiated at our cancer center. All reconstructive surgery candidates were referred to the BRC, who had access to surgical clinic and operating room schedules. The BRC worked with both surgical services to identify the earliest surgery dates and facilitated operative bookings. The median time to MIR and the proportion of MIR cases that met the time-to-treatment goal was determined. These results were compared with a baseline cohort of patients undergoing MIR during the same time period (January to March) in 2013 and 2014. Results: A total of 99 patients were referred to the BRC (62% cancer, 21% neoadjuvant, 17% prophylactic) during the pilot period. Focusing exclusively on patients with a cancer diagnosis, an 18.5% increase in the percentage of cases meeting the target (P = .04) and a 7-day reduction to MIR (P = .02) were observed. Conclusion: A significant reduction in time to MIR was achieved through the implementation of the BRC. Further research is warranted to validate these findings and assess the impact the BRC has on operational efficiency and workflows. PMID:26883406

  20. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  1. Nation-Wide Korean Breast Cancer Data from 2008 Using the Breast Cancer Registration Program

    PubMed Central

    Na, Kuk Young; Kim, Ku Sang; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Soo-Joong; Park, Heung Kyu; Cho, Young Up

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Since 1996, the Korean Breast Cancer Society has collected nation-wide breast cancer data and analyzed the data using their online registration program biannually. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of Korean breast cancer from 2008 and examine chronological based patterns. Methods Data were collected from 38 medical schools (67 hospitals), 20 general hospitals, and 10 private clinics. The data on the total number, gender, and age distribution were collected through a questionnaire as well as other detailed data analyzed via the online registration program. Results In 2008, there were 13,908 patients who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer was 57.3 among 100,000 and the median age was 49 years. The age distribution had not changed since the initial survey; however the proportion of postmenopausal patients had increased and median age was older than the past. In staging distribution, the proportion of early breast cancer (stage 0, I) was 47.2% with, breast-conserving surgery performed in 58% and mastectomy in 39.5%. Conclusion Compared to past data, the incidence of breast cancer in Korea continues to rise. Furthermore, the proportion of those detected by screening and breast conservation surgery has increased remarkably. To understand the patterns of Korean breast cancer, the nation-wide data should continuously investigated. PMID:22031806

  2. Preoperative risk assessment among women undergoing bilateral prophylactic mastectomy for cancer risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Rueth, Natasha M; McMahon, Melissa; Arrington, Amanda K; Swenson, Karen; Leach, Joseph; Tuttle, Todd M

    2011-09-01

    Cancer risk assessment is an important decision-making tool for women considering irreversible risk-reducing surgery. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of BRCA testing among women undergoing bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM) and to review the characteristics of women who choose BPM within a metropolitan setting. We retrospectively reviewed records of women who underwent BPM in the absence of cancer within 2 health care systems that included 5 metropolitan hospitals. Women with invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were excluded; neither lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) nor atypical hyperplasia (AH) were exclusion criteria. We collected demographic information and preoperative screening and risk assessment, BRCA testing, reconstruction, and associated cancer risk-reducing surgery data. We compared women who underwent BRCA testing to those not tested. From January 2002 to July 2009, a total of 71 BPMs were performed. Only 25 women (35.2%) had preoperative BRCA testing; 88% had a BRCA mutation. Compared with tested women, BRCA nontested women were significantly older (39.1 vs. 49.2 years, P < 0.001), had significantly more preoperative biopsies and mammograms and had fewer previous or simultaneous cancer risk-reducing surgery (oophorectomy). Among BRCA nontested women, common indications for BPM were family history of breast cancer (n = 21, 45.6%) or LCIS or AH (n = 16, 34.8%); 9 nontested women (19.6%) chose BPM based on exclusively on cancer-risk anxiety or personal preference. Most women who underwent BPM did not receive preoperative genetic testing. Further studies are needed to corroborate our findings in other geographic regions and practice settings.

  3. Preoperative Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Use by Breast Density and Family History of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Zhu, Weiwei; Weiss, Julie; Wernli, Karen J; Goodrich, Martha E; Kerlikowske, Karla; DeMartini, Wendy; Ozanne, Elissa M; Onega, Tracy

    2018-01-15

    Use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among women with a new breast cancer has increased over the past decade. MRI use is more frequent in younger women and those with lobular carcinoma, but associations with breast density and family history of breast cancer are unknown. Data for 3075 women ages >65 years with stage 0-III breast cancer who underwent breast conserving surgery or mastectomy from 2005 to 2010 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium were linked to administrative claims data to assess associations of preoperative MRI use with mammographic breast density and first-degree family history of breast cancer. Multivariable logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association of MRI use with breast density and family history, adjusting for woman and tumor characteristics. Overall, preoperative MRI use was 16.4%. The proportion of women receiving breast MRI was similar by breast density (17.6% dense, 16.9% nondense) and family history (17.1% with family history, 16.5% without family history). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found no difference in preoperative MRI use by breast density (OR = 0.95 for dense vs. nondense, 95% CI: 0.73-1.22) or family history (OR = 0.99 for family history vs. none, 95% CI: 0.73-1.32). Among women aged >65 years with breast cancer, having dense breasts or a first-degree relative with breast cancer was not associated with greater preoperative MRI use. This utilization is in keeping with lack of evidence that MRI has higher yield of malignancy in these subgroups.

  4. Evaluation of Social Support, Quality of Life, and Body Image in Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spatuzzi, Roberta; Vespa, Anna; Lorenzi, Primo; Miccinesi, Guido; Ricciuti, Marcello; Cifarelli, Wanda; Susi, Marina; Fabrizio, Tommaso; Ferrari, Maria G; Ottaviani, Marica; Giulietti, Maria V; Merico, Fabiana; Aieta, Michele

    2016-02-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the quality of life, body image, and perceived social support in women with breast cancer surgery. Patients receiving breast-conserving surgery (BCS) (n = 72), mastectomy alone (n = 44), and mastectomy with breast reconstruction (n = 41) were evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the EORTC Breast Cancer Module (QLQ-BR23), the Body Image Scale (BIS) and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). The results indicated that the BCS group had a better body image compared with the other 2 groups and better role functioning compared with the mastectomy-alone group. In the reconstruction group, body image correlated with perceived social support, especially from family and significant others. These results suggest that a positive perception of a supportive social network can help women with breast reconstruction to better cope with the psychological effects of surgery on their body image.

  5. Olaparib In Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-27

    Metastatic Breast Cancer; Invasive Breast Cancer; Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA1); Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA2); CHEK2 Gene Mutation; ATM Gene Mutation; PALB2 Gene Mutation; RAD51 Gene Mutation; BRIP1 Gene Mutation; NBN Gene Mutation

  6. Breast conservation in the setting of contemporary multimodality treatment provides excellent outcomes for patients with occult primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rueth, Natasha M; Black, Dalliah M; Limmer, Angela R; Gabriel, Emmanuel; Huo, Lei; Fornage, Bruno D; Dogan, Basak E; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Yi, Min; Hunt, Kelly K; Strom, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate recurrence and survival for patients with occult (T0N+) breast cancer who underwent contemporary treatment, assessing outcomes for breast conservation and mastectomy. We performed a single-institution review of women with occult breast cancer presenting with axillary metastasis without identifiable breast tumor or distant metastasis. We excluded patients with tumors in the axillary tail or mastectomy specimen, patients with additional nonbreast cancer diagnoses, and patients with a history of breast cancer. Breast conservation was defined as axillary node dissection with radiation therapy, without breast surgery. We evaluated patient, tumor, treatment, and outcome variables. Patients were assessed for local, regional, and distant recurrences. Overall survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Thirty-six patients met criteria for occult breast cancer. Most of these patients (77.8 %) had N1 disease. Fifty percent of cancers (n = 18) were estrogen receptor-positive; 12 (33.3 %) were triple-negative. All patients were evaluated with mammography. Thirty-five patients had breast ultrasound (97.2 %) and 33 (91.7 %) had an MRI. Thirty-four patients (94.4 %) were treated with chemotherapy and 33 (91.7 %) with radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients (75.0 %) were treated with breast conservation. The median follow-up was 64 months. There were no local or regional failures. One distant recurrence occurred >5 years after diagnosis, resulting in a 5-years overall survival rate of 100 %. There were no significant survival differences between patients receiving breast conservation versus mastectomy (p = 0.7). Breast conservation-performed with contemporary imaging and multimodality treatment-provides excellent local control and survival for women with T0N+ breast cancer and can be safely offered instead of mastectomy.

  7. Patient Information Needs and Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tracey L; Groot, Gary; Cochran, David; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2018-04-27

    Although many women benefit from breast reconstruction after mastectomy, several studies report women's dissatisfaction with the level of information they were provided with before reconstruction. The present meta-synthesis examines the qualitative literature that explores women's experiences of breast reconstruction after mastectomy and highlights women's healthcare information needs. After a comprehensive search of 6 electronic databases (CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Scopus), we followed the methodology for synthesizing qualitative research. The search produced 423 studies, which were assessed against 5 inclusion criteria. A meta-synthesis methodology was used to analyze the data through taxonomic classification and constant targeted comparison. Some 17 studies met the inclusion criteria, and findings from 16 studies were synthesized. The role of the healthcare practitioner is noted as a major influence on women's expectations, and in some instances, women did not feel adequately informed about the outcomes of surgery and the recovery process. In general, women's desire for normality and effective emotional coping shapes their information needs. The information needs of women are better understood after considering women's actual experiences with breast reconstruction. It is important to inform women of the immediate outcomes of reconstruction surgery and the recovery process. In an attempt to better address women's information needs, healthcare practitioners should discover women's initial expectations of reconstruction as a starting point in the consultation. In addition, the research revealed the importance of the nurse navigator in terms of assisting women through the recovery process.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work

  8. Comparing oncoplastic breast conserving surgery with mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: Case-matched patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, Jennett E; McCulley, Stephen J; Brock, Lisa; Akerlund, Malin T E; Macmillan, R Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery (OBCS) allows women who may otherwise have mastectomy and immediate reconstruction (MxIR) the choice to conserve their breast yet avoid deformity. We compared the outcome of these options. Two cohorts meeting study criteria were identified from prospectively audited series of women undergoing OBCS or MxIR. After case matching for age, tumour size and date of surgery, stratification by breast size and controlling for radiotherapy; body image scale (BIS) scores of psychosocial function and patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for breast appearance and return to function were analysed. A total of 567 women (286 treated by OBCS and 281 by MxIR) fulfilled inclusion criteria. Demographics were similar between the two unmatched cohorts, except for radiotherapy, age and tumour size (all p < 0.001). Overall, BIS score (p = 0.002), self-rated breast appearance, return to work and function (all p < 0.001) significantly favoured OBCS. Case-matched women with larger breasts treated by OBCS reported better BIS scores (mean 3.30 vs. 5.37, p = 0.011) and self-rated breast appearance score (p < 0.001) than MxIR, whereas no significant difference was observed for smaller breasts. BIS and appearance favoured OBCS, regardless of whether radiotherapy would have been avoided if treated by MxIR. OBCS offers suitable women the option to avoid MxIR while providing faster recovery. Better psychosocial and self-rated satisfaction with breast appearance is achieved for OBCS in all groups, regardless of the need for radiotherapy, apart from those women with smaller breasts for whom the results are comparable. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Breast cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Radecka, Barbara; Litwiniuk, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) in young women is rare, affecting only 4-6% of women under the age of 40. Regardless, BC remains the most common malignancy among younger patients. Recently, a significant increase in BC rates has been observed among pre-menopausal subjects. Breast cancer in young women requires special attention due to its specific morphologic and prognostic characteristics and unique aspects, including fertility preservation and psychosocial issues (e.g. its impact on family life and career). Young women are more likely to have tumors with higher incidence of negative clinicopathologic features (higher histological grade, more lymph node positivity, lower estrogen receptor (ER) positivity, higher rates of Her2/neu overexpression). Also, they tend to be diagnosed at more advanced stages of the disease. That, in turn, contributes to less favorable prognosis as compared to older women. Young women are generally treated similarly to older patients. Surgical management includes mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery, followed by radiation therapy (younger women have higher local recurrence rates than older women, especially after breast-conserving therapy). Although the basics of chemotherapy are the same for patients of all ages, younger women have some special considerations. It is important to consider options for fertility preservation before starting systemic treatment. Patients should have access to genetic testing as their results may affect the choice of therapy. Younger women and their families should receive adequate psychological support and counselling.

  10. Breast cancer associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Nakos, Georgios; Sambaziotis, Dimitrios; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2010-10-01

    The association between breast cancer and type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) is a rare clinical entity. We herein present the case of a 59-year-old woman, with typical clinical manifestations of NF1, who presented with a painless lump in her right breast, which she had first noticed 8 months earlier. Clinical examination and diagnostic workup were suggestive of a breast carcinoma, and a modified radical mastectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a poorly differentiated invasive ductal breast carcinoma and multiple neurofibromas. The pathological staging was pT2N1a according to TNM/UICC. Delayed presentation of the patient was the result of her mistakenly identifying the breast tumor as a manifestation of NF1 neurofibromatosis.

  11. Impact of Acellular Dermal Matrix (ADM) Use Under Mastectomy Flap Necrosis on Perioperative Outcomes of Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Young; Bang, Sa Ik

    2017-04-01

    There is conflicting data on the potential necrotic complications of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) use in breast reconstruction, and most studies focus on mastectomy flap necrosis as an outcome measure associated with ADM use. The aim of this study was to examine cases with necrotic complications with and without the use of ADM and to investigate whether ADM affected perioperative outcomes in cases with necrotic complications. Patients who experienced mastectomy flap necrosis following mastectomy with tissue expander placement between January 2009 and March 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was explantation of the expander, and other associated outcomes such as seroma or infection were also recorded. A total of 57 breasts with mastectomy flap necrosis were identified: 32 of which were in the non-ADM group and 25 in the ADM group. The rate of explantation was 28% (7/25) in the ADM group versus 6.3% (2/32) in the non-ADM group, which was significantly different (P = 0.034). The ADM group had a significantly higher rate of "major" infection requiring surgical debridement than the non-ADM group (P = 0.016). Multivariate analysis showed that the use of ADM was trending toward an increasing expander rate with borderline significance (P = 0.05). This study demonstrated that ADM use under mastectomy flap necrosis was a potential risk for explantation of the expander and major infection. Surgeons should be cautious with the use of ADM with devascularized mastectomy skin flaps prone to necrosis. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  12. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  13. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical PMID:28331682

  14. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  15. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    08-1-0767 TITLE: Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yashaswi Shrestha... Breast Cancer Oncogenes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0767 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Yashaswi...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer is attributed to genetic alterations, the majority of which are yet to be characterized. Oncogenic

  16. A study on mastectomy samples to evaluate breast imaging quality and potential clinical relevance of differential phase contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; Trippel, Mafalda; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K; Roessl, Ewald; Köhler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Wieberneit, Nataly; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Differential phase contrast and scattering-based x-ray mammography has the potential to provide additional and complementary clinically relevant information compared with absorption-based mammography. The purpose of our study was to provide a first statistical evaluation of the imaging capabilities of the new technique compared with digital absorption mammography. We investigated non-fixed mastectomy samples of 33 patients with invasive breast cancer, using grating-based differential phase contrast mammography (mammoDPC) with a conventional, low-brilliance x-ray tube. We simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast, and small-angle scattering signals that were combined into novel high-frequency-enhanced images with a dedicated image fusion algorithm. Six international, expert breast radiologists evaluated clinical digital and experimental mammograms in a 2-part blinded, prospective independent reader study. The results were statistically analyzed in terms of image quality and clinical relevance. The results of the comparison of mammoDPC with clinical digital mammography revealed the general quality of the images to be significantly superior (P < 0.001); sharpness, lesion delineation, as well as the general visibility of calcifications to be significantly more assessable (P < 0.001); and delineation of anatomic components of the specimens (surface structures) to be significantly sharper (P < 0.001). Spiculations were significantly better identified, and the overall clinically relevant information provided by mammoDPC was judged to be superior (P < 0.001). Our results demonstrate that complementary information provided by phase and scattering enhanced mammograms obtained with the mammoDPC approach deliver images of generally superior quality. This technique has the potential to improve radiological breast diagnostics.

  17. Synchronous Bilateral Male Breast Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Woo-Young; Lee, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Ho-Chang; Ryu, Dong-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo; Yun, Hyo-Young

    2012-01-01

    Synchronous bilateral breast cancer is extremely rare in men and has not, up to date, been reported in Korea. A 54-year-old man presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. The right nipple was retracted and bilateral axillary accessory breasts and nipples were present. On physical examination, a 2 cm-sized mass was palpated directly under the right nipple, and, with squeezing, bloody discharge developed in a single duct of the left nipple. There was no palpable mass in the left breast, and axillary lymph nodes were not palpable. Physical examination of external genitalia revealed a unilateral undescended testis on the left side. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer was diagnosed using mammography, ultrasonography, and core-needle biopsy. Histopathological examination revealed invasive ductal carcinoma in the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ in the left breast. Bilateral total mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and excision of accessory breasts in the axilla were performed. PMID:22807945

  18. Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Woo-Young; Lee, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Ho-Chang; Ryu, Dong-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo; Yun, Hyo-Young; Song, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Synchronous bilateral breast cancer is extremely rare in men and has not, up to date, been reported in Korea. A 54-year-old man presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. The right nipple was retracted and bilateral axillary accessory breasts and nipples were present. On physical examination, a 2 cm-sized mass was palpated directly under the right nipple, and, with squeezing, bloody discharge developed in a single duct of the left nipple. There was no palpable mass in the left breast, and axillary lymph nodes were not palpable. Physical examination of external genitalia revealed a unilateral undescended testis on the left side. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer was diagnosed using mammography, ultrasonography, and core-needle biopsy. Histopathological examination revealed invasive ductal carcinoma in the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ in the left breast. Bilateral total mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and excision of accessory breasts in the axilla were performed.

  19. Five methods of breast volume measurement: a comparative study of measurements of specimen volume in 30 mastectomy cases.

    PubMed

    Kayar, Ragip; Civelek, Serdar; Cobanoglu, Murat; Gungor, Osman; Catal, Hidayet; Emiroglu, Mustafa

    2011-03-27

    To compare breast volume measurement techniques in terms of accuracy, convenience, and cost. Breast volumes of 30 patients who were scheduled to undergo total mastectomy surgery were measured preoperatively by using five different methods (mammography, anatomic [anthropometric], thermoplastic casting, the Archimedes procedure, and the Grossman-Roudner device). Specimen volume after total mastectomy was measured in each patient with the water displacement method (Archimedes). The results were compared statistically with the values obtained by the five different methods. The mean mastectomy specimen volume was 623.5 (range 150-1490) mL. The breast volume values were established to be 615.7 mL (r = 0.997) with the mammographic method, 645.4 mL (r = 0.975) with the anthropometric method, 565.8 mL (r = 0.934) with the Grossman-Roudner device, 583.2 mL (r = 0.989) with the Archimedes procedure, and 544.7 mL (r = 0.94) with the casting technique. Examination of r values revealed that the most accurate method was mammography for all volume ranges, followed by the Archimedes method. The present study demonstrated that the most accurate method of breast volume measurement is mammography, followed by the Archimedes method. However, when patient comfort, ease of application, and cost were taken into consideration, the Grossman-Roudner device and anatomic measurement were relatively less expensive, and easier methods with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  20. Screening for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Niell, Bethany L; Freer, Phoebe E; Weinfurtner, Robert Jared; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-11-01

    The goal of screening is to detect breast cancers when still curable to decrease breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer screening in the United States is routinely performed with mammography, supplemental digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and/or MR imaging. This article aims to review the most commonly used breast imaging modalities for screening, discuss how often and when to begin screening with specific imaging modalities, and examine the pros and cons of screening. By the article's end, the reader will be better equipped to have informed discussions with patients and medical professionals regarding the benefits and disadvantages of breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Breast Cancer: Pros and Cons of Conservative vs Aggressive Management

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Arthur T.

    1981-01-01

    Cancer of the breast is the leading type of cancer in women in the United States (28 percent), and the leading cause of death from cancer in women (20 percent). More than half of the cases of breast cancer can be anticipated to exhibit recurrent disease. Most deaths occur within five years of discovery. There has been a minimum reduction in the mortality rate in the past 35 years. This failure is due to microemboli that spread via both the lymphatic and vascular systems in the early predetection state of the primary lesion. In Stage I and Stage II disease, modified radical mastectomy is the treatment of choice. In Stage III disease, radical mastectomy gives a higher incidence of local control of the disease without an increased chance of survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy offers a definite improvement in survival rates. PMID:7031277

  2. Prognostically favorable abdominal breast cancer metastases with stomach involvement.

    PubMed

    Akcali, Zafer; Sakalli, Hakan; Ozyilkan, Ozgur; Demirhan, Beyhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2005-05-01

    Abdominal metastases with stomach involvement are rare in breast cancer. The median disease free interval from the time of breast cancer diagnosis to gastric metastasis is usually very long. Treatment is generally palliative, and expected survival time is less than 1 year. A 59-year-old woman with breast cancer developed diffuse abdominal metastases involving stomach, abdominal lymph nodes, and omentum 9 years after she underwent mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The histopathologic diagnosis found by stomach specimen examination was invasive lobular carcinoma, and the cells expressed high levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors. The abdominal metastases were treated with surgery, postoperative chemotherapy, and further hormonal therapy. This was successful, and the patient has been in remission for more than 3 years. Once the definitive diagnosis of breast cancer metastases to the abdomen including the stomach is established, treatment that targets systemic breast cancer must be initiated. Our patient's extended survival time suggests that surgical treatment could be considered for selected patients.

  3. Gastric metastasis 14 years after mastectomy for breast lobular carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aurello, Paolo; D'Angelo, Francesco; Cosenza, Giulia; Petrocca, Sergio; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Ramacciato, Giovanni; Ziparo, Vincenzo

    2006-05-01

    In planning treatment of a gastric neoplasm in a patient previously treated for lobular breast carcinoma, it is important to differentiate a primary gastrointestinal tract tumor from a metastatic form. We report a case of a breast lobular carcinoma metastatic to the stomach. The patient underwent a subtotal gastrectomy for symptomatic disease. Although gastric symptoms appeared 14 years after the breast carcinoma, immunohistochemical analysis of the surgical specimen helped to establish that the gastric lesion, thought to be primary, was effectively a metastatic repetition of the breast neoplasm. To better define treatment in a gastric neoplasm patient previously treated for breast carcinoma, the preoperative diagnosis should rule out a metastatic disease. The patient described received an adjuvant chemotherapy according to breast cancer protocol after gastric resection for symptomatic disease. The patient is still alive and undergoing chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinosis.

  4. Multicenter prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Liu, Yinhua; Xu, Ling; Duan, Xuening; Li, Ting; Qin, Naishan; Kang, Hua; Jiang, Hongchuan; Yang, Deqi; Qu, Xiang; Jiang, Zefei; Yu, Chengze

    2014-01-01

    This multicenter prospective study aimed to assess the utility of dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer. The research subjects were drawn from patients with primary early resectable breast cancer treated in the breast disease centers of six three-level hospitals in Beijing from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. The participants were allocated to a breast-conserving surgery group (breast-conserving group) or a total mastectomy group (total mastectomy group). Enhanced MRI was used to measure breast volume, longest diameter of tumor and tumor volume. The correlations between these measurements and those derived from histopathologic findings were assessed. The relationships between the success rate of breast-conserving surgery and MRI- and pathology-based measurement results were statistically analyzed in the breast-conserving group. The study included 461 cases in the total mastectomy group and 195 in the breast-conserving group. Allocation to these groups was based on clinical indications and patient preferences. The cut-off for concurrence between MRI- and pathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of tumor was set at 0.3 cm. In the total mastectomy group, the confidence interval for 95% concurrence of these measurements was 35.41%-44.63%. Correlation coefficients for MRI and histopathology-based measurements of breast volume, tumor volume and tumor volume/breast volume ratio were r = 0.861, 0.569, and 0.600, respectively (all P < 0.001). In the breast-conserving group, with 0.30 cm taken as the cut-off for concurrence, the 95% confidence interval for MRI and pathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of tumor was 29.98%-44.01%. The subjective and objective success rates for breast-conserving surgery were 100% and 88.54%, respectively. There were significant correlations between dynamic enhanced MRI- and histopathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of breast lesions

  5. A Case of Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Head of the Pancrea.

    PubMed

    Nomizu; Katagata; Matsuoka; Suzuki; Yabuta; Watanabe; Yamaki; Saito; Tsuchiya; Abe

    1999-04-25

    A case of breast cancer that metastasized to the head of the pancreas 6 yearsand 8 months after mastectomy is reported. The pancreas head metastasis was associated with general fatigue and obstructive jaundice. The serum levels of CEA, CA15-3 and NCC-ST-439, tumor markers of breast cancer, were within normal limits, but CA15-3 was immunohistochemically demonstrated in the resected metastatic lesion, in a manner similar to lobular carcinoma of the breast.

  6. Breast cancer metastasis to the stomach resembling early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Eo, Wan Kyu

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer metastases to the stomach are infrequent, with an estimated incidence rate of approximately 0.3%. Gastric metastases usually are derived from lobular rather than from ductal breast cancer. The most frequent type of a breast cancer metastasis as seen on endoscopy to the stomach is linitis plastica; features of a metastatic lesion that resemble early gastric cancer (EGC) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a case of a breast cancer metastasis to the stomach from an infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast in a 48-year-old woman. The patient had undergone a left modified radical mastectomy with axillary dissection nine years prior. A gastric endoscopy performed for evaluation of nausea and anorexia showed the presence of a slightly elevated mucosal lesion in the cardia, suggestive of a type IIa EGC. A histological examination revealed nests of a carcinoma in the subepithelial lymphatics, and immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor was positive. This is an extremely rare case with features of type IIa EGC, but the lesion was finally identified as a cancer metastasis to the cardia of the stomach from an IDC of the breast.

  7. Immediate breast reconstruction with a myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap and implant following skin-sparing salvage mastectomy after irradiation as part of breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    van Huizum, Martine A; Hage, J Joris; Rutgers, Emiel J; Hoornweg, Marije J

    2016-08-01

    Local relapse after breast-conserving therapy including whole breast irradiation is typically treated by salvage mastectomy. Immediate reconstruction by pedicled transfer of a latissimus dorsi flap in combination with implantation of a definitive prosthesis or temporary tissue expander following skin sparing salvage mastectomy has been shown to be feasible. However, it has never been shown to be justifiable. The aim of the study was to compare the outcome of this procedure to the widely accepted secondary breast reconstruction by combined latissimus dorsi flap and implant after mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. The surgical outcome of 93 immediate latissimus dorsi and implant reconstructions after skin-sparing salvage mastectomy performed from 2007 to 2011 after radiotherapy was compared to that of 83 secondary reconstructions with the latissimus dorsi and an implant. The follow-up duration was 3.5 years in both groups. Complications were categorized as minor (conservative treatment sufficed) or major (flap loss, mammary skin loss, implant loss, seroma or haematoma indicating repeat surgery). The salvage group scored significantly less on half of the patient-related and procedure-related risk factors. Nevertheless, we observed 27% of short-term major surgical complications and an ultimate success rate of 94% in the salvage group compared to those observed in our series of secondary reconstruction in post-radiation women (27% and 93%, respectively). Skin-sparing salvage mastectomy combined with immediate reconstruction by transfer of a latissimus dorsi flap with an implant is a justifiable reconstructive option for women with a recurrence after irradiation as part of breast-conserving therapy. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prophylactic Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Direct-to-Implant Reconstruction of the Large and Ptotic Breast: Is Preshaping of the Challenging Breast a Key to Success?

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Bille, Camilla; Reitsma, Laurens C; Wamberg, Peter; Thomsen, Jørn Bo

    2017-09-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy with simultaneous hammock technique direct-to-implant reconstruction is increasingly offered to patients opting for risk-reducing mastectomy. Despite this promising method, patients with macromastia and ptotic breasts remain a challenging group to treat satisfactorily and more often end up undergoing a difficult corrective procedure and experience an unacceptably high rate of failed reconstruction. The authors examined whether targeted preshaping mastopexy/reduction could prepare these patients for a successful nipple-sparing mastectomy/direct-to-implant reconstruction. Patients seeking risk-reducing nipple-sparing mastectomy/direct-to-implant reconstruction at the authors' institutions deemed unfit for a one-stage procedure based on their previous experience were offered a targeted two-stage, risk-reducing mastopexy/reduction followed by a delayed secondary nipple-sparing mastectomy and direct-to-implant reconstruction. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks and 6 or 12 months. Forty-four reconstructions were performed in 22 patients aged 43 years (range, 26 to 57 years). All 44 procedures were completed successfully without any failure or nipple-areola complex losses. Patients' median body mass index was 30 kg/m (range, 22 to 44 kg/m). Six patients were smokers and one had hypertension. Two patients underwent reoperation because of hematoma and fat necrosis. The authors' results demonstrate that a targeted preshaping mastopexy/reduction followed by nipple-sparing mastectomy/direct-to-implant reconstruction can be safely planned in women who opt for a risk-reducing mastectomy and can be performed successfully with a 3- to 4-month time span between operations. On the basis of these results and the superior cosmetic outcome, the two-stage approach has become the authors' standard of care in all such settings. Therapeutic, IV.

  9. Male breast cancer in Tripoli, Libya.

    PubMed

    El-Habbash, Manal M; Alwindi, Abukris A

    2009-08-01

    To study the epidemiology, characteristics, and survival of male breast cancer patients. This non-randomized retrospective study includes male patients with breast cancer confirmed by biopsy. A total of 1568 breast cancer patients were registered in the Oncology Department, Tripoli Medical Center, Tripoli, Libya between January 1990 to June 2008. Twenty-two patients were male (1.4%). The mean age of male breast cancer patients was 61 years. They tend to have advanced local disease, as 65% of them were tumor (T)3 and T4, and 93.3% have positive lymph nodes. The preferred surgical treatment was mastectomy and axillary clearance in 65%, and 85% had invasive duct carcinoma. Regarding hormone receptor status, 70% were estrogen and progesterone positive. A total of 71% received chemotherapy as anthracycline based. During follow up, the overall recurrence rate was 47%. The bone was the most common site of relapse (37.5%). Overall survival rate was 82.4% at first, 76.5% at second, and 57% at fifth year. Two patients were brothers, and one of them developed multiple myeloma during follow up. In comparison to female patients with breast cancer, male patients are older, and have more advanced and more hormone positive disease.

  10. Is there a role for homeopathy in breast cancer surgery? A first randomized clinical trial on treatment with Arnica montana to reduce post-operative seroma and bleeding in patients undergoing total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Luca; Piraneo, Salvatore; Riggio, Eliana; Basilicò, Silvia; Sartani, Alessandra; Bossi, Daniela; Corsi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of Arnica montana on post-operative blood loss and seroma production in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy by administering Arnica Montana 1000 Korsakovian dilution (1000 K). Materials and Methods: From 2012 to 2014, 53 women were randomly assigned to A. montana or placebo and were followed up for 5 days. The main end point was the reduction in blood and serum volumes collected in drainages. Secondary end points were duration of drainage, a self-evaluation of pain, and the presence of bruising or hematomas. Results: The per-protocol analysis revealed a lower mean volume of blood and serum collected in drainages with A. montana (−94.40 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.48-211.28; P = 0.11). A regression model including treatment, volume collected in the drainage on the day of surgery, and patient weight showed a statistically significant difference in favor of A. montana (−106.28 ml; 95% CI: 9.45-203.11; P = 0.03). Volumes collected on the day of surgery and the following days were significantly lower with A. montana at days 2 (P = 0.033) and 3 (P = 0.0223). Secondary end points have not revealed significant differences. Conclusions: A. montana 1000 K could reduce post-operative blood and seroma collection in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy. Larger studies are needed with different dilutions of A. montana to further validate these data. PMID:28163953

  11. Is there a role for homeopathy in breast cancer surgery? A first randomized clinical trial on treatment with Arnica montana to reduce post-operative seroma and bleeding in patients undergoing total mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Piraneo, Salvatore; Riggio, Eliana; Basilicò, Silvia; Sartani, Alessandra; Bossi, Daniela; Corsi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of Arnica montana on post-operative blood loss and seroma production in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy by administering Arnica Montana 1000 Korsakovian dilution (1000 K). From 2012 to 2014, 53 women were randomly assigned to A. montana or placebo and were followed up for 5 days. The main end point was the reduction in blood and serum volumes collected in drainages. Secondary end points were duration of drainage, a self-evaluation of pain, and the presence of bruising or hematomas. The per-protocol analysis revealed a lower mean volume of blood and serum collected in drainages with A. montana (-94.40 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.48-211.28; P = 0.11). A regression model including treatment, volume collected in the drainage on the day of surgery, and patient weight showed a statistically significant difference in favor of A. montana (-106.28 ml; 95% CI: 9.45-203.11; P = 0.03). Volumes collected on the day of surgery and the following days were significantly lower with A. montana at days 2 ( P = 0.033) and 3 ( P = 0.0223). Secondary end points have not revealed significant differences. A. montana 1000 K could reduce post-operative blood and seroma collection in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy. Larger studies are needed with different dilutions of A. montana to further validate these data.

  12. Breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David M; Diaz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women with 232,670 new cases estimated in the USA for 2014. Approaches for reducing breast cancer risk include lifestyle modification, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery. Lifestyle modification has a variety of health benefits with few associated risks and is appropriate for all women regardless of breast cancer risk. Chemoprevention options have expanded rapidly, but most are directed at estrogen receptor positive breast cancer and uptake is low. Prophylactic surgery introduces significant additional risks of its own and is generally reserved for the highest risk women. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Criteria of life quality after reconstructive breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, H J; Neises, M; Blecken, S R

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of women after a breast cancer surgery. The question was if women which had reconstructive breast cancer surgery experience a higher quality of life than women who, for various distinct reasons, had not undergone reconstruction. The participants of this study were women who had either received a mastectomy or those who at the same time underwent a breast reconstruction using implants during the time period from 1/1/2000 until 31/10/2003 at the University Hospital for Women of Heidelberg and Mannheim. With the help of three standardised questionnaires, the women could describe their post-surgical physical and psychological condition as well as the perceived quality of life. The study included 33 patients who had received breast implants and 31 patients without reconstruction. Women who had breast cancer surgery with reconstruction through implants had less problems and restrictions concerning their physical condition as well as their functional status. Moreover, compared to those participants with no reconstruction, their cognitive and emotional burdens were not as pronounced and they also they were able to better cope with the disease. Thus, their overall quality of life was superior than that of the other women. Breast reconstruction after primary and secondary mastectomy is an important contribution in order to improve the self-esteem and quality of a patient's life. Furthermore, it plays an essential role in coping with the psychological effects of breast cancer.

  14. Recurrent granulomatous mastitis mimicking inflammatory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Ahmet Bahadir; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Daw, Hamed; Tahan, Gulgun; Gong, Yun

    2011-01-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is an uncommon benign breast lesion. Diagnosis is a matter of exclusion from other inflammatory, infectious and granulomatous aetiologies. Here, we presented an atypical GM case, which had clinical and radiologic features overlapping with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The disease had multiple recurrences. The patient is a 40-year-old Caucasian woman with a sudden onset of left breast swelling accompanied by diffuse skin redness, especially of the subareolar region and malodorous yellow nipple discharge from the left nipple. The disease progressed on antibiotic treatment and recurred after local resection. A similar lesion developed even after bilateral mastectomy. GM may show clinical/radiologic features suggestive of IBC. Multiple recurrences can be occasionally encountered. GM after recurrence could be much more alarming clinically. Pathology confirmation is the key for accurate diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach is important to rule out IBC. PMID:22715267

  15. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer can lead ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  17. Reducing Decisional Conflict and Enhancing Satisfaction with Information among Women Considering Breast Reconstruction following Mastectomy: Results from the BRECONDA Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Kerry A; Shaw, Laura-Kate E; Winch, Caleb J; Harcourt, Diana; Boyages, John; Cameron, Linda D; Brown, Paul; Lam, Thomas; Elder, Elisabeth; French, James; Spillane, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Deciding whether or not to have breast reconstruction following breast cancer diagnosis is a complex decision process. This randomized controlled trial assessed the impact of an online decision aid [Breast RECONstruction Decision Aid (BRECONDA)] on breast reconstruction decision-making. Women (n = 222) diagnosed with breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ, and eligible for reconstruction following mastectomy, completed an online baseline questionnaire. They were then assigned randomly to receive either standard online information about breast reconstruction (control) or standard information plus access to BRECONDA (intervention). Participants then completed questionnaires at 1 and 6 months after randomization. The primary outcome was participants' decisional conflict 1 month after exposure to the intervention. Secondary outcomes included decisional conflict at 6 months, satisfaction with information at 1 and 6 months, and 6-month decisional regret. Linear mixed-model analyses revealed that 1-month decisional conflict was significantly lower in the intervention group (27.18) compared with the control group (35.5). This difference was also sustained at the 6-month follow-up. Intervention participants reported greater satisfaction with information at 1- and 6-month follow-up, and there was a nonsignificant trend for lower decisional regret in the intervention group at 6-month follow-up. Intervention participants' ratings for BRECONDA demonstrated high user acceptability and overall satisfaction. Women who accessed BRECONDA benefited by experiencing significantly less decisional conflict and being more satisfied with information regarding the reconstruction decisional process than women receiving standard care alone. These findings support the efficacy of BRECONDA in helping women to arrive at their breast reconstruction decision.

  18. [Surgical manegement of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Bussmann, J F; Trede, M

    1975-12-18

    A survey of common operative methods in carcinoma of the breast is given. The own procedure in localized and generalized stages of the disease is presented. Simple mastectomy plus axillary dissection has according to our experience proven to be the method of choice.

  19. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    study by Boehm et al. (2007) identified IKBKE as a breast cancer oncogene that cooperates with HMLE -MEKDD to replace the function of myr-AKT in...1-0767 TITLE: Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes ~ PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yashaswi Shrestha...Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0767 5b. GRANT NUMBER BC083061 - PreDoc 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  20. Quality of Life of Nepalese Women Post Mastectomy

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Muna; Thapa, Niresh; Adhikari, Raj Devi; Petrini, Marcia A; Amatya, Kapendra Shekhar

    2018-04-25

    Introduction: Worldwide breast cancer is the common invasive cancer among the females. The quality of life of women after treatment, which is often a mastectomy, is frequently decreased. Objective: To determine the life quality of Nepalese women post mastectomy. Materials and Methods: One hundred seven women after a mastectomy were selected and interviewed by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire and its Breast Specific Module to assess women’s quality of life. Result: The study findings revealed a good score on global health status/quality of life. The respondents performed well on functional and symptom scales. In the Breast Specific Module, all respondents performed poor regarding sexual function and sexual enjoyment. Global Health Status was found useful among the women involved in service/business/agriculture and the survivors using breast prosthesis. In Breast Specific Module, systemic therapy side effects showed strong statistical associations with age, marital status, occupation, education, use of breast prosthesis and co-morbidity. Body image was highly significant with age, occupation, education, use of breast prosthesis and co-morbidity. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, counseling, and a structured educational programme is recommended to improve the QOL of women after a mastectomy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  1. Comparison among the levels of patients' satisfaction according to the surgical technique used in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Escolar Larrañaga, Lucía; Delgado Martínez, Julio; Miguelena Bobadilla, José María

    2017-12-01

    It has been proved that a breast reconstruction after a mastectomy has a great psycho-social impact on patients. For this reason, it is increasingly done in a greater percentage of cases. There are two major groups of reconstructive techniques: a reconstruction with implants and a reconstruction with autologous tissue of the patient. In order to make a more objective assessment of the results, it is important to know how satisfied these patients are with the results. Therefore, we performed a study using Q-BREAST, the aim of which is to analyze the satisfaction of mastectomized patients according to the different surgical reconstruction techniques. A retrospective, descriptive and observational study of patients reconstructed in our service from 2008 to 2011 was carried out. Patient satisfaction levels were compared according to the surgical technique used in breast reconstruction using the Q-BREAST test, which was mailed to them. There are no statistical differences in the levels of satisfaction in terms of age, type of mastectomy done, coadjutant treatment or existence of complications. Higher levels of satisfaction are observed in patients reconstructed with autologous tissue versus implants (P=.028). Patients reconstructed with autologous tissue have higher levels of satisfaction than those reconstructed with implants. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Mastectomy, body deconstruction, and impact on identity: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Piot-Ziegler, C; Sassi, M-L; Raffoul, W; Delaloye, J-F

    2010-09-01

    This qualitative study aims at understanding the consequences of body deconstruction through mastectomy on corporality and identity in women with breast cancer. Nineteen women were contacted through the hospital. All had to undergo mastectomy. Some were offered immediate breast reconstruction, others, because of cancer treatments, had no planned reconstruction. A qualitative reflexive methodological background was chosen. Women were invited to participate in three semi-structured interviews, one shortly before or after mastectomy, and the other interviews later in their illness courses, after surgery. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was performed. The analysis of the first interview of each woman is presented in this article. Mastectomy provokes a painful experience of body deconstruction. Even when immediate reconstruction is proposed, contrasted feelings and dissonance are expressed when comparing the former healthy body to the present challenged body entity. Body transformations are accompanied with experiences of mutilation, strangeness, and modify the physical, emotional social, symbolic and relational dimensions of the woman's gendered identity. Although the opportunity of breast reconstruction is seen as a possible recovery of a lost physical symmetry and body integrity, grieving the past body and integrating a new corporality leads to a painful identity crisis. With mastectomy, the roots of the woman's identity are challenged, leading to a re-evaluation of her existential values. The consequences of mastectomy transform the woman's corporality and embodiment, and question her identity. Psychological support is discussed in the perspective of our results.

  3. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  4. Mesorectum localization as a special kind of rectal metastasis from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fan; Liu, Zhong-Lin; Zhang, Qing; Kong, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Wen-Zhi

    2015-04-14

    Breast cancer can metastasize to other organs following initial treatment. Bones, liver, and the lung are the most common sites of breast cancer metastases. The digestive tract, on the other hand, is rarely involved. The incidence of mesorectal metastasis (a special category of rectal metastases) from breast cancer has not been described before. The case reported herein concerns a 68-year-old woman who underwent mastectomy. A pelvic mass with no symptoms was subsequently identified by computed tomography in the patient. We ultimately confirmed that this mass was a metastasis from breast cancer located in the mesorectum using surgical exploration and pathology results.

  5. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, J. 3d.; Paletta, C.; Hartrampf, C.R.

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1).more » The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects.« less

  6. Psychological factors associated with the intention to choose for risk-reducing mastectomy in family cancer clinic attendees.

    PubMed

    van Driel, C M G; Oosterwijk, J C; Meijers-Heijboer, E J; van Asperen, C J; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, I A; de Vries, J; Mourits, M J E; Henneman, L; Timmermans, D R M; de Bock, G H

    2016-12-01

    Women seeking counseling because of familial breast cancer occurrence face difficult decisions, such as whether and when to opt for risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) in case of BRCA1/2 mutation. Only limited research has been done to identify the psychological factors associated with the decision for RRM. This study investigated which psychological factors are related to the intention to choose for RRM. A cohort of 486 cancer-unaffected women with a family history of breast cancer completed the following questionnaires prior to genetic counseling: the Cancer Worry Scale, Positive And Negative Affect Scale, Perceived Personal Control Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and State Anxiety Scale and questions regarding socio-demographic characteristics, family history, risk perception and RRM intention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the relation between psychological factors and women's intention to choose for RRM. Factors associated with RRM intention were high positive affect (OR = 1.86, 95%CI = 1.12-3.08), high negative affect (OR = 2.52, 95%CI = 1.44-4.43), high cancer worry (OR = 1.65, 95%CI = 1.00-2.72), high perceived personal control (OR = 3.58, 95%CI = 2.18-5.89), high risk-perception (OR = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.15-2.95) and having children (OR = 2.06, 95%CI = 1.21-3.50). Negative and positive affects play an important role in the intention for RRM. Furthermore, perceived personal control over the situation is associated with an intention for RRM. In addition to focusing on accurate risk communication, counseling should pay attention to the influence of perceived control and emotions to facilitate decision-making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Small bowel metastasis from breast cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Jo, Don Hyoun; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Hyung Keun; Son, Dong Kyun; Chung, Ji Sung; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Soo Heon; Han, Joon Yeol; Kim, Jae Kwang; Chung, Kyu Won

    2005-08-01

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy in women and frequently metastasizes to various organs such as liver, lung, brain, bone and so on. But metastasis to gastrointestinal tract is rare. We describe a 73-year-old woman with small intestinal metastasis of breast cancer. She was diagnosed as right breast cancer in stage I, received modified radical mastectomy 6 years ago and had been followed up without any evidence of residual disease. During investigation for lower abdominal pain and weight loss of 9 kg, we found a small bowel mass. The histology of the tissue taken from small bowel mass was adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated. The immunohistochemical stain of this specimen showed 75% positivity of estrogen receptor and 90% positivity of progesterone receptor. This is a case of small bowel metastasis from breast cancer and we report this case with a review of literatures.

  8. Nummular Eczema of Breast: A Potential Dermatologic Complication after Mastectomy and Subsequent Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iwahira, Yoshiko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Yusuke; Kuwata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Purposes. The present paper reports clinical cases where nummular eczema developed during the course of breast reconstruction by means of implantation and evaluates the occurrence patterns and ratios of this complication. Methods. 1662 patients undergoing breast reconstruction were reviewed. Patients who developed nummular eczema during the treatment were selected, and a survey was conducted on these patients regarding three items: (1) the stage of the treatment at which nummular eczema developed; (2) time required for the lesion to heal; (3) location of the lesion on the reconstructed breast(s). Furthermore, histopathological examination was conducted to elucidate the etiology of the lesion. Results. 48 patients (2.89%) developed nummular eczema. The timing of onset varied among these patients, with lesions developing after the placement of tissue expanders for 22 patients (45.8%); after the tissue expanders were replaced with silicone implants for 12 patients (25%); and after nipple-areola complex reconstruction for 14 patients (29.2%). Nummular eczema developed both in periwound regions (20 cases: 41.7%) and in nonperiwound regions (32 cases: 66.7%). Histopathological examination showed epidermal acanthosis, psoriasiform patterns, and reduction of sebaceous glands. Conclusions. Surgeons should recognize that nummular eczema is a potential complication of breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and silicone implants. PMID:26380109

  9. PET scan for breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  10. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  11. Physical therapy after prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Unukovych, Dmytro; Johansson, Hemming; Johansson, Elizabeth; Arver, Brita; Liljegren, Annelie; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2014-08-01

    The rate of prophylactic mastectomies (PM) is increasing. Patients generally report high levels of health related quality of life and satisfaction after the procedure, whereas body image perception and sexuality may be negatively affected. The aim of the study was to evaluate the interest in physical therapy as a means of improving body image and sexuality in women after PM. Patients undergoing PM at Karolinska University Hospital between 2006 and 2010 were eligible. The following patient-reported outcome measures were used at study baseline and 2 years postoperatively: the body image scale (BIS), the sexual activity questionnaire (SAQ), the short-form health survey (SF-36), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD), and a study specific "pain/motion/sensation scale". Out of 125 patients invited to participate in this prospective randomized study, 43 (34%) consented and were randomized into the intervention (n = 24, 56%) or control (n = 19, 44%) groups. There were no statistically significant between-group differences found with respect to BIS, SAQ, SF-36, HAD, and "pain/motion/sensation". Two years postoperatively, more than half of the patients in both groups reported problems like feeling less attractive, less sexually attractive, their body feeling less whole, and being dissatisfied with their body. A majority marked a decreased sensation in breast area. The interest in a physiotherapy intervention was limited among women who had undergone PM. The intervention did not show any substantial effects. A large proportion of patients reported specific body image related and pain/motion/sensation problems postoperatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Brigid E; Lehman, Margot; Francis, Daniel P; See, Adrienne M

    2016-07-18

    Breast-conserving therapy for women with breast cancer consists of local excision of the tumour (achieving clear margins) followed by radiotherapy (RT). RT is given to sterilize tumour cells that may remain after surgery to decrease the risk of local tumour recurrence. Most true recurrences occur in the same quadrant as the original tumour. Whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) may not protect against the development of a new primary cancer developing in other quadrants of the breast. In this Cochrane review, we investigated the delivery of radiation to a limited volume of the breast around the tumour bed (partial breast irradiation (PBI)) sometimes with a shortened treatment duration (accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)). To determine whether PBI/APBI is equivalent to or better than conventional or hypo-fractionated WBRT after breast-conserving therapy for early-stage breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialized Register (4 May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 4 May 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 4 May 2015), CINAHL (4 May 2015) and Current Contents (4 May 2015). We searched the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register (5 May 2015), the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (4 May 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (17 June 2015). We searched for grey literature: OpenGrey (17 June 2015), reference lists of articles, several conference proceedings and published abstracts, and applied no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) without confounding, that evaluated conservative surgery plus PBI/APBI versus conservative surgery plus WBRT. Published and unpublished trials were eligible. Two review authors (BH and ML) performed data extraction and used Cochrane's 'Risk of bias' tool, and resolved any disagreements through discussion. We entered data into Review Manager 5 for analysis. We included

  13. Giant fibroadenoma presenting like fungating breast cancer in a Nigerian teenager.

    PubMed

    Arowolo, O A; Akinkuolie, A A; Adisa, A O; Obonna, G C; Olasode, B J

    2013-03-01

    Giant fibroadenoma of the breast is a rare benign breast tumour which seldom grows to a giant size, it is even rarer for this benign tumour to grow rapidly, ulcerate spontaneously and present like a fungating breast tumour in a way mimicking breast cancer. This is a presentation of a 14 year old premenarchal girl with a massive ulcerating and fungating left breast mass that was initially thought to be a fungating locally advanced breast carcinoma on clinical examination. Further examination of the morphology of the resected surgical specimen and histological examination confirmed it to be giant fibroadenoma of the breast. It was successfully managed by partial mastectomy and breast reconstruction with an excellent result and a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved. Though a rare clinical entity benign breast tumour can present like a fungating breast cancer and this must be bore in mind especially in young adolescent patients presenting with ulcerating breast tumour.

  14. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection.

  15. An Update in Breast Cancer Screening and Management

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  16. A review of the surgical management of breast cancer: plastic reconstructive techniques and timing implications.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Gedge D; Magarakis, Michael; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Jacobs, Lisa K; Manahan, Michele A; Flores, Jaime I

    2010-07-01

    The oncologic management of breast cancer has evolved over the past several decades from radical mastectomy to modern-day preservation of chest and breast structures. The increased rate of mastectomies over recent years made breast reconstruction an integral part of the breast cancer management. Plastic surgery now offers patients a wide variety of reconstruction options from primary closure of the skin flaps to performance of microvascular and autologous tissue transplantation. Well-coordinated partnerships between surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and patients address concerns of tumor control, cosmesis, and patients' wishes. The gamut of breast reconstruction options is reviewed, particularly noting state-of-the-art techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various timing modalities.

  17. Effects of state-level medicaid policies and patient characteristics on time to breast cancer surgery among medicaid beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Michael T; Schrag, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Medicaid beneficiaries with cancer are less likely to receive timely and high-quality care. This study examined whether differences in state-level Medicaid policies affect delays in time to surgery (TTS) among women diagnosed with breast cancer. Using 2006-2008 Medicaid data, we identified women aged 18-64 enrolled in Medicaid diagnosed with breast cancer. Analyses examined associations of state-specific Medicaid surgery reimbursements, Medicaid eligibility recertification period (annually vs. shorter) and required patient copayment on time from breast cancer diagnosis to receipt of breast surgery. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Separate multivariable regression analyses controlling for patient demographic characteristics and clustering by state were performed for breast conserving surgery (BCS), inpatient mastectomy, and outpatient mastectomy. The study included 7542 Medicaid beneficiaries with breast cancer: 3272 received BCS, 2156 outpatient mastectomy, and 2115 inpatient mastectomy. Higher Medicaid reimbursements for BCS were associated with decreased time from diagnosis to surgery. A 12-month (vs. <12 month) Medicaid eligibility recertification period was associated with decreased TTS for BCS and outpatient mastectomy. Black Medicaid beneficiaries (compared with non-Hispanic White beneficiaries) were more likely to experience delays for all three types of surgery, while Hispanic beneficiaries were more likely to experience delays only for outpatient mastectomy. State-level Medicaid policies and patient characteristics can affect receipt of timely surgery among Medicaid beneficiaries with breast cancer. As delays in surgery can increase morbidity and mortality, changes to state Medicaid policies and health system programs are needed to improve access to care for this vulnerable population.

  18. How breast cancer presents.

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 501 new breast cancers in patients seen in a consulting surgical practice revealed that 87% were in patients 45 years of age or older. The patients had found 83% of the cancers. The distributions of size and stage were the same for the tumours found by the patients and those found by the referring physicians. Two thirds of the cancers had an associated visible clinical sign, demonstrating the importance of inspection in the examination of the breast. Dimpling, sometimes apparent only on manipulation of the tumour, was present with 264 of the cancers and was often associated with "minimal" lesions. Mammography was done for 63 of the breast cancers but it missed 27. Of the physician-found cancers 15 were in patients who had already had breast cancer, 4 were in patients presenting with symptomatic metastases and 14 were in women presenting with other disorders. Of the 52 cancers found by periodic examination 3 were locally advanced and 21 had axillary metastases, while among the 28 "early" cancers 12 were in women who were senile, mentally defective or psychotic. Only four of the cancers found by the physicians were in women under age 45; two were rapidly fatal, one had an axillary metastasis, and the fourth was in a woman who had had cancer of the opposite breast. The remaining 284 lesions found by periodic or routine examination in women under age 45 were benign. Thus, periodic or routine examination for unsuspected breast cancer in women under age 45 seems unjustified except in those who have already had breast cancer. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6861046

  19. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Risk-reducing Surgery in Women at Risk for Familial Breast or Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhiem, K.; Pfeifer, K.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Kiechle, M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated 5 % of breast cancers and 10 % of ovarian cancers may be due to inherited autosomal dominant breast and ovarian cancer alleles BRCA1 und BRCA2. According to population-based studies 1 or 2 women per 1000 carry such a risk allele. The cumulative cancer risk for healthy women with a BRCA-mutation is between 60 and 85 % for breast cancer and between 20 and 60 % for ovarian cancer. Recent studies have reported an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer in women after unilateral breast cancer. Since 1997 the German Cancer Aid has supported an interdisciplinary approach for high-risk women consisting of genetic testing, counselling and prevention in 12 specialised centres. Since 2005 this concept has received additional support from health insurance companies, and results have been assessed with regard to outcomes (e.g. reduced mortality due to more intensive early diagnosis). The number of centres has increased to 15 at various university hospitals. These interdisciplinary centres offer women the opportunity to participate in a structured screening programme for the early diagnosis of breast cancer and provide non-directive counselling on the options for risk-reducing surgery, e.g., prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer. Such surgical interventions can significantly reduce the risk of disease, the respective disease-specific mortality and – particularly prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy – total mortality in BRCA-mutation carriers. PMID:26640291

  1. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  2. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  3. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0389 TITLE: Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin Burgess CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer 5a...safe and effective interventions; (ii) elimination of mortality associated with metastatic breast cancer ; and, (iii) distinguishing aggressive breast

  4. Epigenomics and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

  5. Breast cancer and protein biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gam, Lay-Harn

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

  6. Comprehensive visualization of paresthesia in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Jud, Sebastian M; Hatko, Reinhard; Maihöfner, Christian; Bani, Mayada R; Schrauder, Michael G; Lux, Michael P; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bani, Gassan; Eder, Irina; Fasching, Peter A; Loehberg, Christian R; Rauh, Claudia; Hein, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    As breast cancer survivors are benefiting increasingly from advanced forms of therapy, the side effects of locoregional treatment in the adjuvant setting are becoming more and more important. This article presents a new method of assessing the spatial distribution of paresthesia in breast cancer survivors after different locoregional treatments. A structured questionnaire assessing paresthesia, with body pictograms for marking paresthesia areas, was completed by 343 breast cancer survivors. The image information was digitized, generating gray-scale summation images with numbers from 0, indicating black (100 % of the patients had paresthesia), to 255, indicating white (none had paresthesia). The resulting map visualization showed the locations of paresthesia on body pictograms. The group included patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and mastectomy, and also patients who had received percutaneous and interstitial radiation. A total of 56.5 % of the patients stated that they had paresthesia. The paresthesia areas were distributed within the range suggested by clinical experience. Most patients stated that they had paresthesia in the upper outer quadrant and axilla. Patients who had undergone mastectomy or percutaneous radiotherapy appeared to have more paresthesia on some areas of the body surface. Patients who had undergone mastectomy indicated larger areas of paresthesia than those with BCS-4,066 pixels (px) vs. 2,275 px. Radiotherapy did not appear to influence the spatial distribution of paresthesia. Paresthesia is a common symptom after breast cancer treatment. This paper describes a new method of assessing this side effect to improve and individualize treatment for it in the future.

  7. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does your health insurance cover breast reconstruction? The Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act requires all health insurance providers and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that pay for mastectomy to also pay ...

  8. Obesity and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf

    The relationship between adiposity and breast cancer risk and prognosis is complex, with associations that differ depending on when body size is assessed (e.g., pre- vs. postmenopausal obesity) and when breast cancer is diagnosed (i.e., pre- vs. postmenopausal disease). Further, the impact of obesity on risk differs by tumor hormone receptor status (e.g., estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor) and, among postmenopausal women, use of exogenous hormones (i.e., hormone replacement therapy (HRT)). In the context of these complexities, this review focuses on associations between childhood and adolescent adiposity, general adiposity, weight changes (i.e., loss and gain), abdominal adiposity, and breast cancer risk and survival. Finally, we discuss potential mechanisms linking adiposity to breast cancer.

  9. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  10. Rectal metastasis from breast cancer: an interval of 17 years.

    PubMed

    Amin, Aliasger A; Reddy, Anil; Jha, Madan; Prasad, Kolanu

    2011-05-12

    Metastasis to gastrointestinal (GI) tract from breast cancer is rare. Commonly affected organ in GI tract is stomach, followed by colon and then rectum. The authors report a case of a 61-year-old woman who had a mastectomy for lobular carcinoma of the breast 17 years ago and was referred to colorectal clinic with increased frequency of stools. Colonoscopy showed a stricture in the rectum, but biopsy was inconclusive. As she was symptomatic, she had a Hartmann's resection 5 months after she initially presented to the clinic. Histopathology of the resected specimen showed it to be metastasis from lobular carcinoma of the breast. Awareness of potential long delays in the presentation of metastatic breast cancer especially lobular carcinoma helps in the earlier diagnosis and clinical management.

  11. Changes in shoulder muscle activity pattern on surface electromyography after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun Joo; Kwon, YoungOk

    2018-02-01

    Alterations in muscle activation and restricted shoulder mobility, which are common in breast cancer patients, have been found to affect upper limb function. The purpose of this study was to determine muscle activity patterns, and to compare the prevalence of abnormal patterns among the type of breast surgery. In total, 274 breast cancer patients were recruited after surgery. Type of breast surgery was divided into mastectomy without reconstruction (Mastectomy), reconstruction with tissue expander/implant (TEI), latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, or transverse rectus abdominis flap (TRAM). Activities of shoulder muscles were measured using surface electromyography. Experimental analysis was conducted using a Gaussian filter smoothing method with regression. Patients demonstrated different patterns of muscle activation, such as normal, lower muscle electrical activity, and tightness. After adjusting for BMI and breast surgery, the odds of lower muscle electrical activity and tightness in the TRAM are 40.2% and 38.4% less than in the Mastectomy only group. The prevalence of abnormal patterns was significantly greater in the ALND than SLNB in all except TRAM. Alterations in muscle activity patterns differed by breast surgery and reconstruction type. For breast cancer patients with ALND, TRAM may be the best choice for maintaining upper limb function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Secondary malignancies after breast cancer surgery. Comparison of retro- and prospective findings].

    PubMed

    Holdener, E E; Osterwalder, J; Senn, H J; Enderlin, F; Gloor, F

    1982-12-04

    Second malignancies (SM) represent one of the potential hazards of modern cancer treatment and especially of radio- and chemotherapy after surgery for breast cancer. For this reason, regional tumor registry data (1960-1975) on 1985 breast cancer patients were analyzed for SM in the retrospective part of our study. These data were compared with the prospective part of the study in which 241 patients were randomly assigned to either mastectomy or mastectomy and chemoimmunotherapy (CT + IT). In the retrospective part of the study, SM were observed in 83 cases (4.2%), 49% of which were SM of the contralateral breast. Most frequent extramammary SM were of gastrointestinal (25%), gynecologic (8%) and cerebral (5%) origin. Leukemias were found in 4% of all SM. Median time interval to SM was 5 years and 1 month. Within 5, 10 and 15 years after mastectomy 60%, 85% and 95% of SM were observed respectively. Median survival of patients with SM was 6 1/2 years. In the prospective part of the study, SM were observed in 9 cases (3.7%), 4.1% in the surgical control group and 3.4% in the adjuvant CT + IT group with a median observation time of 6 years post mastectomy. These data are compared to other current adjuvant breast trials and do not indicate as of now an increase in SM under present adjuvant therapy.

  13. Women's Educational Needs and Perceptions About Survivorship Following Bilateral Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Suplee, Patricia D; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Boiler, Jennifer L K

    2016-08-01

    More women are choosing to have a bilateral mastectomy to treat unilateral breast cancer despite it not being considered the standard of care. Women are making this choice for various reasons, including anxiety of follow-up screening of the other breast, risk of cancer recurrence for the rest of their lives, and desire to maintain control over the localized cancer. Currently, evidence-based information is lacking regarding this treatment choice. In addition, the concept of survivorship has yet to be examined in this population of women. This study aimed to explore women's educational needs and perceptions about survivorship following bilateral mastectomy as a treatment for unilateral breast cancer. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 women using a semistructured interview guide. Data were elicited, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Two themes were identified that addressed education and survivorship.

  14. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jessica; Griffith, Kent A.; Hawley, Sarah T.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past yearmore » (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions

  15. Cancer risk of incremental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in electrocautery smoke for mastectomy personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electrocautery applications in surgical operations produce evasive odorous smoke in the cleanest operation rooms. Because of the incomplete combustion of electrical current in the tissues and blood vessels during electrocautery applications, electrocautery smoke (ES) containing significant unknown chemicals and biological forms is released. The potential hazards and cancer risk should be further investigated from the perspective of the occupational health of surgical staff. Methods The particle number concentration and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ES were thoroughly investigated in 10 mastectomies to estimate the cancer risk for surgical staff. The particle number concentration and gaseous/particle PAHs at the surgeons’ and anesthetic technologists’ (AT) breathing heights were measured with a particle counter and filter/adsorbent samplers. PAHs were soxhlet-extracted, cleaned, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Abundant submicron particles and high PAH concentrations were found in ES during regular surgical mastectomies. Most particles in ES were in the size range of 0.3 to 0.5 μm, which may potentially penetrate through the medical masks into human respiration. The average particle/gaseous phase PAH concentrations at the surgeon’s breathing height were 131 and 1,415 ng/m3, respectively, which is 20 to 30 times higher than those in regular outdoor environments. By using a toxicity equivalency factor, the cancer risk for the surgeons and anesthetic technologists was calculated to be 117 × 10-6 and 270 × 10-6, respectively; the higher cancer risk for anesthetic technologists arises due to the longer working hours in operation rooms. Conclusions The carcinogenic effects of PAHs in ES on the occupational health of surgical staff should not be neglected. The use of an effective ES evacuator or smoke removal apparatus is strongly suggested to diminish the ES hazards to surgical

  16. Cancer risk of incremental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in electrocautery smoke for mastectomy personnel.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Shun; Liu, Shi-Ping; Uang, Shi-Nian; Yang, Li-Ru; Lee, Shien-Chih; Liu, Yao-Jen; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2014-02-04

    Electrocautery applications in surgical operations produce evasive odorous smoke in the cleanest operation rooms. Because of the incomplete combustion of electrical current in the tissues and blood vessels during electrocautery applications, electrocautery smoke (ES) containing significant unknown chemicals and biological forms is released. The potential hazards and cancer risk should be further investigated from the perspective of the occupational health of surgical staff. The particle number concentration and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ES were thoroughly investigated in 10 mastectomies to estimate the cancer risk for surgical staff. The particle number concentration and gaseous/particle PAHs at the surgeons' and anesthetic technologists' (AT) breathing heights were measured with a particle counter and filter/adsorbent samplers. PAHs were soxhlet-extracted, cleaned, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Abundant submicron particles and high PAH concentrations were found in ES during regular surgical mastectomies. Most particles in ES were in the size range of 0.3 to 0.5 μm, which may potentially penetrate through the medical masks into human respiration. The average particle/gaseous phase PAH concentrations at the surgeon's breathing height were 131 and 1,415 ng/m³, respectively, which is 20 to 30 times higher than those in regular outdoor environments. By using a toxicity equivalency factor, the cancer risk for the surgeons and anesthetic technologists was calculated to be 117 × 10(-6) and 270 × 10(-6), respectively; the higher cancer risk for anesthetic technologists arises due to the longer working hours in operation rooms. The carcinogenic effects of PAHs in ES on the occupational health of surgical staff should not be neglected. The use of an effective ES evacuator or smoke removal apparatus is strongly suggested to diminish the ES hazards to surgical staff.

  17. A population-based analysis of secondary malignancies in breast cancer patients receiving breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Warschkow, Rene; Cerny, Thomas; Schmied, Bruno M; Güller, Ulrich; Thuerlimann, Beat; Joerger, Markus

    2016-06-28

    There is an ongoing debate about the relationship between breast implants and secondary malignancies. Breast cancer patients undergoing surgical reconstruction after mastectomy by either implants or autologous flap were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registry between 1998 and 2002. The occurrence of secondary malignancies at least 1 year after diagnosis was compared between breast reconstruction with implants vs autologous flap. Of 7955 women, 3727 underwent reconstruction using implants and 4228 using autologous flap. The incidence of secondary tumours was similar in both the groups (hazards ratio (HR)=1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82-1.26, P=0.880). For lung cancer, a significantly increased risk for implants (HR=2.51, 95% CI: 1.28-4.95, P=0.005) was observed. Except for lung cancer, no association between implants and secondary malignancies including lymphomas was observed.

  18. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  19. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. Opportunistic Breast Cancer Education and Screening in Rural Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Linda S.; Bejarano, Suyapa A.; Onega, Tracy L.; Stenquist, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In Honduras, the breast cancer burden is high, and access to women’s health services is low. This project tested the connection of community-based breast cancer detection with clinical diagnosis and treatment in a tightly linked and quickly facilitated format. Methods The Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth College partnered with the Honduran cancer hospital La Liga Contra el Cancer to expand a cervical cancer screening program, which included self-breast exam (SBE) education and clinical breast exams (CBEs), to assess patient attitudes about and uptake of breast cancer education and screening services. The cervical cancer screening event was held in Honduras in 2013; 476 women from 31 villages attended. Results Half of the women attending elected to receive a CBE; most had concerns about lactation. Clinicians referred 12 women with abnormal CBEs to La Liga Contra el Cancer for additional evaluation at no cost. All referred patients were compliant with the recommendation and received follow-up care. One abnormal follow-up mammogram/ultrasound result was negative on biopsy. One woman with an aggressive phyllodes tumor had a mastectomy within 60 days. Multimodal education about breast cancer screening maximized delivery of women’s health services in a low-tech rural setting. Conclusion The addition of opportunistic breast cancer education and screening to a cervical cancer screening event resulted in high uptake of services at low additional cost to program sponsors. Such novel strategies to maximize delivery of women’s health services in low-resource settings, where there is no access to mammography, may result in earlier detection of breast cancer. Close follow-up of positive results with referral to appropriate treatment is essential. PMID:28717699

  1. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  2. A comparison of patient-centered economic and clinical outcomes of post-mastectomy breast reconstruction between obese and non-obese patients.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinhai; Smith, Benjamin D; Giordano, Sharon H; Reece, Gregory P; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare, by patient obesity status, the contemporary utilization patterns of different reconstruction surgery types, understand postoperative complication profiles in the community setting, and analyze the financial impact on health care payers and patients. Using data from the MarketScan Health Risk Assessment Database and Commercial Claims and Encounters Database, we identified breast cancer patients who received breast reconstruction surgery following mastectomy between 2009 and 2012. The Cochran-Armitage test was used to evaluate the utilization pattern of breast reconstruction surgery. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to estimate the association between obesity status and infectious, wound, and perfusion complications within one year of surgery. A generalized linear model was used to compare total, complication-related, and out-of-pocket costs. The rate of TE/implant-based reconstruction increased significantly for non-obese patients but not for obese patients during the years analyzed, whereas autologous reconstruction decreased for both patient groups. Obesity was associated with higher odds of infectious, wound, and perfusion complications after TE/implant-based reconstruction, and higher odds of perfusion complications after autologous reconstruction. The adjusted total healthcare costs and out-of-pocket costs were similar for obese and non-obese patients for either type of breast reconstruction surgery. A greater likelihood of one-year complications arose from TE/implant-based vs autologous reconstruction surgery in obese patients. Given that out-of-pocket costs were independent of the type of reconstruction, greater emphasis should be placed on conveying the surgery-related complications to obese patients to aid in patient-based decision making with their plastic surgeons and oncologists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  4. Patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors associated with treatment of early-stage breast cancer among Asian American women in California

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Press, David J.; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Shema, Sarah J.; Le, Gem M.; Kurian, Allison W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines recommend breast conserving surgery (BCS) with radiation as a viable alternative to mastectomy for treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Yet, Asian Americans (AA) are more likely than other groups to have mastectomy or omit radiation after BCS. Methods We applied polytomous logistic regression and recursive partitioning (RP) to analyze factors associated with mastectomy, or BCS without radiation, among 20,987 California AAs diagnosed with stage 0–II breast cancer from 1990–2007. Results The percentage receiving mastectomy ranged from 40% among US-born Chinese to 58% among foreign-born Vietnamese. Factors associated with mastectomy included tumor characteristics such as larger tumor size, patient characteristics such as older age and foreign birthplace among some AA ethnicities, and additional factors including hospital (smaller hospital size, not NCI cancer center, low socioeconomic status (SES) patient composition, and high hospital AA patient composition) and neighborhood characteristics (ethnic enclaves of low SES). These hospital and neighborhood characteristics were also associated with BCS without radiation. Through RP, the highest mastectomy subgroups were defined by tumor characteristics such as size and anatomic location, in combination with diagnosis year and nativity. Conclusions Tumor characteristics and, secondarily, patient, hospital and neighborhood factors, are predictors of mastectomy and omission of radiation following BCS among AAs. Impact By focusing on interactions among patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors in the differential receipt of breast cancer treatment, our study identifies subgroups of interest for further study, and translation into public health and patient-focused initiatives to ensure that all women are fully informed about treatment options. PMID:22402290

  5. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  6. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-01-04

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-11

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. [Accepting a mastectomy thanks to socio-aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Arquillière, Agnès; Blanc, Nathalie

    2012-12-01

    For women of all ages, a mastectomy can affect their body image and femininity. Poor management, both physical and emotional, of a breast removal, can have major consequences on a patient's intimate, family and social life. In the framework of the multi-disciplinary treatment of breast cancer, a team in Lyon carried out a study on the impact of including socio-aesthetic practices in the overall care.

  10. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant Mastectomy Oral cancer Throat or larynx cancer Patient Instructions Abdominal radiation - discharge After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Brain radiation - discharge Breast radiation - discharge Chemotherapy - what to ask your doctor ...

  11. [Clinico-pathology of lobular breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Langmár, Z; Orosz, Z

    1999-05-16

    997 operations were performed because of malignant breast lesions at the National Institute of Oncology during a two-years period (1990-1991). Histologically 94 tumours proved to be invasive lobular cancer. Comparable data were available for 89 patients; a questionnaire was used for data collection. Analysing these cases, the authors discuss the clinicopathology of lobular cancer and current practice in its treatment. The mean age of the patients was 57.1 years, which in accordance with the literature. No synchronous contralateral tumour was observed in the studied patient group. 4.9% of the cases proved to be multifocal, what is considerably less than that reported in the literature. It is a frequent matter of debate in many papers whether mastectomy should be indicated if the multicentricity of the tumour is only suspected. The features of the studied group may also emphasise this question, and further investigation is needed for moderating the surgical radicality. The rate of large tumours and the mean tumour diameter was lower than suggested by the literature. The rate of positive axillary lymph nodes was higher than in reports of other centres. The authors underline the necessity of axillary block-dissection even in case of operations with decreased radicality. Beside lymph node metastases, invasive lobular cancer produces haematogenous metastases with a higher probabilty than other breast cancers. This observation is supported by our study, too.

  12. Seaweed prevents breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Funahashi, H; Imai, T; Mase, T; Sekiya, M; Yokoi, K; Hayashi, H; Shibata, A; Hayashi, T; Nishikawa, M; Suda, N; Hibi, Y; Mizuno, Y; Tsukamura, K; Hayakawa, A; Tanuma, S

    2001-05-01

    To investigate the chemopreventive effects of seaweed on breast cancer, we have been studying the relationship between iodine and breast cancer. We found earlier that the seaweed, wakame, showed a suppressive effect on the proliferation of DMBA (dimethylbenz(a)anthracene)-induced rat mammary tumors, possibly via apoptosis induction. In the present study, powdered mekabu was placed in distilled water, and left to stand for 24 h at 4 degrees C. The filtered supernatant was used as mekabu solution. It showed an extremely strong suppressive effect on rat mammary carcinogenesis when used in daily drinking water, without toxicity. In vitro, mekabu solution strongly induced apoptosis in 3 kinds of human breast cancer cells. These effects were stronger than those of a chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat human breast cancer. Furthermore, no apoptosis induction was observed in normal human mammary cells. In Japan, mekabu is widely consumed as a safe, inexpensive food. Our results suggest that mekabu has potential for chemoprevention of human breast cancer.

  13. Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer: management and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer is a very rare clinical entity. We describe an extremely rare case of breast cancer metastasis to the rectus abdominis muscle. Our patient, who had undergone a left modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer four years ago, presented with a painful abdominal mass. Computed tomography scans showed a rim-enhancing mass with central hypoatennuation within the sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle. A Fine needle aspiration biopsy was initially performed and the findings were suggestive of malignancy. The muscle lesion was then resected and the histopathological analysis showed metastasis of breast cancer. Through our review of the literature, we found that only two cases of rectus abdominis muscle metastasis from breast cancer have been reported so far. This case highlights the need to rule out muscle metastatic lesions in patients with history of breast cancer presenting with these clinical and imaging characteristics. Differentiation from primary sarcoma is of paramount importance. Skeletal muscle metastases usually indicate an advanced disease associated with poor prognosis. Treatment should be individualized depending on the patient's clinical condition.

  14. Breast Cancer Basics and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... more than 232,670 new cases of female breast cancer in the United States in 2014. More than ...

  15. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print Materials ... Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) ...

  16. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Perceptions of Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Portschy, Pamela R; Abbott, Andrea M; Burke, Erin E; Nzara, Rumbidzayi; Marmor, Schelomo; Kuntz, Karen M; Tuttle, Todd M

    2015-11-01

    An increasing proportion of breast cancer patients undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to reduce their risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Our goal was to evaluate CBC risk perception changes over time among breast cancer patients. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal study of women with newly diagnosed unilateral breast cancer. Patients completed a survey before and approximately 2 years after treatment. Survey questions used open-ended responses or 5-point Likert scale scoring (e.g., 5 = very likely, 1 = not at all likely). A total of 74 women completed the presurgical treatment survey, and 43 completed the postsurgical treatment survey. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different between responders and nonresponders of the follow-up survey. The mean estimated 10-year risk of CBC was 35.7 % on the presurgical treatment survey and 13.8 % on the postsurgical treatment survey (p < 0.001). The perceived risks of developing cancer in the same breast and elsewhere in the body significantly decreased between surveys. Both CPM and non-CPM (breast-conserving surgery or unilateral mastectomy) patients' perceived risk of CBC significantly decreased from pre- to postsurgical treatment surveys. Compared with non-CPM patients, CPM patients had a significantly lower perceived 10-year risk of CBC (5.8 vs. 17.3 %, p = 0.046) on postsurgical treatment surveys. The perceived risk of CBC significantly attenuated over time for both CPM and non-CPM patients. These data emphasize the importance of early physician counseling and improvement in patient education to provide women with accurate risk information before they make surgical treatment decisions.

  19. [Cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hali, Fouzia; Khadir, Khadija; Idhammou, Wassima; Bensardi, Fatima-Zahra; Lefriyekh, Mohamed-Rachid; Benider, Abdelatif; Zamiati, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2011-11-01

    The appearance of skin symptoms in male breast is the main reason for consultation in our context. The aim of this study is to describe the various cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer through a series of cases collected in a dermatology department. A retrospective study was conducted in the dermatology department at the CHU Ibn Rochd January 1988 to December 2009. All cases of male breast cancer initially diagnosed in dermatology were included. The various epidemiological, clinical, histological and therapeutic data were collected from medical records. Twenty cases were collected. The mean age was 61.25 years. Skin invasion by tumor was found in all patients, and it was the reason for consultation. It was a cutaneous involvement at the nipple and areola (17 cases) and at the periareolar skin (three cases). The clinical appearance of skin involvement was vegetative type in 12 cases, infiltrating with nipple retraction in five cases and nodule with skin change in three cases. The average period of consultation was 25 months. The axillary lymph nodes were noted in 11 patients and distant metastases in eight patients. The cutaneous metastases outside breast were noted in six patients. The histological types were: infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 15 cases (75%), papillary carcinoma in two cases (10%) and non-specific carcinoma in three cases (15%). The treatment was surgery in 14 patients and consisted of radical mastectomy with complete axillary nodal dissection according to Patey. Complementary therapies, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were indicated in 14 patients. Our single-center study with dermatological recruitment illustrates the frequency and variety of skin disease in male breast cancer and demonstrates that they are still the main reason for consultation in our context. Better information for public and practitioners would allow earlier diagnosis and a more favourable prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Breast conservation in locally advanced breast cancer in developing countries: wise or waste.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Mallika; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-03-01

    Breast conservation as an additional benefit was beyond the initial expectations of the investigators who pioneered neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). In recent years an increasing number of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) are being treated with NACT, followed by breast conservation surgery with axillary dissection and radiation as a part of the multimodality management. Breast conservation has not been the standard of care for women with LABC, owing to concerns of increased chances of local recurrence, and possible survival disadvantage and psychological trauma from experiencing a recurrence of malignancy. LABC is still a common form of presentation of breast cancer in developing countries. Strict adherence to treatment protocols and regular follow-ups for years may not be practical for a large majority of patients hailing from the regions most affected by LABC. Defaulters often thus have a heavy price to pay. Hence lies the importance of carefully selecting LABC patients for a breast conservation approach from others that would have a higher risk of locoregional recurrence. Can we extrapolate the lessons learnt in early breast cancer to LABC and offer selected patients with LABC breast conservation therapy? Would the local control and survival results with conservative therapy be comparable to those obtained using mastectomy, or does the increased tumor burden in LABC necessitate ablative surgery in all women? This review aims to address these important questions.

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Chen, C.-J.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result:more » There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.« less

  2. Preoperative MRI and surgical management in patients with nonpalpable breast cancer: the MONET - randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Peters, N H G M; van Esser, S; van den Bosch, M A A J; Storm, R K; Plaisier, P W; van Dalen, T; Diepstraten, S C E; Weits, T; Westenend, P J; Stapper, G; Fernandez-Gallardo, M A; Borel Rinkes, I H M; van Hillegersberg, R; Mali, W P Th M; Peeters, P H M

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated whether performing contrast-enhanced breast MRI in addition to mammography and/or ultrasound in patients with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions improves breast cancer management. The MONET - study (MR mammography of nonpalpable breast tumours) is a randomised controlled trial in patients with a nonpalpable BIRADS 3-5 lesion. Patients were randomly assigned to receive routine medical care, including mammography, ultrasound and lesion sampling by large core needle biopsy or additional MRI preceding biopsy. Patients with cancer were referred for surgery. Primary end-point was the rate of additional surgical procedures (re-excisions and conversion to mastectomy) in patients with a nonpalpable breast cancer. Four hundred and eighteen patients were randomised, 207 patients were allocated to MRI, and 211 patients to the control group. In the MRI group 74 patients had 83 malignant lesions, compared to 75 patients with 80 malignant lesions in the control group. The primary breast conserving surgery (BCS) rate was similar in both groups; 68% in the MRI group versus 66% in the control group. The number of re-excisions performed because of positive resection margins after primary BCS was increased in the MRI group; 18/53 (34%) patients in the MRI group versus 6/50 (12%) in the control group (p=0.008). The number of conversions to mastectomy did not differ significantly between groups. Overall, the rate of an additional surgical intervention (BCS and mastectomy combined) after initial breast conserving surgery was 24/53 (45%) in the MRI group versus 14/50 (28%) in the control group (p=0.069). Addition of MRI to routine clinical care in patients with nonpalpable breast cancer was paradoxically associated with an increased re-excision rate. Breast MRI should not be used routinely for preoperative work-up of patients with nonpalpable breast cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma presenting as inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, Ibrahim; Deavers, Michael T; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Coleman, Robert L; Malpica, Anais; Gilcrease, Michael Z

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis to the breast from extramammary malignancies is rare. Nevertheless, its recognition is important because the prognosis and treatment differ from that of primary breast cancer. We report a unique case of primary peritoneal serous carcinoma that initially presented as inflammatory breast cancer. The patient received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer and subsequently underwent bilateral total mastectomy and bilateral sentinel lymph node biopsy. She was found to have extensive intralymphatic carcinoma in both breasts, with only focal minimal breast parenchymal involvement, and residual metastatic carcinoma in bilateral sentinel lymph nodes. Further work-up revealed pelvic ascites and omental nodularities. The patient underwent laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, which revealed high-grade serous carcinoma involving both ovaries and fallopian tubes. Molecular testing of tumor from the ovary and axillary lymph node showed an identical pattern of allelic loss, confirming a common origin for both tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an extramammary primary malignancy that not only presented as inflammatory breast cancer but also was diagnosed and initially treated as such.

  4. Breast Organotypic Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy Elena; Carranza-Torres, Irma Edith; Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Morán-Martínez, Javier

    2018-03-20

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type diagnosed in women, it represents a critical public health problem worldwide, with 1,671,149 estimated new cases and nearly 571,000 related deaths. Research on breast cancer has mainly been conducted using two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures and animal models. The usefulness of these models is reflected in the vast knowledge accumulated over the past decades. However, considering that animal models are three-dimensional (3D) in nature, the validity of the studies using 2D cell cultures has recently been questioned. Although animal models are important in cancer research, ethical questions arise about their use and usefulness as there is no clear predictivity of human disease outcome and they are very expensive and take too much time to obtain results. The poor performance or failure of most cancer drugs suggests that preclinical research on cancer has been based on an over-dependence on inadequate animal models. For these reasons, in the last few years development of alternative models has been prioritized to study human breast cancer behavior, while maintaining a 3D microenvironment, and to reduce the number of experiments conducted in animals. One way to achieve this is using organotypic cultures, which are being more frequently explored in cancer research because they mimic tissue architecture in vivo. These characteristics make organotypic cultures a valuable tool in cancer research as an alternative to replace animal models and for predicting risk assessment in humans. This chapter describes the cultures of multicellular spheroids, organoids, 3D bioreactors, and tumor slices, which are the most widely used organotypic models in breast cancer research.

  5. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-13

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. From policy to patients and back: surgical treatment decision making for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T

    2007-01-01

    Persistent use of mastectomy for breast cancer has motivated concerns about overtreatment by surgeons and lack of patient involvement in decisions. However, recent studies suggest that patients perceive substantial involvement and that some patients prefer more invasive surgery, while other research suggests that surgical treatment choices might be poorly informed. Decision-making quality can be improved by increasing patients' knowledge about treatments' risks and benefits and by optimizing their involvement. The mastectomy story underscores the limitations of utilization measures as quality indicators. Strategies to improve patient outcomes should focus on tools to improve the quality of decision making and innovations in multispecialty practice.

  7. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Impact of prognostic factors for postmastectomy radiation therapy of breast cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, K. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 196 breast cancer patients with stages T1-3N0-3M0. The comprehensive therapy for breast cancer included surgical operation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that multifocality growth of tumor (p = 0.004), high grade III (p = 0.008), two metastatic lymph nodes (p = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of regional node failure in the patients with one to three positive lymph nodes. The prognostic models describing the probability of local recurrences of breast cancer were developed for individualization of the radiation therapy tactics. Postmastectomy radiation therapy in the patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy improves locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, does not increase late toxicity.

  9. Cancer risk among Los Angeles women with cosmetic breast implants.

    PubMed

    Deapen, Dennis M; Hirsch, Elliot M; Brody, Garry S

    2007-06-01

    As the first generation of women who received cosmetic breast implants ages, questions remain about cancer risk. This study is an update of the Los Angeles Augmentation Mammaplasty Study and examines cancer risk among women with long-term exposure to breast implants. The authors conducted a record linkage cohort study of patients with cosmetic breast implants by abstracting from records of the private practices of 35 board-certified plastic surgeons in Los Angeles County, California. They included 3139 Caucasian women who received cosmetic breast implants between 1953 and 1980. Spanish-surnamed women, nonresidents of Los Angeles County, and patients with prior subcutaneous mastectomy or breast cancer were excluded. Cancer outcomes through 1994 were ascertained through record linkage with the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. With a mean follow-up period of 15.5 years, 43 cases of breast cancer were observed, compared with 62.6 expected, based on Los Angeles County population-based incidence rates (standardized incidence ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.93). Significant increases were observed for cancer of the lung and bronchus (standardized incidence ratio, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.42 to 3.09) and vulvar cancer (standardized incidence ratio, 3.47; 95% CI, 1.39 to 7.16). The breast cancer results of this study are consistent with the previous reports of the Los Angeles study as well as with several other long-term cohort studies. Lung cancer has previously been found to be increased in this cohort and also in some, but not most, other studies. The increased risk of vulva cancer has previously been observed in this cohort and just one other.

  10. The diagnostic utility of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or intraoperative sub-nipple biopsy in nipple-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Chan, S-E; Liao, C-Y; Wang, T-Y; Chen, S-T; Chen, D-R; Lin, Y-J; Chen, C-J; Wu, H-K; Chen, S-L; Kuo, S-J; Lee, C-W; Lai, H-W

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of routine sub-nipple biopsy was uncertain, and the role of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting nipple invasion in patients who have been selected for nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) has not been adequately evaluated. We retrospectively collected and analyzed the medical and surgical records of 434 patients with primary operable breast cancer who met the criteria for NSM and underwent breast surgery during the period January 2011 to December 2015. Patients were stratified into three risk groups (low, intermediate, and high) according to tumor size and tumor-to-nipple distance. Among the 434 patients in this study, 29 (6.7%) had occult invasion of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Sub-nipple biopsy had a sensitivity of 84.6%, a specificity of 100%, a false negative rate of 1.2%, a false positive rate of 0%, and an overall accuracy rate of 98.8% in confirming NAC invasion. The NAC invasion rate was 0% in the low-risk group, 5.1% in the intermediate-risk group, and 19.7% in the high-risk group (P < 0.01). The overall NPV of preoperative MRI for predicting NAC invasion was 94.8%. Cost analysis revealed that the cost of NSM with sub-nipple biopsy was significantly higher than that of NSM alone, with a mean difference in cost of USD 238.5 (P < 0.01). The high negative predictive value of MRI for NAC invasion is useful for selection of patients receiving NSM. Sub-nipple biopsy is a reliable procedure to detect occult NAC invasion, however, routine use is not cost-effect for low risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  11. Oncoplastic Surgery for Upper/Upper Inner Quadrant Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joseph; Chen, Dar-Ren; Wang, Yu-Fen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Tumors located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast warrant more attention. A small lesion relative to the size of breast in this location may be resolved by performing a level I oncoplastic technique. However, a wide excision may significantly reduce the overall quality of the breast shape by distorting the visible breast line. From June 2012 to April 2015, 36 patients with breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant underwent breast-conservation surgery with matrix rotation mammoplasty. According to the size and location of the tumor relative to the nipple-areola complex, 11 patients underwent matrix rotation with periareolar de-epithelialization (donut group) and the other 25 underwent matrix rotation only (non-donut group). The cosmetic results were self-assessed by questionnaires. The average weights of the excised breast lumps in the donut and non-donut groups were 104.1 and 84.5 g, respectively. During the 3-year follow-up period, local recurrence was observed in one case and was managed with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction with prosthetic implants. In total, 31 patients (88.6%) ranked their postoperative result as either acceptable or satisfactory. The treated breasts were also self-evaluated by 27 patients (77.1%) to be nearly identical to or just slightly different from the untreated side. Matrix rotation is an easy breast-preserving technique for treating breast cancer located in the upper/upper inner quadrant of the breast that requires a relatively wide excision. With this technique, a larger breast tumor could be removed without compromising the breast appearance.

  12. Surgical management of breast cancer in China: A 15-year single-center retrospective study of 18,502 patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nai-Si; Liu, Meng-Ying; Chen, Jia-Jian; Yang, Ben-Long; Xue, Jing-Yan; Quan, Chen-Lian; Mo, Miao; Liu, Guang-Yu; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Jiong

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to review the surgical trends in breast cancer treatment in China over the past 15 years and to explore the possible factors related to the choice of surgical modality.The medical records of 18,502 patients with unilateral early stage breast cancer who underwent surgery from January 1999 to December 2013 at our institute were retrospectively reviewed. The utilization of different surgical modalities and the associated clinicopathological factors were analyzed. Furthermore, the prognostic role of surgical modality was also evaluated.The median patient age was 50.0 years. According to the pTNM staging system, 12.5% of the patients were classified as stage 0; 30.2% as stage I; 40.0% as stage II; and 17.3% as stage III. In total, 9.3% of the patients could not be staged. Overall, 67.1% of the breast cancer cases were estrogen receptor (ER) positive. The pattern of breast cancer surgery has changed tremendously over the past 15 years (P < 0.001). The pattern of mastectomy has shifted from radical mastectomy to modified radical mastectomy and simple mastectomy + sentinel lymph node biopsy. A total of 81.7% of the patients underwent mastectomy without immediate reconstruction, 15.2% underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS), and 3.7% received immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Age, TNM staging, and pathological characteristics greatly affected the choice of surgical modality. The 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates for the mastectomy, BCS, and reconstruction groups were 87.6%, 93.2%, and 91.7%, respectively (P < 0.001); the RFS rate was likely affected by distant recurrence instead of loco-regional recurrence. We also identified improved RFS over time, stratified by surgical modality and tumor stage. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis revealed that time of treatment, tumor stage, tumor grade, LVI status, and ER status were independent prognostic factors for RFS in our cohort, whereas surgical modality was not.Mastectomy

  13. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-15

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  14. Attitudes and Decisional Conflict Regarding Breast Reconstruction Among Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Manne, Sharon L; Topham, Neal; Kirstein, Laurie; Virtue, Shannon Myers; Brill, Kristin; Devine, Katie A; Gajda, Tina; Frederick, Sara; Darabos, Katie; Sorice, Kristen

    The decision to undergo breast reconstruction (BR) surgery after mastectomy is made during stressful circumstances. Many women do not feel well prepared to make this decision. Using the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, this study aims to describe women's reasons to choose or not choose BR, BR knowledge, decisional preparedness, and decisional conflict about BR. Possible demographic, medical, BR knowledge, and attitudinal correlates of decisional conflict about BR were also evaluated. Participants were 55 women with early-stage breast cancer drawn from the baseline data of a pilot randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of a BR decision support aid for breast cancer patients considering BR. The most highly ranked reasons to choose BR were the desire for breasts to be equal in size, the desire to wake up from surgery with a breast in place, and perceived bother of a scar with no breast. The most highly ranked reasons not to choose BR were related to the surgical risks and complications. Regression analyses indicated that decisional conflict was associated with higher number of reasons not to choose BR and lower levels of decisional preparedness. The results suggest that breast cancer patients considering BR may benefit from decisional support. Healthcare professionals may facilitate decision making by focusing on reasons for each patient's uncertainty and unaddressed concerns. All patients, even those who have consulted with a plastic surgeon and remain uncertain about their decision, may benefit from decision support from a health professional.

  15. Depression and anxiety levels in early stage Turkish breast cancer patients and related factors.

    PubMed

    Dastan, Nihal Bostanci; Buzlu, Sevim

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety are common among cancer patients. If left untreated, these disorders can lead to poor treatment compliance, prolonged hospital stay and reduced life quality. In this prospective study, we aimed determine anxiety and depression levels and related factors among female breast cancer patients presenting to a breast surgery clinic in Istanbul and who met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected using a questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). The mean age was 48.2 years and the mean post-operative period was 17.9 months. It was found that 46.3 % of the patients had stage I, and 53.7 % stage II, 59.3 % of them undergoing breast conserving surgery and 40.7 % mastectomy. When evaluated according to the HAD Scale, it was found that anxiety scores of 35.1 % of the patients and depression scores of 17.1 % of the patients were higher than their cut-off points. With regard to the affecting factors, depression scores of those with no family history of breast cancer were significantly higher than those with no family history of breast cancer (t= 1.53; p= 0.03); that the depression scores of the patients who underwent mastectomy were significantly higher than those who underwent breast conserving surgery (t= 1.75; p= 0.04). Additionally, it was found that low income was an important risk factor for anxiety; whereas a history of breast cancer in the family and mastectomy was an important risk factor for depression.These results indicate the importance of determining psychiatric problems and appropriate approaches in addition to medical treatment in breast cancer patients.

  16. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is the ACA? Sex and Intimacy Birth Control and Breast Cancer Maintaining Sexual Life If You Feel Pain During Sex Sexual Side Effects Body Image and Sexuality Improving Sexual Health With Medical Approaches Improving Sexual Health With Self Care Talking With ...

  17. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically

  18. Ultrasound in Detecting Taxane-Induced Neuropathy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-26

    Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  20. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Breast cancer and the "materiality of risk": the rise of morphological prediction.

    PubMed

    Löwy, Ilana

    2007-01-01

    This paper follows the history of "morphological risk" of breast cancer. In the early twentieth century, surgeons and pathologists arrived at the conclusion that specific anatomical and cytological changes in the breast are related to a heightened risk of developing a malignancy in the future. This conclusion was directly related to a shift from macroscopic to microscopic diagnosis of malignancies, and to the integration of the frozen section into routine surgery for breast cancer. In the interwar era, conditions such as "chronic mastitis" and "cystic disease of the breast" were defined as precancerous, and women diagnosed with these conditions were advised to undergo mastectomy. In the post-World War II era, these entities were replaced by "carcinoma in situ." The recent development of tests for hereditary predisposition to breast cancer is a continuation of attempts to detect an "embodied risk" of cancer and to eliminate this risk by cutting it out.

  2. [Breast cancer metastasis in distal phalanx of the big toe. Case report].

    PubMed

    Carlesimo, B; Tempesta, M; Fioramonti, P; Bistoni, G; Ruggiero, M; Marchetti, F

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer represents the most prevalent malignancies in women and bone is the first site of metastasis in 26-50% of cases. Usually metastasis involve limbs in 16%. We present a rare case of 47-year-old woman, who underwent to monolateral mastectomy for lobular cancer. After 8 years from surgery, she presented pain, swelling and functional limitations, gradually increasing, to the left big toe. X-rays and MRI showed a lucent area of bone destruction on the shaft of the distal phalanx of the left big toe. Surgical biopsy on the excised bone assessed for breast cancer metastasis.

  3. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  4. Breast cancer in Poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Havlik, R J; Sian, K U; Wagner, J D; Binford, R; Broadie, T A

    1999-07-01

    A 33-year-old African-American woman with a severe manifestation of Poland syndrome developed breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast. She had a severely hypoplastic upper extremity, including symbrachydactyly, and a hypoplastic forearm and upper arm. In addition, she lacked the sternal origin of the pectoralis muscle. She had a very small nipple-areola complex and no axillary hair. This is the first case report of breast cancer developing in the ipsilateral breast of a patient with Poland syndrome.

  5. Breast cancer characteristics of Vietnamese women in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Lin, Scarlett S; Phan, John C; Lin, Albert Y

    2002-03-01

    To examine breast cancer characteristics of women of Vietnamese ancestry living in the San Francisco Bay Area in comparison with those of other racial or ethnic groups in the same area. Data were obtained from the population-based Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, part of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. We included breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1988 to 1999 and compared the age at diagnosis, stage and histologic grade at diagnosis, estrogen- and progesterone-receptor status, and surgery types across racial or ethnic groups. We also modeled the effect of patient and clinical characteristics and hospital and physician on the racial or ethnic variations in surgery type. Vietnamese women were younger at diagnosis than other racial or ethnic subgroups (mean age, 51.0 years), with 49.6% of the diagnoses occurring in patients younger than 50. They were also significantly more likely to have received mastectomy for their in situ and localized tumors (61.1% having mastectomy) than women of other racial or ethnic groups. The increased likelihood of having mastectomy among Vietnamese women was not affected greatly by age, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, histologic grade, or physician, but was partly attributable to the hospital of diagnosis. The effects of a lower mean age at diagnosis and the reasons for an unexpectedly higher percentage of mastectomies in this Asian subgroup should be further explored.

  6. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  7. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Surgical Treatment Differences Among Latina and African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Koithan, Mary; Ruiz, Ester; Glover, Johanna Uriri; Juarez, Gloria; Choi, Myunghan; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe breast cancer treatment choices from the perspectives of Latina and African American breast cancer survivors. Design An interdisciplinary team conducted a mixed-methods study of women treated for stages I–IV breast cancer. Setting Participants’ homes in metropolitan areas. Sample 39 participants in three groups: monolingual Spanish-speaking Latinas (n = 15), English-speaking Latinas (n = 15), and African American women (n = 9). Methods Individual participant interviews were conducted by racially and linguistically matched nurse researchers, and sociodemographic data were collected. Content and matrix analysis methods were used. Main Research Variables Perceptions of breast cancer care. Findings High rates of mastectomy were noted for early-stage treatment (stage I or II). Among the participants diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, the majority of English-speaking Latinas (n = 9) and African American women (n = 4) received a mastectomy. However, the majority of the Spanish-speaking Latina group (n = 5) received breast-conserving surgery. Four factors influenced the choice of mastectomy over lumpectomy across the three groups: clinical indicators, fear of recurrence, avoidance of adjuvant side effects, and perceived favorable survival outcomes. Spanish-speaking Latinas were more likely to rely on physician treatment recommendations, and the other two groups used a shared decision-making style. Conclusions Additional study is needed to understand how women select and integrate treatment information with the recommendations they receive from healthcare providers. Among the Spanish-speaking Latina group, limited English proficiency, the use of translators in explaining treatment options, and a lack of available educational materials in Spanish are factors that influenced reliance on physician recommendations. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses were notably absent in supporting the women’s treatment decision making

  9. Outcome of 122 delayed breast reconstruction following post-mastectomy radiotherapy: The scarless latissimus dorsi flap with tissue expansion technique.

    PubMed

    de Runz, A; Boccara, D; Bekara, F; Chaouat, M; Mimoun, M

    2017-02-01

    Delayed breast reconstruction with tissue expansion may be risky after radiotherapy, due to the poor skin quality. To permit the use of the tissue expansion procedure, we propose a scarless latissimus dorsi flap to bring tissue trophicity, by a healthy vascularized muscular interface with no donor scar and no patch effect. The objective of this study is to assess the outcome of the tissue expansion technique with scarless latissimus dorsi flap after post-mastectomy radiotherapy. All the patients who had benefited of a delayed breast reconstruction after radiotherapy using tissue expansion technique with scarless latissimus dorsi flap, between January 2000 and January 2013, were reviewed. The exclusion criteria were: prior breast reconstruction, or interruption of breast reconstruction procedure due to active metastatic disease requiring ongoing oncological treatment. The complications were identified: failures of reconstruction, implant exposure, wound dehiscence, capsular contracture, deflation of implant, hematoma, infection, and skin necrosis. One hundred and twenty-two breasts were reviewed. The average time between the flap and the expander intervention was: 194±114 SD (28-1051) days. The mean volume of inserted expander was 633±111 SD (350-1100) mL and the mean inflation volume was 578±190 SD (170-1160) mL. The average time between insertion of the expander and insertion of the permanent implant was 132±76 SD (49-683) days. The mean inflation of the implant volume was 368±105 SD (130-620) mL. Forty patients developed at least one complication. The most common complication was the appearance of a capsular contracture requiring a capsulectomy: 11 (9.2%) with permanent implants and 6 (4.9%) with expander. Deflation of implants occurred with six permanent implants and with one expander. There were 3 breast reconstructions failures (two infections and one exposure of implants). This procedure offers the advantages that there is no unattractive scar, and

  10. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  11. Postoperative Radiation Therapy after Nipple-Sparing or Skin-Sparing Mastectomy: A Survey of European, North American, and South American Practices.

    PubMed

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; Poortmans, Philip M; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hijal, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Skin sparing mastectomy, a surgical procedure sparing a large portion of the overlying skin of the breast, and nipple-sparing mastectomy, sparing the whole nipple-areolar complex, are increasingly used, although their oncologic efficacy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the radiation oncologists' opinions regarding the indications of radiation therapy (RT) after skin-sparing mastectomy and nipple-sparing mastectomy. Radiation oncology members of four national and international societies were invited to complete a questionnaire comprising of 22 questions to assess their opinions regarding RT indications in the context of skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy. A total of 298 radiation oncologists answered the questionnaire. 90.9% of respondents affirmed that breast cancer is one of their specializations. The majority declared that post-mastectomy RT is indicated for early-stage (stages I and II) breast cancer patients who present with risk factors for recurrence after skin-sparing or nipple-sparing mastectomy (87.2% and 80.2%, respectively). All suggested risk factors (tumor size, lymph node involvement, extracapsular extension, lymphovascular space invasion, positive surgical margins, triple negative tumor, multicentric tumor, and age) were considered as major elements (important or very important). There is no consensus regarding the necessity of evaluating residual breast tissue or the definition of residual breast tissue after mastectomy. All classic factors were considered as major elements, potentially influencing the decision to advice or not postoperative RT. Many uncertainties remain about the indications for RT after skin-sparing mastectomy or nipple-sparing mastectomy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Beyrouti, Mohamed I; Kharrat Koubaa, Madiha; Affes, Najmeddine; Ben Ali, Issam; Abbes, Imed; Frikha, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel; Kechaou, Mohamed; Jlidi, Rachid

    2003-01-01

    This study has been realized to determine epidemiological profile and clinico-pathologic aspects of male breast cancer in the south of Tunisia. We has counted and analysed all male breast cancers diagnosed in the general surgery department of the Sfax university teaching hospital with proof pathologic or to defect cytologic of malignancy, between 1989 and 2000. In the court of these years 23 new cases of mammary cancer has been diagnosed at the man. The average patient age was 68 years (extremes 40 and 95 years). According to TNM classification of 1988, 4.3% were classified T1, 26.1% T2, 8.6% T3 and 61% T4; 22% of tumors were M1. Histology found: 3 in-situ carcinomas (13%), 18 ductular infiltrating carcinomas (79%), 1 papillary cystadenocarcinoma, and 1 neuro-endocrin tumor. The clinic profile of male breast cancer in our country rest again relatively little frequent and its clinic profile resist alarming. To get better prognosis it is important to increase information and to promote early detection.

  13. Focal necrosis mimicking breast cancer following coronary bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Coufal, Oldřich; Ostřížek, Tomáš; Krsička, Petr; Lžičařová, Eva; Nenutil, Rudolf; Procházková, Monika; Bencsiková, Beatrix; Grell, Peter; Šefr, Roman

    2017-05-30

    Breast cancer can be diagnosed easily in most cases. However, occasionally, we are faced with some conditions that can mimic it. These may include inflammations, benign tumors, cysts, hematomas, or, more rarely, focal necrosis. This report presents a case of focal breast necrosis following myocardial revascularization with the left internal mammary artery, which is a very rare condition, with only few cases described in the literature. The necrosis becomes usually apparent a few days or weeks after the surgery and is often coincidental with the dehiscence of sternotomy with necrosis of wound edges. As it mostly affects the skin, it can be easily recognized. Also, our patient developed a dehisced sternotomy shortly after the surgery but there were no obvious objective changes on the breast. The condition was first dominated only by non-specific subjective symptom-pain. Later, a lump in the breast occurred, when the sternotomy had already healed. Moreover, an enlarged lymph node was palpable in the axilla. Because of non-typical symptoms, the condition was suggestive of breast cancer for a relatively long time. The patient had suffered from a very strong pain until she was treated by mastectomy with a good clinical result. Mammary necrosis following the coronary artery bypass is rare. In most cases, it manifests on the skin shortly after the surgery concurrently with dehisced sternotomy, so it can be easily diagnosed. However, in sporadic cases, the symptoms may occur later and may mimic breast cancer. Our objective is to raise awareness of this rare condition.

  14. Surgical treatment for women with breast cancer: do randomized clinical trials represent current medical practices?

    PubMed

    Frederick, Wayne A I; Ames, Sarah; Downing, Stephanie R; Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Chang, David C; Leffall, Lasalle D

    2010-06-01

    Randomized clinical trials have not shown survival differences between breast cancer patients who undergo breast-conserving surgery and those who undergo modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Recent studies however, have suggested that these randomized clinical trials findings may not be representative of the entire population or the nature of current patient care. A retrospective analysis of female invasive breast cancer patients who underwent surgery in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1990-2003) was performed. Survival was compared amongst women who underwent partial mastectomy, partial mastectomy plus radiation (PMR), or MRM. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to investigate the impact of method of treatment upon survival, after adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics. A total of 218,043 patients, mean age 62 years, were identified. MRM accounted for 51.5 per cent of the study population whereas PMR accounted for 34.9 per cent. On multivariate analyses, significant improvement was observed in patient survival associated with PMR when compared with MRM patients (hazard ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval = 0.67-0.74, P < 0.001). This population-based study suggests that there is a survival benefit for women undergoing PMR in the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  18. Disparities in the Initial Local Treatment of Older Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    LeMasters, Traci J; Madhavan, Suresh S; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Vyas, Ami M

    2017-07-01

    Although breast cancer is most prevalent among older women, the majority are diagnosed at an early stage. When diagnosed at an early stage, women have the option of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiation therapy (RT) or mastectomy for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer (ESBC). Omission of RT when receiving BCS increases the risk for recurrence and poor survival. Yet, a small subset of older women may omit RT after BCS. This study examines the current patterns of local treatment for ESBC among older women. This study conducted a retrospective observational analysis using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked dataset of women age ≥66 diagnosed with stage I-II breast cancer in 2003-2009. SEER-Medicare data was additionally linked with data from the Area Resource File (ARF) to examine the association between area-level healthcare resources and treatment. Two logistic regression models were used to estimate how study factors were associated with receiving (1) BCS versus BCS+RT and (2) Mastectomy versus BCS+RT. A stratified analysis was also conducted among women aged <70 years. Among 45,924 patients, 55% received BCS+RT, 23% received mastectomy, and 22% received BCS only. Women of increasing age, comorbidity, primary care provider visits, stage II disease, and nonwhite race were more likely to have mastectomy or BCS only, than BCS+RT. Women diagnosed in 2004-2006, treated by an oncology surgeon, residing in metro areas, areas of greater education and income, were less likely to receive mastectomy or BCS only, than BCS+RT. While women aged <70 years were more likely to receive BCS+RT, socioeconomic and physician specialties were associated with receiving BCS only. Over half of older women with ESBC initially receive BCS+RT. The likelihood for mastectomy and BCS only increases with age, comorbidity, and vulnerable socio-demographic characteristics. Findings demonstrate continued treatment disparities among certain

  19. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  20. Post-Mastectomy and Phantom Breast Pain: Risk Factors, Natural History, and Impact on Quality of Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    be significantly disabled by their chronic pain and can suffer from substantial reductions in quality of life . The primary aims of this research...and examine their impact on quality of life using a prospective research design. To date, 40 women scheduled for surgical procedures for breast cancer...with periodic assessments of pain, health-related quality of life , and psychosocial variables. This allows risk factors for PMPS and phantom breast

  1. Accelerated partial breast irradiation for elderly women with early breast cancer: A compromise between whole breast irradiation and omission of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sumodhee, Shakeel; Levy, Johan; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Lam Cham Kee, Daniel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Barranger, Emmanuel; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    Regarding adjuvant radiation therapy making decision for elderly women, Albert (2013) published a nomogram predicting the mastectomy-free survival (MFS) rate with or without adjuvant irradiation. Based on this approach, we proposed to investigate the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) vs. whole breast irradiation (WBI) or endocrine therapy alone in elderly low-risk breast cancer patients. For each elderly woman treated by conserving surgery and APBI (multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy), 5- and 10-year MFS rates were calculated. For each treated patient, using the Albert nomogram, we calculated the estimated MFS rates at 5 and 10 years, with and without WBI. Then, we compared the estimated MFS rates after no irradiation and WBI vs. observed MFS rates after APBI. From 2005 to 2016, 79 patients were treated. Median followup was 96.8 months [68.6-104.9], median age was 77 years [66-89]. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates calculated with the Albert nomogram without WBI were 2.95% and 7.25%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 92.7%. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates after WBI were 1.41% and 3.66%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 96.3%. Regarding observed MFS rate, 1 pt (1.3%) experienced a salvage mastectomy. The 10-year MFS rate after APBI was 97.4% vs. 96.3% after WBI (p = 1) and 92.7% after no irradiation (p = 0.27). No toxicity Grade 3 or more was observed. APBI seems to be an attractive compromise between WBI and no irradiation for elderly women with early stage breast cancer as far as local control, quality of life and cost benefit is concerned. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  3. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  4. Successful Targeted Therapies for Breast Cancer, The Worcester Foundation and Future Opportunities in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Abderrahman, Balkees; Jordan, V Craig

    2018-06-19

    The signing of the National Cancer Act in 1971, was designed to take laboratory discoveries rapidly from the bench to the bedside. A "war on cancer" had been declared. Combination cytotoxic chemotherapy was predicted to cure all cancers based on the stunning success in treating childhood leukemia. Breast cancer treatments were primitive; radical mastectomy and radiation was standard of care for disease that had not spread. Ablative endocrine surgery (oophorectomy, hypophysectomy, and adrenalectomy) was a palliative last option for metastatic breast cancer. However, only 30% responded for a year or two: everybody died. The discovery of the estrogen receptor (ER), and translation to breast cancer treatment triggered a revolution in women's health. Two important, but interconnected events occurred at the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology (WFEB), which would exploit the breast tumor ER as the first target to save lives and prevent breast cancer development. Two new groups of medicines: Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) would continue the momentum of research at the WFEB to improve women's health. Here we recount the important progress made in women's health based upon knowledge of the endocrinology of breast cancer. We propose future opportunities in SERM therapeutics to "refresh" the current standards of care for breast cancer treatment. The opportunity is based upon emerging knowledge about acquired resistance to long term adjuvant AI therapy used to treat breast cancer.

  5. Whom should we SPY? A cost analysis of laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography in prevention of mastectomy skin flap necrosis during prosthesis-based breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Arjun; Liu, Allen S; Guo, Lifei

    2014-04-01

    Skin flap necrosis is the most common complication following prosthesis-based breast reconstruction. Many studies have reported on the efficacy of laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (SPY Elite System) in detecting flap necrosis. A cost-effectiveness analysis of laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography is lacking. The authors performed a retrospective review of all consecutive immediate postmastectomy prosthesis-based reconstructions at the Brigham and Women's Hospital over a 7-year 10-month period. The rate of mastectomy skin flap necrosis and related implant loss was determined for the entire cohort and for the subgroups of patients at increased risk for developing this complication: smokers, obese patients, and patients with large breasts. Cost of treating implant loss and skin flap necrosis was calculated based on the average treatment courses and costs at the authors' institution. The cost of the SPY was obtained from LifeCell Corp. From January of 2004 through October of 2011, 79 of 710 prosthesis-based breast reconstructions (11.1 percent) developed mastectomy skin flap necrosis requiring excision and reclosure. Performing laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography on the entire cohort would result in an additional cost of $1537.30 per case of flap necrosis prevented. If laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography was performed on only these high-risk subgroups, the cost savings per case of flap necrosis prevented is $2098.80 for smokers, $5162.30 for patients with a body mass index greater than 30, and $1892.70 for patients with mastectomy weight greater than 800 g. Laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography is not cost-effective as a preventative measure for flap necrosis if used indiscriminately on all patients undergoing prosthesis-based breast reconstructions, but it is cost-effective for high-risk patients, such as smokers, obese patients, and patients with large breasts.

  6. Association between local inflammation and breast tissue age-related lobular involution among premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Mirette; Dumas, Isabelle; Orain, Michèle; Jacob, Simon; Têtu, Bernard; Sanschagrin, François; Bureau, Alexandre; Poirier, Brigitte; Diorio, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory markers in the breast tissue can result in local inflammation. We aimed to investigate whether local inflammation in the breast tissue is associated with age-related lobular involution, a process inversely related to breast cancer risk. Levels of eleven pro- and anti-inflammatory markers were assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal breast tissue obtained from 164 pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Involution status of the breast (degree of lobular involution and the predominant lobule type) was microscopically assessed in normal breast tissue on hematoxylin-eosin stained mastectomy slides. Multivariate generalized linear models were used to assess the associations. In age-adjusted analyses, higher levels of pro-inflammatory markers IL-6, TNF-α, CRP, COX-2, leptin, SAA1 and IL-8; and anti-inflammatory marker IL-10, were inversely associated with the prevalence of complete lobular involution (all P≤0.04). Higher levels of the pro-inflammatory marker COX-2 were also associated with lower prevalence of predominant type 1/no type 3 lobules in the breast, an indicator of complete involution, in age-adjusted analysis (P = 0.017). Higher tissue levels of inflammatory markers, mainly the pro-inflammatory ones, are associated with less involuted breasts and may consequently be associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer. PMID:28846716

  7. Eccentric mastectomy and zigzag periareolar incision for gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lung-Chen; Tung, Kwang-Yi; Chen, Heng-Chang; Huang, Wen-Chen; Hsiao, Hung-Tao

    2009-07-01

    Gynecomastia is enlargement of the male breast caused by gland proliferation. Surgery is performed for symptom relief or for cosmetic reasons. The authors used a modified operative procedure, then evaluated the results and safety. Between 2001 and 2005, 22 men (median age, 26 years; range, 13-63 years) with gynecomastia underwent surgery. The operative procedure included a zigzag periareolar skin incision, eccentric subcutaneous mastectomy, and liposuction, with postoperative compression. All the patients were satisfied with the results of the surgery, which produced a chest contour resembling a normal male chest rather than simply a smaller breast. The only complication was a hematoma. One patient was found to have breast cancer. The normal male chest contour can be restored by the described method of eccentric subcutaneous mastectomy.

  8. Trends in epidemiology and management of breast cancer in developing Arab countries: a literature and registry analysis.

    PubMed

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Khalil, Mazen K; Eid, Toufic; El Kinge, Abdul Rahman; Charafeddine, Maya; Geara, Fady; Seoud, Muhieddine; Shamseddine, Ali I

    2007-08-01

    Registries and research on breast cancer in Arabic and developing countries are limited. We searched PubMed, Medline, WHO and IAEA publications, national, regional, hospital tumor registries and abstracts. We reviewed and analyzed available data on epidemiological trends and management of breast cancer in Arab countries, and compared it to current international standards of early detection, surgery and radiation therapy. Breast cancer constitutes 13-35% of all female cancers. Almost half of patients are below 50 and median age is 49-52 years as compared to 63 in industrialized nations. A recent rise of Age-Standardized Incidence Rates (ASR) is noted. Advanced disease remains very common in Egypt, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Palestinians and others. Mastectomy is still performed in more than 80% of women with breast cancer. There are only 84 radiation therapy centers, 256 radiation oncologists and 473 radiation technologists in all Arab countries, as compared with 1875, 3068 and 5155, respectively, in the USA, which has an equivalent population of about 300 million. Population-based screening is rarely practiced. Results from recent campaigns and studies show a positive impact of clinical breast examination leading to more early diagnosis and breast-conserving surgery. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Arab countries with a young age of around 50 years at presentation. Locally advanced disease is very common and total mastectomy is the most commonly performed surgery. Awareness campaigns and value of clinical breast examination were validated in the Cairo Breast Cancer Screening Trial. More radiation centers and early detection would optimize care and reduce the currently high rate of total mastectomies. Population-based screening in those countries with affluent resources and accessible care should be implemented.

  9. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibody in a patient with HER2/neu overexpressing breast cancer: a case report with a current literature review.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Shin; Llaguna, Omar H; Feldman, Sheldon M; Blum, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome, occurring in <1% of breast cancers. We describe a 32-year-old female presenting with ataxia subsequently diagnosed with poorly differentiated breast cancer. She was serum anti-Yo antibody positive, with estrogen/progesterone receptor negative and HER2/neu receptor positive breast cancer. Neurological symptoms progressed despite modified radical mastectomy, supraclavicular lymphadenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids, transtuzumab, and combination chemotherapy. We performed a literature search, which found a possible association between anti-Yo positive PCD and HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer.

  10. OK-432 (Sapylin) Reduces Seroma Formation After Axillary Lymphadenectomy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deguang; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhihua; Cui, Qiuxia; Wang, Kun; Wu, Kongming; Wu, Gaosong

    2017-02-01

    Purpose/aim: Modified radical mastectomy is the standard surgery for breast cancer in developing countries. However, seroma formation regarded as the most frequent postoperative complication limits the therapeutic benefit of mastectomy and axillary surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of OK-432 in reducing seroma formation after axillary dissection. This prospective cohort study included 80 patients with advanced breast cancer who underwent modified radical mastectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups, which differed with the OK-432 administration. N = 40 patients per group were treated with either OK-432 plus closed suction drainage or drainage-only. In comparison with the drainage-only group, we found that patients in the OK-432 group had a lower drainage volume (p = .030) and a shorter duration of axillary drainage (p < .01). Besides, the use of OK-432 could reduce the incidence of seroma formation (p < .01) and the volume of seroma (p = .040). There were also significant differences in reducing the chance of evacuative punctures (p = .036) and the healing time (p < .01) between control and OK-432 group. OK-432 not only shortened the suction drainage duration, but also significantly reduced seroma formation as well as the needs for aspiration punctures after modified radical mastectomy.

  11. Effect of travel distance and time to radiotherapy on likelihood of receiving mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sharad; Chandwani, Sheenu; Haffty, Bruce G; Demissie, Kitaw

    2015-04-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for women with early-stage breast cancer as an alternative to mastectomy. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receipt of mastectomy and travel distance and time to RT facility in New Jersey (NJ). Data were collected from a cohort of 634 NJ women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. In patients receiving RT, the precise RT facility was used, whereas in patients not receiving RT, surgeons were contacted to determine the location of RT referral. Travel distance and time to RT facility from the patients' residential address were modeled separately using multiple binomial regression to examine their association with choice of surgery while adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Overall, 58.5 % patients underwent BCS with median travel distance to the radiation facility of 4.8 miles (vs. 6.6 miles for mastectomy) and median travel time of 12.0 min (vs. 15.0 min for mastectomy). Patients residing > 9.2 miles compared with ≤ 9.2 miles from radiation facility were 44 % more likely to receive mastectomy. Additionally, patients requiring > 19 min compared with ≤ 19 min of travel time were 36 % more likely to receive mastectomy. These data found that travel distance and time from RT facility act as barriers to undergoing BCS in women with early-stage breast cancer. Despite being in an urban region, a significant number of women in NJ with early-stage breast cancer did not receive BCS.

  12. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-25

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-25

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-01

    treating breast diseases and breast cancer. This multidisciplinary model integrates prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and continuing care...breast diseases and breast cancer. This approach integrates prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and continuing care, incorporation of...mammography and clinical breast examination have a very poor accuracy in the young active duty force in determining which breast abnormalities

  15. Robotic da Vinci Xi-assisted nipple-sparing mastectomy: First clinical report.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Benjamin; Honart, Jean-Francois; Leymarie, Nicolas; Rimareix, Francoise; Al Khashnam, Heba; Kolb, Frederic

    2018-05-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is increasingly popular for the treatment of selected breast cancers and prophylactic mastectomy. Surgical scarring and esthetic outcomes are important patient-related cosmetic considerations. Today, the concept of minimally invasive surgery has become popular, especially using robotic surgery. The authors report the first case of NSM using the latest version of the da Vinci Xi surgical system (Xi). The final incision used to remove the entire mammary gland was located behind the axillary line. In this position, hidden by the arm of the patient, the incision was not visible and was compatible with immediate breast reconstruction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, Merav, E-mail: Merav.ben-david@sheba.health.gov.il; Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv; Granot, Hila

    2016-07-01

    Immediate implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial because of the risk of compromised treatment plans and concerns regarding cosmetic outcomes. We evaluated the effects of immediate direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants on the quality of PMRT delivered by 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). In this retrospective, single-institution study, patients who had undergone reconstruction with direct anatomic implant, performed by a single surgeon, received 3D-CRT between 2008 and 2013. For each patient, 2 plans (including or excluding internal mammary nodes [IMN]) were created and calculated. The primary end point was the dose distribution among reconstructed breasts,more » heart, lungs, and IMNs, and between right and left breasts. Of 29 consecutive patients, 11 received right-sided and 18 received left-sided PMRT to a total dose of 50 Gy. For plans excluding IMN coverage, mean D{sub mean} for right and left reconstructed breasts was 49.09 Gy (98.2% of the prescribed dose) and 48.51 Gy (97.0%), respectively. For plans including IMNs, mean D{sub mean} was 49.15 Gy (98.3%) for right and 48.46 Gy (96.9%) for left reconstructed breasts; the mean IMN D{sub mean} was 47.27 Gy (right) and 47.89 Gy (left). Heart D{sub mean} was below 1.56 Gy for all plans. Mean total lung volume receiving a dose of ≥ 20 Gy was 13.80% to 19.47%. PMRT can be delivered effectively and safely by 3D-CRT after direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants, even if patients require IMN treatment.« less

  18. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  19. Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    prevention of breast cancer and the feasibility of translating this approach into preventive breast cancer vaccine setting. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...immunity. Our overall goal is to develop a preventative vaccination strategy to reduce the incidence and mortality from breast cancer based on...thorough understanding of the immunity in breast mucosa will enable the design of appropriate vaccination strategies aimed at generating persistent

  20. 68Ga-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Passah, Averilicia; Arora, Saurabh; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Subudhi, T Kishan; Arora, Geetanjali

    2018-06-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane protein with elevated expression in prostate cancer cells. Breast cancer also shows PSMA expression. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman with triple-negative bilateral breast carcinoma who underwent bilateral mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. She developed a left chest wall and liver recurrence after primary therapy. Her recurrent disease was also triple-negative. In view of the known poor prognosis and very limited therapeutic options, we performed Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan to explore the possibility of PSMA-based therapy as a future option after exhausting standard-of-care treatments.

  1. Nipple Discharge: An Early Warning Sign of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Veda; Rathnam, Usharani

    2012-01-01

    Nipple discharge (ND) can be the earliest presenting symptom of breast cancer. We hereby present two cases of breast cancer with no palpable mass manifesting as isolated ND, which was whitish in color. In both cases, cytology of the discharge revealed highly pleomorphic cells indicating a high grade malignancy. Mammography showed diffuse, extensive microcalcifications. Simple mastectomy with axillary clearance was done. Histology in both cases revealed diffusely spreading intraductal carcinoma, with focus of microinvasion in one case. ND if scanty or not blood stained is often ignored by the patients and at times, the clinicians. This article highlights that ND can be an early warning sign of intraductal carcinomas that are non-invasive in early stage. Irrespective of the color or nature of the discharge, unilateral ND needs to be evaluated. Proper clinical assessment, cytological evaluation of the ND, and mammography ought to be performed in all such cases. Considering the low level of awareness in women regarding the warning signs of breast cancer, the current focus is to create “breast awareness.” Women should be sensitized to recognize any unusual changes in their breasts and report to their health care providers at the earliest. PMID:23189234

  2. Molecular Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    treatment-resistant cancer cells. Clearly new approaches are needed to treat these diseases. This project is designed to develop novel approaches to...detect breast cancer cells that contaminate peripheral blood and bone marrow, and to remove such contaminating cells. An RT-PCR assay has been developed ...to detect breast cancer cells, and a novel gene therapy vector has been developed to kill contaminating cancer cells. Blood and bone marrow samples

  3. Survival in stage I-III breast cancer patients by surgical treatment in a publicly funded health care system.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S; Gao, H; Yasui, Y; Dabbs, K; Winget, M

    2015-06-01

    Recent investigations of breast cancer survival in the United States suggest that patients who receive mastectomy have poorer survival than those who receive breast-conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiotherapy, despite clinically established equivalence. This study investigates breast cancer survival in the publicly funded health care system present in Alberta, Canada. Surgically treated stage I-III breast cancer cases diagnosed in Alberta from 2002 to 2010 were included. Demographic, treatment and mortality information were collected from the Alberta Cancer Registry. Unadjusted overall and breast cancer-specific mortality was assessed using Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence curves, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate stage-specific mortality hazard estimates associated with surgical treatment received. A total of 14 939 cases of breast cancer (14 633 patients) were included in this study. The unadjusted 5-year all-cause survival probabilities for patients treated with BCS plus radiotherapy, mastectomy, and BCS alone were 94% (95% CI 93% to 95%), 83% (95% CI 82% to 84%) and 74% (95% CI 70% to 78%), respectively. Stage II and III patients who received mastectomy had a higher all-cause (stage II HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.13-1.48; stage III HR = 1.74, 95% CI 1.24-2.45) and breast cancer-specific (stage II HR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.09-1.76; stage III HR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.21-2.65) mortality hazard compared with those who received BCS plus radiotherapy, adjusting for patient and clinical characteristics. BCS alone was consistently associated with poor survival. Stage II and III breast cancer patients diagnosed in Alberta, Canada, who received mastectomy had a significantly higher all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality hazard compared with those who received BCS plus radiotherapy. We suggest greater efforts toward educating and encouraging patients to receive BCS plus radiotherapy rather than mastectomy when it is medically feasible and

  4. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-08

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. [Tykerb for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Saito, Yuki; Okamura, Takuho; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    There are four members of the ErbB family: the epidermal growth factor(EGF)receptor(also called HER1 or EGFR), HER2, HER3 and HER4. Dimerization is the process whereby two HER receptor molecules associate to form a noncovalent complex. HER dimers are the active receptor forms required for transmission of external stimuli to the interior of the cell. HER dimerization occurs upon ligand binding and both HER homodimers and heterodimers can be formed in the process. However, HER2 appears to be the preferred dimerization partner of the other HER family members. Fifteen∼20% of all breast cancers are HER2 positive and have a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is an excellent, rationally-designed targeted cancer treatment. It is a recombinant, humanized, anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to the extracellular area of HER2. However, the overall trastuzumab response rate is low, and the causes of trastuzumab resistance are poorly understood. Thus, there is a need for alternative anti-HER2 strategies for trastuzumab-resistant disease. Lapatinib is an orally administered small-molecule, reversible inhibitor of both EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinase, and its activities include subsequent inhibition of its down- stream MAPK-ERK1/2, and the AKT signaling pathway. Lapatinib is more active when used in combination with capecitabine. For women with trastuzumab pre-treated HER2-positive breast cancer, Here, I will review the basics of EGFR and HER, and the treatment strategy for HER2-positive breast cancer with lapatinib.

  6. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure that it is benign (not cancer). These tests can include • A mammogram • A breast ultrasound • A sample of cells from the lump (called a fine needle aspirate) • A sample of a piece of tissue from the lump (called a core biopsy) Possible Symptoms of Breast Cancer • A lump • ...

  7. Postmastectomy Information Needs and Information-seeking Motives for Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Masoome; Salimi, Sohrab; Barahmand, Nilofar; Fahimnia, Fateme; Allahbakhshian Farsani, Leili

    2018-01-01

    Background: Health information-seeking behavior is a key concept in the empowerment of women with breast cancer after mastectomy for self-care management. Thus, a real understanding of their information needs and their information-seeking behavior may open up new opportunities for their postsurgery cares. The current research was conducted to identify the information needs and information-seeking motives of women with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This is an applied qualitative research. Samples included 17 women with breast cancer after mastectomy selected from two hospitals of Shahid Mohammadi and Persian Gulf and Omid Central Chemotherapy in Bandar Abbas. Data were collected using semi-structured interview on winter 2014 and analyzed using qualitative content analysis method. Results: Three basic contents were extracted including information needs related to mental health, physical health related to disease and personal daily activities along with their subcategories, and representing common experience and perception of mastectomized women seeking for health information. Furthermore, hope, self-esteem, return to life, and available social support resources were expressed as the main information-seeking motives. Conclusion: Considering research findings, mastectomized women need to receive information in wide range of health and thus pursue purposeful behavior. Hence, it is necessary that required actions and measures are taken by health-care authorities, especially institutions responsible for women health, to support and meet information needs of the patients considering their information-seeking motives. PMID:29862224

  8. Postmastectomy Information Needs and Information-seeking Motives for Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Masoome; Salimi, Sohrab; Barahmand, Nilofar; Fahimnia, Fateme; Allahbakhshian Farsani, Leili

    2018-01-01

    Health information-seeking behavior is a key concept in the empowerment of women with breast cancer after mastectomy for self-care management. Thus, a real understanding of their information needs and their information-seeking behavior may open up new opportunities for their postsurgery cares. The current research was conducted to identify the information needs and information-seeking motives of women with breast cancer after mastectomy. This is an applied qualitative research. Samples included 17 women with breast cancer after mastectomy selected from two hospitals of Shahid Mohammadi and Persian Gulf and Omid Central Chemotherapy in Bandar Abbas. Data were collected using semi-structured interview on winter 2014 and analyzed using qualitative content analysis method. Three basic contents were extracted including information needs related to mental health, physical health related to disease and personal daily activities along with their subcategories, and representing common experience and perception of mastectomized women seeking for health information. Furthermore, hope, self-esteem, return to life, and available social support resources were expressed as the main information-seeking motives. Considering research findings, mastectomized women need to receive information in wide range of health and thus pursue purposeful behavior. Hence, it is necessary that required actions and measures are taken by health-care authorities, especially institutions responsible for women health, to support and meet information needs of the patients considering their information-seeking motives.

  9. Computer Simulation of Breast Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    techniques for evaluating the screening efficacy of mammography. Breast cancer growth rates, incidence rates, multiracial population demographics, death ... rates , breast cancer prognosis factors, breast density considerations, detection versus diameter probabilities, and other pertinent data have been

  10. Cost of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Ashish A.; Cantor, Scott B.; Crosby, Melissa A.; Dong, Wenli; Shen, Yu; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Peterson, Susan K.; Parker, Patricia A.; Brewster, Abenaa M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the health care costs of women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) with those of women who did not. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 904 women treated for stage I–III breast cancer with or without CPM. Women were matched according to age, year at diagnosis, stage, and receipt of chemotherapy. We included healthcare costs starting from the date of surgery to 24 months. We identified whether care was immediate or delayed (CPM within 6 months or 6–24 months after initial surgery, respectively). Costs were converted to approximate Medicare reimbursement values and adjusted for inflation. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of CPM on total breast cancer care costs adjusting for patient characteristics and accounting for matched pairs. Results The mean difference between the CPM and no-CPM matched groups was $3,573 (standard error [SE]=$455) for professional costs, $4,176 (SE=$1,724) for technical costs, and $7,749 (SE=$2,069) for total costs. For immediate and delayed CPM, the mean difference for total costs was $6,528 (SE =$2,243) and $16,744 (SE=$5,017), respectively. In multivariable analysis, the CPM group had a statistically significant increase of 16.9% in mean total costs compared to the no-CPM group (P<0.0001). HER-2/neu-positive status, receipt of radiation, and reconstruction were associated with increases in total costs. Conclusions CPM significantly increases short-term healthcare costs for women with unilateral breast cancer. These patient-level cost results can be used for future studies that evaluate the influence of costs of CPM on decision making. PMID:24809301

  11. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-28

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage 0 Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Development of a patient decision aid for choice of surgical treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawka, Carol A.; Goel, Vivek; Mahut, Catherine A.; Taylor, Glen A.; Thiel, Elaine C.; O'Connor, Annette M.; Ackerman, Ida; Burt, Janet H.; Gort, Elaine H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose A patient decision aid for the surgical treatment of early stage breast cancer was developed and evaluated. The rationale for its development was the knowledge that breast conserving therapy (lumpectomy followed by breast radiation) and mastectomy produce equivalent outcomes, and the current general agreement that the decision for the type of surgery should rest with the patient. Methods A decision aid was developed and evaluated in sequential pilot studies of 18 and 10 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were facing a decision for breast conserving therapy or mastectomy. Both qualitative (general reaction, self‐reported anxiety, clarity, satisfaction) and quantitative (knowledge and decisional conflict) measures were assessed. Results The decision aid consists of an audiotape and workbook and takes 36 min to complete. Based on qualitative comments and satisfaction ratings, 17 of 18 women reported a positive reaction to the decision aid, and all 18 reported that it helped clarify information given by the surgeon. Women did not report an increase in anxiety and 17 of 18 women were either satisfied or very satisfied with the decision aid. Conclusion This pilot study supports the hypothesis that this decision aid may be a helpful adjunct in the decision for surgical management of early stage breast cancer. We are currently conducting a randomized trial of the decision aid versus a simple educational pamphlet to evaluate its efficacy as measured by knowledge, decisional conflict, anxiety and post‐decisional regret. PMID:11281859

  13. Prediction of margin involvement and local recurrence after skin-sparing and simple mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Al-Himdani, S; Timbrell, S; Tan, K T; Morris, J; Bundred, N J

    2016-07-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) facilitates immediate breast reconstruction. We investigated locoregional recurrence rates after SSM compared with simple mastectomy and the factors predicting oncological failure. Patients with early breast cancer that underwent mastectomy between 2000 and 2005 at a single institution were studied to ascertain local and systemic recurrence rates between groups. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test were used to evaluate disease-free survival. Patients (n = 577) underwent simple mastectomy (80%) or SSM (20%). Median follow up was 80 months. Patients undergoing SSM were of younger average age, less often had involved lymph nodes (22% vs 44%, p < 0.001), more often had DCIS present (79% vs 53%, p < 0.001) and involved margins (29% vs 15%, p = 0.001). Involved surgical margins were associated with large size (p = 0.001). The 8-year local recurrence (LR) rates were 7.9% for SSM and 5% for simple mastectomy respectively (p = 0.35). Predictors of locoregional recurrence were lymph node involvement (HR 8.0, for >4 nodes, p < 0.001) and involved surgical margins (HR 3.3, p = 0.002). In node negative patients, SSM was a predictor of locoregional recurrence (HR 4.8 [1.1, 19.9], p = 0.033). Delayed reconstruction is more appropriate for node positive early breast cancer after post-mastectomy radiotherapy. Re-excision of involved margins is essential to prevent local recurrence after mastectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lulu

    2017-07-05

    Early-stage cancer detection could reduce breast cancer death rates significantly in the long-term. The most critical point for best prognosis is to identify early-stage cancer cells. Investigators have studied many breast diagnostic approaches, including mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, computerized tomography, positron emission tomography and biopsy. However, these techniques have some limitations such as being expensive, time consuming and not suitable for young women. Developing a high-sensitive and rapid early-stage breast cancer diagnostic method is urgent. In recent years, investigators have paid their attention in the development of biosensors to detect breast cancer using different biomarkers. Apart from biosensors and biomarkers, microwave imaging techniques have also been intensely studied as a promising diagnostic tool for rapid and cost-effective early-stage breast cancer detection. This paper aims to provide an overview on recent important achievements in breast screening methods (particularly on microwave imaging) and breast biomarkers along with biosensors for rapidly diagnosing breast cancer.

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessing Affect Reactivity and Regulation in Patients With Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-30

    Healthy Subject; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Male breast cancer is rare: an initial presentation may be as an abscess.

    PubMed

    Ventham, N T; Hussien, M I

    2010-08-06

    Breast cancer in men is rare. Breast cancer presenting initially as an abscess has been described only a handful of times in the literature. We present the first described case of invasive adenocarcinoma presenting as an abscess in a man. An 80-year-old diabetic man presented with symptoms typical of a breast abscess. The abscess failed to respond to percutaneous therapy and excision of breast abscess was performed. Histology revealed an invasive carcinoma. He went on to have a mastectomy. Histology should be obtained from breast abscesses not resolving within 2 months of initial percutaneous therapy. Histology could be obtained by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA), core or vacuum assisted biopsy, or by formal incision and drainage.

  17. Male breast cancer is rare: an initial presentation may be as an abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ventham, N T; Hussien, M I

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is rare. Breast cancer presenting initially as an abscess has been described only a handful of times in the literature. We present the first described case of invasive adenocarcinoma presenting as an abscess in a man. An 80-year-old diabetic man presented with symptoms typical of a breast abscess. The abscess failed to respond to percutaneous therapy and excision of breast abscess was performed. Histology revealed an invasive carcinoma. He went on to have a mastectomy. Histology should be obtained from breast abscesses not resolving within 2 months of initial percutaneous therapy. Histology could be obtained by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA), core or vacuum assisted biopsy, or by formal incision and drainage. PMID:22767683

  18. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-01

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  1. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-29

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  2. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Wani, Burhan; Aziz, Shiekh Aejaz; Ganaie, Mohammad Ashraf; Mir, Mohammad Hussain

    2017-01-01

    The study was meant to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with breast cancer and to establish its role as an independent risk factor on occurrence of breast cancer. Fifty women aged between 40 and 80 years with breast cancer and fifty controls of similar age were assessed for metabolic syndrome prevalence and breast cancer risk factors, including age at menarche, reproductive status, live births, breastfeeding, and family history of breast cancer, age at diagnosis of breast cancer, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome parameters. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was found in 40.0% of breast cancer patients, and 18.0% of those in control group ( P = 0.02). An independent and positive association was seen between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 3.037; 95% confidence interval 1.214-7.597). Metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in breast cancer patients and is an independent risk factor for breast cancer.

  3. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 μg/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 μg/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 μg Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content

  4. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  5. Minimalist breast conserving surgical approaches for inferiorly sited cancers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mona P

    2017-08-01

    Contemporary data suggests that breast conservation treatment (BCT) may confer a survival advantage when compared to mastectomy. Hence, it would be logical to adopt strategies which increase eligibility of successful BCT without compromising oncologic principles or cosmetic outcome. With respect to achieving good aesthetics, inferiorly sited breast cancers pose a particular technical challenge. A vast array of techniques, collectively referred to as oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) have been developed to minimise post treatment distortion. The purported advantages of these approaches are the acquisition of wider margins and reduced re-excision rates. However, to date, there is a lack of data demonstrating significant reduction in local recurrence and overall survival when compared with less extensive procedures. In this review, "minimalist" procedures are described where strict oncologic criteria of clear margins are fulfilled and acceptable cosmesis are simultaneously achieved. These techniques offer less tissue loss, less extensive parenchymal mobilisation and shorter operating times without compromising margin status and aesthetics. They involve the combination of innovative incision designs and certain parenchymal resection patterns. Incision designs include the boomerang, golf-tee, anchor and arrowhead incisions which have been previously described but not widely used. Parenchymal resection patterns follow the "sick lobe hypothesis". These techniques, termed "reductionist", or "minimalist" comprising approaches where breast conserving surgery is condensed to its irreducible elements, offer alternatives which align with contemporary objectives of surgery where optimal survival outcomes are achieved through individualised procedures resulting in reduced iatrogenic impact. This logically allows scope for de-escalation of surgical therapy for breast cancer.

  6. An unusual subcutaneous breast cancer metastasis in a 86-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Metere, A; Di Cosimo, C; Chiesa, C; Esposito, A; Giacomelli, L; Redler, A

    2012-04-01

    The most common metastasis site of breast cancer are the local and distant lymph nodes, bone, lungs, liver and brain. We report a 86-year-old woman with an unusual abdominal subcutaneous metastasis of breast cancer. The patient was diagnosed with invasive lobular breast cancer and had been treated six months earlier with modified radical mastectomy. Later she presented a painless mass on the middle upper abdominal wall. She was subsequently admitted to the hospital to perform a whole body CT scan, confirming the presence of the abdominal mass in epigastric region, causing a partial compression of the stomach. Histopathological studies confirmed that the abdominal mass was a rare subcutaneous metastatic lesion of breast origin. The patient underwent a surgical intervention to remove the metastasis and she recovered fully.

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  8. Breast Cancer Center Support Grant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    indicator for the disease. Am J Epidemiol 1980 ; 111:301-8. (42) Dupont WD, Page DL. Breast cancer risk associated with proliferative disease, age...1993;187:75-9. (52) Burhenne HJ, Burhenne LW, Goldberg F, Hislop TG, Worth AJ, Rebbeck PM, et al. Interval breast cancers in the Screening Mammography...Basier, Ian M. Thompson Until the mid- 1980s , early detection for prostate cancer had only one tool—digital rectal examination (DRE). The tool is

  9. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0461 TITLE: Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Silva CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) l 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC, ~5% of all breast cancers ) is the most lethal form of breast cancer , presenting a 5- year

  10. Evolution in Monitoring of Free Flap Autologous Breast Reconstruction after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy: Is There a Best Way?

    PubMed

    Frey, Jordan D; Stranix, John T; Chiodo, Michael V; Alperovich, Michael; Ahn, Christina Y; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Levine, Jamie P

    2018-05-01

    Free flap monitoring in autologous reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy remains controversial. The authors therefore examined outcomes in nipple-sparing mastectomy with buried free flap reconstruction versus free flap reconstruction incorporating a monitoring skin paddle. Autologous free flap reconstructions with nipple-sparing mastectomy performed from 2006 to 2015 were identified. Demographics and operative results were analyzed and compared between buried flaps and those with a skin paddle for monitoring. Two hundred twenty-one free flaps for nipple-sparing mastectomy reconstruction were identified: 50 buried flaps and 171 flaps incorporating a skin paddle. The most common flaps used were deep inferior epigastric perforator (64 percent), profunda artery perforator (12.1 percent), and muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps (10.4 percent). Patients undergoing autologous reconstructions with a skin paddle had a significantly greater body mass index (p = 0.006). Mastectomy weight (p = 0.017) and flap weight (p < 0.0001) were significantly greater in flaps incorporating a skin paddle. Comparing outcomes, there were no significant differences in flap failure (2.0 percent versus 2.3 percent; p = 1.000) or percentage of flaps requiring return to the operating room (6.0 percent versus 4.7 percent; p = 0.715) between groups. Buried flaps had an absolute greater mean number of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy (0.82) compared with the skin paddle group (0.44); however, rates of revision procedures per nipple-sparing mastectomy were statistically equivalent between the groups (p = 0.296). Although buried free flap reconstruction in nipple-sparing mastectomy has been shown to be safe and effective, the authors' technique has evolved to favor incorporating a skin paddle, which allows for clinical monitoring and can be removed at the time of secondary revision. Therapeutic, III.

  11. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  12. [Management of breast cancer in a woman with breast implants].

    PubMed

    Remacle, S; Lifrange, E; Nizet, J-L

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer, currently one woman on eight, also concerns patients who underwent augmentation surgery. Breast implants have already been the subject of numerous publications concerning the risk of inducing breast cancer or of delaying its diagnosis; however, no significant causal relationship has been established. The purpose of this article is to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic consequences when breast cancer is identified in a patient with breast implants.

  13. Influence of Distance to Hospital and Insurance Status on the Rates of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy, a National Cancer Data Base study.

    PubMed

    Ward, Erin P; Unkart, Jonathan T; Bryant, Alex; Murphy, James; Blair, Sarah L

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the impact of travel distance and insurance status on contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rates in breast cancer. We queried the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for women >18 years of age with a nonmetastatic primary breast cancer of ductal, lobular, or mixed histology. Patient- and facility-specific CPM rates were calculated based on insurance, race, and distance to treatment center. Standard univariable and multivariable regression analysis was performed. Overall, the CPM rate was 6.5% for the 864,105 patients identified. Most patients traveled <20 miles to a treatment center (79.5%) and had private insurance or Medicare (58.3 and 33.4%, respectively). In general, younger, White, non-Hispanic, and privately insured patients residing further from a treatment center was associated with increased rates of CPM. However, distance to the treatment center and insurance type had a greater absolute impact on rates of CPM for Black and Hispanic patients. Absolute CPM rate increases for patients >100 miles from a treatment center compared with those <20 miles from a treatment center were observed to be greater for Black and Hispanic patients (3.5 and 3.9%, respectively) compared with White and non-Hispanic patients (2.5 and 2.6%). Additionally, further patient travel distance was associated with higher treatment center-specific CPM rates. Increased travel distance is independently associated with increased rates of CPM for all patients and increased facility-specific rates of CPM. Black and Hispanic patients were found to be more vulnerable to the impact of travel distance and insurance status on rates of CPM.

  14. Randomized trial of proactive rapid genetic counseling versus usual care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Marc D; Peshkin, Beth N; Isaacs, Claudine; Willey, Shawna; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B; Nusbaum, Rachel; Hooker, Gillian; O'Neill, Suzanne; Jandorf, Lina; Kelly, Scott P; Heinzmann, Jessica; Zidell, Aliza; Khoury, Katia

    2018-08-01

    Breast cancer patients who carry BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutations may consider bilateral mastectomy. Having bilateral mastectomy at the time of diagnosis not only reduces risk of a contralateral breast cancer, but can eliminate the need for radiation therapy and yield improved reconstruction options. However, most patients do not receive genetic counseling or testing at the time of their diagnosis. In this trial, we tested proactive rapid genetic counseling and testing (RGCT) in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in order to facilitate pre-surgical genetic counseling and testing. We recruited newly diagnosed breast cancer patients at increased risk for carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation. Of 379 eligible patients who completed a baseline survey, 330 agreed to randomization in a 2:1 ratio to RGCT (n = 220) versus UC (n = 108). Primary outcomes were genetic counseling and testing uptake and breast cancer surgical decisions. RGCT led to higher overall (83.8% vs. 54.6%; p < 0.0001) and pre-surgical (57.8% vs. 38.7%; p = 0.001) genetic counseling uptake compared to UC. Despite higher rates of genetic counseling, RGCT did not differ from UC in overall (54.1% vs. 49.1%, p > 0.10) or pre-surgical (30.6% vs. 27.4%, p > 0.10) receipt of genetic test results nor did they differ in uptake of bilateral mastectomy (26.6% vs. 21.8%, p > 0.10). Although RGCT yielded increased genetic counseling participation, this did not result in increased rates of pre-surgical genetic testing or impact surgical decisions. These data suggest that those patients most likely to opt for genetic testing at the time of diagnosis are being effectively identified by their surgeons.

  15. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα) dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  16. [Breast cancer: the unspeakable].

    PubMed

    Winaver, D; Slama, L

    1993-04-01

    The drama with the language is that "putting in words" creates an uncrossable chasm between the felt and the expressed. There are moments where the impossibility to communicate cuts the links between doctor and patient. And this often happens in a consultation after the breast cancer has been announced. The unspeakable then, stands between the two protagonists, as the spectral appearance of death. For the patients, the medical revelation then becomes an anathema. The doctor who says the word, becomes the one who overturns a destiny for ever. One knows from greek mythology that confronted to the tragic of his destiny, man hears the ineluctability of the oracle but cannot accepts it. It is the role of the psyche to divert the prophecy so as to have space for hope, for a project of live. To tell, not to tell, how to tell: there is no rule. The misunderstanding is inexorable: it sighs the discordance between the medical reality of the breast cancer, the subject desire and the implication of the doctor who is wedged between the one and the other.

  17. Talking with the Doctor about Breast Surgery Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer. Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages for having a lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy? ... been performed. Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages of having a mastectomy? Dr. Attai: The risk ...

  18. Family History of Breast Cancer, Breast Density, and Breast Cancer Risk in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Population.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Sprague, Brian L; Bissell, Michael C S; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana S M; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-06-01

    Background: The utility of incorporating detailed family history into breast cancer risk prediction hinges on its independent contribution to breast cancer risk. We evaluated associations between detailed family history and breast cancer risk while accounting for breast density. Methods: We followed 222,019 participants ages 35 to 74 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, of whom 2,456 developed invasive breast cancer. We calculated standardized breast cancer risks within joint strata of breast density and simple (1 st -degree female relative) or detailed (first-degree, second-degree, or first- and second-degree female relative) breast cancer family history. We fit log-binomial models to estimate age-specific breast cancer associations for simple and detailed family history, accounting for breast density. Results: Simple first-degree family history was associated with increased breast cancer risk compared with no first-degree history [Risk ratio (RR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.1 at age 40; RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.7 at age 50; RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6 at age 60; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5 at age 70). Breast cancer associations with detailed family history were strongest for women with first- and second-degree family history compared with no history (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2 at age 40); this association weakened in higher age groups (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.88-1.5 at age 70). Associations did not change substantially when adjusted for breast density. Conclusions: Even with adjustment for breast density, a history of breast cancer in both first- and second-degree relatives is more strongly associated with breast cancer than simple first-degree family history. Impact: Future efforts to improve breast cancer risk prediction models should evaluate detailed family history as a risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 938-44. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Treatment decisions and employment of breast cancer patients: Results of a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Abrahamse, Paul H; Lee, Kamaria L; Wallner, Lauren P; Janz, Nancy K; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Morrow, Monica; Kurian, Allison W; Friese, Christopher R; Hawley, Sarah T; Katz, Steven J

    2017-12-15

    Many patients with breast cancer work for pay at the time of their diagnosis, and the treatment plan may threaten their livelihood. Understanding work experiences in a contemporary population-based sample is necessary to inform initiatives to reduce the burden of cancer care. Women who were 20 to 79 years old and had been diagnosed with stage 0 to II breast cancer, as reported to the Georgia and Los Angeles Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries in 2014-2015, were surveyed. Of the 3672 eligible women, 2502 responded (68%); 1006 who reported working before their diagnosis were analyzed. Multivariate models evaluated correlates of missing work for >1 month and stopping work altogether versus missing work for ≤1 month. In this diverse sample, most patients (62%) underwent lumpectomy; 16% underwent unilateral mastectomy (8% with reconstruction); and 23% underwent bilateral mastectomy (19% with reconstruction). One-third (33%) received chemotherapy. Most (84%) worked full-time before their diagnosis; however, only 50% had paid sick leave, 39% had disability benefits, and 38% had flexible work schedules. Surgical treatment was strongly correlated with missing >1 month of work (odds ratio [OR] for bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction vs lumpectomy, 7.8) and with stopping work altogether (OR for bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction vs lumpectomy, 3.1). Chemotherapy receipt (OR for missing >1 month, 1.3; OR for stopping work altogether, 3.9) and race (OR for missing >1 month for blacks vs whites, 2.0; OR for stopping work altogether for blacks vs whites, 1.7) also correlated. Those with paid sick leave were less likely to stop working (OR, 0.5), as were those with flexible schedules (OR, 0.3). Working patients who received more aggressive treatments were more likely to experience substantial employment disruptions. Cancer 2017;123:4791-9. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  1. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  2. Quality of life among breast cancer patients in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Nagi, Nadeem Mohammed Saeed; Ali, Munef Mohammed Saleh; Almuasli, Mahfoudh

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the quality of life among breast cancer patients in Yemen based on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. The data collected from 106 female breast cancer patients who were chosen for recruitment from the outpatient in National Oncology Centre (NOC), Sana'a, Yemen from November 2008 to June 2011. Questionnaires were distributed to the patients during their visit to the outpatient clinics in the center. The instrument of this study consists of two parts: Socio-demographic and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) questionnaire. Regarding data analysis, means and SD of subscales were evaluated for descriptive purpose. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare the three groups regarding QOL subscales. Whereas, independent t-test was performed for comparing two groups regarding QOL subscales. Multiple linear regression using backward analysis was performed to obtain the final model for each domain. The final model was chosen depending on R2 and the p value of the model. A p value less than 0.05 is considered statistically significant. A total number of 106 breast cancer patients were participated in this study. The majority of them were uneducated, unemployed with normal weight and had middle income (60.4%; 95.3%; 59.4%, 46.2%; respectively). As for clinical characteristics of the study participants; the majority of them had had no family history of breast cancer, have been diagnosed at least 2 years, were diagnosed at grade 3 and size of tumor greater than 2 cm (88.7%, 66.0%, 35.8%, 73.6%; respectively). The majority of them underwent mastectomy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and tamoxifen therapy (85.8%, 63.2%, 94.3% and 62.3%; respectively). For univariate analysis, the present study has identified several factors includes family monthly income, BMI, educational status, years after diagnosis, histological grade radiotherapy and

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  5. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells that help fight illness. If breast cancer spreads, the lymph nodes in the underarm (called ... if they contain cancer cells. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. Sentinel node biopsy and ...

  6. Breast Cancer Types: What Your Type Means

    MedlinePlus

    ... with breast cancer, your doctor will review your pathology report and the results of any imaging tests ... effective treatment for your specific cancer. Bleiweiss IJ. Pathology of breast cancer. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/ ...

  7. "Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?" Jordanian men's perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health.

    PubMed

    Taha, Hana; Al-Qutob, Raeda; Nyström, Lennarth; Wahlström, Rolf; Berggren, Vanja

    2013-10-25

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman's decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men's individual and contextual perspectives on women's breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one's wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men's feelings of responsibility for the family's health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men's views about other men's rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men's perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one's own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support.

  8. Late presentation and management of South Asian breast cancer patients in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sreekumar Sundara; Lim, Jennifer N W; Haq, Anwar

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to bridge the knowledge gap and improve our understanding of the late presentation and management of breast cancer among South Asian women of non-oriental origin (SA) living in the United Kingdom. Retrospective review of the breast cancer waiting list data-base held at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS trust was undertaken to identify SA women diagnosed with breast cancer from January 2000 to August 2007. We identified 41 (2.5%) SA women among 1,630 patients diagnosed with breast cancer during this period and 36 were included (median age=53.5 years, range=32-84). Only 19% (n=7) were screen detected and 81% (n=29) presented thorough symptomatic breast clinic. In the latter, 66% (n=19) were in the screening age group and 45% (n=13) presented beyond 8 weeks (late presentation). In our cohort, 91% (n=29) patients had advanced disease (TNM stage 2 and 3) resulting in a high mastectomy rate of 61% (n=22). 19% (n=7) died as a direct result of cancer and the remaining 78% (n=28) remains disease free following treatment thus far. The delay in presentation and poor national breast screening programme uptake among the SA women resulted in advanced disease at diagnosis. There is need for increasing the breast cancer awareness as well as encouraging breast screening among SA women in the UK.

  9. The Angelina Jolie Effect -- Impact on Breast and Ovarian Cancer Prevention: A Systematic Review of Effects after the Public Announcement in May 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Gianmarco; Nante, Nicola; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Background: On 14 May 2013, Angelina Jolie (AJ), revealed herself to be the carrier of a BReast CAncer 1 (BRCA1) gene mutation and announced her decision to undergo a prophylactic mastectomy, followed by a laparoscopic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. This review explores the impact of the "Angelina Jolie Effect" in order to reveal…

  10. Evaluation of symptoms of anxiety and depression in women with breast cancer after breast amputation or conservation treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Marzena; Kubiatowski, Tomasz; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Czarnocki, Krzysztof J; Makara-Studzińska, Marta; Bojar, Iwona; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the presence of symptoms of anxiety and depression in women treated for breast cancer who underwent surgical procedure using one of two alternative methods, either radical mastectomy or breast conserving treatment (BCT). A questionnaire survey involved 85 patients treated in a conservative way and 94 patients after breast amputation. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and depression degree evaluation questionnaire were used in the study. The patients' esponses were statistically analyzed. Based on the HADS questionnaire, the total anxiety level in the group of women treated with BCT was 6.96 points, while in the group of patients who had undergone mastectomy the value was 7.8 points. The observed results were statistically significant. In the case of depression, the following values were found: patients after amputation had 8.04 scale value points, and those after BCT had 6.8 scale value points. The observed differences were statistically significant. Negative correlation was found between the level of anxiety and depression. The total level of depression evaluated using the Beck scale was 16.3 points in the BCT group, which means that they suffered from mild depression, while in the mastectomy group the level was 19.6 points, which corresponds to moderate depression. The level of anxiety and depression among women with breast cancer was influenced by the type of the applied surgical procedure and adjuvant chemotherapy. Demographic variables did not influence the level of anxiety and depression.

  11. Breast cancer: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Collyar, D E

    2001-09-15

    The 2001 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) International Symposium, Breast Cancer: A Global Perspective, was conducted by members of the ASCO International Committee and additional speakers from around the world. An interactive format was chosen to: (1) learn how patterns of incidence, epidemiology, and causal biology relate to breast cancer around the world; (2) discuss the challenges in screening, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer, as well as its socioeconomic impact in various regions; (3) describe international differences in approach to and management of advanced breast cancer; and (4) discuss treatment in terms of hormone response, clinical research, and drug metabolism. After a brief introduction, each speaker gave an overview of breast cancer challenges and issues in their country, and discussed how the following case might be diagnosed and treated: A 44-year-old mother who presents with a finding of a painless breast lump and no prior history of breast masses, trauma, or surgery. Comments from a patient perspective were then presented, followed by a panel discussion and closing remarks. Co-chairs of this Symposium included Deborah Collyar (President, PAIR-Patient Advocates in Research) and Elizabeth Eisenhauer, MD (Director, Investigational New Drug Program, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Speakers included Gilberto Schwartsmann, MD (South America), Monica Morrow, MD (North America), Daniel Vorobiof, MD (South Africa), Rakesh Chopra, MD (India), Klaus Hoeffken, MD (Eastern Europe), Russell Basser, MD (Australia), Susan Matsuko Shinigawa (patient perspective), and Larry Norton, MD (closing remarks).

  12. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Societymore » for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy

  13. The influence of travel time on breast cancer characteristics, receipt of primary therapy, and surveillance mammography.

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Shi, Xun; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tuzzio, Leah; Buist, Diana S M

    2011-08-01

    Travel time has been shown to influence some aspects of cancer characteristics at diagnosis and care for women with breast cancer, but important gaps remain in our understanding of its impact. We examined the influence of travel time to the nearest radiology facility on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and surveillance for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. We included 1,012 women with invasive breast cancer (stages I and II) who had access to care within an integrated health care delivery system in western Washington State. The travel times to the nearest radiology facility were calculated for all the U.S. Census blocks within the study area and assigned to women based on residence at diagnosis. We collected cancer characteristics, primary and adjuvant therapies, and surveillance mammography for at least 2.5 years post diagnosis and used multivariable analyses to test the associations of travel time. The majority of women (68.6%) lived within 20 min of the nearest radiology facility, had stage I disease (72.7%), received breast conserving therapy (68.7%), and had annual surveillance mammography the first 2 years after treatment (73.7%). The travel time was not significantly associated with the stage or surveillance mammography after adjusting for covariates. Primary therapy was significantly related to travel time, with greater travel time (>30 min vs. ≤ 10 min) associated with a higher likelihood of mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.01). The travel time was not associated with the stage at diagnosis or surveillance mammography receipt. The travel time does seem to influence the type of primary therapy among women with breast cancer, suggesting that women may prefer low frequency services, such as mastectomy, if geographic access to a radiology facility is limited.

  14. The influence of travel time on breast cancer characteristics, receipt of primary therapy, and surveillance mammography

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Shi, Xun; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tuzzio, Leah; Buist, Diana S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Travel time has been shown to influence some aspects of cancer characteristics at diagnosis and care for women with breast cancer, but important gaps remain in our understanding of its impact. We examined the influence of travel time to the nearest radiology facility on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and surveillance for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. We included 1,012 women with invasive breast cancer (stages I and II) who had access to care within an integrated health care delivery system in western Washington State. The travel times to the nearest radiology facility were calculated for all the U.S. Census blocks within the study area and assigned to women based on residence at diagnosis. We collected cancer characteristics, primary and adjuvant therapies, and surveillance mammography for at least 2.5 years post diagnosis and used multivariable analyses to test the associations of travel time. The majority of women (68.6%) lived within 20 min of the nearest radiology facility, had stage I disease (72.7%), received breast conserving therapy (68.7%), and had annual surveillance mammography the first 2 years after treatment (73.7%). The travel time was not significantly associated with the stage or surveillance mammography after adjusting for covariates. Primary therapy was significantly related to travel time, with greater travel time (>30 min vs. ≤ 10 min) associated with a higher likelihood of mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16–2.01). The travel time was not associated with the stage at diagnosis or surveillance mammography receipt. The travel time does seem to influence the type of primary therapy among women with breast cancer, suggesting that women may prefer low frequency services, such as mastectomy, if geographic access to a radiology facility is limited. PMID:21553117

  15. Spillover effects of state mandated benefit laws: the case of outpatient breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Bian, John; Lipscomb, Joseph; Mello, Michelle M

    This paper examines the "spillover effects" of state laws that mandate inpatient coverage for breast cancer surgery. It looks at outpatient utilization of two types of breast cancer surgery among Medicare fee-for-service patients, who are exempt from state regulation. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer registries and Medicare claims, we performed difference-in-differences analyses of patients in nine states from 1993 to 2002. The analyses show that state laws had a significant impact on only the likelihood of outpatient mastectomy, which was reduced by five percentage points. Such a spillover effect may diminish the expected impact of federal coverage laws for inpatient breast cancer surgery, which have been proposed to achieve similar ends.

  16. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-30

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. TEN-YEAR RECURRENCE RATES IN YOUNG WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER BY LOCOREGIONAL TREATMENT APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach. PMID:18707822

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seoyon; Park, Dae Hwan; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Jong Won; Han, Jun Young; Kim, Dong Kyu; Jeon, Jae Yong; Choi, Kyoung Hyo; Kim, Won

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and risk factors of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder in breast cancer patients between 13 and 18 months after surgery. This study included 271 women who underwent surgery for breast cancer with a postoperative period of 13-18 months. Current adhesive capsulitis was defined as restriction of external rotation and one or more additional directional restrictions with history of shoulder pain. Cumulative adhesive capsulitis was defined as current adhesive capsulitis or a previous history of adhesive capsulitis after breast cancer surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine associations between current or cumulative adhesive capsulitis and potential risk factors. Among the 271 study patients, 28 (10.3%) and 21 (7.7%) had cumulative or current adhesive capsulitis, respectively. The incidences of cumulative and current adhesive capsulitis were higher in those aged 50-59 years (odds ratio [OR], 9.912; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.790-54.880; and OR, 12.395; 95% CI, 1.187-129.444, respectively) and those who underwent mastectomy (OR, 6.805; 95% CI, 1.800-25.733; and OR, 9.645; 95% CI, 2.075-44.829, respectively) or mastectomy with reconstruction (OR, 13.122; 95% CI, 2.488-69.218; and OR, 20.075; 95% CI, 2.873-140.261, respectively). Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a common problem after breast cancer treatment. An age of 50-59 years and mastectomy are major risk factors for adhesive capsulitis, and breast reconstruction additionally increases the risk. Patients with these risk factors require greater attention for early diagnosis and proper treatment.

  19. Breast Cancer: subgroups specific blood-biomarkers for early / predictive diagnosis and personalized treatment — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Breast-conserving lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be an alternative strategy, competitive to mastectomy, in preventing mortality caused by breast cancer. However, besides negative short-term effects (blood flow disturbances, painful erythema, etc.) breast irradiation causes severe long-term side-effects (leucopenia, anemia, breast edema, fibrosis, increase of angiosarcoma, leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes). Therefore, the identification of individual susceptibility to radiation and improved patient-specific radiotherapy planning are highly desirable for personalised treatment in breast cancer. Why early and predictive diagnosis is crucial for long-term outcomes of breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among women with an average incidence rate of 10-12 per 100 women. In 2005, breast cancer led to 502,000 deaths worldwide. Advanced stages of breast cancer lead to the development of metastasis predominantly in the lymph nodes, bone, lung, skin, brain, and liver. Although breast-MRI is currently the most sensitive diagnostic tool for breast imaging, its specificity is limited resulting in a negative impact for surgical management in approximately 9 % of cases. Early diagnosis has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial, enabling significantly enhanced therapy efficiency and possibly full recovery.

  20. Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Krontiras, Helen; Pisu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Racial disparities in breast cancer treatment among Medicare beneficiaries have been documented. This study aimed to determine whether racial disparities exist among white and black female Medicare beneficiaries in Alabama, an economically disadvantaged U.S. state. Methods: From a linked dataset of breast cancer cases from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry and fee-for-service claims from Medicare, we identified 2,097 white and black females, aged 66 years and older, who were diagnosed with stages 1–3 breast cancer from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2002. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to determine whether there were racial differences in initiating and completing National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice guideline-specific treatment. Results: Sixty-two percent of whites and 64.7% of blacks had mastectomy (p=0.27); 34.6% of whites and 30.2% of blacks had breast conserving surgery (BCS) (p=0.12). Among those who had BCS, 76.8% of whites and 83.3% of blacks started adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.33) and they equally completed adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.29). For women with tumors over 1 centimeter, whites and blacks were equally likely to start (16.1% of whites and 18.3% of black; p=0.34) and complete (50.6% of whites and 46.3% of black; p=0.87) adjuvant chemotherapy. There were still no differences after adjusting for confounders using GEE. However, differences were observed by area-level socioeconomic status (SES), with lower SES residents more likely to receive a mastectomy (odds ratio [OR]=1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.57) and initiate radiation after BCS (OR=2.24; 95% CI: 1.28–3.93). Conclusions: No racial differences were found in guideline-specific breast cancer treatment or treatment completion, but there were differences by SES. Future studies should explore reasons for SES differences and whether similar results hold in other economically disadvantaged U.S. states. PMID