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Sample records for breast cancer model

  1. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Murine models of breast cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Laura E; Ottewell, Penelope D; Rucci, Nadia; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Chiechi, Antonella; Buijs, Jeroen T; Sterling, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality in late-stage breast cancer patients and are currently considered incurable. Investigators rely on translational models to better understand the pathogenesis of skeletal complications of malignancy in order to identify therapeutic targets that may ultimately prevent and treat solid tumor metastasis to bone. Many experimental models of breast cancer bone metastases are in use today, each with its own caveats. In this methods review, we characterize the bone phenotype of commonly utilized human- and murine-derived breast cell lines that elicit osteoblastic and/or osteolytic destruction of bone in mice and report methods for optimizing tumor-take in murine models of bone metastasis. We then provide protocols for four of the most common xenograft and syngeneic inoculation routes for modeling breast cancer metastasis to the skeleton in mice, including the intra-cardiac, intra-arterial, orthotopic and intra-tibial methods of tumor cell injection. Recommendations for in vivo and ex vivo assessment of tumor progression and bone destruction are provided, followed by discussion of the strengths and limitations of the available tools and translational models that aid investigators in the study of breast cancer metastasis to bone. PMID:27867497

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  4. Mathematical Models of Breast and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, since answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible, in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. PMID:27259061

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Assessment SAS Macro (Gail Model)

    Cancer.gov

    A SAS macro (commonly referred to as the Gail Model) that projects absolute risk of invasive breast cancer according to NCI’s Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) algorithm for specified race/ethnic groups and age intervals.

  6. Multiscale Models of Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Verbridge, Scott; Stroock, Abraham D.; Fischbach, Claudia; Varner, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer initiation, invasion and metastasis span multiple length and time scales. Molecular events at short length scales lead to an initial tumorigenic population, which left unchecked by immune action, acts at increasingly longer length scales until eventually the cancer cells escape from the primary tumor site. This series of events is highly complex, involving multiple cell types interacting with (and shaping) the microenvironment. Multiscale mathematical models have emerged as a powerful tool to quantitatively integrate the convective-diffusion-reaction processes occurring on the systemic scale, with the molecular signaling processes occurring on the cellular and subcellular scales. In this study, we reviewed the current state of the art in cancer modeling across multiple length scales, with an emphasis on the integration of intracellular signal transduction models with pro-tumorigenic chemical and mechanical microenvironmental cues. First, we reviewed the underlying biomolecular origin of breast cancer, with a special emphasis on angiogenesis. Then, we summarized the development of tissue engineering platforms which could provide highfidelity ex vivo experimental models to identify and validate multiscale simulations. Lastly, we reviewed top-down and bottom-up multiscale strategies that integrate subcellular networks with the microenvironment. We present models of a variety of cancers, in addition to breast cancer specific models. Taken together, we expect as the sophistication of the simulations increase, that multiscale modeling and bottom-up agent-based models in particular will become an increasingly important platform technology for basic scientific discovery, as well as the identification and validation of potentially novel therapeutic targets. PMID:23008097

  7. Bioengineering Models for Breast Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Arinzeh, Treena L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in early diagnosis, breast cancer (BC) still remains a clinical challenge. Most BC models use complex in vivo models and two-dimensional monolayer cultures that do not fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. The integration of cancer biology and engineering can lead to the development of novel in vitro approaches to study BC behavior and quantitatively assess different features of the tumor microenvironment that may influence cell behavior. In this review, we present tissue engineering approaches to model BC in vitro. Recent advances in the use of three-dimensional cell culture models to study various aspects of BC disease in vitro are described. The emerging area of studying BC dormancy using these models is also reviewed. PMID:26792996

  8. Evaluation of diffusion models in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panek, Rafal; Borri, Marco; Orton, Matthew; O'Flynn, Elizabeth; Morgan, Veronica; Giles, Sharon L; deSouza, Nandita; Leach, Martin O; Schmidt, Maria A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the microvascular pseudodiffusion effects resulting with non-monoexponential behavior are present in breast cancer, taking into account tumor spatial heterogeneity. Additionally, methodological factors affecting the signal in low and high diffusion-sensitizing gradient ranges were explored in phantom studies. The effect of eddy currents and accuracy of b-value determination using a multiple b-value diffusion-weighted MR imaging sequence were investigated in test objects. Diffusion model selection and noise were then investigated in volunteers (n = 5) and breast tumor patients (n = 21) using the Bayesian information criterion. 54.3% of lesion voxels were best fitted by a monoexponential, 26.2% by a stretched-exponential, and 19.5% by a biexponential intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model. High correlation (0.92) was observed between diffusion coefficients calculated using mono- and stretched-exponential models and moderate (0.59) between monoexponential and IVIM (medians: 0.96/0.84/0.72 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, respectively). Distortion due to eddy currents depended on the direction of the diffusion gradient and displacement varied between 1 and 6 mm for high b-value images. Shift in the apparent diffusion coefficient due to intrinsic field gradients was compensated for by averaging diffusion data obtained from opposite directions. Pseudodiffusion and intravoxel heterogeneity effects were not observed in approximately half of breast cancer and normal tissue voxels. This result indicates that stretched and IVIM models should be utilized in regional analysis rather than global tumor assessment. Cross terms between diffusion-sensitization gradients and other imaging or susceptibility-related gradients are relevant in clinical protocols, supporting the use of geometric averaging of diffusion-weighted images acquired with diffusion-sensitization gradients in opposite directions.

  9. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  10. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  11. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... age 35, and having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a ...

  12. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer risk prediction models are used to plan clinical trials and counsel women; however, relationships of predicted risks of breast cancer incidence and prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis are unknown. Methods Using largely pre-diagnostic information from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) for 37,939 invasive breast cancers (1996–2007), we estimated 5-year breast cancer risk (<1%; 1–1.66%; ≥1.67%) with three models: BCSC 1-year risk model (BCSC-1; adapted to 5-year predictions); Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT); and BCSC 5-year risk model (BCSC-5). Breast cancer-specific mortality post-diagnosis (range: 1–13 years; median: 5.4–5.6 years) was related to predicted risk of developing breast cancer using unadjusted Cox proportional hazards models, and in age-stratified (35–44; 45–54; 55–69; 70–89 years) models adjusted for continuous age, BCSC registry, calendar period, income, mode of presentation, stage and treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Results Of 6,021 deaths, 2,993 (49.7%) were ascribed to breast cancer. In unadjusted case-only analyses, predicted breast cancer risk ≥1.67% versus <1.0% was associated with lower risk of breast cancer death; BCSC-1: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.75–0.90); BCRAT: HR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.65–0.81) and BCSC-5: HR = 0.84 (95% CI = 0.75–0.94). Age-stratified, adjusted models showed similar, although mostly non-significant HRs. Among women ages 55–69 years, HRs approximated 1.0. Generally, higher predicted risk was inversely related to percentages of cancers with unfavorable prognostic characteristics, especially among women 35–44 years. Conclusions Among cases assessed with three models, higher predicted risk of developing breast cancer was not associated with greater risk of breast cancer death; thus, these models would have limited utility in planning studies to evaluate breast cancer mortality reduction strategies. Further, when offering

  13. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... idea of what to expect in the future. Breast cancer stages range from 0 to IV. The higher the ... is based on many factors, including: Type of breast cancer Stage of the cancer (staging is a tool your ...

  14. Transgenic Rat Models for Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Introduction 6 6. Body 9 7. Key Research Accomplishments 15 8. Reportable Outcomes 15 9. Conclusions 16 10. References 17 11. Bibliography 20 12. Personnel 20...seen in human breast cancer (2-4). Third, a high percentage of the resulting rat mammary cancers are hormonally responsiveness, closely mimicking that...13, 17), activated c-neu (18-20), wild type c-neu (21), deregulated growth hormone (22), and deregulated transforming growth factor a (23-25) has

  15. Modeling precision treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Daemen, Anneleen; Griffith, Obi L; Heiser, Laura M; Wang, Nicholas J; Enache, Oana M; Sanborn, Zachary; Pepin, Francois; Durinck, Steffen; Korkola, James E; Griffith, Malachi; Hur, Joe S; Huh, Nam; Chung, Jongsuk; Cope, Leslie; Fackler, Mary Jo; Umbricht, Christopher; Sukumar, Saraswati; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Jakkula, Lakshmi R; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Cho, Raymond J; Collisson, Eric A; van't Veer, Laura J; Spellman, Paul T; Gray, Joe W

    2013-01-01

    First-generation molecular profiles for human breast cancers have enabled the identification of features that can predict therapeutic response; however, little is known about how the various data types can best be combined to yield optimal predictors. Collections of breast cancer cell lines mirror many aspects of breast cancer molecular pathobiology, and measurements of their omic and biological therapeutic responses are well-suited for development of strategies to identify the most predictive molecular feature sets. We used least squares-support vector machines and random forest algorithms to identify molecular features associated with responses of a collection of 70 breast cancer cell lines to 90 experimental or approved therapeutic agents. The datasets analyzed included measurements of copy number aberrations, mutations, gene and isoform expression, promoter methylation and protein expression. Transcriptional subtype contributed strongly to response predictors for 25% of compounds, and adding other molecular data types improved prediction for 65%. No single molecular dataset consistently out-performed the others, suggesting that therapeutic response is mediated at multiple levels in the genome. Response predictors were developed and applied to TCGA data, and were found to be present in subsets of those patient samples. These results suggest that matching patients to treatments based on transcriptional subtype will improve response rates, and inclusion of additional features from other profiling data types may provide additional benefit. Further, we suggest a systems biology strategy for guiding clinical trials so that patient cohorts most likely to respond to new therapies may be more efficiently identified.

  16. An Orthotopic Mouse Model of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Liu, Kebin

    2016-08-14

    Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality of breast cancer patients. The mechanism underlying cancer cell metastasis, including breast cancer metastasis, is largely unknown and is a focus in cancer research. Various breast cancer spontaneous metastasis mouse models have been established. Here, we report a simplified procedure to establish orthotopic transplanted breast cancer primary tumor and resultant spontaneous metastasis that mimic human breast cancer metastasis. Combined with the bioluminescence live tumor imaging, this mouse model allows tumor growth and progression kinetics to be monitored and quantified. In this model, a low dose (1 x 10(4) cells) of 4T1-Luc breast cancer cells was injected into BALB/c mouse mammary fat pad using a tuberculin syringe. Mice were injected with luciferin and imaged at various time points using a bioluminescent imaging system. When the primary tumors grew to the size limit as in the IACUC-approved protocol (approximately 30 days), mice were anesthetized under constant flow of 2% isoflurane and oxygen. The tumor area was sterilized with 70% ethanol. The mouse skin around the tumor was excised to expose the tumor which was removed with a pair of sterile scissors. Removal of the primary tumor extends the survival of the 4T-1 tumor-bearing mice for one month. The mice were then repeatedly imaged for metastatic tumor spreading to distant organs. Therapeutic agents can be administered to suppress tumor metastasis at this point. This model is simple and yet sensitive in quantifying breast cancer cell growth in the primary site and progression kinetics to distant organs, and thus is an excellent model for studying breast cancer growth and progression, and for testing anti-metastasis therapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents in vivo.

  17. Modeling precision treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background First-generation molecular profiles for human breast cancers have enabled the identification of features that can predict therapeutic response; however, little is known about how the various data types can best be combined to yield optimal predictors. Collections of breast cancer cell lines mirror many aspects of breast cancer molecular pathobiology, and measurements of their omic and biological therapeutic responses are well-suited for development of strategies to identify the most predictive molecular feature sets. Results We used least squares-support vector machines and random forest algorithms to identify molecular features associated with responses of a collection of 70 breast cancer cell lines to 90 experimental or approved therapeutic agents. The datasets analyzed included measurements of copy number aberrations, mutations, gene and isoform expression, promoter methylation and protein expression. Transcriptional subtype contributed strongly to response predictors for 25% of compounds, and adding other molecular data types improved prediction for 65%. No single molecular dataset consistently out-performed the others, suggesting that therapeutic response is mediated at multiple levels in the genome. Response predictors were developed and applied to TCGA data, and were found to be present in subsets of those patient samples. Conclusions These results suggest that matching patients to treatments based on transcriptional subtype will improve response rates, and inclusion of additional features from other profiling data types may provide additional benefit. Further, we suggest a systems biology strategy for guiding clinical trials so that patient cohorts most likely to respond to new therapies may be more efficiently identified. PMID:24176112

  18. Stochastic Gompertzian model for breast cancer growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni Binti; Rosli, Norhayati

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a stochastic Gompertzian model is developed to describe the growth process of a breast cancer by incorporating the noisy behavior into a deterministic Gompertzian model. The prediction quality of the stochastic Gompertzian model is measured by comparing the simulated result with the clinical data of breast cancer growth. The kinetic parameters of the model are estimated via maximum likelihood procedure. 4-stage stochastic Runge-Kutta (SRK4) is used to simulate the sample path of the model. Low values of mean-square error (MSE) of stochastic model indicate good fits. It is shown that the stochastic Gompertzian model is adequate in explaining the breast cancer growth process compared to the deterministic model counterpart.

  19. Environmental factors in breast cancer invasion: a mathematical modelling review.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Alex; Burrage, Pamela M; Nicolau, Dan V; Lakhani, Sunil R; Burrage, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    This review presents a brief overview of breast cancer, focussing on its heterogeneity and the role of mathematical modelling and simulation in teasing apart the underlying biophysical processes. Following a brief overview of the main known pathophysiological features of ductal carcinoma, attention is paid to differential equation-based models (both deterministic and stochastic), agent-based modelling, multi-scale modelling, lattice-based models and image-driven modelling. A number of vignettes are presented where these modelling approaches have elucidated novel aspects of breast cancer dynamics, and we conclude by offering some perspectives on the role mathematical modelling can play in understanding breast cancer development, invasion and treatment therapies.

  20. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  1. Animal models for exploring the pharmacokinetics of breast cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    Despite massive expenditures in research and development to cure breast cancer, few agents that pass preclinical trials demonstrate efficacy in humans. Although this endeavor relies on murine models to screen for efficacy before progressing to clinical trials, historically there has been little focus on the validation of these models, even in the era of targeted therapy where understanding the genetic signatures of tumors under study is critical. This review includes the transgenic, xenograft, and syngeneic murine breast cancer models, the ectopic, orthotopic and intravenous methods of cell implantation, and the ethics of animal experimentation. It also includes the latest data on tumor gene expression and the issues to consider when exploring the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies. Breast cancer drug development is expensive and inefficient without a consensus preclinical murine model. Investigators must approach the choice of murine model with the same sophistication that is applied to the choice of in vitro assays to improve efficiency. Understanding the limitations of each model available, including the nuances of tumor gene signatures, is critical for investigators exploring the phamacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies, especially in the context of gene profiling and individualized targeted therapy.

  2. Animal models for exploring the pharmacokinetics of breast cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite massive expenditures in research and development to cure breast cancer, few agents that pass preclinical trials demonstrate efficacy in humans. Although this endeavor relies on murine models to screen for efficacy before progressing to clinical trials, historically there has been little focus on the validation of these models, even in the era of targeted therapy where understanding the genetic signatures of tumors under study is critical. Areas covered This review includes the transgenic, xenograft, and syngeneic murine breast cancer models, the ectopic, orthotopic and intravenous methods of cell implantation, and the ethics of animal experimentation. It also includes the latest data on tumor gene expression and the issues to consider when exploring the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies. Expert opinion Breast cancer drug development is expensive and inefficient without a consensus preclinical murine model. Investigators must approach the choice of murine model with the same sophistication that is applied to the choice of in vitro assays to improve efficiency. Understanding the limitations of each model available, including the nuances of tumor gene signatures, is critical for investigators exploring the phamacokinetics and efficacy of breast cancer therapies, especially in the context of gene profiling and individualized targeted therapy. PMID:25416501

  3. Building a Better Model: A Comprehensive Breast Cancer Risk Model Incorporating Breast Density to Stratify Risk and Apply Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    o Comparison of Breast Density Measurements with a Mammographic Volumetric and Area Algorithm and Magnetic resonance imaging . O Alonzo-Proulx, JG... Breast Cancer Risk Model Incorporating Breast Density To Stratify Risk and Apply Resources. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0545 5c...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Purpose: Development and validation of a personalized breast cancer risk

  4. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  5. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it.

  6. The transtheoretical model, health belief model, and breast cancer screening among Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Farajzadegan, Ziba; Fathollahi-Dehkordi, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Sirous, Reza; Tavakoli, Neda; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Participation of Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer in breast cancer screening programs is low. This study evaluates the compliance of women having a family history of breast cancer with clinical breast exam (CBE) according to the stage of transtheoretical model (TTM) and health belief model (HBM). In this cross-sectional study, we used Persian version of champion's HBM scale to collect factors associated with TTM stages applied to screening from women over 20 years and older. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, independent t-test, and analysis of covariance. Final sample size was 162 women. Thirty-three percent were in action/maintenance stage. Older women, family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives, personal history of breast disease, insurance coverage, and a history of breast self-examination were associated with action/maintenance stage. Furthermore, women in action/maintenance stages had significantly fewer perceived barriers in terms of CBE in comparison to women in other stages (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in other HBM subscales scores between various stages of CBE screening behavior (P > 0.05). The finding indicates that the rate of women in action/maintenance stage of CBE is low. Moreover, results show a strong association between perceived barriers and having a regular CBE. These clarify the necessity of promoting national target programs for breast cancer screening, which should be considered as the first preference for reducing CBE barriers.

  7. The transtheoretical model, health belief model, and breast cancer screening among Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadegan, Ziba; Fathollahi-Dehkordi, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Sirous, Reza; Tavakoli, Neda; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Participation of Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer in breast cancer screening programs is low. This study evaluates the compliance of women having a family history of breast cancer with clinical breast exam (CBE) according to the stage of transtheoretical model (TTM) and health belief model (HBM). Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we used Persian version of champion's HBM scale to collect factors associated with TTM stages applied to screening from women over 20 years and older. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, independent t-test, and analysis of covariance. Results: Final sample size was 162 women. Thirty-three percent were in action/maintenance stage. Older women, family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives, personal history of breast disease, insurance coverage, and a history of breast self-examination were associated with action/maintenance stage. Furthermore, women in action/maintenance stages had significantly fewer perceived barriers in terms of CBE in comparison to women in other stages (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in other HBM subscales scores between various stages of CBE screening behavior (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The finding indicates that the rate of women in action/maintenance stage of CBE is low. Moreover, results show a strong association between perceived barriers and having a regular CBE. These clarify the necessity of promoting national target programs for breast cancer screening, which should be considered as the first preference for reducing CBE barriers.

  8. Cox models survival analysis based on breast cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Alireza; Yavari, Parvin; Dehghani-Arani, Monireh; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghasemi, Erfan; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Bajdik, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between different treatments and survival time of breast cancer patients using either standard Cox model or stratified Cox model. The study was conducted on 15830 women diagnosed with breast cancer in British Columbia, Canada. They were divided into eight groups according to patients' ages and stage of disease Either Cox's PH model or stratified Cox model was fitted to each group according to the PH assumption and tested using Schoenfeld residuals. The data show that in the group of patients under age 50 years old and over age 50 with stage I cancer, the highest hazard was related to radiotherapy (HR= 3.15, CI: 1.85-5.35) and chemotherapy (HR= 3, CI: 2.29- 3.93) respectively. For both groups of patients with stage II cancer, the highest risk was related to radiotherapy (HR=3.02, CI: 2.26-4.03) (HR=2.16, CI:1.85-2.52). For both groups of patients with stage III cancer, the highest risk was for surgery (HR=0.49, CI: 0.33-0.73), (HR=0.45, CI: 0.36-0.57). For patients of age 50 years or less with stage IV cancer, none of the treatments were statistically significant. In group of patients over age 50 years old with stage IV cancer, the highest hazard was related to surgery (HR=0.64, CI: 0.53-0.78). The results of this study show that for patients with stage I and II breast cancer, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had the highest hazard; for patients with stage III and IV breast cancer, the highest hazard was associated with treatment surgery.

  9. Cox Models Survival Analysis Based on Breast Cancer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Alireza; Yavari, Parvin; Dehghani-Arani, Monireh; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghasemi, Erfan; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Bajdik, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between different treatments and survival time of breast cancer patients using either standard Cox model or stratified Cox model. Methods The study was conducted on 15830 women diagnosed with breast cancer in British Columbia, Canada. They were divided into eight groups according to patients’ ages and stage of disease Either Cox’s PH model or stratified Cox model was fitted to each group according to the PH assumption and tested using Schoenfeld residuals. Results The data show that in the group of patients under age 50 years old and over age 50 with stage I cancer, the highest hazard was related to radiotherapy (HR= 3.15, CI: 1.85-5.35) and chemotherapy (HR= 3, CI: 2.29- 3.93) respectively. For both groups of patients with stage II cancer, the highest risk was related to radiotherapy (HR=3.02, CI: 2.26-4.03) (HR=2.16, CI:1.85-2.52). For both groups of patients with stage III cancer, the highest risk was for surgery (HR=0.49, CI: 0.33-0.73), (HR=0.45, CI: 0.36-0.57). For patients of age 50 years or less with stage IV cancer, none of the treatments were statistically significant. In group of patients over age 50 years old with stage IV cancer, the highest hazard was related to surgery (HR=0.64, CI: 0.53-0.78). Conclusion The results of this study show that for patients with stage I and II breast cancer, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had the highest hazard; for patients with stage III and IV breast cancer, the highest hazard was associated with treatment surgery. PMID:25250162

  10. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  11. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  12. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  13. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    the Witness model will be tailored for breast cancer survivors and the peer interventionists (breast cancer survivors and lay health advisors) will be...by a lay health advisor; 4) discussion of concerns and myths about breast cancer and screening /surveillance that are prevalent among AAW; 5) review...Breast cancer screening surveillance Breast cancer screening Treatment/Time of Treatment intention /adherence & physician recommendation

  14. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how early the cancer was diagnosed. Left untreated, breast cancer can spread to other parts of the body, including internal organs. This could cause serious health problems or be fatal. It is very important to get treatment as soon as possible.Living with cancer during ...

  15. Validation of transgenic models of breast cancer: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and Brca1-mutation-related breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Frech, M S; Jones, L P; Furth, P A

    2005-08-01

    Available mouse models of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and BRCA1-mutation-related breast cancer are reviewed. The best validated mouse models of human DCIS are the conditional estrogen receptor α in mammary tissue (CERM) model initiated by deregulated estrogen receptor α and the serial explant mouse model initiated by p53 deficiency. At present the most useful and best validated mouse model of BRCA1-mutation-related breast cancer uses the cre-lox system to make a conditional Brca1 deletion targeted to mammary epithelial cells. The major shortcoming of the non-conditional Brca1 models is the high incidence of non-mammary tumor development. The use of mammary gland transplants or explants from these mice into nude hosts is one approach that could be used to circumvent this deficiency. Development and validation of a Brca1-mutation-related mouse model of basal cell breast cancer is an important next step.

  16. Simulation models in population breast cancer screening: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Koleva-Kolarova, Rositsa G; Zhan, Zhuozhao; Greuter, Marcel J W; Feenstra, Talitha L; De Bock, Geertruida H

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review was to critically evaluate published simulation models for breast cancer screening of the general population and provide a direction for future modeling. A systematic literature search was performed to identify simulation models with more than one application. A framework for qualitative assessment which incorporated model type; input parameters; modeling approach, transparency of input data sources/assumptions, sensitivity analyses and risk of bias; validation, and outcomes was developed. Predicted mortality reduction (MR) and cost-effectiveness (CE) were compared to estimates from meta-analyses of randomized control trials (RCTs) and acceptability thresholds. Seven original simulation models were distinguished, all sharing common input parameters. The modeling approach was based on tumor progression (except one model) with internal and cross validation of the resulting models, but without any external validation. Differences in lead times for invasive or non-invasive tumors, and the option for cancers not to progress were not explicitly modeled. The models tended to overestimate the MR (11-24%) due to screening as compared to optimal RCTs 10% (95% CI - 2-21%) MR. Only recently, potential harms due to regular breast cancer screening were reported. Most scenarios resulted in acceptable cost-effectiveness estimates given current thresholds. The selected models have been repeatedly applied in various settings to inform decision making and the critical analysis revealed high risk of bias in their outcomes. Given the importance of the models, there is a need for externally validated models which use systematical evidence for input data to allow for more critical evaluation of breast cancer screening.

  17. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  18. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2014. Last Medical Review: June 1, 2016 Last Revised: August 18, 2016 Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Radiation for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Hormone ...

  19. Machine learning models in breast cancer survival prediction.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Mitra; Montazeri, Mohadeseh; Montazeri, Mahdieh; Beigzadeh, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with a high mortality rate among women. With the early diagnosis of breast cancer survival will increase from 56% to more than 86%. Therefore, an accurate and reliable system is necessary for the early diagnosis of this cancer. The proposed model is the combination of rules and different machine learning techniques. Machine learning models can help physicians to reduce the number of false decisions. They try to exploit patterns and relationships among a large number of cases and predict the outcome of a disease using historical cases stored in datasets. The objective of this study is to propose a rule-based classification method with machine learning techniques for the prediction of different types of Breast cancer survival. We use a dataset with eight attributes that include the records of 900 patients in which 876 patients (97.3%) and 24 (2.7%) patients were females and males respectively. Naive Bayes (NB), Trees Random Forest (TRF), 1-Nearest Neighbor (1NN), AdaBoost (AD), Support Vector Machine (SVM), RBF Network (RBFN), and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) machine learning techniques with 10-cross fold technique were used with the proposed model for the prediction of breast cancer survival. The performance of machine learning techniques were evaluated with accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity, and area under ROC curve. Out of 900 patients, 803 patients and 97 patients were alive and dead, respectively. In this study, Trees Random Forest (TRF) technique showed better results in comparison to other techniques (NB, 1NN, AD, SVM and RBFN, MLP). The accuracy, sensitivity and the area under ROC curve of TRF are 96%, 96%, 93%, respectively. However, 1NN machine learning technique provided poor performance (accuracy 91%, sensitivity 91% and area under ROC curve 78%). This study demonstrates that Trees Random Forest model (TRF) which is a rule-based classification model was the best model with the highest level of

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  1. Therapeutic blockade of Foxp3 in experimental breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ayala, Mariela A; Gottardo, María Florencia; Imsen, Mercedes; Asad, Antonela S; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Casares, Noelia; Lasarte, Juan José; Seilicovich, Adriana; Candolfi, Marianela

    2017-07-29

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) impair the clinical benefit of cancer immunotherapy. To optimize the antitumor efficacy of therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, we aimed to inhibit Foxp3, a transcription factor required for Treg function. Mice bearing established syngeneic LM3 and 4T1 breast tumors were treated with antitumor DC vaccines and a synthetic peptide (P60) that has been shown to inhibit Foxp3. Treatment with P60 improved the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccines in these experimental models. In addition, monotherapy with P60 inhibited tumor growth in immunocompetent as well as in immuno-compromised animals bearing established tumors. We found expression of Foxp3 in human and murine breast tumor cells. P60 inhibited IL-10 secretion in breast cancer cells that expressed Foxp3. Our results suggest that Foxp3 blockade improves the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccines by inhibition of Tregs and through a direct antitumor effect. This strategy could prove useful to neutralize the immunosuppressive microenvironment and to boost antitumor immunity in breast cancer.

  2. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  3. A model for individualized risk prediction of contralateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Marzana; Euhus, David; Onega, Tracy; Biswas, Swati; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2017-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer (BC) or ductal carcinoma in situ are increasingly choosing to undergo contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to reduce their risk of contralateral BC (CBC). This is a particularly disturbing trend as a large proportion of these CPMs are believed to be medically unnecessary. Many BC patients tend to substantially overestimate their CBC risk. Thus, there is a pressing need to educate patients effectively on their CBC risk. We develop a CBC risk prediction model to aid physicians in this task. We used data from two sources: Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results to build the model. The model building steps are similar to those used in developing the BC risk assessment tool (popularly known as Gail model) for counseling women on their BC risk. Our model, named CBCRisk, is exclusively designed for counseling women diagnosed with unilateral BC on the risk of developing CBC. We identified eight factors to be significantly associated with CBC-age at first BC diagnosis, anti-estrogen therapy, family history of BC, high-risk pre-neoplasia status, estrogen receptor status, breast density, type of first BC, and age at first birth. Combining the relative risk estimates with the relevant hazard rates, CBCRisk projects absolute risk of developing CBC over a given period. By providing individualized CBC risk estimates, CBCRisk may help in counseling of BC patients. In turn, this may potentially help alleviate the rate of medically unnecessary CPMs.

  4. Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion Oncogene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0502 TITLE: Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer ...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 AUG 2005 - 14 AUG 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: In this study, we generated a novel mouse model of human breast cancer based on a recurrent chromosomal

  5. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  6. Breast Cancer Multi-classification from Histopathological Images with Structured Deep Learning Model.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhongyi; Wei, Benzheng; Zheng, Yuanjie; Yin, Yilong; Li, Kejian; Li, Shuo

    2017-06-23

    Automated breast cancer multi-classification from histopathological images plays a key role in computer-aided breast cancer diagnosis or prognosis. Breast cancer multi-classification is to identify subordinate classes of breast cancer (Ductal carcinoma, Fibroadenoma, Lobular carcinoma, etc.). However, breast cancer multi-classification from histopathological images faces two main challenges from: (1) the great difficulties in breast cancer multi-classification methods contrasting with the classification of binary classes (benign and malignant), and (2) the subtle differences in multiple classes due to the broad variability of high-resolution image appearances, high coherency of cancerous cells, and extensive inhomogeneity of color distribution. Therefore, automated breast cancer multi-classification from histopathological images is of great clinical significance yet has never been explored. Existing works in literature only focus on the binary classification but do not support further breast cancer quantitative assessment. In this study, we propose a breast cancer multi-classification method using a newly proposed deep learning model. The structured deep learning model has achieved remarkable performance (average 93.2% accuracy) on a large-scale dataset, which demonstrates the strength of our method in providing an efficient tool for breast cancer multi-classification in clinical settings.

  7. Genistein induces breast cancer-associated aromatase and stimulates estrogen-dependent tumor cell growth in in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, M B M; Nijmeijer, S M; de Morree, E S; de Jong, P Chr; van den Berg, M

    2011-11-18

    In breast cancer, the interaction between estrogen-producing breast adipose fibroblasts (BAFs) and estrogen-dependent epithelial tumor cells is pivotal. Local estrogen production is catalyzed by aromatase, which is differentially regulated in disease-free and tumorigenic breast tissue. The use of aromatase inhibitors to block local estrogen production has proven effective in treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. However, a major problem during breast cancer treatment is the sudden onset of menopause and many women seek for alternative medicines, such as the soy isoflavone genistein. In this study, we show that genistein can induce estrogen-dependent MCF-7 tumor cell growth and increase breast cancer-associated aromatase expression and activity in vitro. We have previously developed an in vitro breast cancer model where the positive feedback loop between primary BAFs and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 tumor cells is operational, thereby representing a more natural in vitro model for breast cancer. In this model, genistein could negate the growth inhibitory action of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole at physiologically relevant concentrations. These data suggest that soy-based supplements might affect the efficacy of breast cancer treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Considering the high number of breast cancer patients using soy supplements to treat menopausal symptoms, the increasing risk for adverse interactions with breast cancer treatment is of major concern and should be considered with care.

  8. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0616 TITLE: From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a... Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging 5b. GRANT... Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer -related death in women worldwide, and metastasis is responsible for the majority of these deaths. Triple

  9. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  10. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality From Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Lee, Christoph I; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-02-16

    Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening while considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation among women. 2 simulation-modeling approaches. U.S. population. Women aged 40 to 74 years. Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 years until age 74 years. Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (harms) per 100,000 women screened. Annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancer cases (95% CI, 88 to 178) leading to 16 deaths (CI, 11 to 23), relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete examination (8% of population) were projected to have greater radiation-induced breast cancer risk (266 cancer cases and 35 deaths per 100,000 women) than other women (113 cancer cases and 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 years reduced risk for radiation-induced cancer 5-fold. Life-years lost from radiation-induced breast cancer could not be estimated. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are affected by dose variability from screening, resultant diagnostic work-up, initiation age, and screening frequency. Women with large breasts may have a greater risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Cancer Institute.

  11. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  12. A genomic analysis of mouse models of breast cancer reveals molecular features of mouse models and relationships to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hollern, Daniel P; Andrechek, Eran R

    2014-06-05

    Genomic variability limits the efficacy of breast cancer therapy. To simplify the study of the molecular complexity of breast cancer, researchers have used mouse mammary tumor models. However, the degree to which mouse models model human breast cancer and are reflective of the human heterogeneity has yet to be demonstrated with gene expression studies on a large scale. To this end, we have built a database consisting of 1,172 mouse mammary tumor samples from 26 different major oncogenic mouse mammary tumor models. In this dataset we identified heterogeneity within mouse models and noted a surprising amount of interrelatedness between models, despite differences in the tumor initiating oncogene. Making comparisons between models, we identified differentially expressed genes with alteration correlating with initiating events in each model. Using annotation tools, we identified transcription factors with a high likelihood of activity within these models. Gene signatures predicted activation of major cell signaling pathways in each model, predictions that correlated with previous genetic studies. Finally, we noted relationships between mouse models and human breast cancer at both the level of gene expression and predicted signal pathway activity. Importantly, we identified individual mouse models that recapitulate human breast cancer heterogeneity at the level of gene expression. This work underscores the importance of fully characterizing mouse tumor biology at molecular, histological and genomic levels before a valid comparison to human breast cancer may be drawn and provides an important bioinformatic resource.

  13. Breast Camps for Awareness and Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer in Countries With Limited Resources: A Multidisciplinary Model From Kenya.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Shahin; Moloo, Zahir; Ngugi, Anthony; Allidina, Amyn; Ndumia, Rose; Mutuiri, Anderson; Wasike, Ronald; Wahome, Charles; Abdihakin, Mohamed; Kasmani, Riaz; Spears, Carol D; Oigara, Raymond; Mwachiro, Elizabeth B; Busarla, Satya V P; Kibor, Kibet; Ahmed, Abdulaziz; Wawire, Jonathan; Sherman, Omar; Saleh, Mansoor; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Kenya. There are no national breast cancer early diagnosis programs in Kenya. The objective was to conduct a pilot breast cancer awareness and diagnosis program at three different types of facilities in Kenya. This program was conducted at a not-for-profit private hospital, a faith-based public hospital, and a government public referral hospital. Women aged 15 years and older were invited. Demographic, risk factor, knowledge, attitudes, and screening practice data were collected. Breast health information was delivered, and clinical breast examinations (CBEs) were performed. When appropriate, ultrasound imaging, fine-needle aspirate (FNA) diagnoses, core biopsies, and onward referrals were provided. A total of 1,094 women were enrolled in the three breast camps. Of those, 56% knew the symptoms and signs of breast cancer, 44% knew how breast cancer was diagnosed, 37% performed regular breast self-exams, and 7% had a mammogram or breast ultrasound in the past year. Of the 1,094 women enrolled, 246 (23%) had previously noticed a lump in their breast. A total of 157 participants (14%) had abnormal CBEs, of whom 111 had ultrasound exams, 65 had FNAs, and 18 had core biopsies. A total of 14 invasive breast cancers and 1 malignant phyllodes tumor were diagnosed Conducting a multidisciplinary breast camp awareness and early diagnosis program is feasible in different types of health facilities within a low- and middle-income country setting. This can be a model for breast cancer awareness and point-of-care diagnosis in countries with limited resources like Kenya. This work describes a novel breast cancer awareness and early diagnosis demonstration program in a low- and middle-income country within a limited resource setting. The program includes breast self-awareness and breast cancer education, clinical exams, and point-of-care diagnostics for women in three different types of health facilities in Kenya. This pilot

  14. Breast Camps for Awareness and Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer in Countries With Limited Resources: A Multidisciplinary Model From Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Moloo, Zahir; Ngugi, Anthony; Allidina, Amyn; Ndumia, Rose; Mutuiri, Anderson; Wasike, Ronald; Wahome, Charles; Abdihakin, Mohamed; Kasmani, Riaz; Spears, Carol D.; Oigara, Raymond; Mwachiro, Elizabeth B.; Busarla, Satya V.P.; Kibor, Kibet; Ahmed, Abdulaziz; Wawire, Jonathan; Sherman, Omar; Saleh, Mansoor; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Dawsey, Sanford M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Kenya. There are no national breast cancer early diagnosis programs in Kenya. Objective. The objective was to conduct a pilot breast cancer awareness and diagnosis program at three different types of facilities in Kenya. Methods. This program was conducted at a not-for-profit private hospital, a faith-based public hospital, and a government public referral hospital. Women aged 15 years and older were invited. Demographic, risk factor, knowledge, attitudes, and screening practice data were collected. Breast health information was delivered, and clinical breast examinations (CBEs) were performed. When appropriate, ultrasound imaging, fine-needle aspirate (FNA) diagnoses, core biopsies, and onward referrals were provided. Results. A total of 1,094 women were enrolled in the three breast camps. Of those, 56% knew the symptoms and signs of breast cancer, 44% knew how breast cancer was diagnosed, 37% performed regular breast self-exams, and 7% had a mammogram or breast ultrasound in the past year. Of the 1,094 women enrolled, 246 (23%) had previously noticed a lump in their breast. A total of 157 participants (14%) had abnormal CBEs, of whom 111 had ultrasound exams, 65 had FNAs, and 18 had core biopsies. A total of 14 invasive breast cancers and 1 malignant phyllodes tumor were diagnosed Conclusion. Conducting a multidisciplinary breast camp awareness and early diagnosis program is feasible in different types of health facilities within a low- and middle-income country setting. This can be a model for breast cancer awareness and point-of-care diagnosis in countries with limited resources like Kenya. Implications for Practice: This work describes a novel breast cancer awareness and early diagnosis demonstration program in a low- and middle-income country within a limited resource setting. The program includes breast self-awareness and breast cancer education, clinical exams, and point-of-care diagnostics for

  15. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  16. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  17. Innovative biomagnetic imaging sensors for breast cancer: A model-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Golkowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Breast cancer is a serious potential health problem for all women and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The current screening procedures and imaging techniques, including x-ray mammography, clinical biopsy, ultrasound imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging, provide only 73% accuracy in detecting breast cancer. This gives the impetus to explore alternate techniques for imaging the breast and detecting early stage tumors. Among the complementary methods, the noninvasive biomagnetic breast imaging is attractive and promising, because both ionizing radiation and breast compressions that the prevalent x-ray mammography suffers from are avoided. It furthermore offers very high contrast because of the significant electromagnetic properties' differences between the cancerous, benign, and normal breast tissues. In this paper, a hybrid and accurate modeling tool for biomagnetic breast imaging is developed, which couples the electromagnetic and ultrasonic energies, and initial validations between the model predication and experimental findings are conducted.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells in an in vivo model of spontaneous metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Lagioia, Michelle; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2004-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are rapidly emerging as a new generation of therapeutic drug in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms underlying its antitumor effects are not fully understood and more thorough preclinical trials are needed to determine if COX-2 inhibition represents a useful approach for prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the growth inhibitory mechanism of a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, in an in vivo oncogenic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer that resembles human disease. The oncogenic mice carry the polyoma middle T antigen driven by the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and develop primary adenocarcinomas of the breast. Results show that oral administration of celecoxib caused significant reduction in mammary tumor burden associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis and decreased proliferation in vivo. In vivo apoptosis correlated with significant decrease in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, a cell survival signaling kinase, with increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, celecoxib treatment reduced levels of proangiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), suggesting a role of celecoxib in suppression of angiogenesis in this model. Results from these preclinical studies will form the basis for assessing the feasibility of celecoxib therapy alone or in combination with conventional therapies for treatment and/or prevention of breast cancer.

  19. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  20. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  1. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  2. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  3. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  4. Validation of a breast cancer risk assessment model in women with a positive family history.

    PubMed

    Bondy, M L; Lustbader, E D; Halabi, S; Ross, E; Vogel, V G

    1994-04-20

    Gail et al. developed a statistical model for estimating the risk of developing breast cancer in white women screened annually with mammography. This model is used for counseling and for admission to clinical trials. We evaluated the model prospectively in a cohort of women with a family history of breast cancer. We followed women who participated in the American Cancer Society 1987 Texas Breast Screening Project. The model was evaluated by comparing the observed (O) and expected (E) numbers of breast cancers using composite background rates from both the Breast Cancer Detection and Demonstration Project and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Data were partitioned by adherence to American Cancer Society screening guidelines. The Gail et al. model predicted the risk well among women who adhered to the American Cancer Society guidelines (O/E = 1.12; 95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.61) but overpredicted risk for women who did not adhere to the guidelines. There was an indication that the model overpredicted risk for women younger than 60 years old and underpredicted risk in women aged 60 years and older. Overall, the Gail et al. model accurately predicts risk in women with a family history of breast cancer and who adhere to American Cancer Society screening guidelines. Thus, the model should be used as it was intended, for women who receive annual mammograms.

  5. Systematic Analysis of Challenge-Driven Improvements in Molecular Prognostic Models for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Adam A.; Bilal, Erhan; Huang, Erich; Norman, Thea C.; Ottestad, Lars; Mecham, Brigham H.; Sauerwine, Ben; Kellen, Michael R.; Mangravite, Lara M.; Furia, Matthew D.; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Rueda, Oscar M.; Guinney, Justin; Deflaux, Nicole A.; Hoff, Bruce; Schildwachter, Xavier; Russnes, Hege G.; Park, Daehoon; Vang, Veronica O.; Pirtle, Tyler; Youseff, Lamia; Citro, Craig; Curtis, Christina; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Hellerstein, Joseph; Friend, Stephen H.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular prognostics in breast cancer are among the most successful examples of translating genomic analysis to clinical applications, optimal approaches to breast cancer clinical risk prediction remain controversial. The Sage Bionetworks–DREAM Breast Cancer Prognosis Challenge (BCC) is a crowdsourced research study for breast cancer prognostic modeling using genome-scale data. The BCC provided a community of data analysts with a common platform for data access and blinded evaluation of model accuracy in predicting breast cancer survival on the basis of gene expression data, copy number data, and clinical covariates. This approach offered the opportunity to assess whether a crowdsourced community Challenge would generate models of breast cancer prognosis commensurate with or exceeding current best-in-class approaches. The BCC comprised multiple rounds of blinded evaluations on held-out portions of data on 1981 patients, resulting in more than 1400 models submitted as open source code. Participants then retrained their models on the full data set of 1981 samples and submitted up to five models for validation in a newly generated data set of 184 breast cancer patients. Analysis of the BCC results suggests that the best-performing modeling strategy outperformed previously reported methods in blinded evaluations; model performance was consistent across several independent evaluations; and aggregating community-developed models achieved performance on par with the best-performing individual models. PMID:23596205

  6. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate sensitizes breast cancer cells to paclitaxel in a murine model of breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a microtubule-targeted agent that is widely used for cancer treatment. However, resistance to paclitaxel is frequently encountered in the clinic. There is increasing interest in identifying compounds that may increase the sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated whether green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) could sensitize breast carcinoma to paclitaxel in vivo. Methods Breast cancer cells were treated with or without EGCG and paclitaxel followed by detection of cell survival and apoptosis. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression were detected by Western blotting. For in vivo study, 4T1 breast cancer cells were inoculated into Balb/c mice to establish a transplantation model. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with or without EGCG (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and paclitaxel (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Tumor growth was monitored. Apoptosis in tumor tissues was detected. Cell lysates from tumors were subjected to Western blot analysis of GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. Results EGCG synergistically sensitized breast cancer cells to paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo. EGCG in combination with paclitaxel significantly induced 4T1 cells apoptosis compared with each single treatment. When tumor-bearing mice were treated with paclitaxel in combination with EGCG, tumor growth was significantly inhibited, whereas the single-agent activity for paclitaxel or EGCG was poor. EGCG overcame paclitaxel-induced GRP78 expression and potentiated paclitaxel-induced JNK phosphorylation in 4T1 cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions EGCG may be used as a sensitizer to enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel. PMID:20078855

  7. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality from Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Lee, Christoph I.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J.; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimates of radiation-induced breast cancer risk from mammography screening have not previously considered dose exposure variation or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening. Objective To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening, considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation across women. Design Two simulation-modeling approaches using common data on screening mammography from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and radiation dose from mammography from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women aged 40–74 years. Interventions Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 until 74. Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality per 100,000 women screened (harms). Results On average, annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]=88–178) leading to 16 deaths (95% CI=11–23) relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 radiation-induced breast cancers leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete breast examination (8% of population) were projected to have higher radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (266 cancers, 35 deaths per 100,000 women), compared to women with small or average breasts (113 cancers, 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 reduced risk of radiation-induced cancers 5-fold. Limitations We were unable to estimate years of life lost from radiation-induced breast cancer. Conclusions Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are impacted by dose

  8. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  9. Follistatin is a metastasis suppressor in a mouse model of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seachrist, Darcie D; Sizemore, Steven T; Johnson, Emhonta; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Weber Bonk, Kristen L; Keri, Ruth A

    2017-06-05

    Follistatin (FST) is an intrinsic inhibitor of activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of ligands. The prognostic value of FST and its family members, the follistatin-like (FSTL) proteins, have been studied in various cancers. However, these studies, as well as limited functional analyses of the FSTL proteins, have yielded conflicting results on the role of these proteins in disease progression. Furthermore, very few have been focused on FST itself. We assessed whether FST may be a suppressor of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression in breast cancer. Using publicly available gene expression data, we examined the expression patterns of FST and INHBA, a subunit of activin, in normal and cancerous breast tissue and the prognostic value of FST in breast cancer metastases, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival. The functional effects of activin and FST on in vitro proliferation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells were also examined. FST overexpression in an autochthonous mouse model of breast cancer was then used to assess the in vivo impact of FST on metastatic progression. Examination of multiple breast cancer datasets revealed that FST expression is reduced in breast cancers compared with normal tissue and that low FST expression predicts increased metastasis and reduced overall survival. FST expression was also reduced in a mouse model of HER2/Neu-induced metastatic breast cancer. We found that FST blocks activin-induced breast epithelial cell migration in vitro, suggesting that its loss may promote breast cancer aggressiveness. To directly determine if FST restoration could inhibit metastatic progression, we transgenically expressed FST in the HER2/Neu model. Although FST had no impact on tumor initiation or growth, it completely blocked the formation of lung metastases. These data indicate that FST is a bona fide metastasis suppressor in this mouse model and support future efforts to develop an FST mimetic to

  10. Putative cancer-initiating stem cells in cell culture models for molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    TELANG, NITIN

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating stem cells (CISC) represent a minor subpopulation of heterogeneous breast cancer. CISC are responsible for the acquired resistance to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and eventual relapse observed in patients with breast cancer. Certain molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer that exhibit differential expression of genes coding for hormone and growth factor receptors differ in their response to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and targeted therapeutic inhibitors. Thus, the development of reliable cell culture models for CISC may provide a valuable experimental approach for the study of stem cell-targeted therapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The present study utilized optimized cell culture systems as experimental models for different molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer, including luminal A, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer. Biomarker end points, including control of homeostatic growth, cancer risk and drug resistance, were quantitatively analyzed in the selected models. The results of the analyses indicated that, compared with the non-tumorigenic controls, the cell models representing the aforementioned molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer exhibited aberrant cell cycle progression, downregulated cellular apoptosis and loss of control of homeostatic growth, as evidenced by hyperproliferation. Additionally, these models displayed persistent cancer risk, as indicated by their high incidence and frequency of anchorage-independent (AI) colony formation in vitro and their tumor development capacity in vivo. Furthermore, in the presence of maximum cytostatic drug concentrations, the drug-resistant phenotypes isolated from the parental drug-sensitive cell lines representing luminal A, HER-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer exhibited an 11.5, 5.0 and 6.2 fold increase in cell growth, and a 5.6, 5.4 and 4.4 fold increase in the number of AI colonies

  11. Putative cancer-initiating stem cells in cell culture models for molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Telang, Nitin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer-initiating stem cells (CISC) represent a minor subpopulation of heterogeneous breast cancer. CISC are responsible for the acquired resistance to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and eventual relapse observed in patients with breast cancer. Certain molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer that exhibit differential expression of genes coding for hormone and growth factor receptors differ in their response to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and targeted therapeutic inhibitors. Thus, the development of reliable cell culture models for CISC may provide a valuable experimental approach for the study of stem cell-targeted therapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The present study utilized optimized cell culture systems as experimental models for different molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer, including luminal A, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer. Biomarker end points, including control of homeostatic growth, cancer risk and drug resistance, were quantitatively analyzed in the selected models. The results of the analyses indicated that, compared with the non-tumorigenic controls, the cell models representing the aforementioned molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer exhibited aberrant cell cycle progression, downregulated cellular apoptosis and loss of control of homeostatic growth, as evidenced by hyperproliferation. Additionally, these models displayed persistent cancer risk, as indicated by their high incidence and frequency of anchorage-independent (AI) colony formation in vitro and their tumor development capacity in vivo. Furthermore, in the presence of maximum cytostatic drug concentrations, the drug-resistant phenotypes isolated from the parental drug-sensitive cell lines representing luminal A, HER-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer exhibited an 11.5, 5.0 and 6.2 fold increase in cell growth, and a 5.6, 5.4 and 4.4 fold increase in the number of AI colonies

  12. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  13. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  14. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  15. Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells promotes lung metastasis in breast cancer model mice.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiro; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2017-08-26

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women in the world. Although breast cancer is well treatable at the early stage, patients with distant metastases show a poor prognosis. Data from recent studies using transplantation models indicate that Mint3/APBA3 might promote breast cancer malignancy. However, whether Mint3 indeed contributes to tumor development, progression, or metastasis in vivo remains unclear. To address this, here we examined whether Mint3 depletion affects tumor malignancy in MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model mice. In MMTV-PyMT mice, Mint3 depletion did not affect tumor onset and tumor growth, but attenuated lung metastases. Experimental lung metastasis of breast cancer Met-1 cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice also decreased in Mint3-depleted mice, indicating that host Mint3 expression affected lung metastasis of MMTV-PyMT-derived breast cancer cells. Further bone marrow transplant experiments revealed that Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells promoted lung metastasis in MMTV-PyMT mice. Thus, targeting Mint3 in bone marrow-derived cells might be a good strategy for preventing metastasis and improving the prognosis of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A model of knowledge acquisition in early stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Warren, Laura E; Mendlinger, Sheryl E; Corso, Katherine A; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2012-01-01

    To meaningfully participate in the decision-making regarding a newly diagnosed breast cancer, a patient must acquire new knowledge. We describe a model of knowledge acquisition that can provide a framework for exploring the process and types of knowledge that breast cancer patients gain following their diagnosis. The four types of knowledge presented in this model-authoritative, technical, embodied, and traditional-are described and potential sources discussed. An understanding of knowledge acquisition in early stage breast cancer patients can provide healthcare practitioners with an important framework for optimizing decision-making in this population. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  18. A Model for Breast Cancer-Induced Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Terman BI, Carrion ME, Kovacs E, Rasmussen BA, Eddy RL, Shows TB. Identification of a new endothelial cell growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase...Jensen, H. M., Chen, I., DeVault, M. R., and Lewis , A. E. Angio- Cancer Res. Treat., 11: 241-248, 1988. genesis induced by "normal" human breast

  19. Validation of the Integrated Model of Health Literacy in Patients With Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Huang, Yi-Jing; Lee, Yen; Chen, Cheng-Te; Lin, Gong-Hong; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2017-09-11

    Health literacy (HL) enables patients with breast cancer to actively participate in health decisions and promote positive health outcomes. The Integrated Model of Health Literacy (IMHL), defined as the personal, situational, and societal/environmental factors that predict the level of HL that can influence health outcomes, incorporates the concepts, determinants, and consequences of HL. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms and completeness of the IMHL in patients with breast cancer. Five hundred eleven Taiwanese patients were prospectively recruited. We conducted structural equation modeling to confirm and modify the predictive pathways linking the HL-related factors in the IMHL. Results on a total of 511 breast cancer patients showed good model-data fit. An alternative model revealed better fit with 2 pathways added from cancer stage to self-rated health and from cancer duration to shared decision making. Both the original model and alternative model modification revealed that only personal determinants (age, education, cancer stage, and duration) and not situational determinants (marital status) or social/environmental determinants (residence and occupation) could significantly predict the 3 domains of HL. Theorized consequences of HL were significantly influenced by HL in both models. Our results partially support the relationships proposed in the IMHL for patients with breast cancer as only personal determinants significantly predicted HL. Understanding the predictive pathways of the integrated HL model could help clinicians to tailor HL interventions using a patient's personal determinants to facilitate participation in decision making and promote health for breast cancer patients.

  20. Minority women and breast cancer screening: the role of cultural explanatory models.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, S S; Rashidi, A

    1998-01-01

    Mammography and clinical breast exams are effective secondary prevention techniques for reducing the morbidity and mortality due to breast cancer. Although minority women have higher mortality rates due to breast cancer, they are less likely than white women to use screening procedures. This paper provides a complementary understanding of the use of breast cancer screening among minority women by drawing attention to the role of women's cultural explanatory models (CEMs). CEMs stem from the sociocultural context and involve cultural beliefs and values, personal life experiences, and both biomedical and popular explanations of health and illness. Although women's CEMs may not accord with those of health professionals, they do have an impact on screening behavior. This paper discusses suggestions for addressing these issues in an effort to improve breast cancer screening rates through adopting a cultural relativistic approach.

  1. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Breast cancer in systemic lupus.

    PubMed

    Bernatsky, S; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Petri, M; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Fortin, P F; Ginzler, E; Romero-Diaz, J; Peschken, C; Jacobsen, S; Hanly, J G; Gordon, C; Nived, O; Yelin, E H; Isenberg, D; Rahman, A; Bae, S-C; Joseph, L; Witte, T; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Aranow, C; Kamen, D; Sturfeldt, G; Foulkes, W D; Hansen, J E; St Pierre, Y; Raymer, P Chrétien; Tessier-Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E

    2017-03-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug exposures over time. In univariate and multivariate models, the principal factor associated with breast cancers was older age at cohort entry. Conclusions There was little evidence that breast cancer risk in this SLE sample was strongly driven by any of the clinical factors that we studied. Further search for factors that determine the lower risk of breast cancer in SLE may be warranted.

  3. Application of accelerated failure time models for breast cancer patients' survival in Kurdistan Province of Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Asrin; Delpisheh, Ali; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second common cause of cancer-induced mortalities in Iranian women. There has been a rapid development in hazard models and survival analysis in the last decade. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients using accelerated failure time models (AFT). This was a retrospective-analytic cohort study. About 313 women with a pathologically proven diagnosis of breast cancer who had been treated during a 7-year period (since January 2006 until March 2014) in Sanandaj City, Kurdistan Province of Iran were recruited. Performance among AFT was assessed using the goodness of fit methods. Discrimination among the exponential, Weibull, generalized gamma, log-logistic, and log-normal distributions was done using Akaik information criteria and maximum likelihood. The 5 years OS was 75% (95% CI = 74.57-75.43). The main results in terms of survival were found for the different categories of the clinical stage covariate, tumor metastasis, and relapse of cancer. Survival time in breast cancer patients without tumor metastasis and relapse were 4, 2-fold longer than other patients with metastasis and relapse, respectively. One of the most important undermining prognostic factors in breast cancer is metastasis; hence, knowledge of the mechanisms of metastasis is necessary to prevent it so occurrence and treatment of metastatic breast cancer and ultimately extend the lifetime of patients.

  4. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites. PMID:23118918

  5. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    predictors of surveillance and follow-up care is Baldwin’s Afrocentric model for describing AA women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer screening...African American women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer early detection and screening. Adv Nurs Sci. 1996;19(2):27Y42. 28. Marin G. Subjective...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  6. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan E; Jia, Wei; Xie, Guoxiang; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-03-31

    More accurate diagnostic methods are pressingly needed to diagnose breast cancer, the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. Blood-based metabolomics is a promising diagnostic method for breast cancer. However, many metabolic biomarkers are difficult to replicate among studies. We propose that higher-order functional representation of metabolomics data, such as pathway-based metabolomic features, can be used as robust biomarkers for breast cancer. Towards this, we have developed a new computational method that uses personalized pathway dysregulation scores for disease diagnosis. We applied this method to predict breast cancer occurrence, in combination with correlation feature selection (CFS) and classification methods. The resulting all-stage and early-stage diagnosis models are highly accurate in two sets of testing blood samples, with average AUCs (Area Under the Curve, a receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.968 and 0.934, sensitivities of 0.946 and 0.954, and specificities of 0.934 and 0.918. These two metabolomics-based pathway models are further validated by RNA-Seq-based TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) breast cancer data, with AUCs of 0.995 and 0.993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study metabolomics data for disease diagnosis. Applying this method to blood-based breast cancer metabolomics data, we have discovered crucial metabolic pathway signatures for breast cancer diagnosis, especially early diagnosis. Further, this modeling approach may be generalized to other omics data types for disease diagnosis.

  7. The Walker 256 Breast Cancer Cell- Induced Bone Pain Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Priyank A; Kuo, Andy; Vetter, Irina; Smith, Maree T

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with terminal breast cancer show signs of bone metastasis, the most common cause of pain in cancer. Clinically available drug treatment options for the relief of cancer-associated bone pain are limited due to either inadequate pain relief and/or dose-limiting side-effects. One of the major hurdles in understanding the mechanism by which breast cancer causes pain after metastasis to the bones is the lack of suitable preclinical models. Until the late twentieth century, all animal models of cancer induced bone pain involved systemic injection of cancer cells into animals, which caused severe deterioration of animal health due to widespread metastasis. In this mini-review we have discussed details of a recently developed and highly efficient preclinical model of breast cancer induced bone pain: Walker 256 cancer cell- induced bone pain in rats. The model involves direct localized injection of cancer cells into a single tibia in rats, which avoids widespread metastasis of cancer cells and hence animals maintain good health throughout the experimental period. This model closely mimics the human pathophysiology of breast cancer induced bone pain and has great potential to aid in the process of drug discovery for treating this intractable pain condition.

  8. The Walker 256 Breast Cancer Cell- Induced Bone Pain Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Priyank A.; Kuo, Andy; Vetter, Irina; Smith, Maree T.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with terminal breast cancer show signs of bone metastasis, the most common cause of pain in cancer. Clinically available drug treatment options for the relief of cancer-associated bone pain are limited due to either inadequate pain relief and/or dose-limiting side-effects. One of the major hurdles in understanding the mechanism by which breast cancer causes pain after metastasis to the bones is the lack of suitable preclinical models. Until the late twentieth century, all animal models of cancer induced bone pain involved systemic injection of cancer cells into animals, which caused severe deterioration of animal health due to widespread metastasis. In this mini-review we have discussed details of a recently developed and highly efficient preclinical model of breast cancer induced bone pain: Walker 256 cancer cell- induced bone pain in rats. The model involves direct localized injection of cancer cells into a single tibia in rats, which avoids widespread metastasis of cancer cells and hence animals maintain good health throughout the experimental period. This model closely mimics the human pathophysiology of breast cancer induced bone pain and has great potential to aid in the process of drug discovery for treating this intractable pain condition. PMID:27630567

  9. Proteomics using mammospheres as a model system to identify proteins deregulated in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhao, F; Cui, Y

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSC) exist within many types of breast cancers, functioning to initiate tumorigenesis and augment its progression. The protein profile associated with BCSC has yet to be extensively studied. Mammospheres have been widely employed as a model system to study BCSC. We used proteomics on the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to compare protein expression in mammosphere-derived cells to that of parental monolayer cells. We identified 34 differentially expressed proteins, seven of which were overexpressed, with the remaining downregulated in mammosphere-derived cells. These differentially expressed proteins include those involved in cell metabolism such as GAPDH and fatty acid synthase, stress response proteins like Hsp27 and FKBP4, and signal transduction related proteins like GIPC1. The expression of breast cancer tumorigenesis and progression-promoting proteins GAPDH and FKBP4 were validated through western blotting. These two proteins are especially recognized for their role in breast cancer resistance to current chemotherapies. The data generated by mammosphere proteomics suggest that this system can identify novel targets for breast cancer stem cells and may provide insights into novel therapy of breast cancer.

  10. Tailoring breast cancer screening intervals by breast density and risk for women 50 and older: Collaborative modeling of screening outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Kerlikowske, Karla; Stout, Natasha K.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Schechter, Clyde B.; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Sprague, Brian L.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Near, Aimee M.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Hampton, John M.; Chang, Yaojen; de Koning, Harry J.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Biennial screening is generally recommended for average-risk women aged 50–74 years, but tailored screening may provide greater benefits. Objective To estimate outcomes for varying screening intervals after age 50 based on breast density and risk. Design Collaborative simulation modeling using national incidence, breast density, and screening performance data. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women ages ≥50 with combinations of breast density and relative risk (RR: 1.0, 1.3, 2.0, 4.0). Interventions Annual, biennial, or triennial digital mammography screening from age 50 to 74 (versus no screening) and age 65 to 74 (versus biennial 50–64). Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths, life expectancy and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), false-positives, benign biopsies, overdiagnoses, cost-effectiveness and ratio of false-positives to breast cancer deaths averted. Results Screening benefits and overdiagnosis increase with breast density and risk. False-positives and benign biopsies decrease with increasing risk. Among women with fatty or scattered fibroglandular breast density and RR=1.0–1.3, breast cancer deaths averted were similar for triennial versus biennial screening for both age groups (medians: age 50–74, 3.4–5.1 vs. 4.1–6.5; age 65–74, 1.5–2.1 vs. 1.8–2.6). Breast cancer deaths averted increased with annual versus biennial screening for ages 50–74 years with all levels of breast density and RR=4.0, and ages 65–74 years with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts and RR=4.0, but harms were almost 2-fold higher. Triennial screening for average-risk and annual screening for highest-risk subgroups cost <$100,000 per QALY gained. Limitations Models did not consider ages <50, RR< 1, or other imaging modalities. Conclusions Average-risk/low-breast density women undergoing triennial screening and higher-risk/high-breast density women receiving annual screening will maintain a similar or better balance of benefits and harms

  11. Computer Modeling for Microwave Ablation in Breast Cancer Using a Coaxial Slot Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda Rubio, Mario Francisco Jesus; Guerrero López, Geshel David; Valdés Perezgasga, Francisco; Flores García, Francisco; Vera Hernández, Arturo; Leija Salas, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The use of breast cancer mammography screening has allowed detection of a greater number of small carcinomas, and this has facilitated treatment by minimally invasive techniques. Microwave energy is a promising alternative treatment because it can preferentially heat and damage high-water-content breast carcinomas. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using this technique to treat breast cancer, a coaxial slot antenna computer simulation based on an axisymmetric finite element method (FEM) model was used to compare heating differences between cancer and normal breast tissue. Three FEM computer models were developed: in one of them, the coaxial slot antenna was immersed only in homogeneous breast tissue; for the second one, the antenna was immersed only in cancer tissue; for the third one, the antenna was inserted into malignant tissue surrounded by breast tissue. According to the results, the computer modeling demonstrated that the difference in dielectric properties and thermal parameters between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissue was able to cause preferential heating of tumors during microwave ablation. Furthermore, the ablation zone radius was 42 % larger in the tumor than in low-water-content adipose tissue. Even though this technique requires further research, it is a promising minimally invasive modality for the local treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Collaborative modeling of the impact of obesity on race-specific breast cancer incidence and mortality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaojen; Schechter, Clyde B; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Near, Aimee M; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A M; Adams-Campbell, Lucile; Levy, David; de Koning, Harry J; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2012-12-01

    Obesity affects multiple points along the breast cancer control continuum from prevention to screening and treatment, often in opposing directions. Obesity is also more prevalent in Blacks than Whites at most ages so it might contribute to observed racial disparities in mortality. We use two established simulation models from the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) to evaluate the impact of obesity on race-specific breast cancer outcomes. The models use common national data to inform parameters for the multiple US birth cohorts of Black and White women, including age- and race-specific incidence, competing mortality, mammography characteristics, and treatment effectiveness. Parameters are modified by obesity (BMI of ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) in conjunction with its age-, race-, cohort- and time-period-specific prevalence. We measure age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality and cases and deaths attributable to obesity. Obesity is more prevalent among Blacks than Whites until age 74; after age 74 it is more prevalent in Whites. The models estimate that the fraction of the US breast cancer cases attributable to obesity is 3.9-4.5 % (range across models) for Whites and 2.5-3.6 % for Blacks. Given the protective effects of obesity on risk among women <50 years, elimination of obesity in this age group could increase cases for both the races, but decrease cases for women ≥ 50 years. Overall, obesity accounts for 4.4-9.2 % and 3.1-8.4 % of the total number of breast cancer deaths in Whites and Blacks, respectively, across models. However, variations in obesity prevalence have no net effect on race disparities in breast cancer mortality because of the opposing effects of age on risk and patterns of age- and race-specific prevalence. Despite its modest impact on breast cancer control and race disparities, obesity remains one of the few known modifiable risks for cancer and other diseases, underlining its relevance as a public health target.

  13. NSG Mice Provide a Better Spontaneous Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis than Athymic (Nude) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puchalapalli, Madhavi; Zeng, Xianke; Mu, Liang; Anderson, Aubree; Hix Glickman, Laura; Zhang, Ming; Sayyad, Megan R.; Mosticone Wangensteen, Sierra; Clevenger, Charles V.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most common cause of mortality in breast cancer patients worldwide. To identify improved mouse models for breast cancer growth and spontaneous metastasis, we examined growth and metastasis of both estrogen receptor positive (T47D) and negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM1315, and CN34BrM) human breast cancer cells in nude and NSG mice. Both primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastases were increased in NSG mice compared to nude mice. In addition, a pattern of metastasis similar to that observed in human breast cancer patients (metastases to the lungs, liver, bones, brain, and lymph nodes) was found in NSG mice. Furthermore, there was an increase in the metastatic burden in NSG compared to nude mice that were injected with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in an intracardiac experimental metastasis model. This data demonstrates that NSG mice provide a better model for studying human breast cancer metastasis compared to the current nude mouse model. PMID:27662655

  14. Can a single model explain both breast cancer and prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, A Edward

    2007-01-01

    Background The Estradiol-Dihydrotestosterone model of prostate cancer (PC) showed how the interaction of hormones with specific hormone receptors affected apoptosis. The same hormone can produce different effects, depending on which hormone receptor it interacts with. Model This model proposes that the first step in the development of most PC and breast cancer (BC) occurs when aromatase converts testosterone to estradiol (E2). A sufficiently high enough local level of E2 results in telomerase activity. The telomerase activity allows cell division and may lead to BC or PC, which will proliferate if the rate of cell division is greater than the rate of cell death. The effect of hormones on their hormone receptors will affect the rate of cell death and determine whether or not the cancer proliferates. Conclusion By minimizing bcl-2 and maximizing apoptotic proteins, new systemic treatments for BC and PC can be developed that may be more effective than existing treatments. PMID:17678531

  15. Recent Insights into the Development of Preclinical Trastuzumab-Resistant HER2+ Breast Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, Paula; Cristóbal, Ion; Zazo, Sandra; Martín-Aparicio, Ester; Chamizo, Cristina; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rovira, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; Lluch, Ana; Albanell, Joan; Rojo, Federico

    2016-12-16

    Overexpression and amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) occurs in 20% of total breast carcinomas. HER2-overexpression is implicated in disease initiation and progression and associated with poor prognosis. Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, is the standard HER2-targeted therapy for early and metastatic HER2-amplified breast cancer patients. Trastuzumab has significantly increased clinical benefit in HER2+ metastatic and adjuvant settings, however, it is not effective for many patients due to primary or acquired resistance to the drug. During the last decade, many studies have revealed a number of novel molecular traits of HER2+ breast cancer, allowing us to uncover the molecular mechanisms involved in trastuzumab resistance and develop strategies to overcome resistance to therapy. In this review, we comprehensively addressed the current achievements in preclinical studies; we discussed molecular mechanisms of acquired trastuzumab resistance in HER2+ breast cancer models and potential therapeutic approaches based on the molecular features for HER2+ breast cancer. Enhanced understanding of the molecular profiles in HER2+ breast cancer may lead to identification of novel biomarkers for development of diagnostic approaches and improvement of therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of trastuzumab resistant HER2+ breast cancer.

  16. In vivo models in breast cancer research: progress, challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Holen, Ingunn; Speirs, Valerie; Morrissey, Bethny

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Research using animal model systems has been instrumental in delivering improved therapies for breast cancer, as well as in generating new insights into the mechanisms that underpin development of the disease. A large number of different models are now available, reflecting different types and stages of the disease; choosing which one to use depends on the specific research question(s) to be investigated. Based on presentations and discussions from leading experts who attended a recent workshop focused on in vivo models of breast cancer, this article provides a perspective on the many varied uses of these models in breast cancer research, their strengths, associated challenges and future directions. Among the questions discussed were: how well do models represent the different stages of human disease; how can we model the involvement of the human immune system and microenvironment in breast cancer; what are the appropriate models of metastatic disease; can we use models to carry out preclinical drug trials and identify pathways responsible for drug resistance; and what are the limitations of patient-derived xenograft models? We briefly outline the areas where the existing breast cancer models require improvement in light of the increased understanding of the disease process, reflecting the drive towards more personalised therapies and identification of mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:28381598

  17. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers . A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary ... will develop breast cancer . Some breast cancers that cluster in families are associated with inherited mutations in ...

  18. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to other parts of the body. Where breast cancer begins in men Everyone is born with a ... skin around the nipple. Inherited genes that increase breast cancer risk Some men inherit abnormal (mutated) genes from ...

  19. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  20. Improving the contrast of breast cancer masses in ultrasound using an autoregressive model based filter.

    PubMed

    von Lavante, Etienne; Noble, J Alison

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and diagnosis of breast cancer with ultrasound is a challenging problem due to the low contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue. Due to this low contrast it has proven to be difficult to achieve reliable segmentation results on breast cancer masses. An autoregressive model has been employed to filter out of the backscattered RF-signal from a tissue harmonic image which is not degraded by harmonic leakage. Measurements on the filtered image have shown a significant (up to 45%) increase in contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue.

  1. Accuracy of BRCA1/2 mutation prediction models in Korean breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sue K; Yang, Jae Jeong; Park, Boyoung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Suh, Young Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Oh, Se Jeong; Kim, Sung-Won

    2012-08-01

    BRCAPRO and Myriad II are widely used models for predicting BRCA1/2 mutation probability before genetic testing. However, the accuracy of these models in Koreans is not known. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the BRCAPRO and Myriad II models. Two hundred thirty-six women with breast cancer who underwent comprehensive BRCA1/2 genetic testing at our hospital between 2003 and 2010 were included in this study. We evaluated the performance of each model by comparing the numbers of observed versus predicted mutation carriers. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values at 10 % estimated probability. Forty-six individuals were identified to carry a deleterious BRCA mutation. The prevalence of BRCA mutation (19.5 %) was significantly higher than that predicted by BRCAPRO (9.0 %, p = 0.001) and Myriad (5.6 %, p < 0.001). In familial breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation rate (observed 22.7 %) was underestimated by both BRCAPRO (expected 11.4 %, p = 0.006) and Myriad II (expected 6.4 %, p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses showed that both models underestimated the risk of BRCA mutation in patients with a family history of breast cancer (probands' age at breast cancer diagnosis >50 years), with only one relative with breast cancer, and with non-familial early-onset breast cancer or bilateral breast cancer. Using a 10 % cut-off, the sensitivities were 47.8 % (BRCAPRO) and 50.0 % (Myriad), and positive predictive values were 44.9 % (BRCAPRO) and 43.4 % (Myriad). Both BRCAPRO and Myriad II underestimated the risk of BRCA1/2 mutation in Koreans. Our findings suggest that these models are less sensitive in Korean women, and therefore a new BRCA mutation prediction model based on Korean data is needed for proper genetic counseling.

  2. Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis Breast cancer is sometimes ... cancer screening is so important. Learn more. Can Breast Cancer Be Found Early? Breast cancer is sometimes found ...

  3. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  4. Transforming growth factor-β signalling controls human breast cancer metastasis in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Drabsch, Yvette; He, Shuning; Zhang, Long; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway is known to control human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that the zebrafish xenograft assay is a robust and dependable animal model for examining the role of pharmacological modulators and genetic perturbation of TGF-β signalling in human breast tumour cells. We injected cancer cells into the embryonic circulation (duct of cuvier) and examined their invasion and metastasis into the avascular collagenous tail. Various aspects of the TGF-β signalling pathway were blocked by chemical inhibition, small interfering RNA (siRNA), or small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Analysis was conducted using fluorescent microscopy. Breast cancer cells with different levels of malignancy, according to in vitro and in vivo mouse studies, demonstrated invasive and metastatic properties within the embryonic zebrafish model that nicely correlated with their differential tumourigenicity in mouse models. Interestingly, MCF10A M2 and M4 cells invaded into the caudal hematopoietic tissue and were visible as a cluster of cells, whereas MDA MB 231 cells invaded into the tail fin and were visible as individual cells. Pharmacological inhibition with TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors or tumour specific Smad4 knockdown disturbed invasion and metastasis in the zebrafish xenograft model and closely mimicked the results we obtained with these cells in a mouse metastasis model. Inhibition of matrix metallo proteinases, which are induced by TGF-β in breast cancer cells, blocked invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. The zebrafish-embryonic breast cancer xenograft model is applicable for the mechanistic understanding, screening and development of anti-TGF-β drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  5. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Prevention en español Cáncer de mama You may have heard about special events, like walks or races, to raise money for breast cancer research. Or maybe you've seen people wear ...

  6. Prognostic immune-related gene models for breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianli; Wang, Ying; Lao, Zengding; Liang, Siting; Hou, Jingyi; Yu, Yunfang; Yao, Herui; You, Na; Chen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women, is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease. Numerous prognostic tools have been proposed, including gene signatures. Unlike proliferation-related prognostic gene signatures, many immune-related gene signatures have emerged as principal biology-driven predictors of breast cancer. Diverse statistical methods and data sets were used for building these immune-related prognostic models, making it difficult to compare or use them in clinically meaningful ways. This study evaluated successfully published immune-related prognostic gene signatures through systematic validations of publicly available data sets. Eight prognostic models that were built upon immune-related gene signatures were evaluated. The performances of these models were compared and ranked in ten publicly available data sets, comprising a total of 2,449 breast cancer cases. Predictive accuracies were measured as concordance indices (C-indices). All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Immune-related gene models performed better in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and lymph node-positive (LN+) breast cancer subtypes. The three top-ranked ER- breast cancer models achieved overall C-indices of 0.62-0.63. Two models predicted better than chance for ER+ breast cancer, with C-indices of 0.53 and 0.59, respectively. For LN+ breast cancer, four models showed predictive advantage, with C-indices between 0.56 and 0.61. Predicted prognostic values were positively correlated with ER status when evaluated using univariate analyses in most of the models under investigation. Multivariate analyses indicated that prognostic values of the three models were independent of known clinical prognostic factors. Collectively, these analyses provided a comprehensive evaluation of immune-related prognostic gene signatures. By synthesizing C-indices in multiple independent data sets, immune-related gene signatures were ranked for ER+, ER-, LN+, and LN- breast

  7. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    .624). The multivariate general linear model with income as covariate, 5-year survival by race as a dependent variable, showed a significant effect of income and White race on 5-year survival (p < 0.001), unrelated to Black race (p = 0.780) or other races (p = 0.618). In men, we found a nonsignificant positive correlation between county breast cancer incidence and income (r = 0.098, p = 0.168). Breast cancer risk factors, such as delayed childbirth, less breast-feeding, and use of hormone supplements, are more common in affluent women. Affluent women are more likely to have mammograms, which detect many cancers that might not otherwise be diagnosed. In addition, women in certain affluent ethnic groups-Ashkenazi Jews, Icelanders and the Dutch-are more likely to carry genetic mutations known to predispose to breast cancer. We hypothesize that women with more income can afford better cancer care and survive longer than poorer women. But our hypothesis does not explain why this effect should be limited to White women; or why node involvement increased with income in White women but not in Blacks or Hispanics. Further studies may be worthwhile. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development .

  9. The Impact of Diabetes Treatment on Survival in a Breast Cancer/Diabetes Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-09

    Epidemiological studies have identified that type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a significant risk factor for carcinogenesis and cancer death. A few...poster session. We have successfully bred the mouse model of HER2-positive breast cancer and diabetes mellitus , i.e., MMTV-ErbB2(neu): db/db. Based on

  10. UWB microwave breast cancer detection: generalized models and performance prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Gunawan, Erry; Kim, Yongmin; Low, Kay Soon; Soh, Cheong Boon; Thi, Lin Lin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generic framework for the modeling of ultra-wideband (UWB) signal propagation in human breast, which facilitates system-level simulations and provides performance prediction. The clutter associated with the breast tissue heterogeneity is modeled through several key parameters depending on the tissue compositions. Subsequently, important channel properties such as the backscatter energy and the probability density function of time-of-arrival are derived. The modified Hermite polynomials, which fit well into the real pulse shapes, are then used to model the UWB signals. Armed with the channel/signal model preliminaries, three metrics are proposed, namely, the mean clutter response, the clean tumor response, and the worst-case clutter response. The generalized model provides a parsimonious way to study the effects of tissue structures, pulse templates, and array setup on the performance of a specified UWB imaging system. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  11. Targeting of CD151 in Breast Cancer and in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    role in the progression of breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS CD151 protein, breast cancer progression, ErbB2 amplification, breast carcinoma invasion... malignancy in breast cancer and other types of cancer . Others had found that CD151 knockout mice show normal development, but deficiencies in wound...antagonists can disrupt mammary carcinoma functions. BODY: a. Establishing a mouse model for breast cancer - We attempted to cross our CD151 null

  12. Monitoring Serial Changes in Circulating Human Breast Cancer Cells in Mruine Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Repollet, Madeline; Luker, Kathryn E.; Brown, Martha; Rae, James M.; Dontu, Gabriela; Schott, Anne F.; Wicha, Max; Doyle, Gerald V.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Luker, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are emerging as a powerful prognostic and predictive biomarker in several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate. Studies of CTC in metastasis and further development of CTC as a biomarker in cancer have been limited by the inability to repetitively monitor CTC in mouse models of cancer. We have validated a method to enumerate CTC in blood samples obtained from living mice using a modified version of an in vitro diagnostic system for quantifying CTC in patients. Different routes of blood collection were tested to identify a method to reproducibly recover CTC from tumor-bearing mice without interference from contaminating normal murine epithelial cells. CTC are present in blood samples from mice bearing orthotopic xenografts of several different breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer cells from patient biopsies. We also show that this technology can be used for serial monitoring of CTC in mouse xenograft models of human breast cancer. These results establish a new method for studying CTC in mouse models of epithelial cancer, providing the foundation for studies of molecular regulation of CTC in cancer and CTC as biomarker for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18632603

  13. Molecular Profiling of Breast Cancer Cell Lines Defines Relevant Tumor Models and Provides a Resource for Cancer Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Melanie; Choi, Yoon-La; Girard, Luc; Gandhi, Jeet; Kwei, Kevin A.; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Wang, Pei; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes–luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like–with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs). Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes. Methods Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression. Findings Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B) subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER) signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented), and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and novel

  14. Breast cancer screening behaviors among Korean American immigrant women: findings from the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Stange, Mia Ju; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the utilization of clinical breast examinations (CBEs) and mammograms among Korean American immigrant women and investigated how the six constructs of Health Belief Model (HBM) are associated with the receipt of breast cancer screening. Using a quota sampling strategy, 202 Korean American immigrant women were recruited in metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States. Approximately 64% of the participants reported having had at least one CBE in their lifetime, and about 81% of the sample had undergone at least one mammogram in their lifetime. Women who perceived themselves to be susceptible to breast cancer were more likely to have undergone a CBE, and women who had lower barriers to screening or demonstrated a higher level of confidence were more likely than their counterparts to undergo a mammogram. Findings suggest that HBM constructs such as susceptibility, barriers, and confidence should be considered when designing interventions aimed at promoting breast cancer screening.

  15. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  16. Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Lutz, Amelie M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2013-01-01

    While there is an increasing role of ultrasound for breast cancer screening in patients with dense breast, conventional anatomical-ultrasound lacks sensitivity and specificity for early breast cancer detection. In this study we assessed the potential of molecular-ultrasound imaging, using clinically-translatable vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR2)-targeted microbubbles (MBVEGFR2), to improve the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in earlier detection of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul). In vivo binding specificity studies (n=26 tumors) showed that ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P<0.001) using MBVEGFR2 compared to non-targeted microbubbles and imaging signal significantly decreased (P<0.001) by blocking antibodies. Ultrasound molecular imaging signal significantly increased (P<0.001), when breast tissue (n=315 glands) progressed from normal (1.65±0.17 a.u.) to hyperplasia (4.21±1.16), DCIS (15.95±1.31) and invasive cancer (78.1±6.31) and highly correlated with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression (R2=0.84; 95% CI, 0.72, 0.91; P<0.001). At an imaging signal threshold of 4.6 a.u., ultrasound molecular imaging differentiated benign from malignant entities with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI, 78, 88) and specificity of 89% (95% CI, 81, 94). In a prospective screening trail (n=63 glands) diagnostic performance of detecting DCIS and breast cancer was assessed and two independent readers correctly diagnosed malignant disease in >95% of cases and highly agreed between each other (ICC=0.98; 95% CI, 97, 99). These results suggest that VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging allows highly accurate detection of DCIS and breast cancer in transgenic mice and may be a promising approach for early breast cancer detection in women. PMID:23328585

  17. Monitoring breast cancer treatment using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-based computational model.

    PubMed

    Depciuch, J; Kaznowska, E; Golowski, S; Koziorowska, A; Zawlik, I; Cholewa, M; Szmuc, K; Cebulski, J

    2017-09-05

    Breast cancer affects one in four women, therefore, the search for new diagnostic technologies and therapeutic approaches is of critical importance. This involves the development of diagnostic tools to facilitate the detection of cancer cells, which is useful for assessing the efficacy of cancer therapies. One of the major challenges for chemotherapy is the lack of tools to monitor efficacy during the course of treatment. Vibrational spectroscopy appears to be a promising tool for such a purpose, as it yields Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectra which can be used to provide information on the chemical composition of the tissue. Previous research by our group has demonstrated significant differences between the infrared spectra of healthy, cancerous and post-chemotherapy breast tissue. Furthermore, the results obtained for three extreme patient cases revealed that the infrared spectra of post-chemotherapy breast tissue closely resembles that of healthy breast tissue when chemotherapy is effective (i.e., a good therapeutic response is achieved), or that of cancerous breast tissue when chemotherapy is ineffective. In the current study, we compared the infrared spectra of healthy, cancerous and post-chemotherapy breast tissue. Characteristic parameters were designated for the obtained spectra, spreading the function of absorbance using the Kramers-Kronig transformation and the best fit procedure to obtain Lorentz functions, which represent components of the bands. The Lorentz function parameters were used to develop a physics-based computational model to verify the efficacy of a given chemotherapy protocol in a given case. The results obtained using this model reflected the actual patient data retrieved from medical records (health improvement or no improvement). Therefore, we propose this model as a useful tool for monitoring the efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulation modeling of change to breast cancer detection age eligibility recommendations in Ontario, 2002-2021.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Duncan J W; Drake, Sean M; Shortt, Samuel E D; Dorland, John L; Tran, Ninh

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the development and use of a decision support tool based on simulation modeling of breast cancer screening to evaluate the implications for the provision of health services and the economic impact of extending routine radiographic screening for breast cancer to women in the 40-49 age group between 2002 and 2021. The main method was computer simulation with a Markov model that used published estimates of population size by age group, breast cancer prevalence and incidence, screening program participation rate, sensitivity and specificity of the screening test and diagnostic test, stage transition probabilities, directed diagnosis rates and costs. The model predicted that changes to age eligibility requirements would result in the detection of an additional 6610 women with breast cancer in Ontario requiring treatment, at an additional cost of 795 Canadian per case. These costs include those related to screening, diagnosis and initial treatment and apply to the 20-year period. The model provided a useful decision support tool for those planning and implementing breast cancer screening programs.

  19. Photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in a BALB/c mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Tae-Gyu; Lee, Byoung-Rai; Choi, Eun-Young; Kim, Dong Won

    2012-01-01

    Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for superficial neoplasms and its usage has been recently extended to deeper lesions. The purpose of this study was to observe whether or not PDT can cure breast cancer in the solid tumor model, and to define the critical point of laser amount for killing the cancer cells. Methods Twenty four BALB/c mouse models with subcutaneous EMT6 mammary carcinomas were prepared. Mice were divided into eight groups depending on the amount of illumination, and the tumor size was between 8 mm and 10 mm. We began by peritoneal infiltration with a photosensitizer 48 hours prior to applying the laser light, and then we applied a non-thermal laser light. The energy was from 350 J/cm2 to 30 J/cm2 to the cancer. Results Regardless of the tumor size from 8 mm to 10 mm, all mice apparently showed positive results via PDT. We also did not find any recurrence over 90 J/cm2. In all models, the color of the breast cancer lesions began to vary to dark on 2 days post PDT and the tumor regression began simultaneously. Also, we confirmed the complete regression of the breast cancer 21 days after PDT. Conclusion We confirmed that PDT may treat breast cancers that are sized less 10 mm in mouse models. The moderate energy to destruct the breast cancer cells may be 90 J/cm2. Therefore, we can expcect that PDT may be utilized to treat breast cancer, but we need more experience, skills and processing for clinical trials. PMID:22523628

  20. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. Activity of the Kinesin Spindle Protein Inhibitor Ispinesib (SB-715992) in Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, James W.; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Wood, Kenneth W.; Cases, Sylvaine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein, a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have shown a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities, or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer, we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination with several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. Experimental Design We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the antitumor activity of approved therapies. Results In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad antiproliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models and tumor-free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the antitumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine and exhibited activity comparable with paclitaxel and ixabepilone. Conclusions These findings support further clinical exploration of kinesin spindle protein inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20068098

  2. Improving breast cancer survival analysis through competition-based multidimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Erhan; Dutkowski, Janusz; Guinney, Justin; Jang, In Sock; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Pandey, Gaurav; Sauerwine, Benjamin A; Shimoni, Yishai; Moen Vollan, Hans Kristian; Mecham, Brigham H; Rueda, Oscar M; Tost, Jorg; Curtis, Christina; Alvarez, Mariano J; Kristensen, Vessela N; Aparicio, Samuel; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Friend, Stephen H; Ideker, Trey; Schadt, Eric E; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A; Margolin, Adam A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. As with most cancers, it is a heterogeneous disease and different breast cancer subtypes are treated differently. Understanding the difference in prognosis for breast cancer based on its molecular and phenotypic features is one avenue for improving treatment by matching the proper treatment with molecular subtypes of the disease. In this work, we employed a competition-based approach to modeling breast cancer prognosis using large datasets containing genomic and clinical information and an online real-time leaderboard program used to speed feedback to the modeling team and to encourage each modeler to work towards achieving a higher ranked submission. We find that machine learning methods combined with molecular features selected based on expert prior knowledge can improve survival predictions compared to current best-in-class methodologies and that ensemble models trained across multiple user submissions systematically outperform individual models within the ensemble. We also find that model scores are highly consistent across multiple independent evaluations. This study serves as the pilot phase of a much larger competition open to the whole research community, with the goal of understanding general strategies for model optimization using clinical and molecular profiling data and providing an objective, transparent system for assessing prognostic models.

  3. Improving Breast Cancer Survival Analysis through Competition-Based Multidimensional Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Erhan; Dutkowski, Janusz; Guinney, Justin; Jang, In Sock; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Pandey, Gaurav; Sauerwine, Benjamin A.; Shimoni, Yishai; Moen Vollan, Hans Kristian; Mecham, Brigham H.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Tost, Jorg; Curtis, Christina; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Aparicio, Samuel; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Califano, Andrea; Friend, Stephen H.; Ideker, Trey; Schadt, Eric E.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Margolin, Adam A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. As with most cancers, it is a heterogeneous disease and different breast cancer subtypes are treated differently. Understanding the difference in prognosis for breast cancer based on its molecular and phenotypic features is one avenue for improving treatment by matching the proper treatment with molecular subtypes of the disease. In this work, we employed a competition-based approach to modeling breast cancer prognosis using large datasets containing genomic and clinical information and an online real-time leaderboard program used to speed feedback to the modeling team and to encourage each modeler to work towards achieving a higher ranked submission. We find that machine learning methods combined with molecular features selected based on expert prior knowledge can improve survival predictions compared to current best-in-class methodologies and that ensemble models trained across multiple user submissions systematically outperform individual models within the ensemble. We also find that model scores are highly consistent across multiple independent evaluations. This study serves as the pilot phase of a much larger competition open to the whole research community, with the goal of understanding general strategies for model optimization using clinical and molecular profiling data and providing an objective, transparent system for assessing prognostic models. PMID:23671412

  4. A New In Vitro Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    prostate, lung , and multiple myeloma cancers (1). Metastasis to the bone often progresses with significant morbidity related to substantial bone loss...Cancer Metastasis to Bone PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrea M. Mastro, Ph.D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Penn State University...A New In Vitro Model of Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0432 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  5. Breast cancer patient stories project.

    PubMed

    Tanna, Nuttan; Buijs, Helene; Pitkin, Joan; Reichert, Robert

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that there are almost half a million women living with or beyond a breast cancer diagnosis in the UK, often referred to as the breast cancer survivor population. We report on the setting up of a dedicated breast cancer and menopause symptoms service (BCMS), and present results from research undertaken with breast cancer survivors with the aim of obtaining their perspectives on the BCMS service. An action-oriented approach incorporating improvement science methodology has been used to help develop and drive changes to support a high standard of NHS patient care delivery for women with breast cancer within the BCMS setting. Evaluation was undertaken of this innovative service using qualitative methodology, and included discussion within a focus group setting, patient consent to record discussion, followed by thematic analysis of transcription. Women who have survived breast cancer identified a need for specialist support to help improve their quality of life, which is also affected by menopause type symptomology. This support can be provided within the BCMS service setting. Our recommendations are that the BCMS service model is incorporated into any regional or national breast cancer patient pathway and service redesign work in place. Breast cancer survivors would support the setting up of a BCMS service, and would actively help raise awareness and market this service.

  6. Neoplastic effects of exemestane in premenopausal breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, P; Sadlonova, V; Kajo, K; Machalekova, K; Ostatnikova, D; Nosalova, G; Fetisovova, Z

    2008-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitor exemestane as a single - agent has no established role in the treatment of premenopausal breast cancer women. The aim of this study was to evaluate preventive effects of exemestane in the model of premenopausal Nmethyl- N-nitrosourea - induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats. Exemestane treatment begun 7 days prior to carcinogen administration and continued next 12 weeks - till the end of experiment. Exemestane was dietary administered in two concentrations of 1 mg / 1kg (EXE 1), or 10 mg/1 kg (EXE 10), respectively. Exemestane increased the tumor frequency by 80.5 % (P=0.034) in the group EXE 1 and by 61.5 % (P=0.045) in the group EXE 10 in comparison with control animals. In the group EXE 10, the incidence of mammary tumors was increased by 11.5 % (P=0.31) and tumor volume by 41.5 % (P=0.23), also the latency was shortened by 8 days (P=0.078) compared with controls. In the groups with exemestane, changes in weights and histology of uterus and vagina were not found at the end of experiment. Exemestane did not alter serum concentrations of estradiol, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone. In the group EXE 10 in comparison with untreated animals, exemestane decreased serum concentrations of triacylglycerols by 9 % (P=0.032), total cholesterol by 19.5 % (P=0.0002) and cholesterol of low - density and high - density lipoprotein fractions by 41 % (P<0.0001), or 21.5 % (P=0.0002), respectively. In the group EXE 1, the decrease in cholesterol of low-density lipoprotein fraction by 22.5 % (P=0.0005) was recorded. An increase in food intake (P=0.023) and body weight gain (P=0.036) was found in the group EXE 10 compared with the control group (P<0.05). The present study points to apparent tumor - promoting effects of dietary administered exemestane in the model of premenopausal mammary carcinogenesis in female rats. Exemestane as a steroidal agent indicated androgenic effects on rat lipid metabolism in this experiment.

  7. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  8. Which strategies reduce breast cancer mortality most? Collaborative modeling of optimal screening, treatment, and obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien; Schechter, Clyde; Chang, Yaojen; Huang, An-Tsun; Near, Aimee M; de Koning, Harry; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2013-07-15

    US breast cancer mortality is declining, but thousands of women still die each year. Two established simulation models examine 6 strategies that include increased screening and/or treatment or elimination of obesity versus continuation of current patterns. The models use common national data on incidence and obesity prevalence, competing causes of death, mammography characteristics, treatment effects, and survival/cure. Parameters are modified based on obesity (defined as BMI  ≥  30 kg/m(2) ). Outcomes are presented for the year 2025 among women aged 25+ and include numbers of cases, deaths, mammograms and false-positives; age-adjusted incidence and mortality; breast cancer mortality reduction and deaths averted; and probability of dying of breast cancer. If current patterns continue, the models project that there would be about 50,100-57,400 (range across models) annual breast cancer deaths in 2025. If 90% of women were screened annually from ages 40 to 54 and biennially from ages 55 to 99 (or death), then 5100-6100 fewer deaths would occur versus current patterns, but incidence, mammograms, and false-positives would increase. If all women received the indicated systemic treatment (with no screening change), then 11,400-14,500 more deaths would be averted versus current patterns, but increased toxicity could occur. If 100% received screening plus indicated therapy, there would be 18,100-20,400 fewer deaths. Eliminating obesity yields 3300-5700 fewer breast cancer deaths versus continuation of current obesity levels. Maximal reductions in breast cancer deaths could be achieved through optimizing treatment use, followed by increasing screening use and obesity prevention. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  9. Increased Expression of P-Glycoprotein Is Associated with Doxorubicin Chemoresistance in the Metastatic 4T1 Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lili; Haque, Aliyya; Jackson, Kamilah; Hazari, Sidhartha; Moroz, Krzysztof; Jetly, Rachna; Dash, Srikanta

    2011-01-01

    Development of drug resistance is one of the major causes of breast cancer treatment failure. The goal of this study was to understand the chemoresistance mechanism using the highly metastatic 4T1 breast cancer model, which emulates stage IV breast cancer in humans. The metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cell line treated with either doxorubicin or 5-FU showed a concentration-dependent reduced cell proliferation, with induced G2-phase growth arrest (doxorubicin) or G1-phase growth arrest (5-FU). Doxorubicin treatment partially suppressed the multiorgan metastasis of 4T1 breast cancer cells in the lung, heart, liver, and bone, compared with either 5-FU or cyclophosphamide. We isolated and characterized 4T1 breast cancer cells from doxorubicin-resistant metastatic tumors (cell line 4T1-R). Multiorgan metastasis of drug-resistant 4T1 breast tumors was totally resistant to doxorubicin treatment. Our results indicate that doxorubicin is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of resistant 4T1 breast cancer cells and that it cannot reach the nucleus because of increased nuclear expression of P-glycoprotein. Pretreatment of doxorubicin-resistant 4T1-R breast cancer cells with verapamil, a general inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, increased nuclear translocation of doxorubicin and cellular cytotoxicity. Thus, impaired nuclear translocation of doxorubicin due to increased expression of P-glycoprotein is associated with doxorubicin resistance of highly metastatic 4T1 breast cancer. PMID:21281816

  10. Analysis of survival in breast cancer patients by using different parametric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enera Amran, Syahila; Asrul Afendi Abdullah, M.; Kek, Sie Long; Afiqah Muhamad Jamil, Siti

    2017-09-01

    In biomedical applications or clinical trials, right censoring was often arising when studying the time to event data. In this case, some individuals are still alive at the end of the study or lost to follow up at a certain time. It is an important issue to handle the censoring data in order to prevent any bias information in the analysis. Therefore, this study was carried out to analyze the right censoring data with three different parametric models; exponential model, Weibull model and log-logistic models. Data of breast cancer patients from Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru from 30 December 2008 until 15 February 2017 was used in this study to illustrate the right censoring data. Besides, the covariates included in this study are the time of breast cancer infection patients survive t, age of each patients X1 and treatment given to the patients X2 . In order to determine the best parametric models in analysing survival of breast cancer patients, the performance of each model was compare based on Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and log-likelihood value using statistical software R. When analysing the breast cancer data, all three distributions were shown consistency of data with the line graph of cumulative hazard function resembles a straight line going through the origin. As the result, log-logistic model was the best fitted parametric model compared with exponential and Weibull model since it has the smallest value in AIC and BIC, also the biggest value in log-likelihood.

  11. Targeting CXCR1 on breast cancer stem cells: signaling pathways and clinical application modelling

    PubMed Central

    Fidoamore, Alessia; De Pizzol, Maria; Di Giacomo, Erica; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Confalone, Giuseppina; Galante, Angelo; Cinque, Benedetta; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Ruffini, Pier Adelchi; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Giordano, Antonio; Alecci, Marcello; Allegretti, Marcello; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer it has been proposed that the presence of cancer stem cells may drive tumor initiation, progression and recurrences. IL-8, up-regulated in breast cancer, and associated with poor prognosis, increases CSC self-renewal in cell line models. It signals via two cell surface receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Recently, the IL-8/CXCR1 axis was proposed as an attractive pathway for the design of specific therapies against breast cancer stem cells. Reparixin, a powerful CXCR1 inhibitor, was effective in reducing in vivo the tumour-initiating population in several NOD/SCID mice breast cancer models, showing that the selective targeting of CXCR1 and the combination of reparixin and docetaxel resulted in a concomitant reduction of the bulk tumour mass and CSC population. The available data indicate that IL-8, expressed by tumour cells and induced by chemotherapeutic treatment, is a key regulator of the survival and self-renewal of the population of CXCR1-expressing CSC. Consequently, this investigation on the mechanism of action of the reparixin/paclitaxel combination, was based on the observation that reparixin treatment contained the formation of metastases in several experimental models. However, specific data on the formation of breast cancer brain metastases, which carry remarkable morbidity and mortality to a substantial proportion of advanced breast cancer patients, have not been generated. The obtained data indicate a beneficial use of the drug combination reparixin and paclitaxel to counteract brain tumour metastasis due to CSC, probably due to the combined effects of the two drugs, the pro-apoptotic action of paclitaxel and the cytostatic and anti-migratory effects of reparixin. PMID:26517518

  12. Antineoplastic effects of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in the breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Kapinová, Andrea; Kružliak, Peter; Kello, Martin; Výbohová, Desanka; Kajo, Karol; Novák, Miroslav; Chripková, Martina; Adamkov, Marián; Péč, Martin; Mojžiš, Ján; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Stollárová, Nadežda; Dobrota, Dušan

    2015-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in both clinical and preclinical research about the role of phytochemicals in the reduction of risk for cancer in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the antineoplastic effects of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental breast cancer in vivo and in vitro. In this experiment, the antineoplastic effects of C. pyrenoidosa in the chemoprevention of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats were evaluated. Chlorella powder was administered through diet at concentrations of 0.3% and 3%. The experiment was terminated 14 wk after carcinogen administration. At autopsy, mammary tumors were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro cytotoxicity assay, parameters of apoptosis, and proliferation after chlorella treatment in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were carried out. Basic parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis), chosen metabolic variables, and side effects after long-term chlorella treatment in animals were assessed. Chlorella at higher concentration suppressed tumor frequency by 61% (P < 0.02) and lengthened tumor latency by 12.5 d (P < 0.02) in comparison with the controls. Immunohistochemical analysis of rat tumor cells showed caspase-7 expression increase by 73.5% (P < 0.001) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression decrease by 19% (P = 0.07) after chlorella treatment. In a parallel in vitro study, chlorella significantly decreased survival of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In chlorella-treated MCF-7 cells, a significant increase in cells having sub-G0/G1 DNA content and significant increase of early apoptotic and late apoptotic/necrotic cells after annexin V/PI staining assay were found. Decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing reactive oxygen species generation were observed in the chlorella-treated MCF-7

  13. Family History of Breast Cancer, Breast Density, and Breast Cancer Risk in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Population.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Sprague, Brian L; Bissell, Michael C S; Miglioretti, Diana L; Buist, Diana S M; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-06-01

    Background: The utility of incorporating detailed family history into breast cancer risk prediction hinges on its independent contribution to breast cancer risk. We evaluated associations between detailed family history and breast cancer risk while accounting for breast density.Methods: We followed 222,019 participants ages 35 to 74 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, of whom 2,456 developed invasive breast cancer. We calculated standardized breast cancer risks within joint strata of breast density and simple (1(st)-degree female relative) or detailed (first-degree, second-degree, or first- and second-degree female relative) breast cancer family history. We fit log-binomial models to estimate age-specific breast cancer associations for simple and detailed family history, accounting for breast density.Results: Simple first-degree family history was associated with increased breast cancer risk compared with no first-degree history [Risk ratio (RR), 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.1 at age 40; RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.7 at age 50; RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6 at age 60; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5 at age 70). Breast cancer associations with detailed family history were strongest for women with first- and second-degree family history compared with no history (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2 at age 40); this association weakened in higher age groups (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.88-1.5 at age 70). Associations did not change substantially when adjusted for breast density.Conclusions: Even with adjustment for breast density, a history of breast cancer in both first- and second-degree relatives is more strongly associated with breast cancer than simple first-degree family history.Impact: Future efforts to improve breast cancer risk prediction models should evaluate detailed family history as a risk factor. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 938-44. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Effect of Changing Breast Cancer Incidence Rates on the Calibration of the Gail Model

    PubMed Central

    Schonfeld, Sara J.; Pee, David; Greenlee, Robert T.; Hartge, Patricia; Lacey, James V.; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Visvanathan, Kala; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The Gail model combines relative risks (RRs) for five breast cancer risk factors with age-specific breast cancer incidence rates and competing mortality rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 1983 to 1987 to predict risk of invasive breast cancer over a given time period. Motivated by changes in breast cancer incidence during the 1990s, we evaluated the model's calibration in two recent cohorts. Methods We included white, postmenopausal women from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) –AARP Diet and Health Study (NIH-AARP, 1995 to 2003), and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO, 1993 to 2006). Calibration was assessed by comparing the number of breast cancers expected from the Gail model with that observed. We then evaluated calibration by using an updated model that combined Gail model RRs with 1995 to 2003 SEER invasive breast cancer incidence rates. Results Overall, the Gail model significantly underpredicted the number of invasive breast cancers in NIH-AARP, with an expected-to-observed ratio of 0.87 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.89), and in PLCO, with an expected-to-observed ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.82 to 0.90). The updated model was well-calibrated overall, with an expected-to-observed ratio of 1.03 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.05) in NIH-AARP and an expected-to-observed ratio of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97 to 1.06) in PLCO. Of women age 50 to 55 years at baseline, 13% to 14% had a projected Gail model 5-year risk lower than the recommended threshold of 1.66% for use of tamoxifen or raloxifene but ≥ 1.66% when using the updated model. The Gail model was well calibrated in PLCO when the prediction period was restricted to 2003 to 2006. Conclusion This study highlights that model calibration is important to ensure the usefulness of risk prediction models for clinical decision making. PMID:20368565

  15. Modeling and Controlling Chaos in Breast Cancer: Toward Finding a Practical Cure—A first step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh, Somayeh; Sanayei, Ali

    2010-09-01

    The main aim of this work is finding a practical method which is based on a mathematical model to cure the breast cancer. This model with certain values of parameters could exhibit a chaotic behavior. Consequently, we achieve this goal by controlling chaos and find the best adjustable control parameter in order to control the malignancy.

  16. A risk management model for familial breast cancer: A new application using Fuzzy Cognitive Map method.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Elpiniki I; Jayashree Subramanian; Karmegam, Akila; Papandrianos, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most deadly disease affecting women and thus it is natural for women aged 40-49 years (who have a family history of breast cancer or other related cancers) to assess their personal risk for developing familial breast cancer (FBC). Besides, as each individual woman possesses different levels of risk of developing breast cancer depending on their family history, genetic predispositions and personal medical history, individualized care setting mechanism needs to be identified so that appropriate risk assessment, counseling, screening, and prevention options can be determined by the health care professionals. The presented work aims at developing a soft computing based medical decision support system using Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM) that assists health care professionals in deciding the individualized care setting mechanisms based on the FBC risk level of the given women. The FCM based FBC risk management system uses NHL to learn causal weights from 40 patient records and achieves a 95% diagnostic accuracy. The results obtained from the proposed model are in concurrence with the comprehensive risk evaluation tool based on Tyrer-Cuzick model for 38/40 patient cases (95%). Besides, the proposed model identifies high risk women by calculating higher accuracy of prediction than the standard Gail and NSAPB models. The testing accuracy of the proposed model using 10-fold cross validation technique outperforms other standard machine learning based inference engines as well as previous FCM-based risk prediction methods for BC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in basic and translational breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Airhart, Susie D; Alferez, Denis G; Aparicio, Samuel; Behbod, Fariba; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Brisken, Cathrin; Bult, Carol J; Cai, Shirong; Clarke, Robert B; Dowst, Heidi; Ellis, Matthew J; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Iggo, Richard D; Kabos, Peter; Li, Shunqiang; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Marangoni, Elisabetta; McCoy, Aaron; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Poupon, Marie-France; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Sartorius, Carol A; Scabia, Valentina; Sflomos, George; Tu, Yizheng; Vaillant, François; Visvader, Jane E; Welm, Alana; Wicha, Max S; Lewis, Michael T

    2016-12-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of a growing spectrum of cancers are rapidly supplanting long-established traditional cell lines as preferred models for conducting basic and translational preclinical research. In breast cancer, to complement the now curated collection of approximately 45 long-established human breast cancer cell lines, a newly formed consortium of academic laboratories, currently from Europe, Australia, and North America, herein summarizes data on over 500 stably transplantable PDX models representing all three clinical subtypes of breast cancer (ER+, HER2+, and "Triple-negative" (TNBC)). Many of these models are well-characterized with respect to genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic features, metastatic behavior, and treatment response to a variety of standard-of-care and experimental therapeutics. These stably transplantable PDX lines are generally available for dissemination to laboratories conducting translational research, and contact information for each collection is provided. This review summarizes current experiences related to PDX generation across participating groups, efforts to develop data standards for annotation and dissemination of patient clinical information that does not compromise patient privacy, efforts to develop complementary data standards for annotation of PDX characteristics and biology, and progress toward "credentialing" of PDX models as surrogates to represent individual patients for use in preclinical and co-clinical translational research. In addition, this review highlights important unresolved questions, as well as current limitations, that have hampered more efficient generation of PDX lines and more rapid adoption of PDX use in translational breast cancer research.

  18. Thermal analysis of multiple-antenna-excited breast model for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Yinan Li; Fahimi, Babak

    2016-08-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT), or thermal imaging has long been proposed as a novel method in early detection of breast cancer. Most of the work done was through the detection of abnormal hotspot, or asymmetries in a thermal texture map. However, the surface temperature may not appear symmetric even for a healthy breast because of variations in blood supply and individual differences. In this paper, a method that is independent of the aforementioned symmetry is proposed. The breast under detection is initially excited by a group of patch antennas. Because of the differences in electromagnetic and thermal properties, the temperature increase will be different for healthy and abnormal tissues. Through the analysis of the temperature changing behavior, comparison of the temperature under each antenna with its vicinity point is done to determine whether cancerous tissue is present or not and further to detect its approximate location. A three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element method (FEM) has been used to simulate the thermal behavior of breast tissue exposed to antenna excitations.

  19. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red, or inflamed. Inflammatory breast cancer is rare, accounting for 1 to 5 percent of all breast ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  20. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging model for potential breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell; Xin, Hao

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we develop a complete microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) model for potential breast cancer imaging application. Acoustic pressures generated by different breast tissue targets are investigated by finite-difference time-domain simulations of the entire TAI process including the feeding antenna, matching mechanism, fluidic environment, 3-D breast model, and acoustic transducer. Simulation results achieve quantitative relationships between the input microwave peak power and the resulting specific absorption rate as well as the output acoustic pressure. Microwave frequency dependence of the acoustic signals due to different breast tissues is established across a broadband frequency range (2.3-12 GHz), suggesting key advantages of spectroscopic TAI compare to TAI at a single frequency. Reconstructed thermoacoustic images are consistent with the modeling results. This model will contribute to design, optimization, and safety evaluation of microwave-induced TAI and spectroscopy.

  1. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Breast Cancer Survivor Follow up Care After Breast Cancer Treatment Many women are relieved or excited to ... Menopausal Hormone Therapy After Breast Cancer More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  2. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Treatment of Breast Cancer in Men, by Stage Because there have been ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  3. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  4. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer How Does Breast Cancer Form? Changes or mutations in DNA can cause ... please see our Content Usage Policy . More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  5. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men The thought of surgery can be ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  6. Development of a model to predict breast cancer survival using data from the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Asare, Elliot A; Liu, Lei; Hess, Kenneth R; Gordon, Elisa J; Paruch, Jennifer L; Palis, Bryan; Dahlke, Allison R; McCabe, Ryan; Cohen, Mark E; Winchester, David P; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2016-02-01

    With the large amounts of data on patient, tumor, and treatment factors available to clinicians, it has become critically important to harness this information to guide clinicians in discussing a patient's prognosis. However, no widely accepted survival calculator is available that uses national data and includes multiple prognostic factors. Our objective was to develop a model for predicting survival among patients diagnosed with breast cancer using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to serve as a prototype for the Commission on Cancer's "Cancer Survival Prognostic Calculator." A retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with breast cancer (2003-2006) in the NCDB was included. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to predict overall survival was developed. Model discrimination by 10-fold internal cross-validation and calibration was assessed. There were 296,284 patients for model development and internal validation. The c-index for the 10-fold cross-validation ranged from 0.779 to 0.788 after inclusion of all available pertinent prognostic factors. A plot of the observed versus predicted 5 year overall survival showed minimal deviation from the reference line. This breast cancer survival prognostic model to be used as a prototype for building the Commission on Cancer's "Cancer Survival Prognostic Calculator" will offer patients and clinicians an objective opportunity to estimate personalized long-term survival based on patient demographic characteristics, tumor factors, and treatment delivered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient perspectives on breast cancer treatment side effects and the prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation for women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Binkley, Jill M; Harris, Susan R; Levangie, Pamela K; Pearl, Marcia; Guglielmino, Janine; Kraus, Valerie; Rowden, Diana

    2012-04-15

    Women's experience of breast cancer is complex, affecting all aspects of life during and after treatment. Patients' perspectives about common impairments and functional limitations secondary to breast cancer treatment, including upper extremity motion restriction, lymphedema, fatigue, weight gain, pain, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, are addressed. Women often report being uninformed regarding these side effects and surprised that they do not always disappear after treatment, but remain part of their lives. Breast cancer patients express strong, unmet needs for education, information, and intervention for these side effects. Evidence suggests that rehabilitation and exercise are effective in preventing and managing many physical side effects of breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, few women are referred to rehabilitation during or after treatment, and fewer receive baseline assessments of impairment and function to facilitate early detection of impairment and functional limitations. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation will serve the needs of women with breast cancer by providing education and information about treatment side effects, reducing the incidence and burden of side effects through early identification and treatment, and enhancing access to timely rehabilitation. Integration of exercise as a component of the model benefits patients at every phase of survivorship, by addressing individual concerns about exercise during and after treatment and highlighting the important contribution of exercise to overall health and survival. The prospective surveillance model of rehabilitation can meet the evident and often expressed needs of survivors for information, guidance, and intervention--thus addressing, and potentially improving, overall quality of life for individuals diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  8. Reliability and validity of Champion's Health Belief Model Scale for breast cancer screening among Malaysian women.

    PubMed

    Parsa, P; Kandiah, M; Mohd Nasir, M T; Hejar, A R; Nor Afiah, M Z

    2008-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Malaysian women, and the use of breast self-examination (BSE), clinical breast examination (CBE) and mammography remain low in Malaysia. Therefore, there is a need to develop a valid and reliable tool to measure the beliefs that influence breast cancer screening practices. The Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS) is a valid and reliable tool to measure beliefs about breast cancer and screening methods in the Western culture. The purpose of this study was to translate the use of CHBMS into the Malaysian context and validate the scale among Malaysian women. A random sample of 425 women teachers was taken from 24 secondary schools in Selangor state, Malaysia. The CHBMS was translated into the Malay language, validated by an expert's panel, back translated, and pretested. Analyses included descriptive statistics of all the study variables, reliability estimates, and construct validity using factor analysis. The mean age of the respondents was 37.2 (standard deviation 7.1) years. Factor analysis yielded ten factors for BSE with eigenvalue greater than 1 (four factors more than the original): confidence 1 (ability to differentiate normal and abnormal changes in the breasts), barriers to BSE, susceptibility for breast cancer, benefits of BSE, health motivation 1 (general health), seriousness 1 (fear of breast cancer), confidence 2 (ability to detect size of lumps), seriousness 2 (fear of long-term effects of breast cancer), health motivation 2 (preventive health practice), and confidence 3 (ability to perform BSE correctly). For CBE and mammography scales, seven factors each were identified. Factors for CBE scale include susceptibility, health motivation 1, benefits of CBE, seriousness 1, barriers of CBE, seriousness 2 and health motivation 2. For mammography the scale includes benefits of mammography, susceptibility, health motivation 1, seriousness 1, barriers to mammography seriousness 2 and health

  9. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  10. Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Models Mimic Hallmarks of Size-Induced Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and, consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates ("microtumors") of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150-600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes, such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity, and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor-positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3732-43. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Nursing Approach Based on Roy Adaptation Model in a Patient Undergoing Breast Conserving Surgery for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ursavaş, Figen Erol; Karayurt, Özgül; İşeri, Özge

    2014-01-01

    The use of models in nursing provides nurses to focus on the role of nursing and its applications rather than medical practice. In addition, it helps patient care to be systematic, purposeful, controlled and effective. One of the commonly used models in nursing is Roy Adaptation Model. According to Roy adaptation model, the aim of nursing is to increase compliance and life expectancy. Roy Adaptation Model evaluates the patient in physiologic mode, self-concept mode, role function mode and interdependence mode aiming to provide holistic care. This article describes the use of Roy Adaptation Model in the care of a patient who has been diagnosed with breast cancer and had breast-conserving surgery. Patient data was evaluated in the four modes of Roy adaptation model (physiologic, self-concept, role function, and interdependence modes) and the nursing process was applied.

  12. Modeling of electrical impedance tomography to detect breast cancer by finite volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, K.; Wibowo, R. A.; Soelistiono, S.

    2017-05-01

    The properties of the electrical impedance of tissue are an interesting study, because changes of the electrical impedance of organs are related to physiological and pathological. Both physiological and pathological properties are strongly associated with disease information. Several experiments shown that the breast cancer has a lower impedance than the normal breast tissue. Thus, the imaging based on impedance can be used as an alternative equipment to detect the breast cancer. This research carries out by modelling of Electrical Impedance Tomography to detect the breast cancer by finite volume methods. The research includes development of a mathematical model of the electric potential field by 2D Finite Volume Method, solving the forward problem and inverse problem by linear reconstruction method. The scanning is done by 16 channel electrode with neighbors method to collect data. The scanning is performed at a frequency of 10 kHz and 100 kHz with three objects numeric includes an anomaly at the surface, an anomaly at the depth and an anomaly at the surface and at depth. The simulation has been successfully to reconstruct image of functional anomalies of the breast cancer at the surface position, the depth position or a combination of surface and the depth.

  13. The selective estrogen receptor downregulator GDC-0810 is efficacious in diverse models of ER+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Joseph, James D; Darimont, Beatrice; Zhou, Wei; Arrazate, Alfonso; Young, Amy; Ingalla, Ellen; Walter, Kimberly; Blake, Robert A; Nonomiya, Jim; Guan, Zhengyu; Kategaya, Lorna; Govek, Steven P; Lai, Andiliy G; Kahraman, Mehmet; Brigham, Dan; Sensintaffar, John; Lu, Nhin; Shao, Gang; Qian, Jing; Grillot, Kate; Moon, Michael; Prudente, Rene; Bischoff, Eric; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; Bonnefous, Celine; Douglas, Karensa L; Julien, Jackaline D; Nagasawa, Johnny Y; Aparicio, Anna; Kaufman, Josh; Haley, Benjamin; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Wertz, Ingrid E; Lackner, Mark R; Nannini, Michelle A; Sampath, Deepak; Schwarz, Luis; Manning, Henry Charles; Tantawy, Mohammed Noor; Arteaga, Carlos L; Heyman, Richard A; Rix, Peter J; Friedman, Lori; Smith, Nicholas D; Metcalfe, Ciara; Hager, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-13

    ER-targeted therapeutics provide valuable treatment options for patients with ER+ breast cancer, however, current relapse and mortality rates emphasize the need for improved therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of prevalent ESR1 mutations in relapsed tumors underscores a sustained reliance of advanced tumors on ERα signaling, and provides a strong rationale for continued targeting of ERα. Here we describe GDC-0810, a novel, non-steroidal, orally bioavailable selective ER downregulator (SERD), which was identified by prospectively optimizing ERα degradation, antagonism and pharmacokinetic properties. GDC-0810 induces a distinct ERα conformation, relative to that induced by currently approved therapeutics, suggesting a unique mechanism of action. GDC-0810 has robust in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of human breast cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts, including a tamoxifen-resistant model and those that harbor ERα mutations. GDC-0810 is currently being evaluated in Phase II clinical studies in women with ER+ breast cancer.

  14. Cure frailty models for survival data: application to recurrences for breast cancer and to hospital readmissions for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Virginie; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Corbière, Fabien; Gonzalez, Juan R; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone

    2013-06-01

    Owing to the natural evolution of a disease, several events often arise after a first treatment for the same subject. For example, patients with a primary invasive breast cancer and treated with breast conserving surgery may experience breast cancer recurrences, metastases or death. A certain proportion of subjects in the population who are not expected to experience the events of interest are considered to be 'cured' or non-susceptible. To model correlated failure time data incorporating a surviving fraction, we compare several forms of cure rate frailty models. In the first model already proposed non-susceptible patients are those who are not expected to experience the event of interest over a sufficiently long period of time. The other proposed models account for the possibility of cure after each event. We illustrate the cure frailty models with two data sets. First to analyse time-dependent prognostic factors associated with breast cancer recurrences, metastases, new primary malignancy and death. Second to analyse successive rehospitalizations of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Estimates were obtained by maximization of likelihood using SAS proc NLMIXED for a piecewise constant hazards model. As opposed to the simple frailty model, the proposed methods demonstrate great potential in modelling multivariate survival data with long-term survivors ('cured' individuals).

  15. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    obtained breast specimens from breast cancer patients treated with endocrine therapy (or not, i.e., surgery and radiation only in selected...motility in vitro (Hiscox et al., 2006). In models of lung cancer and CML, Dasatinib can reduce AKT activity and expression of the prosurvival protein...measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferse-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining (Wedam et al., 2006). In an in vitro model of lung

  16. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  17. Estrogen Metabolism and Exposure in a Genotypic-Phenotypic Model for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, Philip S.; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Dawling, Sheila; Roodi, Nady; Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Plummer, W. Dale; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Dupont, William D.; Parl, Fritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current models of breast cancer risk prediction do not directly reflect mammary estrogen metabolism or genetic variability in exposure to carcinogenic estrogen metabolites. Methods We developed a model that simulates the kinetic effect of genetic variants of the enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and COMT on the production of the main carcinogenic estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), expressed as area under the curve metric (4-OHE2-AUC). The model also incorporates phenotypic factors (age, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives, family history), which plausibly influence estrogen metabolism and the production of 4-OHE2. We applied the model to two independent, population-based breast cancer case-control groups, the German GENICA study (967 cases, 971 controls) and the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 465 cases, 885 controls). Results In the GENICA study, premenopausal women at the 90th percentile of 4-OHE2-AUC among control subjects had a risk of breast cancer that was 2.30 times that of women at the 10th control 4-OHE2-AUC percentile (95% CI 1.7 – 3.2, P = 2.9 × 10−7). This relative risk was 1.89 (95% CI 1.5 – 2.4, P = 2.2 × 10−8) in postmenopausal women. In the NBC, this relative risk in postmenopausal women was 1.81 (95% CI 1.3 – 2.6, P = 7.6 × 10−4), which increased to 1.83 (95% CI 1.4 – 2.3, P = 9.5 × 10−7) when a history of proliferative breast disease was included in the model. Conclusions The model combines genotypic and phenotypic factors involved in carcinogenic estrogen metabolite production and cumulative estrogen exposure to predict breast cancer risk. Impact The estrogen carcinogenesis-based model has the potential to provide personalized risk estimates. PMID:21610218

  18. An Integrated Model of the Transcriptome of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Necela, Brian M.; Tang, Xiaojia; Thompson, Kevin J.; Lau, Melissa; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Anderson, S. Keith; Sun, Zhifu; Baheti, Saurabh; Carr, Jennifer M.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Barman, Poulami; Radisky, Derek C.; Joseph, Richard W.; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; Chai, High-seng; Camille, Stephan; Rossell, David; Asmann, Yan W.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Perez, Edith A.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal in these analyses was to use genomic features from a test set of primary breast tumors to build an integrated transcriptome landscape model that makes relevant hypothetical predictions about the biological and/or clinical behavior of HER2-positive breast cancer. We interrogated RNA-Seq data from benign breast lesions, ER+, triple negative, and HER2-positive tumors to identify 685 differentially expressed genes, 102 alternatively spliced genes, and 303 genes that expressed single nucleotide sequence variants (eSNVs) that were associated with the HER2-positive tumors in our survey panel. These features were integrated into a transcriptome landscape model that identified 12 highly interconnected genomic modules, each of which represents a cellular processes pathway that appears to define the genomic architecture of the HER2-positive tumors in our test set. The generality of the model was confirmed by the observation that several key pathways were enriched in HER2-positive TCGA breast tumors. The ability of this model to make relevant predictions about the biology of breast cancer cells was established by the observation that integrin signaling was linked to lapatinib sensitivity in vitro and strongly associated with risk of relapse in the NCCTG N9831 adjuvant trastuzumab clinical trial dataset. Additional modules from the HER2 transcriptome model, including ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, TGF-beta signaling, RHO-family GTPase signaling, and M-phase progression, were linked to response to lapatinib and paclitaxel in vitro and/or risk of relapse in the N9831 dataset. These data indicate that an integrated transcriptome landscape model derived from a test set of HER2-positive breast tumors has potential for predicting outcome and for identifying novel potential therapeutic strategies for this breast cancer subtype. PMID:24223926

  19. Determining the main risk factors and high-risk groups of breast cancer using a predictive model for breast cancer risk assessment in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; You, Chunghee; Lee, Dong-Suk; Han, Wonshik; Choe, Kuk-Jin; Noh, Dong-Young

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing a predictive model for assessing the breast cancer risk of Korean women under the assumption of differences in the risk factors between Westerners and Koreans. The cohort comprised 384 breast cancer patients and 2 control groups: one comprising 166 hospitalized patients and the other comprising 104 nurses and teachers. Two initial models were produced by comparing cases and the 2 control groups, and the final equations were established by selecting highly significant variables of the initial models to test the accuracy of the models in terms of disease probability and predictability. Both the initial models and the final disease-probability models were confirmed to exhibit high degrees of accuracy and predictability. Major risk factors determined by comparing the patients with hospitalized controls were a family history, menstrual regularity, total menstrual duration, age at first full-term pregnancy, and duration of breastfeeding. Major risk factors determined by comparing patients with nurse/teacher controls were age, education level, menstrual regularity, drinking status, and smoking status. The predictive model developed here shows that risk factors for breast cancer differ between Korean and Western subjects in the aspect of breastfeeding behavior. However, identifying the relationship between genetic susceptibility and breast cancer will require further studies with larger samples. In a model with nurse/teacher controls, drinking and higher education were found to be protective variables, whereas smoking was a risk factor. Hence the predictive model in this group could not be generalized to the Korean population; instead, breast cancer incidence needs to be compared among nurses and teachers in a nurse-and-teacher cohort.

  20. Multiple functions of CXCL12 in a syngeneic model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A growing body of work implicates chemokines, in particular CXCL12 and its receptors, in the progression and site-specific metastasis of various cancers, including breast cancer. Various agents have been used to block the CXCL12-CXCR4 interaction as a means of inhibiting cancer metastasis. However, as a potent chemotactic factor for leukocytes, CXCL12 also has the potential to enhance anti-cancer immunity. To further elucidate its role in breast cancer progression, CXCL12 and its antagonist CXCL12(P2G) were overexpressed in the syngeneic 4T1.2 mouse model of breast carcinoma. Results While expression of CXCL12(P2G) significantly inhibited metastasis, expression of wild-type CXCL12 potently inhibited both metastasis and primary tumor growth. The effects of wild-type CXCL12 were attributed to an immune response characterized by the induction of CD8+ T cell activity, enhanced cell-mediated cytotoxicity, increased numbers of CD11c+ cells in the tumor-draining lymph nodes and reduced accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the spleen. Conclusions This study highlights the need to consider carefully therapeutic strategies that block CXCL12 signaling. Therapies that boost CXCL12 levels at the primary tumor site may prove more effective in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:20849618

  1. Interdependence in Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partners: An Interindividual Model of Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorros, Sam M.; Card, Noel A.; Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to test whether interdependence in dyads living with breast cancer could account for person-partner crossover effects in distress outcomes. Method: The sample consisted of 95 dyads with early-stage breast cancer. By using reciprocal dyadic data from women with breast cancer and their partners, we fit a…

  2. Interdependence in Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partners: An Interindividual Model of Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorros, Sam M.; Card, Noel A.; Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to test whether interdependence in dyads living with breast cancer could account for person-partner crossover effects in distress outcomes. Method: The sample consisted of 95 dyads with early-stage breast cancer. By using reciprocal dyadic data from women with breast cancer and their partners, we fit a…

  3. An in vitro 3D model using collagen coated gelatin nanofibers for studying breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Janani, G; Pillai, Mamatha M; Selvakumar, R; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Sabarinath, C

    2017-02-07

    The study of breast cancer metastasis is limited due to poor knowledge of molecular progression of breast tumor and varied heterogeneity. For a better understanding of tumor metastasis, a reliable 3D in vitro model bridging the gap between 2D cultures and in vivo animal model studies is essential. Our study is focused on two key points: (i) designing a 3D microenvironment for studying metastasis and (ii) simulating the metastasis milieu by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). An electrospun gelatin nanofiber matrix (EGNF) was fabricated using electrospinning and further dip coated with different concentrations of collagen to obtain surface complexity and mechanical properties, similar to connective tissues. Nanofiber matrices were physically characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The FTIR, AFM, and FESEM results indicated the crosslinking and confirmed the presence of pores in the nanofiber matrices. Comparative studies on biocompatibility, cell attachment, and the proliferation of MCF-7 cells on EGNF and collagen coated gelatin nanofibrous matrix (CCGM) revealed higher cellular attachment and proliferation in CCGM. CCGM with human metastatic breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) was taken to study breast cancer metastasis using estrogen (induces EMT) and progesterone (induces MET) hormones for 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was used for quantifying the expression of metastasis related genes, and fluorescence microscopy for verifying the invasion of cells to the matrices. The expression of E-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) confirmed the occurrence of EMT and MET. Live cell imaging and cellular attachment showed significant increase of cellular invasion in crosslinked 0.15% CCGM that serves as a suitable non-toxic, biocompatible, and affordable scaffold for studying breast cancer

  4. A Threshold Model of Social Support, Adjustment, and Distress after Breast Cancer Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Armer, Jane M.; Heppner, P. Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a threshold model that proposes that social support exhibits a curvilinear association with adjustment and distress, such that support in excess of a critical threshold level has decreasing incremental benefits. Women diagnosed with a first occurrence of breast cancer (N = 154) completed survey measures of perceived support…

  5. Internal mammary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer: predictive models to assist with prognostic influence.

    PubMed

    Noushi, F; Spillane, A J; Uren, R F; Gebski, V

    2011-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer in the internal mammary nodes (IMN) indicates a poor prognosis. Several recent epidemiological surveys have determined a reduction in survival for patients with medial compared to lateral sector tumors attributing this to a higher rate of unrecognized IMN metastasis and hence these patients are undertreated with adjuvant therapy.(1-6) Through mathematical modeling based on large datasets we aim to quantify the impact on survival of IMN metastases at different tumor and axillary stages. Mathematical models were created to estimate the survival of patients with and without IMN metastasis. It was assumed that the different rate of survival between medial and lateral sector breast cancers was a result of the differential rate of unrecognized IMN metastases with resultant under-staging and under treatment. We applied these models on a retrospective database analysis from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) registries from 1994 to 2003. The 10-year odds of death (OOD) from breast cancer for patients with medial compared with lateral sector tumors ranged from 1.2 to 1.5 depending on stage. The predicted odds of breast cancer death for patients with unrecognized IMN metastases ranged from 2.4 to 20, with the highest OOD in the groups with small tumors and no axillary node metastasis. Through modeling we have been able to predict and quantify the significantly worse survival outcomes for patients with undiagnosed IMN metastasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  7. A Threshold Model of Social Support, Adjustment, and Distress after Breast Cancer Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Armer, Jane M.; Heppner, P. Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a threshold model that proposes that social support exhibits a curvilinear association with adjustment and distress, such that support in excess of a critical threshold level has decreasing incremental benefits. Women diagnosed with a first occurrence of breast cancer (N = 154) completed survey measures of perceived support…

  8. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  9. Developing a utility decision framework to evaluate predictive models in breast cancer risk estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Chen, Xianqiao; Liu, Jie; Page, David C.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Combining imaging and genetic information to predict disease presence and progression is being codified into an emerging discipline called “radiogenomics.” Optimal evaluation methodologies for radiogenomics have not been well established. We aim to develop a decision framework based on utility analysis to assess predictive models for breast cancer diagnosis. We garnered Gail risk factors, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and mammographic features from a retrospective case-control study. We constructed three logistic regression models built on different sets of predictive features: (1) Gail, (2) Gail + Mammo, and (3) Gail + Mammo + SNP. Then we generated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for three models. After we assigned utility values for each category of outcomes (true negatives, false positives, false negatives, and true positives), we pursued optimal operating points on ROC curves to achieve maximum expected utility of breast cancer diagnosis. We performed McNemar’s test based on threshold levels at optimal operating points, and found that SNPs and mammographic features played a significant role in breast cancer risk estimation. Our study comprising utility analysis and McNemar’s test provides a decision framework to evaluate predictive models in breast cancer risk estimation. PMID:26835489

  10. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-04-21

    When trying to explore the biology and etiology of human cancers, clinically relevant human culture models are essential. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. Here, we suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accurate interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context.

  11. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant human culture models are essential for developing effective therapies and exploring the biology and etiology of human cancers. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. We suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accurate interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context. PMID:25896888

  12. Joint modelling of longitudinal CEA tumour marker progression and survival data on breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Ana; Sousa, Inês; Castro, Luis

    2017-06-01

    This work proposes the use of Biostatistics methods to study breast cancer in patients of Braga's Hospital Senology Unit, located in Portugal. The primary motivation is to contribute to the understanding of the progression of breast cancer, within the Portuguese population, using a more complex statistical model assumptions than the traditional analysis that take into account a possible existence of a serial correlation structure within a same subject observations. We aim to infer which risk factors aect the survival of Braga's Hospital patients, diagnosed with breast tumour. Whilst analysing risk factors that aect a tumour markers used on the surveillance of disease progression the Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). As survival and longitudinal processes may be associated, it is important to model these two processes together. Hence, a joint modelling of these two processes to infer on the association of these was conducted. A data set of 540 patients, along with 50 variables, was collected from medical records of the Hospital. A joint model approach was used to analyse these data. Two dierent joint models were applied to the same data set, with dierent parameterizations which give dierent interpretations to model parameters. These were used by convenience as the ones implemented in R software. Results from the two models were compared. Results from joint models, showed that the longitudinal CEA values were signicantly associated with the survival probability of these patients. A comparison between parameter estimates obtained in this analysis and previous independent survival[4] and longitudinal analysis[5][6], lead us to conclude that independent analysis brings up bias parameter estimates. Hence, an assumption of association between the two processes in a joint model of breast cancer data is necessary. Results indicate that the longitudinal progression of CEA is signicantly associated with the probability of survival of these patients. Hence, an assumption of

  13. Three-dimensional breast cancer models mimic hallmarks of size-induced tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates (“microtumors”) of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150–600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. PMID:27216179

  14. An Improved Syngeneic Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Methods Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous injection in the area of the nipple (OP), or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Results ODV produced less variable sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. Conclusions ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development. PMID:25200444

  15. Imaging exosome transfer from breast cancer cells to stroma at metastatic sites in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Honma, Kimi; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Ochiya, Takahiro; Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-03-01

    Exosomes play an important role in cell-to-cell communication to promote tumor metastasis. In order to image the fate of cancer-cell-derived exosomes in orthotopic nude mouse models of breast cancer, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged CD63, which is a general marker of exosomes. Breast cancer cells transferred their own exosomes to other cancer cells and normal lung tissue cells in culture. In orthotopic nude-mouse models, breast cancer cells secreted exosomes into the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-derived exosomes were incorporated into tumor-associated cells as well as circulating in the blood of mice with breast cancer metastases. These results suggest that tumor-derived exosomes may contribute to forming a niche to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of GFP imaging to investigate the role of exosomes in cancer metastasis.

  16. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Statistical modelling of breast cancer incidence and mortality rates in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Robertson, C; Boyle, P

    1997-01-01

    The interpretation of time trends in disease rates can be facilitated using estimable contrasts from age-period-cohort models. Cohort and period trends in breast cancer incidence and mortality rates in Scotland were investigated using contrasts that measure the changes in the linear trends. These contrasts were compared with estimates obtained from mortality rates in the USA and Japan. A significant moderation of both breast cancer incidence and mortality rates was observed in Scotland, associated with cohorts of women born after the Second World War compared with women born between the two world wars. The moderation of breast cancer mortality among cohorts born after 1925 compared with cohorts born before 1925 that was observed in the USA and Japan was also observed in this study. This moderation is not present in the incidence rates. The relative decline in the risk of breast cancer seen in younger cohorts seems to be contradictory to the temporal pattern present among breast cancer risk factors. It may well be that the alteration of eating patterns as a result of rationing in the wartime and immediate post-war period, and the subsequent influence on certain breast cancer risk factors probably produced by such changes, may have had some influence on the development of healthier girls and women. Such speculation could be addressed in a well-designed epidemiological study. There have been no changes in the mortality rate trends with period in Scotland, although the changes in the incidence rate trends with period are consistent with an increase in registration coverage.

  18. Revealing the Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and in Silico Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Agne Tarasevicuite...Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH... cancer development and progression, yet its role in this disease remains obscure. To investigate the effects of stromal TN-C on normal human mammary

  19. The Impact of Autologous Fat Grafting on Breast Cancer: An Experimental Model Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Millet, Eran; Haik, Josef; Ofir, Elad; Mardor, Yael; Winkler, Eyal; Harats, Moti; Tessone, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    Although fat grafting is a common technique to repair defects after breast cancer reconstruction surgery and has a low complication rate, the relation between fat grafting and the risk of breast cancer is unknown. Clinical trials to investigate this connection can elucidate the benefits and potential risks of fat grafting in oncology patients. To establish an efficient experimental model, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, for comparing different breast tumor study groups post-fat grafting. Breast tumor cells were injected into immunocompromised mice. After tumors formed they were removed. Liposuction was performed in a female human donor and fat was collected. Cells were extracted from the fat by enzymatic digestion. Immunocompromised mice were randomized into four groups: a preliminary experiment group and three equal groups according to the type of fat graft: (i) fresh fat enriched with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs), (ii) fresh fat without cell enrichment, and (iii) no fat injected. Tumor volume was assessed by serial MRI scans. The rate of tumor growth was higher in the enriched fat group compared to the non-enriched fat group. This experimental model is an effective measurable method, allowing future investigation of the effect of autologous fat on breast cancer.

  20. Breast cancer risk assessment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shannon Lynn; Kartoz, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer (when excluding skin cancers) in women and the second most common cause of cancer death in women, with a lifetime prevalence of 12.5% (, ; ). Breast cancer screening reduces risk of cancer death, thereby increasing rate of survival to up to 89% for women with stage 1 and 2 breast cancer (; ). Despite these data, undue harm may occur with unnecessary screening because overidentification of risk, and excessive, costly biopsies may result. Costs and benefits of screening must be weighed. Nurses at all levels can play a pivotal role in promotion of appropriate breast cancer screening and subsequently breast cancer prevention by using accurate screening tools, such as the Tyrer-Cuzick model. Although there are some limitations with this tool, screening at the primary care level has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes (). Its use can help nurses accurately assess a woman's breast cancer risk, by promoting appropriate screening at the primary care level ().

  1. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population.

  2. Multiparametric Spectroscopic Photoacoustic Imaging of Breast Cancer Development in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential of multiparametric spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging using oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin, and lipid content to differentiate among four different breast histologies (normal, hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive breast carcinoma) in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer development. Materials and Methods: Animal studies were approved by the Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care. Mammary glands (n=251) of a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer development (FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul) were imaged using B-mode ultrasound and spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging, analyzed for oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin, and lipid content, and processed for histological analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, two-sample t-tests, logistic regression, and ROC analysis. Results: Eighty-two normal, 12 hyperplastic, 96 DCIS, and 61 invasive breast carcinoma mammary glands were analyzed. Based on spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging, the oxygen saturation of hyperplasia (50.6%), DCIS (43.0%), and invasive carcinoma (46.2%) significantly increased compared to normal glands (35.5%, P <0.0001), while both total hemoglobin (P<0.01), and lipid content (P<0.0008) significantly decreased with advancing histology. In differentiating normal and hyperplasia from DCIS and invasive breast carcinoma, multiparametric imaging of oxygen saturation, lipid content, and raw photoacoustic signal at 750 nm provided an AUC value of 0.770. Conclusion: Multiparametric spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging is feasible and allows detection of differences in concentration of tissue chromophores among different histologies in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer development. PMID:25285161

  3. A Portal Vein Injection Model to Study Liver Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Erica T.; Fischer, Jacob; Schedin, Pepper

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide. Liver metastasis is involved in upwards of 30% of cases with breast cancer metastasis, and results in poor outcomes with median survival rates of only 4.8 - 15 months. Current rodent models of breast cancer metastasis, including primary tumor cell xenograft and spontaneous tumor models, rarely metastasize to the liver. Intracardiac and intrasplenic injection models do result in liver metastases, however these models can be confounded by concomitant secondary-site metastasis, or by compromised immunity due to removal of the spleen to avoid tumor growth at the injection site. To address the need for improved liver metastasis models, a murine portal vein injection method that delivers tumor cells firstly and directly to the liver was developed. This model delivers tumor cells to the liver without complications of concurrent metastases in other organs or removal of the spleen. The optimized portal vein protocol employs small injection volumes of 5 - 10 μl, ≥ 32 gauge needles, and hemostatic gauze at the injection site to control for blood loss. The portal vein injection approach in Balb/c female mice using three syngeneic mammary tumor lines of varying metastatic potential was tested; high-metastatic 4T1 cells, moderate-metastatic D2A1 cells, and low-metastatic D2.OR cells. Concentrations of ≤ 10,000 cells/injection results in a latency of ~ 20 - 40 days for development of liver metastases with the higher metastatic 4T1 and D2A1 lines, and > 55 days for the less aggressive D2.OR line. This model represents an important tool to study breast cancer metastasis to the liver, and may be applicable to other cancers that frequently metastasize to the liver including colorectal and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:28060292

  4. Modeling vitamin D actions in triple negative/basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    LaPorta, Erika; Welsh, JoEllen

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with six molecularly defined subtypes, the most aggressive of which are triple negative breast cancers that lack expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) and do not exhibit amplification of the growth factor receptor HER2. Triple negative breast cancers often exhibit basal-like gene signatures and are enriched for CD44+ cancer stem cells. In this report we have characterized the molecular actions of the VDR in a model of triple negative breast cancer. Estrogen independent, invasive mammary tumor cell lines established from wild-type (WT) and VDR knockout (VDRKO) mice were used to demonstrate that VDR is necessary for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) mediated anti-cancer actions in vitro and to identify novel targets of this receptor. Western blotting confirmed differential VDR expression and demonstrated the lack of ER, PR and Her2 in these cell lines. Re-introduction of human VDR (hVDR) into VDRKO cells restored the anti-proliferative actions of 1,25D. Genomic profiling demonstrated that 1,25D failed to alter gene expression in KO240 cells whereas major changes were observed in WT145 cells and in KO clones stably expressing hVDR (KO(hVDR) cells). With a 2-fold cutoff, 117 transcripts in WT145 cells and 197 transcripts in the KO(hVDR) clones were significantly altered by 1,25D. Thirty-five genes were found to be commonly regulated by 1,25D in all VDR-positive cell lines. Of these, we identified a cohort of four genes (Plau, Hbegf, Postn, Has2) that are known to drive breast cancer invasion and metastasis whose expression was markedly down regulated by 1,25D. These data support a model whereby 1,25D coordinately suppresses multiple proteins that are required for survival of triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer cells. Since studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in women with basal-like breast cancer, correction of vitamin D deficiency in these women represents a

  5. Model Development of Illness Perception and Consequences in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, L; Lotfi Kashani, F; Akbari, S; Akbari, M E; Sarafraz Mehr, S

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the first or second malignancy among women worldwide. Illness perception (IP) and quality of life (QoL) are major issues considering breast cancer management. An attempt was here made to inspect the predictive variables influencing IP and their impact on QoL in cancer patients. The key predictors adapted from previous studies including life satisfaction, perceived social support, self-esteem, hope, optimism, and spiritual well being were taken into account. Our sample included 200 female volunteers suffering from breast cancer applying exclusion criteria. The data were collected using various questionnaires and statistically analyzed by means of path analysis and structural equation modeling. The results revealed that of the six predictors, spiritual well being and social support had direct effects on QoL and IP. The only path with significant indirect correlation with IP was social support. Spiritual well being had the second significant direct effect on IP. Self-esteem occupied the third rank in direct effects on both QoL and IP. In conclusion, here in Iran and most likely in other strongly religious communities, spiritual intervention is an effective strategy to raise QoL. Also social support helps women suffering from breast cancer to experience better conception and coping strategies.

  6. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  7. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  8. Estimating the prevalence of breast cancer using a disease model: data problems and trends.

    PubMed

    Kruijshaar, Michelle E; Barendregt, Jan J; Van De Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2003-04-14

    BACKGROUND: Health policy and planning depend on quantitative data of disease epidemiology. However, empirical data are often incomplete or are of questionable validity. Disease models describing the relationship between incidence, prevalence and mortality are used to detect data problems or supplement missing data. Because time trends in the data affect their outcome, we compared the extent to which trends and known data problems affected model outcome for breast cancer. METHODS: We calculated breast cancer prevalence from Dutch incidence and mortality data (the Netherlands Cancer Registry and Statistics Netherlands) and compared this to regionally available prevalence data (Eindhoven Cancer Registry, IKZ). Subsequently, we recalculated the model adjusting for 1) limitations of the prevalence data, 2) a trend in incidence, 3) secondary primaries, and 4) excess mortality due to non-breast cancer deaths. RESULTS: There was a large discrepancy between calculated and IKZ prevalence, which could be explained for 60% by the limitations of the prevalence data plus the trend in incidence. Secondary primaries and excess mortality had relatively small effects only (explaining 17% and 6%, respectively), leaving a smaller part of the difference unexplained. CONCLUSION: IPM models can be useful both for checking data inconsistencies and for supplementing incomplete data, but their results should be interpreted with caution. Unknown data problems and trends may affect the outcome and in the absence of additional data, expert opinion is the only available judge.

  9. Protective Effect of Perindopril on Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis in Animal Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Snehal S; Nakka, Surender

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that the renin angiotensin system via angiogenesis is involved in tumor development. Therefore, objective of the present study was to examine the effect of perindopril on tumor growth and angiogenesis in animal models of breast cancer. In the present study, the effect of perindopril on tumor development of mammary gland cancer induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, mouse tumor xenograft and corneal micropocket model has been investigated. Anti-angiogenic effect by chick yolk sac membrane assay has also been studied. In the present study, it has been found that perindopril produced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, in DMBA induced breast cancer. Treatment also produced significant suppression of cancer biomarkers such as lactate dehydrogenase, gamma glutamyl transferase and inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Histopathological analysis also showed that perindopril was able to inhibit tumor development by the inhibition of hyperplastic lesions. Perindopril produced significant inhibition of tumor growth, in a mouse xenograft model and caused inhibition of neovascularization in the corneal micropocket model. In chick yolk sac membrane assay, perindopril showed inhibition of vascular growth and reduced blood vessel formation. Therefore, perindopril is widely used in clinical practice, may represent a neo-adjuvant therapy for treatment of breast cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Study on mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer: association between higher parity and triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Baocun; Li, Man; Zhao, Xiulan; Gu, Yanjun; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Yan

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between high parity and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and explore the etiologic mechanisms of TNBC in Tientsin Albinao 2 (TA2) mice model. After the TA2 mice model with high parity and TNBC had been established, the cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by immunohistochemical and TUNEL staining in mammary epithelia from different conditions, which included non-pregnancy, low and high gravidity in pregnancy, and carcinogenesis. Apoptotic signaling was analyzed by measuring bcl-2, bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot, and real-time PCR technique. Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) were determined by immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR. Both proliferation and apoptosis in mammary epithelia changed with the increasing of parity. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased cell proliferation and apoptosis were related with upregulation of ERα, PR, bcl-2, bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 expression, especially during the fourth pregnancy. Mammary gland in the fourth pregnancy stage was the closest to precancerous. In precancerous mammary gland, cell proliferation rate was much higher than apoptosis rate. High parity could increase the ovarian hormones level and alter ovarian hormone receptor levels in TA2 mice, and their sensitivity to ovarian hormones result in the imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis in precancerous mammary epithelial cells.

  11. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  12. Global breast cancer seasonality.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Nawaz, Hamayun; Yang, Chul-Ho; Wood, Patricia A; Hrushesky, William J M

    2010-08-01

    Human breast cancer incidence has seasonal patterns that seem to vary among global populations. The aggregate monthly frequency of breast cancer diagnosis was collected and examined for 2,921,714 breast cancer cases diagnosed across 64 global regions over spans from 2 to 53 years. Breast cancer is consistently diagnosed more often in spring and fall, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, regardless of presumable menopausal status (50). This seasonality is increasingly more prominent as population distance from the equator increases and this latitude dependence is most pronounced among women living in rural areas. Moreover, the overall annual incidence (2005-2006), per 100,000 population, of breast cancer increased as the latitude of population residence increased. These data make it clear that human breast cancer discovery occurs non-randomly throughout each year with peaks near both equinoxes and valleys near both solstices. This stable global breast cancer seasonality has implications for better prevention, more accurate screening, earlier diagnosis, and more effective treatment. This complex latitude-dependent breast cancer seasonality is clearly related to predictable local day/night length changes which occur seasonally. Its mechanism may depend upon seasonal sunlight mediation of vitamin D and seasonal mediation of nocturnal melatonin peak level and duration.

  13. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread outside the breast . In stage IB , small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ... centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 ...

  16. Minimal elastographic modeling of breast cancer for model based tumor detection in a digital image elasto tomography (DIET) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Thomas F.; Muller, Natalie; Hann, Christopher E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Digital Image Elasto Tomography (DIET) is a non-invasive breast cancer screening technology that images the surface motion of a breast under harmonic mechanical actuation. A new approach capturing the dynamics and characteristics of tumor behavior is presented. A simple mechanical model of the breast is used to identify a transfer function relating the input harmonic actuation to the output surface displacements using imaging data of a silicone phantom. Areas of higher stiffness cause significant changes of damping and resonant frequencies as seen in the resulting Bode plots. A case study on a healthy and tumor silicone breast phantom shows the potential for this model-based method to clearly distinguish cancerous and healthy tissue as well as correctly predicting the tumor position.

  17. Earlier detection of breast cancer with ultrasound molecular imaging in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Lutz, Amelie M; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-03-15

    While there is an increasing role of ultrasound for breast cancer screening in patients with dense breast, conventional anatomical ultrasound lacks sensitivity and specificity for early breast cancer detection. In this study, we assessed the potential of ultrasound molecular imaging using clinically translatable vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2)-targeted microbubbles (MB(VEGFR2)) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in earlier detection of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a transgenic mouse model [FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul]. In vivo binding specificity studies (n = 26 tumors) showed that ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P < 0.001) using MB(VEGFR2) than nontargeted microbubbles and imaging signal significantly decreased (P < 0.001) by blocking antibodies. Ultrasound molecular imaging signal significantly increased (P < 0.001) when breast tissue (n = 315 glands) progressed from normal [1.65 ± 0.17 arbitrary units (a.u.)] to hyperplasia (4.21 ± 1.16), DCIS (15.95 ± 1.31), and invasive cancer (78.1 ± 6.31) and highly correlated with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression [R(2) = 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-0.91; P < 0.001]. At an imaging signal threshold of 4.6 a.u., ultrasound molecular imaging differentiated benign from malignant entities with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI, 78-88) and specificity of 89% (95% CI, 81-94). In a prospective screening trail (n = 63 glands), diagnostic performance of detecting DCIS and breast cancer was assessed and two independent readers correctly diagnosed malignant disease in more than 95% of cases and highly agreed between each other [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.98; 95% CI, 97-99]. These results suggest that VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging allows highly accurate detection of DCIS and breast cancer in transgenic mice and may be a promising approach for early breast cancer detection in women.

  18. Breast cancer: origins and evolution.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-11-01

    Breast cancer is not a single disease, but rather is composed of distinct subtypes associated with different clinical outcomes. Understanding this heterogeneity is key for the development of targeted cancer-preventative and -therapeutic interventions. Current models explaining inter- and intratumoral diversity are the cancer stem cell and the clonal evolution hypotheses. Although tumor initiation and progression are predominantly driven by acquired genetic alterations, recent data implicate a role for microenvironmental and epigenetic changes as well. Comprehensive unbiased studies of tumors and patient populations have significantly advanced our molecular understanding of breast cancer, but translating these findings into clinical practice remains a challenge.

  19. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  20. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk: 2003 Workshop In February 2003, the National ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  1. Breast cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Wendy; Stout, Steven C; Miller, Andrew H; Musselman, Dominique

    2004-07-01

    Major depression and depressive symptoms, although commonly encountered in patients with medical illnesses, are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated in women with breast cancer. Depression and its associated symptoms diminish quality of life, adversely affect compliance with medical therapies, and reduce survival. Treatment of depression in women with breast cancer improves their dysphoria and other depressive symptoms, enhances quality of life, and may increase longevity. In this review, studies that investigate pathophysiologic alterations in patients with cancer and comorbid depression are discussed, and the few studies on treatment of depression and related symptoms in women with breast cancer are examined.

  2. Interdependence in Women with Breast Cancer and their Partners: An Inter-Individual Model of Distress

    PubMed Central

    Dorros, Sam M.; Card, Noel A.; Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this investigation was to test whether interdependence in dyads living with breast cancer could account for person-partner crossover effects in distress outcomes. Method The sample consisted of 95 dyads with early-stage breast cancer. By using reciprocal dyadic data from women with breast cancer and their partners, we fit a structural equation model (SEM) of the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) to examine the interaction of participants’ depression and stress in predicting their partner’s health outcomes. Results Results revealed a pattern of influence whereby the interaction of high levels of depression coupled with high levels of stress in women with breast cancer was associated with lowered physical health and well-being in their partners. Although depression seemed to be the key mechanism in predicting distressing outcomes, when depression is combined with any additional stress, the level of physical distress was significantly greater. Results provided preliminary empirical support for crossover effects in the physical well-being of close relational partners in a cancer-related context. Further, results showed that distressing outcomes do not have to be limited to emotional distress, but can also include physical distress. Conclusions The findings from this study illustrate why it is not sufficient to concentrate care solely on the patient with cancer. Monitoring the social well-being of patients as they go through the cancer process could be as important as assessing their psychological state or other peripheral biomarkers. This line of inquiry would be advanced by including methods other than self-report to assess psychological and physical health. PMID:20099957

  3. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  4. Using Residential History and Groundwater Modeling to Examine Drinking Water Exposure and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Lisa G.; Webster, Thomas F.; Aschengrau, Ann; Vieira, Verónica M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spatial analyses of case–control data have suggested a possible link between breast cancer and groundwater plumes in upper Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Objective We integrated residential histories, public water distribution systems, and groundwater modeling within geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the association between exposure to drinking water that has been contaminated by wastewater effluent and breast cancer. Methods Exposure was assessed from 1947 to 1993 for 638 breast cancer cases who were diagnosed from 1983 to 1993 and 842 controls; we took into account residential mobility and drinking water source. To estimate the historical impact of effluent on drinking water wells, we modified a modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater model (MODFLOW) from the U.S. Geological Survey. The analyses included latency and exposure duration. Results Wastewater effluent impacted the drinking water wells of study participants as early as 1966. For > 0–5 years of exposure (versus no exposure), associations were generally null. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for > 10 years of exposure were slightly increased, assuming latency periods of 0 or 10 years [AOR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9–1.9 and AOR = 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.2, respectively]. Statistically significant associations were estimated for ever-exposed versus never-exposed women when a 20-year latency period was assumed (AOR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0–3.4). A sensitivity analysis that classified exposures assuming lower well-pumping rates showed similar results. Conclusion We investigated the hypothesis generated by earlier spatial analyses that exposure to drinking water contaminated by wastewater effluent may be associated with breast cancer. Using a detailed exposure assessment, we found an association with breast cancer that increased with longer latency and greater exposure duration. PMID:20164002

  5. Using residential history and groundwater modeling to examine drinking water exposure and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lisa G; Webster, Thomas F; Aschengrau, Ann; Vieira, Verónica M

    2010-06-01

    Spatial analyses of case-control data have suggested a possible link between breast cancer and groundwater plumes in upper Cape Cod, Massachusetts. We integrated residential histories, public water distribution systems, and groundwater modeling within geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the association between exposure to drinking water that has been contaminated by wastewater effluent and breast cancer. Exposure was assessed from 1947 to 1993 for 638 breast cancer cases who were diagnosed from 1983 to 1993 and 842 controls; we took into account residential mobility and drinking water source. To estimate the historical impact of effluent on drinking water wells, we modified a modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater model (MODFLOW) from the U.S. Geological Survey. The analyses included latency and exposure duration. Wastewater effluent impacted the drinking water wells of study participants as early as 1966. For > 0-5 years of exposure (versus no exposure), associations were generally null. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for > 10 years of exposure were slightly increased, assuming latency periods of 0 or 10 years [AOR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9-1.9 and AOR = 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.2, respectively]. Statistically significant associations were estimated for ever-exposed versus never-exposed women when a 20-year latency period was assumed (AOR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.4). A sensitivity analysis that classified exposures assuming lower well-pumping rates showed similar results. We investigated the hypothesis generated by earlier spatial analyses that exposure to drinking water contaminated by wastewater effluent may be associated with breast cancer. Using a detailed exposure assessment, we found an association with breast cancer that increased with longer latency and greater exposure duration.

  6. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  7. Proteome and transcriptome profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoenherr, Regine M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Lin, ChenWei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E; Amon, Lynn M; Schepmoes, Athena A; Moore, Ronald J; Camp, David G; Chodosh, Lewis A; Smith, Richard D; Nelson, Peter S; McIntosh, Martin W; Kemp, Christopher J; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2011-04-01

    We generated extensive transcriptional and proteomic profiles from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates human breast cancer. This report makes these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, we previously made biospecimens from this same mouse model freely available through a sample repository, so researchers can obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Twelve datasets are available, encompassing 841 LC-MS/MS experiments (plasma and tissues) and 255 microarray analyses of multiple tissues (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast). Cases and controls were rigorously paired to avoid bias. In total, 18,880 unique peptides were identified (PeptideProphet peptide error rate ≤1%), with 3884 and 1659 non-redundant protein groups identified in plasma and tissue datasets, respectively. Sixty-one of these protein groups overlapped between cancer plasma and cancer tissue. These data are of use for advancing our understanding of cancer biology, for software and quality control tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, and selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring-MS. The availability of these datasets will contribute positively to clinical proteomics. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, ChenWei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We generated extensive transcriptional and proteomic profiles from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates human breast cancer. This report makes these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, we previously made biospecimens from this same mouse model freely available through a sample repository, so researchers can obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Experimental design Twelve datasets are available, encompassing 841 LC-MS/MS experiments (plasma and tissues) and 255 microarray analyses of multiple tissues (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast). Cases and controls were rigorously paired to avoid bias. Results In total, 18,880 unique peptides were identified (PeptideProphet peptide error rate ≤1%), with 3884 and 1659 non-redundant protein groups identified in plasma and tissue datasets, respectively. Sixty-one of these protein groups overlapped between cancer plasma and cancer tissue. Conclusions and clinical relevance These data are of use for advancing our understanding of cancer biology, for software and quality control tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, and selection of proteotypic peptides for MRM-MS. The availability of these datasets will contribute positively to clinical proteomics. PMID:21448875

  9. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  10. Application of hazard models for patients with breast cancer in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Anet Garcia; de Oca, Néstor Arcia Montes

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid development in hazard models and survival analysis in the last decade. This article aims to assess the overall survival time of breast cancer in Cuba, as well as to determine plausible factors that may have a significant impact in the survival time. The data are obtained from the National Cancer Register of Cuba. The data set used in this study relates to 6381 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2000 and December 2002. Follow-up data are available until the end of December 2007, by which time 2167 (33.9%) had died and 4214 (66.1%) were still alive. The adequacy of six parametric models is assessed by using their Akaike information criterion values. Five of the six parametric models (Exponential, Weibull, Log-logistic, Lognormal, and Generalized Gamma) are parameterized by using the accelerated failure-time metric, and the Gompertz model is parameterized by using the proportional hazard metric. The main result in terms of survival is found for the different categories of the clinical stage covariate. The survival time among patients who have been diagnosed at early stage of breast cancer is about 60% higher than the one among patients diagnosed at more advanced stage of the disease. Differences among provinces have not been found. The age is another significant factor, but there is no important difference between patient ages. PMID:21686138

  11. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  12. Second Cancer Incidence Risk Estimates using BEIR VII Models for Standard and Complex External Beam Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, E M; James, H; Bonora, M; Yarnold, JR; Evans, PM

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy including cone beam CT verification following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Method Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated : (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) non-coplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low local cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contra-lateral breast, left and right lung, oesophagus, stomach, liver, colon and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 years according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver and bladder (< 0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB

  13. S6K1 promotes invasiveness of breast cancer cells in a model of metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Goverdhan, Aarthi; Shen, Jia; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wei, Yongkun; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of oncology-related death in US women. Of all invasive breast cancers, patients with tumors lacking expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have the poorest clinical prognosis. These referred to as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represent an aggressive form of disease that is marked by early-onset metastasis, high tumor recurrence rate, and low overall survival during the first three years post-diagnosis. In this report, we discuss a novel model of early-onset TNBC metastasis to bone and lungs, derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast cancer cells injected intravenously produced rapid, osteolytic metastases in long bones and spines of athymic nude mice, with concurrent metastasis to lungs, liver, and soft tissues. From the bone metastases, we developed a highly metastatic luciferase-tagged cell line variant named MDA-231-LUC Met. In this report, we demonstrate that the Akt/mTOR/S6K1 axis is hyperactivated in these cells, leading to a dramatic increase in phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein at Ser235/236. Lastly, we provide evidence that inhibition of the furthest downstream kinase in the mTOR pathway, S6K1, with a highly specific inhibitor PF-4708671 inhibits cell migration, and thus may provide a potent anti-metastatic adjuvant therapy approach. PMID:25075253

  14. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    which is a study of 3131 human tumor samples and cancer cell lines including 243 breast samples. Tumorscape showed that PAK1 is located in an...chromosome 11q of human tumor samples and cancer cell lines that exhibit highest level of PAK1 amplification divided according to cancer type...breast, non-small cell (NSC) lung, ovarian (Ov), small cell lung (SCL), melanoma (Mel) and esophageal squamous (Esq). PAK1 and CCND1 1oci are marked . B

  15. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  16. IMPACT OF OBESITY ON DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRESSION OF MAMMARY TUMORS IN PRECLINICAL MODELS OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Margot P.

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and/or obesity are known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. More recently increased body weight has also been associated with poor prognosis for both pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. This relationship has primarily been identified through epidemiological studies. Additional information from in vitro studies has also been produced in attempts to delineate mechanisms of action for the association of obesity and body weight and breast cancer. This approach has identified potential growth factors such as insulin, leptin, estrogen and IGF-I which are reported to be modulated by body weight changes. However, in vitro studies are limited in scope and frequently use non-physiological concentrations of growth factors, while long follow-up is needed for human studies. Preclinical animal models provide an intermediary approach to investigate the impact of body weight and potential growth factors on mammary/breast tumor development and progression. Here results of a number of studies addressing this issue are presented. In the majority of the studies either genetically-obese or diet-induced obese rodent models have been used to investigate spontaneous, transgenic and carcinogen-induced mammary tumor development. To study tumor progression the major focus has been allograft studies in mice with either genetic or dietary-induced obesity. In general, obesity has been demonstrated to shorten mammary tumor latency and to impact tumor pathology. However, in rodents with defects in leptin and other growth factors the impact of obesity is not as straightforward. Future studies using more physiologically relevant obesity models and clearly distinguishing diet composition from body weight effects will be important in continuing to understand the factors associated with body weight’s impact on the mammary/breast cancer development and progression. PMID:24122258

  17. A Model for Diagnosing Breast Cancerous Tissue from Thermal Images Using Active Contour and Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    GHAYOUMI ZADEH, Hossein; HADDADNIA, Javad; MONTAZERI, Alimohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The segmentation of cancerous areas in breast images is important for the early detection of disease. Thermal imaging has advantages, such as being non-invasive, non-radiation, passive, quick, painless, inexpensive, and non-contact. Imaging technique is the focus of this research. Methods: The proposed model in this paper is a combination of surf and corners that are very resistant. Obtained features are resistant to changes in rotation and revolution then with the help of active contours, this feature has been used for segmenting cancerous areas. Results: Comparing the obtained results from the proposed method and mammogram show that proposed method is Accurate and appropriate. Benign and malignance of segmented areas are detected by Lyapunov exponent. Values obtained include TP=91.31%, FN=8.69%, FP=7.26%. Conclusion: The proposed method can classify those abnormally segmented areas of the breast, to the Benign and malignant cancer. PMID:27398339

  18. Progress towards understanding heterotypic interactions in multi-culture models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Regier, Mary C; Alarid, Elaine T; Beebe, David J

    2016-06-13

    Microenvironments in primary tumors and metastases include multiple cell types whose dynamic and reciprocal interactions are central to progression of the disease. However, the literature involving breast cancer studied in vitro is dominated by cancer cells in mono-culture or co-cultured with one other cell type. For in vitro studies of breast cancer the inclusion of multiple cell types has led to models that are more representative of in vivo behaviors and functions as compared to more traditional monoculture. Here, we review foundational co-culture techniques and their adaptation to multi-culture (including three or more cell types). Additionally, while macroscale methods involving conditioned media, direct contact, and indirect interactions have been informative, we examined many advances that have been made more recently using microscale systems with increased control over cellular and structural complexity. Throughout this discussion we consider the benefits and limitations of current multi-culture methods and the significant results they have produced.

  19. A Model for Diagnosing Breast Cancerous Tissue from Thermal Images Using Active Contour and Lyapunov Exponent.

    PubMed

    Ghayoumi Zadeh, Hossein; Haddadnia, Javad; Montazeri, Alimohammad

    2016-05-01

    The segmentation of cancerous areas in breast images is important for the early detection of disease. Thermal imaging has advantages, such as being non-invasive, non-radiation, passive, quick, painless, inexpensive, and non-contact. Imaging technique is the focus of this research. The proposed model in this paper is a combination of surf and corners that are very resistant. Obtained features are resistant to changes in rotation and revolution then with the help of active contours, this feature has been used for segmenting cancerous areas. Comparing the obtained results from the proposed method and mammogram show that proposed method is Accurate and appropriate. Benign and malignance of segmented areas are detected by Lyapunov exponent. Values obtained include TP=91.31%, FN=8.69%, FP=7.26%. The proposed method can classify those abnormally segmented areas of the breast, to the Benign and malignant cancer.

  20. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  1. The need for complex 3D culture models to unravel novel pathways and identify accurate biomarkers in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weigelt, Britta; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

    2014-01-01

    The recent cataloging of the genomic aberrations in breast cancer has revealed the diversity and complexity of the disease at the genetic level. To unravel the functional consequences of specific repertoires of mutations and copy number changes on signaling pathways in breast cancer, it is crucial to develop model systems that truly recapitulate the disease. Here we discuss the three-dimensional culture models currently being used or recently developed for the study of normal mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer, including primary tumors and dormancy. We discuss the insights gained from these models in regards to cell signaling and potential therapeutic strategies, and the challenges that need to be met for the generation of heterotypic breast cancer model systems that are amenable for high-throughput approaches. PMID:24412474

  2. Breast cancer cells form primary tumors on ex vivo four-dimensional lung model.

    PubMed

    Pence, Kristi A; Mishra, Dhruva K; Thrall, Michael; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Kim, Min P

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer mortality is most common in cancer in women, and there are no ex vivo models that can capture the primary growth of tumor with fidelity to the in vivo tumor growth. In this study, we grew human breast cancer cell lines in an acellular lung matrix of the ex vivo four-dimensional lung model to determine if they form primary tumor and the extent to which they mimic the histology and characteristics of the human tumors. Rat lungs were harvested, decellularized, and placed in a bioreactor. To study the primary tumor growth, we seeded the lung via the trachea with human breast cancer cells SUM159, MCF7, or MDMB231 and perfused the pulmonary artery with oxygenated media. Lobectomies were performed and processed for hematoxylin and eosin, Ki-67, caspase-3, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor antibodies. All three cell lines grew in the ex vivo four-dimensional model and formed perfusable tumor nodules with similar histology and morphology as the primary tumors. SUM159 and MDAMB231 showed higher proliferation and apoptotic indices than MCF7. In addition, MCF7 retained its estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor positivity, whereas SUM159 and MDAMB 231 did not have any staining. Overall, our study showed that human breast cancer cells can be grown on the ex vivo four-dimensional lung model, which then form primary tumor nodules that mimic the morphology and histology of the original tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluoxetine modulates breast cancer metastasis to the brain in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, Yuriy; Zettel, Martha; Spielman, Sara C; Amico-Ruvio, Stacy A; Kelly, Emily A; Sipe, Grayson O; Dickerson, Ian M; Majewska, Ania K; Brown, Edward B

    2014-08-16

    Despite advances in the treatment of primary breast tumors, the outcome of metastatic breast cancer remains dismal. Brain metastases present a particularly difficult therapeutic target due to the "sanctuary" status of the brain, with resulting inability of most chemotherapeutic agents to effectively eliminate cancer cells in the brain parenchyma. A large number of breast cancer patients receive various neuroactive drugs to combat complications of systemic anti-tumor therapies and to treat concomitant diseases. One of the most prescribed groups of neuroactive medications is anti-depressants, in particular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Since SSRIs have profound effects on the brain, it is possible that their use in breast cancer patients could affect the development of brain metastases. This would provide important insight into the mechanisms underlying brain metastasis. Surprisingly, this possibility has been poorly explored. We studied the effect of fluoxetine, an SSRI, on the development of brain metastatic breast cancer using MDA-MB-231BR cells in a mouse model. The data demonstrate that fluoxetine treatment increases the number of brain metastases, an effect accompanied by elevated permeability of the blood-brain barrier, pro-inflammatory changes in the brain, and glial activation. This suggests a possible role of brain-resident immune cells and glia in promoting increased development of brain metastases. Our results offer experimental evidence that neuroactive substances may influence the pathogenesis of brain metastatic disease. This provides a starting point for further investigations into possible mechanisms of interaction between various neuroactive drugs, tumor cells, and the brain microenvironment, which may lead to the discovery of compounds that inhibit metastasis to the brain.

  4. Inclusion of endogenous hormone levels in risk prediction models of postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tworoger, Shelley S; Zhang, Xuehong; Eliassen, A Heather; Qian, Jing; Colditz, Graham A; Willett, Walter C; Rosner, Bernard A; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Endogenous hormones are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, and their measurement may improve our ability to identify high-risk women. Therefore, we evaluated whether inclusion of plasma estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, prolactin, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) improved risk prediction for postmenopausal invasive breast cancer (n = 437 patient cases and n = 775 controls not using postmenopausal hormones) in the Nurses' Health Study. We evaluated improvement in the area under the curve (AUC) for 5-year risk of invasive breast cancer by adding each hormone to the Gail and Rosner-Colditz risk scores. We used stepwise regression to identify the subset of hormones most associated with risk and assessed AUC improvement; we used 10-fold cross validation to assess model overfitting. Each hormone was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio doubling, 0.82 [SHBG] to 1.37 [estrone sulfate]). Individual hormones improved the AUC by 1.3 to 5.2 units relative to the Gail score and 0.3 to 2.9 for the Rosner-Colditz score. Estrone sulfate, testosterone, and prolactin were selected by stepwise regression and increased the AUC by 5.9 units (P = .003) for the Gail score and 3.4 (P = .04) for the Rosner-Colditz score. In cross validation, the average AUC change across the validation data sets was 6.0 (P = .002) and 3.0 units (P = .03), respectively. Similar results were observed for estrogen receptor-positive disease (selected hormones: estrone sulfate, testosterone, prolactin, and SHBG; change in AUC, 8.8 [P < .001] for Gail score and 5.8 [P = .004] for Rosner-Colditz score). Our results support that endogenous hormones improve risk prediction for invasive breast cancer and could help identify women who may benefit from chemoprevention or more screening. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Inclusion of Endogenous Hormone Levels in Risk Prediction Models of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tworoger, Shelley S.; Zhang, Xuehong; Eliassen, A. Heather; Qian, Jing; Colditz, Graham A.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Endogenous hormones are risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer, and their measurement may improve our ability to identify high-risk women. Therefore, we evaluated whether inclusion of plasma estradiol, estrone, estrone sulfate, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, prolactin, and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) improved risk prediction for postmenopausal invasive breast cancer (n = 437 patient cases and n = 775 controls not using postmenopausal hormones) in the Nurses' Health Study. Methods We evaluated improvement in the area under the curve (AUC) for 5-year risk of invasive breast cancer by adding each hormone to the Gail and Rosner-Colditz risk scores. We used stepwise regression to identify the subset of hormones most associated with risk and assessed AUC improvement; we used 10-fold cross validation to assess model overfitting. Results Each hormone was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio doubling, 0.82 [SHBG] to 1.37 [estrone sulfate]). Individual hormones improved the AUC by 1.3 to 5.2 units relative to the Gail score and 0.3 to 2.9 for the Rosner-Colditz score. Estrone sulfate, testosterone, and prolactin were selected by stepwise regression and increased the AUC by 5.9 units (P = .003) for the Gail score and 3.4 (P = .04) for the Rosner-Colditz score. In cross validation, the average AUC change across the validation data sets was 6.0 (P = .002) and 3.0 units (P = .03), respectively. Similar results were observed for estrogen receptor–positive disease (selected hormones: estrone sulfate, testosterone, prolactin, and SHBG; change in AUC, 8.8 [P < .001] for Gail score and 5.8 [P = .004] for Rosner-Colditz score). Conclusion Our results support that endogenous hormones improve risk prediction for invasive breast cancer and could help identify women who may benefit from chemoprevention or more screening. PMID:25135988

  6. Digital breast tomosynthesis for detecting multifocal and multicentric breast cancer: influence of acquisition geometry on model observer performance in breast phantom images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Gezheng; Park, Subok; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-03-01

    Multifocal and multicentric breast cancer (MFMC), i.e., the presence of two or more tumor foci within the same breast, has an immense clinical impact on treatment planning and survival outcomes. Detecting multiple breast tumors is challenging as MFMC breast cancer is relatively uncommon, and human observers do not know the number or locations of tumors a priori. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in which an x-ray beam sweeps over a limited angular range across the breast, has the potential to improve the detection of multiple tumors.1, 2 However, prior efforts to optimize DBT image quality only considered unifocal breast cancers (e.g.,3-9), so the recommended geometries may not necessarily yield images that are informative for the task of detecting MFMC. Hence, the goal of this study is to employ a 3D multi-lesion (ml) channelized-Hotelling observer (CHO) to identify optimal DBT acquisition geometries for MFMC. Digital breast phantoms and simulated DBT scanners of different geometries (e.g., wide or narrow arc scans, different number of projections in each scan) were used to generate image data for the simulation study. Multiple 3D synthetic lesions were inserted into different breast regions to simulate MF cases and MC cases. 3D partial least squares (PLS) channels, and 3D Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels were estimated to capture discriminant information and correlations among signals in locally varying anatomical backgrounds, enabling the model observer to make both image-level and location-specific detection decisions. The 3D ml-CHO with PLS channels outperformed that with LG channels in this study. The simulated MC cases and MC cases were not equally difficult for the ml-CHO to detect across the different simulated DBT geometries considered in this analysis. Also, the results suggest that the optimal design of DBT may vary as the task of clinical interest changes, e.g., a geometry that is better for finding at least one lesion may be worse for counting the

  7. Survey of breast cancer mammography screening behaviors in Eastern Taiwan based on a health belief model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Li; Hsu, Sheng-Der; Wang, Jen-Hung; Huang, Li-Chuan; Hsu, Wen-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer is the main form of cancer affecting women and the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality in women. The aim of this study was to explore regular mammography screening in Hualien women and to identify the factors that influence its uptake based on a health belief model. This cross-sectional study was performed between July 2012 and December 2012. A total of 776 women aged 45-69 years were enrolled in the study. The results of crude and adjusted analyses showed that there were significant differences in the prevalence of regular mammography screening, which were related to different age groups, residence areas, educational levels, hormone replacement therapy status, and history of breast cancer. Women in the older age groups, with a higher educational level, in receipt of hormone replacement therapy, and with a personal history of breast cancer had significantly higher odds ratios for regular mammography screening (2.75, 1.68, 1.75, and 1.98, respectively; all p < 0.05).

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  10. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPCR 2017 CDC National Cancer Conference Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  11. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. Breast Cancer In Women

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  13. Antitumour activity of the novel flavonoid Oncamex in preclinical breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Carlos; Ward, Carol; Turnbull, Arran K; Mullen, Peter; Cook, Graeme; Meehan, James; Jarman, Edward J; Thomson, Patrick IT; Campbell, Colin J; McPhail, Donald; Harrison, David J; Langdon, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Background: The natural polyphenol myricetin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in preclinical cancer models. We hypothesised that myricetin-derived flavonoids with enhanced redox properties, improved cell uptake and mitochondrial targeting might have increased potential as antitumour agents. Methods: We studied the effect of a second-generation flavonoid analogue Oncamex in a panel of seven breast cancer cell lines, applying western blotting, gene expression analysis, fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of xenograft tissue to investigate its mechanism of action. Results: Proliferation assays showed that Oncamex treatment for 8 h reduced cell viability and induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, concomitant with increased caspase activation. Microarray analysis showed that Oncamex was associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling cell cycle and apoptosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed the compound's mitochondrial targeting and reactive oxygen species-modulating properties, inducing superoxide production at concentrations associated with antiproliferative effects. A preliminary in vivo study in mice implanted with the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft showed that Oncamex inhibited tumour growth, reducing tissue viability and Ki-67 proliferation, with no signs of untoward effects on the animals. Conclusions: Oncamex is a novel flavonoid capable of specific mitochondrial delivery and redox modulation. It has shown antitumour activity in preclinical models of breast cancer, supporting the potential of this prototypic candidate for its continued development as an anticancer agent. PMID:27031849

  14. Breast size, handedness and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C C; Trichopoulos, D

    1991-01-01

    Bra cup size and handedness were studied as possible risk factors for breast cancer. Data for 3918 cases and 11,712 controls from 7 centres were used to examine the association of handedness with laterality of breast cancer; data for 2325 cases and 7008 controls from 4 centres were used to assess the relation of bra cup size to breast cancer risk. There was a suggestive (P about 0.10) association of handedness with breast cancer laterality: odds ratio of a left-handed (or ambidextrous) woman having a left-sided cancer 1.22 (95% CI 0.96-1.56). Handedness may affect the lateral occurrence of breast cancer, although this tumour is in general more common in the left breast, possibly because this breast is usually slightly larger. Premenopausal women who do not wear bras had half the risk of breast cancer compared with bra users (P about 0.09), possibly because they are thinner and likely to have smaller breasts. Among bra users, larger cup size was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (P about 0.026), although the association was found only among postmenopausal women and was accounted for, in part, by obesity. These data suggest that bra cup size (and conceivably mammary gland size) may be a risk factor for breast cancer.

  15. Using the Precede-Proceed Model of Health Program Planning in breast cancer nursing research.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Ralph; McCarthy, Alexandra; Yates, Patsy

    2012-08-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of the Precede-Proceed model when investigating health promotion options for breast cancer survivors. Adherence to recommended health behaviours can optimize well-being after cancer treatment. Guided by the Precede-Proceed approach, we studied the behaviours of breast cancer survivors in our health service area. The interview data from the cohort of breast cancer survivors are used in this article to illustrate the use of Precede-Proceed in this nursing research context. Interview data were collected from June to December 2009. We also searched Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo and PsychExtra up to 2010 for relevant literature in the English language to interrogate the data from other theoretical perspectives. The Precede-Proceed model is theoretically complex. The deductive analytic process guided by the model usefully explained some of the health behaviours of cancer survivors, although it could not explicate many other findings. A complementary inductive approach to the analysis and subsequent interpretation by way of Uncertainty in Illness Theory and other psychosocial perspectives provided a comprehensive account of the qualitative data that resulted in contextually relevant recommendations for nursing practice. Nursing researchers using Precede-Proceed should maintain theoretical flexibility when interpreting qualitative data. Perspectives not embedded in the model might need to be considered to ensure that the data are analysed in a contextually relevant way. Precede-Proceed provides a robust framework for nursing researchers investigating health promotion in cancer survivors; however, additional theoretical lenses to those embedded in the model can enhance data interpretation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Quiz: How much do you know about breast cancer? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer late stage breast cancer locally advanced breast cancer Stage III breast cancer is early stage breast cancer late stage breast cancer locally advanced breast cancer Stage IV breast cancer is early stage breast cancer ...

  17. Types of oral contraceptives and breast cancer survival among women enrolled in Medicaid: A competing-risk model.

    PubMed

    Samson, Marsha E; Adams, Swann Arp; Mulatya, Caroline M; Zhang, Jiajia; Bennett, Charles L; Hebert, James; Steck, Susan E

    2017-01-01

    Oral contraceptive pills have been implicated in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Although many studies have examined the relationship between combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and breast cancer, there is a paucity of literature that discusses progestin-only oral contraceptives (POCs) and breast cancer. The purpose of this investigation is to examine potential associations between different types of oral contraceptives and breast cancer mortality in the South Carolina Medicaid population among different racial/ethnic groups. Subjects included 4816 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 2000 and 2013. Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated to determine time-to-mortality rates among users of oral contraceptives. Competing-risks models and Cox multivariate survival models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer and other-cause mortality, as well as all-cause mortality. POCs were associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer mortality (HR: 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.52) and a non-significant increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.52, 2.07). COCs increased the risk of breast cancer mortality (HR: 1.61; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.28) and all-cause mortality (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.30, 2.57). Use of POCs may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer mortality. Due to the small sample size of POC users in the current study, additional research is needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Models in Breast Cancer Screening in the General Population: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Schiller-Frühwirth, Irmgard C; Jahn, Beate; Arvandi, Marjan; Siebert, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Many Western countries have long-established population-based mammography screening programs. Prior to implementing these programs, decision-analytic modeling was widely used to inform decisions. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of cost-effectiveness models in breast cancer screening in the general population to analyze their structural and methodological approaches. A systematic literature search for health economic models was performed in the electronic databases MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE, CRD Databases, Cochrane Library, and EconLit in August 2011 with updates in June 2013, April 2015, and November 2016. To assess studies systematically, a standardized form was applied to extract relevant information that was then summarized in evidence tables. Thirty-five studies were included; 27 state-transition models were analyzed using cohort (n = 12) and individual-level simulation (n = 15). Twenty-one studies modeled the natural history of breast cancer and predicted mortality as a function of the early detection modality. The models employed different assumptions regarding ductal carcinoma in situ. Thirteen studies performed cost-utility analyses with different sources for utility values, but assumptions were often made about utility weights. Twenty-two models did not report any validation. State-transition modeling was the most frequently applied analytic approach. Different methods in modeling the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer were identified because there is currently no agreement on the biological behavior of noninvasive breast cancer. Main weaknesses were the lack of precise utility estimates and insufficient reporting of validation. Sensitivity analyses of assumptions regarding ductal carcinoma in situ and in particular adequate validation are critical to minimize the risk of biased model outcomes.

  19. An updated PREDICT breast cancer prognostication and treatment benefit prediction model with independent validation.

    PubMed

    Candido Dos Reis, Francisco J; Wishart, Gordon C; Dicks, Ed M; Greenberg, David; Rashbass, Jem; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van den Broek, Alexandra J; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew; Rakha, Emad; Maishman, Tom; Eccles, Diana M; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2017-05-22

    PREDICT is a breast cancer prognostic and treatment benefit model implemented online. The overall fit of the model has been good in multiple independent case series, but PREDICT has been shown to underestimate breast cancer specific mortality in women diagnosed under the age of 40. Another limitation is the use of discrete categories for tumour size and node status resulting in 'step' changes in risk estimates on moving between categories. We have refitted the PREDICT prognostic model using the original cohort of cases from East Anglia with updated survival time in order to take into account age at diagnosis and to smooth out the survival function for tumour size and node status. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to fit separate models for ER negative and ER positive disease. Continuous variables were fitted using fractional polynomials and a smoothed baseline hazard was obtained by regressing the baseline cumulative hazard for each patients against time using fractional polynomials. The fit of the prognostic models were then tested in three independent data sets that had also been used to validate the original version of PREDICT. In the model fitting data, after adjusting for other prognostic variables, there is an increase in risk of breast cancer specific mortality in younger and older patients with ER positive disease, with a substantial increase in risk for women diagnosed before the age of 35. In ER negative disease the risk increases slightly with age. The association between breast cancer specific mortality and both tumour size and number of positive nodes was non-linear with a more marked increase in risk with increasing size and increasing number of nodes in ER positive disease. The overall calibration and discrimination of the new version of PREDICT (v2) was good and comparable to that of the previous version in both model development and validation data sets. However, the calibration of v2 improved over v1 in patients diagnosed under the age

  20. Interactome analysis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine models of colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aliper, Alexander M; Frieden-Korovkina, Victoria P; Buzdin, Anton; Roumiantsev, Sergey A; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2014-11-30

    In solid cancers, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) infiltrate (peri)tumoral tissues to induce immune tolerance and hence to establish a microenvironment permissive to tumor growth. Importantly, the mechanisms that facilitate such infiltration or a subsequent immune suppression are not fully understood. Hence, in this study, we aimed to delineate disparate molecular pathways which MDSC utilize in murine models of colon or breast cancer. Using pathways enrichment analysis, we completed interactome maps of multiple signaling pathways in CD11b+/Gr1(high/low) MDSC from spleens and tumor infiltrates of mice with c26GM colon cancer and tumor infiltrates of MDSC in 4T1 breast cancer. In both cancer models, infiltrating MDSC, but not CD11b+ splenic cells, have been found to be enriched in multiple signaling molecules suggestive of their enhanced proliferative and invasive phenotypes. The interactome data has been subsequently used to reconstruct a previously unexplored regulation of MDSC cell cycle by the c-myc transcription factor which was predicted by the analysis. Thus, this study represents a first interactome mapping of distinct multiple molecular pathways whereby MDSC sustain cancer progression.

  1. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  2. Assessing a Drosophila Metastasis Model in Mouse and Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Upper right: Cyclopamine reduced lung metastases (arrow) in In a syngeneic breast cancer 4TI xenograft. Imaging at day 5. Bone metastases model...hepatitis B virus, or hepatitis C virus; 5. Pregnant, breastfeeding , or of childbearing potential without using dual forms of effective contraception...assessed by bioluminenscence imaging on days 2, 7 and 9 after tumor injection (Fig.2c). This data indicates that Hh inhibitors could be effective

  3. Epithelial cell culture models for the prevention and therapy of clinical breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical breast cancer progresses via a multi-step carcinogenic process wherein genetic, molecular, endocrine and dietary factors play significant roles in the pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of the disease. Preclinical cell culture models, expressing clinically relevant genetic and endocrine defects and exhibiting quantifiable cancer risk, may provide facile, clinically translatable approaches to identify molecular targets and susceptible mechanistic pathways for the efficacy of novel interventional approaches. This review summarizes laboratory investigations focused on i) developing murine and human mammary tissue-derived cell culture models; ii) optimizing mechanism-based quantitative endpoint biomarker assays specific for carcinogenic risk and preventive/therapeutic efficacy; and iii) providing quantifiable proof-of-principle evidence for validation of the present cell culture approaches, capable of prioritizing efficacious lead compounds for subsequent in vivo animal studies and clinical trials for the prevention/therapy of breast cancer. Epithelial cell culture models are developed and characterized where the carcinogenic process is initiated by the targeted expression of clinically relevant oncogenes. The cell culture systems from mouse mammary tissue are in vitro approaches that complement the Ras and Myc transgenic mouse models. The human mammary tissue-derived systems are in vitro models for chemoendocrine, therapy-resistant, clinical, pre-invasive ER-/PR-/HER-2+ comedo ductal carcinoma in situ, ER+/PR+ chemoendocrine therapy-responsive breast cancer and ER-/PR-/HER-2- triple-negative chemoendocrine, therapy-resistant breast cancer. The oncogene-initiated phenotypes exhibit loss of homeostatic growth control, downregulation of cell apoptosis and gain of carcinogenic risk in vitro, as well as transplantable tumor development in vivo. Numerous mechanistically distinct, synthetic pharmacological agents, as well as naturally occurring dietary compounds

  4. Cost effectiveness of trastuzumab in the adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer: a lifetime model.

    PubMed

    Millar, J Alasdair; Millward, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Recent randomised trials have demonstrated a statistically significant effect of trastuzumab on disease-free survival when used as adjuvant therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein (HER2)-positive resectable early stage breast cancer, with a treatment course lasting either 9 or 52 weeks. However, the cost effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab with respect to mortality remains uncertain, especially in an Australian setting. To estimate the cost effectiveness of trastuzumab in Australia, in a cohort of 50-year-old patients with HER2-positive breast cancer over a lifetime, using (i) disease-free survival and cardiotoxicity data from recent randomised trials; (ii) information on long-term survival of patients with treated primary breast cancer; and (iii) costs of treating local and distant relapses and disease from causes other than breast cancer. A Markov model consisting of four health states (remission, loco-regional recurrence, metastatic disease and death) was developed. Transition probabilities corresponded to patterns of relapse and metastases seen in recent trials. The model was run until age 100 years to allow calculation of average survival. Outcome measures were life-years and QALYs (calculated using utility weights reported in the literature). The model was calibrated to reflect literature evidence that the risk of breast cancer recurrence following primary treatment diminishes progressively to zero after about 20 years. It was assumed that the morbidity benefit of trastuzumab observed in trials would be present for 5 years but would then diminish progressively to zero after 8 years. Costs (year 2005 values) and benefits were discounted at 3% per annum. For every 1000 patients treated with a 52-week course of trastuzumab, there were 136 fewer breast cancer deaths (relative risk reduction 28%). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were Australian dollars ($ A)13 730 per year of life saved (YOLS) and $ A22 793 per QALY. The

  5. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  6. Competing risks to breast cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Marjorie A

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models analyzing the impact of treatment interventions and screening on the level of breast cancer mortality require an input of mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or competing risks. This chapter presents an actuarial method of creating cohort life tables using published data that removes breast cancer as a cause of death. Mortality from causes other than breast cancer as a percentage of all-cause mortality is smallest for women in their forties and fifties, as small as 85% of the all-cause rate, although the level and percentage of the impact varies by birth cohort. This method produces life tables by birth cohort and by age that are easily included as a common input by the various CISNET modeling groups to predict mortality from other causes. Attention to removing breast cancer mortality from all-cause mortality is worthwhile, because breast cancer mortality can be as high as 15% at some ages.

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  8. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  9. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... in lymph and help fight infection and disease. Clusters of lymph nodes are found near the breast ... the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter ...

  10. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... men may have radiation after surgery. Since most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor-positive, hormone therapy (with tamoxifen) is often used depending on the stage. Chemotherapy may be given before tamoxifen. For men ...

  11. Obesity and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf

    The relationship between adiposity and breast cancer risk and prognosis is complex, with associations that differ depending on when body size is assessed (e.g., pre- vs. postmenopausal obesity) and when breast cancer is diagnosed (i.e., pre- vs. postmenopausal disease). Further, the impact of obesity on risk differs by tumor hormone receptor status (e.g., estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor) and, among postmenopausal women, use of exogenous hormones (i.e., hormone replacement therapy (HRT)). In the context of these complexities, this review focuses on associations between childhood and adolescent adiposity, general adiposity, weight changes (i.e., loss and gain), abdominal adiposity, and breast cancer risk and survival. Finally, we discuss potential mechanisms linking adiposity to breast cancer.

  12. The breast cancer conundrum.

    PubMed

    Adams, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    For decades, rates of breast cancer have been going up faster in rich countries than in poor ones. Scientists are beginning to understand more about its causes but unanswered questions remain. Patrick Adams reports.

  13. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Breast Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/breastcancer.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  14. Therapy targeted to the metastatic niche is effective in a model of stage IV breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Kavishwar, Amol; Wang, Ping; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dudley, Michael; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients is limited to palliative options and represents an unmet clinical need. Here, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of miRNA-10b - a master regulator of metastatic cell viability – leads to elimination of distant metastases in a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer. This was achieved using the miRNA-10b inhibitory nanodrug, MN-anti-miR10b, which consists of magnetic nanoparticles, conjugated to LNA-based miR-10b antagomirs. Intravenous injection of MN-anti-miR10b into mice bearing lung, bone, and brain metastases from breast cancer resulted in selective accumulation of the nanodrug in metastatic tumor cells. Weekly treatments of mice with MN-anti-miR-10b and low-dose doxorubicin resulted in complete regression of pre-existing distant metastases in 65% of the animals and a significant reduction in cancer mortality. These observations were supported by dramatic reduction in proliferation and increase in apoptosis in metastatic sites. On a molecular level, we observed a significant increase in the expression of HOXD10, which is a known target of miRNA-10b. These results represent first steps into the uncharted territory of therapy targeted to the metastatic niche. PMID:28322342

  15. Trastuzumab (Herceptin®): overcoming resistance in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Huguette

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of: Fujimoto-Ouchi K, Sekiguchi F, Yamamoto K et al.: Preclinical study of prolonged administration of trastuzumab as combination therapy after disease progression during trastuzumab monotherapy. Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 66, 269-276 (2010). Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody targeted against human epidermal receptor (HER)2, is used in combination with chemotherapy to treat patients with breast cancers overexpressing HER2. Despite initial clinical responses, disease progresses in a significant proportion of patients treated with trastuzumab and chemotherapy. Evidence of resistance to trastuzumab has not deterred a widespread clinical practice in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer - at least before lapatinib entered the clinic - which consists of continued administration of trastuzumab in combination with another chemotherapeutic drug. At present, it is not known if patients benefit from this practice. The present preclinical study demonstrates that, in the MDA-MB-361 and KPL-4 HER2(+) breast cancer models, induced resistance to trastuzumab monotherapy can be overcome by a combination of trastuzumab and granulocyte colony stimulating factor or chemotherapy. The response to trastuzumab and granulocyte colony stimulating factor appears to involve the host's immune system and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The mechanisms underlying the response to trastuzumab and chemotherapy remain unclear.

  16. Computer Simulation of Breast Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    of Breast Cancer Screening PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Boone, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616...Final (01 Jul 98 - 30 Jun 01) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Computer Simulation of Breast Cancer Screening DAMD17- 98 - 1-8176 6. AUTHOR(S...Woirds) (abstract should contain no proprietary or confidential information) A breast cancer screening computer model was developed. Simulations of

  17. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  18. Phytoestrogens oestrogen synthesis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Suman; Whitehead, Saffron A

    2008-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are used as 'natural' alternatives to HRT and, although epidemiological evidence implies that diets rich in phytoestrogens reduce the incidence of breast cancer, their weak oestrogenicity is also known to stimulate growth in experimental models of breast cancer. This review addresses the question as to how phytoestrogens may protect against breast cancer through their ability to bind preferentially to oestrogen receptor beta, inhibit enzymes that convert circulating steroid precursors into oestradiol and inhibit cell signalling pathways of growth factors.

  19. To screen or not to screen for breast cancer? How do modelling studies answer the question?

    PubMed

    Koleva-Kolarova, R G; Zhan, Z; Greuter, M J W; Feenstra, T L; De Bock, G H

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is a topic of hot debate, and currently no general consensus has been reached on starting and ending ages and screening intervals, in part because of a lack of precise estimations of the benefit-harm ratio. Simulation models are often applied to account for the expected benefits and harms of regular screening; however, the degree to which the model outcomes are reliable is not clear. In a recent systematic review, we therefore aimed to assess the quality of published simulation models for breast cancer screening of the general population. The models were scored according to a framework for qualitative assessment. We distinguished seven original models that utilized a common model type, modelling approach, and input parameters. The models predicted the benefit of regular screening in terms of mortality reduction; and overall, their estimates compared well to estimates of mortality reduction from randomized controlled trials. However, the models did not report on the expected harms associated with regular screening. We found that current simulation models for population breast cancer screening are prone to many pitfalls; their outcomes bear a high overall risk of bias, mainly because of a lack of systematic evaluation of evidence to calibrate the input parameters and a lack of external validation. Our recommendations concerning future modelling are therefore to use systematically evaluated data for the calibration of input parameters, to perform external validation of model outcomes, and to account for both the expected benefits and the expected harms so as to provide a clear balance and cost-effectiveness estimation and to adequately inform decision-makers.

  20. Tailoring Breast Cancer Screening Intervals by Breast Density and Risk for Women Aged 50 Years or Older: Collaborative Modeling of Screening Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Kerlikowske, Karla; Stout, Natasha K; Miglioretti, Diana L; Schechter, Clyde B; Ergun, Mehmet Ali; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Sprague, Brian L; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Near, Aimee M; Gangnon, Ronald E; Hampton, John M; Chandler, Young; de Koning, Harry J; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2016-11-15

    Biennial screening is generally recommended for average-risk women aged 50 to 74 years, but tailored screening may provide greater benefits. To estimate outcomes for various screening intervals after age 50 years based on breast density and risk for breast cancer. Collaborative simulation modeling using national incidence, breast density, and screening performance data. United States. Women aged 50 years or older with various combinations of breast density and relative risk (RR) of 1.0, 1.3, 2.0, or 4.0. Annual, biennial, or triennial digital mammography screening from ages 50 to 74 years (vs. no screening) and ages 65 to 74 years (vs. biennial digital mammography from ages 50 to 64 years). Lifetime breast cancer deaths, life expectancy and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), false-positive mammograms, benign biopsy results, overdiagnosis, cost-effectiveness, and ratio of false-positive results to breast cancer deaths averted. Screening benefits and overdiagnosis increase with breast density and RR. False-positive mammograms and benign results on biopsy decrease with increasing risk. Among women with fatty breasts or scattered fibroglandular density and an RR of 1.0 or 1.3, breast cancer deaths averted were similar for triennial versus biennial screening for both age groups (50 to 74 years, median of 3.4 to 5.1 vs. 4.1 to 6.5 deaths averted; 65 to 74 years, median of 1.5 to 2.1 vs. 1.8 to 2.6 deaths averted). Breast cancer deaths averted increased with annual versus biennial screening for women aged 50 to 74 years at all levels of breast density and an RR of 4.0, and those aged 65 to 74 years with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts and an RR of 4.0. However, harms were almost 2-fold higher. Triennial screening for the average-risk subgroup and annual screening for the highest-risk subgroup cost less than $100 000 per QALY gained. Models did not consider women younger than 50 years, those with an RR less than 1, or other imaging methods. Average-risk women

  1. Low doses of paclitaxel enhance liver metastasis of breast cancer cells in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yinhua; Kan, Xiaoxi; Wang, Changjun; Su, Bingnan; Li, Yuchen; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Pingzhang; Luo, Yang; Na, Daxiang; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Guoying; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Wang, Lu

    2016-08-01

    Paclitaxel is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in breast cancer treatment. In addition to its well-known cytotoxic effects, recent studies have shown that paclitaxel has tumor-supportive activities. Importantly, paclitaxel levels are not maintained at the effective concentration through one treatment cycle; rather, the concentration decreases during the cycle as a result of drug metabolism. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of paclitaxel's effects requires insight into the dose-specific activities of paclitaxel and their influence on cancer cells and the host microenvironment. Here we report that a low dose of paclitaxel enhances metastasis of breast cancer cells to the liver in mouse models. We used microarray analysis to investigate gene expression patterns in invasive breast cancer cells treated with low or clinically relevant high doses of paclitaxel. We also investigated the effects of low doses of paclitaxel on cell migration, invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that low doses of paclitaxel promoted inflammation and initiated the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro. These effects could be reversed by inhibiting NF-κB. Furthermore, low doses of paclitaxel promoted liver metastasis in mouse xenografts, which correlated with changes in estrogen metabolism in the host liver. Collectively, these findings reveal the paradoxical and dose-dependent effects of paclitaxel on breast cancer cell activity, and suggest that increased consideration be given to potential adverse effects associated with low concentrations of paclitaxel during treatment. Gene expression microarray data are available in the GEO database under accession number GSE82048. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Examining the pathogenesis of breast cancer using a novel agent-based model of mammary ductal epithelium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chapa, Joaquin; Bourgo, Ryan J; Greene, Geoffrey L; Kulkarni, Swati; An, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The study of the pathogenesis of breast cancer is challenged by the long time-course of the disease process and the multi-factorial nature of generating oncogenic insults. The characterization of the longitudinal pathogenesis of malignant transformation from baseline normal breast duct epithelial dynamics may provide vital insight into the cascading systems failure that leads to breast cancer. To this end, extensive information on the baseline behavior of normal mammary epithelium and breast cancer oncogenesis was integrated into a computational model termed the Ductal Epithelium Agent-Based Model (DEABM). The DEABM is composed of computational agents that behave according to rules established from published cellular and molecular mechanisms concerning breast duct epithelial dynamics and oncogenesis. The DEABM implements DNA damage and repair, cell division, genetic inheritance and simulates the local tissue environment with hormone excretion and receptor signaling. Unrepaired DNA damage impacts the integrity of the genome within individual cells, including a set of eight representative oncogenes and tumor suppressors previously implicated in breast cancer, with subsequent consequences on successive generations of cells. The DEABM reproduced cellular population dynamics seen during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, and demonstrated the oncogenic effect of known genetic factors associated with breast cancer, namely TP53 and Myc, in simulations spanning ∼40 years of simulated time. Simulations comparing normal to BRCA1-mutant breast tissue demonstrated rates of invasive cancer development similar to published epidemiologic data with respect to both cumulative incidence over time and estrogen-receptor status. Investigation of the modeling of ERα-positive (ER+) tumorigenesis led to a novel hypothesis implicating the transcription factor and tumor suppressor RUNX3. These data suggest that the DEABM can serve as a potentially valuable framework to augment the

  3. Examining the Pathogenesis of Breast Cancer Using a Novel Agent-Based Model of Mammary Ductal Epithelium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chapa, Joaquin; Bourgo, Ryan J.; Greene, Geoffrey L.; Kulkarni, Swati; An, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The study of the pathogenesis of breast cancer is challenged by the long time-course of the disease process and the multi-factorial nature of generating oncogenic insults. The characterization of the longitudinal pathogenesis of malignant transformation from baseline normal breast duct epithelial dynamics may provide vital insight into the cascading systems failure that leads to breast cancer. To this end, extensive information on the baseline behavior of normal mammary epithelium and breast cancer oncogenesis was integrated into a computational model termed the Ductal Epithelium Agent-Based Model (DEABM). The DEABM is composed of computational agents that behave according to rules established from published cellular and molecular mechanisms concerning breast duct epithelial dynamics and oncogenesis. The DEABM implements DNA damage and repair, cell division, genetic inheritance and simulates the local tissue environment with hormone excretion and receptor signaling. Unrepaired DNA damage impacts the integrity of the genome within individual cells, including a set of eight representative oncogenes and tumor suppressors previously implicated in breast cancer, with subsequent consequences on successive generations of cells. The DEABM reproduced cellular population dynamics seen during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, and demonstrated the oncogenic effect of known genetic factors associated with breast cancer, namely TP53 and Myc, in simulations spanning ∼40 years of simulated time. Simulations comparing normal to BRCA1-mutant breast tissue demonstrated rates of invasive cancer development similar to published epidemiologic data with respect to both cumulative incidence over time and estrogen-receptor status. Investigation of the modeling of ERα-positive (ER+) tumorigenesis led to a novel hypothesis implicating the transcription factor and tumor suppressor RUNX3. These data suggest that the DEABM can serve as a potentially valuable framework to augment the

  4. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-06-24

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring's breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters' risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father's germ-line and modulate their daughters' birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters' mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans.

  5. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M.; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M. Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring’s breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters’ risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father’s germ-line and modulate their daughters’ birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters’ mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans. PMID:27339599

  6. A Model for Breast Cancer-Induced Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    M ., Roesel, J. L ., Benz, rally) regulated. For instance, our data show that PD-ECGF C., Mueller, H., Matter, A., Zuber, M ., Luescher, K., Litschgi, M ...Harris, A. L ., and Bicknell, R. 2. Heffelfimger, S. C., Yassin, R., Miller, M . A., and Lower, E. Vascu- Thymidine phosphorylase is angiogenic and promotes... Gullino , P. M . Neovascularization induced by breast precancerous? Arch. Pathol. Lab, Med., 110: 171-173, 1985. intraocular xenografts of normal

  7. Immunocompetent mouse allograft models for development of therapies to target breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Yang, Howard H; Hu, Ying; Watson, Peter H; Liu, Huaitian; Geiger, Thomas R; Anver, Miriam R; Haines, Diana C; Martin, Philip; Green, Jeffrey E; Lee, Maxwell P; Hunter, Kent W; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2017-05-09

    Effective drug development to combat metastatic disease in breast cancer would be aided by the availability of well-characterized preclinical animal models that (a) metastasize with high efficiency, (b) metastasize in a reasonable time-frame, (c) have an intact immune system, and (d) capture some of the heterogeneity of the human disease. To address these issues, we have assembled a panel of twelve mouse mammary cancer cell lines that can metastasize efficiently on implantation into syngeneic immunocompetent hosts. Genomic characterization shows that more than half of the 30 most commonly mutated genes in human breast cancer are represented within the panel. Transcriptomically, most of the models fall into the luminal A or B intrinsic molecular subtypes, despite the predominance of an aggressive, poorly-differentiated or spindled histopathology in all models. Patterns of immune cell infiltration, proliferation rates, apoptosis and angiogenesis differed significantly among models. Inherent within-model variability of the metastatic phenotype mandates large cohort sizes for intervention studies but may also capture some relevant non-genetic sources of variability. The varied molecular and phenotypic characteristics of this expanded panel of models should aid in model selection for development of antimetastatic therapies in vivo, and serve as a useful platform for predictive biomarker identification.

  8. Exploring factors related to metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients using Bayesian cure models.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Mansourian, Marjan; Mokarian, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a fatal disease and the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women with an increasing pattern worldwide. The burden is mostly attributed to metastatic cancers that occur in one-third of patients and the treatments are palliative. It is of great interest to determine factors affecting time from cancer diagnosis to secondary metastasis. Cure rate models assume a Poisson distribution for the number of unobservable metastatic-component cells that are completely deleted from the non-metastasis patient body but some may remain and result in metastasis. Time to metastasis is defined as a function of the number of these cells and the time for each cell to develop a detectable sign of metastasis. Covariates are introduced to the model via the rate of metastatic-component cells. We used non-mixture cure rate models with Weibull and log-logistic distributions in a Bayesian setting to assess the relationship between metastasis free survival and covariates. The median of metastasis free survival was 76.9 months. Various models showed that from covariates in the study, lymph node involvement ratio and being progesterone receptor positive were significant, with an adverse and a beneficial effect on metastasis free survival, respectively. The estimated fraction of patients cured from metastasis was almost 48%. The Weibull model had a slightly better performance than log-logistic. Cure rate models are popular in survival studies and outperform other models under certain conditions. We explored the prognostic factors of metastatic breast cancer from a different viewpoint. In this study, metastasis sites were analyzed all together. Conducting similar studies in a larger sample of cancer patients as well as evaluating the prognostic value of covariates in metastasis to each site separately are recommended.

  9. Morphine does not facilitate breast cancer progression in two preclinical mouse models for human invasive lobular and HER2⁺ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doornebal, Chris W; Vrijland, Kim; Hau, Cheei-Sing; Coffelt, Seth B; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Jonkers, Jos; de Visser, Karin E; Hollmann, Markus W

    2015-08-01

    Morphine and other opioid analgesics are potent pain-relieving agents routinely used for pain management in patients with cancer. However, these drugs have recently been associated with a worse relapse-free survival in patients with surgical cancer, thus suggesting that morphine adversely affects cancer progression and relapse. In this study, we evaluated the impact of morphine on breast cancer progression, metastatic dissemination, and outgrowth of minimal residual disease. Using preclinical mouse models for metastatic invasive lobular and HER2 breast cancer, we show that analgesic doses of morphine do not affect mammary tumor growth, angiogenesis, and the composition of tumor-infiltrating immune cells. Our studies further demonstrate that morphine, administered in the presence or absence of surgery-induced tissue damage, neither facilitates de novo metastatic dissemination nor promotes outgrowth of minimal residual disease after surgery. Together, these findings indicate that opioid analgesics can be used safely for perioperative pain management in patients with cancer and emphasize that current standards of "good clinical practice" should be maintained.

  10. A decision-analytic model for early stage breast cancer: lumpectomy vs mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Büyükdamgaci-Alogan, G; Elele, T; Hayran, M; Erman, M; Kiliçkap, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to construct a decision model that incorporated patient preferences over differing health state prospects and to analyze the decision context of early stage breast cancer patients in relation to two main surgical treatment options. A Markov chain was constructed to project the clinical history of breast carcinoma following surgery. A Multi Attribute Utility Model was developed for outcome evaluation. Transition probabilities were obtained by using subjective probability assessment. This study was performed on the sample population of female university students and utilities were elicited from these healthy volunteers. The results were validated by using Standard Gamble technique. Finally, Monte Carlo Simulation was utilized in Treeage-Pro 2006-Suit software program in order to calculate expected utility generated by each treatment option. The results showed that, if the subject had mastectomy, mean value for the quality adjusted life years gained was 6.42; on the other hand, if the preference was lumpectomy, it was 7.00 out of a possible 10 years. Sensitivity analysis on transition probabilities to local recurrence and salvaged states was performed and two threshold values were observed. Additionally, sensitivity analysis on utilities showed that the model was more sensitive to no evidence of disease state; however, was not sensitive to utilities of local recurrence and salvaged states. The decision model was developed with reasonable success for early stage breast cancer patients, and tested by using general public data. The results obtained from these data showed that lumpectomy was more favourable for these participants.

  11. Cancer stem/progenitor cell active compound 8-quinolinol in combination with paclitaxel achieves an improved cure of breast cancer in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiangbing; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Peihua; Margolick, Joseph B; Yin, Deling; Zhang, Ying

    2009-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer is caused by cancer stem cells and the cure of breast cancer requires eradication of breast cancer stem cells. In this study, we established and characterized a sphere culture model derived from side population cells from the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. The sphere culture could be maintained long term and was enriched in cells expressing known breast cancer stem cell marker CD44+CD24-. These sphere cells showed higher colony formation ability in vitro and higher tumorigenicity in vivo than MCF7 cells, suggesting the enrichment of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. To identify compounds that preferentially inhibit the sphere cells, we performed a compound library screening. Two lead compounds, NSC24076 and NSC125034 and an analog of NSC125034, 8-quinolinol (8Q), were identified as having preferential activity against the sphere cells. 8Q showed some antitumor activity alone but had much better therapeutic effect and relapse prevention when combined with paclitaxel than either 8Q or paclitaxel alone in both MCF7 and MDA-MB-435 xenograft models. We propose that compounds selectively targeting cancer stem/progenitor cells when combined with standard chemotherapy drugs may produce an improved treatment of cancer without significant relapse.

  12. Combination of drug-conjugated SWCNT nanocarriers for efficient therapy of cancer stem cells in a breast cancer animal model.

    PubMed

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Asma Sultana; Ratemi, Elaref; Halwani, Rabih

    2016-03-10

    Targeting breast cancer and more specifically cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation, responsible for tumor growth, resistance and self-renewal, using combination of therapeutic drugs selectively delivered via biocompatible nanocarriers, provides a novel approach for effective therapy. Here, we propose to evaluate the potential therapeutic efficacy of combining Paclitaxel and Salinomycin drugs actively targeted to both breast cancer and CSCs in xenograft murine model after conjugation with biocompatible CD44 antibody conjugated SWCNTs via hydrazone linker allowing pH-responsive release mechanism near the acidic tumor microenvironment. Both in vitro investigations on MDA-MB-231, sorted CSC negative or CSC positive fractions and in vivo evaluations on tumor-bearing mice using noninvasive bioluminescence and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the enhanced therapeutic effect of the combined therapy compared to treatment with individual drug-conjugated nanocarriers or free drug suspensions. Thus, confirmed the great promise of the developed SWCNTs drug delivery system for effective breast cancer treatment by targeting and eradicating both whole tumor cells and CSCs populations.

  13. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  14. Breast Cancer Detection Using Optical Vascular Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    growing characteristics in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the current non- invasive imaging technique . As a model for breast cancer...cells, to help improve technique detection and validation of the imaging system and protocols. In this work we used two human breast cancer models...brain cancer, and DLD-1 colon cancer). Our imaging technique examines the vasculature of the tumor through its response to inhalation of carbon

  15. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Preinvasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sgroi, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Preinvasive breast cancer accounts for approximately one-third of all newly diagnosed breast cancer cases in the United States and constitutes a spectrum of neoplastic lesions with varying degrees of differentiation and clinical behavior. High-throughput genetic, epigenetic, and gene-expression analyses have enhanced our understanding of the relationship of these early neoplastic lesions to normal breast tissue, and they strongly suggest that preinvasive breast cancer develops and evolves along two distinct molecular genetic and biological pathways that correlate with tumor grade. Although unique epigenetic and gene-expression changes are not observed in the tumor epithelial compartment during the transition from preinvasive to invasive disease, distinct molecular alterations are observed in the tumor-stromal and myoepithelial cells. This suggests that the stromal and myoepithelial microenvironment of preinvasive breast cancer actively participates in the transition from preinvasive to invasive disease. An improved understanding of the transition from preinvasive to invasive breast cancer will pave the way for novel preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19824828

  17. Mucin 1-specific immunotherapy in a mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Madsen, Cathy S; Ginardi, Amelia R; Tinder, Teresa L; Jacobs, Fred; Parker, Joanne; Agrawal, Babita; Longenecker, B Michael; Gendler, Sandra J

    2003-01-01

    Human mucin 1 (MUC1) is an epithelial mucin glycoprotein that is overexpressed in 90% of all adenocarcinomas including breast, lung, pancreas, prostate, stomach, colon, and ovary. MUC1 is a target for immune intervention, because, in patients with solid adenocarcinomas, low-level cellular and humoral immune responses to MUC1 have been observed, which are not sufficiently strong to eradicate the growing tumor. The hypothesis for this study is that enhancing MUC1-specific immunity will result in antitumor immunity. To test this, the authors have developed a clinically relevant breast cancer model that demonstrates peripheral and central tolerance to MUC1 and develops spontaneous tumors of the mammary gland. In these mice, the authors tested a vaccine formulation comprised of liposomal-MUC1 lipopeptide and human recombinant interleukin-2. Results indicate that when compared with untreated mice, immunized mice develop T cells that express intracellular IFN-gamma, are reactive with MHC class I H-2Db/MUC1 tetramer, and are cytotoxic against MUC1-expressing tumor cells in vitro. The presence of MUC1-specific CTL did not translate into a clinical response as measured by time of tumor onset, tumor burden, and survival. The authors demonstrate that some of the immune-evasion mechanisms used by the tumor cells include downregulation of MHC-class I molecule, expression of TGF-beta2, and decrease in IFN-gamma -expressing effector T cells as tumors progress. Finally, utilizing an injectable breast cancer model, the authors show that targeting a single tumor antigen may not be an effective antitumor treatment, but that immunization with dendritic cells fed with whole tumor lysate is effective in breaking tolerance and protecting mice from subsequent tumor challenge. A physiologically relevant spontaneous breast cancer model has been developed to test improved immunotherapeutic approaches.

  18. A dose- and time-controllable syngeneic animal model of breast cancer microcalcification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangbing; Misra, Preeti; Lunsford, Elaine P; Vannah, Joanne T; Liu, Yuxia; Lenkinski, Robert E; Frangioni, John V

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel diagnostic agents for the detection of breast cancer microcalcifications requires a reliable animal model. Based on previous work from our group, we hypothesized that a single systemic injection of recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rBMP-2) could be used to create such a model. The cDNA encoding mature human BMP-2 was expressed in BL21(DE3) bacteria, purified to homogeneity, and refolded as a dimer. Bioactivity was confirmed using a C2C12 alkaline phosphatase assay. rBMP-2 was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc, and its biodistribution and clearance were quantified after both intravenous (IV) and intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Fischer 344 rats bearing syngeneic R3230 breast tumors received a single intraperitoneal injection of rBMP-2 at a specified dose. Tumor microcalcification was quantified over time using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and microcomputed tomography (CT). rBMP-2 could be expressed in E. coli at high levels, isolated at >95% purity, and refolded to a bioactive dimer. Beta-phase half-life was 30.5 min after IV administration and 47.6 min after IP administration. Renal excretion was the primary mode of clearance. A single IP injection of >or=50 microg rBMP-2 when tumors were not yet palpable resulted in dose-dependent microcalcification in 8 of 8 R3230 tumors. No calcification was found in control tumors or in normal tissues and organs of animals injected with rBMP-2. Tumor calcification increased progressively between weeks 2 and 4 post-rBMP-2 injection. A single IP injection of rBMP-2 in rats bearing a syngeneic breast cancer will produce dose-dependent and time-dependent microcalcifications. This animal model lays the foundation for the development of novel diagnostic radiotracers for breast cancer.

  19. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  20. Breast Cancer Knowledge, Beliefs, and Screening Behaviors of College Women: Application of the Health Belief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilford, Kendra; McKinley, Erin; Turner, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death among US women, causes severe physiological problems, including treatment outcomes of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. It results in severe psychological suffering, including anxiety, depression, and disfigurement. One out of every 8 American women will develop breast cancer…

  1. Longitudinal in vivo transcutaneous observation of Raman signals from breast cancer during chemotherapy in small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-02-01

    Because mammography, the gold standard of breast cancer screening and monitoring treatment efficacy, has limitations, there is a necessity to have a new method for breast cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy is considered as one of the best alternative approaches due to its ability of visualizing (bio)chemical information of a matter. In this study, we hypothesized that the change of biochemical composition occurs earlier than morphological change in breast cancer during chemotherapy, and attempted to prove it by employing fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for longitudinal Raman measurement in small animal breast cancer model. To confirm the hypothesis, we measured Raman spectra of a tumor breast and the contralateral breast during chemotherapy for 4 fisher 344 female rats longitudinally. Principal component analysis and Raman spectral differences between breast tumor and contralateral normal breast did not show a clear difference between them which may have been caused by interference from skin. Thus, spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy will be employed in order to acquire the Raman signal directly from tumor while suppressing Raman signal from skin for the future study.

  2. Doxorubicin in Combination with a Small TGFβ Inhibitor: A Potential Novel Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Long; Agyin, Joseph; Tang, Yuping; Lin, Shu; Yeh, I-Tien; De, Keya; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggested that induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) might confer both metastatic and self-renewal properties to breast tumor cells resulting in drug resistance and tumor recurrence. TGFβ is a potent inducer of EMT and has been shown to promote tumor progression in various breast cancer cell and animal models. Principal Findings We report that chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin activates TGFβ signaling in human and murine breast cancer cells. Doxorubicin induced EMT, promoted invasion and enhanced generation of cells with stem cell phenotype in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro, which were significantly inhibited by a TGFβ type I receptor kinase inhibitor (TβRI-KI). We investigated the potential synergistic anti-tumor activity of TβR1-KI in combination with doxorubicin in animal models of metastatic breast cancer. Combination of Doxorubicin and TβRI-KI enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin in reducing tumor growth and lung metastasis in the 4T1 orthotopic xenograft model in comparison to single treatments. Doxorubicin treatment alone enhanced metastasis to lung in the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 orthotopic xenograft model and metastasis to bone in the 4T1 orthotopic xenograft model, which was significantly blocked when TβR1-KI was administered in combination with doxorubicin. Conclusions These observations suggest that the adverse activation of TGFβ pathway by chemotherapeutics in the cancer cells together with elevated TGFβ levels in tumor microenvironment may lead to EMT and generation of cancer stem cells resulting in the resistance to the chemotherapy. Our results indicate that the combination treatment of doxorubicin with a TGFβ inhibitor has the potential to reduce the dose and consequently the toxic side-effects of doxorubicin, and improve its efficacy in the inhibition of breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:20442777

  3. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  4. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-12

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  5. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  6. Prevention of Distant Lung Metastasis After Photodynamic Therapy Application in a Breast Cancer Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Portilho, Flávia Arruda; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Silva, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lacava, Zulmira Guerrero Marques; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the activity of photodynamic therapy mediated by aluminum-chlorophthalocyanine contained in a polymeric nanostructured carrier composed by methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride (PVM/MA) against local subcutaneous breast cancer tumors and its effects against distant metastasis in a mouse tumor model. In our results, we observed a decrease in breast cancer tumor growth, prevention of distant lung metastases, and a significant increased survival in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. In addition to these results, we observed that tumor-bearing mice without treatment developed a significant extension of liver hematopoiesis that was significantly reduced in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. We hypothesized and showed that this reduction in (1) metastasis and (2) liver hematopoiesis may be related to the systemic activity of immature hematopoietic cells, specifically the myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were suppressed in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. These cells produce a tolerogenic tumor environment that protects tumor tissues from immunological surveillance. Therefore, we suggest that photodynamic therapy could be employed in combination with other conventional therapies; such as surgery and radiotherapy, to improve the overall survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, as observed in our experimental resuIts.

  7. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity. PMID:27068794

  8. Premenopausal Obesity and Breast Cancer Growth Rates in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Shawna B; McGinley, John N; Neil, Elizabeth S; Thompson, Henry J

    2016-04-11

    Obese premenopausal women with breast cancer have poorer prognosis for long term survival, in part because their tumors are larger at the time of diagnosis than are found in normal weight women. Whether larger tumor mass is due to obesity-related barriers to detection or to effects on tumor biology is not known. This study used polygenic models for obesity and breast cancer to deconstruct this question with the objective of determining whether cell autonomous mechanisms contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer burden. Assessment of the growth rates of 259 chemically induced mammary carcinomas from rats sensitive to dietary induced obesity (DS) and of 143 carcinomas from rats resistant (DR) to dietary induced obesity revealed that tumors in DS rats grew 1.8 times faster than in DR rats. This difference may be attributed to alterations in cell cycle machinery that permit more rapid tumor cell accumulation. DS tumors displayed protein expression patterns consistent with reduced G1/S checkpoint inhibition and a higher threshold of factors required for execution of the apoptotic cell death pathway. These mechanistic insights identify regulatory targets for life style modifications or pharmacological interventions designed to disrupt the linkage between obesity and tumor burden.

  9. A model of breast cancer heterogeneity reveals vascular mimicry as a driver of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wagenblast, Elvin; Soto, Mar; Gutiérrez-Ángel, Sara; Hartl, Christina A.; Gable, Annika L.; Maceli, Ashley R.; Erard, Nicolas; Williams, Alissa M.; Kim, Sun Y.; Dickopf, Steffen; Harrell, J. Chuck; Smith, Andrew D.; Perou, Charles M.; Wilkinson, John E.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Knott, Simon R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metastasis requires that primary tumour cells evolve the capacity to intravasate into the lymphatic system or vasculature, and extravasate into and colonize secondary sites1. Others have demonstrated that individual cells within complex populations show heterogeneity in their capacity to form secondary lesions2–5. Here we develop a polyclonal mouse model of breast tumour heterogeneity, and show that distinct clones within a mixed population display specialization, for example, dominating the primary tumour, contributing to metastatic populations, or showing tropism for entering the lymphatic or vasculature systems. We correlate these stable properties to distinct gene expression profiles. Those clones that efficiently enter the vasculature express two secreted proteins, Serpine2 and Slpi, which were necessary and sufficient to program these cells for vascular mimicry. Our data indicate that these proteins not only drive the formation of extra-vascular networks but also ensure their perfusion by acting as anticoagulants. We propose that vascular mimicry drives the ability of some breast tumour cells to contribute to distant metastases while simultaneously satisfying a critical need of the primary tumour to be fed by the vasculature. Enforced expression of SERPINE2 and SLPI in human breast cancer cell lines also programmed them for vascular mimicry, and SERPINE2 and SLPI were overexpressed preferentially in human patients that had lung-metastatic relapse. Thus, these two secreted proteins, and the phenotype they promote, may be broadly relevant as drivers of metastatic progression in human cancer. PMID:25855289

  10. The selective estrogen receptor downregulator GDC-0810 is efficacious in diverse models of ER+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, James D; Darimont, Beatrice; Zhou, Wei; Arrazate, Alfonso; Young, Amy; Ingalla, Ellen; Walter, Kimberly; Blake, Robert A; Nonomiya, Jim; Guan, Zhengyu; Kategaya, Lorna; Govek, Steven P; Lai, Andiliy G; Kahraman, Mehmet; Brigham, Dan; Sensintaffar, John; Lu, Nhin; Shao, Gang; Qian, Jing; Grillot, Kate; Moon, Michael; Prudente, Rene; Bischoff, Eric; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; Bonnefous, Celine; Douglas, Karensa L; Julien, Jackaline D; Nagasawa, Johnny Y; Aparicio, Anna; Kaufman, Josh; Haley, Benjamin; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Wertz, Ingrid E; Lackner, Mark R; Nannini, Michelle A; Sampath, Deepak; Schwarz, Luis; Manning, Henry Charles; Tantawy, Mohammed Noor; Arteaga, Carlos L; Heyman, Richard A; Rix, Peter J; Friedman, Lori; Smith, Nicholas D; Metcalfe, Ciara; Hager, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    ER-targeted therapeutics provide valuable treatment options for patients with ER+ breast cancer, however, current relapse and mortality rates emphasize the need for improved therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of prevalent ESR1 mutations in relapsed tumors underscores a sustained reliance of advanced tumors on ERα signaling, and provides a strong rationale for continued targeting of ERα. Here we describe GDC-0810, a novel, non-steroidal, orally bioavailable selective ER downregulator (SERD), which was identified by prospectively optimizing ERα degradation, antagonism and pharmacokinetic properties. GDC-0810 induces a distinct ERα conformation, relative to that induced by currently approved therapeutics, suggesting a unique mechanism of action. GDC-0810 has robust in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of human breast cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts, including a tamoxifen-resistant model and those that harbor ERα mutations. GDC-0810 is currently being evaluated in Phase II clinical studies in women with ER+ breast cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15828.001 PMID:27410477

  11. A model of breast cancer heterogeneity reveals vascular mimicry as a driver of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wagenblast, Elvin; Soto, Mar; Gutiérrez-Ángel, Sara; Hartl, Christina A; Gable, Annika L; Maceli, Ashley R; Erard, Nicolas; Williams, Alissa M; Kim, Sun Y; Dickopf, Steffen; Harrell, J Chuck; Smith, Andrew D; Perou, Charles M; Wilkinson, John E; Hannon, Gregory J; Knott, Simon R V

    2015-04-16

    Cancer metastasis requires that primary tumour cells evolve the capacity to intravasate into the lymphatic system or vasculature, and extravasate into and colonize secondary sites. Others have demonstrated that individual cells within complex populations show heterogeneity in their capacity to form secondary lesions. Here we develop a polyclonal mouse model of breast tumour heterogeneity, and show that distinct clones within a mixed population display specialization, for example, dominating the primary tumour, contributing to metastatic populations, or showing tropism for entering the lymphatic or vasculature systems. We correlate these stable properties to distinct gene expression profiles. Those clones that efficiently enter the vasculature express two secreted proteins, Serpine2 and Slpi, which were necessary and sufficient to program these cells for vascular mimicry. Our data indicate that these proteins not only drive the formation of extravascular networks but also ensure their perfusion by acting as anticoagulants. We propose that vascular mimicry drives the ability of some breast tumour cells to contribute to distant metastases while simultaneously satisfying a critical need of the primary tumour to be fed by the vasculature. Enforced expression of SERPINE2 and SLPI in human breast cancer cell lines also programmed them for vascular mimicry, and SERPINE2 and SLPI were overexpressed preferentially in human patients that had lung-metastatic relapse. Thus, these two secreted proteins, and the phenotype they promote, may be broadly relevant as drivers of metastatic progression in human cancer.

  12. Variable selection in semiparametric cure models based on penalized likelihood, with application to breast cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Peng, Yingwei; Tu, Dongsheng; Liang, Hua

    2012-10-30

    Survival data with a sizable cure fraction are commonly encountered in cancer research. The semiparametric proportional hazards cure model has been recently used to analyze such data. As seen in the analysis of data from a breast cancer study, a variable selection approach is needed to identify important factors in predicting the cure status and risk of breast cancer recurrence. However, no specific variable selection method for the cure model is available. In this paper, we present a variable selection approach with penalized likelihood for the cure model. The estimation can be implemented easily by combining the computational methods for penalized logistic regression and the penalized Cox proportional hazards models with the expectation-maximization algorithm. We illustrate the proposed approach on data from a breast cancer study. We conducted Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. We used and compared different penalty functions in the simulation studies.

  13. NKTR-102 Efficacy versus irinotecan in a mouse model of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Nounou, Mohamed I; Hye, Tanvirul; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori; Mohan, Neel K; Eldon, Michael A; Hoch, Ute; Lockman, Paul R

    2015-10-13

    Brain metastases are an increasing problem in women with invasive breast cancer. Strategies designed to treat brain metastases of breast cancer, particularly chemotherapeutics such as irinotecan, demonstrate limited efficacy. Conventional irinotecan distributes poorly to brain metastases; therefore, NKTR-102, a PEGylated irinotecan conjugate should enhance irinotecan and its active metabolite SN38 exposure in brain metastases leading to brain tumor cytotoxicity. Female nude mice were intracranially or intracardially implanted with human brain seeking breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231Br) and dosed with irinotecan or NKTR-102 to determine plasma and tumor pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and SN38. Tumor burden and survival were evaluated in mice treated with vehicle, irinotecan (50 mg/kg), or NKTR-102 low and high doses (10 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg respectively). NKTR-102 penetrates the blood-tumor barrier and distributes to brain metastases. NKTR-102 increased and prolonged SN38 exposure (>20 ng/g for 168 h) versus conventional irinotecan (>1 ng/g for 4 h). Treatment with NKTR-102 extended survival time (from 35 days to 74 days) and increased overall survival for NKTR-102 low dose (30 % mice) and NKTR-102 high dose (50 % mice). Tumor burden decreased (37 % with 10 mg/kg NKTR-102 and 96 % with 50 mg/kg) and lesion sizes decreased (33 % with 10 mg/kg NKTR-102 and 83 % with 50 mg/kg NKTR-102) compared to conventional irinotecan treated animals. Elevated and prolonged tumor SN38 exposure after NKTR-102 administration appears responsible for increased survival in this model of breast cancer brain metastasis. Further, SN38 concentrations observed in this study are clinically achieved with 145 mg/m(2) NKTR-102, such as those used in the BEACON trial, underlining translational relevance of these results.

  14. The Neoadjuvant Model Is Still the Future for Drug Development in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    DeMichele, Angela; Yee, Douglas; Berry, Donald A; Albain, Kathy S; Benz, Christopher C; Boughey, Judy; Buxton, Meredith; Chia, Stephen K; Chien, Amy J; Chui, Stephen Y; Clark, Amy; Edmiston, Kirsten; Elias, Anthony D; Forero-Torres, Andres; Haddad, Tufia C; Haley, Barbara; Haluska, Paul; Hylton, Nola M; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaplan, Henry; Korde, Larissa; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Liu, Minetta C; Melisko, Michelle; Minton, Susan E; Moulder, Stacy L; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Paoloni, Melissa; Park, John W; Parker, Barbara A; Perlmutter, Jane; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rugo, Hope; Symmans, Fraser; Tripathy, Debasish; van't Veer, Laura J; Viscusi, Rebecca K; Wallace, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Yau, Christina; Esserman, Laura J

    2015-07-01

    The many improvements in breast cancer therapy in recent years have so lowered rates of recurrence that it is now difficult or impossible to conduct adequately powered adjuvant clinical trials. Given the many new drugs and potential synergistic combinations, the neoadjuvant approach has been used to test benefit of drug combinations in clinical trials of primary breast cancer. A recent FDA-led meta-analysis showed that pathologic complete response (pCR) predicts disease-free survival (DFS) within patients who have specific breast cancer subtypes. This meta-analysis motivated the FDA's draft guidance for using pCR as a surrogate endpoint in accelerated drug approval. Using pCR as a registration endpoint was challenged at ASCO 2014 Annual Meeting with the presentation of ALTTO, an adjuvant trial in HER2-positive breast cancer that showed a nonsignificant reduction in DFS hazard rate for adding lapatinib, a HER-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, to trastuzumab and chemotherapy. This conclusion seemed to be inconsistent with the results of NeoALTTO, a neoadjuvant trial that found a statistical improvement in pCR rate for the identical lapatinib-containing regimen. We address differences in the two trials that may account for discordant conclusions. However, we use the FDA meta-analysis to show that there is no discordance at all between the observed pCR difference in NeoALTTO and the observed HR in ALTTO. This underscores the importance of appropriately modeling the two endpoints when designing clinical trials. The I-SPY 2/3 neoadjuvant trials exemplify this approach.

  15. The Efficacy of Trastuzumab in Animal Models of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Canhong; Guo, Bin; Sena, Emily S.; Macleod, Malcolm R.; Yuan, Yawei; Hirst, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequent cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Trastuzumab is an effective treatment, the first monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). To inform the development of other effective treatments we report summary estimates of efficacy of trastuzumab on survival and tumour volume in animal models of breast cancer. Methods We searched PubMed and EMBASE systematically to identify publications testing trastuzumab in animal models of breast cancer. Data describing tumour volume, median survival and animal features were extracted and we assessed quality using a 12-item checklist. We analysed the impact of study design and quality and evidence for publication bias. Results We included data from 83 studies reporting 169 experiments using 2076 mice. Trastuzumab treatment caused a substantial reduction in tumour growth, with tumours in treated animals growing to 32.6% of the volume of tumours in control animals (95%CI 27.8%-38.2%). Median survival was prolonged by a factor of 1.45 (1.30–1.62). Many study design and quality features accounted for between-study heterogeneity and we found evidence suggesting publication bias. Conclusion We have found trastuzumab to be effective in animal breast cancer models across a range of experimental circumstances. However the presence of publication bias and a low prevalence of measures to reduce bias provide a focus for future improvements in preclinical breast cancer research. PMID:27463246

  16. The Efficacy of Trastuzumab in Animal Models of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Canhong; Guo, Bin; Sena, Emily S; Macleod, Malcolm R; Yuan, Yawei; Hirst, Theodore C

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Trastuzumab is an effective treatment, the first monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). To inform the development of other effective treatments we report summary estimates of efficacy of trastuzumab on survival and tumour volume in animal models of breast cancer. We searched PubMed and EMBASE systematically to identify publications testing trastuzumab in animal models of breast cancer. Data describing tumour volume, median survival and animal features were extracted and we assessed quality using a 12-item checklist. We analysed the impact of study design and quality and evidence for publication bias. We included data from 83 studies reporting 169 experiments using 2076 mice. Trastuzumab treatment caused a substantial reduction in tumour growth, with tumours in treated animals growing to 32.6% of the volume of tumours in control animals (95%CI 27.8%-38.2%). Median survival was prolonged by a factor of 1.45 (1.30-1.62). Many study design and quality features accounted for between-study heterogeneity and we found evidence suggesting publication bias. We have found trastuzumab to be effective in animal breast cancer models across a range of experimental circumstances. However the presence of publication bias and a low prevalence of measures to reduce bias provide a focus for future improvements in preclinical breast cancer research.

  17. Survival Analysis of Patients with Breast Cancer using Weibull Parametric Model.

    PubMed

    Baghestani, Ahmad Reza; Moghaddam, Sahar Saeedi; Majd, Hamid Alavi; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Nafissi, Nahid; Gohari, Kimiya

    2015-01-01

    The Cox model is known as one of the most frequently-used methods for analyzing survival data. However, in some situations parametric methods may provide better estimates. In this study, a Weibull parametric model was employed to assess possible prognostic factors that may affect the survival of patients with breast cancer. We studied 438 patients with breast cancer who visited and were treated at the Cancer Research Center in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences during 1992 to 2012; the patients were followed up until October 2014. Patients or family members were contacted via telephone calls to confirm whether they were still alive. Clinical, pathological, and biological variables as potential prognostic factors were entered in univariate and multivariate analyses. The log-rank test and the Weibull parametric model with a forward approach, respectively, were used for univariate and multivariate analyses. All analyses were performed using STATA version 11. A P-value lower than 0.05 was defined as significant. On univariate analysis, age at diagnosis, level of education, type of surgery, lymph node status, tumor size, stage, histologic grade, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and lymphovascular invasion had a statistically significant effect on survival time. On multivariate analysis, lymph node status, stage, histologic grade, and lymphovascular invasion were statistically significant. The one-year overall survival rate was 98%. Based on these data and using Weibull parametric model with a forward approach, we found out that patients with lymphovascular invasion were at 2.13 times greater risk of death due to breast cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  19. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K H; Millard, P S

    1996-10-01

    The Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer conducted a meta-analysis of data from 10 cohort and 44 case-control studies of the association between combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer. 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women with no breast cancer from 25 countries worldwide were studied. Current OC users faced a 24% increased risk of developing breast cancer (confidence interval = 1.15-1.33). This risk fell steadily after cessation and reached 0 at 10 years and thereafter. Use of OCs with higher doses were associated with a greater risk of breast cancer than medium or low-dose OCs. The number of excess cancers in women while using OCs and up to 10 years after OC cessation stood at 0.5/10,000 women 16-19 years old, 1.5/10,000 women 20-24 years old, and 4.7/10,000 women 25-29 years old. The elevated risk of developing breast cancer did not differ by country of origin, ethnic background, reproductive history, or family history of breast cancer. OC users had less clinically advanced breast cancer than never-users who had breast cancer. This finding plus the moderate reduced risk of breast cancer more than 10 years after OC cessation suggest that OCs may effect earlier diagnosis of existing breast cancer instead of causing new breast cancers. The findings of this meta-analysis along with a plausible biologic mechanism (estrogen stimulates breast cancer cells) suggest a causal relationship between OC use and breast cancer. They also indicate that the risk is small, decreases with time, and is lower among low-dose OC users. It is reassuring that the breast cancers found among OC users is less clinically advanced than those found in never-users.

  20. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  1. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000830.htm Understanding your breast cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot ...

  2. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. Survival benefit with radium-223 dichloride in a mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Suominen, Mari I; Rissanen, Jukka P; Käkönen, Rami; Fagerlund, Katja M; Alhoniemi, Esa; Mumberg, Dominik; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Halleen, Jussi M; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Scholz, Arne

    2013-06-19

    Bone metastases are associated with increased morbidity and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Radium-223 dichloride is a calcium mimetic that localizes to bone, providing targeted therapy for skeletal metastasis. We investigated the mode of action of radium-223 dichloride using breast cancer cell, osteoclast, and osteoblast cultures as well as a mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis. A single dose of radium-223 dichloride was used in three different settings mimicking the prevention or treatment of bone metastasis. Disease progression was monitored using fluorescence and radiographic imaging and histological analyses. The effect of radium-223 dichloride alone and in combination with doxorubicin or zoledronic acid on survival of mice was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier methods. All statistical tests used were two-sided. Radium-223 dichloride incorporated into bone matrix and inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells and differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts (all P values < .001) in vitro. In an established bone metastasis setting, radium-223 dichloride prevented tumor-induced cachexia (0/14 vs 7/14 control mice) and decreased osteolysis by 56% and tumor growth by 43% (all P values < .05). Radium-223 dichloride induced double-strand DNA breaks in cancer cells in vivo. Finally, radium-223 dichloride extended survival as a monotherapy (29.2 days, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 26.6 to 31.8 days, P = .039) and in combination with zoledronic acid (31.4 days, 95% CI = 28.8 to 34.0 days, P = .004) or doxorubicin (31.5 days, 95% CI = 29.5 to 33.5 days, P < .001) compared to the vehicle group (24.9 days, 95% CI = 23.4 to 26.4 days). Similar but even more pronounced effects were observed when radium-223 dichloride was administered in a preventive or micrometastatic setting. Our findings strongly support the development of radium-223 dichloride for the treatment of breast cancer patients with or at high risk of developing bone metastases.

  5. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  6. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    DOE PAGES

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-04-21

    When trying to explore the biology and etiology of human cancers, clinically relevant human culture models are essential. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. Here, we suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accuratemore » interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context.« less

  7. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ≤1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

  8. Breast cancer awareness among Turkish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Celik, Sevim; Tasdemir, Nurten; Sancak, Hulya; Demirel, Merve; Akman, Ozlem; Kara, Merve

    2014-01-01

    This study conducted to determine breast cancer awareness and influencing factors among nursing students in the West Black Sea Region in Turkey. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between April-May, 2014. The sample was 270 female nursing students. Data were collected by Personal Information Form and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). The students' mean age was 21.6±2.09 and 81.1% had knowledge about breast cancer from their academic education. It is found that 63.7% of the students performed Breast Self-Examination (BSE) and 11.1% had a family member diagnosed with breast cancer. The CHBMS mean score of the students was 117.7±14.5. Breast cancer awareness of nursing students is on a good level and was affected by family history of breast cancer and health beliefs.

  9. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  10. Aromatase and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Sabnis, G; Jelovac, D

    2006-12-01

    Several aromatase inhibitors and also new antiestrogens are now available for treating breast cancer. We have developed a model to compare the antitumor efficacy of these agents and to explore strategies for their optimal use. Results from the model have been predictive of clinical outcome. In this model, tumors are grown in ovariectomized, immunodeficient mice from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with the aromatase gene (MCF-7Ca). The possibility that blockade of estrogen action and estrogen synthesis may be synergistic was explored by treating mice with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and the antiestrogen tamoxifen alone and in combination. The results indicated that letrozole alone was better than all other treatments. In addition, when tamoxifen treatment was no longer effective, tumor growth was significantly reduced in mice switched to letrozole treatment. However, tumors ultimately began to grow during continued treatment. To investigate the mechanisms by which tumors eventually adapt and grow during letrozole treatment, we determined the expression of signaling proteins in tumors during the course of letrozole treatment compared to the tumors of control mice. Tumors initially up-regulated the ER while responding to treatment, but subsequently receptor levels decreased in tumors unresponsive to letrozole. Also, Her-2 and adapter proteins (p-Shc and Grb-2) as well as all of the signaling proteins in the MAPK cascade (p-Raf, p-Mekl/2, and p-MAPK), but not in the Pl3/Akt pathway, were increased in tumors no longer responsive to letrozole. To investigate whether sensitivity to letrozole could be regained, cells were isolated from the letrozole resistant tumors (LTLT) and treated with inhibitors of the MAPKinase pathway (PD98059 and UO126). These compounds reduced MAPK activity and increased ER expression. EGFR/Her-2 inhibitors, gefitinib and AEE78S although not effective in the parental MCF-70a cells, restored the sensitivity of LTLT cells to

  11. Two Models of Caregiver Strain and Bereavement Adjustment: A Comparison of Husband and Daughter Caregivers of Breast Cancer Hospice Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Lori L.; Guarnaccia, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Caregiver bereavement adjustment literature suggests opposite models of impact of role strain on bereavement adjustment after care-recipient death--a Complicated Grief Model and a Relief Model. This study tests these competing models for husband and adult-daughter caregivers of breast cancer hospice patients. Design and Methods: This…

  12. A Model for Breast Cancer-Induced Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    524, 1990. 17. Terman BI, Carrion ME, Kovacs E, Rasmussen BA, Eddy RL, Shows TB. Identification of a new endothelial cell growth factor receptor...tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate on adhesiveness and lung-colonizing ability of Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Cancer Res 46:375-380. iV61 Tamaoki T, Nomoto H

  13. Carcinogen metabolism, cigarette smoking, and breast cancer risk: a Bayes model averaging approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Standard logistic regression with or without stepwise selection has the disadvantage of not incorporating model uncertainty and the dependency of estimates on the underlying model into the final inference. We explore the use of a Bayes Model Averaging approach as an alternative to analyze the influence of genetic variants, environmental effects and their interactions on disease. Methods Logistic regression with and without stepwise selection and Bayes Model Averaging were applied to a population-based case-control study exploring the association of genetic variants in tobacco smoke-related carcinogen pathways with breast cancer. Results Both regression and Bayes Model Averaging highlighted a significant effect of NAT1*10 on breast cancer, while regression analysis also suggested a significant effect for packyears and for the interaction of packyears and NAT2. Conclusions Bayes Model Averaging allows incorporation of model uncertainty, helps reduce dimensionality and avoids the problem of multiple comparisons. It can be used to incorporate biological information, such as pathway data, into the analysis. As with all Bayesian analysis methods, careful consideration must be given to prior specification. PMID:21080951

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Hormones and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    OHE 1 hypothesis are cancer patients and lacto- vegetarians . The evidence is rather clear that certain sparse. Schneider and co-workers used a Both of... Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Giske Ursin, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles...TYPE AND DATES COVERED I October 1997 Final (30 Sep 94 - 29 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Hormones and Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J

  16. Vasopressin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    receptors7:on-breast cancer cells represents a way in which these peptides might influence cancer cell pathophysiology. However, the expression of...National Institutes of Health . In the conduct of research utilIzing recombinant DNA, the nvestigator(s) adhered to the NIH G.idelines for Research...possible autocrine/paracrine role for this peptide in cancer cells. In support of this hypothesis vasopressin was shown to have a growth-promoting influence

  17. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Doğer, Emek; Calışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences.

  18. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  19. The cancer genetics and pathology of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deb, Siddhartha; Lakhani, Sunil R; Ottini, Laura; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon and poorly understood disease. Recent molecular studies have shown important differences from female breast cancer which are likely to influence treatment strategies from the current female-based management towards a more tailored approach. Significantly more MBCs than female breast cancers arise with an underlying germline cancer predisposition, and display a vastly different penetrance compared with females. Furthermore, the genophenotypical association of basal-like cancer with BRCA1 present in female breast cancer is not observed in male breast cancer. Differences in somatic changes between male and female breast cancer have also been reported, with particular enrichment of PIK3CA mutations and a paucity of TP53 mutations. In general, chromosomal-based changes, in particular regions of gains, are seen more frequently in male than female breast cancer and methylation is seen less frequently. Clinically, several molecular subtypes with prognostic relevance have been described, including chromosomal complex high and methylation high groups, and subgroups with profiling signatures pertaining to epithelial mesenchymal transition and hormonal therapy insensitivity. As with female breast cancer, attention to male specific multicentre trials based on the individual characteristics are needed, together with establishment of reliable preclinical models to understand more clearly the pathogenesis of male breast cancer and improve the general poor outcome of this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Color model comparative analysis for breast cancer diagnosis using H and E stained images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyu; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital cancer diagnosis is a research realm where signal processing techniques are used to analyze and to classify color histopathology images. Different from grayscale image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging or X-ray, colors in histopathology images convey large amount of histological information and thus play significant role in cancer diagnosis. Though color information is widely used in histopathology works, as today, there is few study on color model selections for feature extraction in cancer diagnosis schemes. This paper addresses the problem of color space selection for digital cancer classification using H and E stained images, and investigates the effectiveness of various color models (RGB, HSV, CIE L*a*b*, and stain-dependent H and E decomposition model) in breast cancer diagnosis. Particularly, we build a diagnosis framework as a comparison benchmark and take specific concerns of medical decision systems into account in evaluation. The evaluation methodologies include feature discriminate power evaluation and final diagnosis performance comparison. Experimentation on a publicly accessible histopathology image set suggests that the H and E decomposition model outperforms other assessed color spaces. For reasons behind various performance of color spaces, our analysis via mutual information estimation demonstrates that color components in the H and E model are less dependent, and thus most feature discriminate power is collected in one channel instead of spreading out among channels in other color spaces.

  1. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A. Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-01-01

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of adolescent total red meat was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintiles, RR, 1.42; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend=0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent poultry intake was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.75; 95%CI, 0.59-0.96; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 16% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 24% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). Higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  2. Photodynamic therapy as an effective therapeutic approach in MAME models of inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neha; Santiago, Ann Marie; Kessel, David; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2015-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive, FDA-approved therapy for treatment of endobronchial and esophageal cancers that are accessible to light. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and highly metastatic form of breast cancer that spreads to dermal lymphatics, a site that would be accessible to light. IBC patients have a relatively poor survival rate due to lack of targeted therapies. The use of PDT is underexplored for breast cancers but has been proposed for treatment of subtypes for which a targeted therapy is unavailable. We optimized and used a 3D mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) model of IBC to examine the effects of PDT using two treatment protocols. The first protocol used benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A (BPD) activated at doses ranging from 45 to 540 mJ/cm(2). The second PDT protocol used two photosensitizers: mono-L-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) and BPD that were sequentially activated. Photokilling by PDT was assessed by live-dead assays. Using a MAME model of IBC, we have shown a significant dose-response in photokilling by BPD-PDT. Sequential activation of NPe6 followed by BPD is more effective in photokilling of tumor cells than BPD alone. Sequential activation at light doses of 45 mJ/cm(2) for each agent resulted in >90 % cell death, a response only achieved by BPD-PDT at a dose of 360 mJ/cm(2). Our data also show that effects of PDT on a volumetric measurement of 3D MAME structures reflect efficacy of PDT treatment. Our study is the first to demonstrate the potential of PDT for treating IBC.

  3. Hyperinsulinemia Promotes Metastasis to the Lung in a Mouse Model of Her2-mediated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Rosalyn; Gallagher, Emily; Cohen, Dara; Tobin-Hess, Aviva; Alikhani, Nyosha; Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Haddad, Nadine; Yakar, Shoshana; LeRoith, Derek

    2014-01-01

    The Her2 oncogene is expressed in approximately 25% of human breast cancers and is associated with metastatic progression and poor outcome. Epidemiological studies report that breast cancer incidence and mortality rates are higher in women with type 2 diabetes. Here we use a mouse model of Her2-mediated breast cancer on a background of hyperinsulinemia to determine how elevated circulating insulin levels affect Her2-mediated primary tumor growth and lung metastasis. Hyperinsulinemic (MKR+/+) mice were crossed with doxycycline-inducible NeuNT (MTB/TAN) mice to produce the MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ mouse model. Both MTB/TAN and MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ mice were administered doxycycline in drinking water to induce NeuNT mammary tumor formation. In tumor tissues removed at two, four and six weeks of Neu-NT overexpression, we observed increased tumor mass and higher phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR)/insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R), suggesting that activation of these receptors in conditions of hyperinsulinemia could contribute to the increased growth of mammary tumors. After 12 weeks on doxycycline, although no significant further increase in tumor weight was observed in MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ compared to MTB/TAN mice, the number of lung metastases was significantly higher in MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ mice compared to controls (MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ 16.41 ± 4.18 vs. MTB/TAN 5.36 ± 2.72). In tumors at the six week time-point, we observed an increase in vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein and marker of mesenchymal cells, associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cancer associated fibroblasts. We conclude that hyperinsulinemia in MTB/TAN/MKR+/+ mice resulted in larger primary tumors, with more mesenchymal cells and therefore, more aggressive tumors with more numerous pulmonary metastases. PMID:23572162

  4. Photodynamic therapy as an effective therapeutic approach in MAME models of inflammatory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ann Marie; Kessel, David; Sloane, Bonnie F.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive, FDA-approved therapy for treatment of endobronchial and esophageal cancers that are accessible to light. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and highly metastatic form of breast cancer that spreads to dermal lymphatics, a site that would be accessible to light. IBC patients have a relatively poor survival rate due to lack of targeted therapies. The use of PDT is underexplored for breast cancers but has been proposed for treatment of subtypes for which a targeted therapy is unavailable. We optimized and used a 3D mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) model of IBC to examine the effects of PDT using two treatment protocols. The first protocol used benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A (BPD) activated at doses ranging from 45 to 540 mJ/cm2. The second PDT protocol used two photosensitizers: mono-l-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) and BPD that were sequentially activated. Photokilling by PDT was assessed by live–dead assays. Using a MAME model of IBC, we have shown a significant dose–response in photokilling by BPD–PDT. Sequential activation of NPe6 followed by BPD is more effective in photokilling of tumor cells than BPD alone. Sequential activation at light doses of 45 mJ/cm2 for each agent resulted in >90 % cell death, a response only achieved by BPD–PDT at a dose of 360 mJ/cm2. Our data also show that effects of PDT on a volumetric measurement of 3D MAME structures reflect efficacy of PDT treatment. Our study is the first to demonstrate the potential of PDT for treating IBC. PMID:26502410

  5. Microstructural models for diffusion MRI in breast cancer and surrounding stroma: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Siow, Bernard; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria; Hipwell, John H.; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Owen, Julie; Gazinska, Patrycja; Pinder, Sarah E.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Hawkes, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion signal in breast tissue has primarily been modelled using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and diffusion tensor (DT) models, which may be too simplistic to describe the underlying tissue microstructure. Formalin‐fixed breast cancer samples were scanned using a wide range of gradient strengths, durations, separations and orientations. A variety of one‐ and two‐compartment models were tested to determine which best described the data. Models with restricted diffusion components and anisotropy were selected in most cancerous regions and there were no regions in which conventional ADC or DT models were selected. Maps of ADC generally related to cellularity on histology, but maps of parameters from more complex models suggest that both overall cell volume fraction and individual cell size can contribute to the diffusion signal, affecting the specificity of ADC to the tissue microstructure. The areas of coherence in diffusion anisotropy images were small, approximately 1 mm, but the orientation corresponded to stromal orientation patterns on histology. PMID:28000292

  6. IMP1, an mRNA binding protein that reduces the metastatic potential of breast cancer in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nwokafor, Chiso U.; Sellers, Rani S.; Singer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Cells that are able to localize β-actin mRNA efficiently have decreased metastatic potential. Invasive carcinoma cells derived from primary mammary tumors have reduced levels of an RNA binding protein IMP1/ZBP1/IGF2BP1, required for β-actin mRNA localization. We showed previously that in human breast carcinoma cells in vitro, this protein suppresses invasion. In this work we examined whether its re-expression can suppress breast cancer metastasis in a breast cancer mouse model. We developed a mouse conditionally expressing IMP1-GFP (hereinafter referred to as the IMP1 transgene) specifically in the mammary gland of a PYMT breast cancer mouse. We found that mice conditionally expressing the IMP1 transgene showed little or no metastases to the lungs from the primary tumor in contrast to PYMT mice not expressing IMP1, which uniformly develop metastases at an early stage. PMID:27655671

  7. An analytic strategy for modeling multiple-item responses: a breast cancer symptom example.

    PubMed

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Verbitsky, Natalya; Given, Barbara; Given, Charles W

    2005-01-01

    Item Response Theory (IRT) is increasingly applied in health research to combine information from multiple-item responses. IRT posits that a person's susceptibility to a symptom is driven by the interaction of the characteristics of the symptom and person. This article describes the statistical background of incorporating IRT into a multilevel framework and extends this approach to longitudinal health outcomes, where the self-report method is used to construct a multi-item scale. A secondary analysis of data from 2 descriptive longitudinal studies is performed. The data include 21 symptoms reported across time by 350 women with breast cancer. A 3-level hierarchical linear model (HLM) was used for the analysis. Level 1 models the item responses, consisting of symptom presence or absence. Level 2 models the trajectory of each individual, representing change over time of the IRT-created latent variable symptom experience. Level 3 explains that trajectory using person-specific characteristics such as age and location of care. The purpose of the analysis is to examine if older and younger women with breast cancer differ in their symptom experience trajectory after controlling for location of care. Fatigue and pain were the most prevalent symptoms. The symptom experience of women with breast cancer was found to improve over time. Neither age nor location of care was significantly associated with the symptom experience trajectory. Embedding IRT into an HLM framework produces several benefits. The example provided demonstrates benefits through the creation of a latent symptom experience variable that can be used either as an outcome or as a covariate in another model, examining the latent symptom experience trajectory and its relationship with covariates at the individual level, and managing symptom nonresponse.

  8. Comparing the benefits of screening for breast cancer and lung cancer using a novel natural history model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ray S; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the impact of early detection of cancer, knowledge of how quickly primary tumors grow and at what size they shed lethal metastases is critical. We developed a natural history model of cancer to estimate the probability of disease-specific cure as a function of tumor size, the tumor volume doubling time (TVDT), and disease-specific mortality reduction achievable by screening. The model was applied to non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), separately. Model parameter estimates were based on Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry datasets and validated on screening trials. Compared to IDC, NSCLC is estimated to have a lower probability of disease-specific cure at the same detected tumor size, shed lethal metastases at smaller sizes (median: 19 mm for IDC versus 8 mm for NSCLC), have a TVDT that is almost half as long (median: 252 days for IDC versus 134 days for NSCLC). Consequently, NSCLC is associated with a lower mortality reduction from screening at the same screen detection threshold and screening interval. In summary, using a similar natural history model of cancer, we quantify the disease-specific curability attributable to screening for breast cancer, and separately lung cancer, in terms of the TVDT and onset of lethal metastases.

  9. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated.

  10. Effects of Breast Cancer Fatalism on Breast Cancer Awareness among Nursing Students in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kulakci, Hulya; Ayyildiz, Tulay Kuzlu; Yildirim, Nuriye; Ozturk, Ozlem; Topan, Aysel Kose; Tasdemir, Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and leading cause of death worldwide, including in Turkey. High perceptions of cancer fatalism are associated with lower rates of participation in screening for breast cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of breast cancer fatalism and other factors on breast cancer awareness among nursing students in Turkey. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at three universities in the Western Black Sea region. The sample was composed of 838 nursing students. Data were collected by Personal Information Form, Powe Fatalism Inventory (PFI) and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). Breast cancer fatalism perception of the students was at a low level. It was determined that students' seriousness perception was moderate, health motivation, BSE benefits and BSE self-efficacy perceptions were high, and BSE barriers and sensitivity perceptions were low. In addition, it was determined that students awareness of breast cancer was affected by breast cancer fatalism, class level, family history of breast cancer, knowledge on BSE, source of information on BSE, frequency of BSE performing, having breast examination by a healthcare professional within the last year and their health beliefs. In promoting breast cancer early diagnosis behaviour, it is recommended to evaluate fatalism perceptions and health beliefs of the students and to arrange training programs for this purpose.

  11. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  12. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180µl/kg) and low frequency pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by high frequency imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11–13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=−0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of

  13. Comparison of Logistic Regression and Artificial Neural Network Models in Breast Cancer Risk Estimation1

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Turgay; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Kahn, Charles E.; Woods, Ryan W.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2010-01-01

    Computer models in medical diagnosis are being developed to help physicians differentiate between healthy patients and patients with disease. These models can aid in successful decision making by allowing calculation of disease likelihood on the basis of known patient characteristics and clinical test results. Two of the most frequently used computer models in clinical risk estimation are logistic regression and an artificial neural network. A study was conducted to review and compare these two models, elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of each, and provide criteria for model selection. The two models were used for estimation of breast cancer risk on the basis of mammographic descriptors and demographic risk factors. Although they demonstrated similar performance, the two models have unique characteristics—strengths as well as limitations—that must be considered and may prove complementary in contributing to improved clinical decision making. PMID:19901087

  14. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Recognising symptoms of breast cancer as a reason for delayed presentation in Asian women--the psycho-socio-cultural model for breast symptom appraisal: opportunities for intervention.

    PubMed

    Taib, Nur Aishah; Yip, Cheng-Har; Low, Wah-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Advanced presentation of breast cancer and the problem of late diagnosis is well documented. Patient delay beyond three months has been shown to reduce survival. This paper aims to explore the experience of Malaysian women presenting with advanced breast cancer with regards to their interpretation of breast symptoms. Purposive sampling of 19 breast cancer patients presenting with delayed treatment and/ or advanced cancer diagnosed within two years at the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur were carried out. In-depth interviews were conducted using a self-devised interview guide. The interview guide covered the journey of the patient from discovering of symptoms to their present state. The audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim. NVivo 8 qualitative software was utilised for data management. Grounded theory with thematic analysis was utilised. Nine women delayed seeking diagnosis although recognizing the symptom, five did not recognize symptom, three delayed treatment and two did not delay health attention. Themes that emerged with regards to triggering help seeking behavior were: a) poor symptom knowledge and recognition; b) importance of knowledge of the disease and its' outcomes; c) role of coping mechanisms and affect; and lastly d) role of significant others in appraising a breast symptom. Symptom recognition remains an important public health issue in Malaysia. Educating women, their significant others and primary health and primary care providers in detecting early staged breast cancer are needed. Supporting and sanctioning women with breast symptoms are important. The psycho-social-cultural model of symptom appraisal may serve as an important addition to the fight against cancer in countries that do not have the resources for population based screening mammogram programmes.

  16. HSP90 empowers evolution of resistance to hormonal therapy in human breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Luke; Santagata, Sandro; Mendillo, Marc L; Lin, Nancy U; Proia, David A; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-12-23

    The efficacy of hormonal therapies for advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers is limited by the nearly inevitable development of acquired resistance. Efforts to block the emergence of resistance have met with limited success, largely because the mechanisms underlying it are so varied and complex. Here, we investigate a new strategy aimed at the very processes by which cancers evolve resistance. From yeast to vertebrates, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) plays a unique role among molecular chaperones by promoting the evolution of heritable new traits. It does so by regulating the folding of a diverse portfolio of metastable client proteins, many of which mediate adaptive responses that allow organisms to adapt and thrive in the face of diverse challenges, including those posed by drugs. Guided by our previous work in pathogenic fungi, in which very modest HSP90 inhibition impairs resistance to mechanistically diverse antifungals, we examined the effect of similarly modest HSP90 inhibition on the emergence of resistance to antiestrogens in breast cancer models. Even though this degree of inhibition fell below the threshold for proteotoxic activation of the heat-shock response and had no overt anticancer activity on its own, it dramatically impaired the emergence of resistance to hormone antagonists both in cell culture and in mice. Our findings strongly support the clinical testing of combined hormone antagonist-low-level HSP90 inhibitor regimens in the treatment of metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. At a broader level, they also provide promising proof of principle for a generalizable strategy to combat the pervasive problem of rapidly emerging resistance to molecularly targeted therapeutics.

  17. HSP90 empowers evolution of resistance to hormonal therapy in human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Whitesell, Luke; Santagata, Sandro; Mendillo, Marc L.; Lin, Nancy U.; Proia, David A.; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of hormonal therapies for advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers is limited by the nearly inevitable development of acquired resistance. Efforts to block the emergence of resistance have met with limited success, largely because the mechanisms underlying it are so varied and complex. Here, we investigate a new strategy aimed at the very processes by which cancers evolve resistance. From yeast to vertebrates, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) plays a unique role among molecular chaperones by promoting the evolution of heritable new traits. It does so by regulating the folding of a diverse portfolio of metastable client proteins, many of which mediate adaptive responses that allow organisms to adapt and thrive in the face of diverse challenges, including those posed by drugs. Guided by our previous work in pathogenic fungi, in which very modest HSP90 inhibition impairs resistance to mechanistically diverse antifungals, we examined the effect of similarly modest HSP90 inhibition on the emergence of resistance to antiestrogens in breast cancer models. Even though this degree of inhibition fell below the threshold for proteotoxic activation of the heat-shock response and had no overt anticancer activity on its own, it dramatically impaired the emergence of resistance to hormone antagonists both in cell culture and in mice. Our findings strongly support the clinical testing of combined hormone antagonist-low-level HSP90 inhibitor regimens in the treatment of metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. At a broader level, they also provide promising proof of principle for a generalizable strategy to combat the pervasive problem of rapidly emerging resistance to molecularly targeted therapeutics. PMID:25489079

  18. Endometriosis as a model for inflammation-hormone interactions in ovarian and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Modugno, Francesmary

    2006-04-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in a variety of cancers. In this review, we consider associations between endometriosis and cancers both local (ovarian) and distant (breast). We review the epidemiological data linking endometriosis to ovarian and breast cancers. We then consider evidence for a role for sex steroid hormones and for inflammation in the aetiology of each of these cancers. Finally, we consider that endometriosis may promote alterations in sex steroid hormones and inflammatory mediators. A possible explanation for the association between endometriosis and these reproductive cancers may then be local and systemic enhancement of aberrant inflammatory and hormonal mediators. If this hypothesis is true, endometriosis may need to be considered as a risk factor for ovarian and breast cancers, triggering increasingly intensive surveillance. Moreover, treatments for endometriosis may require consideration of the impact on long-term cancer risk.

  19. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  20. In vivo Raman spectroscopy for breast cancer: diagnosis in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, R.; Martins, M. A.; Ribeiro, D.; Carvalho, C.; Santos, E. A. P.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.; Ramalho, F.; Martinho, H.; Martin, A. A.

    2008-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been well established as a powerful method for studying biological tissues and diagnosing diseases. In this study we have developed a breast cancer animal model and collected in vivo Raman spectra of mammary glands of 27 Sprague-Dawley female rats treated with DMBA and 5 non-treated used as control group. A dispersive Raman spectrometer with a @785 nm laser excitation coupled a fiber optic probe and a CCD detector was used to obtain the spectra. The obtained in vivo transcutaneous Raman spectra have shown important differences between normal and abnormal tissues when acquired from one side to the other side of the lesion.

  1. Modeling prolactin actions in breast cancer in vivo: insights from the NRL-PRL mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Kathleen A; Shea, Michael P; Schuler, Linda A

    2015-01-01

    Elevated exposure to prolactin (PRL) is epidemiologically associated with an increased risk of aggressive ER+ breast cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms and crosstalk with other oncogenic factors, we developed the NRL-PRL mouse. In this model, mammary expression of a rat prolactin transgene raises local exposure to PRL without altering estrous cycling. Nulliparous females develop metastatic, histotypically diverse mammary carcinomas independent from ovarian steroids, and most are ER+. These characteristics resemble the human clinical disease, facilitating study of tumorigenesis, and identification of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches.

  2. Role of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    understood. We have found that the anti-inflammatory and insulin sensitizing effects of omega-3 fatty acids (ω3 FAs) are mediated by a specific G... triglyceride deposits. The ob/ob mouse becomes obese on a standard low-fat high- complex-carbohydrate rodent chow. This model relies on de novo lipid synthesis...mice. The PyMT needs to be bred on the male line as female mice get breast cancer and cannot breed. The male GPR120-/-:PyMT mice were being bred

  3. Modeling Prolactin Actions in Breast Cancer in vivo: Insights from the NRL-PRL Mouse

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Kathleen A.; Shea, Michael P.; Schuler, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated exposure to prolactin is epidemiologically associated with an increased risk of aggressive ER+ breast cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms and crosstalk with other oncogenic factors, we developed the NRL-PRL mouse. In this model, mammary expression of a rat prolactin transgene raises local exposure to prolactin without altering estrous cycling. Nulliparous females develop metastatic, histotypically diverse mammary carcinomas independent from ovarian steroids, and most are ER+. These characteristics resemble the human clinical disease, facilitating study of tumorigenesis, and identification of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25472540

  4. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  5. Radiation-enhanced lung cancer progression in a transgenic mouse model of lung cancer is predictive of outcomes in human lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Oliver; Batten, Kimberly G; Richardson, James A; Xie, Xian-Jin; Gazdar, Adi F; Kaisani, Aadil A; Girard, Luc; Behrens, Carmen; Suraokar, Milind; Fasciani, Gail; Wright, Woodring E; Story, Michael D; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Minna, John D; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-03-15

    Carcinogenesis is an adaptive process between nascent tumor cells and their microenvironment, including the modification of inflammatory responses from antitumorigenic to protumorigenic. Radiation exposure can stimulate inflammatory responses that inhibit or promote carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of radiation exposure on lung cancer progression in vivo and assess the relevance of this knowledge to human carcinogenesis. K-ras(LA1) mice were irradiated with various doses and dose regimens and then monitored until death. Microarray analyses were performed using Illumina BeadChips on whole lung tissue 70 days after irradiation with a fractionated or acute dose of radiation and compared with age-matched unirradiated controls. Unique group classifiers were derived by comparative genomic analysis of three experimental cohorts. Survival analyses were performed using principal component analysis and k-means clustering on three lung adenocarcinoma, three breast adenocarcinoma, and two lung squamous carcinoma annotated microarray datasets. Radiation exposure accelerates lung cancer progression in the K-ras(LA1) lung cancer mouse model with dose fractionation being more permissive for cancer progression. A nonrandom inflammatory signature associated with this progression was elicited from whole lung tissue containing only benign lesions and predicts human lung and breast cancer patient survival across multiple datasets. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that tumor cells drive predictive signature. These results demonstrate that radiation exposure can cooperate with benign lesions in a transgenic model of cancer by affecting inflammatory pathways, and that clinically relevant similarities exist between human lung and breast carcinogenesis. ©2014 AACR.

  6. Early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nettles-Carlson, B

    1989-01-01

    Timely, comprehensive screening for breast cancer is a major, though often overlooked, component of primary health care for women. This article reviews the scientific rationale for screening and outlines the current recommendations of the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force regarding the use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE). Nursing interventions to decrease barriers to effective screening are discussed, and an expanded role of nurses in breast cancer screening is proposed.

  7. The Combinational Polymorphisms of ORAI1 Gene Are Associated with Preventive Models of Breast Cancer in the Taiwanese

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Fu; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The ORAI calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1 (ORAI1) has been proven to be an important gene for breast cancer progression and metastasis. However, the protective association model between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ORAI1 gene was not investigated. Based on a published data set of 345 female breast cancer patients and 290 female controls, we used a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to identify the possible protective models of breast cancer association in terms of the SNPs of ORAI1 gene. Results showed that the PSO-generated models of 2-SNP (rs12320939-TT/rs12313273-CC), 3-SNP (rs12320939-TT/rs12313273-CC/rs712853-(TT/TC)), 4-SNP (rs12320939-TT/rs12313273-CC/rs7135617-(GG/GT)/rs712853-(TT/TC)), and 5-SNP (rs12320939-TT/rs12313273-CC/rs7135617-(GG/GT)/rs6486795-CC/rs712853-(TT/TC)) displayed low values of odds ratios (0.409–0.425) for breast cancer association. Taken together, these results suggested that our proposed PSO strategy is powerful to identify the combinational SNPs of rs12320939, rs12313273, rs7135617, rs6486795, and rs712853 of ORAI1 gene with a strongly protective association in breast cancer. PMID:26380267

  8. A steroid metabolizing gene variant in a polyfactorial model improves risk prediction in a high incidence breast cancer population

    PubMed Central

    Jupe, Eldon R.; Dalessandri, Kathie M.; Mulvihill, John J.; Miike, Rei; Knowlton, Nicholas S.; Pugh, Thomas W.; Zhao, Lue Ping; DeFreese, Daniele C.; Manjeshwar, Sharmila; Gramling, Bobby A.; Wiencke, John K.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background We have combined functional gene polymorphisms with clinical factors to improve prediction and understanding of sporadic breast cancer risk, particularly within a high incidence Caucasian population. Methods A polyfactorial risk model (PFRM) was built from both clinical data and functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) gene candidates using multivariate logistic regression analysis on data from 5022 US Caucasian females (1671 breast cancer cases, 3351 controls), validated in an independent set of 1193 women (400 cases, 793 controls), and reassessed in a unique high incidence breast cancer population (165 cases, 173 controls) from Marin County, CA. Results The optimized PFRM consisted of 22 SNPs (19 genes, 6 regulating steroid metabolism) and 5 clinical risk factors, and its 5-year and lifetime risk prediction performance proved significantly superior (~ 2-fold) over the Gail model (Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, BCRAT), whether assessed by odds (OR) or positive likelihood (PLR) ratios over increasing model risk levels. Improved performance of the PFRM in high risk Marin women was due in part to genotype enrichment by a CYP11B2 (-344T/C) variant. Conclusions and general significance Since the optimized PFRM consistently outperformed BCRAT in all Caucasian study populations, it represents an improved personalized risk assessment tool. The finding of higher Marin County risk linked to a CYP11B2 aldosterone synthase SNP associated with essential hypertension offers a new genetic clue to sporadic breast cancer predisposition. PMID:26673457

  9. Breast cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Berkowitz, G S

    1988-10-15

    The various risk factors for breast cancer have been recognized for many years. A table lists these established breast cancer risk factors together with the approximate magnitude of the increase in risk associated with them. Breast cancer incidence rates increase with age throughout the life span in Western countries, although the rate of increase is greater up to age 50 years than after 50 years. Breast cancer is more common among women in upper rather than lower social classes, among women who never have been married, among women living in urban areas, among women living in the northern US than in the southern US, and among whites than blacks, at least among those over age 50. Women in North American and Northern European countries have the highest risk for breast cancer, women in Southern European and Latin American countries are at intermediate risk, and women in Africa and Asian countries have the lowest risk. Yet, rapid rates of increase in incident rates have been noted in recent years in many Asian, Central European, and some South American countries. The later the age at which a woman has her 1st full-term pregnancy, the higher her risk for breast cancer; the earlier the age at menarche and the later the age at menopause the higher the risk; and among women who have a premenopausal oophorectomy, the earlier the age at which this occurs the lower the risk. Among postmenopausal women, obesity is associated with an increase in risk. Lactation is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer risk. Some current research is considering potential risk factors that have not been well studied in the past, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, caffeine consumption, exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), emotional stress, exposure to electric power, and lack of physical activity. Other areas of current research reviewed here include radiation, mammographic parenchymal patterns, a high-fat diet, use of oral contraceptives (OCs), use of estrogen

  10. Inoculated Cell Density as a Determinant Factor of the Growth Dynamics and Metastatic Efficiency of a Breast Cancer Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Ana C.; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Moura, Vera; Lacerda, Manuela; Figueiredo, Paulo; Simões, Sérgio; Dias, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2016-01-01

    4T1 metastatic breast cancer model have been widely used to study stage IV human breast cancer. However, the frequent inoculation of a large number of cells, gives rise to fast growing tumors, as well as to a surprisingly low metastatic take rate. The present work aimed at establishing the conditions enabling high metastatic take rate of the triple-negative murine 4T1 syngeneic breast cancer model. An 87% 4T1 tumor incidence was observed when as few as 500 cancer cells were implanted. 4T1 cancer cells colonized primarily the lungs with 100% efficiency, and distant lesions were also commonly identified in the mesentery and pancreas. The drastic reduction of the number of inoculated cells resulted in increased tumor doubling times and decreased specific growth rates, following a Gompertzian tumor expansion. The established conditions for the 4T1 mouse model were further validated in a therapeutic study with peguilated liposomal doxorubicin, in clinical used in the setting of metastatic breast cancer. Inoculated cell density was proven to be a key methodological aspect towards the reproducible development of macrometastases in the 4T1 mouse model and a more reliable pre-clinical assessment of antimetastatic therapies. PMID:27820870

  11. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  12. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  13. Prospective Approach to Breast Cancer Risk Prediction in African American Women: The Black Women's Health Study Model

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, Deborah A.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.; Palmer, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer risk prediction models have underestimated risk for African American women, contributing to lower recruitment rates in prevention trials. A model previously developed for African American women was found to underestimate risk in the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS). Methods We developed a breast cancer risk model for African American women using relative risks derived from 10 years of follow-up of BWHS participants age 30 to 69 years at baseline. Using the subsequent 5 years of follow-up data, we evaluated calibration as the ratio of expected to observed number of breast cancers and assessed discriminatory accuracy using the concordance statistic. Results The BWHS model included family history, previous biopsy, body mass index at age 18 years, age at menarche, age at first birth, oral contraceptive use, bilateral oophorectomy, estrogen plus progestin use, and height. There was good agreement between predicted and observed number of breast cancers overall (expected-to-observed ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.05) and in most risk factor categories. Discriminatory accuracy was higher for women younger than age 50 years (area under the curve [AUC], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.65) than for women age ≥ 50 years (AUC, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.59). Using a 5-year predicted risk of 1.66% or greater as a cut point, 2.8% of women younger than 50 years old and 32.2% of women ≥ 50 years old were classified as being at elevated risk of invasive breast cancer. Conclusion The BWHS model was well calibrated overall, and the predictive ability was best for younger women. The proportion of women predicted to meet the 1.66% cut point commonly used to determine eligibility for breast cancer prevention trials was greatly increased relative to previous models. PMID:25624428

  14. Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Skaane, Per

    2017-01-01

    To give an overview of studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in breast cancer screening. The implementation of tomosynthesis in breast imaging is rapidly increasing world-wide. Experimental clinical studies of relevance for DBT screening have shown that tomosynthesis might have a great potential in breast cancer screening, although most of these retrospective reading studies are based on small populations, so that final conclusions are difficult to draw from individual reports. Several retrospective studies and three prospective trials on tomosynthesis in breast cancer screening have been published so far, confirming the great potential of DBT in mammography screening. The main results of these screening studies are presented. The retrospective screening studies from USA have all shown a significant decrease in the recall rate using DBT as adjunct to mammography. Most of these studies have also shown an increase in the cancer detection rate, and the non-significant results in some studies might be explained by a lack of statistical power. All the three prospective European trials have shown a significant increase in the cancer detection rate. The retrospective and the prospective screening studies comparing FFDM and DBT have all demonstrated that tomosynthesis has a great potential for improving breast cancer screening. DBT should be regarded as a better mammogram that could improve or overcome limitations of the conventional mammography, and tomosynthesis might be considered as the new technique in the next future of breast cancer screening.

  15. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  16. Key signalling nodes in mammary gland development and cancer. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling in experimental models of breast cancer progression and in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Jacqueline; Bergin, Orla; Bianchi, Alessandro; McNally, Sara; Martin, Finian

    2009-01-01

    Seven classes of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) intracellular signalling cascades exist, four of which are implicated in breast disease and function in mammary epithelial cells. These are the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathway, the ERK5 pathway, the p38 pathway and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. In some forms of human breast cancer and in many experimental models of breast cancer progression, signalling through the ERK1/2 pathway, in particular, has been implicated as being important. We review the influence of ERK1/2 activity on the organised three-dimensional association of mammary epithelial cells, and in models of breast cancer cell invasion. We assess the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor family signalling through ERK1/2 in models of breast cancer progression and the influence of ERK1/2 on its substrate, the oestrogen receptor, in this context. In parallel, we consider the importance of these MAPK-centred signalling cascades during the cycle of mammary gland development. Although less extensively studied, we highlight the instances of signalling through the p38, JNK and ERK5 pathways involved in breast cancer progression and mammary gland development.

  17. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. © AlphaMed Press.

  18. Development and characterization of a preclinical model of breast cancer lung micrometastatic to macrometastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C; Thorpe, Jessica E; Disch, Bryan C; Bastian, Anja; Hauser, Paul J; Farasyn, Taleah; Berry, William L; Hurst, Robert E; Ihnat, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500-1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30-60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2-30 brain micrometastases) two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly) was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis.

  19. Development and Characterization of a Preclinical Model of Breast Cancer Lung Micrometastatic to Macrometastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Disch, Bryan C.; Bastian, Anja; Hauser, Paul J.; Farasyn, Taleah; Berry, William L.; Hurst, Robert E.; Ihnat, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500–1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30–60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2–30 brain micrometastases) two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly) was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis. PMID:24878664

  20. A Three-Gene Model to Robustly Identify Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Desmedt, Christine; Loi, Sherene; Culhane, Aedin C.; Bontempi, Gianluca; Quackenbush, John; Sotiriou, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Background Single sample predictors (SSPs) and Subtype classification models (SCMs) are gene expression–based classifiers used to identify the four primary molecular subtypes of breast cancer (basal-like, HER2-enriched, luminal A, and luminal B). SSPs use hierarchical clustering, followed by nearest centroid classification, based on large sets of tumor-intrinsic genes. SCMs use a mixture of Gaussian distributions based on sets of genes with expression specifically correlated with three key breast cancer genes (estrogen receptor [ER], HER2, and aurora kinase A [AURKA]). The aim of this study was to compare the robustness, classification concordance, and prognostic value of these classifiers with those of a simplified three-gene SCM in a large compendium of microarray datasets. Methods Thirty-six publicly available breast cancer datasets (n = 5715) were subjected to molecular subtyping using five published classifiers (three SSPs and two SCMs) and SCMGENE, the new three-gene (ER, HER2, and AURKA) SCM. We used the prediction strength statistic to estimate robustness of the classification models, defined as the capacity of a classifier to assign the same tumors to the same subtypes independently of the dataset used to fit it. We used Cohen κ and Cramer V coefficients to assess concordance between the subtype classifiers and association with clinical variables, respectively. We used Kaplan–Meier survival curves and cross-validated partial likelihood to compare prognostic value of the resulting classifications. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results SCMs were statistically significantly more robust than SSPs, with SCMGENE being the most robust because of its simplicity. SCMGENE was statistically significantly concordant with published SCMs (κ = 0.65–0.70) and SSPs (κ = 0.34–0.59), statistically significantly associated with ER (V = 0.64), HER2 (V = 0.52) status, and histological grade (V = 0.55), and yielded similar strong prognostic value. Conclusion

  1. Risk determination and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Howell, Anthony; Anderson, Annie S; Clarke, Robert B; Duffy, Stephen W; Evans, D Gareth; Garcia-Closas, Montserat; Gescher, Andy J; Key, Timothy J; Saxton, John M; Harvie, Michelle N

    2014-09-28

    Breast cancer is an increasing public health problem. Substantial advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, but the introduction of methods to predict women at elevated risk and prevent the disease has been less successful. Here, we summarize recent data on newer approaches to risk prediction, available approaches to prevention, how new approaches may be made, and the difficult problem of using what we already know to prevent breast cancer in populations. During 2012, the Breast Cancer Campaign facilitated a series of workshops, each covering a specialty area of breast cancer to identify gaps in our knowledge. The risk-and-prevention panel involved in this exercise was asked to expand and update its report and review recent relevant peer-reviewed literature. The enlarged position paper presented here highlights the key gaps in risk-and-prevention research that were identified, together with recommendations for action. The panel estimated from the relevant literature that potentially 50% of breast cancer could be prevented in the subgroup of women at high and moderate risk of breast cancer by using current chemoprevention (tamoxifen, raloxifene, exemestane, and anastrozole) and that, in all women, lifestyle measures, including weight control, exercise, and moderating alcohol intake, could reduce breast cancer risk by about 30%. Risk may be estimated by standard models potentially with the addition of, for example, mammographic density and appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This review expands on four areas: (a) the prediction of breast cancer risk, (b) the evidence for the effectiveness of preventive therapy and lifestyle approaches to prevention, (c) how understanding the biology of the breast may lead to new targets for prevention, and (d) a summary of published guidelines for preventive approaches and measures required for their implementation. We hope that efforts to fill these and other gaps will lead to considerable advances in our

  2. Imagable 4T1 model for the study of late stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Kai; Fang, Min; Alroy, Joseph; Sahagian, G Gary

    2008-01-01

    Background The 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cell line is one of only a few breast cancer models with the capacity to metastasize efficiently to sites affected in human breast cancer. Here we describe two 4T1 cell lines modified to facilitate analysis of tumor growth and metastasis and evaluation of gene function in vivo. New information regarding the involvement of innate and acquired immunity in metastasis and other characteristics of the model relevant to its use in the study of late stage breast cancer are reported. Methods The lines were engineered for stable expression of firefly luciferase to allow tracking and quantitation of the cells in vivo. Biophotonic imaging was used to characterize growth and metastasis of the lines in vivo and an improved gene expression approach was used to characterize the basis for the metastatic phenotype that was observed. Results Growth of cells at the primary site was biphasic with metastasis detected during the second growth phase 5–6 weeks after introduction of the cells. Regression of growth, which occurred in weeks 3–4, was associated with extensive necrosis and infiltration of leukocytes. Biphasic tumor growth did not occur in BALB/c SCID mice indicating involvement of an acquired immune response in the effect. Hematopoiesis in spleen and liver and elevated levels of circulating leukocytes were observed at week 2 and increased progressively until death at week 6–8. Gene expression analysis revealed an association of several secreted factors including colony stimulatory factors, cytokines and chemokines, acute phase proteins, angiogenesis factors and ECM modifying proteins with the 4T1 metastatic phenotype. Signaling pathways likely to be responsible for production of these factors were also identified. Conclusion The production of factors that stimulate angiogenesis and ECM modification and induce hematopoiesis, recruitment and activation of leukocytes suggest that 4T1 tumor cells play a more direct role than previously

  3. Efficacy of a cathepsin K inhibitor in a preclinical model for prevention and treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Duong, Le T; Wesolowski, Gregg A; Leung, Patrick; Oballa, Renata; Pickarski, Maureen

    2014-12-01

    Cathepsin K (CatK) is essential for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. CatK expression is also detected in breast cancer cells that metastasize to bone. Here, the CatK inhibitor L-235 dosed in prevention (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) or treatment regimen (30 mg/kg) was compared with the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZOL, 7.5 μg/kg/wk, s.c.) in the intratibial injection model of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma in nude rats. Progression of osteolysis, skeletal tumor burden, and local metastasis was evaluated by radiography through 42 days and ex vivo μCT and histology. IHC and RT-PCR confirmed the increases in CatK protein and mRNA levels in human breast cancer primary and metastatic tumors. In the experimental model of breast cancer bone metastasis, L-235 dosed in preventive mode resulted in a dose-related reduction of osteolysis of 72%, 75%, and 87% respectively, compared with ZOL by 86% versus intact. Similarly, L-235 significantly reduced intratibial tumor volume by 29%, 40%, and 63%, respectively, compared with 56% by ZOL versus vehicle. Efficacy of L-235 and ZOL on reduction of osteolytic lesions and tumor burden was comparable in treatment versus preventive regimens. All L-235 doses inhibited cortical disruption and extraskeletal tumor growth to a level comparable with ZOL. Assessment of local metastasis demonstrated that treatment with the CatK inhibitor was more effective than ZOL in reducing breast cancer invasion. These data support the role of CatK in breast cancer skeletal growth and metastasis and CatK inhibitors may represent a novel oral therapy for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  4. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  5. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease.

  6. Ultrasound in Detecting Taxane-Induced Neuropathy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-15

    Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. Acid-sensitive lipidated doxorubicin prodrug entrapped in nanoemulsion impairs lung tumor metastasis in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Câmara, Ana Lygia; Nagel, Gregor; Tschiche, Harald R; Cardador, Camila Magalhães; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; de Oliveira, Daniela Mara; Alvim, Paula Queiroz; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Calderón, Marcelo; Figueiró Longo, João Paulo

    2017-08-01

    To develop an acid-sensitive lipidated, doxorubicin (Dox) prodrug (C16-Dox) to be entrapped in lipid nanoemulsion (NE-C16-Dox) as a nanocarrier to treat breast cancer models (in vitro and in vivo). We report the efficacy of NE-C16-Dox in in vitro experiments, as well as the improved chemotherapeutic index and tumor-control efficacy compared with treatment with free Dox in an in vivo murine 4T1 breast cancer model. In addition, NE-C16-Dox allowed the use of a higher dose of Dox, acceptable biocompatibility and a significant reduction in lung metastasis. Taken together, these results indicate that NE-C16-Dox is promising for breast cancer treatment, thus creating possibilities to translate these nanotechnology concepts to clinical applications.

  8. Breast cancer screening and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mai

    2009-01-01

    Annual screening mammograms have been shown to be cost-effective and are credited for the decline in mortality of breast cancer. New technologies including breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may further improve early breast cancer detection in asymptomatic women. Serum tumor markers such as CA 15-3, carcinoembyonic antigen (CEA), and CA 27-29 are ordered in the clinic mainly for disease surveillance, and not useful for detection of localized cancer. This review will discuss blood-based markers and breast-based markers, such as nipple/ductal fluid, with an emphasis on biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. In the future, it is likely that a combination approach to simultaneously measure multiple markers would be most successful in detecting early breast cancer. Ideally, such a biomarker panel should be able to detect breast cancer in asymptomatic patients, even in the setting of normal mammogram and physical examination results.

  9. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3Tyr705, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  10. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-03-26

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3(Tyr705), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. The Effect of Everolimus in an In Vitro Model of Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Mercatali, Laura; Spadazzi, Chiara; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Liverani, Chiara; De Vita, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Recine, Federica; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni

    2016-11-01

    Metastatic bone disease has a major impact on morbidity of breast cancer (BC) patients. Alterations in mTOR signaling are involved both in cancer progression and in osteoclast differentiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of mTOR inhibitor Everolimus (Eve) on osteoclastogenesis induced by triple negative BC cells. To this aim, we developed an in vitro human model of osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood monocytes co-cultured with the triple negative SCP2 and the hormonal receptor positive MCF7 cell lines. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining, evaluation of F actin rings and Calcitonin Receptor expression. Eve significantly reduced differentiation induced by cancer cells and resulted more effective when evaluated in combination with Denosumab and Zoledronic Acid (Zol). Combination with Zol showed a total abrogation of osteoclast differentiation induced by the triple negative cell line, not by MCF7. Finally, we observed that Eve was active in the inhibition of the crosstalk between cancer cells and osteoclasts reproduced by our model, highlighting a new therapeutic choice for the subsetting of triple negative BC patients. We observed a difference in the response to bone-targeted therapy with respect to BC subtypes. Our model may represent a valid platform for preclinical trials on bone-targeted drugs and for the study of the interplay of BC with bone stromal cells.

  14. The Effect of Everolimus in an In Vitro Model of Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Mercatali, Laura; Spadazzi, Chiara; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Liverani, Chiara; De Vita, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Recine, Federica; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease has a major impact on morbidity of breast cancer (BC) patients. Alterations in mTOR signaling are involved both in cancer progression and in osteoclast differentiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of mTOR inhibitor Everolimus (Eve) on osteoclastogenesis induced by triple negative BC cells. To this aim, we developed an in vitro human model of osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood monocytes co-cultured with the triple negative SCP2 and the hormonal receptor positive MCF7 cell lines. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining, evaluation of F actin rings and Calcitonin Receptor expression. Eve significantly reduced differentiation induced by cancer cells and resulted more effective when evaluated in combination with Denosumab and Zoledronic Acid (Zol). Combination with Zol showed a total abrogation of osteoclast differentiation induced by the triple negative cell line, not by MCF7. Finally, we observed that Eve was active in the inhibition of the crosstalk between cancer cells and osteoclasts reproduced by our model, highlighting a new therapeutic choice for the subsetting of triple negative BC patients. We observed a difference in the response to bone-targeted therapy with respect to BC subtypes. Our model may represent a valid platform for preclinical trials on bone-targeted drugs and for the study of the interplay of BC with bone stromal cells. PMID:27809291

  15. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was <12%. Reproducibility analysis was performed on animal data, and within-subject coefficients of variation ranged from 2 to 13% at the bulk level and 32% at the voxel level. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the reproducibility of an elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  16. Intratumoral heterogeneity in a p53 null mouse model of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Tsimelzon, Anna; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Fan, Cheng; Wolff, Andrew; Perou, Charles M.; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity correlates with clinical outcome and reflects the cellular complexity and dynamics within a tumor. Such heterogeneity is thought to contribute to radio- and chemoresistance since many treatments may only target certain tumor cell subpopulations. A better understanding of the functional interactions between various subpopulations of cells, therefore, may help in the development of effective cancer treatments. We identified a unique subpopulation of tumor cells expressing mesenchymal-like markers in a p53 null mouse model of basal-like breast cancer using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and microarray analysis. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed the existence of crosstalk between these “mesenchymal-like” cells and tumor-initiating cells. Knockdown of genes encoding ligands upregulated in the mesenchymal cells and their corresponding receptors in the tumor-initiating cells resulted in reduced tumorigenicity and increased tumor latency. These studies illustrate the non-cell autonomous properties and importance of cooperativity between tumor subpopulations. PMID:25735774

  17. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D

    1994-07-01

    It has been recognized for some time that a family history of breast cancer is associated rather strongly with a woman's own risk of developing the disease. Recent segregation analyses of population-based data on familial patterns provide evidence for a rare autosomal dominant allele that increases a carrier's susceptibility to breast cancer. The estimated proportion of breast cancer patients who carry this allele declines sharply with age at diagnosis. Empirical estimates of the risk associated with particular patterns of family history of breast cancer indicate the following: (1) having any first-degree relative with breast cancer increases a woman's risk of breast cancer 1.5-3-fold, depending on age, (2) having multiple first degree relatives affected is associated with particularly elevated risks, (3) having a second-degree relative affected increases the risk by approximately 50%, (4) affected family members on the maternal side and the paternal side contribute similarly to the risk, (5) a family history of breast cancer is associated with bilateral disease, and (6) breast cancer in males is associated with breast cancer in female relatives in much the same way as is breast cancer in women. Ovarian cancer clearly has been shown to be associated with breast cancer in families, and genetic linkage has provided strong evidence for a breast-ovarian cancer gene located somewhere on chromosome 17q. At the population level, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer may be at least as predictive of a woman's risk for developing breast cancer as is having a second-degree relative with breast cancer. Considerably weaker evidence points to a possible familial relationship between breast and endometrial cancer and between breast cancer in women and prostatic cancer in males. The clinical applications of the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer are complicated by uncertainty as to the efficacy of mammographic screening in women under the age of 50. For the vast

  18. Synergistic antitumor effects of liposomal honokiol combined with adriamycin in breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenli; Chen, Lijuan; Yang, Guangli; Zhou, Hang; Jiang, Qiqi; Zhong, Zhenhua; Hu, Jia; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xianhuo; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Minghai; Wen, Jing; Wei, Yuquan

    2008-08-01

    Honokiol, a novel antitumor agent, could induce apoptosis and inhibit the growth of vascular endothelium in several tumor cell lines and xenograft models. It has been suggested that the antitumor effect of chemotherapy could be increased by combining it with an antiangiogenesis agent in anticancer strategy. The present study explored the potential to increase the antitumor effect of adriamycin by combining it with honokiol in mouse 4T1 breast cancer models, and the underlining mechanism was investigated. Honokiol was encapsulated in liposomes to improve the water insolubility. In vitro, liposomal honokiol inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells via apoptosis and significantly enhanced the apoptosis of 4T1 cells induced by adriamycin. In vivo, the systemic administration of liposomal honokiol and adriamycin significantly decreased tumor growth through increased tumor cell apoptosis compared with either treatment alone. Collectively, these findings suggest that liposomal honokiol may augment the induction of apoptosis in 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo, and this combined treatment has shown synergistic suppression in tumor progression according to the analysis of isobologram. The present study may be important in future exploration of the potential application of the combined approach in the treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene CHFR Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    human model system. To characterize the role of CHFR in breast cancer , we used both cultured breast cell lines... epithelial cells became elongated and showed more variability in cell size, which is suggestive of the epithelial -to- mesenchymal transition that is...was to characterize the role of CHFR in breast cancer tumorigenesis using both cultured breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers

  20. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Heterogeneity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. There is a high degree of diversity between and within tumors as well as among cancer-bearing individuals, and all of these factors together determine the risk of disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Advances in technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and functional viability screens now allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. However, translating this increasing knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge in part due to tumor evolution driven by the diversity of cancer cell populations and their microenvironment. The articles in this Review series discuss recent advances in our understanding of breast tumor heterogeneity, therapies tailored based on this knowledge, and future ways of assessing and treating heterogeneous tumors.

  3. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed? The most common way to find breast cancer is through a breast exam or mammogram (x-ray). Some women at high risk may need a screening MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan, which is more sensitive than a mammogram. ...

  4. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  5. Risk assessment model for invasive breast cancer in Hong Kong women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Dai, Juncheng; Li, Mengjie; Chan, Wing-cheong; Kwok, Carol Chi-hei; Leung, Siu-lan; Wu, Cherry; Li, Wentao; Yu, Wai-cho; Tsang, Koon-ho; Law, Sze-hong; Lee, Priscilla Ming-yi; Wong, Carmen Ka-man; Shen, Hongbing; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Tse, Lap Ah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No risk assessment tool is available for identifying high risk population of breast cancer (BCa) in Hong Kong. A case–control study including 918 BCa cases and 923 controls was used to develop the risk assessment model among Hong Kong Chinese women. Each participant received an in-depth interview to obtain their lifestyle and environmental risk factors. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) selection model was used to select the optimal risk factors (LASSO-model). A risk score system was constructed to evaluate the cumulative effects of selected factors. Bootstrap simulation was used to test the internal validation of the model. Model performance was evaluated by receiver-operator characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC). Age, number of parity, number of BCa cases in 1st-degree relatives, exposure to light at night, and sleep quality were the common risk factors for all women. Alcohol drinking was included for premenopausal women; body mass index, age at menarche, age at 1st give birth, breast feeding, using of oral contraceptive, hormone replacement treatment, and history of benign breast diseases were included for postmenopausal women. The AUCs were 0.640 (95% CI, 0.598–0.681) and 0.655 (95% CI, 0.621–0.653) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. Further subgroup evaluation revealed that the model performance was better for women aged 50 to 70 years or ER-positive. This BCa risk assessment tool in Hong Kong Chinese women based on LASSO selection is promising, which shows a slightly higher discriminative accuracy than those developed in other populations. PMID:27512870

  6. Mutation Screening of 1,237 Cancer Genes across Six Model Cell Lines of Basal-Like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Törngren, Therese; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K.; Saal, Lao H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937) and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing of 1,237 cancer-associated genes, including all exons, UTRs and upstream flanking regions. In total, 658 somatic variants were identified, of which 378 were non-silent (average 63 per cell line, range 37–146) and 315 were novel (not present in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database; COSMIC). 125 novel mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing (59 exonic, 48 3’UTR and 10 5’UTR, 1 splicing), with a validation rate of 94% of high confidence variants. Of 36 mutations previously reported for these cell lines but not detected in our exome data, 36% could not be detected by Sanger sequencing. The base replacements C/G>A/T, C/G>G/C, C/G>T/A and A/T>G/C were significantly more frequent in the coding regions compared to the non-coding regions (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.0–5.3, P<0.0001; OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9–6.6, P<0.0001; OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8–3.1, P<0.0001; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7, P = 0.024, respectively). The single nucleotide variants within the context of T[C]T/A[G]A and T[C]A/T[G]A were more frequent in the coding than in the non-coding regions (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.2–6.1, P<0.0001; OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0–7.2, P = 0.001, respectively). Copy number estimations were derived from the targeted regions and correlated well to Affymetrix SNP array copy number data (Pearson correlation 0.82 to 0.96 for all compared cell lines; P<0.0001). These mutation calls across 1,237 cancer-associated genes and identification of novel variants will aid

  7. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  8. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  9. Targeting of primary breast cancers and metastases in a transgenic mouse model using rationally designed multifunctional SPIONs.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Stephen, Zachary R; Veiseh, Omid; Arami, Hamed; Wang, Tingzhong; Lai, Vy P; Park, James O; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Disis, Mary L; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-03-27

    Breast cancer remains one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies in women. The inability to diagnose small volume metastases early has limited effective treatment of stage 4 breast cancer. Here we report the rational development and use of a multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) for targeting metastatic breast cancer in a transgenic mouse model and imaging with magnetic resonance (MR). SPIONs coated with a copolymer of chitosan and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were labeled with a fluorescent dye for optical detection and conjugated with a monoclonal antibody against the neu receptor (NP-neu). SPIONs labeled with mouse IgG were used as a nontargeting control (NP-IgG). These SPIONs had desirable physiochemical properties for in vivo applications such as near neutral zeta potential and hydrodynamic size around 40 nm and were highly stable in serum containing medium. Only NP-neu showed high uptake in neu expressing mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) cells which was reversed by competing free neu antibody, indicating their specificity to the neu antigen. In vivo, NP-neu was able to tag primary breast tumors and significantly, only NP-neu bound to spontaneous liver, lung, and bone marrow metastases in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, highlighting the necessity of targeting for delivery to metastatic disease. The SPIONs provided significant contrast enhancement in MR images of primary breast tumors; thus, they have the potential for MRI detection of micrometastases and provide an excellent platform for further development of an efficient metastatic breast cancer therapy. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. [Occult multicentric breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Vtorushin, S V; Zab'ialova, M V; Glushchenko, S A; Perel'muter, V M; Slonimskaia, E M

    2009-01-01

    The study included 92 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer (T2-4N0-2M0-1). In 38 cases, tumor growth was unicentric while histologically identifiable ones as multicentric in 44. Multicentricity mostly occurred in cases of macroscopically-identifiable nodes located in the central segments of the breast. Clinically-identifiable nodes of multicentric tumor growth measured more than 3 cm. Multicentric tumors were mostly grade III, featured lower expression of sex hormone receptors and positive Her2 status.

  11. The effectiveness of the Gail model in estimating risk for development of breast cancer in women under 40 years of age.

    PubMed

    MacKarem, G; Roche, C A; Hughes, K S

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided information on risk factors for breast cancer. Gail and associates identified five risk factors using the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP) population and developed a model to calculate a composite relative risk (RR). This model is commonly used to counsel women regarding their risk for breast cancer and was used by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project (NSABP) for eligibility for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial. Because the BCDDP population was composed almost entirely of women 40 years of age or older, our purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Gail model in estimating the risk of breast cancer for women under 40 in the clinical setting. The Gail risk factors were assessed for 124 patients under the age of 40 treated for either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast cancer at the Lahey Hitchcock Medical Center between 1983 and 1995. The RR was calculated using the Gail model. For comparison, two cohorts of women under the age of 40 were used: 107 randomly selected patients who underwent a breast biopsy because of a benign condition and 129 nurses from our institution who responded to a questionnaire that included reproductive and family history information as used in the Gail model. The RR calculated was the RR that existed at the time of the surgical consultation for a suspicious breast lesion. The Tarone-Ware method was used to analyze statistical significance of differences between distribution. Contingency tables were analyzed using Miettinen's modification of Fisher's exact test. No differences were found between the median RR for all groups. Only 2 of the 124 patients with breast cancer had a RR of 5 or more (the RR required to enter the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial). The distribution of age at menarche (AGEMEN) was the same for each group. No difference was found for the distribution of age at first live birth (AGEFLB) between those with breast cancer and those with

  12. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men? For many men with breast cancer, ... Breast Cancer in Men Stops Working More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  13. Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0059 TITLE: Educating normal breast mucosa to prevent breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith L Knutson...SUBTITLE Educating Normal Breast Mucosa to Prevent Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0059 5c...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Breast cancer develops from breast mucosa and breast mucosa has intact immune system to

  14. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  15. Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of grape skin polyphenols in a murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Chen, Q Y; Wu, L J; Yao, X M; Sun, X J

    2012-10-01

    Treatment modalities are not effective once breast cancer metastasis has occurred. Dietary botanicals may have a better protective effect. We therefore investigated the effects of grape skin polyphenols on a highly metastatic mouse mammary carcinoma cell line. In vitro treatment of 4T1 cells, with grape skin polyphenols resulted in inhibition of the migration and viability in a dose-dependent manner. The migration of 4T1 cells was significantly inhibited by grape skin polyphenols, even at a very low concentration (5 μg/ml), and was totally inhibited when the concentration was 20 μg/ml. However, 20 μg/ml of grape skin polyphenols inhibited cell viability by only 11.4%. The inhibition of migration is independent of decreased cell viability or apoptosis induction. Further analysis indicated that the inhibition of migration by grape skin polyphenols is involved in blocking the PI3k/Akt and MAPK pathways. The effects of dietary grape skin polyphenols were then examined using an in vivo model in which 4T1 cells were implanted subcutaneously in Balb/c mice. The metastasis of tumor cells to the lungs was inhibited significantly by dietary grape skin extracts (0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml in drinking water) and the survival of the mice enhanced. These data suggest that grape skin polyphenols possess chemotherapeutic efficacy against breast cancer with metastases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  17. How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed? Medical history and physical exam ... in Men Survival Rates, by Stage More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  18. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  19. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nodes . The axillary nodes are the first place breast cancer is likely to spread. During breast surgery, some ... if cancer cells are present. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. So, it is more ...

  20. Perceived Versus Objective Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Risk in Diverse Women

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Julia; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Jessica; Ozanne, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Prior research suggests that women do not accurately estimate their risk for breast cancer. Estimating and informing women of their risk is essential for tailoring appropriate screening and risk reduction strategies. Methods: Data were collected for BreastCARE, a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a PC-tablet based intervention providing multiethnic women and their primary care physicians with tailored information about breast cancer risk. We included women ages 40–74 visiting general internal medicine primary care clinics at one academic practice and one safety net practice who spoke English, Spanish, or Cantonese, and had no personal history of breast cancer. We collected baseline information regarding risk perception and concern. Women were categorized as high risk (vs. average risk) if their family history met criteria for referral to genetic counseling or if they were in the top 5% of risk for their age based on the Gail or Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium Model (BCSC) breast cancer risk model. Results: Of 1,261 participants, 25% (N=314) were classified as high risk. More average risk than high risk women had correct risk perception (72% vs. 18%); 25% of both average and high risk women reported being very concerned about breast cancer. Average risk women with correct risk perception were less likely to be concerned about breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.2–0.4) while high risk women with correct risk perception were more likely to be concerned about breast cancer (OR=5.1; 95%CI=2.7–9.6). Conclusions: Many women did not accurately perceive their risk for breast cancer. Women with accurate risk perception had an appropriate level of concern about breast cancer. Improved methods of assessing and informing women of their breast cancer risk could motivate high risk women to apply appropriate prevention strategies and allay unnecessary concern among average risk women. PMID:24372085

  1. Breast cancer fear in African American breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Lynette M; Thomas, Sheila; Parker, Veronica; Mayo, Rachel; Wetsel, Margaret Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe breast cancer fear according to phase of survivorship, determine whether breast cancer fear levels differed among survivorship phases, and determine the relationship between fear and age in African-American breast cancer survivors. The study utilized secondary data analysis from the study, Inner Resources as Predictors of Psychological Well-Being in AABCS. A new subscale entitled, "Breast Cancer Fear" was adapted from the Psychological Well Being Subscale by Ferrell and Grant. There was no significant difference between fear and phase of survivorship. There was a significant positive relationship between age and fear.

  2. Clinical Prediction Model and Tool for Assessing Risk of Persistent Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Meretoja, Tuomo J; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Bruce, Julie; Haasio, Lassi; Sipilä, Reetta; Scott, Neil W; Ripatti, Samuli; Kehlet, Henrik; Kalso, Eija

    2017-05-20

    Purpose Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery is a well-recognized problem, with moderate to severe pain affecting 15% to 20% of women at 1 year from surgery. Several risk factors for persistent pain have been recognized, but tools to identify high-risk patients and preventive interventions are missing. The aim was to develop a clinically applicable risk prediction tool. Methods The prediction models were developed and tested using three prospective data sets from Finland (n = 860), Denmark (n = 453), and Scotland (n = 231). Prediction models for persistent pain of moderate to severe intensity at 1 year postoperatively were developed by logistic regression analyses in the Finnish patient cohort. The models were tested in two independent cohorts from Denmark and Scotland by assessing the areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC-AUCs). The outcome variable was moderate to severe persistent pain at 1 year from surgery in the Finnish and Danish cohorts and at 9 months in the Scottish cohort. Results Moderate to severe persistent pain occurred in 13.5%, 13.9%, and 20.3% of the patients in the three studies, respectively. Preoperative pain in the operative area ( P < .001), high body mass index ( P = .039), axillary lymph node dissection ( P = .008), and more severe acute postoperative pain intensity at the seventh postoperative day ( P = .003) predicted persistent pain in the final prediction model, which performed well in the Danish (ROC-AUC, 0.739) and Scottish (ROC-AUC, 0.740) cohorts. At the 20% risk level, the model had 32.8% and 47.4% sensitivity and 94.4% and 82.4% specificity in the Danish and Scottish cohorts, respectively. Conclusion Our validated prediction models and an online risk calculator provide clinicians and researchers with a simple tool to screen for patients at high risk of developing persistent pain after breast cancer surgery.

  3. Metabolic reprogramming underlies metastatic potential in an obesity-responsive murine model of metastatic triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Flanagan, Ciara H; Rossi, Emily L; McDonell, Shannon B; Chen, Xuewen; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Parker, Joel S; Usary, Jerry; Perou, Charles M; Hursting, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of cancer-related deaths are due to metastatic disease, whereby primary tumor cells disseminate and colonize distal sites within the body. Triple negative breast cancer typically displays aberrant Wnt signaling, lacks effective targeted therapies, and compared with other breast cancer subtypes, is more likely to recur and metastasize. We developed a Wnt-driven lung metastasis model of triple negative breast cancer (metM-Wnt(lung)) through serial passaging of our previously described, nonmetastatic, claudin-low M-Wnt cell line. metM-Wnt(lung) cells displayed characteristics of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (e.g., increased invasiveness) with some re-epithealization (e.g., increased adhesion, tight colony formation, increased E-cadherin expression, and decreased Vimentin and Fibronectin expression). When orthotopically transplanted into syngeneic mice, metM-Wnt(lung) cells readily formed tumors and metastasized in vivo, and tumor growth and metastasis were enhanced in obese mice compared with non-obese mice. Gene expression analysis revealed several genes and pathways altered in metM-Wnt(lung) cells compared with M-Wnt cells, including multiple genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, energy metabolism and inflammation. Moreover, obesity caused significant transcriptomic changes, especially in metabolic pathways. Metabolic flux analyses showed greater metabolic plasticity, with heightened mitochondrial and glycolytic energetics in metM-Wnt(lung) cells relative to M-Wnt cells. Similar metabolic profiles were found in a second triple negative breast cancer progression series, M6 and M6C cells. These findings suggest that metabolic reprogramming is a feature of metastatic potential in triple negative breast cancer. Thus, targeting metastases-associated metabolic perturbations may represent a novel strategy for reducing the burden of metastatic triple negative breast cancer, particularly in obese women.

  4. Monitoring Dynamic Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and Human Bone Tissue in a Co-Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Contag, Christopher H.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Bammer, Marie C.; Hardy, Jonathan W.; Schmidt, Tobi L.; Maloney, William J.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bone is a preferential site of breast cancer metastasis and models are needed to study this process at the level of the microenvironment. We have used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and multiplex biomarker immunoassays to monitor dynamic breast cancer cell behaviors in co-culture with human bone tissue. Procedures Femur tissue fragments harvested from hip replacement surgeries were co-cultured with luciferase-positive MDA-MB-231-fLuc cells. BLI was performed to quantify breast cell division and track migration relative to bone tissue. Breast cell colonization of bone tissues was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Biomarkers in co-culture supernatants were profiled with MILLIPLEX® immunoassays. Results BLI demonstrated increased MDA-MB-231-fLuc proliferation (p<0.001) in the presence vs. absence of bones, and revealed breast cell migration toward bone. Immunohistochemistry illustrated MDA-MB-231-fLuc colonization of bone, and MILLIPLEX® profiles of culture supernatants suggested breast/bone crosstalk. Conclusions Breast cell behaviors that facilitate metastasis occur reproducibly in human bone tissue co-cultures and can be monitored and quantified using BLI and multiplex immunoassays. PMID:24008275

  5. Monitoring dynamic interactions between breast cancer cells and human bone tissue in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Contag, Christopher H; Lie, Wen-Rong; Bammer, Marie C; Hardy, Jonathan W; Schmidt, Tobi L; Maloney, William J; King, Bonnie L

    2014-04-01

    Bone is a preferential site of breast cancer metastasis, and models are needed to study this process at the level of the microenvironment. We have used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and multiplex biomarker immunoassays to monitor dynamic breast cancer cell behaviors in co-culture with human bone tissue. Femur tissue fragments harvested from hip replacement surgeries were co-cultured with luciferase-positive MDA-MB-231-fLuc cells. BLI was performed to quantify breast cell proliferation and track migration relative to bone tissue. Breast cell colonization of bone tissues was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Biomarkers in co-culture supernatants were profiled with MILLIPLEX(®) immunoassays. BLI demonstrated increased MDA-MB-231-fLuc cell proliferation (p < 0.001) in the presence vs. absence of bones and revealed breast cell migration toward bone. Immunohistochemistry illustrated MDA-MB-231-fLuc cell colonization of bone, and MILLIPLEX(®) profiles of culture supernatants suggested breast/bone crosstalk. Breast cell behaviors that facilitate metastasis occur reproducibly in human bone tissue co-cultures and can be monitored and quantified using BLI and multiplex immunoassays.

  6. Health behaviour models and patient preferences regarding nutrition and physical activity after breast or prostate cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Green, H J; Steinnagel, G; Morris, C; Laakso, E L

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to improve understanding of prostate and breast cancer survivors' physical activity and nutrition and the association of these behaviours with two models. The first model, the Commonsense Self-Regulation Model (CSM), addresses cognitive and emotional perceptions of illness whereas the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) focuses on stage of readiness to engage in a behaviour. Participants who had been diagnosed with either breast (n = 145) or prostate cancer (n = 92) completed measures of demographic and health information, illness representations, stage of change, self-efficacy and preferences regarding health behaviour interventions. Health behaviours in the past seven days were measured via the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and concordance with national dietary guidelines. As hypothesised, TTM variables (stage of change and self-efficacy) demonstrated independent associations with physical activity and nutrition in regression analyses. CSM variables were not independently associated with absolute levels of health behaviours but both TTM and CSM variables were independently associated with self-reported changes in physical activity and nutrition following prostate or breast cancer diagnosis. Many participants reported high interest in receiving lifestyle interventions, particularly soon after diagnosis. Results supported application of the TTM and CSM models for strengthening behaviour change intentions and actions in breast and prostate cancer survivors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  8. Posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their husbands based on the actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Lee, MyoSuk; Kim, Kyunghee; Lim, Changwon; Kim, Ji-Su

    2016-12-10

    This study aimed to verify actor and partner effects, by examining the effects of self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their spouses, and involved a structural analysis of descriptive cause-and-effect relationships to verify the suitability of the actor-partner interdependence model. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from breast cancer survivors and their spouses at outpatient centers, wards, and patient meetings in 4 general hospitals in Seoul between April 13 and September 20, 2015. Data for 336 individuals (168 couples) were analyzed. The suitability of the hypothetical model was assessed via SPSS Win 21.0 and AMOS 21.0. Actor and partner effects on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and their spouses were examined. Self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress exerted significant actor effects, and subjective distress exerted a significant partner effect on posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors. Relationship quality and support exerted significant actor effects, and self-esteem, relationship quality, and subjective distress exerted significant partner effects on posttraumatic growth in spouses. Posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors was influenced by not only relationship quality and spouses' self- esteem but also subjective distress; therefore, solidarity between breast cancer survivors and their spouses was important and should be maintained to provide healthy relationship support and enhance posttraumatic growth. Further, health care providers should include spouses in health-related education and involve them in interventions and family support programs for couples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. TRAIL-R2 promotes skeletal metastasis in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Charlotte; von Au, Anja; El-Sheikh, Doaa; Campbell, Graeme M.; Alp, Göhkan; Schewe, Denis; Hübner, Sebastian; Tiwari, Sanjay; Kownatzki, Daniel; Boretius, Susann; Adam, Dieter; Jonat, Walter; Becker, Thomas; Glüer, Claus C.; Zöller, Margot; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in detection, surgical approaches and systemic therapies, breast cancer remains typically incurable once distant metastases occur. High expression of TRAIL-R2 was found to be associated with poor prognostic parameters in breast cancer patients, suggesting an oncogenic function of this receptor. In the present study, we aimed to determine the impact of TRAIL-R2 on breast cancer metastasis. Using an osteotropic variant of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we examine the effects of TRAIL-R2 knockdown in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, in addition to the reduced levels of the proliferation-promoting factor HMGA2 and corresponding inhibition of cell proliferation, knockdown of TRAIL-R2 increased the levels of E-Cadherin and decreased migration. In vivo, these cells were strongly impaired in their ability to form bone metastases after intracardiac injection. Evaluating possible underlying mechanisms revealed a strong downregulation of CXCR4, the receptor for the chemokine SDF-1 important for homing of cancers cells to the bone. In accordance, cell migration towards SDF-1 was significantly impaired by TRAIL-R2 knockdown. Conversely, overexpression of TRAIL-R2 upregulated CXCR4 levels and enhanced SDF-1-directed migration. We therefore postulate that inhibition of TRAIL-R2 expression could represent a promising therapeutic strategy leading to an effective impairment of breast cancer cell capability to form skeletal metastases. PMID:25909161

  10. Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

  11. Model development of laser fiber optic endoablative treatment for primary breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David S.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Denham, David B.; Manns, Fabrice; Gonzalez, Xochitl; Schachner, Robert D.; Herron, Alan J.; Burdette, Everette C.

    1996-05-01

    A mammographic stereotactic core biopsy instrument can be adapted for laser hyperthermic ablation of breast cancer. The object of this study is to characterize laser endohyperthermia ex-vivo and in-vivo to develop a reliable approach leading to human trials. Light of a Nd:YAG laser passed through a fiberoptic cable to a diffusing quartz tip upon entering surrounding tissues can bring about very high temperatures. This approach concentrating on the heat distribution to fat and fibrofatty tissue, first analyzed a physical model into which both the quartz tip and thermocouple needles were placed. Temperature recordings in volume through a time course demonstrated a progressive thermal increase around the tip. Additional light distribution studies in several media demonstrated the tip's output. The technique transferred to ex-vivo human breast and porcine fibrofatty tissue showed similar findings leading to an in-vivo analysis of subcutaneous porcine fibrofatty tissue. A step-down energy program beginning at 20 watts and decreasing to 15 watts, 10 watts, and to 7 watts, at 30 second intervals was held at the latter power for the remainder of 6 minutes. Three such cycles appear to be the optimal treatment program to develop temperatures between 60 degrees Celsius and 80 degrees Celsius (approximately equals 9700 joules). In-vivo experiments conducted on 5 occasions revealed no skin change. At necropsy the treated tissues demonstrated a circular sharply defined 3 cm volume of necrosis with no change in adjacent tissue. Time-temperature correlations between ex-vivo and in-vivo tissues showed great similarity. Nd:YAG laser energy distributed to a quartz tip through a fiberoptic cable is capable of uniform, complete tissue destruction to a 1 1/2 cm radius with no change beyond that field. This technique with further refinement will be appropriate to the treatment of small breast cancers that have been stereotactically biopsied.

  12. Multiscale and multi-modality visualization of angiogenesis in a human breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Cebulla, Jana; Kim, Eugene; Rhie, Kevin; Zhang, Jiangyang; Pathak, Arvind P

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis in breast cancer helps fulfill the metabolic demands of the progressing tumor and plays a critical role in tumor metastasis. Therefore, various imaging modalities have been used to characterize tumor angiogenesis. While micro-CT (μCT) is a powerful tool for analyzing the tumor microvascular architecture at micron-scale resolution, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with its sub-millimeter resolution is useful for obtaining in vivo vascular data (e.g. tumor blood volume and vessel size index). However, integration of these microscopic and macroscopic angiogenesis data across spatial resolutions remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of 'multiscale' angiogenesis imaging in a human breast cancer model, wherein we bridge the resolution gap between ex vivo μCT and in vivo MRI using intermediate resolution ex vivo MR microscopy (μMRI). To achieve this integration, we developed suitable vessel segmentation techniques for the ex vivo imaging data and co-registered the vascular data from all three imaging modalities. We showcase two applications of this multiscale, multi-modality imaging approach: (1) creation of co-registered maps of vascular volume from three independent imaging modalities, and (2) visualization of differences in tumor vasculature between viable and necrotic tumor regions by integrating μCT vascular data with tumor cellularity data obtained using diffusion-weighted MRI. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of 'mesoscopic' resolution μMRI for integrating macroscopic in vivo MRI data and microscopic μCT data. Although focused on the breast tumor xenograft vasculature, our imaging platform could be extended to include additional data types for a detailed characterization of the tumor microenvironment and computational systems biology applications.

  13. Modeling Malignant Breast Cancer Occurrence and Survival in Black and White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC), the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States, is a heterogeneous disease in which age-specific incidence rates (ASIRs) differ by race and mortality rates are higher in blacks than whites. Goals: (i) understand the reasons for the black-to-white ethnic crossover in the ASIRs; (ii) formulate a…

  14. Modeling Malignant Breast Cancer Occurrence and Survival in Black and White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC), the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States, is a heterogeneous disease in which age-specific incidence rates (ASIRs) differ by race and mortality rates are higher in blacks than whites. Goals: (i) understand the reasons for the black-to-white ethnic crossover in the ASIRs; (ii) formulate a…

  15. [Immediate breast reconstruction for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Tsubota, Yu; Sueoka, Noriko; Endo, Kayoko; Ogura, Tsunetaka; Nagumo, Yoshinori; Kwon, A-Hon

    2014-11-01

    We performed immediate breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy or skin-sparing mastectomy and evaluated the reconstruction procedure, cosmesis, and complications. Among the 30 patients included in the study, 6 received latissimus dorsi flaps, 1 received a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, 7 received deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps, 1 received an implant, and 15 received tissue expanders. In addition, the results were excellent in 25 patients, good in 3 patients, and poor in 2 patients. As the number of patients with breast cancer is increasing, the demand for breast reconstruction will increase. Therefore, it is essential to choose an appropriate method of breast reconstruction for each case.

  16. Modelling the overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to mammography screening in women aged 40 to 49 in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gunsoy, Necdet B; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Moss, Sue M

    2012-11-29

    Overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to mammography screening, defined as the diagnosis of screen-detected cancers that would not have presented clinically in a women's lifetime in the absence of screening, has emerged as a highly contentious issue, as harm caused may question the benefit of mammographic screening. Most studies included women over 50 years old and little information is available for younger women. We estimated the overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to screening in women aged 40 to 49 years using data from a randomised trial of annual mammographic screening starting at age 40 conducted in the UK. A six-state Markov model was constructed to estimate the sensitivity of mammography for invasive and in situ breast cancer and the screen-detectable mean sojourn time for non-progressive in situ, progressive in situ, and invasive breast cancer. Then, a 10-state simulation model of cancer progression, screening, and death, was developed to estimate overdiagnosis attributable to screening. The sensitivity of mammography for invasive and in situ breast cancers was 90% (95% CI, 72 to 99) and 82% (43 to 99), respectively. The screen-detectable mean sojourn time of preclinical non-progressive and progressive in situ cancers was 1.3 (0.4 to 3.4) and 0.11 (0.05 to 0.19) years, respectively, and 0.8 years (0.6 to 1.2) for preclinical invasive breast cancer. The proportion of screen-detected in situ cancers that were non-progressive was 55% (25 to 77) for the first and 40% (22 to 60) for subsequent screens. In our main analysis, overdiagnosis was estimated as 0.7% of screen-detected cancers. A sensitivity analysis, covering a wide range of alternative scenarios, yielded a range of 0.5% to 2.9%. Although a high proportion of screen-detected in situ cancers were non-progressive, a majority of these would have presented clinically in the absence of screening. The extent of overdiagnosis due to screening in women aged 40 to 49 was small. Results also suggest annual

  17. Modelling the overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to mammography screening in women aged 40 to 49 in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to mammography screening, defined as the diagnosis of screen-detected cancers that would not have presented clinically in a women's lifetime in the absence of screening, has emerged as a highly contentious issue, as harm caused may question the benefit of mammographic screening. Most studies included women over 50 years old and little information is available for younger women. Methods We estimated the overdiagnosis of breast cancer due to screening in women aged 40 to 49 years using data from a randomised trial of annual mammographic screening starting at age 40 conducted in the UK. A six-state Markov model was constructed to estimate the sensitivity of mammography for invasive and in situ breast cancer and the screen-detectable mean sojourn time for non-progressive in situ, progressive in situ, and invasive breast cancer. Then, a 10-state simulation model of cancer progression, screening, and death, was developed to estimate overdiagnosis attributable to screening. Results The sensitivity of mammography for invasive and in situ breast cancers was 90% (95% CI, 72 to 99) and 82% (43 to 99), respectively. The screen-detectable mean sojourn time of preclinical non-progressive and progressive in situ cancers was 1.3 (0.4 to 3.4) and 0.11 (0.05 to 0.19) years, respectively, and 0.8 years (0.6 to 1.2) for preclinical invasive breast cancer. The proportion of screen-detected in situ cancers that were non-progressive was 55% (25 to 77) for the first and 40% (22 to 60) for subsequent screens. In our main analysis, overdiagnosis was estimated as 0.7% of screen-detected cancers. A sensitivity analysis, covering a wide range of alternative scenarios, yielded a range of 0.5% to 2.9%. Conclusion Although a high proportion of screen-detected in situ cancers were non-progressive, a majority of these would have presented clinically in the absence of screening. The extent of overdiagnosis due to screening in women aged 40 to 49 was

  18. Effect of health belief model and health promotion model on breast cancer early diagnosis behavior: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ersin, Fatma; Bahar, Zuhal

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is an important public health problem on the grounds that it is frequently seen and it is a fatal disease. The objective of this systematic analysis is to indicate the effects of interventions performed by nurses by using the Health Belief Model (HBM) and Health Promotion Model (HPM) on the breast cancer early diagnosis behaviors and on the components of the Health Belief Model and Health Promotion Model. The reveiw was created in line with the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guide dated 2009 (CRD) and developed by York University National Institute of Health Researches. Review was conducted by using PUBMED, OVID, EBSCO and COCHRANE databases. Six hundred seventy eight studies (PUBMED: 236, OVID: 162, EBSCO: 175, COCHRANE:105) were found in total at the end of the review. Abstracts and full texts of these six hundred seventy eight studies were evaluated in terms of inclusion and exclusion criteria and 9 studies were determined to meet the criteria. Samplings of the studies varied between ninety four and one thousand six hundred fifty five. It was detected in the studies that educations provided by taking the theories as basis became effective on the breast cancer early diagnosis behaviors. When the literature is examined, it is observed that the experimental researches which compare the concepts of Health Belief Model (HBM) and Health Promotion Model (HPM) preoperatively and postoperatively and show the effect of these concepts on education and are conducted by nurses are limited in number. Randomized controlled studies which compare HBM and HPM concepts preoperatively and postoperatively and show the efficiency of the interventions can be useful in evaluating the efficiency of the interventions.

  19. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  20. Unifying screening processes within the PROSPR consortium: a conceptual model for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Beaber, Elisabeth F; Kim, Jane J; Schapira, Marilyn M; Tosteson, Anna N A; Zauber, Ann G; Geiger, Ann M; Kamineni, Aruna; Weaver, Donald L; Tiro, Jasmin A

    2015-06-01

    General frameworks of the cancer screening process are available, but none directly compare the process in detail across different organ sites. This limits the ability of medical and public health professionals to develop and evaluate coordinated screening programs that apply resources and population management strategies available for one cancer site to other sites. We present a trans-organ conceptual model that incorporates a single screening episode for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers into a unified framework based on clinical guidelines and protocols; the model concepts could be expanded to other organ sites. The model covers four types of care in the screening process: risk assessment, detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Interfaces between different provider teams (eg, primary care and specialty care), including communication and transfer of responsibility, may occur when transitioning between types of care. Our model highlights across each organ site similarities and differences in steps, interfaces, and transitions in the screening process and documents the conclusion of a screening episode. This model was developed within the National Cancer Institute-funded consortium Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR). PROSPR aims to optimize the screening process for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer and includes seven research centers and a statistical coordinating center. Given current health care reform initiatives in the United States, this conceptual model can facilitate the development of comprehensive quality metrics for cancer screening and promote trans-organ comparative cancer screening research. PROSPR findings will support the design of interventions that improve screening outcomes across multiple cancer sites.

  1. Quantifying the natural history of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, K H X; Simonella, L; Wee, H L; Roellin, A; Lim, Y-W; Lim, W-Y; Chia, K S; Hartman, M; Cook, A R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Natural history models of breast cancer progression provide an opportunity to evaluate and identify optimal screening scenarios. This paper describes a detailed Markov model characterising breast cancer tumour progression. Methods: Breast cancer is modelled by a 13-state continuous-time Markov model. The model differentiates between indolent and aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ tumours, and aggressive tumours of different sizes. We compared such aggressive cancers, that is, which are non-indolent, to those which are non-growing and regressing. Model input parameters and structure were informed by the 1978–1984 Ostergotland county breast screening randomised controlled trial. Overlaid on the natural history model is the effect of screening on diagnosis. Parameters were estimated using Bayesian methods. Markov chain Monte Carlo integration was used to sample the resulting posterior distribution. Results: The breast cancer incidence rate in the Ostergotland population was 21 (95% CI: 17–25) per 10 000 woman-years. Accounting for length-biased sampling, an estimated 91% (95% CI: 85–97%) of breast cancers were aggressive. Larger tumours, 21–50 mm, had an average sojourn of 6 years (95% CI: 3–16 years), whereas aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ took around half a month (95% CI: 0–1 month) to progress to the invasive ⩽10 mm state. Conclusion: These tumour progression rate estimates may facilitate future work analysing cost-effectiveness and quality-adjusted life years for various screening strategies. PMID:24084766

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  6. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  8. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  9. Genistein Programming Against Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, *GENES, *DIET, *ESTROGENS, *SOY PROTEIN, *BREAST CANCER, RATS , CHEMICALS, MOLECULES, ENZYMES, PROTEINS, SENSITIVITY, WOMEN, SENSE ORGANS, ASIA, MAMMARY GLANDS, METHYLATION, ANDROGENS, TRANSFERASES.

  10. Polyurethane foam scaffold as in vitro model for breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Valentina; Contessi, Nicola; De Marco, Cinzia; Bertoldi, Serena; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Farè, Silvia

    2017-09-18

    Breast cancer (BC) represents the most incident cancer case in women (29%), with high mortality rate. Bone metastasis occurs in 20-50% cases and, despite advances in BC research, the interactions between tumor cells and the metastatic microenvironment are still poorly understood. In vitro 3D models gained great interest in cancer research, thanks to the reproducibility, the 3D spatial cues and associated low costs, compared to in vivo and 2D in vitro models. In this study, we investigated the suitability of a poly-ether-urethane (PU) foam as 3D in vitro model to study the interactions between BC tumor-initiating cells and the bone microenvironment. PU foam open porosity (>70%) appeared suitable to mimic trabecular bone structure. The PU foam showed good mechanical properties under cyclic compression (E=69-109kPa), even if lower than human trabecular bone. The scaffold supported osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line proliferation, with no cytotoxic effects. Human adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) were cultured and differentiated into osteoblast lineage on the PU foam, as shown by alizarin red staining and RT-PCR, thus offering a bone biomimetic microenvironment to the further co-culture with BC derived tumor-initiating cells (MCFS). Tumor aggregates were observed after three weeks of co-culture by e-cadherin staining and SEM; modification in CaP distribution was identified by SEM-EDX and associated to the presence of tumor cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated the suitability of the PU foam to reproduce a bone biomimetic microenvironment, useful for the co-culture of human osteoblasts/BC tumor-initiating cells and to investigate their interaction. 3D in vitro models represent an outstanding alternative in the study of tumor metastases development, compared to traditional 2D in vitro cultures, which oversimplify the 3D tissue microenvironment, and in vivo studies, affected by low reproducibility and ethical issues. Several scaffold-based 3D in vitro models have been proposed

  11. Breast cancer: agenda setting through activism.

    PubMed

    Brendtro, M J

    1998-01-01

    Breast cancer has long been one of the leading causes of death among women in the United States. The disease did not gain serious attention in the public policy arena, however, until the 1990s. Using Kingdon's agenda-setting model as a framework, this article describes how breast cancer moved to a place of prominence on the national health care agenda. The role of breast cancer activists in this effort is examined. Suggestions are then made concerning why and how advanced practice nurses might effectively influence the health policy agenda through political activism.

  12. Physical Activity, Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Panel Model.

    PubMed

    Awick, Elizabeth A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Lloyd, Gillian R; McAuley, Edward

    2016-05-27

    Physical activity (PA) has been consistently associated with improved self-esteem in breast cancer survivors. However, this relationship is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in PA and self-efficacy influenced changes in self-esteem in breast cancer survivors across six-months. Increases in PA were hypothesized to result in increases in self-efficacy which were hypothesized to influence increases in physical self-worth and global self-esteem. Breast cancer survivors (n = 370; Mage  = 56.04) wore accelerometers to measure PA and completed measures of self-efficacy (e.g., exercise and barriers self-efficacy), physical self-worth, and global self-esteem at baseline and 6 months. The hypothesized model provided a good fit to the data (χ(2)  = 67.56, df = 26, p < .001; CFI = .98; SRMR = .05). Women with higher activity at baseline reported significantly higher levels of barrier (β = .29) and exercise (β = .23) self-efficacy. In turn, more efficacious women reported significantly higher physical self-worth (β = .26, .16). Finally, higher physical self-worth was significantly associated with greater global self-esteem (β = .47). Relationships were similar among changes in model constructs over 6 months. After controlling for covariates, the hypothesized model provided an excellent fit to the data (χ(2)  = 59.93, df = 33, p = .003; CFI = .99; SRMR = .03). Our findings provide support for the role played by PA and self-efficacy in positive self-esteem, a key component of well-being. Highlighting successful PA mastery experiences is likely to enhance self-efficacy and improve self-esteem in this population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential expression of cell adhesion molecules in an ionizing radiation-induced breast cancer model system.

    PubMed

    Calaf, Gloria M; Roy, Debasish; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Balajee, Adayabalam S

    2013-07-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is mediated by members of the cadherin-catenin system and among them E-cadherin and β-catenin are important adhesion molecules for epithelial cell function and preservation of tissue integrity. To investigate the importance of cell adhesion molecules in breast carcinogenesis, we developed an in vitro breast cancer model system wherein immortalized human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10F, was malignantly transformed by exposure to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) α particle radiation (150 keV/µm) and subsequent growth in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol. This model consisted of human breast epithelial cells in different stages of transformation: i) parental cell line MCF-10F; ii) MCF-l0F continuously grown with estradiol at 10(-8) (Estrogen); iii) a non-malignant cell line (Alpha3); and iv) a malignant and tumorigenic cell line (Alpha5) and the Tumor2 cell line derived from the nude mouse xenograft of the Alpha5 cell line. Expression levels of important cell adhesion molecules such as α-catenin, β-catenin, γ-catenin, E-cadherin and integrin were found to be higher at the protein level in the Alpha5 and Tumor2 cell lines relative to these levels in the non-tumorigenic MCF-10F, Estrogen and Alpha3 cell lines. In corroboration, cDNA expression analysis revealed elevated levels of genes involved in the cell adhesion function [E-cadherin, integrin β6 and desmocollin3 (DSc3)] in the Alpha5 and Tumor2 cell lines relative to the levels in the MCF-10F, Estrogen and Alpha3 cell lines. Collectively, our results suggest that cell adhesion molecules are expressed at higher levels in malignantly transformed breast epithelial cells relative to levels in non-malignant cells. However, reduced levels of adhesion molecules observed in the mouse xenograft-derived Tumor 2 cell line compared to the pre-tumorigenic Alpha5 cell line suggests that the altered expression levels of adhesion molecules depend on the tumor tissue

  14. Amphiphysin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    condition appears to represent a novel entity within the emerging family of neurological autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes , conditions in which...We have recently identified a new human syndrome characterized by breast cancer, autoimmunity directed against the neuronal protein in amphiphysin...and Stiff-Man syndrome (SMS). SMS is a rare disease of the central nervous system characterized by progressive rigidity of the body musculature. This

  15. Erythropoietin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position...CONTRACT NUMBER Erythropoietin and Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0737 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT...NUMBER Arthur J. Sytkowski, MD 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING

  16. A Bayesian model for censored positive count data in evaluating breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hung-Wen; Jiang, Yu; Garrard, Lili; Lei, Yang; Gajewski, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Basic science researchers transplant human cancer tissues from patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to animals and observe the progression of the disease. Successful transplants show invasion of human tissues across mammary ducts in animal fat pads and cause DCIS-like lesions in one or more ducts. In this work, we consider data from a recent publication of breast cancer research where positive counts of affected ducts may be subject to censoring. We fit the data with zero-truncated Poisson (ZTP) models with an informative prior of gamma. Due to the zero-truncation and right censoring, posterior distributions may not be conventional gamma and are estimated through Markov chain Monte Carlo and grid approximation. For each of the two cell lines, we fit a model with group-specific parameters for DCIS subtypes classified by the cell surface biomarkers, and another model with a homogeneous parameter across groups. Models are compared by the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC). For the chosen prior parameter values, Bayes estimates are comparative to the maximum likelihood estimates, and the DIC favors the simpler model in both cell lines.

  17. Studies on Breast Cancer Cell Interactions with Aged Endothelial Cells in Culture and Rat Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    hydrogen peroxide for 4 h were used as a positive control. Second, fluorescein annexin-V binding (using ApoAlert TM Annexin-V-FITC, Clontech...and BPAECs 4 h after the addition of 1 mM hydrogen peroxide (positive control), but not in the lanes containing the young BPAECs to which MCF-7 cells...reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the cancer cells. Breast cancer cells and other cancer cell types produce ROS including hydrogen peroxide

  18. Periodontal disease may associate with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Söder, Birgitta; Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Andersson, Leif C; Klinge, Björn; Söder, Per-Östen

    2011-06-01

    The main purpose was to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and the incidence of breast cancer in a prospective study of 3273 randomly selected subjects aged 30-40 years at baseline. Breast cancer incidence was registered from 1985 to 2001 according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases criteria. At baseline, 1676 individuals also underwent a clinical oral examination (Group A) whereas 1597 subjects were not clinically examined but were registered (Group B). The associations between breast cancer, periodontal disease, and missing molars were determined using multiple logistic regression models with several background variables and known risk factors for cancer. In total 26 subjects in group A and 15 subjects in group B had breast cancer. The incidence of breast cancer was 1.75% in subjects who had periodontal disease and/or any missing molars, and 0 in subjects who had periodontal disease but had no missing molars. For periodontally healthy subjects with no missing teeth the breast cancer incidence was 1%. For group B the respective incidence was 0.94%. Female gender (odds ratio (OR) 13.08) and missing any molar in the mandible (OR 2.36) were explanatory variables for breast cancer. Of the subjects with periodontal disease and any missing molars in the mandible 5.5% had breast cancer in comparison to 0.5% of the subjects who had periodontal disease but no missing molars in the mandible (P < 0.02). Chronic periodontal disease indicated by missing molars seemed to associate statistically with breast cancer.

  19. Canine cell line, IPC-366, as a good model for the study of inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Caceres, S; Peña, L; Lacerda, L; Illera, M J; de Andres, P J; Larson, R A; Gao, H; Debeb, B G; Woodward, W A; Reuben, J M; Illera, J C

    2016-05-05

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive type of cancer with poor survival in women. Inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) in dogs is very similar to human IBC and it has been proposed as a good surrogate model for study the human disease. The aim was to determine if IPC-366 shared characteristics with the IBC cell line SUM149. The comparison was conducted in terms of ability to grow (adherent and nonadherent conditions), stem cell markers expression using flow cytometry, protein production using western blot and tumorigenic capacity. Our results revealed that both are capable of forming long-term mammospheres with a grape-like morphology. Adherent and nonadherent cultures exhibited fast growth in vivo. Stem cell markers expressions showed that IPC-366 and SUM149 in adherent and nonadherent conditions has mesenchymal-like characteristics, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, was higher in adherent than in nonadherent cultures. Therefore, this study determines that both cell lines are similar and IPC-366 is a good model for the human and canine disease.

  20. Health behavior change models and their socio-cultural relevance for breast cancer screening in African American women.

    PubMed

    Ashing-Giwa, K

    1999-01-01

    Models of health behavior provide the conceptual bases for most of the breast cancer screening intervention studies. These models were not designed for and have not been adequately tested with African American women. The models discussed in this paper are: The Health Belief Model, the Theory of Reasoned Action/Theory of Planned Behavior, and the Transtheoretical Model. This paper will examine the socio-cultural relevance of these health behavior models, and discuss specific socio-cultural dimensions that are not accounted for by these paradigms. It is critical that researchers include socio-cultural dimensions, such as interconnectedness, health socialization, ecological factors and health care system factors into their intervention models with African American women. Comprehensive and socio-culturally based investigations are necessary to guide the scientific and policy challenge for reducing breast cancer mortality in African American women.

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Michalak, Ewa M.; Braumuller, Tanya M.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J.; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics. PMID:26100884

  3. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Michalak, Ewa M; Braumuller, Tanya M; Jaspers, Janneke E; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-07-07

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  4. Exploiting evolutionary principles to prolong tumor control in preclinical models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez-Navas, Pedro M.; Kam, Yoonseok; Das, Tuhin; Hassan, Sabrina; Silva, Ariosto; Foroutan, Parastou; Ruiz, Epifanio; Martinez, Gary; Minton, Susan; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional cancer treatment strategies assume that maximum patient benefit is achieved through maximum killing of tumor cells. However, by eliminating the therapy-sensitive population, this strategy accelerates emergence of resistant clones that proliferate unopposed by competitors—an evolutionary phenomenon termed “competitive release.” We present an evolution-guided treatment strategy designed to maintain a stable population of chemosensitive cells that limit proliferation of resistant clones by exploiting the fitness cost of the resistant phenotype. We treated MDA-MB-231/luc triple-negative and MCF7 estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancers growing orthotopically in a mouse mammary fat pad with paclitaxel, using algorithms linked to tumor response monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. We found that initial control required more intensive therapy with regular application of drug to deflect the exponential tumor growth curve onto a plateau. Dose-skipping algorithms during this phase were less successful than variable dosing algorithms. However, once initial tumor control was achieved, it was maintained with progressively smaller drug doses. In 60 to 80% of animals, continued decline in tumor size permitted intervals as long as several weeks in which no treatment was necessary. Magnetic resonance images and histological analysis of tumors controlled by adaptive therapy demonstrated increased vascular density and less necrosis, suggesting that vascular normalization resulting from enforced stabilization of tumor volume may contribute to ongoing tumor control with lower drug doses. Our study demonstrates that an evolution-based therapeutic strategy using an available chemotherapeutic drug and conventional clinical imaging can prolong the progression-free survival in different preclinical models of breast cancer. PMID:26912903

  5. Dietary Isoflavones and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ziaei, Samira; Halaby, Reginald

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the deadliest neoplasm in women globally, resulting in a significant health burden. In many cases, breast cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapies. It is believed that genetics is not the major cause of breast cancer. Other contributing risk factors include age at first childbirth, age at menarche, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives, race and ethnicity, and diet. Diet has been shown to influence breast cancer incidence, recurrence, and prognosis. Soy isoflavones have long been a staple in Asian diets, and there appears to be an increase, albeit modest, compared to Asian populations, in soy consumption among Americans. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens that have antiestrogenic as well as estrogenic effects on breast cancer cells in culture, in animal models, and in clinical trials. This study will investigate anticancer and tumor promoting properties of dietary isoflavones and evaluate their effects on breast cancer development. Furthermore, this work seeks to elucidate the putative molecular pathways by which these phytochemicals modulate breast cancer risk by synergizing or antagonizing the estrogen receptor (ER) and in ER-independent signaling mechanisms. PMID:28930233

  6. Modeling the positioning of single needle electrodes for the treatment of breast cancer in a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and is the second most common cause of cancer death in women. Electrochemotherapy (ECT) used in early-phase clinical trials for the treatment of primary breast cancer resulted in a not complete tumor necrosis in most cases. The present study was undertaken to analyze the feasibility to use ECT to treat patients with histologically proven unifocal ductal breast cancer. In particular, results of ECT treatment in a clinical case are compared with the ones of a simplified 3D dosimetric model. Methods This clinical study was conducted with the pulse generator Cliniporator Vitae (IGEA, Carpi, Italy). ECT procedures were performed according to ESOPE standard operating procedures. Five single needle electrodes were used with one positioned in the center of the tumor, and the other four distributed around the nodule. Histological images of the resected tumor are compared with the maps of the electric field obtained with a simplified 3D model in Comsol Multiphysics v 4.3. Results The results of the clinical case demonstrated a reduced efficacy of the ECT treatment described. The proposed simple numerical model of the breast tumor located in a low conductive tissue suggests that this is due to the reduced electric field induced inside the tumor with such 5 electrodes placement. However, where the electric field is predicted higher than the reversible electroporation threshold (E>400 V/cm), also the histological images confirm the necrosis of the target with a good agreement between the modeled and clinical results. Conclusions The results suggest the dependence of the effectiveness of the treatment on the careful placement of the electrodes. A detailed planned procedure for the tumor analysis after the treatment is also needed in order to better correlate the single electrode positions and the histological images. Simulation models could be used to identify better electrodes configuration in planning the

  7. Modeling the positioning of single needle electrodes for the treatment of breast cancer in a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Strigari, Lidia; Di Filippo, Franco; Botti, Claudio; Di Filippo, Simona; Perracchio, Letizia; Ronchetti, Mattia; Cadossi, Ruggero; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and is the second most common cause of cancer death in women. Electrochemotherapy (ECT) used in early-phase clinical trials for the treatment of primary breast cancer resulted in a not complete tumor necrosis in most cases. The present study was undertaken to analyze the feasibility to use ECT to treat patients with histologically proven unifocal ductal breast cancer. In particular, results of ECT treatment in a clinical case are compared with the ones of a simplified 3D dosimetric model. This clinical study was conducted with the pulse generator Cliniporator Vitae (IGEA, Carpi, Italy). ECT procedures were performed according to ESOPE standard operating procedures. Five single needle electrodes were used with one positioned in the center of the tumor, and the other four distributed around the nodule. Histological images of the resected tumor are compared with the maps of the electric field obtained with a simplified 3D model in Comsol Multiphysics v 4.3. The results of the clinical case demonstrated a reduced efficacy of the ECT treatment described. The proposed simple numerical model of the breast tumor located in a low conductive tissue suggests that this is due to the reduced electric field induced inside the tumor with such 5 electrodes placement. However, where the electric field is predicted higher than the reversible electroporation threshold (E>400 V/cm), also the histological images confirm the necrosis of the target with a good agreement between the modeled and clinical results. The results suggest the dependence of the effectiveness of the treatment on the careful placement of the electrodes. A detailed planned procedure for the tumor analysis after the treatment is also needed in order to better correlate the single electrode positions and the histological images. Simulation models could be used to identify better electrodes configuration in planning the experimental protocol for ECT treatment

  8. Effective combination therapies in preclinical endocrine resistant breast cancer models harboring ER mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Brendon; Mazzola, Anne Marie; Bihani, Teeru; Lai, Zhongwu; Bradford, James; Collins, Michael; Barry, Evan; Goeppert, Anne U.; Weir, Hazel M.; Hearne, Kelly; Renshaw, Jonathan G.; Mohseni, Morvarid; Hurt, Elaine; Jalla, Sanjoo; Bao, Haifeng; Hollingsworth, Robert; Reimer, Corinne; Zinda, Michael; Fawell, Stephen; D'Cruz, Celina M.

    2016-01-01

    Although endocrine therapy is successfully used to treat patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, a substantial proportion of this population will relapse. Several mechanisms of acquired resistance have been described including activation of the mTOR pathway, increased activity of CDK4 and activating mutations in ER. Using a patient derived xenograft model harboring a common activating ER ligand binding domain mutation (D538G), we evaluated several combinatorial strategies using the selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD) fulvestrant in combination with chromatin modifying agents, and CDK4/6 and mTOR inhibitors. In this model, fulvestrant binds WT and MT ER, reduces ER protein levels, and downregulated ER target gene expression. Addition of JQ1 or vorinostat to fulvestrant resulted in tumor regression (41% and 22% regression, respectively) though no efficacy was seen when either agent was given alone. Interestingly, although the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib and mTOR inhibitor everolimus were efficacious as monotherapies, long-term delayed tumor growth was only observed when co-administered with fulvestrant. This observation was consistent with a greater inhibition of compensatory signaling when palbociclib and everolimus were co-dosed with fulvestrant. The addition of fulvestrant to JQ1, vorinostat, everolimus and palbociclib also significantly reduced lung metastatic burden as compared to monotherapy. The combination potential of fulvestrant with palbociclib or everolimus were confirmed in an MCF7 CRISPR model harboring the Y537S ER activating mutation. Taken together, these data suggest that fulvestrant may have an important role in the treatment of ER positive breast cancer with acquired ER mutations. PMID:27472462

  9. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (p<0.0001) and in vivo tumors (p<0.0001) versus controls. Subpopulation analyses revealed a homogeneous response to combined therapy in both cultured organoids and in vivo tumors, while single agent treatment with XL147 alone or paclitaxel alone elicited heterogeneous responses in organoids. Tumor volume decreased with combination treatment through treatment day 30. These results indicate that OMI of organoids generated from PyVmT tumors can accurately reflect drug response in heterogeneous allografts with both innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  10. Evidence That Breast Tissue Stiffness Is Associated with Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Norman F.; Li, Qing; Melnichouk, Olga; Huszti, Ella; Martin, Lisa J.; Gunasekara, Anoma; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J.; Minkin, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. Methods Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases) and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls). Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. Results After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02) and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. Conclusion An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement. PMID:25010427

  11. Assessment of the Cancer Risk of the Fat-Grafted Breast in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Claro, Francisco; Moreira, Luciana R; Morari, Joseane; Sarian, Luis O Z; Pinto, Glauce A; Velloso, Licio A; Pinto-Neto, Aara O M

    2017-05-01

    The results of experimental studies indicate that grafting of autologous adipose tissue may induce tumorigenesis at the recipient site, but clinical results do not support a carcinogenic effect of fat grafting to the breast. The authors assessed cancer risk following transplantation of autologous fat into murine mammary tissue. In this animal study, mammary tissues from 54 breasts of 9 female rats were either grafted with autologous subcutaneous fat, grafted with autologous omental fat, or unmanipulated. Tissues were harvested and processed for histologic and immunohistochemical analyses, and the mRNA expression levels of specific genes were determined. No atypia or changes in lobular structures were observed in lipofilled breasts compared with controls. The numbers of ductal cell layers and terminal ductal units were similar for lipofilled and control breasts. Macrophage concentrations also were similar for the 3 groups. The localization and magnitude of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 were similar for lipofilled and unmanipulated breast tissue. The percentages of cells expressing Ki67 or estrogen receptor (ER) and the ER/Ki67 balance were similar for the 3 groups. Gene expression was not altered in lipofilled breasts, compared with controls. No theoretical risk of cancer was detected in the microenvironment of the lipofilled rat breast.

  12. Serotonin transporter antagonists target tumor-initiating cells in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Gwynne, William D.; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Bisson, Jennifer N.P.; Jensen, Jeremy E.; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggests that the initiation and progression of human breast tumors is fueled by a rare subpopulation of tumor cells, termed breast tumor-initiating cells (BTIC), which resist radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Consequently, therapies that abrogate BTIC activity are needed to achieve durable cures for breast cancer patients. To identify such therapies we used a sensitive assay to complete a high-throughput screen of small molecules, including approved drugs, with BTIC-rich mouse mammary tumor cell populations. We found that inhibitors of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and serotonin receptors, which include approved drugs used to treat mood disorders, were potent inhibitors of mouse BTIC activity as determined by functional sphere-forming assays and the initiation of tumor formation by transplant of drug-exposed tumor cells into syngeneic mice. Moreover, sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), synergized with docetaxel (Taxotere) to shrink mouse breast tumors in vivo. Hence drugs targeting the serotonergic system might be repurposed to treat breast cancer patients to afford more durable breast cancer remissions. PMID:27447971

  13. Breast-feeding after breast cancer in childbearing women.

    PubMed

    Camune, Barbara; Gabzdyl, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society in 2007, about 178,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the United States. Of these, 25% have tumors in their childbearing years and may desire future opportunities for pregnancy and lactation. Although there is a multitude of options related to preserving fertility, little is known about the residual effects of breast cancer treatment and the ability to breast-feed afterward. This article describes the epidemiological relationship between breast cancer and pregnancy and lactation. Basic types of treatment for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are reviewed. Practical information on how to support breast-feeding after breast cancer is included.

  14. Local health departments implement a theory-based model to increase breast and cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Suarez, L; Nichols, D C; Pulley, L; Brady, C A; McAlister, A

    1993-01-01

    Su Vida, Su Salud/Your Life, Your Health is a community program to increase participation in breast and cervical cancer screening. This program illustrates the diffusion of an innovative outreach strategy from a research environment to two local health departments. The program uses A Su Salud, the communication model in which positive role models are featured in the media, and community volunteers who give positive social reinforcement. Local health departments in Galveston and Corpus Christi, TX, were selected to implement the model because of excessive mortality rates in the region and the departments' adequate level of resources and commitment. Over an 18-month period, 54 stories of role models appeared in the media in Corpus Christi, and 60 appeared in Galveston. There were 490 volunteers active in Corpus Christi and 279 in Galveston. Of 365 inquiries to the Corpus Christi program, 35 percent were from the Mexican American target group of women ages 40-70. Of 1,457