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Sample records for breast cancer target

  1. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  2. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  3. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Sean P.; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that tumors are maintained by a self-renewing CSC population that is also capable of differentiating into non-self renewing cell populations that constitute the bulk of the tumor. Although, the CSC hypothesis does not directly address the cell of origin of cancer, it is postulated that tissue-resident stem or progenitors are the most common targets of transformation. Clinically, CSCs are predicted to mediate tumor recurrence after chemo- and radiation-therapy due to the relative inability of these modalities to effectively target CSCs. If this is the case, then CSC must be efficiently targeted to achieve a true cure. Similarities between normal and malignant stem cells, at the levels of cell-surface proteins, molecular pathways, cell cycle quiescence, and microRNA signaling present challenges in developing CSC-specific therapeutics. Approaches to targeting CSCs include the development of agents targeting known stem cell regulatory pathways as well as unbiased high-throughput siRNA or small-molecule screening. Based on studies of pathways present in normal stem cells, recent work has identified potential “Achilles heals” of CSC, whereas unbiased screening provides opportunities to identify new pathways utilized by CSC as well as develop potential therapeutic agents. Here, we review both approaches and their potential to effectively target breast CSC. PMID:20599450

  4. HER2-targeted therapies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nahta, Rita

    2013-01-01

    HER2 was acknowledged as an important therapeutic target in breast cancer more than twenty-five years ago. Subsequently, significant basic science and translational discoveries have resulted in the approval of four HER2-targeted therapies over the past fifteen years. This editorial discusses future challenges regarding selection and development of treatments for HER2-positive breast cancer, which can only be met by continuing to support research efforts into the basic mechanisms by which cancer cells escape targeted therapies. Identifying specific molecular mechanisms underlying the sensitivity or resistance to each HER2-targeted agent will ultimately allow individualized therapy for each patient. PMID:23565676

  5. Targeting SH2 domains in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morlacchi, Pietro; Robertson, Fredika M; Klostergaard, Jim; McMurray, John S

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed cancer types in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer-related disease in the USA. SH2 domains recruit signaling proteins to phosphotyrosine residues on aberrantly activated growth factor and cytokine receptors and contribute to cancer cell cycling, metastasis, angiogenesis and so on. Herein we review phosphopeptide mimetic and small-molecule approaches targeting the SH2 domains of Grb2, Grb7 and STAT3 that inhibit their targets and reduce proliferation in in vitro breast cancer models. Only STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated in in vivo models and have led to tumor reduction. Taken together, these studies suggest that targeting SH2 domains is an important approach to the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25495984

  6. New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Etet, Paul Faustin Seke; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed. PMID:25516852

  7. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  8. Targeting Angiogenesis in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sangeetha; Raffin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis has become an important target in the treatment of several solid tumors, including breast cancer. As monotherapy, antiangiogenic agents have demonstrated limited activity in metastatic breast cancer (MBC); therefore, they have generally been developed for use in combination with chemotherapies. Thus far, the experience with antiangiogenic agents for MBC has been mixed. The results from one study assessing addition of the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab to paclitaxel led to approval of bevacizumab for MBC. However, the modest improvement of progression-free survival rates in subsequent MBC studies has led to reappraisal of bevacizumab. Phase III studies have not produced evidence supporting use of the multikinase inhibitor sunitinib alone or in combination with MBC chemotherapy. Experience with sorafenib in a phase IIb program indicates potential when used in select combinations, particularly with capecitabine; however, phase III confirmatory data are needed. Although antiangiogenic therapies combined with chemotherapy have increased progression-free survival rates for patients with MBC, increases in overall survival times have not been observed. Some studies have tried to combine antiangiogenic agents such as bevacizumab and sunitinib or sorafenib, but that approach has been limited because of toxicity concerns. Sequential use of antiangiogenic agents with differing mechanisms of action may be an effective approach. Despite setbacks, angiogenesis will likely remain an important target of treatment for selected patients with MBC. PMID:22843553

  9. Targeting metabolism in breast cancer: How far we can go?

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jing-Pei; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant therapies for breast cancer have achieved great success in recent years and early breast cancer is now a curable or chronic disease. Targeted therapies, including endocrine therapy and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 targeted therapy, marked a new era of breast cancer treatment. However, except for chemotherapy, an efficient drug treatment to improve the overall survival of breast cancer patients is still lacking for triple negative breast cancer. Furthermore, a certain proportion of breast cancer patients present with resistance to drug therapy, making it much more difficult to control the deterioration of the disease. Recently, altered energy metabolism has become one of the hallmarks of cancer, including breast cancer, and it may be linked to drug resistance. Targeting cellular metabolism is becoming a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. This review discusses metabolic reprogramming in breast cancer and the possible complex mechanism of modulation. We also summarize the recent advances in metabolic therapy targeted glycolysis, glutaminolysis and fatty acids synthesis in breast cancer. PMID:26862496

  10. Targeting metabolism in breast cancer: How far we can go?

    PubMed

    Long, Jing-Pei; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-10

    Adjuvant therapies for breast cancer have achieved great success in recent years and early breast cancer is now a curable or chronic disease. Targeted therapies, including endocrine therapy and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 targeted therapy, marked a new era of breast cancer treatment. However, except for chemotherapy, an efficient drug treatment to improve the overall survival of breast cancer patients is still lacking for triple negative breast cancer. Furthermore, a certain proportion of breast cancer patients present with resistance to drug therapy, making it much more difficult to control the deterioration of the disease. Recently, altered energy metabolism has become one of the hallmarks of cancer, including breast cancer, and it may be linked to drug resistance. Targeting cellular metabolism is becoming a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. This review discusses metabolic reprogramming in breast cancer and the possible complex mechanism of modulation. We also summarize the recent advances in metabolic therapy targeted glycolysis, glutaminolysis and fatty acids synthesis in breast cancer. PMID:26862496

  11. Targeted therapy in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHU GUANG; LI, LI

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for breast cancer vary based on tumor surface markers and clinical factors, including cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy or a combination thereof. An important molecular determinant of therapy is the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positivity of the tumor, which has been identified in 20–25% of breast cancers and is a prognostic marker of poor outcome. The advent of HER2-targeted therapies has significantly improved the survival of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. This review focuses on current HER2-targeted therapeutic options for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). PMID:24648975

  12. Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

    2014-08-10

    There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients' overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current "state of play" with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk's role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  13. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y; Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. "Smart" nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer. PMID:27679576

  14. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y; Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. "Smart" nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer.

  15. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y.; Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. “Smart” nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer.

  16. Skp2 is a Promising Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wan, Lixin; Liu, Pengda; Gao, Daming; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Wei, Wenyi

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among American women, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death for female in the United States. It has been known that several signaling pathways and various factors play critical roles in the development and progression of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor, Notch, PTEN, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, PI3K/Akt, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Emerging evidence has shown that the F-box protein S-phase kinase associated protein 2 (Skp2) also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Therefore, in this brief review, we summarize the novel functions of Skp2 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Moreover, we provide further evidence regarding the state of our knowledge toward the development of novel Skp2 inhibitors especially natural “chemopreventive agents” as targeted approach for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22279619

  17. Urban Endocrine Disruptors Targeting Breast Cancer Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-02-15

    Humans are exposed to a huge amount of environmental pollutants called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These molecules interfere with the homeostasis of the body, usually through mimicking natural hormones leading to activation or blocking of their receptors. Many of these compounds have been associated with a broad range of diseases including the development or increased susceptibility to breast cancer, the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Thus, this article presents a virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) to evaluate the affinity of proteins related to breast cancer, such as ESR1, ERBB2, PGR, BCRA1, and SHBG, among others, with EDCs from urban sources. A blind docking strategy was employed to screen each protein-ligand pair in triplicate in AutoDock Vina 2.0, using the computed binding affinities as ranking criteria. The three-dimensional structures were previously obtained from EDCs DataBank and Protein Data Bank, prepared and optimized by SYBYL X-2.0. Some of the chemicals that exhibited the best affinity scores for breast cancer proteins in each category were 1,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, bisphenol A derivatives, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid, and benzo(a)pyrene, for catalase, several proteins, sex hormone-binding globulin, and cytochrome P450 1A2, respectively. An experimental validation of this approach was performed with a complex that gave a moderate binding affinity in silico, the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and bisphenol A (BPA) complex. The protein was obtained using DNA recombinant technology and the physical interaction with BPA assessed through spectroscopic techniques. BPA binds on the recombinant SHBG, and this results in an increase of its α helix content. In short, this work shows the potential of several EDCs to bind breast cancer associated proteins as a tool to prioritize compounds to perform in vitro analysis to benefit the regulation or exposure prevention by the

  18. Targeting breast cancer with sugar-coated carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Hadimani, Mallinath; King, S Bruce; Torti, Suzy V; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the use of glucosamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (glyco-MWCNTs) for breast cancer targeting. Materials & methods Two types of glucosamine functionalized MWCNTs were developed (covalently linked glucosamine and non-covalently phospholipid-glucosamine coated) and evaluated for their potential to bind and target breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Results & conclusion Binding of glyco-MWCNTs in breast cancer cells is mediated by specific interaction with glucose transporters. Glyco-MWCNTs prepared by non-covalent coating with phospholipid-glucosamine displayed an extended blood circulation time, delayed urinary clearance, low tissue retention and increased breast cancer tumor accumulation in vivo. These studies lay the foundation for development of a cancer diagnostic agent based upon glyco-MWCNTs with the potential for superior accuracy over current radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26296098

  19. Targeted therapy for HER2 positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death for women behind lung cancer and the most common cause of cancer deaths for women aged 45–55 years old (CDC.gov 2012). Although there continue to be enormously large numbers of disease incidence, deaths have been declining due to the disease with two hallmark time frames. The first occurred during the mid to late 1980’s when hormonal therapy was introduced as a treatment for ER/PR positive breast cancer. The second occurred in the late 1990’s when trastuzumab was introduced in treating HER2 positive breast cancer. These remarkable accomplishments in developing novel targeted therapies for breast cancer, along with a better understanding of the disease biology have improved disease outcome over the past 20 years. This article reviews the data presented at 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology and 2012 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium regarding progress made in the field of HER2 positive breast cancer and examines the future of HER2 targeted therapy. PMID:23731980

  20. BRCA1 as target for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Romagnolo, Alberto P G; Romagnolo, Donato F; Selmin, Ornella I

    2015-01-01

    The Breast Cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor involved in basic cellular functions necessary for cell replication and DNA synthesis, but reduced expression of BRCA1, due to mutations or epigenetic inactivation, leads to impaired mammary gland differentiation and increased risk of breast cancer development. Although BRCA1 acts as a tumor suppressor and is present in all cells, where it is essential for the maintenance of the genome integrity, it is still not clear why mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to breast and ovarian, but not to other types of cancer. In the first part of this review, we briefly discuss the function and regulation of the BRCA1 protein, including its role associated with familial and sporadic breast cancer. The second part is an overview of the therapeutic compounds used for breast cancer treatment targeting BRCA1, and the natural food components that hold potential preventive effect against those types of breast cancer in which BRCA1 expression is either reduced or lacking. Further studies elucidating the interactions between dietary compounds and cellular pathways, involved in regulation of BRCA1expression, are necessary for the development of strategies that may successfully prevent or treat breast cancer.

  1. Novel targeted agents for the treatment of advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Máximo; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; Alvarez, Ricardo H

    2012-05-01

    The discovery of the molecular processes involved in cancer development has led to the design of an array of targeted agents. These agents, directed to specific proteins in the machinery of cancer cells, interfere with vital cascades involved in cell invasion, metastasis, apoptosis, cell-cycle control and angiogenesis. In breast cancer, the main pathways studied and targeted by drugs are the HER2 pathway, EGFR, VEGF, PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K-M-Tor), IGF/IGFR, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1, HDAC and many others. In this review, we present the most promising studies of these new targeted therapies and novel combination of targeted therapies with cytotoxic agents for the treatment of breast cancer patients. PMID:22571614

  2. Therapeutic targeting of casein kinase 1δ in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Quereda, Victor; Grant, Wayne; Chen, Weimin; Bibian, Mathieu; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Chang, Jenny C; Roush, William R; Cleveland, John L; Duckett, Derek R

    2015-12-16

    Identification of specific drivers of human cancer is required to instruct the development of targeted therapeutics. We demonstrate that CSNK1D is amplified and/or overexpressed in human breast tumors and that casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ) is a vulnerability of human breast cancer subtypes overexpressing this kinase. Specifically, selective knockdown of CK1δ, or treatment with a highly selective and potent CK1δ inhibitor, triggers apoptosis of CK1δ-expressing breast tumor cells ex vivo, tumor regression in orthotopic models of triple-negative breast cancer, including patient-derived xenografts, and tumor growth inhibition in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer models. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a hallmark of human tumors overexpressing CK1δ, that disabling CK1δ blocks nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and T cell factor transcriptional activity, and that constitutively active β-catenin overrides the effects of inhibition or silencing of CK1δ. Thus, CK1δ inhibition represents a promising strategy for targeted treatment in human breast cancer with Wnt/β-catenin involvement.

  3. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y.; Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. “Smart” nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer. PMID:27679576

  4. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  5. Clinical Implementation of Novel Targeted Therapeutics in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Mary D; Bernhardt, Erica B; Miller, Todd W

    2016-11-01

    The majority of advanced breast cancers have genetic alterations that are potentially targetable with drugs. Through initiatives such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), data can be mined to provide context for next-generation sequencing (NGS) results in the landscape of advanced breast cancer. Therapies for targets other than estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and HER2, such as cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, were recently approved based on efficacy in patient subpopulations, but no predictive biomarkers have been found, leaving clinicians to continue a trial-and-error approach with each patient. Next-generation sequencing identifies potentially actionable alterations in genes thought to be drivers in the cancerous process including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), and mutant HER2. Epigenetically directed and immunologic therapies have also shown promise for the treatment of breast cancer via histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1 and 3, programmed T cell death 1 (PD-1), and programmed T cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Identifying biomarkers to predict primary resistance in breast cancer will ultimately affect clinical decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in the first-line setting. However, the bulk of medical decision-making is currently made in the secondary resistance setting. Herein, we review the clinical potential of PI3K, AKT, FGFRs, mutant HER2, HDAC1/3, PD-1, and PD-L1 as therapeutic targets in breast cancer, focusing on the rationale for therapeutic development and the status of clinical testing. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2454-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  7. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  8. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  9. Targeting type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase inhibits breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Wang, X; Xiong, X; Liu, Q; Huang, Y; Xu, Q; Hu, J; Ge, G; Ling, K

    2015-08-27

    Most deaths from breast cancer are caused by metastasis, a complex behavior of cancer cells involving migration, invasion, survival and microenvironment manipulation. Type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPKIγ) regulates focal adhesion assembly and its phosphorylation at Y639 is critical for cell migration induced by EGF. However, the role of this lipid kinase in tumor metastasis remains unclear. Here we report that PIPKIγ is vital for breast cancer metastasis. Y639 of PIPKIγ can be phosphorylated by stimulation of EGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), two promoting factors for breast cancer progression. Histological analysis revealed elevated Y639 phosphorylation of PIPKIγ in invasive ductal carcinoma lesions and suggested a positive correlation with tumor grade. Orthotopically transplanted PIPKIγ-depleted breast cancer cells showed substantially reduced growth and metastasis, as well as suppressed expression of multiple genes related to cell migration and microenvironment manipulation. Re-expression of wild-type PIPKIγ in PIPKIγ-depleted cells restored tumor growth and metastasis, reinforcing the importance of PIPKIγ in breast cancer progression. Y639-to-F or a kinase-dead mutant of PIPKIγ could not recover the diminished metastasis in PIPKIγ-depleted cancer cells, suggesting that Y639 phosphorylation and lipid kinase activity are both required for development of metastasis. Further analysis with in vitro assays indicated that depleting PIPKIγ inhibited cell proliferation, MMP9 secretion and cell migration and invasion, lending molecular mechanisms for the eliminated cancer progression. These results suggest that PIPKIγ, downstream of EGF and/or HGF receptor, participates in breast cancer progression from multiple aspects and deserves further studies to explore its potential as a therapeutic target.

  10. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Haitao; Yao, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12). CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26356032

  11. Vascular targeting of a gold nanoparticle to breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Pubudu M.; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P.; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. While deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the gold nanoparticles, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Due to the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. PMID:26036431

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  13. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  14. Targeted Therapies in Breast Cancer: Implications for Advanced Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Luu, Thehan

    2014-01-01

    The systemic therapeutic management of breast cancer has undergone significant transformation in the past decade. Without targeted therapies, conventional treatment with cytotoxic agents has reached the limit of its potential in terms of patient survival for most types of cancer. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of tumor cell growth and metastasis has led to the identification of signaling growth pathways as targets for these directed therapies. Novel therapies targeted to HER2/neu, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), histone deacetylase (HDAC), the heat shock protein, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been developed and have demonstrated some efficacy in breast cancer. Recognition and management of the toxicities associated with targeted therapies is imperative. This review will describe the clinical development and utilization of targeted therapies currently in use or in clinical trials, with a focus on considerations for the oncology advanced practitioner. PMID:26110069

  15. Targeting of two aspects of metabolism in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gang, Bevan P; Dilda, Pierre J; Hogg, Phillip J; Blackburn, Anneke C

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is gaining recognition as a hallmark of cancer cells, and is being explored for therapeutic potential. The Warburg effect is a metabolic phenotype that occurs in 90% of tumors, where glycolysis is favored despite the presence of oxygen. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inhibitor that can reverse the Warburg effect. PENAO (4-(N-(S-penicillaminylacetyl)amino) phenylarsonous acid) is a novel anti-mitochondrial agent that targets the adenine nucleotide transporter in mitochondria and is currently in clinical trials for solid tumors. We have investigated the targeting of two aspects of metabolism, using DCA to promote mitochondrial activity combined with PENAO to inhibit mitochondrial activity, in breast and other carcinoma cell lines. PENAO was effective at low uM concentrations in luminal (T-47D) and triple negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells, in normoxia and hypoxia. The cytotoxicity of PENAO was enhanced by DCA by a mechanism involving increased reactive oxygen species in both T-47D and MDA-MB-231 cells, however further investigations found it did not always involve PDK2 inhibition or reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential, which are the accepted mechanisms for DCA induction of apoptosis. Nevertheless, DCA sensitized all cancer cell lines tested toward apoptosis of PENAO. DCA and PENAO are both currently in clinical trials and targeting cancer metabolism with these drugs may offer options for difficult to treat cancers. PMID:25482950

  16. Targeting of two aspects of metabolism in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Bevan P; Dilda, Pierre J; Hogg, Phillip J; Blackburn, Anneke C

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is gaining recognition as a hallmark of cancer cells, and is being explored for therapeutic potential. The Warburg effect is a metabolic phenotype that occurs in 90% of tumors, where glycolysis is favored despite the presence of oxygen. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inhibitor that can reverse the Warburg effect. PENAO (4-(N-(S-penicillaminylacetyl)amino) phenylarsonous acid) is a novel anti-mitochondrial agent that targets the adenine nucleotide transporter in mitochondria and is currently in clinical trials for solid tumors. We have investigated the targeting of two aspects of metabolism, using DCA to promote mitochondrial activity combined with PENAO to inhibit mitochondrial activity, in breast and other carcinoma cell lines. PENAO was effective at low uM concentrations in luminal (T-47D) and triple negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells, in normoxia and hypoxia. The cytotoxicity of PENAO was enhanced by DCA by a mechanism involving increased reactive oxygen species in both T-47D and MDA-MB-231 cells, however further investigations found it did not always involve PDK2 inhibition or reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential, which are the accepted mechanisms for DCA induction of apoptosis. Nevertheless, DCA sensitized all cancer cell lines tested toward apoptosis of PENAO. DCA and PENAO are both currently in clinical trials and targeting cancer metabolism with these drugs may offer options for difficult to treat cancers. PMID:25482950

  17. Targeting Glutamine Metabolism in Breast Cancer with Aminooxyacetate

    PubMed Central

    Korangath, Preethi; Teo, Wei Wen; Sadik, Helen; Han, Liangfeng; Mori, Noriko; Huijts, Charlotte M.; Wildes, Flonne; Bharti, Santosh; Zhang, Zhe; Santa-Maria, Cesar A.; Tsai, Hualing; Dang, Chi V.; Stearns, Vered; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Glutamine addiction in c-MYC–overexpressing breast cancer is targeted by the aminotransferase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate (AOA). However, the mechanism of ensuing cell death remains unresolved. Experimental Design A correlation between glutamine dependence for growth and c-MYC expression was studied in breast cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effects of AOA, its correlation with high c-MYC expression, and effects on enzymes in the glutaminolytic pathway were investigated. AOA-induced cell death was assessed by measuring changes in metabolite levels by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), the effects of amino acid depletion on nucleotide synthesis by cell-cycle and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) uptake analysis, and activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress–mediated pathway. Antitumor effects of AOA with or without common chemotherapies were determined in breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice and in a transgenic MMTV-rTtA-TetO-myc mouse mammary tumor model. Results We established a direct correlation between c-MYC overexpression, suppression of glutaminolysis, and AOA sensitivity in most breast cancer cells. MRS, cell-cycle analysis, and BrdUrd uptake measurements indicated depletion of aspartic acid and alanine leading to cell-cycle arrest at S-phase by AOA. Activation of components of the ER stress–mediated pathway, initiated through GRP78, led to apoptotic cell death. AOA inhibited growth of SUM159, SUM149, and MCF-7 xenografts and c-myc–overexpressing transgenic mouse mammary tumors. In MDA-MB-231, AOA was effective only in combination with chemotherapy. Conclusions AOA mediates its cytotoxic effects largely through the stress response pathway. The preclinical data of AOA’s effectiveness provide a strong rationale for further clinical development, particularly for c-MYC–overexpressing breast cancers. PMID:25813021

  18. Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F.; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:21090693

  19. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  20. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  1. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans.

  2. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  3. Targeted Therapy of HER2-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Florian; Domschke, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Personalized and targeted treatments are the most discussed topics in oncology. However, how much personalized medicine is standard of care nowadays and how much is part of our hope for a better future? So far, only a few targeted therapies are available in daily practice for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. And even for these few targeted agents - besides those targeting the estrogen receptor (ER) for endocrine treatment - thus far, predictive factors are missing. There are many new drugs and strategies under evaluation but, unfortunately, they are being developed without any cross-comparison. What drug will we choose for which patient in the future? Without answering this question oncologists will not be able to individualize treatment. Predictive factors for every new splendid drug are eagerly needed before it comes to an approval.

  4. Bone marrow endothelium-targeted therapeutics for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mai, Junhua; Huang, Yi; Mu, Chaofeng; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Rong; Guo, Xiaojing; Xia, Xiaojun; Volk, David E; Lokesh, Ganesh L; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Gorenstein, David G; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2014-08-10

    Effective treatment of cancer metastasis to the bone relies on bone marrow drug accumulation. The surface proteins in the bone marrow vascular endothelium provide docking sites for targeted drug delivery. We have developed a thioaptamer that specifically binds to E-selectin that is overexpressed in the vasculature of tumor and inflammatory tissues. In this study, we tested targeted delivery of therapeutic siRNA loaded in the E-selectin thioaptamer-conjugated multistage vector (ESTA-MSV) drug carrier to bone marrow for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis. We evaluated tumor type- and tumor growth stage-dependent targeting in mice bearing metastatic breast cancer in the bone, and carried out studies to identify factors that determine targeting efficiency. In a subsequent study, we delivered siRNA to knock down expression of the human STAT3 gene in murine xenograft models of human MDA-MB-231 breast tumor, and assessed therapeutic efficacy. Our studies revealed that the CD31(+)E-selectin(+) population accounted for 20.8%, 26.4% and 29.9% of total endothelial cells respectively inside the femur of mice bearing early, middle and late stage metastatic MDA-MB-231 tumors. In comparison, the double positive cells remained at a basal level in mice with early stage MCF-7 tumors, and jumped to 23.9% and 28.2% when tumor growth progressed to middle and late stages. Accumulation of ESTA-MSV inside the bone marrow correlated with the E-selectin expression pattern. There was up to 5-fold enrichment of the targeted MSV in the bone marrow of mice bearing early or late stage MDA-MB-231 tumors and of mice with late stage, but not early stage, MCF-7 tumors. Targeted delivery of STAT3 siRNA in ESTA-MSV resulted in knockdown of STAT3 expression in 48.7% of cancer cells inside the bone marrow. Weekly systemic administration of ESTA-MSV/STAT3 siRNA significantly extended survival of mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis. In conclusion, targeting the overexpressed E

  5. "Targeting" triple-negative breast cancer: the lessons learned from BRCA1-associated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Rita

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer has long been recognized as a heterogeneous entity, with distinct subsets characterized by differences in tumor biology and response to therapy. With the advent of molecular profiling, we have gained a further appreciation of the heterogeneity of this complex disease. While the last decade has seen advances in the treatment of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/erb-B2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers, outcomes for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)-, and HER2-negative-or "triple-negative"-breast cancer (TNBC) remain poor. A better understanding of the shared biology of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and sporadic TNBC holds much promise for changing the outlook for women with this aggressive disease. This review focuses on our current understanding of the clinicopathological features of TNBC, therapeutic options and ongoing research efforts.

  6. Promise and failure of targeted therapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Antonio; Tagliabue, Elda; Pupa, Serenella M

    2012-01-01

    The current molecular targets in breast cancer (BC) clinical trials were identified before the advent of the genomic era and their relevance was confirmed and validated by the introduction of gene profiling. Pioneering molecular analyses and repeated data validations on different gene platforms have thus far served to define 5 subtypes of BC based on their gene signature: luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER2-positive, and basal. Luminal A and B tumors are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, while basal-like are mostly negative for ER, progesterone receptor, and HER2, i.e., triple-negative. Normal-like tumors resemble normal breast tissue and the HER2 subtype is characterized by HER2 overexpression. Here, we summarize current targeted therapeutic options for the luminal, HER2-positive, and basal-like BC subtypes with respect to results observed in clinical trials as a step toward optimizing their appropriate application in the different clinical settings. We give particular consideration to the ER- and HER2-targeted therapies approved for clinical practice with respect to their merits and shortcomings in early and advanced disease, and mention the therapeutic options currently available and potentially promising for the basal-like subtype.

  7. Insights into Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Prognostic Markers and Novel Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aesoy, Reidun; Clyne, Colin D.; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence asserting the importance of orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs) in cancer initiation and progression. In breast cancer, there is a lot unknown about ONRs in terms of their expression profile and their transcriptional targets in the various stages of tumor progression. With the classification of breast tumors into distinct molecular subtypes, we assess ONR expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and with patient outcomes. Complementing this, we review evidence implicating ONR-dependent molecular pathways in breast cancer progression to identify candidate ONRs as potential prognostic markers and/or as therapeutic targets. PMID:26300846

  8. Better Together: Targeted Combination Therapies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Elisa; Bregni, Giacomo; de Braud, Filippo; Di Cosimo, Serena

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries both in cell proliferation and survival mechanisms and new antineoplastic agents have led to deep change in the breast cancer treatment paradigm. Nonetheless, all of the progress in knowledge and strategy has not been enough to overcome mechanisms of escape and resistance put in place by the tumor cells. New targeted agents mean new possibilities for combinations, a viable option to try to stop compensatory pathways of tumor growth activated in response to therapeutics. The main challenges in designing a combined therapy come from the variety of subtypes of breast cancer (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like) and from the multitude of pathways each subtype can exploit. Recent research has focused on dual blockade of HER2 (trastuzumab-lapatinib; trastuzumab-pertuzumab) and concomitant blockade of the endocrine driver and other pathways such as the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway (everolimus-exemestane), HER2 (trastuzumab/lapatinib-endocrine therapy) and the cell cycle through cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition (letrozole-palbociclib). This combined and personalized approach to treatment needs a profound knowledge of the mechanisms leading to proliferation in each tumor subtype. Deepening our understanding of tumor growth is mandatory to keep improving the efficacy of combination therapy. PMID:26615133

  9. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  10. Targeted therapy in her2-positive metastatic breast cancer: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X.; Verma, S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumours positive for her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) represent approximately 20% of all breast cancer cases and are associated with an aggressive natural history. The advent of targeted anti-her2 therapies has dramatically improved disease control and survival in patients with metastatic her2-positive breast cancer. Targeted agents are now considered the standard of care in the first-line setting and beyond. The present review summarizes the currently available data on targeted anti-her2 therapies from completed randomized phase iii clinical trials and briefly discusses emerging advances that will address unmet needs in metastatic her2-positive breast cancer. PMID:25848336

  11. Targeted therapies in breast cancer: are heart and vessels also being targeted?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The concept of 'targeted' therapies implies that such drugs only act on cells that specifically express the particular target, therefore giving rise to a low incidence of side effects. However, targeted therapies currently approved for the treatment of breast cancer have demonstrated a relatively high incidence of cardiovascular events. The anti-HER2 agents trastuzumab and lapatinib may cause left ventricular dysfunction or even congestive heart failure. Bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic drug, has been shown to increase the risk of hypertension, cardiovascular dysfunction and thromboembolic events. In addition, several anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and antiangiogenic agents plus their combinations are currently being developed and evaluated for the treatment of breast cancer. In this review, we aim to assess the incidence of cardiac adverse events associated with targeted therapies designed to block HER2 and angiogenic pathways. PMID:22713170

  12. Preferential targeting of vesicular stomatitis virus to breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Ira . E-mail: ira.bergman@chp.edu; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Gao Yanhua; Griffin, Judith A.

    2004-12-05

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a candidate for development for cancer therapy. We created a recombinant replicating VSV (rrVSV) with an altered surface protein that targeted preferentially to breast cancer cells. The rrVSV genome contained a single glycoprotein (gp) gene derived from Sindbis virus. This gene expressed a chimeric Sindbis E2 binding gp and the native Sindbis E1 fusion gp. The chimeric E2 binding gp, called Sindbis-SCA-erbb2, was modified to reduce its native binding function and to contain a single chain antibody (SCA) with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor Her2/neu protein, erbb2. These viruses selectively infected, replicated in and killed cells expressing erbb2. The titer of rrVSV on SKBR3 cells, a human breast cancer cell line which highly expresses erbb2 was 3.1 x 10{sup 7}/ml compared with a titer of 7.3 x 10{sup 5}/ml on 143 cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line which does not express erbb2. The titer of rrVSV on D2F2/E2 cells, a mouse mammary cancer cell line stably transfected to express human erbb2 was 2.46 x 10{sup 6}/ml compared with a titer of 5 x 10{sup 4}/ml on the parent D2F2 cells which do not express erbb2. When titered on erbb2-negative cells, non-replicating pseudotype VSV coated with Sindbis-SCA-erbb2 had <3% the titer of pseudotype VSV coated with wild type Sindbis gp indicating that the chimeric Sindbis gp had severely impaired binding to the natural receptor. Analysis of the protein composition of the rrVSV found low expression of the modified Sindbis gp on the virus.

  13. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Targeted Agents Active Against Breast Cancer: Q&A

    Cancer.gov

    ALTTO was a clinical trial designed to determine whether the combination of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) and the drug lapatinib (Tykerb) was more effective in treating HER2/ErbB2-positive breast cancer when combined with chemotherapy.

  15. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field.

  16. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field. PMID:27312135

  17. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Tang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Liu, Ning-Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-10-13

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  18. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  19. MiR-654-5p attenuates breast cancer progression by targeting EPSTI1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu-Yan; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Zhang, Sheng-Chu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) dysregulation is a common event in a variety of human diseases including breast cancer. However, clinical relevance and biological role of miR-654-5p in the progression of breast cancer remain greatly elusive. Herein, the expression levels of miR-654-5p were aberrantly downregulated in human breast cancer specimens and four breast cancer cell lines. Low expression of miR-654-5p was strongly associated with advanced TNM stage and lymph node metastasis as well as a poor survival. Functional analysis showed that miR-654-5p overexpression inhibited cell growth and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis in two aggressive breast cancer cells. Further studies demonstrated that Epithelial stromal interaction 1 (EPSTI1) was a direct target gene of miR-654-5p and showed an inverse correlation with miR-654-5p expression. Forced expression of EPSTI1 could abrogate the inhibitory effect of miR-654-5p on the growth and invasion of breast cancer cells as well as apoptosis-induced ability. In conclusion, the present study highlights that miR-654-5p acts as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer through directly targeting EPSTI1, and their functional regulation may open a novel avenue with regard to the therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:27186421

  20. Targeting IL-8 signalling to inhibit breast cancer stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep K; Simões, Bruno M; Clarke, Robert B; Bundred, Nigel J

    2013-11-01

    Although survival from breast cancer has improved significantly over the past 20 years, disease recurrence remains a significant clinical problem. The concept of stem-like cells in cancer has been gaining currency over the last decade or so, since evidence for stem cell activity in human leukaemia and solid tumours, including breast cancer, was first published. Evidence indicates that this sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), is responsible for driving tumour formation and disease progression. In breast cancer, there is good evidence that CSCs are intrinsically resistant to conventional chemo-, radio- and endocrine therapies. By evading the effects of these treatments, CSCs are held culpable for disease recurrence. Hence, in order to improve treatment there is a need to develop CSC-targeted therapies. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), an inflammatory cytokine, is upregulated in breast cancer and associated with poor prognostic factors. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that IL-8, through its receptors CXCR1/2, is an important regulator of breast CSC activity. Inhibiting CXCR1/2 signalling has proved efficacious in pre-clinical models of breast cancer providing a good rationale for targeting CXCR1/2 clinically. Here, we discuss the role of IL-8 in breast CSC regulation and development of novel therapies to target CXCR1/2 signalling in breast cancer.

  1. Immunologic Targeting of FOXP3 in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Eoin; Cheng, Qing; Aggarwal, Anshu; Patel, Pujan; Williams, Monique M.; Boczkowski, David; Lyerly, H. Kim; Morse, Michael A.; Devi, Gayathri R.

    2013-01-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FOXP3 is necessary for induction of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) and their immunosuppressive function. We have previously demonstrated that targeting Tregs by vaccination of mice with murine FOXP3 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells (DCs) elicits FOXP3-specific T cell responses and enhances tumor immunity. It is clear that FOXP3 expression is not restricted to T-cell lineage and herein, using RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and western immunoblot we demonstrate for the first time that FOXP3 is expressed in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cells, SUM149 (triple negative, ErbB1-activated) and SUM190 (ErbB2-overexpressing). Importantly, FOXP3-specific T cells generated in vitro using human FOXP3 RNA-transfected DCs as stimulators efficiently lyse SUM149 cells. Interestingly, an isogenic model (rSUM149) derived from SUM149 with an enhanced anti-apoptotic phenotype was resistant to FOXP3-specific T cell mediated lysis. The MHC class I cellular processing mechanism was intact in both cell lines at the protein and transcription levels suggesting that the resistance to cytolysis by rSUM149 cells was not related to MHC class I expression or to the MHC class I antigen processing machinery in these cells. Our data suggest that FOXP3 may be an effective tumor target in IBC cells however increased anti-apoptotic signaling can lead to immune evasion. PMID:23341929

  2. Targeted therapies with companion diagnostics in the management of breast cancer: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Myers, Meagan B

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifaceted disease exhibiting both intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity as well as variable disease course. Over 2 decades of research has advanced the understanding of the molecular substructure of breast cancer, directing the development of new therapeutic strategies against these actionable targets. In vitro diagnostics, and specifically companion diagnostics, have been integral in the successful development and implementation of these targeted therapies, such as those directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Lately, there has been a surge in the development, commercialization, and marketing of diagnostic assays to assist in breast cancer patient care. More recently, multigene signature assays, such as Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, and Prosigna, have been integrated in the clinical setting in order to tailor decisions on adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy treatment. This review provides an overview of the current state of breast cancer management and the use of companion diagnostics to direct personalized approaches in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26858530

  3. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  4. The transcriptional modulator BCL6 as a molecular target for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Liu, Suhu; Xiang, Michael; Nicolais, Maria; Hatzi, Katerina; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Melnick, Ari; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate expression or activation of transcription factors can drive patterns of gene expression leading to the malignant behavior of breast cancer cells. We have found that the transcriptional repressor BCL6 is highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines, and its locus is amplified in about half of primary breast cancers. To understand how BCL6 regulates gene expression in breast cancer cells, we utilized ChIP-seq to identify the BCL6 binding sites on a genomic scale. This revealed that BCL6 regulates a unique cohort of genes in breast cancer cell lines compared to B cell lymphomas. Furthermore, BCL6 expression promotes the survival of breast cancer cells, and targeting BCL6 with a peptidomimetic inhibitor leads to apoptosis of these cells. Finally, combining a BCL6 inhibitor and a STAT3 inhibitor provided enhanced cell killing in triple negative breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that combination therapy may be particularly useful. Thus, targeting BCL6 alone or in conjunction with other signaling pathways may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer. PMID:24662818

  5. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  6. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors meditate targeted delivery of anticancer drug with encapsulated nanoparticles to breast cancer cells with high selectivity and its potential for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Shen, Zheyu; Ma, Xuehua; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Gong, An; Xia, Tian; Guo, Junming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-03-11

    By enabling nanoparticle-based drug delivery system to actively target cancer cells with high selectivity, active targeted molecules have attracted great attention in the application of nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery. However, the clinical application of most active targeted molecules in breast cancer therapy is limited, due to the low expression of their receptors in breast tumors or coexpression in the normal and tumor breast tissues. Here, a neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors ligand PNBL-NPY, as a novel targeted molecule, is conjugated with anticancer drug doxorubicin encapsulating albumin nanoparticles to investigate the effect of Y1 receptors on the delivery of drug-loaded nanoparticles to breast cancer cells and its potential for breast cancer therapy. The PNBL-NPY can actively recognize and bind to the Y1 receptors that are significantly overexpressed on the surface of the breast cancer cells, and the drug-loaded nanoparticles are delivered directly into the cancer cells through internalization. This system is highly selective and able to distinguish the breast cancer cells from the normal cells, due to normal breast cells that express Y2 receptors only. It is anticipated that this study may provide a guidance in the development of Y1 receptor-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system for a safer and more efficient breast cancer therapy.

  7. Target volume definition and target conformal irradiation technique for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kiricuta, I C; Götz, U; Schwab, F; Fehn, M; Neumann, H H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the target volume and irradiation technique in the most complex situation where the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics (mammaria interna lymph nodes, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes) have to be irradiated. The study comprised 125 breast cancer patients treated with curative intent after primary surgery in the last two years at our institute. In 62 cases the target volume included the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics, which were treated using our irradiation technique. The target conformal irradiation technique is a multiple non-opposed beams one isocenter technique developed to protect the heart and lungs. This technique, consisting of several rotation beams modulated with wedge filters and individual lung absorbers as well as additional fixed beams, was used in our study to apply a homogeneous dose of 46 to 56 Gy to the target volume; the irradiation technique was optimized by means of dose-volume histograms. After pre-localization, the patients underwent computerized tomographic scanning, with sections at 1.0 cm intervals. Contouring of target volume and organs at risk was carried out with a MULTIDATA workstation for regions of interest (mammaria interna and/or axillary and/or supraclavicular lymphatics and the breast or chest wall) as well as the organs at risk, such as heart and lung parenchyma. Planning target volume coverage was examined by three-dimensional isodose visualization for all CT axial sections for each patient. To determine the incidence of acute or late side effects on the lung parenchyma, conventional chest x-rays and CT studies were carried out at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that this irradiation technique permits the application of a homogeneous dose to the target volume, conforming to the ICRU norms. The maximum dose applied to the ipsilateral lung parenchyma was less than 50-70% of

  8. Predicting associations between microRNAs and target genes in breast cancer by bioinformatics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianying; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yonggang; Yu, Xiucui

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among females. However, the association between microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes in breast tumorigenesis is poorly studied. The original data set GSE26659 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and then the differentially expressed miRNAs among 77 breast cancer patients and 17 controls were identified using the Limma package in R software. Furthermore, breast cancer-related differentially expressed miRNAs were selected from a human miRNA disease database and their target genes were selected from five miRNA databases. Then, functional analysis was performed for the target genes followed by construction of a miRNA-target gene network. A total of 34 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 breast cancer-related miRNAs. Moreover, the target genes of the 13 miRNAs were significantly enriched in regulation of transcription (P=7.43E-09) and pathways related to cancer (P=3.33E-11). Finally, eight upregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-425) and five downregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145 and hsa-miR-125b) were identified in the miRNA-target gene network. In conclusion, using bioinformatics approaches, we demonstrate that the changes in regulation of transcription and cancer pathways may play significant roles in the process of breast cancerogenesis. Differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes may be new targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27446395

  9. Mammaglobin as a potential molecular target for breast cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Li, Ly; Wang, Qian; Fleming, Timothy P; You, Shaojin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mammaglobin (MAM) has been used as a specific molecular marker for breast cancer diagnosis. Recently, several groups of researchers proposed a number of therapeutic strategies targeting this molecule. Some of the strategies are based upon an essential but not demonstrated hypothesis – mammaglobin is associated with the surface of breast cancer cells, which strongly disputes the therapeutic strategies. Results We conducted a computer-based predictive analysis and identified a small fragment at the N-end of MAM as a potential transmembrane domain. We provided several evidences to demonstrate the presence of the membrane-associated MAM. We isolated the membrane protein components from known MAM positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB361 and MDA-MB415). We showed that about 22–64% of MAM proteins, depending upon the types of the cancer cells, directly attached on the membrane of breast cancer cells, by Western blotting assays. To directly visualize the presence of the membrane-bound MAM protein, we incubated the MAM positive cancer cells with FITC labeled anti-MAM antibody, and observed clear fluorescent signals on the surface of the cells. In studying the MAM protein distribution in human breast cancer tissues, we first identified two immunostain patterns that are associated with the membrane-bound MAM: the membrane stain pattern and luminary surface stain pattern. To test whether the membrane-associated MAM can serve as a molecular target for drug delivery, we conjugated anti-MAM antibody to human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and loaded doxorubicin (Dox) in the core of LDL. Specific binding and cytotoxicity of the MAM targeted and Dox loaded LDL was tested in the MAM positive breast cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion We first showed that some of MAM protein directly associated with the surface of breast cancer cells. The membrane-associated MAM protein may be utilized as a useful molecular marker for breast cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:19309500

  10. MiR-340 suppresses cell migration and invasion by targeting MYO10 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai-Ping; Sun, Zong-Lin; Lu, Xiang; Wu, Wan-Xin; Guo, Wen-Li; Lu, Jian-Ju; Han, Chao; Huang, Jian-Qi; Fang, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors among females, and can seriously affect the physical and mental health and even threaten the lives of women. Recently, research has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs), as a new method of regulation, have been shown to have oncogenic and tumor‑suppressive functions in human breast cancer. Detection of their expression may lead to the identification of novel markers for breast cancer. In the present study, we firstly detected miR‑340 expression and found lower expression of miR‑340 in 6 human breast cancer cell lines by using RT‑qPCR. Then by using wound healing assay and Transwell migration and invasion experiments, we focused on the role of miR-340 in the regulation of tumor cell migration and invasion, exploring the relationship between them. The results revealed that induction of miR‑340 expression was able to suppress tumor cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of miR‑340 expression promoted breast cancer cell migration and invasion. At the gene level, MYO10 (myosin X), as a direct miR‑340 target gene, mediated the cell migration and invasion. Finally, we verified our research further at the tissue specimen level and in animal experiments. In brief, miR‑340 plays an important role in breast cancer progression. Thus, miR‑340 may be further explored as a novel biomarker for breast cancer metastasis and prognosis, and potentially a therapeutic target.

  11. The DEK Oncogene Is a Target of Steroid Hormone Receptor Signaling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors indicates a favorable prognosis due to the successful use of hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Unfortunately, 15–20% of patients will experience breast cancer recurrence despite continued use of tamoxifen. Drug resistance to hormonal therapies is of great clinical concern so it is imperative to identify novel molecular factors that contribute to tumorigenesis in hormone receptor positive cancers and/or mediate drug sensitivity. The hope is that targeted therapies, in combination with hormonal therapies, will improve survival and prevent recurrence. We have previously shown that the DEK oncogene, which is a chromatin remodeling protein, supports breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion and the maintenance of the breast cancer stem cell population. In this report, we demonstrate that DEK expression is associated with positive hormone receptor status in primary breast cancers and is up-regulated in vitro following exposure to the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and androgen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments identify DEK as a novel estrogen receptor α (ERα) target gene whose expression promotes estrogen-induced proliferation. Finally, we report for the first time that DEK depletion enhances tamoxifen-induced cell death in ER+ breast cancer cell lines. Together, our data suggest that DEK promotes the pathogenesis of ER+ breast cancer and that the targeted inhibition of DEK may enhance the efficacy of conventional hormone therapies. PMID:23071688

  12. Targeting the HER/EGFR/ErbB family to prevent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Howe, Louise R; Brown, Powel H

    2011-08-01

    Preventing breast cancer is possible with selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators and aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of invasive disease by up to 65% (up to 73% for ER-positive and no effect for ER-negative cancer) and the risk of preinvasive disease [ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)] by up to 50%. Clearly, approaches for preventing ER-negative, and increased prevention of ER-positive breast cancers would benefit public health. A growing body of work (including recent preclinical and clinical data) support targeting the HER family [epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 1 or ErbB1) and HER2, HER3, and HER4] for preventing ER-negative and possibly ER-positive breast cancer. Preclinical studies of HER family-targeting drugs in mammary neoplasia show suppression of (i) ER-negative tumors in HER2-overexpressing mouse strains, (ii) ER-negative tumors in mutant Brca1/p53(+/-) mice, and (iii) ER-positive tumors in the methylnitrosourea (MNU) rat model; tumors arising in both the MNU and mutant Brca1/p53(+/-) models lack HER2 overexpression. Clinical trials include a recent placebo-controlled phase IIb presurgical trial of the dual EGFR HER2 inhibitor lapatinib that suppressed growth of breast premalignancy [including atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and DCIS] and invasive cancer in patients with early-stage, HER2-overexpressing or -amplified breast cancer. These results suggest that lapatinib can clinically suppress the progression of ADH and DCIS to invasive breast cancer, an effect previously observed in a mouse model of HER2-overexpressing, ER-negative mammary cancer. The preclinical and clinical signals provide a compelling rationale for testing HER-targeting drugs for breast cancer prevention in women at moderate-to-high risk, leading perhaps to combinations that prevent ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer.

  13. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  14. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  15. Blockade of extracellular NM23 or its endothelial target slows breast cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yokdang, Nucharee; Nordmeier, Senny; Speirs, Katie; Burkin, Heather R.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase (NDPK), described as NM23 a metastasis suppressor, is found in the culture medium of cancer cells lines suggesting that the kinase may have an extracellular role. We propose that extracellular NM23 released from breast cancers in vivo stimulates tumor cell migration, proliferation and endothelial cell angiogenesis in support of metastasis development. Methods NM23 in the bloodstream of immunocompromised mice carrying human triple-negative breast cancers or in breast cancer patients was measured by ELISA. Primary and metastatic tumor development, the impact of blockade of NM23 and/or its stimulation of nucleotide receptors were measured using in vivo imaging. NM23 expression data in the Curtis breast dataset was examined to test our hypothesis that NM23 may play a mechanistic role in breast cancer development. Results SCID mice carrying metastatic MDA-MB-231Luc+ triple-negative human breast tumor cells elaborate NM23 into the circulation correlated with primary tumor growth. Treatment of mice with the NM23 inhibitor ellagic acid (EA) or the purinergic receptor antagonist MRS2179 slowed primary tumor growth. At 16 weeks following implantation, lung metastases were reduced in mice treated with EA, MRS2179 or the combination. Expression of NM23 in the Curtis breast dataset confirmed a likely role for NM23 in tumor metastasis. Conclusions Extracellular NM23 may constitute both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in the management of breast cancer. PMID:26413311

  16. Role of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Exercise in Breast Cancer Prevention: Identifying Common Targets

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmagid, Salma A.; MacKinnon, Jessica L.; Janssen, Sarah M.; Ma, David W.L.

    2016-01-01

    Diet and exercise are recognized as important lifestyle factors that significantly influence breast cancer risk. In particular, dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to play an important role in breast cancer prevention. Growing evidence also demonstrates a role for exercise in cancer and chronic disease prevention. However, the potential synergistic effect of n-3 PUFA intake and exercise is yet to be determined. This review explores targets for breast cancer prevention that are common between n-3 PUFA intake and exercise and that may be important study outcomes for future research investigating the combined effect of n-3 PUFA intake and exercise. These lines of evidence highlight potential new avenues for research and strategies for breast cancer prevention. PMID:27812288

  17. Oncogenic role and therapeutic target of leptin signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Wang, Guangdi; Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant correlations between obesity and incidence of various cancers have been reported. Obesity, considered a mild inflammatory process, is characterized by a high level of secretion of several cytokines from adipose tissue. These molecules have disparate effects, which could be relevant to cancer development. Among the inflammatory molecules, leptin, mainly produced by adipose tissue and overexpressed with its receptor (Ob-R) in cancer cells is the most studied adipokine. Mutations of leptin or Ob-R genes associated with obesity or cancer are rarely found. However, leptin is an anti-apoptotic molecule in many cell types, and its central roles in obesity-related cancers are based on its pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic actions. Notably, these leptin actions are commonly reinforced through entangled crosstalk with multiple oncogenes, cytokines and growth factors. Leptin-induced signals comprise several pathways commonly triggered by many cytokines (i.e, canonical: JAK2/STAT; MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI-3K/AKT1 and, non-canonical signaling pathways: PKC, JNK and p38 MAP kinase). Each of these leptin-induced signals is essential to its biological effects on food intake, energy balance, adiposity, immune and endocrine systems, as well as oncogenesis. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role of leptin in breast cancer. Additionally, leptin pro-angiogenic molecular mechanisms and its potential role in breast cancer stem cells will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding-affinity and activation of leptin/Ob-R complex makes it a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer, particularly in obesity contexts. PMID:22289780

  18. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients.

  19. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27261608

  20. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  1. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44highCD24lowHER2low cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  2. Cancer Stem and Progenitor-Like Cells as Pharmacological Targets in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Valéria B.; Schenka, André A.

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focused on the current role of neoplastic stem and progenitor-like cells as primary targets in the pharmacotherapy of cancer as well as in the development of new anticancer drugs. We begin by summarizing the main characteristics of these tumor-initiating cells and key concepts that support their participation in therapeutic failure. In particular, we discuss the differences between the major carcinogenesis models (ie, clonal evolution vs cancer stem cell (CSC) model) with emphasis on breast cancer (given its importance to the study of CSCs) and their implications for the development of new treatment strategies. In addition, we describe the main ways to target these cells, including the main signaling pathways that are more activated or altered in CSCs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive compilation of the most recently tested drugs. PMID:26609237

  3. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family-Targeted Therapies in the Treatment of HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Zeynep; Tagawa, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer characterized by overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been associated with more aggressive disease progression and a poorer prognosis. Although an improved understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and the role of HER2 signaling has resulted in significant survival improvements in the past 20 years, resistance to HER2-targeted therapy remains a concern. A number of strategies to prevent or overcome resistance to HER2-targeted therapy in breast cancer are being evaluated. This article provides a comprehensive review of (a) the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, (b) potential receptor and downstream therapeutic targets in breast cancer to overcome resistance to HER2-targeted therapy, and (c) clinical trials evaluating agents targeting one or more members of the HER family and/or downstream pathways for the treatment of breast cancer, with a focus on metastatic disease. PMID:24436312

  4. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  5. Recent advances reveal IL-8 signaling as a potential key to targeting breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep K; Simões, Bruno M; Howell, Sacha J; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are an important therapeutic target as they are purported to be responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, metastases, and disease recurrence. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is upregulated in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue and is associated with poor prognosis. IL-8 is reported to promote breast cancer progression by increasing cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastases and is upregulated in HER2-positive cancers. Recently, we and others have established that IL-8 via its cognate receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, is also involved in regulating breast CSC activity. Our work demonstrates that in metastatic breast CSCs, CXCR1/2 signals via transactivation of HER2. Given the importance of HER2 in breast cancer and in regulating CSC activity, a pathway driving the activation of these receptors would have important biological and clinical consequences, especially in tumors that express high levels of IL-8 and other CXCR1/2-activating ligands. Here, we review the IL-8 signaling pathway and the role of HER2 in maintaining an IL-8 inflammatory loop and discuss the potential of combining CXCR1/2 inhibitors with other treatments such as HER2-targeted therapy as a novel approach to eliminate CSCs and improve patient survival.

  6. Overcoming resistance and restoring sensitivity to HER2-targeted therapies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sharial, M. S. N.; Crown, J.; Hennessy, B. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 15%–23% of breast cancers overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which leads to the activation of signaling pathways that stimulate cell proliferation and survival. HER2-targeted therapy has substantially improved outcomes in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, both de novo and acquired resistance are observed. Design A literature search was performed to identify proposed mechanisms of resistance to HER2-targeted therapy and identified novel targets in clinical development for treating HER2-resistant disease. Results Proposed HER2-resistance mechanisms include impediments to HER2-inhibitor binding, signaling through alternative pathways, upregulation of signaling pathways downstream of HER2, and failure to elicit an appropriate immune response. Although continuing HER2 inhibition beyond progression may provide an additional clinical benefit, the availability of novel therapies targeting different mechanisms of action could improve outcomes. The developmental strategy with the most available data is targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The oral mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising activity in combination with chemotherapy and trastuzumab in trastuzumab-refractory, advanced breast cancer. Conclusions Non-HER2-targeted therapy is a promising means of overcoming resistance to HER2-targeted treatment. Ongoing clinical studies will provide additional information on the efficacy and safety of novel targeted therapies in HER2-resistant advanced breast cancer. PMID:22865781

  7. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  8. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  9. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  10. Targeting the epigenetics of the DNA damage response in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M F; González-Guerrero, R; Sánchez-del-Campo, L; Piñero-Madrona, A; Cabezas-Herrera, J; Rodríguez-López, J N

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic disease, and epigenetic alterations in cancer often serve as potent surrogates for genetic mutations. Because the epigenetic factors involved in the DNA damage response are regulated by multiple elements, therapies to target specific components of the epigenetic machinery can be inefficient. In contrast, therapies aimed at inhibiting the methionine cycle can indirectly inhibit both DNA and protein methylation, and the wide variety of genes and pathways that are affected by these methylations make this global strategy very attractive. In the present study, we propose an adjuvant therapy that targets the epigenetics of the DNA damage response in breast cancer cells and that results in efficient apoptosis and a reduction in distant metastases in vivo. We observed that a combined therapy designed to uncouple adenosine metabolism using dipyridamole in the presence of a new synthetic antifolate, 3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)-(−)-catechin, simultaneously and efficiently blocked both the folic cycle and the methionine cycle in breast cancer cells and sensitized these cells to radiotherapy. The treatment impeded the recruitment of 53BP1 and BRCA1 to the chromatin regions flanking DNA double-strand breaks and thereby avoided the DNA damage responses in breast cancer cells that were exposed to ionizing radiation. In addition, this hypomethylating therapy was also efficient in reducing the self-renewal capability of breast cancer-initiating cells and induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotypes in breast cancer cells. PMID:27054335

  11. Emerging targeted combinations in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca J; Armstrong, Anne C; Wardley, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    The number of targeted treatments has risen exponentially over the last few years and is an important concept in the fight against cancer. This review will concentrate on some of the main treatments targeting aberrant pathways which have been tested mainly in the Phase I/II setting. These include human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 inhibitors, drug-antibody conjugates, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, reticular activating system, mammalian target of rapamycin and multi-kinase inhibitors. Further knowledge of these pathways and the predictors of response to them will enable personalized medicine to become a reality. PMID:24648759

  12. Liposomes Coated with Isolated Macrophage Membrane Can Target Lung Metastasis of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiqiang; Dan, Zhaoling; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Yin, Qi; Li, Yaping

    2016-08-23

    Cancer metastasis leads to high mortality of breast cancer and is difficult to treat because of the poor delivery efficiency of drugs. Herein, we report the wrapping of a drug-carrying liposome with an isolated macrophage membrane to improve delivery to metastatic sites. The macrophage membrane decoration increased cellular uptake of the emtansine liposome in metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells and had inhibitory effects on cell viability. In vivo, the macrophage membrane enabled the liposome to target metastatic cells and produced a notable inhibitory effect on lung metastasis of breast cancer. Our results provide a biomimetic strategy via the biological properties of macrophages to enhance the medical performance of a nanoparticle in vivo for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:27454827

  13. A perspective on anti-EGFR therapies targeting triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Katsuya; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yamaguchi, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which lacks estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), accounts for about 15-20% of breast cancers and is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. There are currently no effective therapies against metastatic TNBC. Compared with other breast cancer subtypes, EGFR is frequently overexpressed in TNBC and a potential therapeutic target for this disease. There are two types of EGFR inhibitors, small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and monoclonal antibody (mAb), for the treatment of cancers, such as non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, however, the clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors have failed due to low response rates. Because a small portion of patients do demonstrate response to EGFR inhibitors, it may be necessary to stratify patients to enhance the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC and to develop the effective combination therapy for this patient population. In this review, we describe some of the molecular mechanisms underlying EGFR inhibitor sensitivity and further discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to increase the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC. PMID:27648353

  14. A perspective on anti-EGFR therapies targeting triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Katsuya; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yamaguchi, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which lacks estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), accounts for about 15-20% of breast cancers and is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. There are currently no effective therapies against metastatic TNBC. Compared with other breast cancer subtypes, EGFR is frequently overexpressed in TNBC and a potential therapeutic target for this disease. There are two types of EGFR inhibitors, small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and monoclonal antibody (mAb), for the treatment of cancers, such as non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, however, the clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors have failed due to low response rates. Because a small portion of patients do demonstrate response to EGFR inhibitors, it may be necessary to stratify patients to enhance the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC and to develop the effective combination therapy for this patient population. In this review, we describe some of the molecular mechanisms underlying EGFR inhibitor sensitivity and further discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to increase the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC.

  15. A perspective on anti-EGFR therapies targeting triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Katsuya; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yamaguchi, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which lacks estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), accounts for about 15-20% of breast cancers and is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. There are currently no effective therapies against metastatic TNBC. Compared with other breast cancer subtypes, EGFR is frequently overexpressed in TNBC and a potential therapeutic target for this disease. There are two types of EGFR inhibitors, small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and monoclonal antibody (mAb), for the treatment of cancers, such as non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, however, the clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors have failed due to low response rates. Because a small portion of patients do demonstrate response to EGFR inhibitors, it may be necessary to stratify patients to enhance the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC and to develop the effective combination therapy for this patient population. In this review, we describe some of the molecular mechanisms underlying EGFR inhibitor sensitivity and further discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to increase the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC. PMID:27648353

  16. Imaging Diagnostic and Therapeutic Targets - Steroid Receptors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Amy M.; Clark, Amy S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Linden, Hannah M.; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) are important steroid hormone receptor biomarkers used to determine prognosis and predict benefit from endocrine therapies for breast cancer patients. Receptor expression is routinely measured in biopsy specimens using immunohistochemistry, although such testing can be challenging particularly in the setting of metastatic disease. ERα and PR can be quantitatively assayed non-invasively with positron emission tomography (PET). This approach provides the opportunity to assess receptor expression and function in “real-time”, within the entire tumor, and across distant sites of metastatic disease. This article reviews the current evidence of ERα and PR PET imaging as predictive and early response biomarkers for endocrine therapy. PMID:26834106

  17. Concepts and targets in triple-negative breast cancer: recent results and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Poornima; Nanda, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumors are defined by lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. No targeted therapies are available for the treatment of TNBC, and chemotherapy remains the standard of care. Gene expression profiling has identified six distinct molecular subtypes of TNBC. The identification of novel targets, coupled with the development of therapies for different subsets of TNBC, holds great promise for the future treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. This review focuses on novel therapies in development for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27583027

  18. Concepts and targets in triple-negative breast cancer: recent results and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Saha, Poornima; Nanda, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumors are defined by lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. No targeted therapies are available for the treatment of TNBC, and chemotherapy remains the standard of care. Gene expression profiling has identified six distinct molecular subtypes of TNBC. The identification of novel targets, coupled with the development of therapies for different subsets of TNBC, holds great promise for the future treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. This review focuses on novel therapies in development for the treatment of TNBC.

  19. Concepts and targets in triple-negative breast cancer: recent results and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Saha, Poornima; Nanda, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease in which tumors are defined by lack of expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) receptor. No targeted therapies are available for the treatment of TNBC, and chemotherapy remains the standard of care. Gene expression profiling has identified six distinct molecular subtypes of TNBC. The identification of novel targets, coupled with the development of therapies for different subsets of TNBC, holds great promise for the future treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. This review focuses on novel therapies in development for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27583027

  20. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  1. Targeting Apoptosis Pathway with Natural Terpenoids: Implications for Treatment of Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Dou, Q. Ping

    2012-01-01

    Terpenoids represent a large and diverse class of naturally occurring compounds found in a variety of fruits, vegetables and medicinal plants. Structurally some of the terpenoids are similar to human hormones. A diet rich in terpenoids is inversely related with the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Breast and prostate cancers are hormone-related diseases and the second leading cause of female and male cancer mortality. Diterpenoid paclitaxel, and its semi-synthetic analogue docetaxel, have entered clinical use against established breast and prostate cancers. Here we reviewed potential molecular targets and biological properties of natural terpenoids, including monoterpenoids, diterpenoids, triterpenoids and tetraterpenoids, and their applications in treatment of human breast and prostate cancers. These terpenoids are able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce tumor cell death by inhibiting multiple cancer-specific targets including the proteasome, NF-κB, and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. The efficacy of these terpenoids against breast or prostate cancer cells, as demonstrated in pre-clinical studies supports clinical application of these naturally occurring terpenoids in treatment of hormone-related human cancers. PMID:20298150

  2. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  3. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Wajeeha

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly vascular nature of the bone marrow (which increases the probability that cancer cells will be deposited in bone marrow capillaries), and molecular characteristics of the cancer cells that allow them to adapt to the bone marrow microenvironment. The goals of treating osseous metastases are manifold. Proper treatment can lead to significant improvements in pain control and function, and maintain skeletal integrity. The treatment plan requires a multidisciplinary approach. Widespread metastatic disease necessitates systemic therapy, while a localized problem is best managed with surgery, external beam radiotherapy, or both. Patients with bone metastasis can have prolonged survival, and proper management can have a significant impact on their quality of life. We will review the factors in this article that are promising molecular bone-targeted therapies or will be likely targets for future therapeutic intervention to restore bone remodeling and suppress tumor growth. PMID:26237142

  4. Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 3: A Potential Target for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenghong; Jiang, Enze; Wang, Xinxing; Shi, Yaqin; Shangguan, Anna Junjie; Zhang, Luo; Li, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most effective endocrine treatment for estrogen receptor α-positive (ERα+) postmenopausal breast cancer. Identification of biomarkers that are able to predict AIs responsiveness of patients is a key for successful treatment. The currently used biomarkers for tamoxifen responsiveness, which including ERα as well as progesterone receptor can only predict part of the potential responders to AIs treatment. Sushi domain-containing protein 3 (SUSD3) is a potential novel biomarker of AIs responsiveness. The lack of SUSD3 expression in breast cancer tissue can be an important predictor for non-responsiveness to AI. Here we reviewed the property and function of SUSD3, its usage as a biomarker and the practicability for SUSD3 to become a target for immune therapy. We suggest this protein can be potentially measured or targeted for prevention, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes for estrogen or progesterone-dependent disorders including breast cancer in women.

  5. Sushi Domain-Containing Protein 3: A Potential Target for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenghong; Jiang, Enze; Wang, Xinxing; Shi, Yaqin; Shangguan, Anna Junjie; Zhang, Luo; Li, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most effective endocrine treatment for estrogen receptor α-positive (ERα+) postmenopausal breast cancer. Identification of biomarkers that are able to predict AIs responsiveness of patients is a key for successful treatment. The currently used biomarkers for tamoxifen responsiveness, which including ERα as well as progesterone receptor can only predict part of the potential responders to AIs treatment. Sushi domain-containing protein 3 (SUSD3) is a potential novel biomarker of AIs responsiveness. The lack of SUSD3 expression in breast cancer tissue can be an important predictor for non-responsiveness to AI. Here we reviewed the property and function of SUSD3, its usage as a biomarker and the practicability for SUSD3 to become a target for immune therapy. We suggest this protein can be potentially measured or targeted for prevention, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes for estrogen or progesterone-dependent disorders including breast cancer in women. PMID:25556073

  6. Impact of Bone-Targeted Treatments on Skeletal Morbidity and Survival in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Bone health is of increasing clinical importance throughout the clinical course of breast cancer. First, many breast cancer treatments have effects on reproductive hormones that are critical for bone health. This endocrine disturbance results in accelerated bone loss and an increased risk of fractures that can have a significant negative impact on cancer survivors. Second, the bone marrow microenvironment is intimately involved in the metastatic processes required for cancer dissemination, and may be modified by agents that influence bone cell physiology; there is now strong clinical trial evidence that the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates reduces metastasis to bone by one-third and reduces breast cancer mortality by one-sixth in postmenopausal or premenopausal women undergoing ovarian function suppression. Finally, bone metastases are common in advanced breast cancer, and may be associated with serious morbidity, including fractures, pain, nerve compression, and hypercalcemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management and the use of bone-targeted treatments such as bisphosphonates or denosumab, patients with advanced breast cancer have experienced a major reduction in skeletal complications, less bone pain, and an improved quality of life.

  7. Impact of Bone-Targeted Treatments on Skeletal Morbidity and Survival in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Bone health is of increasing clinical importance throughout the clinical course of breast cancer. First, many breast cancer treatments have effects on reproductive hormones that are critical for bone health. This endocrine disturbance results in accelerated bone loss and an increased risk of fractures that can have a significant negative impact on cancer survivors. Second, the bone marrow microenvironment is intimately involved in the metastatic processes required for cancer dissemination, and may be modified by agents that influence bone cell physiology; there is now strong clinical trial evidence that the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates reduces metastasis to bone by one-third and reduces breast cancer mortality by one-sixth in postmenopausal or premenopausal women undergoing ovarian function suppression. Finally, bone metastases are common in advanced breast cancer, and may be associated with serious morbidity, including fractures, pain, nerve compression, and hypercalcemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management and the use of bone-targeted treatments such as bisphosphonates or denosumab, patients with advanced breast cancer have experienced a major reduction in skeletal complications, less bone pain, and an improved quality of life. PMID:27528238

  8. CXCR1 blockade selectively targets human breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Liu, Suling; Diebel, Mark E.; Korkaya, Hasan; Luo, Ming; Brown, Marty; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Birnbaum, Daniel; Guan, Jun-Lin; Dontu, Gabriela; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that breast cancer and other solid tumors possess a rare population of cells capable of extensive self-renewal that contribute to metastasis and treatment resistance. We report here the development of a strategy to target these breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) through blockade of the IL-8 receptor CXCR1. CXCR1 blockade using either a CXCR1-specific blocking antibody or repertaxin, a small-molecule CXCR1 inhibitor, selectively depleted the CSC population in 2 human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, this was followed by the induction of massive apoptosis in the bulk tumor population via FASL/FAS signaling. The effects of CXCR1 blockade on CSC viability and on FASL production were mediated by the FAK/AKT/FOXO3A pathway. In addition, repertaxin was able to specifically target the CSC population in human breast cancer xenografts, retarding tumor growth and reducing metastasis. Our data therefore suggest that CXCR1 blockade may provide a novel means of targeting and eliminating breast CSCs. PMID:20051626

  9. Trastuzumab emtansine: the first targeted chemotherapy for treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Parvin F; Hurvitz, Sara A

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is a novel antibody–drug conjugate, comprised of a potent cytotoxic drug connected via a stable linker to the anti-HER2 antibody, trastuzumab, thereby primarily targeting chemotherapy delivery to cells overexpressing the HER2 receptor. A Phase II randomized trial of T-DM1 in the front-line metastatic breast cancer setting revealed promising activity and improved safety compared with standard chemotherapy plus trastuzumab. Subsequently, a Phase III trial in patients with trastuzumab-pretreated metastatic breast cancer showed T-DM1 to be associated with prolonged progression-free and overall survival compared with lapatinib plus capecitabine. T-DM1 represents a major shift in the treatment of patients with breast cancer as it replaces traditional nontargeted chemotherapy with a ‘smart’ medication that directs the cytotoxic therapy to cancer cells by using a known biomarker. PMID:23469968

  10. FOXD1 promotes breast cancer proliferation and chemotherapeutic drug resistance by targeting p27

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhao, Jing-Yu; Yue, Hong; Hu, Ke-Shi; Shen, Hao; Guo, Zheng-Gang; Su, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD1 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance by inducing G1 to S transition. • FOXD1 transcriptionally suppresses p27 expression. - Abstract: Forkhead transcription factors are essential for diverse processes in early embryonic development and organogenesis. As a member of the forkhead family, FOXD1 is required during kidney development and its inactivation results in failure of nephron progenitor cells. However, the role of FOXD1 in carcinogenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we reported that FOXD1 is a potential oncogene in breast cancer. We found that FOXD1 is up-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Depletion of FOXD1 expression decreases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas overexpression of FOXD1 increases the ability of cell proliferation and chemoresistance in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we observed that FOXD1 induces G1 to S phase transition by targeting p27 expression. Our results suggest that FOXD1 may be a potential therapy target for patients with breast cancer.

  11. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types. PMID:27259361

  12. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  13. CDK4 regulates cancer stemness and is a novel therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meiou; Zhang, Chenjing; Ali, Ayad; Hong, Xinyuan; Tian, Jun; Lo, Chieh; Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Burgos, Sergio A.; Ali, Suhad; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers exhibit very aggressive features and poor patient outcomes. These tumors are enriched in cancer stem cells and exhibit resistance to most treatments and chemotherapy. In this study, we found the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) to act as a cancer stem cell regulator and novel prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancers. We found CDK4 to be highly expressed in these tumors and its expression to correlate with poor overall and relapse free survival outcomes, high tumor grade and poor prognostic features of triple negative breast cancer patients. Moreover, we found that blocking CDK4 expression or kinase activity, using a pharmacological inhibitor prevented breast cancer stem cell self-renewal. Interestingly, suppression of CDK4 expression or kinase activity reversed the basal-B TNBC mesenchymal phenotype to an epithelial- and luminal-like phenotype which correlates with better clinical prognosis. Finally, blocking CDK4 activity efficiently eliminated both normal and chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells in triple negative breast cancers, highlighting CDK4 as a promising novel therapeutic target for these aggressive breast tumors. PMID:27759034

  14. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yang, Kwangmo; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ► The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup −}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ► The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  15. Reprogramming of the ERRα and ERα target gene landscape triggers tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thewes, Verena; Simon, Ronald; Schroeter, Petra; Schlotter, Magdalena; Anzeneder, Tobias; Büttner, Reinhard; Benes, Vladimir; Sauter, Guido; Burwinkel, Barbara; Nicholson, Robert I; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Deuschle, Ulrich; Zapatka, Marc; Heck, Stefanie; Lichter, Peter

    2015-02-15

    Endocrine treatment regimens for breast cancer that target the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) are effective, but acquired resistance remains a limiting drawback. One mechanism of acquired resistance that has been hypothesized is functional substitution of the orphan receptor estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) for ERα. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed ERRα and ERα in recurrent tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors and conducted a genome-wide target gene profiling analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell populations that were sensitive or resistant to tamoxifen treatment. This analysis uncovered a global redirection in the target genes controlled by ERα, ERRα, and their coactivator AIB1, defining a novel set of target genes in tamoxifen-resistant cells. Beyond differences in the ERα and ERRα target gene repertoires, both factors were engaged in similar pathobiologic processes relevant to acquired resistance. Functional analyses confirmed a requirement for ERRα in tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells, with pharmacologic inhibition of ERRα sufficient to partly restore sensitivity to antiestrogens. In clinical specimens (n = 1041), increased expression of ERRα was associated with enhanced proliferation and aggressive disease parameters, including increased levels of p53 in ERα-positive cases. In addition, increased ERRα expression was linked to reduced overall survival in independent tamoxifen-treated patient cohorts. Taken together, our results suggest that ERα and ERRα cooperate to promote endocrine resistance, and they provide a rationale for the exploration of ERRα as a candidate drug target to treat endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

  16. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  17. MiR-630 suppresses breast cancer progression by targeting metadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, An-Lu; Wang, Qiu-Yu; Zhan, Meng-Na; Tang, Jun; Gong, Xiu-Feng; Yin, Qian-Qian; He, Ming; He, Jian-Rong; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Zhao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been integrated into tumorigenic programs as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. The miR-630 was reported to be deregulated and involved in tumor progression of several human malignancies. However, its expression regulation shows diversity in different kinds of cancers and its potential roles remain greatly elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-630 is significantly suppressed in human breast cancer specimens, as well as in various breast cancer cell lines. In aggressive MDA-MB-231-luc and BT549 breast cancer cells, ectopic expression of miR-630 strongly inhibits cell motility and invasive capacity in vitro. Moreover, lentivirus delivered miR-630 bestows MDA-MB-231-luc cells with the ability to suppress cell colony formation in vitro and pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Further studies identify metadherin (MTDH) as a direct target gene of miR-630. Functional studies shows that MTDH contributes to miR-630-endowed effects including cell migration and invasion as well as colony formation in vitro. Taken together, these findings highlight an important role for miR-630 in the regulation of metastatic potential of breast cancer and suggest a potential application of miR-630 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26595523

  18. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  19. Brachyury, a vaccine target, is overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Duane H; Roselli, Mario; Ferroni, Patrizia; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Cavaliere, Francesco; Taffuri, Mariateresa; Palena, Claudia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2016-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a high rate of tumor metastasis and a poor prognosis. The treatment option for these patients is currently chemotherapy, which results in very low response rates. Strategies that exploit the immune system for the treatment of cancer have now shown the ability to improve survival in several tumor types. Identifying potential targets for immune therapeutic interventions is an important step in developing novel treatments for TNBC. In this study, in silico analysis of publicly available datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of primary and metastatic tumor biopsies from TNBC patients were conducted to evaluate the expression of the transcription factor brachyury, which is a driver of tumor metastasis and resistance and a target for cancer vaccine approaches. Analysis of breast cancer datasets demonstrated a predominant expression of brachyury mRNA in TNBC and in basal vs luminal or HER2 molecular breast cancer subtypes. At the protein level, variable levels of brachyury expression were detected both in primary and metastatic TNBC lesions. A strong association was observed between nuclear brachyury protein expression and the stage of disease, with nuclear brachyury being more predominant in metastatic vs primary tumors. Survival analysis also demonstrated an association between high levels of brachyury in the primary tumor and poor prognosis. Two brachyury-targeting cancer vaccines are currently undergoing clinical evaluation; the data presented here provide rationale for using brachyury-targeting immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:27580659

  20. Trastuzumab-Conjugated Liposome-Coated Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles to Target Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mijung; Yoon, Young Il; Kwon, Yong Soo; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Lee, Hak Jong; Hwang, Sung Il; Yun, Bo La

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesize mesoporous silica-core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) encapsulated by liposomes (Lipo [MNP@m-SiO2]) in order to enhance their stability, allow them to be used in any buffer solution, and to produce trastuzumab-conjugated (Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2]-Her2Ab) nanoparticles to be utilized in vitro for the targeting of breast cancer. Materials and Methods The physiochemical characteristics of Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] were assessed in terms of size, morphological features, and in vitro safety. The multimodal imaging properties of the organic dye incorporated into Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] were assessed with both in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging. The specific targeting ability of trastuzumab (Her2/neu antibody, Herceptin®)-conjugated Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] for Her2/neu-positive breast cancer cells was also evaluated with fluorescence and MR imaging. Results We obtained uniformly-sized and evenly distributed Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] that demonstrated biological stability, while not disrupting cell viability. Her2/neu-positive breast cancer cell targeting by trastuzumab-conjugated Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] was observed by in vitro fluorescence and MR imaging. Conclusion Trastuzumab-conjugated Lipo[MNP@m-SiO2] is a potential treatment tool for targeted drug delivery in Her2/neu-positive breast cancer. PMID:25053899

  1. Targeting BCL-2 to enhance vulnerability to therapy in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merino, D; Lok, S W; Visvader, J E; Lindeman, G J

    2016-04-14

    The last three decades have seen significant progress in our understanding of the role of the pro-survival protein BCL-2 and its family members in apoptosis and cancer. BCL-2 and other pro-survival family members including Mcl-1 and BCL-XL have been shown to have a key role in keeping pro-apoptotic 'effector' proteins BAK and BAX in check. They also neutralize a group of 'sensor' proteins (such as BIM), which are triggered by cytotoxic stimuli such as chemotherapy. BCL-2 proteins therefore have a central role as guardians against apoptosis, helping cancer cells to evade cell death. More recently, an increasing number of BH3 mimetics, which bind and neutralize BCL-2 and/or its pro-survival relatives, have been developed. The utility of targeting BCL-2 in hematological malignancies has become evident in early-phase studies, with remarkable clinical responses seen in heavily pretreated patients. As BCL-2 is overexpressed in ~75% of breast cancer, there has been growing interest in determining whether this new class of drug could show similar promise in breast cancer. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of BCL-2 and its family members in mammary gland development and breast cancer, recent progress in the development of new BH3 mimetics as well as their potential for targeting estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

  2. SF3B1 mutations constitute a novel therapeutic target in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L; Leonidou, Andri; Wai, Patty; Marchiò, Caterina; Ng, Charlotte KY; Sapino, Anna; Salomon, Anne-Vincent; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta; Natrajan, Rachael C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in RNA splicing have been found to occur at relatively high frequencies in several tumour types including myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, uveal melanoma, and pancreatic cancer, and at lower frequencies in breast cancer. To investigate whether dysfunction in RNA splicing is implicated in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, we performed a re-analysis of published exome and whole genome sequencing data. This analysis revealed that mutations in spliceosomal component genes occurred in 5.6% of unselected breast cancers, including hotspot mutations in the SF3B1 gene, which were found in 1.8% of unselected breast cancers. SF3B1 mutations were significantly associated with ER-positive disease, AKT1 mutations, and distinct copy number alterations. Additional profiling of hotspot mutations in a panel of special histological subtypes of breast cancer showed that 16% and 6% of papillary and mucinous carcinomas of the breast harboured the SF3B1 K700E mutation. RNA sequencing identified differentially spliced events expressed in tumours with SF3B1 mutations including the protein coding genes TMEM14C, RPL31, DYNL11, UQCC, and ABCC5, and the long non-coding RNA CRNDE. Moreover, SF3B1 mutant cell lines were found to be sensitive to the SF3b complex inhibitor spliceostatin A and treatment resulted in perturbation of the splicing signature. Albeit rare, SF3B1 mutations result in alternative splicing events, and may constitute drivers and a novel therapeutic target in a subset of breast cancers. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:25424858

  3. MiR-449a promotes breast cancer progression by targeting CRIP2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Lee, Matthew; Yue, Shijun; Rowe, Matthew; Pintilie, Melania; Kogo, Ryunosuke; Bissey, Pierre-Antoine; Fyles, Anthony; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The identification of prognostic biomarkers and their underlying mechanisms of action remain of great interest in breast cancer biology. Using global miRNA profiling of 71 lymph node-negative invasive ductal breast cancers and 5 normal mammary epithelial tissues, we identified miR-449a to be highly overexpressed in the malignant breast tissue. Its expression was significantly associated with increased incidence of patient relapse, decreased overall survival, and decreased disease-free survival. In vitro, miR-449a promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, clonogenic survival, migration, and invasion. By utilizing a tri-modal in silico approach for target identification, Cysteine-Rich Protein 2 (CRIP2; a transcription factor) was identified as a direct target of miR-449a, corroborated using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assays. MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with CRIP2 demonstrated a significant reduction in cell viability, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in mouse xenograft models. Our data revealed that overexpression of miR-449a suppresses CRIP2, which then affects the tumor vasculature, likely via NF-κB/p65 complex-mediated transcription of VEGF. These finding define an oncogenic function of miR-449a in human breast cancer, and highlight the importance of this pathway in driving aggressive behaviour. PMID:26934316

  4. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Folate conjugated chitosan grafted thiazole orange derivative with high targeting for early breast cancer cells diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xue-Ning; Liu, Yin; Li, Chao

    2012-11-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on many solid tumors and has been exploited for targeted delivery of folic acid linked liposomes to cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we developed a novel folic acid (FA) conjugated chitosan (CTS) grafted thiazole orange (TO) complex (FA-CTS-TO), and the formation can be used to label tumor cells. The structure of TO derivatives was confirmed by (1)H NMR and MS, and the fluorescence probe of FA-CTS-TO complex was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis and Differential thermal analysis. The in vitro and in vivo of FA-CTS-TO complex were tested in breast cancer cells and the results showed a high targeting specificity in tumor cells with FR over-expressed. Such prominent fluorescence properties demonstrate again that FA-CTS-TO complex as a tumor targeting fluorescence probe is appropriate for breast cancer cells.

  6. RAD50 targeting impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes human breast cancer cells to cisplatin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Pérez, Ali; Rafaelli, Lourdes E; Ramírez-Torres, Nayeli; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Frías, Sara; Sánchez, Silvia; Marchat, Laurence A; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Carlos-Reyes, Ángeles; López-Camarillo, César

    2014-01-01

    In tumor cells the effectiveness of anti-neoplastic agents that cause cell death by induction of DNA damage is influenced by DNA repair activity. RAD50 protein plays key roles in DNA double strand breaks repair (DSBs), which is crucial to safeguard genome integrity and sustain tumor suppression. However, its role as a potential therapeutic target has not been addressed in breast cancer. Our aim in the present study was to analyze the expression of RAD50 protein in breast tumors, and evaluate the effects of RAD50-targeted inhibition on the cytotoxicity exerted by cisplatin and anthracycline and taxane-based therapies in breast cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry assays on tissue microarrays indicate that the strong staining intensity of RAD50 was reduced in 14% of breast carcinomas in comparison with normal tissues. Remarkably, RAD50 silencing by RNA interference significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Combinations of cisplatin with doxorubicin and paclitaxel drugs induced synergistic effects in early cell death of RAD50-deficient MCF-7, SKBR3, and T47D breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we found an increase in the number of DSBs, and delayed phosphorylation of histone H2AX after cisplatin treatment in RAD50-silenced cells. These cellular events were associated to a dramatical increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease of cell number in metaphase. In conclusion, our data showed that RAD50 abrogation impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes breast cancer cells to cisplatin-combined therapies. We propose that the development and use of inhibitors to manipulate RAD50 levels might represent a promising strategy to sensitize breast cancer cells to DNA damaging agents. PMID:24642965

  7. Covalent Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wells S; Tan, Li; Smith, Andrew; Gray, Nathanael S; Wendt, Michael K

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic targeting of late-stage breast cancer is limited by an inadequate understanding of how tumor cell signaling evolves during metastatic progression and by the currently available small molecule inhibitors capable of targeting these processes. Herein, we demonstrate that both β3 integrin and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) are part of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that is required to facilitate metastatic outgrowth in response to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). Mechanistically, β3 integrin physically disrupts an interaction between FGFR1 and E-cadherin, leading to a dramatic redistribution of FGFR1 subcellular localization, enhanced FGF2 signaling and increased three-dimensional (3D) outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer cells. This ability of β3 integrin to drive FGFR signaling requires the enzymatic activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Consistent with these mechanistic data, we demonstrate that FGFR, β3 integrin, and FAK constitute a molecular signature capable of predicting decreased survival of patients with the basal-like subtype of breast cancer. Importantly, covalent targeting of a conserved cysteine in the P-loop of FGFR1-4 with our newly developed small molecule, FIIN-4, more effectively blocks 3D metastatic outgrowth as compared with currently available FGFR inhibitors. In vivo application of FIIN-4 potently inhibited the growth of metastatic, patient-derived breast cancer xenografts and murine-derived metastases growing within the pulmonary microenvironment. Overall, the current studies demonstrate that FGFR1 works in concert with other EMT effector molecules to drive aberrant downstream signaling, and that these events can be effectively targeted using our novel therapeutics for the treatment of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2096-106. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27371729

  8. IDENTIFYING AND TARGETING TUMOR-INITIATING CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (exclusive of skin cancer), and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although conventional and targeted therapies have improved survival rates, there are still considerable challenges in treating breast cancer, including treatment resistance, disease recurrence, and metastasis. Treatment resistance can be either de novo - due to traits that tumor cells possess prior to treatment, or acquired, - due to traits that tumor cells gain in response to treatment. A recently proposed mechanism of de novo resistance invokes existence of a specialized subset of cancer cells defined as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells (CSC). TICs have the capacity to self-renew and regenerate new tumors that consist of all clonally-derived cell types present in the parental tumor. There are data to suggest that TICs are resistant to many conventional cancer therapies, and survive treatment in spite of dramatic shrinkage of the tumor. Residual TICs can then eventually regrow resulting in disease relapse. It is also hypothesized that TIC may be responsible for metastatic disease. If these hypotheses are correct, targeting TICs may be imperative to achieve cure. In this review, we discuss evidence for breast TICs and their apparent resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as to various targeted therapies. We also address the potential impact of breast TIC plasticity and metastatic potential on therapeutic strategies. Finally, we describe several genes and signaling pathways that appear important for TIC function that may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25876646

  9. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kawa, Seiji; Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu; Semba, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  10. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-02-20

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nude mice expressing nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). ND-GFP mice express GFP in nascent blood vessels. In the orthotopically-injected mice, the primary tumor was surgically-resected in order to allow brain metastasis to develop. At various time points, the tumors and vasculature in the brain were imaged by confocal and stereo fluorescence microscopy. Some of the breast cancer cells that reached the brain extravasated and grew perivascularly and some of the cells proliferated within the vasculature. S. typhimurium A1-R significantly inhibited brain metastasis in both metastatic models and increased survival of the orthotopically-transplanted, primary-tumor-resected mice (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest the clinical potential of bacterial therapy of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  11. Developmental windows of breast cancer risk provide opportunities for targeted chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Holly A.; Lyons, Traci R.; Giles, Erin D.; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude of the breast cancer problem implores researchers to aggressively investigate prevention strategies. However, several barriers currently reduce the feasibility of breast cancer prevention. These barriers include the inability to accurately predict future breast cancer diagnosis at the individual level, the need for improved understanding of when to implement interventions, uncertainty with respect to optimal duration of treatment, and negative side effects associated with currently approved chemoprevention therapies. None-the-less, the unique biology of the mammary gland, with its postnatal development and conditional terminal differentiation, may permit the resolution of many of these barriers. Specifically, lifecycle-specific windows of breast cancer risk have been identified that may be amenable to risk-reducing strategies. Here, we argue for prevention research focused on two of these lifecycle windows of risk: postpartum mammary gland involution and peri-menopause. We provide evidence that these windows are highly amenable to targeted, limited duration treatments. Such approaches could result in the prevention of postpartum and postmenopausal breast cancers, correspondingly. PMID:23664839

  12. Correlation between molybdenum target mammography signs and pathological prognostic factors of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Ma, A D; Jia, H X

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the correlation between molybdenum target (mo-target) mammography signs and pathological prognostic factors of breast cancer. We selected 320 breast cancer patients who were treated between January 2014 and January 2016; using single-factor and multiple-factor logistic regression method, we made correlation analysis on their clinical features, pathological features and mo-target mammography signs. Among mo-target mammography signs, lumps accompanied with calcification and blurry edge were associated with high histologic grades; lumps accompanied with calcification and clear edge were associated with Ki-67 positive; compared with the patients who had lumps with non-stellate edges, positive rates of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were significantly higher for the patients who had lumps with stellate edges (p < 0.01), while positive rate of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) and tumor proliferative activity were significantly lower (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). According to the study, we can conclude that mo-target mammography signs mainly include lumps and calcification. Mo-target mammography can improve the accuracy of diagnosis and reduce misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis. Part of mo-target mammography signs are associated with clinical pathology prognostic factors; by grasping the relation, breast cancer patient conditions are expected to be relieved.

  13. Orphan nuclear receptors as drug targets for the treatment of prostate and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Hsing, Michael; Butler, Miriam S; Cherkasov, Artem; Rennie, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs), a family of 48 transcriptional factors, have been studied intensively for their roles in cancer development and progression. The presence of distinctive ligand binding sites capable of interacting with small molecules has made NRs attractive targets for developing cancer therapeutics. In particular, a number of drugs have been developed over the years to target human androgen- and estrogen receptors for the treatment of prostate cancer and breast cancer. In contrast, orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs), which in many cases lack known biological functions or ligands, are still largely under investigated. This review is a summary on ONRs that have been implicated in prostate and breast cancers, specifically retinoic acid-receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), liver X receptors (LXRs), chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs), estrogen related receptors (ERRs), nerve growth factor 1B-like receptors, and ‘‘dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1’’ (DAX1). Discovery and development of small molecules that can bind at various functional sites on these ONRs will help determine their biological functions. In addition, these molecules have the potential to act as prototypes for future drug development. Ultimately, the therapeutic value of targeting the ONRs may go well beyond prostate and breast cancers. PMID:25455729

  14. Targeting uPAR with Antagonistic Recombinant Human Antibodies in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Pepin, Francois; Hann, Byron; Gray, Joe W.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system (PAS) which are overexpressed in aggressive breast cancer subtypes offer appealing targets for development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. By comparing gene expression data in patient populations and cultured cell lines, we identified elevated levels of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (uPAR, PLAUR) in highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes and cell lines. Recombinant human anti-uPAR antagonistic antibodies exhibited potent binding in vitro to the surface of cancer cells expressing uPAR. In vivo these antibodies detected uPAR expression in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor xenografts using near infrared (NIR) imaging and 111In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Antibody-based uPAR imaging probes accurately detected small disseminated lesions in a tumor metastasis model, complementing the current clinical imaging standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) at detecting non-glucose-avid metastatic lesions. A monotherapy study using the antagonistic antibodies resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth in a TNBC xenograft model. Additionally, a radioimmunotherapy (RIT) study, using the anti-uPAR antibodies conjugated to the therapeutic radioisotope 177Lu, found that they were effective at reducing tumor burden in vivo. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for uPAR targeting as a strategy for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy using this novel human antibody technology. PMID:23400595

  15. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  16. Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Daniel W.; Harb, Wael; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2006-03-01

    A novel radiation targeted therapy is investigated for HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed concept combines two known approaches, but never used together for the treatment of advanced, relapsed or metastasized HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed radiation binary targeted concept is based on the anti HER-2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) that would be used as vehicles to transport the nontoxic agent to cancer cells. The anti HER-2 MABs have been successful in targeting HER-2 positive breast cancers with high affinity. The proposed concept would utilize a neutral nontoxic boron-10 predicting that anti HER-2 MABs would assure its selective delivery to cancer cells. MABs against HER-2 have been a widely researched strategy in the clinical setting. The most promising antibody is Trastuzumab (Herceptin®). Targeting HER-2 with the MAB Trastuzumab has been proven to be a successful strategy in inducing tumour regression and improving patient survival. Unfortunately, these tumours become resistant and afflicted women succumb to breast cancer. In the proposed concept, when the tumour region is loaded with boron-10 it is irradiated with neutrons (treatment used for head and neck cancers, melanoma and glioblastoma for over 40 years in Japan and Europe). The irradiation process takes less than an hour producing minimal side effects. This paper summarizes our recent theoretical assessments of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers on: the effective drug delivery mechanism, the numerical model to evaluate the targeted radiation delivery and the survey study to find the neutron facility in the world that might be capable of producing the radiation effect as needed. A novel method of drug delivery utilizing Trastuzumab is described, followed by the description of a computational Monte Carlo based breast model used to determine radiation dose distributions. The total flux and neutron energy spectra of five currently available neutron

  17. Radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers: assumptions, theoretical assessment and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Daniel W; Harb, Wael; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2006-03-21

    A novel radiation targeted therapy is investigated for HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed concept combines two known approaches, but never used together for the treatment of advanced, relapsed or metastasized HER-2 positive breast cancers. The proposed radiation binary targeted concept is based on the anti HER-2 monoclonal antibodies (MABs) that would be used as vehicles to transport the nontoxic agent to cancer cells. The anti HER-2 MABs have been successful in targeting HER-2 positive breast cancers with high affinity. The proposed concept would utilize a neutral nontoxic boron-10 predicting that anti HER-2 MABs would assure its selective delivery to cancer cells. MABs against HER-2 have been a widely researched strategy in the clinical setting. The most promising antibody is Trastuzumab (Herceptin). Targeting HER-2 with the MAB Trastuzumab has been proven to be a successful strategy in inducing tumour regression and improving patient survival. Unfortunately, these tumours become resistant and afflicted women succumb to breast cancer. In the proposed concept, when the tumour region is loaded with boron-10 it is irradiated with neutrons (treatment used for head and neck cancers, melanoma and glioblastoma for over 40 years in Japan and Europe). The irradiation process takes less than an hour producing minimal side effects. This paper summarizes our recent theoretical assessments of radiation binary targeted therapy for HER-2 positive breast cancers on: the effective drug delivery mechanism, the numerical model to evaluate the targeted radiation delivery and the survey study to find the neutron facility in the world that might be capable of producing the radiation effect as needed. A novel method of drug delivery utilizing Trastuzumab is described, followed by the description of a computational Monte Carlo based breast model used to determine radiation dose distributions. The total flux and neutron energy spectra of five currently available neutron

  18. Targeting DNA replication before it starts: Cdc7 as a therapeutic target in p53-mutant breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Proctor, Ian; Loddo, Marco; Wollenschlaeger, Alex; Rashid, Mohammed; Falzon, Mary; Prevost, A Toby; Sainsbury, Richard; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth H

    2010-10-01

    Treatment options for triple-receptor negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) and Her2-overexpressing (ER-/PR-/Her2+) breast cancers with acquired or de novo resistance are limited, and metastatic disease remains incurable. Targeting of growth signaling networks is often constrained by pathway redundancy or growth-independent cancer cell cycles. The cell-cycle protein Cdc7 regulates S phase by promoting DNA replication. This essential kinase acts as a convergence point for upstream growth signaling pathways and is therefore an attractive therapeutic target. We show that increased Cdc7 expression during mammary tumorigenesis is linked to Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative subtypes, accelerated cell cycle progression (P < 0.001), arrested tumor differentiation (P < 0.001), genomic instability (P = 0.019), increasing NPI score (P < 0.001), and reduced disease-free survival (HR = 1.98 [95% CI: 1.27-3.10]; P = 0.003), thus implicating its deregulation in the development of aggressive disease. Targeting Cdc7 with RNAi, we demonstrate that p53-mutant Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines undergo an abortive S phase and apoptotic cell death due to loss of a p53-dependent Cdc7-inhibition checkpoint. In contrast, untransformed breast epithelial cells arrest in G1, remain viable, and are able to resume cell proliferation on recovery of Cdc7 kinase activity. Thus, Cdc7 appears to represent a potent and highly specific anticancer target in Her2-overexpressing and triple-negative breast cancers. Emerging Cdc7 kinase inhibitors may therefore significantly broaden the therapeutic armamentarium for treatment of the aggressive p53-mutant breast cancer subtypes identified in this study.

  19. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status.

    PubMed

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors' ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  20. Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Contrast Agents for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer Hormonal Status

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Adi; Degani, Hadassa

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) α is overexpressed in most breast cancers, and its level serves as a major prognostic factor. It is important to develop quantitative molecular imaging methods that specifically detect ER in vivo and assess its function throughout the entire primary breast cancer and in metastatic breast cancer lesions. This study presents the biochemical and molecular features, as well as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) effects of two novel ER-targeted contrast agents (CAs), based on pyridine-tetra-acetate-Gd(III) chelate conjugated to 17β-estradiol (EPTA-Gd) or to tamoxifen (TPTA-Gd). The experiments were conducted in solution, in human breast cancer cells, and in severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with transfected ER-positive and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. Binding studies with ER in solution and in human breast cancer cells indicated affinities in the micromolar range of both CAs. Biochemical and molecular studies in breast cancer cell cultures showed that both CAs exhibit estrogen-like agonistic activity, enhancing cell proliferation, as well as upregulating cMyc oncogene and downregulating ER expression levels. The MRI longitudinal relaxivity was significantly augmented by EPTA-Gd in ER-positive cells as compared to ER-negative cells. Dynamic contrast-enhanced studies with EPTA-Gd in vivo indicated specific augmentation of the MRI water signal in the ER-positive versus ER-negative xenografts, confirming EPTA-Gd-specific interaction with ER. In contrast, TPTA-Gd did not show increased enhancement in ER-positive tumors and did not appear to interact in vivo with the tumors’ ER. However, TPTA-Gd was found to interact strongly with muscle tissue, enhancing muscle signal intensity in a mechanism independent of the presence of ER. The specificity of EPTA-Gd interaction with ER in vivo was further verified by acute and chronic competition with tamoxifen. The chronic tamoxifen treatment also revealed that this

  1. Targeting CXCR1 on breast cancer stem cells: signaling pathways and clinical application modelling

    PubMed Central

    Fidoamore, Alessia; De Pizzol, Maria; Di Giacomo, Erica; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Confalone, Giuseppina; Galante, Angelo; Cinque, Benedetta; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Ruffini, Pier Adelchi; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Giordano, Antonio; Alecci, Marcello; Allegretti, Marcello; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer it has been proposed that the presence of cancer stem cells may drive tumor initiation, progression and recurrences. IL-8, up-regulated in breast cancer, and associated with poor prognosis, increases CSC self-renewal in cell line models. It signals via two cell surface receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Recently, the IL-8/CXCR1 axis was proposed as an attractive pathway for the design of specific therapies against breast cancer stem cells. Reparixin, a powerful CXCR1 inhibitor, was effective in reducing in vivo the tumour-initiating population in several NOD/SCID mice breast cancer models, showing that the selective targeting of CXCR1 and the combination of reparixin and docetaxel resulted in a concomitant reduction of the bulk tumour mass and CSC population. The available data indicate that IL-8, expressed by tumour cells and induced by chemotherapeutic treatment, is a key regulator of the survival and self-renewal of the population of CXCR1-expressing CSC. Consequently, this investigation on the mechanism of action of the reparixin/paclitaxel combination, was based on the observation that reparixin treatment contained the formation of metastases in several experimental models. However, specific data on the formation of breast cancer brain metastases, which carry remarkable morbidity and mortality to a substantial proportion of advanced breast cancer patients, have not been generated. The obtained data indicate a beneficial use of the drug combination reparixin and paclitaxel to counteract brain tumour metastasis due to CSC, probably due to the combined effects of the two drugs, the pro-apoptotic action of paclitaxel and the cytostatic and anti-migratory effects of reparixin. PMID:26517518

  2. Targeting CXCR1 on breast cancer stem cells: signaling pathways and clinical application modelling.

    PubMed

    Brandolini, Laura; Cristiano, Loredana; Fidoamore, Alessia; De Pizzol, Maria; Di Giacomo, Erica; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Confalone, Giuseppina; Galante, Angelo; Cinque, Benedetta; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Ruffini, Pier Adelchi; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Giordano, Antonio; Alecci, Marcello; Allegretti, Marcello; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-22

    In breast cancer it has been proposed that the presence of cancer stem cells may drive tumor initiation, progression and recurrences. IL-8, up-regulated in breast cancer, and associated with poor prognosis, increases CSC self-renewal in cell line models. It signals via two cell surface receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Recently, the IL-8/CXCR1 axis was proposed as an attractive pathway for the design of specific therapies against breast cancer stem cells. Reparixin, a powerful CXCR1 inhibitor, was effective in reducing in vivo the tumour-initiating population in several NOD/SCID mice breast cancer models, showing that the selective targeting of CXCR1 and the combination of reparixin and docetaxel resulted in a concomitant reduction of the bulk tumour mass and CSC population. The available data indicate that IL-8, expressed by tumour cells and induced by chemotherapeutic treatment, is a key regulator of the survival and self-renewal of the population of CXCR1-expressing CSC. Consequently, this investigation on the mechanism of action of the reparixin/paclitaxel combination, was based on the observation that reparixin treatment contained the formation of metastases in several experimental models. However, specific data on the formation of breast cancer brain metastases, which carry remarkable morbidity and mortality to a substantial proportion of advanced breast cancer patients, have not been generated. The obtained data indicate a beneficial use of the drug combination reparixin and paclitaxel to counteract brain tumour metastasis due to CSC, probably due to the combined effects of the two drugs, the pro-apoptotic action of paclitaxel and the cytostatic and anti-migratory effects of reparixin.

  3. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Patrick V.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A.

    2014-08-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA+ relies on the capability of the conjugated HA+ to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA+-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA+) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA+ nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of Un

  4. [Organs at risk and target volumes: definition for conformal radiation therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Atean, I; Pointreau, Y; Barillot, I; Kirova, Y-M

    2012-09-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is a standard component of breast cancer treatment. The addition of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery has been shown to reduce local recurrence rate and improve long-term survival. Accurate delineation of target volumes and organs at risk is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and delivered accomplished with innovate technologies in radiation therapy. This allows the radiation beam to be shaped specifically to each individual patient's anatomy. Target volumes include the mammary gland and surgical bed in case of breast conserving surgery, the chest wall in case of mastectomy, and if indicated, regional lymph nodes (axillary, supra- and infraclavicular and internal mammary). Organs at risk include lungs, thyroid, brachial plexus, heart, spinal cord and oesophagus. The aim of this article is to encourage the use of conformal treatment and delineation of target volumes and organs at risk and to describe specifically the definition of these volumes.

  5. Development of a Radiolabeled Peptide-Based Probe Targeting MT1-MMP for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kaiyin; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Min; Ji, Tiefeng; Chen, Bin; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent and aggressive primary tumors among women of all races. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), a family of zinc- and calcium-dependent secreted or membrane anchored endopeptidases, is overexpressed in varieties of diseases including breast cancer. Therefore, noninvasive visualization and quantification of MMP in vivo are of great interest in basic research and clinical application for breast cancer early diagnosis. Herein, we developed a 99mTc labeled membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) specific binding peptide, [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7p)(tricine)(TPPTS), for in vivo detection of MDA-MB-231 breast tumor by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7p)(tricine)(TPPTS) demonstrated nice biostability and high MT1-MMP binding affinity in vitro and in vivo. Tumor-to-muscle ratio was found to reach to the highest (4.17±0.49) at 2 hour after intravenously administration of [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7P)(tricine)(TPPTS) into MDA-MB-231 tumor bearing mice. Overall, [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7P)(tricine)(TPPTS) demonstrated great potential for MT1-MMP targeted detection in vivo and it would be a promising molecular imaging probe that are probably beneficial to breast cancer early diagnoses. PMID:26437463

  6. Breast cancer at bone metastatic sites: recent discoveries and treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Osama; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2011-06-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common cancer of women. Bones are often involved with breast carcinoma metastases with the resulting morbidity and reduced quality of life. Breast cancer cells arriving at bone tissues mount supportive microenvironment by recruiting and modulating the activity of several host tissue cell types including the specialized bone cells osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Pathologically activated osteoclasts produce osteolytic lesions associated with bone pain, pathological fractures, cord compression and other complications of metastatic breast carcinoma at bone. Over the last decade there has been enormous growth of knowledge in the field of osteoclasts biology both in the physiological state and in the tumor microenvironment. This knowledge allowed the development and implementation of several targeted therapeutics that expanded the armamentarium of the oncologists dealing with the metastases-associated osteolytic disease. While the interactions of cancer cells with resident bone cells at the established metastatic gross lesions are well-studied, the preclinical events that underlie the progression of disseminated tumor cells into micrometastases and then into clinically-overt macrometastases are just starting to be uncovered. In this review, we discuss the established information and the most recent discoveries in the pathogenesis of osteolytic metastases of breast cancer, as well as the corresponding investigational drugs that have been introduced into clinical development.

  7. Expression and therapeutic targeting of dopamine receptor-1 (D1R) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borcherding, D C; Tong, W; Hugo, E R; Barnard, D F; Fox, S; LaSance, K; Shaughnessy, E; Ben-Jonathan, N

    2016-06-16

    Patients with advanced breast cancer often fail to respond to treatment, creating a need to develop novel biomarkers and effective therapeutics. Dopamine (DA) is a catecholamine that binds to five G protein-coupled receptors. We discovered expression of DA type-1 receptors (D1Rs) in breast cancer, thereby identifying these receptors as novel therapeutic targets in this disease. Strong to moderate immunoreactive D1R expression was found in 30% of 751 primary breast carcinomas, and was associated with larger tumors, higher tumor grades, node metastasis and shorter patient survival. DA and D1R agonists, signaling through the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, suppressed cell viability, inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Fenoldopam, a peripheral D1R agonist that does not penetrate the brain, dramatically suppressed tumor growth in two mouse models with D1R-expressing xenografts by increasing both necrosis and apoptosis. D1R-expressing primary tumors and metastases in mice were detected by fluorescence imaging. In conclusion, D1R overexpression is associated with advanced breast cancer and poor prognosis. Activation of the D1R/cGMP/PKG pathway induces apoptosis in vitro and causes tumor shrinkage in vivo. Fenoldopam, which is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved to treat renal hypertension, could be repurposed as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with D1R-expressing tumors.

  8. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Wei; Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing; Yang, An-Gang; Zhang, Rui; Fan, Jing; Bian, Ka

    2015-08-07

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells.

  9. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  10. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  11. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer tumor with HER2-targeted nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-09-01

    Radiation-damaged nanodiamonds (NDs) are ideal optical contrast agents for photoacoustic (PA) imaging in biological tissues due to their good biocompatibility and high optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) range. Acid treated NDs are oxidized to form carboxyl groups on the surface, functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting ligand for breast cancer tumor imaging. Because of the specific binding of the ligand conjugated NDs to the HER2-overexpressing murine breast cancer cells (4T1.2 neu), the tumor tissues are significantly delineated from the surrounding normal tissue at wavelength of 820 nm under the PA imaging modality. Moreover, HER2 targeted NDs (HER2-PEG-NDs) result in higher accumulation in HER2 positive breast tumors as compared to non-targeted NDs after intravenous injection (i.v.). Longer retention time of HER-PEG-NDs is observed in HER2 overexpressing tumor model than that in negative tumor model (4T1.2). This demonstrates that targeting moiety conjugated NDs have great potential for the sensitive detection of cancer tumors and provide an attractive delivery strategy for anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Gold Nano Popcorn Attached SWCNT Hybrid Nanomaterial for Targeted Diagnosis and Photothermal Therapy of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beqa, Lule; Fan, Zhen; Singh, Anant Kumar; Senapati, Dulal; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer presents greatest challenge in health care in today’s world. The key to ultimately successful treatment of breast cancer disease is an early and accurate diagnosis. Current breast cancer treatments are often associated with severe side effects. Driven by the need, we report the design of novel hybrid nanomaterial using gold nano popcorn-attached single wall carbon nanotube for targeted diagnosis and selective photothermal treatment. Targeted SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell sensing have been performed in 10 cancer cells/mL level, using surface enhanced Raman scattering of single walls carbon nanotube’s D and G bands. Our data show that S6 aptamer attached hybrid nanomaterial based SERS assay is highly sensitive to targeted human breast cancer SK-BR-3 cell line and it will be able to distinguish it from other non targeted MDA-MB breast cancer cell line and HaCaT normal skin cell line. Our results also show that 10 minutes of photothermal therapy treatment by 1.5 W/cm2 power, 785 nm laser is enough to kill cancer cells very effectively using S6 aptamer attached hybrid nanomaterials. Possible mechanisms for targeted sensing and operating principle for highly efficient photothermal therapy have been discussed. Our experimental results reported here open up a new possibility for using aptamers modified hybrid nanomaterial for reliable diagnosis and targeted therapy of cancer cell lines quickly. PMID:21842867

  13. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins in combination with ErbB antagonists in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Fiona M; Owens, Thomas W; Tanianis-Hughes, Jolanta; Clarke, Robert B; Brennan, Keith; Bundred, Nigel J; Streuli, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins are a family of proteins that can block apoptosis in normal cells and have been suggested to cause resistance to apoptosis in cancer. Overexpression of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases is common in breast cancer; in particular 20% of all cases show elevated Her2. Despite clinical success with the use of targeted therapies, such as Trastuzumab, only up to 35% of Her2-positive patients initially respond. We reasoned that IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance might contribute to this insensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase therapy, in particular ErbB antagonists. Here we examine the levels of IAPs in breast cancer and evaluate whether targeting IAPs can enhance apoptosis in response to growth factor receptor antagonists and TRAIL. Methods IAP levels were examined in a breast cancer cell line panel and in patient samples. IAPs were inhibited using siRNA or cell permeable mimetics of endogenous inhibitors. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib, or Gefitinib for 48 hours. Examining nuclear morphology and staining for cleaved caspase 3 was used to score apoptosis. Proliferation was examined by Ki67 staining. Results Four members of the IAP family, Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, were all expressed to varying extents in breast cancer cell lines or tumours. MDAMB468, BT474 and BT20 cells all expressed XIAP to varying extents. Depleting the cells of XIAP overcame the intrinsic resistance of BT20 and MDAMB468 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, siRNA-based depletion of XIAP or use of a Smac mimetic to target multiple IAPs increased apoptosis in response to the ErbB antagonists, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib or Gefitinib in Her2-overexpressing BT474 cells, or Gefitinib in EGFR-overexpressing MDAMB468 cells. Conclusions The novel findings of this study are that multiple IAPs are concomitantly expressed in breast cancers, and that, in combination with clinically relevant Her2 treatments, IAP antagonists promote apoptosis

  14. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  15. A Combined Shotgun and Targeted Mass Spectrometry Strategy for Breast Cancer Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Martin; Ossola, Reto; Breslin, Thomas; Rinner, Oliver; Malmström, Lars; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Johan; Niméus, Emma

    2015-07-01

    It is of highest importance to find proteins responsible for breast cancer dissemination, for use as biomarkers or treatment targets. We established and performed a combined nontargeted LC-MS/MS and a targeted LC-SRM workflow for discovery and validation of protein biomarkers. Eighty breast tumors, stratified for estrogen receptor status and development of distant recurrence (DR ± ), were collected. After enrichment of N-glycosylated peptides, label-free LC-MS/MS was performed on each individual tumor in triplicate. In total, 1515 glycopeptides from 778 proteins were identified and used to create a map of the breast cancer N-glycosylated proteome. Based on this specific proteome map, we constructed a 92-plex targeted label-free LC-SRM panel. These proteins were quantified across samples by LC-SRM, resulting in 10 proteins consistently differentially regulated between DR+/DR- tumors. Five proteins were further validated in a separate cohort as prognostic biomarkers at the gene expression level. We also compared the LC-SRM results to clinically reported HER2 status, demonstrating its clinical accuracy. In conclusion, we demonstrate a combined mass spectrometry strategy, at large scale on clinical samples, leading to the identification and validation of five proteins as potential biomarkers for breast cancer recurrence. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange and PASSEL with identifiers PXD001685 and PASS00643. PMID:25944384

  16. Amplification of Distant Estrogen Response Elements Deregulates Target Genes Associated with Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Yin; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Lan, Xun; Juan, Liran; Yan, Pearlly S.; Labanowska, Jadwiga; Heerema, Nyla; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Liu, Yunlong; Li, Lang; Li, Rong; Thompson, Ian M.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Sharp, Zelton D.; Kirma, Nameer B.; Jin, Victor X.; Huang, Tim H.-M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A causal role of gene amplification in tumorigenesis is well-known, while amplification of DNA regulatory elements as an oncogenic driver remains unclear. In this study, we integrated next-generation sequencing approaches to map distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) that remotely control transcription of target genes through chromatin proximity. Two densely mapped DERE regions located on chromosomes 17q23 and 20q13 were frequently amplified in ERα-positive luminal breast cancer. These aberrantly amplified DEREs deregulated target gene expression potentially linked to cancer development and tamoxifen resistance. Progressive accumulation of DERE copies was observed in normal breast progenitor cells chronically exposed to estrogenic chemicals. These findings may extend to other DNA regulatory elements, the amplification of which can profoundly alter target transcriptome during tumorigenesis. PMID:23948299

  17. miR-203 facilitates tumor growth and metastasis by targeting fibroblast growth factor 2 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuqian; Zhang, Guihui; Dong, He; Ma, Maoqiang; Sun, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Molecular therapy is needed to improve the outcome in patients with breast cancer. miR-203 participates in cancer cell proliferation, transformation, and apoptosis. This study showed that miR-203 was upregulated in breast cancer tissues and the MCF-7 cell line. miR-203 knockdown suppressed colony formation and transformation and also limited migration in MCF-7 cells. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was confirmed as a novel target of miR-203, as miR-203 knockdown induced an enhanced expression of FGF2 in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, FGF2 can reverse transforming growth factor-β signal pathway to suppress breast cancer. These findings provide new insights with potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27785068

  18. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  19. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Elizabeth; Lal, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a major class of small endogenous RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally inhibit gene expression. Many miRNAs have been implicated in several human cancers, including breast cancer. Here we describe the association between altered miRNA signatures and breast cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis. The loss of several tumor suppressor miRNAs (miR-206, miR-17-5p, miR-125a, miR-125b, miR-200, let-7, miR-34 and miR-31) and the overexpression of certain oncogenic miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-10b, miR-373 and miR-520c) have been observed in many breast cancers. The gene networks orchestrated by these miRNAs are still largely unknown, although key targets have been identified that may contribute to the disease phenotype. Here we report how the observed perturbations in miRNA expression profiles may lead to disruption of key pathways involved in breast cancer.

  20. Targeting the RB-E2F pathway in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jackie; Thijssen, Bram; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Bernards, René

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (RB1) or components regulating the CDK-RB-E2F pathway have been identified in nearly every human malignancy. Re-establishing cell cycle control through CDK inhibition has therefore emerged as an attractive option in the development of targeted cancer therapy. The most successful example of this today is the use of the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib combined with aromatase inhibitors for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the CDK-RB-E2F pathway is critical for the control of cell proliferation. More recently, studies have highlighted additional roles of this pathway, especially E2F transcription factors themselves, in tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. Specific E2Fs also have prognostic value in breast cancer, independent of clinical parameters. We discuss here recent advances in understanding of the RB-E2F pathway in breast cancer. We also discuss the application of genome-wide genetic screening efforts to gain insight into synthetic lethal interactions of CDK4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer for the development of more effective combination therapies. PMID:26923330

  1. Profiling and targeting HER2-positive breast cancer using trastuzumab emtansine

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Saeed; Olevsky, Olga; Hurvitz, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This article reviews the mechanism of action of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), existing clinical data relating to its use for human growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, potential pathways of resistance, and ongoing studies evaluating this novel agent. Background The development of HER2-targeted therapies has dramatically improved clinical outcomes for patients with any stage of HER2-positive breast cancer. Although the positive effect of these treatments cannot be overstated, treatment resistance develops in the vast majority of those diagnosed with stage IV HER2-positive breast cancer. Moreover, HER2-directed therapies are most effective when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy. The need for chemotherapy leads to significant adverse effects and a clear decrease in quality of life for those dealing with a chronic incurable disease. T-DM1 is a recently developed, novel antibody–drug conjugate in which highly potent maytanisinoid chemotherapy is stably linked to the HER2-targeted monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab. Results Preclinical and phase 1–3 clinical data support the significant antitumor activity of T-DM1. Importantly, several randomized studies also now demonstrate its clear superiority in terms of tolerability compared with standard chemotherapy-containing regimens. Its role in the treatment of trastuzumab-resistant metastatic breast cancer has now been established on the basis of the results of two phase 3 randomized studies, EMILIA (An Open-label Study of Trastuzumab Emtansine (T-DM1) vs Capecitabine + Lapatinib in Patients With HER2-positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer) and TH3RESA (A Study of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Comparison With Treatment of Physician’s Choice in Patients With HER2-positive Breast Cancer Who Have Received at Least Two Prior Regimens of HER2-directed Therapy). The most common toxicities seen with T-DM1 are thrombocytopenia and an elevation in liver transaminases. Significant cardiac

  2. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities. PMID:27446389

  3. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27322743

  4. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  5. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  7. Abrogating endocrine resistance by targeting ERα and PI3K in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Emily M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Miller, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen therapies targeting estrogen receptor α (ER) signaling are a mainstay for patients with ER+ breast cancer. While many cancers exhibit resistance to antiestrogen therapies, a large body of clinical and experimental evidence indicates that hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway promotes antiestrogen resistance. In addition, continued ligand-independent ER signaling in the setting of estrogen deprivation may contribute to resistance to endocrine therapy. PI3K activates several proteins which promote cell cycle progression and survival. In ER+ breast cancer cells, PI3K promotes ligand-dependent and -independent ER transcriptional activity. Models of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer often remain sensitive to estrogen stimulation and PI3K inhibition, suggesting that clinical trials with combinations of drugs targeting both the PI3K and ER pathways are warranted. Herein, we review recent findings on the roles of PI3K and ER in antiestrogen resistance, and clinical trials testing drug combinations which target both pathways. We also discuss the need for clinical investigation of ER downregulators in combination with PI3K inhibitors. PMID:23087906

  8. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dye-labeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection.

  9. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  10. Amine-modified hyaluronic acid-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for targeting breast cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Patrick V; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-09-01

    Active targeting of nanoparticles to receptor-overexpressing cancer cells has great potential for enhancing the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and for reducing fast clearance of the nanoparticles from the body. Herein, we present a preparation method of a porous silicon (PSi)-based nanodelivery system for breast cancer targeting, by covalently conjugating a synthesized amide-modified hyaluronic acid (HA(+)) derived polymer on the surface of undecylenic acid-modified thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles. The resulting UnTHCPSi-HA(+) nanoparticles showed relatively small size, reduced polydispersibility, high biocompatibility, improved colloidal and human plasma stability, as well as enhanced cellular interactions and internalization. Moreover, we demonstrated that the enhanced cellular association of UnTHCPSi-HA(+) relies on the capability of the conjugated HA(+) to bind and consequently target CD44 receptors expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells, thus making the HA(+)-functionalized UnTHCPSi nanoparticles a suitable and promising nanoplatform for the targeting of CD44-overexpressing breast tumors and for drug delivery.

  11. FOXM1 targets XIAP and Survivin to modulate breast cancer survival and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Nestal de Moraes, Gabriela; Delbue, Deborah; Silva, Karina L; Robaina, Marcela Cristina; Khongkow, Pasarat; Gomes, Ana R; Zona, Stefania; Crocamo, Susanne; Mencalha, André Luiz; Magalhães, Lídia M; Lam, Eric W-F; Maia, Raquel C

    2015-12-01

    Drug resistance is a major hurdle for successful treatment of breast cancer, the leading cause of deaths in women throughout the world. The FOXM1 transcription factor is a potent oncogene that transcriptionally regulates a wide range of target genes involved in DNA repair, metastasis, cell invasion, and migration. However, little is known about the role of FOXM1 in cell survival and the gene targets involved. Here, we show that FOXM1-overexpressing breast cancer cells display an apoptosis-resistant phenotype, which associates with the upregulation of expression of XIAP and Survivin antiapoptotic genes. Conversely, FOXM1 knockdown results in XIAP and Survivin downregulation as well as decreased binding of FOXM1 to the promoter regions of XIAP and Survivin. Consistently, FOXM1, XIAP, and Survivin expression levels were higher in taxane and anthracycline-resistant cell lines when compared to their sensitive counterparts and could not be downregulated in response to drug treatment. In agreement with our in vitro findings, we found that FOXM1 expression is significantly associated with Survivin and XIAP expression in samples from patients with IIIa stage breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Importantly, patients co-expressing FOXM1, Survivin, and nuclear XIAP had significantly worst overall survival, further confirming the physiological relevance of the regulation of Survivin and XIAP by FOXM1. Together, these findings suggest that the overexpression of FOXM1, XIAP, and Survivin contributes to the development of drug-resistance and is associated with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

  12. Novel approaches to target HER2-positive breast cancer: trastuzumab emtansine

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo; de la Vega, Maximo; Galanternik, Fernando; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20% of breast carcinomas. Prior to the development of targeted therapies, HER2-positive breast cancer was associated with more aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate that results from the combination of trastuzumab and DM1, a derivative of the antimicrotubule agent maytansine. This molecule has the ability to enhance cytotoxic drug delivery to specifically targeted cells that overexpress HER2, therefore, maximizing efficacy while sparing toxicity. In recent years, T-DM1 has shown to improve outcomes in metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer that is resistant to trastuzumab. In addition, T-DM1 is currently being tested in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings to identify patients who may benefit from this therapy. This review focuses on the mechanism of action, early and late-phase clinical trials, and ongoing studies of T-DM1 in HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:27274311

  13. RGD-conjugated PLA-PLL nanoparticles targeting to Bacp-37 breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peifeng; Qi, Xuelian; Sun, Ying; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Duan, Yourong

    2011-12-01

    Targeted delivery carriers are receiving considerable attention, the development of a more precise targeted delivery carrier is critical for the advancement of cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the effects of RGD-conjugated poly (lactic acid-co-lysine)-(Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic) nanoparticles (PLA-PLL-RGD NPs) on targeted delivery to Bacp-37 breast cancer bearing mice. PLA-PLL-RGD NPs were prepared by using the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. A subsequent MTT assay indicated that the NPs were non-toxic and had good biocompatibility. In vitro, the results of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) and FAC Scan flow cytometry (FACS) indicated that the PLA-PLL-RGD NPs can bind more significantly to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, compared to PLA-PLL NPs. In vivo, the results of target imaging and biodistribution showed that PLA-PLL-RGD can significantly target to tumor of Bacp-37 breast cancer bearing mice. These results demonstrated that PLA-PLL-RGD NPs can effectively enhance targeted efficiency in vivo, and have the potential to be used as targeted delivery carrier.

  14. miR-155 drives telomere fragility in human breast cancer by targeting TRF1.

    PubMed

    Dinami, Roberto; Ercolani, Cristiana; Petti, Eleonora; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Sestito, Rosanna; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; le Sage, Carlos; Agami, Reuven; Benetti, Roberta; Mottolese, Marcella; Schneider, Claudio; Blandino, Giovanni; Schoeftner, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Telomeres consist of DNA tandem repeats that recruit the multiprotein complex shelterin to build a chromatin structure that protects chromosome ends. Although cancer formation is linked to alterations in telomere homeostasis, there is little understanding of how shelterin function is limited in cancer cells. Using a small-scale screening approach, we identified miR-155 as a key regulator in breast cancer cell expression of the shelterin component TERF1 (TRF1). miR-155 targeted a conserved sequence motif in the 3'UTR of TRF1, resulting in its translational repression. miR-155 was upregulated commonly in breast cancer specimens, as associated with reduced TRF1 protein expression, metastasis-free survival, and relapse-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive cases. Modulating miR-155 expression in cells altered TRF1 levels and TRF1 abundance at telomeres. Compromising TRF1 expression by elevating miR-155 increased telomere fragility and altered the structure of metaphase chromosomes. In contrast, reducing miR-155 levels improved telomere function and genomic stability. These results implied that miR-155 upregulation antagonizes telomere integrity in breast cancer cells, increasing genomic instability linked to poor clinical outcome in estrogen receptor-positive disease. Our work argued that miRNA-dependent regulation of shelterin function has a clinically significant impact on telomere function, suggesting the existence of "telo-miRNAs" that have an impact on cancer and aging. PMID:24876105

  15. Selective apoptosis of breast cancer cells by siRNA targeting of BORIS.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Christopher J; Ichim, Thomas E; Liu, Liping; Reznik, Gary; Min, Wei-Ping; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Agadjanyan, Michael G; Reznik, Boris N

    2008-05-23

    Brother of the regulator of imprinted sites (BORIS) is an epigenetically acting transcription factor which represses the tumor inhibitor functions of the tumor suppressor protein CTCF. BORIS expression has not been documented in adult females, making it an exciting molecular target for drug development in breast cancer. Previously, we demonstrated that vaccination of mice with zing-finger (ZF)-deleted non-functional BORIS results in regression of breast cancer and generation of potent anti-tumor immune responses. RNAi induction can be used as an alternative approach for selective tumor cell killing. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules targeting BORIS were generated and their efficacy was tested in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and non-malignant epithelial cell lines. Treatment with BORIS-specific siRNA, but not control siRNA led to a concentration-dependent reduction in BORIS expression and proportional apoptotic death of the cancer but not control cells. To our knowledge this is first report demonstrating a critical role of BORIS in maintaining tumor cell viability.

  16. Cisplatin Prodrug-Conjugated Gold Nanocluster for Fluorescence Imaging and Targeted Therapy of the Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Feng, Bing; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Dangge; Wang, Tingting; Liu, Jianping; Meng, Qingshuo; Wang, Siling; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine has emerged as a promising modality for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorescence gold nanoclusters (GNC) conjugated with a cisplatin prodrug and folic acid (FA) (FA-GNC-Pt) for fluorescence imaging and targeted chemotherapy of breast cancer. The physio-chemical properties of FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by fluorescence/UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement, particle size and zeta-potential examination. We find that FA-modification significantly accelerated the cellular uptake and increased the cytotoxicity of GNC-Pt nanoparticles in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging in vivo using 4T1 tumor bearing nude mouse model shows that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles selectively accumulate in the orthotopic 4T1 tumor and generate strong fluorescence signal due to the tumor targeting effect of FA. Moreover, we demonstrate that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles significantly inhibit the growth and lung metastasis of the orthotopically implanted 4T1 breast tumors. All these data imply a good potential of the GNC-based theranostic nanoplatform for fluorescence tumor imaging and cancer therapy. PMID:27022415

  17. Breast cancer as photodynamic therapy target: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency by overview of tumor complexity.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, María Julia; Vittar, Natalia Belén Rumie; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-12-10

    Photodynamic therapy is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure for eliminating selected malignant cells with specific light activation of a photosensitizer agent. Whereas interstitial and intra-operative approaches have been investigated for the ablation of a broad range of superficial or bulky solid tumors such as breast cancer, the majority of approved photodynamic therapy protocols are for the treatment of superficial lesions of skin and luminal organs. This review article will discuss recent progress in research focused mainly on assessing the efficacies of various photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy, as well as the combinatory strategies of various therapeutic modalities for improving treatments of parenchymal and/or stromal tissues of breast cancer solid tumors. Cytotoxic agents are used in cancer treatments for their effect on rapidly proliferating cancer cells. However, such therapeutics often lack specificity, which can lead to toxicity and undesirable side effects. Many approaches are designed to target tumors. Selective therapies can be established by focusing on distinctive intracellular (receptors, apoptotic pathways, multidrug resistance system, nitric oxide-mediated stress) and environmental (glucose, pH) differences between tumor and healthy tissue. A rational design of effective combination regimens for breast cancer treatment involves a better understanding of the mechanisms and molecular interactions of cytotoxic agents that underlie drug resistance and sensitivity.

  18. Serum 5-LOX: a progressive protein marker for breast cancer and new approach for therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Shekhar, Shashank; Rai, Nitish; Kaur, Punit; Parshad, Rajinder; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway has emerged to have a role in carcinogenesis. There is an evidence that both 12-LOX and 5-LOX have procarcinogenic role. We have previously reported the elevated level of serum 12-LOX in breast cancer patients. This study evaluated the serum level of 5-LOX in breast cancer patients and its in vitro inhibition assessment with peptide inhibitor YWCS. The level of 5-LOX was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide inhibitor of 5-LOX was designed by molecular modeling and kinetic assay was performed by spectrophotometry. The siRNA mediated 5-LOX gene silencing was performed to investigate the effect on proliferation of MDA-MB-231, breast cancer cell line. The serum 5-LOX level in breast cancer (5.69±1.97ng/µl) was almost 2-fold elevated compared to control (3.53±1.0ng/µl) (P < 0.0001). The peptide YWCS had shown competitive inhibitory effects with IC50, 2.2 µM and dissociation constant (K D), 4.92×10(-8) M. The siRNA mediated knockdown of 5-LOX, resulted in the decreased gene expression for 5-LOX and increased cell death in MDA-MB-231 cell line and thereby play a key role in reducing tumor proliferation. Thus, it can be concluded that 5-LOX is one of the potential serum protein marker for breast cancer and a promising therapeutic target for the same. PMID:27432812

  19. Downregulated miR-45 Inhibits the G1-S Phase Transition by Targeting Bmi-1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Liang; Liu, Xiang-Xia; Wu, Hong-Mei; Lei, Fang-Yong; Wu, Shu; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bmi-1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1) is upregulated in breast cancer and was involved in many malignant progressions of breast cells, including cell proliferation, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer initiation. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of Bmi-1 in breast cancer remains unclear. After analysis of the ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666, we comparatively detected the expression levels of miR-495 in 9 examined breast cancer cell lines, normal breast epithelial cells and 8 pairs of fresh clinical tumor samples. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of miR-495 on the progression of breast cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were transduced to stably overexpress miR-495. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assays, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine labeling and immunofluorescence, anchorage-independent growth ability assay, flow cytometry analysis, and luciferase assays were used to test the effect of miR-495 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Xenografted tumor model was also used to evaluate the effect of miR-495 in breast cancer. Herein, we found that miR-495, a predicted regulator of Bmi-1, was frequently downregulated in malignant cells and tissues of breast. Upregulation of miR-495 significantly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity via G1-S arrest. Further analysis revealed that miR-495 targeted Bmi-1 through its 3′ untranslated region. Moreover, Bmi-1 could neutralize the suppressive effect of miR-495 on cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer in vivo. These data suggested that miR-495 could inhibit the G1-S phase transition that leads to proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition by targeting and suppressing Bmi-1 in breast cancer. PMID:26020378

  20. Targets for Neoadjuvant Therapy – The Preferences of Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thill, M.; Pisa, G.; Isbary, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapists and administrative bodies consider a pathological complete remission as an independent and relevant endpoint in evaluations of the clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy for early breast cancer. The present study aims to investigate which treatment outcomes of a neoadjuvant therapy are considered by the patients themselves to be relevant. Materials and Methods: With the help of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods patient preferences about the treatment targets of neoadjuvant therapy were assessed quantitatively. All participants had undergone a neoadjuvant therapy in the form of chemotherapy and, in HER2-positive cases, as a targeted antibody therapy against HER2 for the primary diagnosis of early breast cancer 12–36 months prior to the interview. The criteria for the hierarchy model were identified in an earlier qualitative survey. The patient interviews were conducted by 4 experienced female interviewers. Results: Forty-one patients participated in the quantitative survey, of these 15 (36.6 %) had suffered from HER2-positive disease. The achievement of pCR was the most important therapeutic target for the patients, even before disease-free survival, overall survival and the option for breast-preserving operation. Avoidance of side effects was considered to be the least important. In a comparison of the side effects the patients judged fatigue to be most important before nausea and loss of hair. Conclusion: For the patients the achievement of a pathological complete remission is considered to be an independent, relevant and highly desired target of neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27239064

  1. Novel targets for paclitaxel nano formulations: Hopes and hypes in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakrania, Anita K; Variya, Bhavesh C; Patel, Snehal S

    2016-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer is defined as one of the utmost prevailing breast cancers worldwide, possessing an inadequate prognosis and treatment option limited to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, creating a challenge for researchers as far as developing a specific targeted therapy is concerned. The past research era has shown several promising outcomes for TNBC such as nano-formulations of the chemotherapeutic agents already used for the management of the malignant tumor. Taking a glance at paclitaxel nano formulations, it has been proven beneficial in several researches in the past decade; nevertheless its solubility is often a challenge to scientists in achieving success. We have henceforth discussed the basic heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancer along with the current management options as well as a brief outlook on pros and cons of paclitaxel, known as the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of the disease. We further analyzed the need of nanotechnology pertaining to the problems encountered with the current paclitaxel formulations available discussing the strategic progress in various nano-formulations till date taking into account the basic research strategies required in terms of solubility, permeability, physicochemical properties, active and passive targeting. A thorough review in recent advances in active targeting for TNBC was carried out whereby the various ligands which are at present finding its way into TNBC research such as hyaluronic acid, folic acid, transferrin, etc. were discussed. These ligands have specific receptor affinity to TNBC tumor cells hence can be beneficial for novel drug targeting approaches. Conversely, there are currently several novel strategies in the research pipeline whose targeting ligands have not yet been studied. Therefore, we reviewed upon the numerous novel receptor targets along with the respective nano-formulation aspects which have not yet been fully researched upon and could be

  2. Targeting the MUC1-C oncoprotein inhibits self-renewal capacity of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alam, Maroof; Rajabi, Hasan; Ahmad, Rehan; Jin, Caining; Kufe, Donald

    2014-05-15

    The capacity of breast cancer cells to form mammospheres in non-adherent serum-free culture is used as a functional characteristic of the self-renewing stem-like cell population. The present studies demonstrate that silencing expression of the MUC1-C oncoprotein inhibits growth of luminal MCF-7 and HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 breast cancer cells as mammospheres. We also show that triple-negative MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells are dependent on MUC1-C for growth as mammospheres and tumor xenografts. Similar results were obtained when MUC1-C function was inhibited by expression of a MUC1-C(CQCAQA) mutant. Moreover, treatment with the MUC1-C inhibitor GO-203, a cell penetrating peptide that binds to the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain and blocks MUC1-C function, confirmed the importance of this target for self-renewal. The mechanistic basis for these findings is supported by the demonstration that MUC1-C activates NF-κB, occupies the IL-8 promoter with NF-κB, and induces IL-8 transcription. MUC1-C also induces NF-κB-dependent expression of the IL-8 receptor, CXCR1. In concert with these results, targeting MUC1-C with GO-203 suppresses IL-8/CXCR1 expression and disrupts the formation of established mammospheres. Our findings indicate that MUC1-C contributes to the self-renewal of breast cancer cells by activating the NF-κBIL-8/CXCR1 pathway and that targeting MUC1-C represents a potential approach for the treatment of this population.

  3. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  4. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  5. Targeting the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Pathway in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Olson, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, was an important milestone in our understanding of the biology of breast cancers. This heralded the discovery of trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting HER2. Trastuzumab is the foundation of treatment of HER2-positive breast cancers, demonstrating dramatic responses in patients with metastatic disease. Unfortunately, most tumors will inevitably develop resistance to trastuzumab, necessitating the need for alternate HER2-directed therapeutic approaches. Recent advances in our understanding of the interaction between HER2 and other members of the epidermal growth factor receptor family have led to identification of newer agents, resulting in the expansion of the clinical armamentarium of available agents for the treatment of HER2-positive tumors. In this article, we review the molecular biology of the ERbb receptor family, the use of HER2-targeted agents in early and advanced breast cancer, and the next-generation anti-HER2 agents that are currently in clinical evaluation. PMID:23299030

  6. MicroRNA-34c Suppresses Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion by Targeting GIT1

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wei-Yang; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Yong-Hui; Su, Yong-Hui; Pang, Da; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal expression of microRNAs plays important role in tumor metastasis. Migration and invasion of cancer cells accord for the metastasis and deterioration of breast cancer. However, the regulatory role of microRNAs in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells has not completely understood yet. Here we found that microRNA-34c (miR-34c) was significantly downregulated in metastatic tissue of breast cancer. In vitro study showed that miR-34c negatively regulated GIT1 protein expression by binding to the 3'UTR of GIT1 mRNA. Consistently, GIT1 protein expression was found upregulated significantly in metastatic breast cancer. Moreover, miR-34c overexpression suppressed the expression of GIT1 protein, and this effect was restored by AMO-miR-34c in breast cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-34c suppressed cell migration and invasion in both MCF-7 and MDA-MD-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of endogenous GIT1 expression reduced the migration and invasion of both two breast cancer cells. Collectively, miR-34c downregulation in breast cancer cells resulted in the upregulation of GIT1, which in turn enhanced the migration and invasion of breast cancer. This study highlights molecular mechanism of migration and invasion of breast cancer cells.

  7. Targeting a cell state common to triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Muellner, Markus K; Mair, Barbara; Ibrahim, Yasir; Kerzendorfer, Claudia; Lechtermann, Hannelore; Trefzer, Claudia; Klepsch, Freya; Müller, André C; Leitner, Ernestine; Macho-Maschler, Sabine; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L; Baselga, José; Rix, Uwe; Kubicek, Stefan; Colinge, Jacques; Serra, Violeta; Nijman, Sebastian MB

    2015-01-01

    Some mutations in cancer cells can be exploited for therapeutic intervention. However, for many cancer subtypes, including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), no frequently recurring aberrations could be identified to make such an approach clinically feasible. Characterized by a highly heterogeneous mutational landscape with few common features, many TNBCs cluster together based on their ‘basal-like’ transcriptional profiles. We therefore hypothesized that targeting TNBC cells on a systems level by exploiting the transcriptional cell state might be a viable strategy to find novel therapies for this highly aggressive disease. We performed a large-scale chemical genetic screen and identified a group of compounds related to the drug PKC412 (midostaurin). PKC412 induced apoptosis in a subset of TNBC cells enriched for the basal-like subtype and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. We employed a multi-omics approach and computational modeling to address the mechanism of action and identified spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) as a novel and unexpected target in TNBC. Quantitative phosphoproteomics revealed that SYK inhibition abrogates signaling to STAT3, explaining the selectivity for basal-like breast cancer cells. This non-oncogene addiction suggests that chemical SYK inhibition may be beneficial for a specific subset of TNBC patients and demonstrates that targeting cell states could be a viable strategy to discover novel treatment strategies. PMID:25699542

  8. Inhibitors of glutamate release from breast cancer cells; new targets for cancer-induced bone-pain.

    PubMed

    Fazzari, Jennifer; Lin, Hanxin; Murphy, Cecilia; Ungard, Robert; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-02-11

    Glutamate is an important signaling molecule in a wide variety of tissues. Aberrant glutamatergic signaling disrupts normal tissue homeostasis and induces several disruptive pathological conditions including pain. Breast cancer cells secrete high levels of glutamate and often metastasize to bone. Exogenous glutamate can disrupt normal bone turnover and may be responsible for cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). CIBP is a significant co-morbidity that affects quality of life for many advanced-stage breast cancer patients. Current treatment options are commonly accompanied by serious side-effects that negatively impact patient care. Identifying small molecule inhibitors of glutamate release from aggressive breast cancer cells advances a novel, mechanistic approach to targeting CIBP that could advance treatment for several pathological conditions. Using high-throughput screening, we investigated the ability of approximately 30,000 compounds from the Canadian Compound Collection to reduce glutamate release from MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This line is known to secrete high levels of glutamate and has been demonstrated to induce CIBP by this mechanism. Positive chemical hits were based on the potency of each molecule relative to a known pharmacological inhibitor of glutamate release, sulfasalazine. Efficacy was confirmed and drug-like molecules were identified as potent inhibitors of glutamate secretion from MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and Mat-Ly-Lu cells.

  9. Coding polypurine hairpins cause target-induced cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Almagro, M Cristina; Mencia, Núria; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J

    2011-04-01

    Polypurine reverse-Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs) are double-stranded DNA molecules formed by two polypurine stretches linked by a pentathymidine loop, with intramolecular reverse-Hoogsteen bonds that allow a hairpin structure. PPRHs bind to polypyrimidine targets by Watson-Crick bonds maintaining simultaneously a hairpin structure due to intramolecular Hoogsteen bonds. Previously, we described the ability of Template-PPRHs to decrease mRNA levels because these PPRHs target the template DNA strand interfering with the transcription process. Now, we designed Coding-PPRHs, a new type of PPRHs that directly target the pre-mRNA. The dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene was selected as a target in breast cancer therapy. These PPRHs caused a high degree of cytotoxicity and a decrease in DHFR mRNA and protein levels, but by a different mechanism of action than Template-PPRHs. Coding-PPRHs interfere with the splicing process by competing with U2 auxiliary factor 65 for binding to the polypyrimidine target sequence, leading to a lower amount of mature mRNA. These new PPRHs showed high specificity as no off-target effects were found. The application of these molecules as therapeutic tools was tested in breast cancer cells resistant to methotrexate, obtaining a noticeable cytotoxicity even though the dhfr locus was amplified. Coding-PPRHs can be considered as new molecules to decrease gene expression at the mRNA level and an alternative to other antisense molecules.

  10. Overview of diagnostic/targeted treatment combinations in personalized medicine for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Anna; Palmieri, Dario; Di Cosimo, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer includes a body of molecularly distinct subgroups, characterized by different presentation, prognosis, and sensitivity to treatments. Significant advances in our understanding of the complex architecture of this pathology have been achieved in the last few decades, thanks to new biotechnologies that have recently come into the research field and the clinical practice, giving oncologists new instruments that are based on biomarkers and allowing them to set up a personalized approach for each individual patient. Here we review the main treatments available or in preclinical development, the biomolecular diagnostic and prognostic approaches that changed our perspective about breast cancer, giving an overview of targeted therapies that represent the current standard of care for these patients. Finally, we report some examples of how new technologies in clinical practice can set in motion the development of new drugs. PMID:24403841

  11. IRAK1 is a therapeutic target that drives breast cancer metastasis and resistance to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Zhen Ning; Yatim, Siti Maryam J. M.; Kohlbauer, Vera K; Feng, Min; Goh, Jian Yuan; Yi, Bao; Lee, Puay Leng; Zhang, Songjing; Wang, Pan Pan; Lim, Elgene; Tam, Wai Leong; Cai, Yu; Ditzel, Henrik J; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Tan, Ern Yu; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumour recurrence due to failed treatments remains a major challenge of breast cancer clinical management. Here we report that interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) is overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers, in particular triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), where it acts to drive aggressive growth, metastasis and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. We show that IRAK1 overexpression confers TNBC growth advantage through NF-κB-related cytokine secretion and metastatic TNBC cells exhibit gain of IRAK1 dependency, resulting in high susceptibility to genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1. Importantly, paclitaxel treatment induces strong IRAK1 phosphorylation, an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression, enrichment of cancer stem cells and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. Pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1 is able to reverse paclitaxel resistance by triggering massive apoptosis at least in part through inhibiting p38-MCL1 pro-survival pathway. Our study thus demonstrates IRAK1 as a promising therapeutic target for TNBC metastasis and paclitaxel resistance. PMID:26503059

  12. Targeting the Psychosexual Challenges Faced by Couples with Breast Cancer: Can Couples Group Psychotherapy Help?

    PubMed Central

    Lagana, Luciana; Fobair, Patricia; Spiegel, David

    2016-01-01

    The need for the psychosexual rehabilitation of breast cancer survivors and their intimate partners is underscored by the high prevalence of multiple psychosexual difficulties encountered by this patient population. Concerns about health, sexuality, and emotional distress are common among women with breast cancer and are often related to the side effects of cancer treatment. Additionally, both intimate relationship problems and partners’ distress are likely to influence patients’ psychosexual health. A clearer understanding of these complex clinical issues is needed in order to implement effective psychosexual rehabilitation interventions. In this article, we extended the use of the manualized and empirically validated Supportive-Expressive Group Therapy (SEGT) model to target the specific psychosexual needs of couples with breast (as well as other types of) cancer. In view of the pertinent literature in this area and based on our clinical experience utilizing this group therapy model with different patient populations, we have discussed how clinicians involved in the psychosexual care of oncology patients could apply such a model within a couples group therapy format. PMID:27239398

  13. Anti-metastatic outcome of isoform-specific prolactin receptor targeting in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Rivera, Lorena; Dill, Riva; Ma, Lisa; Villa, Pedro A; Kawaminami, Mitsumori; Walker, Ameae M

    2015-09-28

    Controversy exists concerning the role of the long prolactin receptor (PRLR) in the progression of breast cancer. By targeting pre-mRNA splicing, we succeeded in knocking down only the long PRLR in vivo, leaving the short forms unaffected. Using two orthotopic and highly-metastatic models of breast cancer, one of which was syngeneic (mouse 4T1) to allow assessment of tumor-immune interactions and one of which was endocrinologically humanized (human BT-474) to activate human PRLRs, we examined the effect of long PRLR knockdown on disease progression. In both models, knockdown dramatically inhibited metastatic spread to the lungs and liver and resulted in increased central death in the primary tumor. In the syngeneic model, immune infiltrates in metastatic sites were changed from innate inflammatory cells to lymphocytes, with an increase in the incidence of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. Long PRLR knockdown in three-dimensional culture induced apoptosis of tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (death of 95% of cells displaying stem cell markers in 15 days). We conclude that the long PRLR plays an important role in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26095602

  14. Breast cancer photothermal therapy based on gold nanorods targeted by covalently-coupled bombesin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Zahra; Salouti, Mojtaba; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2015-05-01

    Photothermal therapy, a minimally invasive treatment method for killing cancers cells, has generated a great deal of interest. In an effort to improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects, better targeting of photoabsorbers to tumors has become a new concept in the battle against cancer. In this study, a bombesin (BBN) analog that can bind to all gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor subtypes was bound covalently with gold nanorods (GNRs) using Nanothinks acid as a link. The BBN analog was also coated with poly(ethylene glycol) to increase its stability and biocompatibility. The interactions were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A methylthiazol tetrazolium assay showed no cytotoxicity of the PEGylated GNR-BBN conjugate. The cell binding and internalization studies showed high specificity and uptake of the GNR-BBN-PEG conjugate toward breast cancer cells of the T47D cell line. The in vitro study revealed destruction of the T47D cells exposed to the new photothermal agent combined with continuous-wave near-infrared laser irradiation. The biodistribution study showed significant accumulation of the conjugate in the tumor tissue of mice with breast cancer. The in vivo photothermal therapy showed the complete disappearance of xenographted breast tumors in the mouse model.

  15. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  16. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  17. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  18. HER-2 and NF-κB as the Targets for Therapy-resistant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kazi M.; Cao, Ning; Li, Jian Jian

    2013-01-01

    HER-2 (also called ErbB2 or Neu) tyrosine kinase, one of the four members of ErbB receptor family (ErbBl, i.e., EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4), plays a critical role in the control of diverse cellular functions involved in differentiation, proliferation, migration and cell survival via multiple signal transduction pathways. Overexpression of HER-2, observed in HER-2-positive breast cancer patients, is believed to cause the tumor resistance to an array of anti-cancer agents and poor prognosis. Although HER-2 antibodies have shown growth inhibitory effects, more efficient molecular targets against HER-2-mediated tumor resistance need to be developed. The molecular mechanisms underlying HER-2-mediated tumor resistance, especially the connections between HER-2 and therapy-resistant signaling networks, need to be further investigated. NF-κB, a key stress transcription factor that can initiate a pro-survival network, was found to be activated in many cancer cells overexpressing HER-2 and to be responsible for the radiation resistance in HER-2 transfected breast cancer cells. Recent findings in literature and data from this laboratory suggest a possible co-operation between HER-2 and NF-κB in signaling tumor resistance to radiotherapy. This review will discuss the mechanisms of HER-2 mediated NF-κB signaling pathway and potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:17201139

  19. Enhanced noscapine delivery using estrogen-receptor-targeted nanoparticles for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Kasetti, Yoganjaneyulu; Bharatam, Prasad V; Aneja, Ritu; Katyal, Anju; Jain, Upendra K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine (Nos), an orally available plant-derived antitussive alkaloid, is in phase II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. It has extensively been shown to inhibit tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of hematopoietic, breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostate origin. However, high tumor-suppressive Nos dosages encumber the development of oral controlled-release formulations because of a short biological half-life (<2 h), poor absorption, low aqueous solubility, and extensive first-pass metabolism. Here, we present the design, fabrication, optimization, characterization, and biological evaluation of estrone-conjugated noscapine-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (Nos-ES-GN) for targeting estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Gelatin nanoparticles (GN) were a uniformly compact size, stable at physiological pH, and showed a drug entrapment efficiency of 66.1±5.9 and 65.2±5.6% for Nos-GN and Nos-ES-GN, respectively. The secondary structure of gelatin nanocoacervates was predicted using circular dichroism and in-silico molecular modeling. Our data suggest that ethanol-fabricated GN retained the α-helical content of gelatin, whereas acetone favored the formation of random coils. The conjugation of estrone to Nos-GN did not affect the release rate of the drug, and both formulations followed first-order release kinetics with an initial burst, followed by a slow release. The IC50 value of Nos-ES-GN was 21.2 μmol/l, which was ∼50% lower than the free drug (43.3 μmol/l), suggesting targeted drug delivery. Our cell uptake study carried out in an estrogen-receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines showed greater accumulation of Nos-ES-GN in MCF-7 cells instead of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data indicated that estrone-conjugated nanoparticles may potentially be used for targeting breast cancer cells.

  20. Targeting of miR9/NOTCH1 interaction reduces metastatic behavior in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Mansouri, Ardalan; Paryan, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Many reports have indicated deregulation of a variety of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancers. In this study, we appraised miR-9 correlation with NOTCH1 involved in Notch signaling in metastatic breast cancer. The Notch signaling pathway has been approved to be associated with the development and progression of many human cancers, including breast cancer, but the precise mechanism has remained unknown. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that introduces miR-9 and NOTCH1 correlation as an effective factor in breast cancer. We found that miR-9 expression was decreased in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared with MCF-10A normal breast cell line. However, NOTCH1 was upregulated in the metastatic breast cancer cells. Furthermore, luciferase assay revealed a significant inverse correlation between miR-9 and NOTCH1. Overexpression of Notch signaling via Notch1 intracellular domain in MDA-MB-231 cell line was suppressed by lentiviruses expressing miR-9. Taken together, the results obtained by MTT, flow cytometry, migration, and wound healing assays showed that it is possible to inhibit metastasis and induce pro-apoptotic state by induction of miR-9 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells but with no effect on cell proliferation. These results shows that miR-9, by direct targeting of NOTCH1, can reveal a suppressor-like activity in metastatic breast cancer cells.

  1. MiR-153 promotes breast cancer cell apoptosis by targeting HECTD3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Lin; Li, Yi; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Homologous to the E6-associated protein carboxyl terminus domain containing 3 (HECTD3) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which ubiquitinates caspase-8, caspase-9 and promotes cancer cell survival. Aberrant HECTD3 expression is frequently involved in various types of cancer progression. However, to date, the regulation of HECTD3 remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that miR-153 functions as a negative regulator of HECTD3 and sensitizes cisplatin-induced apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and BT-549. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 suppresses HECTD3 expression through directly targeting its mRNA within the 3'-Untranslated Region (3'UTR). Additionally, the expression levels of miR-153 and HECTD3 are inversely correlated in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-153 promotes apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells treated with cisplatin or TNF-α, and miR-153 inhibitor treatment inhibits cisplatin induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells. Moreover, stable overexpression of HECTD3 abrogates the sensitization effect of miR-153 to cisplatin treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells, and miR-153 inhibitor protects cells against cisplatin cytotoxicity in control cells, but not in the stable knockdown HECTD3 MDA-MB-231 cells. More importantly, breast cancer patients with higher expression levels of miR-153 had significant higher 5-year survival rate in PROGmiR database (P<0.05). Taken together, our study indicated that miR-153 inhibits TNBC survival by targeting HECTD3 and functions as a potent tumor suppressor. PMID:27508098

  2. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dyelabeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection. In vivo photoacoustic MAP and fluorescence images before and after injection. Micrographs were merged with fluorescence images taken 24 hours post injection with indicated agent (a, e, i). Panels b thru 1. Photoacoustic MAP images were merged with images of blood vessels before injection (b, f, j), and at 5 hours (c, g, k) and 24 hours (d, h, l) post injection. PMID:23125139

  3. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Hsu, Brian E.; Tam, Christine E.; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors. PMID:25823815

  4. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G; Hsu, Brian E; Tam, Christine E; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M

    2015-04-20

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors.

  5. Effective Targeting of Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancers with the Protein Kinase D inhibitor CRT0066101

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sahra; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Radisky, Derek C.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the breast are associated with altered expression of hormone receptors (HR), amplification or overexpression of HER2, or a triple-negative phenotype. The most aggressive cases of IDC are characterized by a high proliferation rate, a great propensity to metastasize and their ability to resist to standard chemotherapy, hormone therapy or HER2 targeted therapy. Using progression tissue microarrays we here demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase Protein Kinase D3 (PKD3) is highly up-regulated in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. We identify direct binding of the estrogen receptor to the PRKD3 gene promoter as a mechanism of inhibition of PKD3 expression. Loss of ER results in upregulation of PKD3 leading to all hallmarks of aggressive IDC, including increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. This identifies ER-negative breast cancers as ideal for treatment with the PKD inhibitor CRT0066101. We show that similar to a knockdown of PKD3, treatment with this inhibitor targets all tumorigenic processes in vitro and decreases growth of primary tumors and metastasis in vivo. Our data strongly support the development of PKD inhibitors for clinical use for ER-negative breast cancers, including the triple-negative phenotype. PMID:25852060

  6. Medical treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis: from bisphosphonates to targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Bulent; Cicin, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer bone metastasis causing severe morbidity is commonly encountered in daily clinical practice. It causes pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord and other nerve compression syndromes and life threatening hypercalcemia. Breast cancer metastasizes to bone through complicated steps in which numerous molecules play roles. Metastatic cells disrupt normal bone turnover and create a vicious cycle to which treatment efforts should be directed. Bisphosphonates have been used safely for more than two decades. As a group they delay time to first skeletal related event and reduce pain, but do not prevent development of bone metastasis in patients with no bone metastasis, and also do not prolong survival. The receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand inhibitor denosumab delays time to first skeletal related event and reduces the skeletal morbidity rate. Radionuclides are another treatment option for bone pain. New targeted therapies and radionuclides are still under investigation. In this review we will focus on mechanisms of bone metastasis and its medical treatment in breast cancer patients.

  7. mir-101-3p is a key regulator of tumor metabolism in triple negative breast cancer targeting AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Tang, Hailin; Li, Shuaijie; Huang, Xiaojia; Song, Cailu; Wei, Weidong; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    mir-101-3p has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and a promising therapeutic target in cancer. Recently, AMPK dysfunction has been highlighted in cancers, including breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the biological roles of mir-101-3p and AMPK in breast cancer. Our research demonstrated that AMPK was up-regulated in breast cancer tissues and cell lines, especially in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). High-expression of AMPK correlated with poor outcome in both total breast cancer and TNBC patients. Ectopic expression of AMPK improved glucose uptake, glycolysis, proliferation of TNBC cells in vitro and its tumorigenicity in vivo. AMPK was predicted to be a direct target of mir-101-3p. The luciferase reporter assay was performed to certificate this prediction. The expression of AMPK was suppressed by transfection of mir-101-3p in TNBC cells. Over-expression of mir-101-3p or knock-down of AMPK inhibited glucose metabolism and proliferation of TNBC cells in vitro. Our study provides evidence that mir-101-3p- AMPK axis could be a promising therapeutic target in TNBC targeting tumor metabolism. PMID:27145268

  8. A review of HER2-targeted therapy in breast and ovarian cancer: lessons from antiquity - CLEOPATRA and PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Hodeib, Melissa; Serna-Gallegos, Tasha; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2015-01-01

    Although breast and ovarian cancer have notable distinctions, there may exist parallel pathways that can be exploited for therapeutic gain. For example, the therapeutic arena in breast cancer has benefited greatly from available endocrine therapies as well as novel drugs designed to target the HER2 receptor, including trastuzumab, lapatinib, T-DM1 and pertuzumab. CLEOPATRA, a Phase III randomized clinical trial studying pertuzumab in women with HER2-amplified metastatic breast cancer, was practice-changing in 2014. Its counterpart, the Phase III randomized PENELOPE trial, was activated following promising Phase II data and studied pertuzumab in an enriched ovarian cancer patient population with low HER3 mRNA. This review will trace the development of anti-HER2 therapies in breast and ovarian cancer.

  9. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  10. Targeting galectin-1 overcomes breast cancer-associated immunosuppression and prevents metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Dalotto-Moreno, Tomás; Croci, Diego O; Cerliani, Juan P; Martinez-Allo, Verónica C; Dergan-Dylon, Sebastián; Méndez-Huergo, Santiago P; Stupirski, Juan C; Mazal, Daniel; Osinaga, Eduardo; Toscano, Marta A; Sundblad, Victoria; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Salatino, Mariana

    2013-02-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal1), an evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding protein, contributes to the creation of an immunosuppressed microenvironment at sites of tumor growth. In spite of considerable progress in elucidating its role in tumor-immune escape, the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory functions of Gal1 remain obscure. Here, we investigated the contribution of tumor Gal1 to tumor growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression in breast cancer. We found that the frequency of Gal1(+) cells in human breast cancer biopsies correlated positively with tumor grade, while specimens from patients with benign hyperplasia showed negative or limited Gal1 staining. To examine the pathophysiologic relevance of Gal1 in breast cancer, we used the metastatic mouse mammary tumor 4T1, which expresses and secretes substantial amounts of Gal1. Silencing Gal1 expression in this model induced a marked reduction in both tumor growth and the number of lung metastases. This effect was abrogated when mice were inoculated with wild-type 4T1 tumor cells in their contralateral flank, suggesting involvement of a systemic modulation of the immune response. Gal1 attenuation in 4T1 cells also reduced the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells within the tumor, draining lymph nodes, spleen, and lung metastases. Further, it abrogated the immunosuppressive function of T(reg) cells and selectively lowered the expression of the T-cell regulatory molecule LAT (linker for activation of T cells) on these cells, disarming their suppressive activity. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept that therapeutic targeting of Gal1 can overcome breast cancer-associated immunosuppression and can prevent metastatic disease. PMID:23204230

  11. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast cancer targeting contrast agent for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgroom, Andrew Carson

    Current clinical use of ultrasound for breast cancer diagnostics is strictly limited to a role as a supplementary detection method to other modalities, such as mammography or MRI. A major reason for ultrasound’s role as a secondary method is its inability to discern between cancerous and non-cancerous bodies of similar density, like dense calcifications or benign fibroadenomas. Its detection capabilities are further diminished by the variable density of the surrounding breast tissue with the progression of age. Preliminary studies suggest that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are a good candidate as an in situ contrast agent for ultrasound. By tagging the silica particle surface with the cancer-targeting antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin), suspect regions of interest can be better identified in real time with standard ultrasound equipment. Once the silica-antibody conjugate is injected into the bloodstream and enters the cancerous growth’s vasculature, the antibody arm will bind to HER2, a cell surface receptor known to be dysfunctional or overexpressed in certain types of breast cancer. As more particles aggregate at the cell surface, backscatter of the ultrasonic waves increases as a result of the higher porous silica concentration. This translates to an increased contrast around the lesion boundary. Tumor detection through ultrasound contrast enhancement provides a tremendous advantage over current cancer diagnostics because is it significantly cheaper and can be monitored in real time. Characterization of MCM-41 type MSNs suggests that these particles have sufficient stability and particle size distribution to penetrate through fenestrated tumor vasculature and accumulate in HER2+ breast cancer cells through the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. A study of acoustic properties showed that particle concentration is linearly correlated to image contrast in clinical frequency-range ultrasound, although less pronounced than typical microbubble

  12. MiR-200c inhibits autophagy and enhances radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells by targeting UBQLN1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quanquan; Liu, Tongxin; Yuan, Yawei; Guo, Zhenli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha; Lin, Xiaoshan; Xu, Zhixin; Liu, Minfeng; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Longhua

    2015-03-01

    Radioresistance is a major challenge during the treatment of breast cancer. A further understanding of the mechanisms of radioresistance could provide strategies to address this challenge. In our study, we compared the expression of miR-200c in four distinct breast cancer cell lines: two representative basal cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and BT549) vs. two representative luminal cancer cells (MCF-7 and BT474). The results revealed practically lower expression of miR-200c in the two basal cancer cell lines and higher expression of miR-200c in luminal cancer cells compared to the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Ectopic expression of miR-200c in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited irradiation-induced autophagy and sensitized the breast cancer cells to irradiation. We also identified UBQLN1 as a direct functional target of miR-200c involved in irradiation-induced autophagy and radioresistance. In 35 human breast cancer tissue samples, we detected an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-200c vs. UBQLN1 and LC3. These results indicate that the identified miR-200c/UBQLN1-mediated autophagy pathway may help to elucidate radioresistance in human breast cancer and might represent a therapeutic strategy.

  13. Transcription factor networks as targets for therapeutic intervention of cancer: the breast cancer paradigm.

    PubMed

    Karamouzis, Michalis V; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2011-01-01

    It has long been shown that many of the presently used anticancer drugs exert their effects partly through modulating the activity of vital transcription factors. The intricacy of transcriptional regulation still represents the main obstacle for the design of transcription factor-directed agents. Systematic mapping of tumor-specific transcriptional networks and application of new molecular tools have reinforced research interest and efforts in this venue. The case of breast cancer is discussed as a representative example.

  14. Genetic Alterations of Triple Negative Breast Cancer By Targeted Next Generation Sequencing And Correlation With Tumor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Paul S; Ng, Charlotte K.Y.; Brogi, Edi; Eisenberg, Rachel E; Won, Helen H.; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; De Filippo, Maria R.; Ioris, Rafael; Akram, Muzaffar; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Berger, Michael F.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Wen, Hannah Y.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer represents a heterogeneous group of breast carcinomas, both at the histologic and genetic level. While recent molecular studies have comprehensively characterized the genetic landscape of these tumors, few have integrated a detailed histologic examination into the analysis. In this study, we defined the genetic alterations in 39 triple negative breast cancers using a high-depth targeted massively parallel sequencing assay and correlated the findings with a detailed morphologic analysis. We obtained representative frozen tissue of primary triple negative breast cancers from patients treated at our institution between 2002 and 2010. We characterized tumors according to their histologic subtype and morphologic features. DNA was extracted from paired frozen primary tumor and normal tissue samples and was subjected to a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform comprising 229 cancer associated genes common across all experiments. The average number of non-synonymous mutations was 3 (range 0–10) per case. The most frequent somatic alterations were mutations in TP53 (74%) and PIK3CA (10%) and MYC amplifications (26%). Triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation less frequently harbored TP53 mutations (25%) and MYC gains (0%), and displayed a high mutation frequency in PIK3CA and other PI3K signaling pathway related genes (75%). Using a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform, we identified the key somatic genetic alterations previously reported in triple negative breast cancers. Furthermore, our findings show that triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation constitute a distinct subset, characterized by a high frequency of PI3K pathway alterations similar to luminal subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:26939876

  15. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an actively targeted conjugated polymer

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Li, Kai; Driessen, Wouter; Dinish, US; Wong, Chi Lok; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Liu, Bin; Olivo, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) are upcoming optical contrast agents in view of their unique optical properties and versatile synthetic chemistry. Biofunctionalization of these polymer-based nanoparticles enables molecular imaging of biological processes. In this work, we propose the concept of using a biofunctionalized CP for noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging of breast cancer. In particular, after verifying the PA activity of a CP nanoparticle (CP dots) in phantoms and the targeting efficacy of a folate-functionalized version of the same (folate-CP dots) in vitro, we systemically administered the probe into a folate receptor-positive (FR+ve) MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft model to demonstrate the possible application of folate-CP dots for imaging FR+ve breast cancers in comparison to CP dots with no folate moieties. We observed a strong PA signal at the tumor site of folate-CP dots-administered mice as early as 1 hour after administration as a result of the active targeting of the folate-CP dots to the FR+ve tumor cells but a weak PA signal at the tumor site of CP-dots-administered mice as a result of the passive accumulation of the probe by enhanced permeability and retention effect. We also observed that folate-CP dots produced ~4-fold enhancement in the PA signal in the tumor, when compared to CP dots. These observations demonstrate the great potential of this active-targeting CP to be used as a contrast agent for molecular PA diagnostic imaging in various biomedical applications. PMID:25609951

  16. Evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing for personalized breast cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increasing number of targeted therapies, together with a deeper understanding of cancer genetics and drug response, have prompted major healthcare centers to implement personalized treatment approaches relying on high-throughput tumor DNA sequencing. However, the optimal way to implement this transformative methodology is not yet clear. Current assays may miss important clinical information such as the mutation allelic fraction, the presence of sub-clones or chromosomal rearrangements, or the distinction between inherited variants and somatic mutations. Here, we present the evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) to generate and interpret the molecular profile of 38 breast cancer patients from two academic medical centers. Methods We sequenced 47 genes in matched germline and tumor DNA samples from 38 breast cancer patients. The selected genes, or the pathways they belong to, can be targeted by drugs or are important in familial cancer risk or drug metabolism. Results Relying on the added value of sequencing matched tumor and germline DNA and using a dedicated analysis, UDT-Seq has a high sensitivity to identify mutations in tumors with low malignant cell content. Applying UDT-Seq to matched tumor and germline specimens from the 38 patients resulted in a proposal for at least one targeted therapy for 22 patients, the identification of tumor sub-clones in 3 patients, the suggestion of potential adverse drug effects in 3 patients and a recommendation for genetic counseling for 2 patients. Conclusion Overall our study highlights the additional benefits of a sequencing strategy, which includes germline DNA and is optimized for heterogeneous tumor tissues. PMID:24326041

  17. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  18. MiR-221 promotes stemness of breast cancer cells by targeting DNMT3b

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Giuseppina; Quintavalle, Cristina; Donnarumma, Elvira; Puoti, Ilaria; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Iaboni, Margherita; Fiore, Danilo; Russo, Valentina; Todaro, Matilde; Romano, Giulia; Thomas, Renato; Cortino, Giuseppina; Gaggianesi, Miriam; Esteller, Manel; Croce, Carlo M.; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small part of the heterogeneous tumor cell population possessing self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential as well as a great ability to sustain tumorigenesis. The molecular pathways underlying CSC phenotype are not yet well characterized. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a powerful role in biological processes. Early studies have linked miRs to the control of self-renewal and differentiation in normal and cancer stem cells. We aimed to study the functional role of miRs in human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), also named mammospheres. We found that miR-221 was upregulated in BCSCs compared to their differentiated counterpart. Similarly, mammospheres from T47D cells had an increased level of miR-221 compared to differentiated cells. Transfection of miR-221 in T47D cells increased the number of mammospheres and the expression of stem cell markers. Among miR-221's targets, we identified DNMT3b. Furthermore, in BCSCs we found that DNMT3b repressed the expression of various stemness genes, such as Nanog and Oct 3/4, acting on the methylation of their promoters, partially reverting the effect of miR-221 on stemness. We hypothesize that miR-221 contributes to breast cancer tumorigenicity by regulating stemness, at least in part through the control of DNMT3b expression. PMID:26556862

  19. A review of systematic reviews of the cost-effectiveness of hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaby, Vakaramoko; Tawk, Rima; Sanogo, Vassiki; Xiao, Hong; Montero, Alberto J

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is a global health concern. In fact, breast cancer is the primary cause of death among women worldwide and constitutes the most expensive malignancy to treat. As health care resources are finite, decisions regarding the adoption and coverage of breast cancer treatments are increasingly being based on "value for money," i.e., cost-effectiveness. As the evidence about the cost-effectiveness of breast cancer treatments is abundant, therefore difficult to navigate, systematic reviews of published systematic reviews offer the advantage of bringing together the results of separate systematic reviews in a single report. As a consequence, this paper presents an overview of systematic reviews of the cost-effectiveness of hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy for breast cancer to inform policy and reimbursement decision-making. A systematic review was conducted of published systematic reviews documenting cost-effectiveness analyses of breast cancer treatments from 2000 to 2014. Systematic reviews identified through a literature search of health and economic databases were independently assessed against inclusion and exclusion criteria. Systematic reviews of original evaluations were included only if they targeted breast cancer patients and specific breast cancer treatments (hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy only), documented incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and were reported in the English language. The search strategy used a combination of these key words: "breast cancer," "systematic review/meta-analysis," and "cost-effectiveness/economics." Data were extracted using predefined extraction forms and qualitatively appraised using the assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR) tool. The literature search resulted in 511 bibliographic records, of which ten met our inclusion criteria. Five reviews were conducted in the early-stage breast cancer setting and five reviews in the metastatic setting. In early-stage breast

  20. Targeting the chromatin remodeling enzyme BRG1 increases the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Sharma, Soni; Cui, Hang; LeBlanc, Scott E.; Zhang, Hong; Muthuswami, Rohini; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Brahma related gene product 1 (BRG1) is an ATPase that drives the catalytic activity of a subset of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes. BRG1 is overexpressed in most human breast cancer tumors without evidence of mutation and is required for breast cancer cell proliferation. We demonstrate that knockdown of BRG1 sensitized triple negative breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat breast cancer. An inhibitor of the BRG1 bromodomain had no effect on breast cancer cell viability, but an inhibitory molecule that targets the BRG1 ATPase activity recapitulated the increased drug efficacy observed in the presence of BRG1 knockdown. We further demonstrate that inhibition of BRG1 ATPase activity blocks the induction of ABC transporter genes by these chemotherapeutic drugs and that BRG1 binds to ABC transporter gene promoters. This inhibition increased intracellular concentrations of the drugs, providing a likely mechanism for the increased chemosensitivity. Since ABC transporters and their induction by chemotherapy drugs are a major cause of chemoresistance and treatment failure, these results support the idea that targeting the enzymatic activity of BRG1 would be an effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. PMID:27029062

  1. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  2. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  3. Dietary targeting of tumor suppressors and oncogenes for breast cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer is a complex disease that arises from genetic and epigenetic changes in molecules that are critical for growth control, DNA repair, apoptosis, and differentiation. The incidence of breast cancer varies worldwide, implicating diet and lifestyle disparities among the general population a...

  4. Role of HER2 mutations in refractory metastatic breast cancers: targeted sequencing results in patients with refractory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Choi, Yoon-La; Ahn, TaeJin; Park, Kyunghee; Lee, Aeri; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Woong-Yang; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2015-01-01

    In women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), introduction of the anti-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) directed therapies including trastuzumab, pertuzumab, lapatinib, and/or trastuzumab-DM1 has markedly improved overall survival. However, not all cases of HER2-positive breast tumours derive similar benefit from HER2-directed therapy, and a significant number of patients experience disease progression because of primary or acquired resistance to anti-HER2-directed therapies. We integrated genomic and clinicopathological analyses in a cohort of patients with refractory breast cancer to anti-HER2 therapies to identify the molecular basis for clinical heterogeneity. To study the molecular basis underlying refractory MBC, we obtained 36 MBC tumours tissues and used next-generation sequencing to investigate the mutational and transcriptional profiles of 83 genes. We focused on HER2 mutational sites and HER2 pathways to identify the roles of HER2 mutations and the HER2 pathway in the refractoriness to anti-HER2 therapies. Analysis using massively parallel sequencing platform, CancerSCAN™, revealed that HER2 mutations were found in six of 36 patients (16.7%). One patient was ER (estrogen receptor)-positive and HER2-negative and the other five HER2 mutated patients were HER2-positive and HR (hormone receptor)-negative. Most importantly, four of these five patients did not show any durable clinical response to HER2-directed therapies. The HER2 pathway score obtained through transcriptional analyses identified that Growth Receptor Biding protein 2 (GRB2) was the most significantly down regulated gene in the HER2 mutated samples. Detection of HER2 mutations using higher deep DNA sequencing may identify a predictive biomarker of resistance to HER2-directed therapy. Functional validation is warranted. PMID:26397225

  5. MicroRNA-155 Regulates Cell Survival, Growth, and Chemosensitivity by Targeting FOXO3a in Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Kong, William; He, Lili; Coppola, Marc; Guo, Jianping; Esposito, Nicole N.; Coppola, Domenico; Cheng, Jin Q.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Despite improvement in treatment over the past few decades, there is an urgent need for development of targeted therapies. miR-155 (microRNA-155) is frequently up-regulated in breast cancer. In this study, we demonstrate the critical role of miR-155 in regulation of cell survival and chemosensitivity through down-regulation of FOXO3a in breast cancer. Ectopic expression of miR-155 induces cell survival and chemoresistance to multiple agents, whereas knockdown of miR-155 renders cells to apoptosis and enhances chemosensitivity. Further, we identified FOXO3a as a direct target of miR-155. Sustained overexpression of miR-155 resulted in repression of FOXO3a protein without changing mRNA levels, and knockdown of miR-155 increases FOXO3a. Introduction of FOXO3a cDNA lacking the 3′-untranslated region abrogates miR-155-induced cell survival and chemoresistance. Finally, inverse correlation between miR-155 and FOXO3a levels were observed in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and tumors. In conclusion, our study reveals a molecular link between miR-155 and FOXO3a and presents evidence that miR-155 is a critical therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:20371610

  6. Molecular phenotypes in triple negative breast cancer from African American patients suggest targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Sullivan, Catherine; Offor, Onyinye; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Halligan, Kyle; Fischbach, Neal; Shah, Mansi; Bossuyt, Veerle; Schulz, Vincent; Tuck, David P; Harris, Lyndsay N

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by high proliferation, poor differentiation and a poor prognosis due to high rates of recurrence. Despite lower overall incidence African American (AA) patients suffer from higher breast cancer mortality in part due to the higher proportion of TNBC cases among AA patients compared to European Americans (EA). It was recently shown that the clinical heterogeneity of TNBC is reflected by distinct transcriptional programs with distinct drug response profiles in preclinical models. In this study, gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry were used to elucidate potential differences between TNBC tumors of EA and AA patients on a molecular level. In a retrospective cohort of 136 TNBC patients, a major transcriptional signature of proliferation was found to be significantly upregulated in samples of AA ethnicity. Furthermore, transcriptional profiles of AA tumors showed differential activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and a signature of BRCA1 deficiency in this cohort. Using signatures derived from the meta-analysis of TNBC gene expression carried out by Lehmann et al., tumors from AA patients were more likely of basal-like subtypes whereas transcriptional features of many EA samples corresponded to mesenchymal-like or luminal androgen receptor driven subtypes. These results were validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas mRNA and protein expression data, again showing enrichment of a basal-like phenotype in AA tumors and mesenchymal subtypes in EA tumors. In addition, increased expression of VEGF-activated genes together with elevated microvessel area determined by the AQUA method suggest that AA patients exhibit higher tumor vascularization. This study confirms the existence of distinct transcriptional programs in triple negative breast cancer in two separate cohorts and that these programs differ by racial group. Differences in TNBC subtypes and levels of tumor angiogenesis in AA versus EA patients

  7. Targeting Innate Immunity with dsRNA-Conjugated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Promotes Antitumor Effects on Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ultimo, Amelia; Giménez, Cristina; Bartovsky, Pavel; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Marcos, M Dolores; Amorós, Pedro; Bernardo, Ana R; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Jiménez-Lara, Ana M; Murguía, José R

    2016-01-26

    We describe herein a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) targeting delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles capped with the synthetic double stranded RNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) for controlled cargo delivery in SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells. Our results show that poly(I:C)-conjugated nanoparticles efficiently targeted breast cancer cells due to dsRNA-TLR3 interaction. Such interaction also triggered apoptotic pathways in SK-BR-3, significantly decreasing cells viability. Poly(I:C) cytotoxic effect in breast carcinoma cells was enhanced by loading nanoparticles' mesopores with the anthracyclinic antibiotic doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26641630

  8. A combination of trastuzumab and BAG-1 inhibition synergistically targets HER2 positive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Robson, Natalia; Yeomans, Alison; Bailey, Sarah; Laversin, Stephanie; Beers, Stephen; Sayan, A. Emre; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Schwaiger, Stefan; Stuppner, Hermann; Troppmair, Jakob; Packham, Graham; Cutress, Ramsey

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of HER2+ breast cancer with trastuzumab is effective and combination anti-HER2 therapies have demonstrated benefit over monotherapy in the neoadjuvant and metastatic settings. This study investigated the therapeutic potential of targeting the BAG-1 protein co-chaperone in trastuzumab-responsive or -resistant cells. In the METABRIC dataset, BAG-1 mRNA was significantly elevated in HER2+ breast tumors and predicted overall survival in a multivariate analysis (HR = 0.81; p = 0.022). In a breast cell line panel, BAG-1 protein was increased in HER2+ cells and was required for optimal growth as shown by siRNA knockdown. Overexpression of BAG-1S in HER2+ SKBR3 cells blocked growth inhibition by trastuzumab, whereas overexpression of a mutant BAG-1S protein (BAG-1S H3AB), defective in binding HSC70, potentiated the effect of trastuzumab. Injection of a Tet-On SKBR3 clone, induced to overexpress myc-BAG-1S into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice, resulted in 2-fold larger tumors compared to uninduced controls. Induction of myc-BAG-1S expression in two Tet-On SKBR3 clones attenuated growth inhibition by trastuzumab in vitro. Targeting endogenous BAG-1 by siRNA enhanced growth inhibition of SKBR3 and BT474 cells by trastuzumab, while BAG-1 protein-protein interaction inhibitor (Thio-S or Thio-2) plus trastuzumab combination treatment synergistically attenuated growth. In BT474 cells this reduced protein synthesis, caused G1/S cell cycle arrest and targeted the ERK and AKT signaling pathways. In a SKBR3 subpopulation with acquired resistance to trastuzumab BAG-1 targeting remained effective and either Thio-2 or BAG-1 siRNA reduced growth more compared to trastuzumab-responsive parental cells. In summary, targeting BAG-1 function in combination with anti-HER2 therapy might prove beneficial. PMID:26958811

  9. CD44-Tropic Polymeric Nanocarrier for Breast Cancer Targeted Rapamycin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunqi; Zhang, Ti; Duan, Shaofeng; Davies, Neal M.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the conventional targeting of nanoparticles to cancer cells with antibody or peptide conjugates, a hyaluronic acid (HA) matrix nanoparticle with intrinsic-CD44-tropism was developed to deliver rapamycin for localized CD44-positive breast cancer treatment. Rapamycin was chemically conjugated to the particle surface via a novel sustained-release linker, 3-amino-4-methoxy-benzoic acid. The release of the drug from the HA nanoparticle was improved by 42-fold compared to HA-temsirolimus in buffered saline. In CD44 positive MDA-MB-468 cells, using HA as drug delivery carrier, the cell-viability was significantly decreased compared to free rapamycin and CD44-blocked controls. Rat pharmacokinetics showed that the area-under-the-curve of HA nanoparticle formulation was 2.96-fold greater than that of the free drug, and the concomitant total body clearance was 8.82-fold slower. Moreover, in immunocompetent BALB/c mice bearing CD44-positive 4T1.2neu breast cancer, the rapamycin1loaded HA particles significantly improved animal survival, suppressed tumor growth and reduced the prevalence of lung metastasis. PMID:24637218

  10. Targeting radioresistant breast cancer cells by single agent CHK1 inhibitor via enhancing replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhanwen; Gao, Jinnan; Yang, Shuming; Gorityala, Shashank; Xiong, Xiahui; Deng, Ou; Ma, Zhefu; Yan, Chunhong; Susana, Gonzalo; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junran

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains a standard therapeutic modality for breast cancer patients. However, intrinsic or acquired resistance limits the efficacy of RT. Here, we demonstrate that CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 alone significantly inhibited the growth of radioresistant breast cancer cells (RBCC). Given the critical role of ATR/CHK1 signaling in suppressing oncogene-induced replication stress (RS), we hypothesize that CHK1 inhibition leads to the specific killing for RBCC due to its abrogation in the suppression of RS induced by oncogenes. In agreement, the expression of oncogenes c-Myc/CDC25A/c-Src/H-ras/E2F1 and DNA damage response (DDR) proteins ATR/CHK1/BRCA1/CtIP were elevated in RBCC. AZD7762 exposure led to significantly higher levels of RS in RBCC, compared to the parental cells. The mechanisms by which CHK1 inhibition led to specific increase of RS in RBCC were related to the interruptions in the replication fork dynamics and the homologous recombination (HR). In summary, RBCC activate oncogenic pathways and thus depend upon mechanisms controlled by CHK1 signaling to maintain RS under control for survival. Our study provided the first example where upregulating RS by CHK1 inhibitor contributes to the specific killing of RBCC, and highlight the importance of the CHK1 as a potential target for treatment of radioresistant cancer cells. PMID:27167194

  11. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M.; Kant, Rajeev J.; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular

  12. Targeted therapy against Bcl-2-related proteins in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Emi, Manabu; Kim, Ryungsa; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Uchida, Yoko; Toge, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL confer resistance to apoptosis, thereby reducing the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We examined the relationship between the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells, with the aim of developing specific targeted therapy. Methods Four human breast cancer cell lines were examined, and the effects of antisense (AS) Bcl-2 and AS Bcl-xL phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on chemosensitivity were tested in vitro and in vivo. Chemosensitivity was evaluated by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, and the antitumor effect was assessed in vivo by the success of xenograft transplantation into athymic mice. Results Treatment with AS Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL ODNs resulted in a sequence-specific decrease in protein expression, compared with controls. Treatment of BT-474, ZR-75-1, and MDA-MB-231 cells with AS Bcl-2 increased chemosensitivity to doxorubicin (DOX), mitomycin C (MMC), paclitaxel (TXL), and docetaxel (TXT). Transfection of the Bcl-2 gene into MDA-MB-453 cells decreased sensitivity to DOX and MMC. Treatment of MDA-MB-231, BT-474, and ZR-75-1 cells with AS Bcl-xL increased chemosensitivity to DOX, MMC and taxanes to a smaller extent than AS Bcl-2. This occurred in the setting of increased Bax and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, as well as decreased Bcl-2 and pAkt. AS Bcl-2 ODNs induced splenomegaly in association with increased serum IL-12, which was attenuated by methylation of the CpG motifs of AS Bcl-2; however, methylated CpG failed to negate the increased antitumor effect of AS Bcl-2. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, to a smaller extent, are major determinants of chemosensitivity in breast cancer cells. Conclusion Targeted therapy against Bcl-2 protein with the use of AS ODNs might enhance the effects of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. PMID:16280040

  13. Overexpression of miR-206 suppresses glycolysis, proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells via PFKFB3 targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Xin; Lyu, Pengwei; Cao, Zhang; Li, Jingruo; Guo, Guangcheng; Xia, Wanjun; Gu, Yuanting

    2015-08-07

    miRNAs, sorting as non-coding RNAs, are differentially expressed in breast tumor and act as tumor promoters or suppressors. miR-206 could suppress the progression of breast cancer, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The study here was aimed to investigate the effect of miR-206 on human breast cancers. We found that miR-206 was down-regulated while one of its predicted targets, 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3) was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. 17β-estradiol dose-dependently decreased miR-206 expression as well as enhanced PFKFB3 mRNA and protein expression in estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we identified that miR-206 directly interacted with 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of PFKFB3 mRNA. miR-206 modulated PFKFB3 expression in MCF-7, T47D and SUM159 cells, which was influenced by 17β-estradiol depending on ERα expression. In addition, miR-206 overexpression impeded fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) production, diminished lactate generation and reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-206 regulated PFKFB3 expression in breast cancer cells, thereby stunting glycolysis, cell proliferation and migration. - Highlights: • miR-206 was down-regulated and PFKFB3 was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. • 17β-estradiol regulated miR-206 and PFKFB3 expression in ERα+ cancer cells. • miR-206directly interacted with 3′-UTR of PFKFB3 mRNA. • miR-206 fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) impeded production and lactate generation. • miR-206 reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells.

  14. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27231203

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling in breast and prostate cancers: emergence as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Kach, Jacob; Conzen, Suzanne D; Szmulewitz, Russell Z

    2016-01-01

    Steroid receptors for androgens and estrogens have essential roles in prostate and breast cancers. Recently, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity has also been proposed as having an important role in these cancers. Underscoring the cooperative nature of nuclear receptor activity, data now suggest that GR function in prostate and breast cancers is dependent on the tumor’s concomitant androgen or estrogen receptor activity. PMID:26378243

  16. miR-145 suppresses breast cancer cell migration by targeting FSCN-1 and inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Kang, Xing; Xia, Xuefeng; Wo, Like; Gu, Xidong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Xiaohong; Chang, Helena; Lou, Lihua; Shen, Xuning

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes such as cell growth, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. In our present study, we investigated the inhibitory role of miR-145 on breast cancer cell migration as well as its underlying mechanism. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay showed that ectopic expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited breast cancer cell migration. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that FSCN-1 was a putative target of miR-145. The expression of FSCN-1 varied among four different breast cancer cells, and inversely correlated with miR-145 levels. Moreover, miR-145 mimic transfection enhanced the expression of FSCN-1 in Bcap-37 and HCC-1937 cells. We also found that siRNA- mediated down-regulation of FSCN-1 inhibited cell motility in breast cancer cells. In addition, we found that up-regulation of miR-145 blocked EMT and decreased the expression of MMP-2/9 in breast cancer cells. These results reveal a new link between miR-145, FSCN-1 and EMT in the regulation of breast cancer migration. PMID:27508031

  17. miR-145 suppresses breast cancer cell migration by targeting FSCN-1 and inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Kang, Xing; Xia, Xuefeng; Wo, Like; Gu, Xidong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Xiaohong; Chang, Helena; Lou, Lihua; Shen, Xuning

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes such as cell growth, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. In our present study, we investigated the inhibitory role of miR-145 on breast cancer cell migration as well as its underlying mechanism. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay showed that ectopic expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited breast cancer cell migration. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that FSCN-1 was a putative target of miR-145. The expression of FSCN-1 varied among four different breast cancer cells, and inversely correlated with miR-145 levels. Moreover, miR-145 mimic transfection enhanced the expression of FSCN-1 in Bcap-37 and HCC-1937 cells. We also found that siRNA- mediated down-regulation of FSCN-1 inhibited cell motility in breast cancer cells. In addition, we found that up-regulation of miR-145 blocked EMT and decreased the expression of MMP-2/9 in breast cancer cells. These results reveal a new link between miR-145, FSCN-1 and EMT in the regulation of breast cancer migration. PMID:27508031

  18. MiR-132 prohibits proliferation, invasion, migration, and metastasis in breast cancer by targeting HN1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhan-Guo Chen, Wei-Xun Wu, Yan-Hui Liang, Hui-Fang Zhang, Bi-Xiang

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • MiR-132 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. • MiR-132 directly regulates HN1 by binding its 3′ UTR. • MiR-132 shows regulatory role in proliferation, invasion, migration and metastasis. • HN1 is involved in miR-132-mediated cell behavior. • Aberrant HN1 is associated with worse overall survival of breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play critical roles in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. This study aims to investigate the role and the underlying mechanism of miR-132 in breast cancer. Here, we report that miR-132 is significantly down-regulated in breast cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Additional study identifies HN1 as a novel direct target of miR-132. MiR-132 down-regulates HN1 expression by binding to the 3′ UTR of HN1 transcript, thereby, suppressing multiple oncogenic traits such as cancer cell proliferation, invasion, migration and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of HN1 restores miR-132-suppressed malignancy. Importantly, higher HN1 expression is significantly associated with worse overall survival of breast cancer patients. Taken together, our data demonstrate a critical role of miR-132 in prohibiting cell proliferation, invasion, migration and metastasis in breast cancer through direct suppression of HN1, supporting the potential utility of miR-132 as a novel therapeutic strategy against breast cancer.

  19. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  20. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  1. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Nicola H.; Broome, Laura R.; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L.; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements (“bait fragments”) within the captured regions and “targets” that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant. PMID:25122612

  2. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  3. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-09-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents. PMID:27574003

  4. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B.; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents. PMID:27574003

  5. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  6. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  7. Synthesis of folate- pegylated polyester nanoparticles encapsulating ixabepilone for targeting folate receptor overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Siafaka, P; Betsiou, M; Tsolou, A; Angelou, E; Agianian, B; Koffa, M; Chaitidou, S; Karavas, E; Avgoustakis, K; Bikiaris, D

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of novel polyester nanoparticles based on folic acid (FA)-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(propylene succinate) (PEG-PPSu) copolymer and loaded with the new anticancer drug ixabepilone (IXA). These nanoparticles may serve as a more selective (targeted) treatment of breast cancer tumors overexpressing the folate receptor. The synthesized materials were characterized by (1)H-NMR, FTIR, XRD and DSC. The nanoparticles were prepared by a double emulsification and solvent evaporation method and characterized with regard to their morphology by scanning electron microscopy, drug loading with HPLC-UV and size by dynamic light scattering. An average size of 195 nm and satisfactory drug loading efficiency (3.5%) were observed. XRD data indicated that IXA was incorporated into nanoparticles in amorphous form. The nanoparticles exhibited sustained drug release properties in vitro. Based on in vitro cytotoxicity studies, the blank FA-PEG-PPSu nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic to the cells. Fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by conjugating Rhodanine B to PEG-PPSu, and live cell, fluorescence, confocal microscopy was applied in order to demonstrate the ability of FA-PEG-PPSu nanoparticles to enter into human breast cancer cells expressing the folate receptor.

  8. CXorf61 is a target for T cell based immunotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paret, Claudia; Simon, Petra; Vormbrock, Kirsten; Bender, Christian; Kölsch, Anne; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Yildiz, Özlem; Omokoko, Tana; Hubich-Rau, Stefanie; Hartmann, Christoph; Häcker, Sabine; Wagner, Meike; Roldan, Diana Barea; Selmi, Abderaouf

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a high medical need disease with limited treatment options. CD8+ T cell-mediated immunotherapy may represent an attractive approach to address TNBC. The objectives of this study were to assess the expression of CXorf61 in TNBCs and healthy tissues and to evaluate its capability to induce T cell responses. We show by transcriptional profiling of a broad comprehensive set of normal human tissue that CXorf61 expression is strictly restricted to testis. 53% of TNBC patients express this antigen in at least 30% of their tumor cells. In CXorf61-negative breast cancer cell lines CXorf61 expression is activated by treatment with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. By vaccination of HLA-A*02-transgenic mice with CXorf61 encoding RNA we obtained high frequencies of CXorf61-specific T cells. Cloning and characterization of T cell receptors (TCRs) from responding T cells resulted in the identification of the two HLA-A*0201-restricted T cell epitopes CXorf6166–74 and CXorf6179–87. Furthermore, by in vitro priming of human CD8+ T cells derived from a healthy donor recognizing CXorf6166–74 we were able to induce a strong antigen-specific immune response and clone a human TCR recognizing this epitope. In summary, our data confirms this antigen as promising target for T cell based therapies. PMID:26327325

  9. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís F. F.; Krais, John J.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg-1 and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer.

  10. Targeted delivery of CXCR4-siRNA by scFv for HER2(+) breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuo; Li, Jia; Yin, Jipeng; Ma, Qiong; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Lifeng; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Yang, Angang; Qiu, Xiuchun; Ma, Baoan

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutics based on short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have great potential to treat human diseases. However, the clinical application of siRNAs has been limited by their poor intracellular uptake, low serum stability, and inability to target specific cells. In this study, we addressed this lack of specificity by synthesizing a molecularly targeted CXCR4-siRNA (CXCR4si) for the treatment of HER2(+) breast cancers using a HER2-scFv-arginine nonamer peptide fusion protein (e23sFv-9R) as an siRNA carrier. The e23sFv-9R binding siRNA is able to specifically deliver the siRNA to HER2(+) breast cancer cells and concentrate and persist in orthotopic HER2(+) breast cancer xenografts for at least 36 h. CXCR4si delivered by e23sFv-9R inhibited CXCR4 gene expression, reduced proliferation and metastasis and induced apoptosis in the HER2(+) breast cancer BT-474 cell line in vitro. Moreover, the systemic delivery of CXCR4si by e23sFv-9R is able to suppress tumor growth, reduce metastasis and prolong survival in mice bearing HER2(+) xenografts. This approach causes no systemic toxicity and does not activate the innate immune response, suggesting that a fusion protein carrying CXCR4si shows promise in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:25956853

  11. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  12. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram YouTube 2,600 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Learn about risk factors, treatment options ... help hundreds of thousands of people affected by breast cancer. Donate Today Breast Cancer inFocus: Breast Cancer During ...

  13. Targeting of Primary Breast Cancers and Metastases in a Transgenic Mouse Model Using Rationally Designed Multifunctional SPIONs

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Stephen, Zachary R.; Veiseh, Omid; Arami, Hamed; Wang, Tingzhong; Lai, Vy P.; Park, James O.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Disis, Mary L.; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer remains one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies in women. The inability to diagnose small volume metastases early has limited effective treatment of stage 4 breast cancer. Here we report the rational development and use of a multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) for targeting metastatic breast cancer in a transgenic mouse model and imaging with magnetic resonance (MR). SPIONs coated with a copolymer of chitosan and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were labeled with a fluorescent dye for optical detection and conjugated with a monoclonal antibody against the neu receptor (NP-neu). SPIONs labeled with mouse IgG were used as a non-targeting control (NP-IgG). These SPIONs had desirable physiochemical properties for in vivo applications such as near neutral zeta potential and hydrodynamic size around 40 nm, and were highly stable in serum containing medium. Only NP-neu showed high uptake in neu expressing mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) cells which was reversed by competing free neu antibody, indicating their specificity to the neu antigen. In vivo, NP-neu was able to tag primary breast tumors and significantly, only NP-neu bound to spontaneous liver, lung, and bone marrow metastases in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, highlighting the necessity of targeting for delivery to metastatic disease. The SPIONs provided significant contrast enhancement in MR images of primary breast tumors; thus, they have the potential for MRI detection of micrometastases, and provide an excellent platform for further development of an efficient metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:22324543

  14. A Quantitative Study on the Photothermal Effect of Immuno Gold Nanocages Targeted to Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Au, Leslie; Zheng, Desheng; Zhou, Fei; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Xingde; Xia, Younan

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanocages with an average edge length of 65 ± 7 nm and a strong absorption peak at 800 nm were conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HER2) to target breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) through the epidermal growth factor receptor (in this case, HER2), which is overexpressed on the surfaces of the cells. Both the number of immuno Au nanocages immobilized per cell and the photothermal therapeutic effect were quantified using flow cytometry. The targeted cells were irradiated with a pulsed near-infrared laser, and by varying the power density, the duration of laser exposure, and the time of response after irradiation, we were able to optimize the treatment conditions to achieve effective destruction of the cancer cells. We found that cells targeted with the immuno Au nanocages responded immediately to laser irradiation and that the cellular damage was irreversible at power densities greater than 1.6 W/cm2. The percentage of dead cells increased with increasing exposure time up to 5 min and then became steady. By quantifying the photothermal effect of immuno Au nanocages, critical information with regards to both the optimal dosage of nanocages and parameters of the laser irradiation has been garnered and will be applied to future in vivo studies. PMID:19206368

  15. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  16. Prostaglandin E receptor EP4 is a therapeutic target in breast cancer cells with stem-like properties.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Namita; Ma, Xinrong; Kochel, Tyler; Goloubeva, Olga; Staats, Paul; Thompson, Keyata; Martin, Stuart; Reader, Jocelyn; Take, Yukinori; Collin, Peter; Fulton, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooxygenase pathway is strongly implicated in breast cancer progression but the role of this pathway in the biology of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells has not been defined. Recent attention has focused on targeting the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway downstream of the COX-2 enzyme by blocking the activities of individual prostaglandin E (EP) receptors. Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) is widely expressed in primary invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast and antagonizing this receptor with small molecule inhibitors or shRNA directed to EP4 inhibits metastatic potential in both syngeneic and xenograft models. Breast cancer stem/progenitor cells are defined as a subpopulation of cells that drive tumor growth, metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse. Mammosphere-forming breast cancer cells of human (MDA-MB-231, SKBR3) or murine (66.1, 410.4) origin of basal-type, Her-2 phenotype and/or with heightened metastatic capacity upregulate expression of both EP4 and COX-2 and are more tumorigenic compared to the bulk population. In contrast, luminal-type or non-metastatic counterparts (MCF7, 410, 67) do not increase COX-2 and EP4 expression in mammosphere culture. Treatment of mammosphere-forming cells with EP4 inhibitors (RQ-15986, AH23848, Frondoside A) or EP4 gene silencing, but not with a COX inhibitor (Indomethacin) reduces both mammosphere-forming capacity and the expression of phenotypic markers (CD44(hi)/CD24(low), aldehyde dehydrogenase) of breast cancer stem cells. Finally, an orally delivered EP4 antagonist (RQ-08) reduces the tumor-initiating capacity and markedly inhibits both the size of tumors arising from transplantation of mammosphere-forming cells and phenotypic markers of stem cells in vivo. These studies support the continued investigation of EP4 as a potential therapeutic target and provide new insight regarding the role of EP4 in supporting a breast cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating phenotype.

  17. Metaplastic breast cancer: clinical overview and molecular aberrations for potential targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Abouharb, Sausan; Moulder, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Metaplastic breast cancer is a rare subtype of invasive mammary carcinoma, with an aggressive behavior and usually poor outcome. Responses to systemic chemotherapy are suboptimal compared to patients with standard invasive ductal carcinoma. Limited data are available in regards to best treatment modalities, including chemotherapy. This review gives an overview of metaplastic breast cancer and its clinical and pathologic characteristics, in addition to treatment strategies, clinical trials, and future directions.

  18. The tumor proteasome as a novel target for gold(III) complexes: implications for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Dou, Q. Ping

    2009-01-01

    Although cisplatin plays a vital role in the treatment of several types of human cancer, its wide use is limited by the development of drug resistance and associated toxic side effects. Gold and gold complexes have been used to treat a wide range of ailments for many centuries. In recent years, the use of gold(III) complexes as an alternative to cisplatin treatment was proposed due to the similarities of gold and platinum. Gold(III) is isoelectronic with platinum(II) and gold(III) complexes have the same square-planar geometries as platinum(II) complexes, such as cisplatin. Although it was originally thought that gold(III) complexes might have the same molecular target as cisplatin, several lines of data indicated that proteins, rather than DNA, are targeted by gold complexes. We have recently evaluated cytotoxic and anti-cancer effects of several gold(III) dithiocarbamates against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We have identified the tumor proteasome as an important target for gold(III) complexes and have shown that proteasome inhibition by gold(III) complexes is associated with apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, treatment of human breast tumor-bearing nude mice with a gold(III) dithiocarbamate complex was associated with tumor growth inhibition, supporting the significance of its potential development for breast cancer treatment. PMID:20047011

  19. Micro RNA 100 sensitizes luminal A breast cancer cells to paclitaxel treatment in part by targeting mTOR

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Fu, Xing; Fu, Liya; Zhu, Zhengmao; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Luminal A breast cancer usually responds to hormonal therapies but does not benefit from chemotherapies, including microtubule-targeted paclitaxel. MicroRNAs could play a role in mediating this differential response. In this study, we examined the role of micro RNA 100 (miR-100) in the sensitivity of breast cancer to paclitaxel treatment. We found that while miR-100 was downregulated in both human breast cancer primary tumors and cell lines, the degree of downregulation was greater in the luminal A subtype than in other subtypes. The IC50 of paclitaxel was much higher in luminal A than in basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Ectopic miR-100 expression in the MCF-7 luminal A cell line enhanced the effect of paclitaxel on cell cycle arrest, multinucleation, and apoptosis, while knockdown of miR-100 in the MDA-MB-231 basal-like line compromised these effects. Similarly, overexpression of miR-100 enhanced the effects of paclitaxel on tumorigenesis in MCF-7 cells. Rapamycin-mediated inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a target of miR-100, also sensitized MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that genes that are part of the known paclitaxel-sensitive signature had a significant expression correlation with miR-100 in breast cancer samples. In addition, patients with lower levels of miR-100 expression had worse overall survival. These results suggest that miR-100 plays a causal role in determining the sensitivity of breast cancers to paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26744318

  20. MicroRNA-204 targets JAK2 in breast cancer and induces cell apoptosis through the STAT3/BCl-2/survivin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xilong; Qiu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Shujian; Gao, Qiang; Yang, Zhenlin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators that potentially play critical roles in cancer cell biological processes. Previous studies have shown that miR-204 plays an important role in various human cancers. However, the underlying mechanisms of this microRNA in breast cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated that miR-204 expression level was markedly reduced in both the human breast cancer tissue and cultured breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231). Overexpression of miR-204 inhibited the proliferation and promoted the apoptosis in breast cancer cells, which were reversed by co-transfection of miR-204 inhibitor. We validated that Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), as a direct target of miR-204, is overexpressed in breast cancer. Knockdown of JAK2 suppressed cell viability and induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Moreover, the level of miR-204 is negatively correlated with p-STAT3 and anti-apoptotic genes BCl-2 and surviving in breast cancer. In conclusions, miR-204 targets JAK2 and suppressed JAK2 and p-JAK2 expression in breast cancer, which further inhibit the activation of STAT3, BCl-2 and survivin. These findings indicate that manipulation of miR-204 expression may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26191195

  1. Divergent targets of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation result in additive effects of metformin and starvation in colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marini, Cecilia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Ravera, Silvia; Martella, Roberto; Bottoni, Gianluca; Petretto, Andrea; Emionite, Laura; Monteverde, Elena; Capitanio, Selene; Inglese, Elvira; Fabbi, Marina; Bongioanni, Francesca; Garaboldi, Lucia; Bruzzi, Paolo; Orengo, Anna Maria; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Sambuceti, Gianmario

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that targeting energy metabolism is a promising strategy to fight cancer. Here we show that combining metformin and short-term starvation markedly impairs metabolism and growth of colon and breast cancer. The impairment in glycolytic flux caused by starvation is enhanced by metformin through its interference with hexokinase II activity, as documented by measurement of 18F-fluorodeoxyglycose uptake. Oxidative phosphorylation is additively compromised by combined treatment: metformin virtually abolishes Complex I function; starvation determines an uncoupled status of OXPHOS and amplifies the activity of respiratory Complexes II and IV thus combining a massive ATP depletion with a significant increase in reactive oxygen species. More importantly, the combined treatment profoundly impairs cancer glucose metabolism and virtually abolishes lesion growth in experimental models of breast and colon carcinoma. Our results strongly suggest that energy metabolism is a promising target to reduce cancer progression. PMID:26794854

  2. Current advances in biomarkers for targeted therapy in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Brett; Clarke, Charlotte; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a complex heterogeneous disease characterized by the absence of three hallmark receptors: human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Compared to other breast cancer subtypes, TNBC is more aggressive, has a higher prevalence in African-Americans, and more frequently affects younger patients. Currently, TNBC lacks clinically accepted targets for tailored therapy, warranting the need for candidate biomarkers. BiomarkerBase, an online platform used to find biomarkers reported in clinical trials, was utilized to screen all potential biomarkers for TNBC and select only the ones registered in completed TNBC trials through clinicaltrials.gov. The selected candidate biomarkers were classified as surrogate, prognostic, predictive, or pharmacodynamic (PD) and organized by location in the blood, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Blood biomarkers include vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and interleukin-8 (IL-8); cell surface biomarkers include EGFR, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, c-Kit, c-Met, and PD-L1; cytoplasm biomarkers include PIK3CA, pAKT/S6/p4E-BP1, PTEN, ALDH1, and the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR-related metabolites; and nucleus biomarkers include BRCA1, the gluco-corticoid receptor, TP53, and Ki67. Candidate biomarkers were further organized into a “cellular protein network” that demonstrates potential connectivity. This review provides an inventory and reference point for promising biomarkers for breakthrough targeted therapies in TNBC. PMID:27785100

  3. Targeting Mdmx to treat breast cancers with wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, S; Buckley, D; Pang, J-MB; Panimaya, J; Paul, P J; Gamell, C; Takano, E A; Ying Lee, Y; Hiddingh, S; Rogers, T-M; Teunisse, A F A S; Herold, M J; Marine, J-C; Fox, S B; Jochemsen, A; Haupt, Y

    2015-01-01

    The function of the tumor suppressor p53 is universally compromised in cancers. It is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers (reviewed). In cases where p53 is not mutated, alternative regulatory pathways inactivate its tumor suppressive functions. This is primarily achieved through elevation in the expression of the key inhibitors of p53: Mdm2 or Mdmx (also called Mdm4) (reviewed). In breast cancer (BrCa), the frequency of p53 mutations varies markedly between the different subtypes, with basal-like BrCas bearing a high frequency of p53 mutations, whereas luminal BrCas generally express wild-type (wt) p53. Here we show that Mdmx is unexpectedly highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and its expression is further elevated in most luminal BrCas, whereas p53 expression is generally low, consistent with wt p53 status. Inducible knockdown (KD) of Mdmx in luminal BrCa MCF-7 cells impedes the growth of these cells in culture, in a p53-dependent manner. Importantly, KD of Mdmx in orthotopic xenograft transplants resulted in growth inhibition associated with prolonged survival, both in a preventative model and also in a treatment model. Growth impediment in response to Mdmx KD was associated with cellular senescence. The growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was recapitulated in an additional luminal BrCa cell line MPE600, which expresses wt p53. Further, the growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was also demonstrated in the wt p53 basal-like cell line SKBR7 line. These results identify Mdmx growth dependency in wt p53 expressing BrCas, across a range of subtypes. Based on our findings, we propose that Mdmx targeting is an attractive strategy for treating BrCas harboring wt p53. PMID:26181202

  4. Targeted Apoptotic Effects of Thymoquinone and Tamoxifen on XIAP Mediated Akt Regulation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B. N. Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Das, Subhasis; Azab, Belal; Santhekadur, Prasanna K.; Das, Swadesh K.; Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2013-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is constitutively expressed endogenous inhibitor of apoptosis, exhibit its antiapoptotic effect by inactivating key caspases such as caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9 and also play pivotal role in rendering cancer chemoresistance. Our studies showed the coadministration of TQ and TAM resulting in a substantial increase in breast cancer cell apoptosis and marked inhibition of cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-angiogenic and anti-invasive potential of TQ and TAM was assessed through in vitro studies. This novel combinatorial regimen leads to regulation of multiple cell signaling targets including inactivation of Akt and XIAP degradation. At molecular level, TQ and TAM synergistically lowers XIAP expression resulting in binding and activation of caspase-9 in apoptotic cascade, and interfere with cell survival through PI3-K/Akt pathway by inhibiting Akt phosphorylation. Cleaved caspase-9 further processes other intracellular death substrates such as PARP thereby shifting the balance from survival to apoptosis, indicated by rise in the sub-G1 cell population. This combination also downregulates the expression of Akt-regulated downstream effectors such as Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 and induce expression of Bax, AIF, cytochrome C and p-27. Consistent with these results, overexpression studies further confirmed the involvement of XIAP and its regulatory action on Akt phosphorylation along with procaspase-9 and PARP cleavage in TQ-TAM coadministrated induced apoptosis. The ability of TQ and TAM in inhibiting XIAP was confirmed through siRNA-XIAP cotransfection studies. This novel modality may be a promising tool in breast cancer treatment. PMID:23613836

  5. Targeted delivery of cisplatin by LHRH-peptide conjugated dextran nanoparticles suppresses breast cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqiang; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yu; Lv, Shixian; Li, Quanshun; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    The metastasis of breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women. In this work, an attempt to simultaneously inhibit the primary tumor growth and organ-specific metastasis by the cisplatin-loaded LHRH-modified dextran nanoparticles (Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH) was performed in the 4T1 orthotopic mammary tumor metastasis model. With the rationally designed conjugation site of the LHRH ligand, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles maintained the targeting function of LHRH and specifically bound to the LHRH-receptors overexpressed on the surface of 4T1 breast cancer cells. Therefore, the Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles exhibited improved cellular uptake and promoted cytotoxicity, when compared with the non-targeted Dex-SA-CDDP nanoparticles. Moreover, both the non-targeted and targeted nanoparticles significantly decreased the systemic toxicity of CDDP and increased the maximum tolerated dose of CDDP from 4 to 30mgkg(-1). Importantly, Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH markedly enhanced the accumulation of CDDP in the injected primary tumor and metastasis-containing organs, and meanwhile significantly reduced the nephrotoxicity of CDDP. Dose-dependent therapeutic effects further demonstrated that the CDDP-loaded LHRH-decorated polysaccharide nanoparticles significantly enhanced the antitumor and antimetastasis efficacy, as compared to the non-targeted nanoparticles. These results suggest that Dex-SA-CDDP-LHRH nanoparticles show great potential for targeted chemotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25735801

  6. MiR-99a Antitumor Activity in Human Breast Cancer Cells through Targeting of mTOR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Zhu, Qin; Tang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in human tumorigenesis as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. miR-99a has been reported as a tumor suppressor gene in various cancers in humans. However, only limited information about the function of miR-99a in human breast cancers is available. Here we investigated the expression of miR-99a in breast cancer tissue specimens and its antitumor activity in breast cancer cells. We initially identified that the expression of miR-99a was significantly reduced in four breast cancer cell lines. More importantly, we found downregulation of miR-99a in breast cancer specimens from ten different patients. We then analyzed the mechanism of miR-99a in inhibiting tumorigenesis. Cell-based assays that showed overexpression of miR-99a not only reduced breast cancer cell viability by inducing accumulation of cells at sub-G1 phase and cell apoptosis, but also inhibited tumorigenicity in vivo. As a critical miR-99a target, we have shown that the function of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was greatly inhibited by miR-99a-based Luciferase report assay; overexpression of miR-99a reduced the expression of mTOR and its downstream phosphorylated proteins (p-4E-BP1 and p-S6K1). Similar to restoring miR-99a expression, mTOR downregulation suppressed cell viability and increased cell apoptosis, whereas restoration of mTOR expression significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-99a on the mTOR/p-4E-BP1/p-S6K1 signal pathway and the miR-99a antitumor activity. In clinical specimens and cell lines, mTOR was commonly overexpressed and its protein levels were statistically inversely correlated with miR-99a expression. Taken together, these results have demonstrated that miR-99a antitumor activity is achieved by targeting the mTOR/p-4E-BP1/p-S6K1 pathway in human breast cancer cells. This study suggests a potential therapeutic strategy to effectively control breast cancer development. PMID:24637915

  7. Targeted delivery of albumin bound paclitaxel in the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Costanzo, Francesco; Gasperoni, Silvia; Rotella, Virginia; Di Costanzo, Federica

    2009-01-01

    Taxanes are chemotherapeutic agents with a large spectrum of antitumor activity when used as monotherapy or in combination regimens. Paclitaxel and docetaxel have poor solubility and require a complex solvent system for their commercial formulation, Cremophor EL® (CrEL) and Tween 80® respectively. Both these biological surfactants have recently been implicated as contributing not only to the hypersensitivity reactions, but also to the degree of peripheral neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, and may antagonize the cytotoxicity. Nab-paclitaxel, or nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (ABI-007; Abraxane®), is a novel formulation of paclitaxel that does not employ the CrEL solvent system. Nab-paclitaxel demonstrates greater efficacy and a favorable safety profile compared with standard paclitaxel in patients with advanced disease (breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, ovarian cancer). Clinical studies in breast cancer have shown that nab-paclitaxel is significantly more effective than standard paclitaxel in terms of overall objective response rate (ORR) and time to progression. Nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine, capecitabine or bevacizumab has been shown to be very active in patients with advanced breast cancer. An economic analysis showed that nab-paclitaxel would be an economically reasonable alternative to docetaxel or standard paclitaxel in metastatic breast cancer. Favorable tumor ORR and manageable toxicities have been reported for nab-paclitaxel as monotherapy or in combination treatment in advanced breast cancer. PMID:20616905

  8. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150–250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  9. A novel miR-34a target, protein kinase D1, stimulates cancer stemness and drug resistance through GSK3/β-catenin signaling in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, EunSun; Kang, Hyeok-Gu; Koo, Yoonjin; Lee, Eun Ji; Ko, Je Yeong; Kong, Hyun Kyung; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    One of the properties of human breast cancer cells is cancer stemness, which is characterized by self-renewal capability and drug resistance. Protein kinase D1 (PRKD1) functions as a key regulator of many cellular processes and is downregulated in invasive breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that PRKD1 was upregulated in MCF-7-ADR human breast cancer cells characterized by drug resistance. Additionally, we discovered that PRKD1 expression was negatively regulated by miR-34a binding to the PRKD1 3′-UTR. PRKD1 expression increased following performance of a tumorsphere formation assay in MCF-7-ADR cells. We also found that reduction of PRKD1 by ectopic miR-34a expression or PRKD1 siRNA treatment resulted in suppressed self-renewal ability in breast cancer stem cells. Furthermore, we confirmed that the PRKD1 inhibitor CRT0066101 reduced phosphorylated PKD/PKCμ, leading to suppression of breast cancer stemness through GSK3/β-catenin signaling. PRKD1 inhibition also influenced apoptosis initiation in MCF-7-ADR cells. Tumors from nude mice treated with miR-34a or CRT0066101 showed suppressed tumor growth, proliferation, and induced apoptosis. These results provide evidence that regulation of PRKD1, a novel miR-34a target, contributes to overcoming cancer stemness and drug resistance in human breast cancer. PMID:26895471

  10. Targeting of preexisting and induced breast cancer stem cells with trastuzumab and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, J; Bruttel, V; Stein, R G; Horn, E; Häusler, S F M; Dietl, J; Hönig, A; Wischhusen, J

    2014-01-01

    The antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has substantially improved overall survival for patients with aggressive HER2-positive breast cancer. However, about 70% of all treated patients will experience relapse or disease progression. This may be related to an insufficient targeting of the CD44highCD24low breast cancer stem cell subset, which is not only highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy but also a poor target for trastuzumab due to low HER2 surface expression. Hence, we explored whether the new antibody-drug conjugate T-DM1, which consists of the potent chemotherapeutic DM1 coupled to trastuzumab, could improve the targeting of these tumor-initiating or metastasis-initiating cells. To this aim, primary HER2-overexpressing tumor cells as well as HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer cell lines were treated with T-DM1, and effects on survival, colony formation, gene and protein expression as well as antibody internalization were assessed. This revealed that CD44highCD24lowHER2low stem cell-like breast cancer cells show high endocytic activity and are thus particularly sensitive towards the antibody-drug conjugate T-DM1. Consequently, preexisting CD44highCD24low cancer stem cells were depleted by concentrations of T-DM1 that did not affect the bulk of the tumor cells. Likewise, colony formation was efficiently suppressed. Moreover, when tumor cells were cocultured with natural killer cells, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was enhanced, and EMT-mediated induction of stem cell-like properties was prevented in differentiated tumor cells. Thus our study reveals an unanticipated targeting of stem cell-like breast cancer cells by T-DM1 that may contribute to the clinical efficacy of this recently approved antibody-drug conjugate. PMID:24675467

  11. HER2 Targeted Breast Cancer Therapy with Switchable "Off/On" Multifunctional "Smart" Magnetic Polymer Core-Shell Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Raju; Thangam, Ramar; Kumar, Selvaraj Rajesh; Rejeeth, Chandrababu; Kumar, Gopal Senthil; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Vincent, Savariar; Gopi, Dhanaraj; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2016-01-27

    Multifunctional magnetic polymer nanocombinations are gaining importance in cancer nanotheranostics due to their safety and their potential in delivering targeted functions. Herein, we report a novel multifunctional core-shell magnetic polymer therapeutic nanocomposites (NCs) exhibiting pH dependent "Off-On" release of drug against breast cancer cells. The NCs are intact in blood circulation ("Off" state), i.e., at physiological pH, whereas activated ("On" state) at intracellular acidic pH environment of the targeted breast cancer cells. The NCs are prepared by coating the cannonball (iron nanocore) with hydrophobic nanopockets of pH-responsive poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer nanoshell that allows efficient loading of therapeutics. Further, the nanocore-polymer shell is stabilized by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and functionalized with a targeting HER2 ligand. The prepared Her-Fe3O4@PLGA-PVP nanocomposites facilitate packing of anticancer drug (Tamoxifen) without premature release in the bloodstream, recognizing the target cells through binding of Herceptin antibody to HER2, a cell surface receptor expressed by breast cancer cells to promote HER2 receptor mediated endocytosis and finally releasing the drug at the intracellular site of tumor cells ("On" state) to induce apoptosis. The therapeutic efficiency of hemo/cytocompatible NCs drug delivery system (DDS) in terms of targeted delivery and sustained release of therapeutic agent against breast cancer cells was substantiated by in vitro and in vivo studies. The multifunctional properties of Her-Tam-Fe3O4@PLGA-PVP NCs may open up new avenues in cancer therapy through overcoming the limitations of conventional cancer therapy. PMID:26771508

  12. Targeted Vaccination against Human α-Lactalbumin for Immunotherapy and Primary Immunoprevention of Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuohy, Vincent K; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M; Loya, Matthew G; Wilk, Dennis; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Mazumder, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed that safe and effective protection against the development of adult onset cancers may be achieved by vaccination against tissue-specific self-proteins that are "retired" from expression at immunogenic levels in normal tissues as we age, but are overexpressed in emerging tumors. α-Lactalbumin is an example of a "retired" self-protein because its expression in normal tissues is confined exclusively to the breast during late pregnancy and lactation, but is also expressed in the vast majority of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC)-the most aggressive and lethal form of breast cancer and the predominant form that occurs in women at high genetic risk including those with mutated BRCA1 genes. In anticipation of upcoming clinical trials, here we provide preclinical data indicating that α-lactalbumin has the potential as a vaccine target for inducing safe and effective primary immunoprevention as well as immunotherapy against TNBC. PMID:27322324

  13. Targeted Vaccination against Human α-Lactalbumin for Immunotherapy and Primary Immunoprevention of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tuohy, Vincent K.; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Loya, Matthew G.; Wilk, Dennis; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Mazumder, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed that safe and effective protection against the development of adult onset cancers may be achieved by vaccination against tissue-specific self-proteins that are “retired” from expression at immunogenic levels in normal tissues as we age, but are overexpressed in emerging tumors. α-Lactalbumin is an example of a “retired” self-protein because its expression in normal tissues is confined exclusively to the breast during late pregnancy and lactation, but is also expressed in the vast majority of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC)—the most aggressive and lethal form of breast cancer and the predominant form that occurs in women at high genetic risk including those with mutated BRCA1 genes. In anticipation of upcoming clinical trials, here we provide preclinical data indicating that α-lactalbumin has the potential as a vaccine target for inducing safe and effective primary immunoprevention as well as immunotherapy against TNBC. PMID:27322324

  14. [Trastuzumab - a monoclonal antibody - and dendrimers in a targeted therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Stańczyk, Maciej; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women. It has been confirmed that approximately 30% of patients have overexpression of human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) on the surface of tumor cells. Trastuzumab - a recombinant, humanized monoclonal antibody - is directed against this receptor. Its use in traditional chemotherapy (with anthracyclines or taxanes) causes an increase of therapy efficiency. However, the systemic toxicity of the anticancer drugs is still a serious problem. Therefore, new solutions are sought, especially in the field of selective drug transport to tumor cells. Dendrimers are composed of a core and branches. They are the bestknown group of nanoparticles. A lot of publications have shown that they can be used as carriers of various types of molecules, including anticancer drugs. The branched structure provides effective protection against premature release of the drug into the circulatory system. It gives a chance to reduce the dose while maintaining a therapeutic effect, and to reduce the toxicity of the drug for normal cells. Furthermore, the surface of dendrimers can be modified by a monoclonal antibody to achieve a targeted therapy. For that reason synthesis of conjugates of trastuzumab, dendrimers, and anticancer drugs is so crucial. This paper presents an overview of publications about the use of trastuzumab in in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies, as well as the latest developments of biology and chemistry, whose goal is to create the perfect, targeted carrier. PMID:26671922

  15. Targeted nanodiamonds as phenotype-specific photoacoustic contrast agents for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-03-01

    The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly targeted contrast agent for high-resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with PEG to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-HER2 peptide with a final nanoparticle size of approximately 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near-infrared laser. PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 h. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are nontoxic. PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high-resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype-specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  16. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  17. Targeting matriptase in breast cancer abrogates tumor progression via impairment of stromal-epithelial growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Gina L.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Varela, Fausto A.; Murray, Andrew S.; Bergum, Christopher; Colombo, Eloic; Lang, Julie; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Eric; Boerner, Julie; List, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Matriptase is an epithelia-specific membrane-anchored serine protease that has received considerable attention in recent years due to its consistent dysregulation in human epithelial tumors, including breast cancer. Mice with reduced levels of matriptase display a significant delay in oncogene-induced mammary tumor formation and blunted tumor growth. The abated tumor growth is associated with a decrease in cancer cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate by genetic deletion and silencing that the proliferation impairment in matriptase deficient breast cancer cells is caused by their inability to initiate activation of the c-Met signaling pathway in response to fibroblast-secreted pro-HGF. Similarly, inhibition of matriptase catalytic activity using a selective small-molecule inhibitor abrogates the activation of c-Met, Gab1 and AKT, in response to pro-HGF, which functionally leads to attenuated proliferation in breast carcinoma cells. We conclude that matriptase is critically involved in breast cancer progression and represents a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25873032

  18. Dietary compound isoliquiritigenin targets GRP78 to chemosensitize breast cancer stem cells via β-catenin/ABCG2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Wang, Zhiyu; Peng, Cheng; You, Jieshu; Shen, Jiangang; Han, Shouwei; Chen, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that β-catenin signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) is closely correlated to chemoresistance and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette subfamily G2 (ABCG2) expression. Targeting the aberrant β-catenin signaling in CSCs has become a promising strategy to improve chemosensitivity in cancer treatment. In a pilot screening study, we found that the natural compound isoliquiritigenin (ISL) blocked β-catenin transcription activity with the highest inhibition ratio. Here, we investigated the chemosensitizing effects of ISL on breast CSCs and the underlying mechanisms regulating the β-catenin pathway. ISL could have synergistic effects with chemotherapeutic drugs to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, ISL could significantly limit the side population and CSC ratios in breast cancer cells, accompanied by inhibited self-renewal and multidifferentiation abilities. A mechanistic study revealed that ISL could inhibit β-catenin/ABCG2 signaling by activating the proteasome degradation pathway. The drug affinity responsive target stability strategy further identified GRP78 as the direct target of ISL. Subsequent molecular docking analysis and functional studies demonstrated that ISL could dock into the ATP domain of GRP78 and thereby inhibit its ATPase activity, resulting in its dissociation from β-catenin. An in vivo study also suggested that ISL could chemosensitize breast CSCs via the GRP78/β-catenin/ABCG2 pathway, with little toxicity in normal tissues and mammary stem cells. Taken together, the data from this study not only suggest ISL as a natural candidate to enhance breast CSC chemosensitivity but also highlight the significance of GRP78 in mediating cancer drug resistance and β-catenin signaling in CSCs.

  19. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  20. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  1. Radium-223 dichloride bone-targeted alpha particle therapy for hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone is a clinically challenging disease associated with high morbidity, poor prognosis, and impaired quality of life owing to pain and skeletal-related events. In a preclinical study using a mouse model of breast cancer and bone metastases, Ra-223 dichloride was incorporated into bone matrix and inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells and differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts (all P values < .001) in vitro. Ra-223 dichloride also induced double-strand DNA breaks in cancer cells in vivo. Methods The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved radium-223 (Ra-223) dichloride (Ra-223; Xofigo injection) alpha-particle therapy for the treatment of symptomatic bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. On the basis of a strong preclinical rationale, we used Ra-223 dichloride to treat bone metastases in a patient with breast cancer. Results A 44-year-old white woman with metastatic breast cancer who was estrogen receptor–positive, BRCA1-negative, BRCA2-negative, PIK3CA mutation (p.His1047Arg) positive presented with diffuse bony metastases and bone pain. She had hormone refractory and chemotherapy refractory breast cancer. After Ra-223 therapy initiation her bone pain improved, with corresponding decrease in tumor markers and mixed response in 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-NaF bone PET/CT. The patient derived clinical benefit from therapy. Conclusion We have shown that Ra-223 dichloride can be safely administered in a patient with hormone-refractory bone metastasis from breast cancer at the US FDA–approved dose for prostate cancer. Furthermore, because the treatment did not cause any drop in hematologic parameters, it has the potential to be combined with other radiosensitizing therapies, which may include chemotherapy or targeted therapies. Given that Ra-223 dichloride is already commercially available, this case report may help future patients and provide a

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. [Neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ena, G

    2011-09-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment is the standard therapy for inflammatory and locally advanced breast cancer but is also applied in patients with primary operable breast cancer to facilitate breast-conserving surgery. Disease-free survival and overall survival are equivalent between patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and patient receiving the same regimen postoperatively. Nevertheless, pathologic complete response can be a predictive indicator of long-term outcomes. Initially encompassing chemotherapy, it is actually extended to hormonotherapy for hormonoresponsive tumor and to targeted therapy such as trastuzumab for the HER2 positive tumor. The neoadjuvant approach of breast cancer will provide better understanding of breast cancer biology and promote translational research. In this paper, a review of the role of preoperative treatment in the management of breast cancer disease is discussed.

  4. The locus of microRNA-10b: a critical target for breast cancer insurgence and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell's life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  5. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. • The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  6. Targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for new breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaomeng; Bai, Longchuan; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Sun, Haiying

    2012-12-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of human cancer. Research in the last two decades has identified key regulators of apoptosis, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). These critical apoptosis regulators have been targeted for the development of new cancer therapeutics. In this article, we will discuss three members of IAP proteins, namely XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, as cancer therapeutic targets and the progress made in developing new cancer therapeutic agents to target these IAP proteins.

  7. Comparative evaluation of novel biodegradable nanoparticles for the drug targeting to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mattu, C; Pabari, R M; Boffito, M; Sartori, S; Ciardelli, G; Ramtoola, Z

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine formulations such as biodegradable nanoparticles (nps) and liposomes offer several advantages over traditional routes of administration: due to their small size, nanocarriers are able to selectively accumulate inside tumours or inflammatory tissues, resulting in improved drug efficacy and reduced side effects. To further augment targeting ability of nanoparticles towards tumour cells, specific ligands or antibodies that selectively recognise biomarkers over-expressed on cancer cells, can be attached to the surface either by chemical bond or by hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. In the present work, Herceptin (HER), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) able to selectively recognise HER-2 over-expressing tumour cells (such as breast and ovarian cancer cells), was absorbed on the surface of nanoparticles through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. Nps were prepared by a modified single emulsion solvent evaporation method with five different polymers: three commercial polyesters (poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly (D,L-lactide) (PLA) and poly (D,L-lactide-co-.glycolide) (PLGA)) and two novel biodegradable polyesterurethanes (PURs) based on Poly(ε-caprolactone) blocks, synthesised with different chain extenders (1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) and N-Boc-serinol). Polyurethanes were introduced as matrix-forming materials for nanoparticles due to their high chemical versatility, which allows tailoring of the materials final properties by properly selecting the reagents. All nps exhibited a small size and negative surface charge, suitable for surface functionalisation with mAb through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. The extent of cellular internalisation was tested on two different cell lines: MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells showing a normal and a high expression of the HER-2 receptor, respectively. Paclitaxel, a model anti-neoplastic drug, was encapsulated inside all nps, and release profiles and cytotoxicity on SK-BR-3 cells were also assessed

  8. Treatment of multifocal breast cancer by systemic delivery of dual-targeted adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Trepel, M; Körbelin, J; Spies, E; Heckmann, M B; Hunger, A; Fehse, B; Katus, H A; Kleinschmidt, J A; Müller, O J; Michelfelder, S

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors yield high potential for clinical gene therapy but, like for other vectors systems, they frequently do not sufficiently transduce the target tissue and their unspecific tropism prevents their application for multifocal diseases such as disseminated cancer. Targeted AAV vectors have been obtained from random AAV display peptide libraries but so far, all vector variants selected from AAV libraries upon systemic administration in vivo retained some collateral tropism, frequently the heart. Here we explored, if this impediment can be overcome by microRNA-regulated transgene cassettes as the combination of library-derived capsid targeting and micro-RNA control has not been evaluated so far. We used a tumor-targeted AAV capsid variant (ESGLSQS) selected from random AAV-display peptide libraries in vivo with remaining off-target tropism toward the heart and regulated targeted transgene expression in vivo by complementary target elements for heart-specific microRNA (miRT-1d). Although this vector still maintained its strong transduction capacity for tumor target tissue after intravenous injection, transgene expression in the heart was almost completely abrogated. This strong and completely tumor-specific transgene expression was used for therapeutic gene transfer in an aggressive multifocal, transgenic, polyoma middle T-induced, murine breast cancer model. A therapeutic suicide gene, delivered systemically by this dual-targeted AAV vector to multifocal breast cancer, significantly inhibited tumor growth after one single vector administration while avoiding side effects compared with untargeted vectors.

  9. Norstictic Acid Inhibits Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, Invasion, and In Vivo Invasive Growth Through Targeting C-Met.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Hassan Y; Elsayed, Heba E; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; Akl, Mohamed R; Bhattacharjee, Joydeep; Egbert, Susan; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem affecting the female population worldwide. The triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are characterized by malignant phenotypes, worse patient outcomes, poorest prognosis, and highest mortality rates. The proto-oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is usually dysregulated in TNBCs, contributing to their oncogenesis, tumor progression, and aggressive cellular invasiveness that is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Therefore, c-Met is proposed as a promising candidate target for the control of TNBCs. Lichens-derived metabolites are characterized by their structural diversity, complexity, and novelty. The chemical space of lichen-derived metabolites has been extensively investigated, albeit their biological space is still not fully explored. The anticancer-guided fractionation of Usnea strigosa (Ach.) lichen extract led to the identification of the depsidone-derived norstictic acid as a novel bioactive hit against breast cancer cell lines. Norstictic acid significantly suppressed the TNBC MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, with minimal toxicity to non-tumorigenic MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Molecular modeling, Z'-LYTE biochemical kinase assay and Western blot analysis identified c-Met as a potential macromolecular target. Norstictic acid treatment significantly suppressed MDA-MB-231/GFP tumor growth of a breast cancer xenograft model in athymic nude mice. Lichen-derived natural products are promising resources to discover novel c-Met inhibitors useful to control TNBCs. PMID:26744260

  10. Norstictic Acid Inhibits Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, Invasion, and In Vivo Invasive Growth Through Targeting C-Met

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Hassan Y.; Elsayed, Heba E.; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M.; Akl, Mohamed R.; Bhattacharjee, Joydeep; Egbert, Susan; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem affecting the female population worldwide. The triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are characterized by malignant phenotypes, worse patient outcomes, poorest prognosis, and highest mortality rates. The proto-oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met is usually dysregulated in TNBCs, contributing to their oncogenesis, tumor progression, and aggressive cellular invasiveness that is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Therefore, c-Met is proposed as a promising candidate target for the control of TNBCs. Lichens-derived metabolites are characterized by their structural diversity, complexity, and novelty. The chemical space of lichen-derived metabolites has been extensively investigated, albeit their biological space is still not fully explored. The anticancer-guided fractionation of Usnea strigosa (Ach.) lichen extract led to the identification of the depsidone-derived norstictic acid as a novel bioactive hit against breast cancer cell lines. Norstictic acid significantly suppressed the TNBC MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, with minimal toxicity to non-tumorigenic MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Molecular modeling, Z′-LYTE biochemical kinase assay and Western blot analysis identified c-Met as a potential macromolecular target. Norstictic acid treatment significantly suppressed MDA-MB-231/GFP tumor growth of a breast cancer xenograft model in athymic nude mice. Lichen-derived natural products are promising resources to discover novel c-Met inhibitors useful to control TNBCs. PMID:26744260

  11. Selective activity of deguelin identifies therapeutic targets for androgen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Cai, Shengxin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-06-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are aggressive malignancies with no effective targeted therapies. Recent gene expression profiling of these heterogeneous cancers and the classification of cell line models now allows for the identification of compounds with selective activities against molecular subtypes of TNBC. The natural product deguelin was found to have selective activity against MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cell lines, which both model the luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype of TNBC. Deguelin potently inhibited proliferation of these cells with GI50 values of 30 and 61 nM, in MDA-MB-453 and SUM-185PE cells, respectively. Deguelin had exceptionally high selectivity, 197 to 566-fold, for these cell lines compared to cell lines representing other TNBC subtypes. Deguelin's mechanisms of action were investigated to determine how it produced these potent and selective effects. Our results show that deguelin has dual activities, inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, and decreasing androgen receptor levels and nuclear localization. Based on these data, we hypothesized that the combination of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and the antiandrogen enzalutamide would have efficacy in LAR models. Rapamycin and enzalutamide showed additive effects in MDA-MB-453 cells, and both drugs had potent antitumor efficacy in a LAR xenograft model. These results suggest that the combination of antiandrogens and mTOR inhibitors might be an effective strategy for the treatment of androgen receptor-expressing TNBC. PMID:27255535

  12. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of exquisite targeting SPIONs-PEG-HER in HER2+ human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Almaki, Javad Hamzehalipour; Nasiri, Rozita; Idris, Ani; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Salouti, Mojtaba; Wong, Tet Soon; Dabagh, Shadab; Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda

    2016-03-11

    A stable, biocompatible and exquisite SPIONs-PEG-HER targeting complex was developed. Initially synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were silanized using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) as the coupling agent in order to allow the covalent bonding of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the SPIONs to improve the biocompatibility of the SPIONs. SPIONs-PEG were then conjugated with herceptin (HER) to permit the SPIONs-PEG-HER to target the specific receptors expressed over the surface of the HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells. Each preparation step was physico-chemically analyzed and characterized by a number of analytical methods including AAS, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, FESEM, TEM, DLS and VSM. The biocompatibility of SPIONs-PEG-HER was evaluated in vitro on HSF-1184 (human skin fibroblast cells), SK-BR-3 (human breast cancer cells, HER+), MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) and MDA-MB-468 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) cell lines by performing MTT and trypan blue assays. The hemolysis analysis results of the SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG did not indicate any sign of lysis while in contact with erythrocytes. Additionally, there were no morphological changes seen in RBCs after incubation with SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG under a light microscope. The qualitative and quantitative in vitro targeting studies confirmed the high level of SPION-PEG-HER binding to SK-BR-3 (HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells). Thus, the results reflected that the SPIONs-PEG-HER can be chosen as a favorable biomaterial for biomedical applications, chiefly magnetic hyperthermia, in the future. PMID:26861770

  13. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of exquisite targeting SPIONs-PEG-HER in HER2+ human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehalipour Almaki, Javad; Nasiri, Rozita; Idris, Ani; Majid, Fadzilah Adibah Abdul; Salouti, Mojtaba; Wong, Tet Soon; Dabagh, Shadab; Marvibaigi, Mohsen; Amini, Neda

    2016-03-01

    A stable, biocompatible and exquisite SPIONs-PEG-HER targeting complex was developed. Initially synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were silanized using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) as the coupling agent in order to allow the covalent bonding of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the SPIONs to improve the biocompatibility of the SPIONs. SPIONs-PEG were then conjugated with herceptin (HER) to permit the SPIONs-PEG-HER to target the specific receptors expressed over the surface of the HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells. Each preparation step was physico-chemically analyzed and characterized by a number of analytical methods including AAS, FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, FESEM, TEM, DLS and VSM. The biocompatibility of SPIONs-PEG-HER was evaluated in vitro on HSF-1184 (human skin fibroblast cells), SK-BR-3 (human breast cancer cells, HER+), MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) and MDA-MB-468 (human breast cancer cells, HER-) cell lines by performing MTT and trypan blue assays. The hemolysis analysis results of the SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG did not indicate any sign of lysis while in contact with erythrocytes. Additionally, there were no morphological changes seen in RBCs after incubation with SPIONs-PEG-HER and SPIONs-PEG under a light microscope. The qualitative and quantitative in vitro targeting studies confirmed the high level of SPION-PEG-HER binding to SK-BR-3 (HER2+ metastatic breast cancer cells). Thus, the results reflected that the SPIONs-PEG-HER can be chosen as a favorable biomaterial for biomedical applications, chiefly magnetic hyperthermia, in the future.

  14. Role of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin in the treatment of luminal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ciruelos, Eva; Cortes-Funes, Hernán; Ghanem, Ismael; Manso, Luis; Arteaga, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    Approximately 75% of patients with breast cancer present hormone receptor-positive tumors. This subtype of breast cancer initially shows a high overall response rate to hormonal treatments. However, resistance eventually develops, resulting in tumor progression. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates several cellular functions in cancer such as cell growth, survival, and proliferation. In addition, a high activation level of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is related to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and hormone therapy. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus, in combination with hormonal treatments, has led to excellent results in progression-free survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to hormone therapies. Therefore, everolimus has entered the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines 2012 and its combination with exemestane was approved recently by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. This is the first time that a drug will have been approved for the restoration of hormone sensitivity in breast cancer.

  15. An In silico Chimeric Vaccine Targeting Breast Cancer Containing Inherent Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Amani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, Lack of efficient therapeutic strategy for breast cancer (the most common cause of death in women) is one of the momentous problematic topics for all health care committees. Designing new specific vaccine, based on antigens located on the surface of cancer cells can be useful. Over expression of ROR1, lacked of HER2/neu, and hormone receptors on cell surface in the breast cancer, introduce this protein as an appropriate candidate for designing cancer vaccine. Objectives: We hypothesized the extracellular domain of receptor tyrosine kinase like orphan receptor 1 (ROR-1) along with a super antigen such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B could be a potent vaccine for drug resistant breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Here, we assessed the findings of bioinformatics analysis to identify the antitumor immune properties of this chimeric construct. In addition, the stability, physic-chemical properties and allergic potency of designed fusion protein were investigated by valid bioinformatics software. Results: Our result suggested that chimeric model is capable to be a stimulant of both T-cell and B- cell mediated immune responses with an acceptable accessibility and solubility but without any allergenicity. Conclusions: The ROR-1 with an enterotoxin B could be a potent vaccine for breast cancer. PMID:26413246

  16. Genomic Analyses as a Guide to Target Identification and Preclinical Testing of Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Christina N; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-species genomic analyses have proven useful for identifying common genomic alterations that occur in human cancers and mouse models designed to recapitulate human tumor development. High-throughput molecular analyses provide a valuable tool for identifying particular animal models that may represent aspects of specific subtypes of human cancers. Corresponding alterations in gene copy number and expression in tumors from mouse and human suggest that these conserved changes may be mechanistically essential for cancer development and progression, and therefore, they may be critical targets for therapeutic intervention. Using a cross-species analysis approach, mouse models in which the functions of p53, Rb, and BRCA1 have been disrupted demonstrate molecular features of human, triple-negative (ER-, PR-, and ERBB2-), basal-type breast cancer. Using mouse tumor models based on the targeted abrogation of p53 and Rb function, we identified a large, integrated genetic network that correlates to poor outcome in several human epithelial cancers. This gene signature is highly enriched for genes involved in DNA replication and repair, chromosome maintenance, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. Current studies are determining whether inactivation of specific members within this signature, using drugs or siRNA, will identify potentially important new targets to inhibit triple-negative, basal-type breast cancer for which no targeted therapies currently exist. PMID:20080934

  17. Targeting HMG-CoA reductase with statins in a window-of-opportunity breast cancer trial.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Olöf; Romero, Quinci; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Jirström, Karin; Rydén, Lisa; Loman, Niklas; Uhlén, Mathias; Johannesson, Henrik; Rose, Carsten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borgquist, Signe

    2013-04-01

    Lipophilic statins purportedly exert anti-tumoral effects on breast cancer by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, is the target of statins. However, data on statin-induced effects on HMGCR activity in cancer are limited. Thus, this pre-operative study investigated statin-induced effects on tumor proliferation and HMGCR expression while analyzing HMGCR as a predictive marker for statin response in breast cancer treatment. The study was designed as a window-of-opportunity trial and included 50 patients with primary invasive breast cancer. High-dose atorvastatin (i.e., 80 mg/day) was prescribed to patients for 2 weeks before surgery. Pre- and post-statin paired tumor samples were analyzed for Ki67 and HMGCR immunohistochemical expression. Changes in the Ki67 expression and HMGCR activity following statin treatment were the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. Up-regulation of HMGCR following atorvastatin treatment was observed in 68 % of the paired samples with evaluable HMGCR expression (P = 0.0005). The average relative decrease in Ki67 expression following atorvastatin treatment was 7.6 % (P = 0.39) in all paired samples, whereas the corresponding decrease in Ki67 expression in tumors expressing HMGCR in the pre-treatment sample was 24 % (P = 0.02). Furthermore, post-treatment Ki67 expression was inversely correlated to post-treatment HMGCR expression (rs = -0.42; P = 0.03). Findings from this study suggest that HMGCR is targeted by statins in breast cancer cells in vivo, and that statins may have an anti-proliferative effect in HMGCR-positive tumors. Future studies are needed to evaluate HMGCR as a predictive marker for the selection of breast cancer patients who may benefit from statin treatment.

  18. Targeting HMG-CoA reductase with statins in a window-of-opportunity breast cancer trial.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Olöf; Romero, Quinci; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Jirström, Karin; Rydén, Lisa; Loman, Niklas; Uhlén, Mathias; Johannesson, Henrik; Rose, Carsten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borgquist, Signe

    2013-04-01

    Lipophilic statins purportedly exert anti-tumoral effects on breast cancer by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, is the target of statins. However, data on statin-induced effects on HMGCR activity in cancer are limited. Thus, this pre-operative study investigated statin-induced effects on tumor proliferation and HMGCR expression while analyzing HMGCR as a predictive marker for statin response in breast cancer treatment. The study was designed as a window-of-opportunity trial and included 50 patients with primary invasive breast cancer. High-dose atorvastatin (i.e., 80 mg/day) was prescribed to patients for 2 weeks before surgery. Pre- and post-statin paired tumor samples were analyzed for Ki67 and HMGCR immunohistochemical expression. Changes in the Ki67 expression and HMGCR activity following statin treatment were the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. Up-regulation of HMGCR following atorvastatin treatment was observed in 68 % of the paired samples with evaluable HMGCR expression (P = 0.0005). The average relative decrease in Ki67 expression following atorvastatin treatment was 7.6 % (P = 0.39) in all paired samples, whereas the corresponding decrease in Ki67 expression in tumors expressing HMGCR in the pre-treatment sample was 24 % (P = 0.02). Furthermore, post-treatment Ki67 expression was inversely correlated to post-treatment HMGCR expression (rs = -0.42; P = 0.03). Findings from this study suggest that HMGCR is targeted by statins in breast cancer cells in vivo, and that statins may have an anti-proliferative effect in HMGCR-positive tumors. Future studies are needed to evaluate HMGCR as a predictive marker for the selection of breast cancer patients who may benefit from statin treatment. PMID:23471651

  19. Co-Targeting of JNK and HUNK in Resistant HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phelps-Polirer, Kendall; Abt, Melissa A.; Smith, Danzell; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for successful primary treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer include use of the HER2 inhibitors trastuzumab or lapatinib in combination with standard chemotherapy. While successful, many patients develop resistance to these HER2 inhibitors indicating an unmet need. Consequently, current research efforts are geared toward understanding mechanisms of resistance and the signaling modalities that regulate these mechanisms. We have undertaken a study to examine whether signaling molecules downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor, which often act as compensatory signaling outlets to circumvent HER2 inhibition, can be co-targeted to overcome resistance. We identified JNK signaling as a potential area of intervention and now show that inhibiting JNK using the pan-JNK inhibitor, SP600125, is effective in the HER2-positive, resistant JIMT-1 xenograft mammary tumor model. We also investigate potential combination strategies to bolster the effects of JNK inhibition and find that co-targeting of JNK and the protein kinase HUNK can prohibit tumor growth of resistant HER2-positive mammary tumors in vivo. PMID:27045589

  20. OncomiRdbB: a comprehensive database of microRNAs and their targets in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the estimate that 30% of our genes are controlled by microRNAs, it is essential that we understand the precise relationship between microRNAs and their targets. OncomiRs are microRNAs (miRNAs) that have been frequently shown to be deregulated in cancer. However, although several oncomiRs have been identified and characterized, there is as yet no comprehensive compilation of this data which has rendered it underutilized by cancer biologists. There is therefore an unmet need in generating bioinformatic platforms to speed the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Description We describe here OncomiRdbB, a comprehensive database of oncomiRs mined from different existing databases for mouse and humans along with novel oncomiRs that we have validated in human breast cancer samples. The database also lists their respective predicted targets, identified using miRanda, along with their IDs, sequences, chromosome location and detailed description. This database facilitates querying by search strings including microRNA name, sequence, accession number, target genes and organisms. The microRNA networks and their hubs with respective targets at 3'UTR, 5'UTR and exons of different pathway genes were also deciphered using the 'R' algorithm. Conclusion OncomiRdbB is a comprehensive and integrated database of oncomiRs and their targets in breast cancer with multiple query options which will help enhance both understanding of the biology of breast cancer and the development of new and innovative microRNA based diagnostic tools and targets of therapeutic significance. OncomiRdbB is freely available for download through the URL link http://tdb.ccmb.res.in/OncomiRdbB/index.htm. PMID:24428888

  1. Efficacy and Safety of HER2-Targeted Agents for Breast Cancer with HER2-Overexpression: A Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiuyan; Zhu, Zhenli; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted agents added to standard treatment have been efficacious for HER2-positive (HER2+) advanced breast cancer. To our knowledge, no meta-analysis has evaluated HER2-targeted therapy including trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) and pertuzumab for HER2-positive breast caner and ranked the targeted treatments. We performed a network meta-analysis of both direct and indirect comparisons to evaluate the effect of adding HER2-targeted agents to standard treatment and examined side effects. Methods We performed a Bayesian-framework network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare 6 HER2-targeted treatment regimens and 1 naïve standard treatment (NST, without any-targeted drugs) in targeted treatment of HER2+ breast cancer in adults. These treatment regimens were T-DM1, LC (lapatinib), HC (trastuzumab), PEC (pertuzumab), LHC (lapatinib and trastuzumab), and PEHC (pertuzumab and trastuzumab). The main outcomes were overall survival and response rates. We also examined side effects of rash, LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction), fatigue, and gastrointestinal disorders, and performed subgroup analysis for the different treatment regimens in metastatic or advanced breast cancer. Results We identified 25 articles of 21 trials, with data for 11,276 participants. T-DM1 and PEHC were more efficient drug regimens with regard to overall survival as compared with LHC, LC, HC and PEC. The incidence of treatment-related rash occurs more frequently in the patients who received LC treatment regimen than PEHC and T-DM1 and HC. In subgroup analysis, T-DM1 was associated with increased overall survival as compared with LC and HC. PEHC was associated with increased overall response as compared with LC, HC, and NST. Conclusions Overall, the regimen of T-DM1 as well as pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel is efficacious with fewer side effects as compared with other regimens

  2. Optimization of Landscape Phage Fusion Protein-Modified Polymeric PEG-PE Micelles for Improved Breast Cancer Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic landscape phage fusion proteins with high affinity and selectivity towards breast cancer MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) cells self-assemble with polymeric PEG-PE conjugates to form mixed micelles (phage-micelles) capable of cancer cell-targeted delivery of poorly-soluble drugs. While the PEG corona provides the stability and longevity to the micelles, its presence is a potential steric difficulties for the interaction of phage fusion protein with cell surface targets. We attempted to address this problem by controlling the length of the PEG block and the phage fusion protein quantity, selecting the optimal ones to produce a reasonable retention of the targeting affinity and selectivity of the MCF-7-specific phage fusion protein. Three PEG-PE conjugates with different PEG lengths were used to construct phage- and plain-micelles, followed by FACS analysis of the effect of the PEG length on their binding affinity and selectivity towards target MCF-7 cells using either a MCF-7 cell monoculture or a cell co-culture model composed of target cancer MCF-7 cells and non-target, non-cancer C166 cells expressing GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein). Both, the length of PEG and quantity of phage fusion protein had a profound impact on the targetability of the phage-micelles. Phage-micelles prepared with PEG2k-PE achieved a desirable binding affinity and selectivity. Incorporation of a minimal concentration of phage protein, up to 0.5%, produced maximal targeting efficiency towards MCF-7 cells. Overall, phage-micelles with PEG2k-PE and 0.5% of phage protein represent the optimal formulation for targeting towards breast cancer cells. PMID:26451274

  3. Current Management Strategies in Breast Cancer by Targeting Key Altered Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shazia; Mondal, Neelima; Choudhry, Hani; Rasool, Mahmood; Pushparaj, Peter N.; Khan, Mohammad A.; Mahfooz, Maryam; Sami, Ghufrana A.; Jarullah, Jummanah; Ali, Ashraf; Jamal, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second largest disease affecting women worldwide. It remains the most frequently reported and leading cause of death among women in both developed and developing countries. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are commonly used selective estrogen receptor modulators for treatment of breast cancer in women with high risk, although resistance occurs by tamoxifen after 5 years of therapy and both drugs cause uterine cancer and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are one of the optional modes used for breast cancer treatment. The combination of AIs along with tamoxifen can also be beneficial. Various therapeutic agents from different sources are being studied, which further need to be improved for potential outcome. For this, clinical trials based on large number of patients with optimal dose and lesser side effects have to be more in practice. Despite the clinical trials going on, there is need of better molecular models, which can identify high risk population, new agents with better benefit having less side effects, and improved biomarkers for treating breast cancer. PMID:26973813

  4. [DNA aptamers selection for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zamay, G S; Belayanina, I V; Zamay, A S; Komarova, M A; Krat, A V; Eremina, E N; Zukov, R A; Sokolov, A E; Zamay, T N

    2016-05-01

    A method of selection of DNA aptamers to breast tumor tissue based on the use of postoperative material has been developed. Breast cancer tissues were used as the positive target; the negative targets included benign tumor tissue, adjacent healthy tissues, breast tissues from mastopathy patients, and also tissues of other types of malignant tumors. During selection a pool of DNA aptamers demonstrating selective binding to breast cancer cells and tissues and insignificant binding to breast benign tissues has been obtained. These DNA aptamers can be used for identification of protein markers, breast cancer diagnostics, and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  5. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-11-17

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed.

  6. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed. PMID:26573433

  7. Public Education and Targeted Outreach to Underserved Women Through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Levano, Whitney; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Leonard, Banning; Bellick, Linda; Crane, Barbara E.; Kennedy, Stephenie K.; Haslage, Natalie M.; Hammond, Whitney; Tharpe, Felicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) was established to provide low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women access to cancer screening and diagnostic services with the goal of increasing the early detection and prevention of breast and cervical cancer. Although this is a valuable resource for women who might not have the means to get screened otherwise, providing services at no cost, by itself, does not guarantee uptake of screening services. Public education and targeted outreach facilitate the critical link between public service programs and the communities they serve. The purpose of public education and outreach in the NBCCEDP is to increase the number of women who use breast and cervical cancer screening services by raising awareness, providing education, addressing barriers, and motivating women to complete screening exams and follow-up. Effective strategies focus on helping to remove structural, physical, interpersonal, financial, and cultural barriers; educate women about the importance of screening and inform women about the services available to them. This article provides an overview of the importance of public education and targeted outreach activities for cancer screening through community-based programs including examples from NBCCEDP grantees that highlight successes, challenges, and solutions, encountered when conducting these types of interventions. PMID:25099902

  8. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  9. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  10. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  11. Transcriptome-wide analysis of compression-induced microRNA expression alteration in breast cancer for mining therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sung Hwan; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth–generated mechanical compression may increase or decrease expression of microRNAs, leading to tumor progression. However, little is known about whether mechanical compression induces aberrant expression of microRNAs in cancer and stromal cells. To investigate the relationship between compression and microRNA expression, microRNA array analysis was performed with breast cancer cell lines and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) exposed to different compressive conditions. In our study, mechanical compression induced alteration of microRNA expression level in breast cancer cells and CAFs. The alteration was greater in the breast cancer cells than CAFs. Mechanical compression mainly induced upregulation of microRNAs rather than downregulation. In a parallel mRNA array analysis, more than 25% of downregulated target genes were functionally involved in tumor suppression (apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell cycle arrest), whereas generally less than 15% were associated with tumor progression (epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis). Of all cells examined, MDA-MB-231 cells showed the largest number of compression-upregulated microRNAs. miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p were upregulated by compression in both MDA-MB-231 cells and CAFs. Our results suggest that mechanical compression induces changes in microRNA expression level, which contribute to tumor progression. In addition, miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p may be potential therapeutic targets for incurable cancers, such as triple negative breast cancer, in that this would reduce or prevent downregulation of tumor-suppressing genes in both the tumor and its microenvironment simultaneously. PMID:27027350

  12. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Martins, Ivone M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line– 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 –CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2—EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  13. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  14. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    SciTech Connect

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  15. HDAC Inhibitors Target HDAC5, Upregulate MicroRNA-125a-5p, and Induce Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsung-Hua; Hsu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Long, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Chin-Hu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Lee, Jau-Nan; Chang, Wei-Chun; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are novel clinical anticancer drugs that inhibit HDAC gene expression and induce cell apoptosis in human cancers. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism or the downstream HDAC targets by which HDACi mediates apoptosis in human breast cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we show that HDACi reduce tumorigenesis and induce intrinsic apoptosis of human breast cancer cells through the microRNA miR-125a-5p in vivo and in vitro. Intrinsic apoptosis was activated by the caspase 9/3 signaling pathway. In addition, HDACi mediated the expression of miR-125a-5p by activating RUNX3/p300/HDAC5 complex. Subsequently, miR-125a-5p silenced HDAC5 post-transcriptionally in the cells treated with HDACi. Thus, a regulatory loop may exist in human breast cancer cells involving miR-125a-5p and HDAC5 that is controlled by RUNX3 signaling. Silencing of miR-125a-5p and RUNX3 inhibited cancer progression and activated apoptosis, but silencing of HDAC5 had a converse effect. In conclusion, we demonstrate a possible new mechanism by which HDACi influence tumorigenesis and apoptosis via downregulation of miR-125a-5p expression. This study provides clinical implications in cancer chemotherapy using HDACi. PMID:25531695

  16. Improved Treatment of MT-3 Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases in a Mouse Xenograft by LRP-Targeted Oxaliplatin Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Orthmann, Andrea; Peiker, Lisa; Fichtner, Iduna; Hoffmann, Annika; Hilger, Ralf Axel; Zeisig, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxP) has rarely been used to treat breast carcinoma, as it cannot cross the BBB to treat the frequently subsequent brain metastases. Here, we encapsulated OxP in liposomes prepared to reduce side effects and to simultaneously treat primary tumor and brain metastasis. The angiopep LRP-receptor ligand was bound to the vesicular surface for targeting. Targeted and non-targeted OxP liposomes were tested in vitro (binding, uptake, and transcytosis) and in vivo. Liposomes contained 0.65 mg OxP/mL, their mean diameter was 165 nm, and they released 50% of OxP within 8 days at 4 degrees C and within 22 h at 36 degrees C. MDCK cells were used for uptake and transcytosis quantification. Compared to non-targeted liposomes, targeted liposomes showed 12-fold greater uptake, and 2.25-fold higher transcytosis. In vivo efficacy was tested using human MT-3 breast cancer cells transplanted subcutaneously and intracerebrally into female nude mice, and tumor growth inhibition was measured. OxP was injected (6 mg OxP/kg) four times. The best results were obtained with targeted liposomes (T/C: 21% for subcutaneous and 50% for intracerebral). OxP liposomes with a fluid membrane all inhibited MT-3 tumors significantly better than free OxP, with no significant difference between targeted and non-targeted liposomes. The therapeutic effect was accompanied with strong leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia with all formulations. The newly developed OxP liposomes significantly improved the treatment of subcutaneously and intracerebrally growing breast cancer, but the targeted angiopep-equipped liposomes showed no superior effect in vivo.

  17. Local microRNA delivery targets Palladin and prevents metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gilam, Avital; Conde, João; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Oliva, Nuria; Friedman, Eitan; Artzi, Natalie; Shomron, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause for mortality in breast cancer. MicroRNAs, gene expression master regulators, constitute an attractive candidate to control metastasis. Here we show that breast cancer metastasis can be prevented by miR-96 or miR-182 treatment, and decipher the mechanism of action. We found that miR-96/miR-182 downregulate Palladin protein levels, thereby reducing breast cancer cell migration and invasion. A common SNP, rs1071738, at the miR-96/miR-182-binding site within the Palladin 3'-UTR abolishes miRNA:mRNA binding, thus diminishing Palladin regulation by these miRNAs. Regulation is successfully restored by applying complimentary miRNAs. A hydrogel-embedded, gold-nanoparticle-based delivery vehicle provides efficient local, selective, and sustained release of miR-96/miR-182, markedly suppressing metastasis in a breast cancer mouse model. Combined delivery of the miRNAs with a chemotherapy drug, cisplatin, enables significant primary tumour shrinkage and metastasis prevention. Our data corroborate the role of miRNAs in metastasis, and suggest miR-96/miR-182 delivery as a potential anti-metastatic drug. PMID:27641360

  18. Local microRNA delivery targets Palladin and prevents metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gilam, Avital; Conde, João; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Oliva, Nuria; Friedman, Eitan; Artzi, Natalie; Shomron, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause for mortality in breast cancer. MicroRNAs, gene expression master regulators, constitute an attractive candidate to control metastasis. Here we show that breast cancer metastasis can be prevented by miR-96 or miR-182 treatment, and decipher the mechanism of action. We found that miR-96/miR-182 downregulate Palladin protein levels, thereby reducing breast cancer cell migration and invasion. A common SNP, rs1071738, at the miR-96/miR-182-binding site within the Palladin 3′-UTR abolishes miRNA:mRNA binding, thus diminishing Palladin regulation by these miRNAs. Regulation is successfully restored by applying complimentary miRNAs. A hydrogel-embedded, gold-nanoparticle-based delivery vehicle provides efficient local, selective, and sustained release of miR-96/miR-182, markedly suppressing metastasis in a breast cancer mouse model. Combined delivery of the miRNAs with a chemotherapy drug, cisplatin, enables significant primary tumour shrinkage and metastasis prevention. Our data corroborate the role of miRNAs in metastasis, and suggest miR-96/miR-182 delivery as a potential anti-metastatic drug. PMID:27641360

  19. miR-136 suppresses tumor invasion and metastasis by targeting RASAL2 in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAN, MEISI; LI, XIAOBO; TONG, DANDAN; HAN, CHANGSONG; ZHAO, RAN; HE, YAN; JIN, XIAOMING

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of cancer migration, invasion and metastasis. Patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a high incidence of early relapse and metastasis; however, the molecular basis for metastasis and recurrence in these individuals remains largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-136 is an anti-invasive microRNA in TNBC and suppresses mesenchymal invasion and metastasis. Our results demonstrated that miR-136 was downregulated in TNBC and negative correlated with the WHO grades. However, RASAL2 was identified as a functional target of miR-136, and was overexpressed in TNBC and correlates with pathological grades. Moreover, overexpression of RASAL2 in a breast cancer cell line rescued miR-136-mediated cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR-136/RASAL2/MET axis act as a suppressor of TNBC metastasis. PMID:27108696

  20. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained. PMID:27269304

  1. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained.

  2. Lymphatic-targeted therapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a promising strategy for lymph node-positive breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianghao; Yao, Qing; Wang, Hui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Juliang; Wang, Ting; Lv, Yonggang; Han, Zenghui; Wang, Ling

    2015-07-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly used to downstage breast cancer prior to surgery recently. However, in some cases, it was observed that despite sufficient regression of primary tumors, the metastatic lymph nodes remained nonresponsive. In this study, we applied lymphatic-targeted strategy to evaluate its efficacy and safety for patients presenting refractory nodes following systemic chemotherapy. A total of 318 breast cancer patients were demonstrated with lymph node metastasis by needle biopsy and given neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Two cycles later, 72 patients were observed with responsive tumors but stable nodes, 42 of which received a subcutaneous injection of lymphatic-targeted pegylated liposomal doxorubicin during the third cycle, while the remaining 30 patients were continued with former neoadjuvant therapeutic pattern and regarded as the control. Lymphatic-targeted treatment substantially increased both clinical and pathological node response rate [62 % (26/42) vs. 13 % (4/30) and 12 % (5/42) vs. 0 (0/30), respectively], and induced a higher apoptosis level of metastatic cells (median, 41 vs. 6 %), compared with the control. Moreover, a higher disease-free survival was observed after a median follow-up of 4 years (69 vs. 56 %). Inflammatory reaction surrounding injection sites was the most common side effect. Lymphatic chemotherapy has reliable efficacy and well-tolerated toxicity for breast cancer patients presenting refractory lymph nodes following neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. A novel class of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles modifies mitochondrial proteins and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells through redox mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R; Smith, M Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins.

  4. ICAM-1-Targeted, Lcn2 siRNA-Encapsulating Liposomes are Potent Anti-angiogenic Agents for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Yang, Jiang; Jia, Di; Moses, Marsha A.; Auguste, Debra T.

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is a promising therapeutic target as well as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer. It has been previously shown to promote breast cancer progression by inducing the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells as well as by enhancing angiogenesis. Lcn2 levels in urine and tissue samples of breast cancer patients has also been correlated with breast cancer status and poor patient prognosis. In this study, we have engineered a novel liposomal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system to target triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) via a recently identified molecular target, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This ICAM-1-targeted, Lcn2 siRNA- encapsulating liposome (ICAM-Lcn2-LP) binds human TNBC MDA-MB-231cells significantly stronger than non-neoplastic MCF-10A cells. Efficient Lcn2 knockdown by ICAM-Lcn2-LPs led to a significant reduction in the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from MDA-MB-231 cells, which, in turn, led to reduced angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Angiogenesis (neovascularization) is a requirement for solid tumor growth and progression, and its inhibition is an important therapeutic strategy for human cancers. Our results indicate that a tumor-specific strategy such as the TNBC-targeted, anti-angiogenic therapeutic approach developed here, may be clinically useful in inhibiting TNBC progression. PMID:26722369

  5. ICAM-1-Targeted, Lcn2 siRNA-Encapsulating Liposomes are Potent Anti-angiogenic Agents for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Yang, Jiang; Jia, Di; Moses, Marsha A; Auguste, Debra T

    2016-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is a promising therapeutic target as well as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer. It has been previously shown to promote breast cancer progression by inducing the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells as well as by enhancing angiogenesis. Lcn2 levels in urine and tissue samples of breast cancer patients has also been correlated with breast cancer status and poor patient prognosis. In this study, we have engineered a novel liposomal small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system to target triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) via a recently identified molecular target, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This ICAM-1-targeted, Lcn2 siRNA- encapsulating liposome (ICAM-Lcn2-LP) binds human TNBC MDA-MB-231cells significantly stronger than non-neoplastic MCF-10A cells. Efficient Lcn2 knockdown by ICAM-Lcn2-LPs led to a significant reduction in the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from MDA-MB-231 cells, which, in turn, led to reduced angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Angiogenesis (neovascularization) is a requirement for solid tumor growth and progression, and its inhibition is an important therapeutic strategy for human cancers. Our results indicate that a tumor-specific strategy such as the TNBC-targeted, anti-angiogenic therapeutic approach developed here, may be clinically useful in inhibiting TNBC progression.

  6. Camptothecin targets WRN protein: mechanism and relevance in clinical breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Ball, Graham; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Ellis, Ian O; Pommier, Yves; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-03-22

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a RecQ helicase that participates in DNA repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. The five human RecQ helicases, RECQL1, Bloom, WRN, RECQL4 and RECQL5 play critical roles in DNA repair and cell survival after treatment with the anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT). CPT derivatives are widely used in cancer chemotherapy to inhibit topoisomerase I and generate DNA double-strand breaks during replication. Here we studied the effects of CPT on the stability and expression dynamics of human RecQ helicases. In the cells treated with CPT, we observed distinct effects on WRN compared to other human RecQ helicases. CPT altered the cellular localization of WRN and induced its degradation by a ubiquitin-mediated proteasome pathway. WRN knockdown cells as well as CPT treated cells became senescent and stained positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase at a higher frequency compared to control cells. However, the senescent phenotype was attenuated by ectopic expression of WRN suggesting functional implication of WRN degradation in CPT treated cells. Approximately 5-23% of breast cancer tumors are known to respond to CPT-based chemotherapy. Interestingly, we found that the extent of CPT-induced WRN degradation correlates with increasing sensitivity of breast cancer cells to CPT. The abundance of WRN decreased in CPT-treated sensitive cells; however, WRN remained relatively stable in CPT-resistant breast cancer cells. In a large clinical cohort of breast cancer patients, we find that WRN and topoisomerase I expression correlate with an aggressive tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Our novel observations suggest that WRN abundance along with CPT-induced degradation could be a promising strategy for personalizing CPT-based cancer chemotherapeutic regimens.

  7. miR-655 suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by targeting Prrx1 in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhi-Dong; Kong, Bin; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Jin, Li-Ying; Dong, Qian; Li, Fu-Nian; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2016-05-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive breast cancer subtype that lacks effective targeted therapies. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor in the metastatic process. In this study, we found that miR-655 was down-regulated in TNBC, and its expression levels were associated with molecular-based classification and lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. These findings led us to hypothesize that miR-655 overexpression may inhibit EMT and its associated traits of TNBC. Ectopic expression of miR-655 not only induced the up-regulation of cytokeratin and decreased vimentin expression but also suppressed migration and invasion of mesenchymal-like cancer cells accompanied by a morphological shift towards the epithelial phenotype. In addition, we found that miR-655 was negatively correlated with Prrx1 in cell lines and clinical samples. Overexpression of miR-655 significantly suppressed Prrx1, as demonstrated by Prrx1 3'-untranslated region luciferase report assay. Our study demonstrated that miR-655 inhibits the acquisition of the EMT phenotype in TNBC by down-regulating Prrx1, thereby inhibiting cell migration and invasion during cancer progression. PMID:26820102

  8. Forkhead Box Q1 Is a Novel Target of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Inhibition by Diallyl Trisulfide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hyeong; Kaschula, Catherine H; Priedigkeit, Nolan; Lee, Adrian V; Singh, Shivendra V

    2016-06-24

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a metabolic byproduct of garlic, is known to inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo This study demonstrates that DATS targets breast cancer stem cells (bCSC). Exposure of MCF-7 and SUM159 human breast cancer cells to pharmacological concentrations of DATS (2.5 and 5 μm) resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of bCSC, as evidenced by a mammosphere assay and flow cytometric analysis of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and the CD44(high)/CD24(low)/epithelial specific antigen-positive fraction. DATS-mediated inhibition of bCSC was associated with a decrease in the protein level of FoxQ1. Overexpression of FoxQ1 in MCF-7 and SUM159 cells increased ALDH1 activity and the CD49f(+)/CD24(-) fraction. Inhibition of ALDH1 activity and/or mammosphere formation upon DATS treatment was significantly attenuated by overexpression of FoxQ1. In agreement with these results, stable knockdown of FoxQ1 using small hairpin RNA augmented bCSC inhibition by DATS. Expression profiling for cancer stem cell-related genes suggested that FoxQ1 may negatively regulate the expression of Dachshund homolog 1 (DACH1), whose expression is lost in invasive breast cancer. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed recruitment of FoxQ1 at the DACH1 promoter. Moreover, inducible expression of DACH1 augmented DATS-mediated inhibition of bCSC. Expression of FoxQ1 protein was significantly higher in triple-negative breast cancer cases compared with normal mammary tissues. Moreover, an inverse association was observed between FoxQ1 and DACH1 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines and tumors. DATS administration inhibited ALDH1 activity in vivo in SUM159 xenografts. These results indicate that FoxQ1 is a novel target of bCSC inhibition by DATS. PMID:27129776

  9. Oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and growth factors in breast cancer: novel targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Callahan, R; Salomon, D S

    1993-01-01

    The complexity of growth factors and growth factor receptors that are aberrantly expressed, as well as the mutational events that either directly cause or influence the expression of these and other gene products, should provide in the near future multiple diagnostic, prognostic indicators or targets for therapeutic intervention. It seems reasonable to expect that soon the search for aberrantly expressed gene products in breast cancer cells will merge with the search and characterization of somatic mutations that are selected during tumour progression. Clearly, the current rapid development of new molecular biological methodologies aimed at detecting and cloning of RNA sequences that are aberrantly expressed in breast tumour cells, as well as molecular probes and reagents to detect and physically map mutated genes on affected chromosomes, should accelerate the effort to identify targets for therapeutic intervention. We are at the beginning of this learning curve, but already several potential target gene products have been identified. A major challenge will be to sort out those approaches and reagents that appear efficacious on the basis of results from in vitro and in vivo model systems that will actually have an impact on the treatment of the disease in the clinic. Reagents that target some of these gene products are currently in clinical trials; however, there are others such as immunotherapy against the mutated TP53 protein and human CG treatment of high risk breast cancer patients that warrant testing in this context.

  10. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis.

  11. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:27398151

  12. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research. PMID:25557227

  13. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research.

  14. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  15. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation and Breast Tumor Targeting of pHLIP-Monomethyl Auristatin E Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kelly E.; Robinson, Matthew K.; Théveninr, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Localized delivery is vital for the successful development of novel and effective therapeutics for the treatment of cancer. The targeting and delivery described herein is based on the pH(Low) Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), a unique delivery peptide that can selectively target tumors in mice and translocate and release cargo molecules intra-cellularly based solely on the low extracellular pH intrinsic to cancer cells. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of pHLIP to target and deliver the highly potent and clinically validated microtubule inhibitor monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) to cancer cells and breast tumors. We show that pHLIP-MMAE conjugates induce a potent cytotoxic effect (> 90% inhibition of cell growth) in a concentration- and pH-dependent manner after only 2-hour incubation without any apparent disruption of the plasma membrane. pHLIP-MMAE conjugates exhibit between an 11 and 144-fold higher anti-proliferative effect at low pH than at physiological pH, and a pronounced pH-dependent cytotoxicity as compared to free drug. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a pHLIP-MMAE drug conjugate effectively targets triple negative breast tumor xenografts in mice. These results indicate pHLIP-based auristatin conjugates may have an enhanced therapeutic window as compared to free drug, providing a targeting mechanism to attenuate systemic toxicity. PMID:25741818

  16. Efficacy of RG7787, a next-generation mesothelin-targeted immunotoxin, against triple-negative breast and gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Alewine, Christine; Xiang, Laiman; Yamori, Takao; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bosslet, Klaus; Pastan, Ira

    2014-11-01

    The RG7787 mesothelin-targeted recombinant immunotoxin (RIT) consists of an antibody fragment targeting mesothelin (MSLN) fused to a 24-kD fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin A for cell killing. Compared with prior RITs, RG7787 has improved properties for clinical development including decreased nonspecific toxicity and immunogenicity and resistance to degradation by lysosomal proteases. MSLN is a cell surface glycoprotein highly expressed by many solid tumor malignancies. New reports have demonstrated that MSLN is expressed by a significant percentage of triple-negative breast and gastric cancer clinical specimens. Here, panels of triple-negative breast and gastric cancer cell lines were tested for surface MSLN expression, and for sensitivity to RG7787 in vitro and in animal models. RG7787 produced >95% cell killing of the HCC70 and SUM149 breast cancer cell lines in vitro with IC50 < 100 pmol/L. RG7787 was also effective against gastric cancer cell lines MKN28, MKN45, and MKN74 in vitro, with subnanomolar IC50s. In a nude mouse model, RG7787 treatment (2.5 mg/kg i.v. qod ×3-4) resulted in a statistically significant 41% decrease in volumes of HCC70 xenograft tumors (P < 0.0001) and an 18% decrease in MKN28 tumors (P < 0.0001). Pretreatment with paclitaxel (50 mg/kg i.p.) enhanced efficacy, producing 88% and 70% reduction in tumor volumes for HCC70 and MKN28, respectively, a statistically significant improvement over paclitaxel alone (P < 0.0001 for both). RG7787 merits clinical testing for triple-negative breast and gastric cancers. PMID:25239937

  17. Galectin signatuares contribute to the heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide new prognostic information and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Labrie, Marilyne; Vladoiu, Maria Claudia; Yousef, Einas M; Gaboury, Louis; St-Pierre, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Because of their ability to induce local immunosuppression and to confer cancer cells with resistance to apoptosis, members of the galectin family are emerging as a new class of actionable targets in cancer. Unfortunately, we have yet to obtain a clear picture of the galectin signatures in cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to provide the first detailed analysis of the galectin signature in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Expression signatures of galectins were obtained at the mRNA and protein levels. A particular attention was paid to stromal versus epithelial staining and to subcellular compartmentalization. Analysis of the stromal signature showed that gal-1, -3, -9-positive stroma were preferentially found in triple-negative (TN) and HER2 subtypes. In cancer cells, gal-1, −3, -8, and -9 showed a dual expression pattern, being found either in the cytosol or in the cytosol and the nucleus. TN patients with gal-8-positive nuclei had significantly better disease-free survival (DFS), distant-disease-free survival (DDFS), and overall survival (OS). In contrast, high expression of nuclear gal-1 correlated with poor DDFS and OS. TNBC patients who were positive for both nuclear gal-1 and gal-8 had 5-year DFS and DDFS of 100%, suggesting a dominance of the gal-8 phenotype. Overall, the results indicate that specific galectin expression signatures contribute to the phenotypic heterogeneity of aggressive subtypes of breast cancer. Our data also suggest that galectins have clinical utility as indicators of disease progression and therapeutic targets in aggressive molecular subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:26933916

  18. Tamoxifen as the First Targeted Long Term Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an unlikely pioneering medicine in medical oncology. Nevertheless, the medicine has continued to surprise us, perform and save lives for the past 40 years. Unlike any other medicine in oncology, it is used to treat all stages of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, male breast cancer, pioneered the use of chemoprevention by reducing the incidence of breast cancer in women at high risk and induces ovulation in subfertile women! The impact of tamoxifen is ubiquitous. However, the power to save lives from this unlikely success story came from the first laboratory studies which defined that “longer was going to be better” when tamoxifen was being considered as an adjuvant therapy (Jordan 1978 Use of the DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinoma system for the evaluation of tamoxifen as a potential adjuvant therapy Reviews in Endocrine Related Cancer. October Supplement: 49–55.). This is that success story, with a focus on the interdependent components of: excellence in drug discovery, investment in self-selecting young investigators, a conversation with Nature, a conversation between the laboratory and the clinic, and the creation of the Oxford Overview Analysis. Each of these factors was essential to propel the progress of tamoxifen to evolve as an essential part of the fabric of society. “Science is adventure, discovery, new horizons, insight into our world, a means of predicting the future and enormous power to help others”(Hoagland 1990).- Mahlon Hoagland, MD. Director, Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology (1970–85) PMID:24659478

  19. Targeting an IKBKE cytokine network impairs triple-negative breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Barbie, Thanh U.; Alexe, Gabriela; Aref, Amir R.; Li, Shunqiang; Zhu, Zehua; Zhang, Xiuli; Imamura, Yu; Thai, Tran C.; Huang, Ying; Bowden, Michaela; Herndon, John; Cohoon, Travis J.; Fleming, Timothy; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P.; Ogino, Shuji; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Ellis, Matthew J.; Hahn, William C.; Barbie, David A.; Gillanders, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are a heterogeneous set of cancers that are defined by the absence of hormone receptor expression and HER2 amplification. Here, we found that inducible IκB kinase–related (IKK-related) kinase IKBKE expression and JAK/STAT pathway activation compose a cytokine signaling network in the immune-activated subset of TNBC. We found that treatment of cultured IKBKE-driven breast cancer cells with CYT387, a potent inhibitor of TBK1/IKBKE and JAK signaling, impairs proliferation, while inhibition of JAK alone does not. CYT387 treatment inhibited activation of both NF-κB and STAT and disrupted expression of the protumorigenic cytokines CCL5 and IL-6 in these IKBKE-driven breast cancer cells. Moreover, in 3D culture models, the addition of CCL5 and IL-6 to the media not only promoted tumor spheroid dispersal but also stimulated proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Interruption of cytokine signaling by CYT387 in vivo impaired the growth of an IKBKE-driven TNBC cell line and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs). A combination of CYT387 therapy with a MEK inhibitor was particularly effective, abrogating tumor growth and angiogenesis in an aggressive PDX model of TNBC. Together, these findings reveal that IKBKE-associated cytokine signaling promotes tumorigenicity of immune-driven TNBC and identify a potential therapeutic strategy using clinically available compounds. PMID:25365225

  20. Targeting tyrosine-kinases and estrogen receptor abrogates resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuying; Meng, Xiaolong; Chen, Huiqin; Liu, Wenbin; Miller, Todd; Murph, Mandi; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Gagea, Mihai; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Mills, Gordon B.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; González-Angulo, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous therapies that effectively inhibit estrogen signaling in breast cancer, a significant proportion of patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive malignancy will succumb to their disease. Herein we demonstrate that long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) therapy among ER-positive breast cancer cells results in the adaptive increase in ER expression and subsequent activation of multiple tyrosine kinases. Combination therapy with the ER down-regulator fulvestrant and dasatinib, a broad kinase inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity against LTED cells, by reduction of cell proliferation, cell survival, cell invasion and mammary acinar formation. Screening kinase phosphorylation using protein arrays and functional proteomic analysis demonstrates that the combination of fulvestrant and dasatinib inhibits multiple tyrosine kinases and cancer-related pathways that are constitutively activated in LTED cells. Because LTED cells display increased insulin receptor (InsR)/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling, we added an ant-IGF-1 antibody to the combination with fulvestrant and dasatinib in an effort to further increase the inhibition. However, adding MK0646 only modestly increased the inhibition of cell growth in monolayer culture, but neither suppressed acinar formation nor inhibited cell migration in vitro and invasion in vivo. Therefore, combinations of fulvestrant and dasatinib, but not MK0646, may benefit patients with tyrosine-kinase-activated, endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer. PMID:24979294

  1. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 11/2016).

    PubMed

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    On page 1310 J. S. Merzaban, A. E. Porter, and co-workers present fluorescently labeled RGD-targeted ZnO nanoparticles (NPs; green) for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic ZnO to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on triple negative breast cancer cells. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that NPs dissolve into ionic Zn(2+) (blue) upon uptake and cause apoptosis (red) with intra-tumor heterogeneity, thereby providing a possible strategy for targeted breast cancer therapy. Cover design by Ivan Gromicho. PMID:27275627

  2. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Breast Cancer Survivors: New Insight into Activity Patterns and Potential Intervention Targets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Siobhan M.; Dodd, Kevin W.; Steeves, Jeremy; McClain, James; Alfano, Catherine M.; McAuley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background Inactivity and sedentary behavior are related to poorer health outcomes in breast cancer survivors. However, few studies examining these behaviors in survivors have used objective measures, considered activities other than moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity (MVPA) and/or sedentary behavior (i.e. low intensity activities) or compared survivors to healthy controls. The purpose of the present study is to compare accelerometer-measured activity of various intensities (total, light, lifestyle, MVPA) and sedentary behavior between breast cancer survivors and non-cancer controls. Methods An imputation-based approach of independent sample t-tests adjusting for multiple comparisons was used to compare estimates of participation in each activity and sedentary behavior between survivors [n=398; M(SD)age=56.95 (9.11)] and block-matched non-cancer controls [n=1120; M(SD)age=54.88 (16.11)]. Potential moderating effects of body mass index (BMI), age, and education were also examined. Results Breast cancer survivors registered less daily total (282.8 v. 346.9) light (199.1 v. 259.3) and lifestyle (62.0 v. 71.7) activity minutes and more MVPA (21.6 v. 15.9) and sedentary behavior (555.7 v. 500.6) minutes than controls (p<0.001 for all). These relationships were largely consistent across BMI, age and education. On average, survivors spent an estimated 66.4% of their waking time sedentary and 31.1% in light/lifestyle activity and 2.6% in MVPA. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors are more sedentary and participate in less low intensity activity than controls. Although survivors registered more MVPA, these levels were insufficient. Future research should explore these differences and potential benefits of targeting low intensity activities and reducing sedentary time in this population. PMID:26026737

  3. Identification and targeting of a TACE-dependent autocrine loopwhich predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, Paraic A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2005-06-15

    The ability to proliferate independently of signals from other cell types is a fundamental characteristic of tumor cells. Using a 3D culture model of human breast cancer progression, we have delineated a protease-dependent autocrine loop which provides an oncogenic stimulus in the absence of proto-oncogene mutation. Inhibition of this protease, TACE/ADAM17, reverts the malignant phenotype by preventing mobilization of two crucial growth factors, Amphiregulin and TGF{alpha}. We show further that the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors is overcome by physiological levels of growth factors and that successful EGFR inhibition is dependent on reducing ligand bioavailability. Using existing patient outcome data, we demonstrate a strong correlation between TACE and TGF{alpha} expression in human breast cancers that is predictive of poor prognosis.

  4. Quercetin and doxorubicin co-encapsulated biotin receptor-targeting nanoparticles for minimizing drug resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Liu, Chunxia; Chen, Chuxiong; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Guanghui; Shi, Yonghui; Qin, Fengchao; Ou, Jiebin; Qiu, Kaifeng; Li, Guocheng

    2016-05-31

    The combination of a chemotherapeutic drug with a chemosensitizer has emerged as a promising strategy for cancers showing multidrug resistance (MDR). Herein we describe the simultaneous targeted delivery of two drugs to tumor cells by using biotin-decorated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles encapsulating the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin and the chemosensitizer quercetin (BNDQ). Next, the potential ability of BNDQ to reverse MDR in vitro and in vivo was investigated. Studies demonstrated that BNDQ was more effectively taken up with less efflux by doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) than by the cells treated with the free drugs, single-drug-loaded nanoparticles, or non-biotin-decorated nanoparticles. BNDQ exhibited clear inhibition of both the activity and expression of P-glycoprotein in MCF-7/ADR cells. More importantly, it caused a significant reduction in doxorubicin resistance in MCF-7/ADR breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, among all the groups. Overall, this study suggests that BNDQ has a potential role in the treatment of drug-resistant breast cancer. PMID:27058756

  5. Targeting Cell Cycle Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells with siRNA by Using Lipid-Substituted Polyethylenimines

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Manoj B.; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Mahdipoor, Parvin; Kucharski, Cezary; Maranchuk, Robert; Hugh, Judith C.; Uludağ, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle proteins are key regulators of cell cycle progression whose deregulation is one of the causes of breast cancer. RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous mechanism to regulate gene expression and it could serve as the basis of regulating aberrant proteins including cell cycle proteins. Since the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a main barrier for implementation of RNAi therapy, we explored the potential of a non-viral delivery system, 2.0 kDa polyethylenimines substituted with linoleic acid and caprylic acid, for this purpose. Using a library of siRNAs against cell cycle proteins, we identified cell division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), a recombinase RAD51, and serine–threonine protein kinase CHEK1 as effective targets for breast cancer therapy, and demonstrated their therapeutic potential in breast cancer MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7 cells with respect to another well-studied cell cycle protein, kinesin spindle protein. We also explored the efficacy of dicer-substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) against CDC20, RAD51, and CHEK1, where a particular DsiRNA against CDC20 showed an exceptionally high inhibition of cell growth in vitro. There was no apparent effect of silencing selected cell cycle proteins on the potency of the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. The efficacy of DsiRNA against CDC20 was subsequently assessed in a xenograft model, which indicated a reduced tumor growth as a result of CDC20 DsiRNA therapy. The presented study highlighted specific cell cycle protein targets critical for breast cancer therapy, and provided a polymeric delivery system for their effective down-regulation. PMID:25763370

  6. Mammary gland involution as an immunotherapeutic target for postpartum breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fornetti, Jaime; Martinson, Holly A; Betts, Courtney B; Lyons, Traci R; Jindal, Sonali; Guo, Qiuchen; Coussens, Lisa M; Borges, Virginia F; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-07-01

    Postpartum mammary gland involution has been identified as tumor-promotional and is proposed to contribute to the increased rates of metastasis and poor survival observed in postpartum breast cancer patients. In rodent models, the involuting mammary gland microenvironment is sufficient to induce enhanced tumor cell growth, local invasion, and metastasis. Postpartum involution shares many attributes with wound healing, including upregulation of genes involved in immune responsiveness and infiltration of tissue by immune cells. In rodent models, treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ameliorates the tumor-promotional effects of involution, consistent with the immune milieu of the involuting gland contributing to tumor promotion. Currently, immunotherapy is being investigated as a means of breast cancer treatment with the purpose of identifying ways to enhance anti-tumor immune responses. Here we review evidence for postpartum mammary gland involution being a uniquely defined 'hot-spot' of pro-tumorigenic immune cell infiltration, and propose that immunotherapy should be explored for prevention and treatment of breast cancers that arise in this environment.

  7. Overexpression of caspase 7 is ERα dependent to affect proliferation and cell growth in breast cancer cells by targeting p21Cip

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, S; Madhukrishna, B; Adhya, A K; Keshari, S; Mishra, S K

    2016-01-01

    Caspase 7 (CASP7) expression has important function during cell cycle progression and cell growth in certain cancer cells and is also involved in the development and differentiation of dental tissues. However, the function of CASP7 in breast cancer cells is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of CASP7 in breast carcinoma patients and determine the role of CASP7 in regulating tumorigenicity in breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that the CASP7 expression is high in breast carcinoma tissues compared with normal counterpart. The ectopic expression of CASP7 is significantly associated with ERα expression status and persistently elevated in different stages of the breast tumor grades. High level of CASP7 expression showed better prognosis in breast cancer patients with systemic endocrine therapy as observed from Kaplan–Meier analysis. S3 and S4, estrogen responsive element (ERE) in the CASP7 promoter, is important for estrogen-ERα-mediated CASP7 overexpression. Increased recruitment of p300, acetylated H3 and pol II in the ERE region of CASP7 promoter is observed after hormone stimulation. Ectopic expression of CASP7 in breast cancer cells results in cell growth and proliferation inhibition via p21Cip reduction, whereas small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated reduction of CASP7 rescued p21Cip levels. We also show that pro- and active forms of CASP7 is located in the nucleus apart from cytoplasmic region of breast cancer cells. The proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells is significantly reduced by broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors and siRNA of CASP7. Taken together, our findings show that CASP7 is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer and contributes to cell growth and proliferation by downregulating p21Cip protein, suggesting that targeting CASP7-positive breast cancer could be one of the potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27089142

  8. Overexpression of caspase 7 is ERα dependent to affect proliferation and cell growth in breast cancer cells by targeting p21(Cip).

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, S; Madhukrishna, B; Adhya, A K; Keshari, S; Mishra, S K

    2016-04-18

    Caspase 7 (CASP7) expression has important function during cell cycle progression and cell growth in certain cancer cells and is also involved in the development and differentiation of dental tissues. However, the function of CASP7 in breast cancer cells is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of CASP7 in breast carcinoma patients and determine the role of CASP7 in regulating tumorigenicity in breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that the CASP7 expression is high in breast carcinoma tissues compared with normal counterpart. The ectopic expression of CASP7 is significantly associated with ERα expression status and persistently elevated in different stages of the breast tumor grades. High level of CASP7 expression showed better prognosis in breast cancer patients with systemic endocrine therapy as observed from Kaplan-Meier analysis. S3 and S4, estrogen responsive element (ERE) in the CASP7 promoter, is important for estrogen-ERα-mediated CASP7 overexpression. Increased recruitment of p300, acetylated H3 and pol II in the ERE region of CASP7 promoter is observed after hormone stimulation. Ectopic expression of CASP7 in breast cancer cells results in cell growth and proliferation inhibition via p21(Cip) reduction, whereas small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated reduction of CASP7 rescued p21(Cip) levels. We also show that pro- and active forms of CASP7 is located in the nucleus apart from cytoplasmic region of breast cancer cells. The proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells is significantly reduced by broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors and siRNA of CASP7. Taken together, our findings show that CASP7 is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer and contributes to cell growth and proliferation by downregulating p21(Cip) protein, suggesting that targeting CASP7-positive breast cancer could be one of the potential therapeutic strategies.

  9. The genomic map of breast cancer: which roads lead to better targeted therapies?

    PubMed

    Balko, Justin M; Stricker, Thomas P; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in whole-genome technologies have supplied the field of cancer research with an overwhelming amount of molecular data. Improvements in massively parallel sequencing approaches have led to logarithmic decreases in costs, and so these methods are becoming almost commonplace in the analysis of clinical trials and other cohorts of interest. Furthermore, whole-transcriptome quantification by RNA sequencing is quickly replacing microarrays. However, older chip-based methodologies such as comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays have benefited from this technological explosion and are now so accessible that they can be employed in increasingly larger cohorts of patients. The study of breast cancer lends itself particularly well to these technologies. It is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm in women, giving rise to nearly 230,000 new cases each year. Many patients are given a diagnosis of early-stage disease, for which surgery is the standard of care. These attributes result in excellent availability of tissues for whole-genome/transcriptome analysis. The Cancer Genome Atlas project has generated comprehensive catalogs of publically available genomic breast cancer data. In addition, other studies employing the power of genomic technologies in medium to large cohorts were recently published. These data are now publically available for the generation of novel hypotheses. However, these studies differed in the methods, patient cohorts, and analytical techniques employed and represent complementary snapshots of the molecular underpinnings of breast cancer. Here, we will discuss the convergences and divergences of these reports as well as the scientific and clinical implications of their findings.

  10. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Sabina; Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Mazzarelli, Paola

    2016-04-12

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors.

  11. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26799588

  12. Near infrared light-actuated gold nanorods with cisplatin-polypeptide wrapping for targeted therapy of triple negative breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bing; Xu, Zhiai; Zhou, Fangyuan; Yu, Haijun; Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Dangge; Tang, Zhaohui; Yu, Haiyang; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2015-09-01

    Despite considerable progress being made in breast cancer therapy, the complete eradication of highly aggressive triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains a notable challenge today. We herein report on the fabrication of novel gold nanorods (GNRs) with covalent cisplatin-polypeptide wrapping and folic acid (FA) conjugation (FA-GNR@Pt) for the targeted photothermal (PT) therapy and chemotherapy of TNBC. The FA-GNR@Pt hybrid nanoparticles are designed to integrate the photothermal conversion property of GNRs, the superior biocompatibility of polypeptide poly(l-glutamic acid) (PGA), the chemotoxicity of cisplatin, and the tumor targeting ability of FA into one single nanoplatform. In combination with localized near infrared (NIR) laser illumination, the resulting FA-GNR@Pt hybrid nanoparticles are able to significantly inhibit the growth of the TNBC tumor when administered systemically. In particular, they can extensively suppress the dissemination of TNBC cells from the primary tumor to the lung by eliminating the peripheral tumor blood vessels. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the combined PT therapy and chemotherapy using cisplatin-loaded GNRs with FA conjugation might imply a promising strategy for targeted treatment of TNBC.Despite considerable progress being made in breast cancer therapy, the complete eradication of highly aggressive triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains a notable challenge today. We herein report on the fabrication of novel gold nanorods (GNRs) with covalent cisplatin-polypeptide wrapping and folic acid (FA) conjugation (FA-GNR@Pt) for the targeted photothermal (PT) therapy and chemotherapy of TNBC. The FA-GNR@Pt hybrid nanoparticles are designed to integrate the photothermal conversion property of GNRs, the superior biocompatibility of polypeptide poly(l-glutamic acid) (PGA), the chemotoxicity of cisplatin, and the tumor targeting ability of FA into one single nanoplatform. In combination with localized near infrared (NIR

  13. Targeting FASN in Breast Cancer and the Discovery of Promising Inhibitors from Natural Products Derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chien-shan; Wang, Zhiyu; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells process a fundamental change in its bioenergetic metabolism from normal cells on an altered lipid metabolism, also known as the de novo fatty acid synthesis, for sustaining their high proliferation rates. Fatty acid synthesis is now associated with clinically aggressive tumor behavior and tumor cell growth and has become a novel target pathway for chemotherapy development. Although the underlying mechanisms of the altered de novo fatty acid synthesis still remains unclear, recent progress has shown that by targeting Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of endogenous long chain fatty acid could be a critical target for drug discovery. However, relatively few FASN inhibitors have been discovered. With the long history of clinical practices and numerous histological case study reports, traditional Chinese medicine enjoys an important role in seeking bioactive anticancer natural compounds. Herein, we will give an overall picture of the current progress of molecular targeted therapy in cancer fatty acid synthesis, describe the advances in the research on natural products-derived FASN inhibitors and their potential for enhancing our understanding of fatty acids in tumor biology, and may provide new therapeutic moieties for breast cancer patient care. PMID:24778702

  14. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  15. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  16. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  18. MicroRNA-320a sensitizes tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells to tamoxifen by targeting ARPP-19 and ERRγ.

    PubMed

    Lü, Mingrong; Ding, Keshuo; Zhang, Guofeng; Yin, Mianmian; Yao, Guidong; Tian, Hui; Lian, Jie; Liu, Lin; Liang, Meng; Zhu, Tao; Sun, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen represents a major adjuvant therapy to those patients with estrogen receptor-alpha positive breast cancer. However, tamoxifen resistance occurs quite often, either de novo or acquired during treatment. To investigate the role of miR-320a in the development of resistance to tamoxifen, we established tamoxifen-resistant (TamR) models by continually exposing MCF-7 or T47D breast cancer cells to tamoxifen, and identified microRNA(miRNA)-320a as a down-regulated miRNA in tamoxifen resistant cells. Re-expression of miR-320a was sufficient to sensitize TamR cells to tamoxifen by targeting cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (ARPP-19) and estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) as well as their downstream effectors, c-Myc and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, progesterone (P4) promoted the expression of miR-320a by repressing c-Myc expression, while estrogen (E2) exerted the opposite effect. These results suggest the potential therapeutic approach for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer by restorating miR-320a expression or depleting ARPP-19/ERRγ expression. PMID:25736597

  19. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification.

  20. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification. PMID:26082378

  1. MicroRNA-146a inhibits cell migration and invasion by targeting RhoA in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIU, QIN; WANG, WEI; YANG, XIONGFA; ZHAO, DONGXIAO; LI, FANGQIONG; WANG, HAI

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as genetic modulators that regulate gene expression and are involved in a wide range of biological roles, including tumor cell migration and invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that the migration and invasion activity in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells could be directly influenced by altering miR-146a expression. The expression of RhoA and miR-146a in the breast cancer cells showed an inverse correlation. Upregulation of miR-146a in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by transfection of miR-146a mimics resulted in decreased RhoA protein levels. Conversely, downregulation of miR-146a by transfection of miR-146a inhibitor resulted in increased RhoA protein levels. To confirm the fact that RhoA is a potential target of miR-146a, luciferase reporter containing the RhoA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) was constructed. The results demonstrated that the luciferase reporter activity was reduced after overexpression of miR-146a. Moreover, the luciferase reporter which was constructed with the RhoA 3′UTR mutant did not show significantly altered luciferase reporter activity. Furthermore, after treatment with the RhoA inhibitor exoenzyme C3 transferase protein, the migratory capacity of the MDA-MB-231 cells was not significantly altered even though the amount of miR-146a was changed. Our results indicate that miR-146a functions as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Downregulation of the expression of miR-146a increased the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, due to the upregulation of RhoA expression. PMID:27175941

  2. Targeted and intracellular triggered delivery of therapeutics to cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment: impact on the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vera; Lacerda, Manuela; Figueiredo, Paulo; Corvo, Maria L; Cruz, Maria E M; Soares, Raquel; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João N

    2012-05-01

    Limiting tumor invasion to the surrounding healthy tissues has proven to be clinically relevant for anticancer treatment options. We have demonstrated that, within a solid tumor, it is possible to achieve such a goal with the same nanoparticle by intracellular and triggered targeted drug delivery to more than one cell population. We have identified the nucleolin receptor in endothelial and cancer cells in tissue samples from breast cancer patients, which enabled the design of a F3-peptide-targeted sterically stabilized pH-sensitive liposome. The clinical potential of such strategy was demonstrated by the successful specific cellular association by breast cancer cells harvested from tumors of patients submitted to mastectomy. In vitro, the nanoparticle targeted the nucleolin receptor on a cell and ligand-specific manner and improved cytotoxicity of doxorubicin (used as a model drug) towards breast cancer and endothelial cells by 177- and 162-fold, respectively, relative to the commercially available non-targeted non-pH-sensitive liposomes. Moreover, active accumulation of F3-targeted pH-sensitive liposomes into human orthotopic tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad of nude mice, was registered for a time point as short as 4 h, reaching 48% of the injected dose/g of tissue. Twenty-four hours post-injection the accumulation of the dual-targeted pH-sensitive nanoparticle in the tumor tissue was 33-fold higher than the non-targeted non-pH-sensitive counterpart. In mice treated with the developed targeted nanoparticle significant decrease of the tumor viable rim area and microvascular density, as well as limited invasion to surrounding healthy tissues were observed (as opposed to other tested controls), which may increase the probability of tumors falling in the category of "negative margins" with reduced risk of relapse.

  3. CDK4/6 inhibition provides a potent adjunct to Her2-targeted therapies in preclinical breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Cox, Derek; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the efficacy of Her2-targeted therapies, recurrence and progression remain a challenge for treatment of Her2 positive breast cancer. CDK4/6 controls pathway downstream of Her2, Inhibition of these kinases could represent an important therapeutic approach to augment the effectiveness of standard therapies. In models of acquired resistance to Her2-targeted therapies, Cyclin D1 was inappropriately activated and CDK4/6 inhibition was effective at blocking proliferation by targeting this common pathway associated with resistance. These data were recapitulated in Her2 positive xenografts. Furthermore, in a series of 35 primary breast tumor explants, treatment with PD-0332991 resulted in a greater than 4-fold suppression of the Ki67. The effects of CDK4/6 inhibition were dependent on an intact RB-pathway, and consonantly, loss of RB and high-levels of p16 were associated with resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition. Combination studies illustrated that CDK4/6 inhibition is cooperative with multiple Her2-targeted agents and provides a complementary mechanism of action to T-DM1 to efficiently suppresses the proliferation of residual Her2-positive tumor cell populations that survive T-DM1. Together, these data indicate CDK4/6 is a viable therapeutic target that functions downstream of Her2, and tissue based markers are available to direct rational utilization of CDK4/6 inhibitors in combination with Her2-targeted agents. PMID:25221644

  4. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-08-20

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  5. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice.

  6. Targeted expression of miR-34a using the T-VISA system suppresses breast cancer cell growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Laisheng; Xie, Xinhua; Luo, Jinmei; Liu, Min; Xi, Shaoyan; Guo, Jiaoli; Kong, Yanan; Wu, Minqing; Gao, Jie; Xie, Zeming; Tang, Jun; Wang, Xi; Wei, Weidong; Yang, Mingtian; Hung, Mien-Chie; Xie, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    Recurrence and metastasis result in a poor prognosis for breast cancer patients. Recent studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the development and metastasis of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of miR-34a in breast cancer. We found that miR-34a is downregulated in breast cancer cell lines and tissues, compared with normal cell lines and the adjacent nontumor tissues, respectively. To explore the therapeutic potential of miR-34a, we designed a targeted miR-34a expression plasmid (T-VISA-miR-34a) using the T-VISA system, and evaluated its antitumor effects, efficacy, mechanism of action, and systemic toxicity. T-VISA-miR-34a induced robust, persistent expression of miR-34a, and dramatically suppressed breast cancer cell growth, migration, and invasion in vitro by downregulating the protein expression levels of the miR-34a target genes E2F3, CD44, and SIRT1. In an orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer, intravenous injection of T-VISA-miR-34a:liposomal complex nanoparticles significantly inhibited tumor growth, prolonged survival, and did not induce systemic toxicity. In conclusion, T-VISA-miR-34a lead to robust, specific overexpression of miR-34a in breast cancer cells and induced potent antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. T-VISA-miR-34a may provide a potentially useful, specific, and safe-targeted therapeutic approach for breast cancer.

  7. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  8. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  9. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  10. Peri-operative biology in primary breast cancer: a credible therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Love, Richard R; Love, Susan M

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 25 years, there has been a growing body of basic science, modeling, and clinical data suggesting that the peri-operative period in the treatment of primary breast cancer is dynamic and can be manipulated to improve long-term outcomes. Clinical data have demonstrated early peaks of hazards for recurrence and emphasized the relationship of these to peri-operative events. More recently, clinical trial data with surgical oophorectomy at different times in the menstrual cycle, peri-operative progesterone, and anti-inflammatory drugs suggest that interventional studies are particularly well justified, given the increasing recognition of the costs both financially and clinically of current systemic regimens.

  11. Helping Eve overcome ADAM: G-quadruplexes in the ADAM-15 promoter as new molecular targets for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert V; Gaerig, Vanessa C; Simmons, Taesha; Brooks, Tracy A

    2013-12-05

    ADAM-15, with known zymogen, secretase, and disintegrin activities, is a catalytically active member of the ADAM family normally expressed in early embryonic development and aberrantly expressed in various cancers, including breast, prostate and lung. ADAM-15 promotes extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, a soluble ligand for the HER2/neu receptor, leading to activation, increased motility, and proliferation. Targeted downregulation of both ADAM-15 and HER2/neu function synergistically kills breast cancer cells, but to date there are no therapeutic options for decreasing ADAM-15 function or expression. In this vein, we have examined a unique string of guanine-rich DNA within the critical core promoter of ADAM-15. This region of DNA consists of seven contiguous runs of three or more consecutive guanines, which, under superhelical stress, can relax from duplex DNA to form an intrastrand secondary G-quadruplex (G4) structure. Using biophysical and biological techniques, we have examined the G4 formation within the entire and various truncated regions of the ADAM-15 promoter, and demonstrate strong intrastrand G4 formation serving to function as a biological silencer element. Characterization of the predominant G4 species formed within the ADAM-15 promoter will allow for specific drug targeting and stabilization, and the further development of novel, targeted therapeutics.

  12. The class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin targets inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli and synergizes with paclitaxel to inhibit metastasis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Chu, Khoi; Boley, Kimberly M; Ye, Zaiming; Liu, Hui; Wright, Moishia C; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Green, Tessa L; Barsky, Sanford H; Heise, Carla; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer. IBC has distinctive characteristics including invasion of tumor emboli into the skin and rapid disease progression. Given our previous studies suggesting that HDAC inhibitors have promise in targeting IBC, the present study revealed that the class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin (FK-288, Istodax; Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ) potently induced destruction of IBC tumor emboli and lymphatic vascular architecture. associated with inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha, (HIF1alpha) proteins in the Mary-X pre-clinical model of IBC. Romidepsin treatment induced clinically relevant biomarkers in including induction of acetylated Histone 3 (Ac-H3) proteins, apoptosis, and increased p21WAF1/CIP1. Romidepsin, alone and synergistically when combined with Paclitaxel, effectively eliminated both primary tumors and metastatic lesions at multiple sites formed by the SUM149 IBC cell line. This is the first report of the ability of an HDAC inhibitor to eradicate IBC tumor emboli, to destroy the integrity of lymphatic vessel architecture and to target metastasis. Furthermore, Romidepsin, in combination with a taxane, warrants evaluation as a therapeutic strategy that may effectively target the skin involvement and rapid metastasis that are hallmarks of IBC.

  13. Near infrared light-actuated gold nanorods with cisplatin-polypeptide wrapping for targeted therapy of triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Xu, Zhiai; Zhou, Fangyuan; Yu, Haijun; Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Dangge; Tang, Zhaohui; Yu, Haiyang; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2015-09-28

    Despite considerable progress being made in breast cancer therapy, the complete eradication of highly aggressive triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) remains a notable challenge today. We herein report on the fabrication of novel gold nanorods (GNRs) with covalent cisplatin-polypeptide wrapping and folic acid (FA) conjugation (FA-GNR@Pt) for the targeted photothermal (PT) therapy and chemotherapy of TNBC. The FA-GNR@Pt hybrid nanoparticles are designed to integrate the photothermal conversion property of GNRs, the superior biocompatibility of polypeptide poly(l-glutamic acid) (PGA), the chemotoxicity of cisplatin, and the tumor targeting ability of FA into one single nanoplatform. In combination with localized near infrared (NIR) laser illumination, the resulting FA-GNR@Pt hybrid nanoparticles are able to significantly inhibit the growth of the TNBC tumor when administered systemically. In particular, they can extensively suppress the dissemination of TNBC cells from the primary tumor to the lung by eliminating the peripheral tumor blood vessels. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the combined PT therapy and chemotherapy using cisplatin-loaded GNRs with FA conjugation might imply a promising strategy for targeted treatment of TNBC. PMID:26222373

  14. Radiotherapy-induced miR-223 prevents relapse of breast cancer by targeting the EGF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, L; Berton, S; Citron, F; D'Andrea, S; Segatto, I; Nicoloso, M S; Massarut, S; Armenia, J; Zafarana, G; Rossi, S; Ivan, C; Perin, T; Vaidya, J S; Avanzo, M; Roncadin, M; Schiappacassi, M; Bristow, R G; Calin, G; Baldassarre, G; Belletti, B

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer (BC) patients, local recurrences often arise in proximity of the surgical scar, suggesting that response to surgery may have a causative role. Radiotherapy (RT) after lumpectomy significantly reduces the risk of recurrence. We investigated the direct effects of surgery and of RT delivered intraoperatively (IORT), by collecting irradiated and non-irradiated breast tissues from BC patients, after tumor removal. These breast tissue specimens have been profiled for their microRNA (miR) expression, in search of differentially expressed miR among patients treated or not with IORT. Our results demonstrate that IORT elicits effects that go beyond the direct killing of residual tumor cells. IORT altered the wound response, inducing the expression of miR-223 in the peri-tumoral breast tissue. miR-223 downregulated the local expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), leading to decreased activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) on target cells and, eventually, dampening a positive EGF–EGFR autocrine/paracrine stimulation loop induced by the post-surgical wound-healing response. Accordingly, both RT-induced miR-223 and peri-operative inhibition of EGFR efficiently prevented BC cell growth and reduced recurrence formation in mouse models of BC. Our study uncovers unknown effects of RT delivered on a wounded tissue and prompts to the use of anti-EGFR treatments, in a peri-operative treatment schedule, aimed to timely treat BC patients and restrain recurrence formation. PMID:26876200

  15. ERRα Regulated Lactate Metabolism Contributes to Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunghee; Chang, Ching-yi; Safi, Rachid; Liu, Xiaojing; Baldi, Robert; Jasper, Jeff S.; Anderson, Grace R.; Liu, Tingyu; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Wood, Kris C.; Locasale, Jason W.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Imaging studies in animals and in humans have indicated that the oxygenation and nutritional status of solid tumors is dynamic. Further, the extremely low level of glucose within tumors, while reflecting its rapid uptake and metabolism, also suggests that cancer cells must rely on other energy sources in some circumstances. Here we find that some breast cancer cells can switch to utilizing lactate as a primary source of energy, allowing them to survive glucose deprivation for extended periods, and that this activity confers resistance to PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. The nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα), was shown to regulate the expression of genes required for lactate utilization and isotopomer analysis revealed that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ERRα activity compromised lactate oxidation. Importantly, ERRα antagonists increased the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, highlighting the potential clinical utility of this drug combination. PMID:27050525

  16. Emerging drug discovery approaches for selective targeting of “precursor” metastatic breast cancer cells: highlights and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    AAlaoui-Jamali, Moulay; Bijian, Krikor; Batist, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease and a major cause of morbidity and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. A significant number of patients at the time of primary diagnosis present metastatic disease, at least to locoregional lymph nodes, which results in somewhat unpredictable prognosis that often prompts adjuvant systemic therapies of various kinds. The time course of distant recurrence is also unpredictable with some patients sustaining a recurrence within months after diagnosis, even during adjuvant treatments, while others can experience recurrence years or decades after initial diagnosis. To date, clinically approved therapeutics yielded marginal benefits for patients with systemic metastatic breast disease, since despite high clinical responses to various therapies, the patients virtually always become resistant and tumor relapses. Molecular profiling studies established that breast cancer is highly heterogeneous and encompasses diverse histological and molecular subtypes with distinct biological and clinical implications in particular in relation to the incidence of progression to metastasis. The latter has been recognized to result from late genetic events during the multistep progression proposed by the dominant theory of carcinogenesis. However, there is evidence that the dissemination of primary cancer can also be initiated at a very early stage of cancer development, originating from rare cell variants, possibly cancer stem-like cells (CSC), with invasive potential. These precursor metastatic cancer cells with stem-like properties are defined by their ability to self-renew and to regenerate cell variants, which have high plasticity and intrinsic invasive properties required for dissemination and tropism toward specific organs. Equally relevant to the CSC hypothesis for metastasis formation is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, which is critical for the acquisition of cancer cell invasive behavior and for selection/gain of

  17. Therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garcia, José; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Cortés, Javier; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of HER2 and development of trastuzumab pioneered the field of targeted therapy in breast cancer. Hoping to emulate the same clinical success, pharmaceutical companies have developed several antibodies against newly identified membrane-bound targets. Unfortunately, none of these agents has yet matched the thousands of lives saved by trastuzumab. In this article we review the most advanced therapeutic antibodies in breast cancer. While acknowledging their unquestionable benefit, we emphasize the need to better understand their biology and mechanisms of action in order to optimize their use in defined patient populations.

  18. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  19. EGF induces microRNAs that target suppressors of cell migration: miR-15b targets MTSS1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kedmi, Merav; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Körner, Cindy; Mancini, Maicol; Ben-Moshe, Noa Bossel; Lauriola, Mattia; Lavi, Sara; Biagioni, Francesca; Carvalho, Silvia; Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Schmitt, Fernando; Wiemann, Stefan; Blandino, Giovanni; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-03-17

    Growth factors promote tumor growth and metastasis. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced a set of 22 microRNAs (miRNAs) before promoting the migration of mammary cells. These miRNAs were more abundant in human breast tumors relative to the surrounding tissue, and their abundance varied among breast cancer subtypes. One of these miRNAs, miR-15b, targeted the 3' untranslated region of MTSS1 (metastasis suppressor protein 1). Although xenografts in which MTSS1 was knocked down grew more slowly in mice initially, longer-term growth was unaffected. Knocking down MTSS1 increased migration and Matrigel invasion of nontransformed mammary epithelial cells. Overexpressing MTSS1 in an invasive cell line decreased cell migration and invasiveness, decreased the formation of invadopodia and actin stress fibers, and increased the formation of cellular junctions. In tissues from breast cancer patients with the aggressive basal subtype, an inverse correlation occurred with the high expression of miRNA-15b and the low expression of MTSS1. Furthermore, low abundance of MTSS1 correlated with poor patient prognosis. Thus, growth factor-inducible miRNAs mediate mechanisms underlying the progression of cancer. PMID:25783158

  20. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  1. Targeted nanoparticles for image-guided treatment of triple-negative breast cancer: clinical significance and technological advances.

    PubMed

    Miller-Kleinhenz, Jasmine M; Bozeman, Erica N; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with its aggressive tumor biology, highly heterogeneous tumor cells, and poor prognosis requires an integrated therapeutic approach that addresses critical issues in cancer therapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles with the abilities of targeted drug delivery and noninvasive imaging for monitoring drug delivery and responses to therapy, such as theranostic nanoparticles, hold great promise toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of TNBC using a single therapeutic platform. The biological and pathological characteristics of TNBC provide insight into several potential molecular targets for current and future nanoparticle-based therapeutics. Extensive tumor stroma, highly proliferative cells, and a high rate of drug resistance are all barriers that must be appropriately addressed in order for these nanotherapeutic platforms to be effective. Utilization of the enhanced permeability and retention effect coupled with active targeting of cell surface receptors expressed by TNBC cells, and tumor-associated endothelial cells, stromal fibroblasts, and macrophages is likely to overcome such barriers to facilitate more effective drug delivery. An in-depth summary of current studies investigating targeted nanoparticles in preclinical TNBC mouse and human xenograft models is presented. This review aims to outline the current status of nanotherapeutic options for TNBC patients, identification of promising molecular targets, challenges associated with the development of targeted nanotherapeutics, the research done by our group as well as by others, and future perspectives on the nanomedicine field and ways to translate current preclinical studies into the clinic.

  2. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  3. Mutational profiling of brain metastasis from breast cancer: matched pair analysis of targeted sequencing between brain metastasis and primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Park, Kyunghee; Lim, Sung Hee; Kim, Hae Su; Yoo, Kwai Han; Jung, Ki Sun; Song, Haa-Na; Hong, Mineui; Do, In-Gu; Ahn, TaeJin; Lee, Se Kyung; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2015-12-22

    Although breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastasis with a notable increase of incidence, genes that mediate breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) are not fully understood. To study the molecular nature of brain metastasis, we performed gene expression profiling of brain metastasis and matched primary breast cancer (BC). We used the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel v2 covering 2,855 mutations from 50 cancer genes to analyze 18 primary BC and 42 BCBM including 15 matched pairs. The most common BCBM subtypes were triple-negative (42.9%) and basal-like (36.6%). In a total of 42 BCBM samples, 32 (76.2%) harbored at least one mutation (median 1, range 0-7 mutations). Frequently detected somatic mutations included TP53 (59.5%), MLH1 (14.3%), PIK3CA (14.3%), and KIT (7.1%). We compared BCBM with patient-matched primary BC specimens. There were no significant differences in mutation profiles between the two groups. Notably, gene expression in BCBM such as TP53, PIK3CA, KIT, MLH1, and RB1 also seemed to be present in primary breast cancers. The TP53 mutation frequency was higher in BCBM than in primary BC (59.5% vs 38.9%, respectively). In conclusion, we found actionable gene alterations in BCBM that were maintained in primary BC. Further studies with functional testing and a delineation of the role of these genes in specific steps of the metastatic process should lead to a better understanding of the biology of metastasis and its susceptibility to treatment.

  4. Estrogen receptor-targeted optical imaging of breast cancer cells with near-infrared fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Iven; Deodhar, Kodand; Chiplunkar, Shuba V.; Patkar, Meena

    2010-02-01

    Molecular imaging provides the in vivo characterization of cellular molecular events involved in normal and pathologic processes. With the advent of optical molecular imaging, specific molecules, proteins and genes may be tagged with a luminescent reporter and visualized in small animals. This powerful new tool has pushed in vivo optical imaging to the forefront as it allows for direct determination of drug bio-distribution and uptake kinetics as well as an indicator of biochemical activity and drug efficacy. Although optical imaging encompasses diverse techniques and makes use of various wavelengths of light, a great deal of excitement in molecular research lies in the use of tomographic and fluorescence techniques to image living tissues with near-infrared (NIR) light. Nonionizing, noninvasive near-infrared optical imaging has great potential to become promising alternative for breast cancer detection. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies of human tissue suggest that a variety of lesions show distinct fluorescence spectra compared to those of normal tissue. It has also been shown that exogenous dyes exhibit selective uptake in neoplastic lesions and may offer the best contrast for optical imaging. Use of exogenous agents would provide fluorescent markers, which could serve to detect embedded tumors in the breast. In particular, the ability to monitor the fluorescent yield and lifetime may also enable biochemical specificity if the fluorophore is sensitive to a specific metabolite, such as oxygen. As a first step, we have synthesized and characterized one such NIR fluorescent dye conjugate, which could potentially be used to detect estrogen receptors (ER)[2] . The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of indocyanine green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1, 1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5- carboxylic acid, sodium salt. The ester formed was found to have an extra binding ability with the receptor cites as

  5. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  6. Targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling with oncolytic virotherapy disrupts tumor vasculature and inhibits breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund; Komorowski, Marcin P.; Abrams, Scott I.; Kozbor, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise for the treatment of cancer, but their interaction with the tumor microenvironment needs to be elucidated for optimal tumor cell killing. Because the CXCR4 receptor for the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) chemokine is one of the key stimuli involved in signaling interactions between tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment, we used oncolytic virotherapy with a CXCR4 antagonist to target the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling axis in a triple-negative 4T1 breast carcinoma in syngeneic mice. We show here that CXCR4 antagonist expression from an oncolytic vaccinia virus delivered intravenously to mice with orthotopic tumors attains higher intratumoral concentration than its soluble counterpart and exhibits increased efficacy over that mediated by oncolysis alone. A systemic delivery of the armed virus after resection of the primary tumor was efficacious in inhibiting the development of spontaneous metastasis and increased overall tumor-free survival. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with destruction of tumor vasculature, reductions in expression of CXCL12 and VEGF, and decrease in intratumoral numbers of bone marrow-derived endothelial and myeloid cells. These changes led to induction of antitumor antibody responses and resistance to tumor rechallenge. Engineering an oncolytic virus armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents an innovative strategy that targets multiple elements within the tumor microenvironment. As such, this approach could have a significant therapeutic impact against primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23509246

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  8. Evaluation of data-dependent versus targeted shotgun proteomic approaches for monitoring transcription factor expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Charanjit; Hewel, Johannes A; Badis, Gwenael; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Liu, Jian; Hughes, Timothy R; Emili, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    In breast cancer, there is a significant degree of molecular diversity among tumors. Multiple perturbations in signal transduction pathways impinge on transcriptional networks that in turn dictate malignant transformation and metastatic progression. Detailed knowledge of the sequence-specific transcription factors that become activated or repressed within a tumor and comparison of their relative levels of expression in cancer versus normal tissue should therefore provide insight into disease mechanisms, improving patient stratification and facilitating personalized treatment. While high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry methods for global proteome profiling have been developed, existing approaches have limited sensitivity and are often unable to detect low-abundance transcription factors in a complex biological specimen like a biopsy or tumor cell extract. To this end, we have undertaken a systematic comparative evaluation of three MS/MS methods for the ability to detect reference transcription factors spiked in known amounts into a cell-free breast cancer nuclear extract: Data-Dependent Acquisition (DDA), wherein precursor ion intensity dictates selection for fragmentation; Targeted Peptide Monitoring (TPM), a directed approach using successive isolation and fragmentation of predefined m/ z ratios; and Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), in which specific precursor ion to product ion transitions are selectively monitored. Through a series of controlled, parallel benchmarking experiments, we have determined the relative figures-of-merit of each approach, and have established that prior knowledge of signature proteotypic peptides markedly improves overall detection sensitivity, reliability, and quantification.

  9. Redox-modulating agents target NOX2-dependent IKKε oncogenic kinase expression and proliferation in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mukawera, Espérance; Chartier, Stefany; Williams, Virginie; Pagano, Patrick J.; Lapointe, Réjean; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a causative factor in carcinogenesis, but also in the development of resistance to current chemotherapies. The appropriate usage of redox-modulating compounds is limited by the lack of knowledge of their impact on specific molecular pathways. Increased levels of the IKKε kinase, as a result of gene amplification or aberrant expression, are observed in a substantial number of breast carcinomas. IKKε not only plays a key role in cell transformation and invasiveness, but also in the development of resistance to tamoxifen. Here, we studied the effect of in vitro treatment with the redox-modulating triphenylmethane dyes, Gentian Violet and Brilliant Green, and nitroxide Tempol on IKKε expression and cell proliferation in the human breast cancer epithelial cell lines exhibiting amplification of IKKε, MCF-7 and ZR75.1. We show that Gentian Violet, Brilliant Green and Tempol significantly decrease intracellular superoxide anion levels and inhibit IKKε expression and cell viability. Treatment with Gentian Violet and Brilliant Green was associated with a reduced cyclin D1 expression and activation of caspase 3 and/or 7. Tempol decreased cyclin D1 expression in both cell lines, while activation of caspase 7 was only observed in MCF-7 cells. Silencing of the superoxide-generating NOX2 NADPH oxidase expressed in breast cancer cells resulted in the significant reduction of IKKε expression. Taken together, our results suggest that redox-modulating compounds targeting NOX2 could present a particular therapeutic interest in combination therapy against breast carcinomas exhibiting IKKε amplification. PMID:26177467

  10. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  11. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine targets cancer stem cells in triple negative breast cancer by inducing mitochondrial damage and impairing DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Liang, Diana H; Choi, Dong Soon; Ensor, Joe E; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bass, Barbara L; Chang, Jenny C

    2016-07-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), characterized by an abundance of treatment-resistant breast cancer stem cells (CSCs), has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancers. Despite its aggressiveness, no effective targeted therapy exists for TNBC. Here, we demonstrate that CQ effectively targets CSCs via autophagy inhibition, mitochondrial structural damage, and impairment of double-stranded DNA break repair. Electron microscopy demonstrates CQ-induced mitochondrial cristae damage, which leads to mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a significant reduction in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase and accumulation of superoxide and double-stranded DNA breaks. CQ effectively diminishes the TNBC cells' ability to metastasize in vitro and in a TNBC xenograft model. When administered in combination with carboplatin, CQ effectively inhibits carboplatin-induced autophagy. This combination treatment significantly diminishes the expression of DNA repair proteins in CSC subpopulations, resulting in tumor growth reduction in carboplatin-resistant BRCA1 wild-type TNBC orthotopic xenografts. As TNBC's high treatment failure rate has been attributed to enrichment of CSCs, CQ, an autophagy inhibitor with anti-CSC effects, may be an effective adjunct to current TNBC chemotherapy regimens with carboplatin. PMID:27060208

  12. Energy metabolism targeted drugs synergize with photodynamic therapy to potentiate breast cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2014-12-01

    Malignant cells are highly dependent on aerobic glycolysis, which differs significantly from normal cells (the Warburg effect). Interference of this metabolic process has been considered as an innovative method for developing selective cancer therapy. A recent study demonstrated that the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) can potentiate PDT efficacy, whereas the possible mechanisms have not been carefully investigated. This study firstly proved the general potentiation of PDT efficacy by 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, and carefully elucidated the underlying mechanism in the process. Our results showed that both 2-DG and 3-BP could significantly promote a PDT-induced cell cytotoxic effect when compared with either monotherapy. Synergistic potentiation of mitochondria- and caspase-dependent cell apoptosis was observed, including a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) drop, Bax translocation, and caspase-3 activation. Besides, ROS generation and the expression of oxidative stress related proteins such as P38 MAPK phosphorylation and JNK phosphorylation were notably increased after the combined treatments. Moreover, when pretreated with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the ROS generation, the MMP drop, cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity were differently inhibited, suggesting that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptotic process induced by 2-DG/3-BP combined with PDT treatment. These results indicate that the combination of glycolytic antagonists and PDT may be a promising therapeutic strategy to effectively kill cancer cells. PMID:25363473

  13. Dynamic Reprogramming of the Kinome In Response to Targeted MEK Inhibition In Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James S.; Whittle, Martin C.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Abell, Amy N.; Midland, Alicia A.; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Granger, Deborah A.; Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Darr, David B.; Usary, Jerry; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Smalley, David M.; Major, Ben; He, Xiaping; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Zhou, Bing; Sharpless, Norman E.; Perou, Charles M.; Kim, William Y.; Gomez, Shawn M.; Chen, Xin; Jin, Jian; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Graves, Lee M.; Johnson, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Kinase inhibitors have limited success in cancer treatment because tumors circumvent their action. Using a quantitative proteomics approach, we assessed kinome activity in response to MEK inhibition in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells and genetically engineered mice (GEMMs). MEK inhibition caused acute ERK activity loss, resulting in rapid c-Myc degradation that induced expression and activation of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). RNAi knockdown of ERK or c-Myc mimicked RTK induction by MEK inhibitors, whereas prevention of proteasomal c-Myc degradation blocked kinome reprogramming. MEK inhibitor-induced RTK stimulation overcame MEK2 but not MEK1 inhibition, reactivating ERK and producing drug resistance. The C3Tag GEMM for TNBC similarly induced RTKs in response to MEK inhibition. The inhibitor-induced RTK profile suggested a kinase inhibitor combination therapy that produced GEMM tumor apoptosis and regression where single agents were ineffective. This approach defines mechanisms of drug resistance, allowing rational design of combination therapies for cancer. PMID:22500798

  14. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    To develop a therapeutic system with cancer cell selectivity, the present study evaluated a possible specific and localized tumor treatment. Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on the external face of the cell membrane is almost completely exclusive to cancer cells and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature. The human protein annexin V is known to have strong calcium-dependent binding to anionic phospholipids such as PS. This protein was studied for targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the vasculature of breast tumors. The synthesis of the protein annexin V, by a pET vector in Escherichia coli, constitutes the first phase of this study. Recombinant annexin V was purified from the cell lysate supernatant by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The overall production of purified annexin V protein was 50 mg/L. The binding ability of the protein annexin V was evaluated by determining the dissociation constant when incubated with proliferating human endothelial cells in vitro. The dissociation constant, Kd, was measured to be 0.8 nM, indicating relatively strong binding. This value of Kd is within the range reported in the literature. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were functionalized with annexin V using two intermediate linkers (containing FMOC and DSPE) resulting in stable suspensions. The SWNT and protein concentrations were 202 mg/L and 515 mg/L, respectively, using the linker with DSPE (average of nine preparations). The conjugation method that used the DSPE-PEG-maleimide linker allowed to successfully conjugate the SWNTs with final concentrations approximately five times higher than the linker containing FMOC. The conjugation method used has a non-covalent nature, and therefore the optical properties of the nanotubes were preserved. The conjugate was also visually observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), allowing to verify the presence of the protein annexin V on the surface of the nanotubes, with an height ranging between 2

  15. miR-630 targets IGF1R to regulate response to HER-targeting drugs and overall cancer cell progression in HER2 over-expressing breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While the treatment of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer with recent HER-targeted drugs has been highly effective for some patients, primary (also known as innate) or acquired resistance limits the success of these drugs. microRNAs have potential as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as well as replacement therapies. Here we investigated the role of microRNA-630 (miR-630) in breast cancer progression and as a predictive biomarker for response to HER-targeting drugs, ultimately yielding potential as a therapeutic approach to add value to these drugs. Methods We investigated the levels of intra- and extracellular miR-630 in cells and conditioned media from breast cancer cell lines with either innate- or acquired- resistance to HER-targeting lapatinib and neratinib, compared to their corresponding drug sensitive cell lines, using qPCR. To support the role of miR-630 in breast cancer, we examined the clinical relevance of this miRNA in breast cancer tumours versus matched peritumours. Transfection of miR-630 mimics and inhibitors was used to manipulate the expression of miR-630 to assess effects on response to HER-targeting drugs (lapatinib, neratinib and afatinib). Other phenotypic changes associated with cellular aggressiveness were evaluated by motility, invasion and anoikis assays. TargetScan prediction software, qPCR, immunoblotting and ELISAs, were used to assess miR-630’s regulation of mRNA, proteins and their phosphorylated forms. Results We established that introducing miR-630 into cells with innate- or acquired- resistance to HER-drugs significantly restored the efficacy of lapatinib, neratinib and afatinib; through a mechanism which we have determined to, at least partly, involve miR-630’s regulation of IGF1R. Conversely, we demonstrated that blocking miR-630 induced resistance/insensitivity to these drugs. Cellular motility, invasion, and anoikis were also observed as significantly altered by miR-630 manipulation, whereby

  16. [Breast cancer. Individualized therapy concepts].

    PubMed

    Harbeck, N; Wuerstlein, R

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine in the sense of individualized therapy concepts plays an important role in breast cancer. In early breast cancer the molecular subtypes luminal A and B and basal-like are important for planning adjuvant systemic therapy. Prognostic and predictive markers, such as hormone receptor status, HER2, Ki-67, uPA/PAI-1 or multiple gene tests, such as Oncotype DX® currently allow avoidance of an over therapy or under therapy. In early and also advanced breast cancer there are an increasing number of new targeted therapies which represent an augmentation of standard endocrine and chemotherapy and in the future could at least partially replace them. As a whole the therapy regimens for breast cancer have become more complex due to the inclusion of molecular information, new therapies and the withdrawal of conventional treatment concepts. Decisive for the future will be the confirmation of this development by modern study concepts contemporarily with adequate evidence. It could then be expected that a personalized therapy for early breast cancer and in particular adjuvant chemotherapy would only be used for those patients for whom it is really necessary. In advanced stage disease there is justified hope that the survival time in the sense of a chronic disease can be improved by the use of targeted therapy.

  17. Active Pin1 is a key target of all-trans retinoic acid in acute promyelocytic leukemia and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuo; Kozono, Shingo; Kats, Lev; Nechama, Morris; Li, Wenzong; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Luo, Manli; You, Mi-Hyeon; Yao, Yandan; Kondo, Asami; Hu, Hai; Bozkurt, Gunes; Moerke, Nathan J.; Cao, Shugeng; Reschke, Markus; Chen, Chun-Hau; Rego, Eduardo M.; LoCoco, Francesco; Cantley, Lewis; Lee, Tae Ho; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-01-01

    A common key regulator of oncogenic signaling pathways in multiple tumor types is the unique isomerase Pin1. However, available Pin1 inhibitors lack the required specificity and potency. Using mechanism-based screening, here we find that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)--a therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that is considered the first example of targeted therapy in cancer, but its drug target remains elusive--inhibits and degrades active Pin1 selectively in cancer cells by directly binding to the substrate phosphate- and proline-binding pockets in the Pin1 active site. ATRA-induced Pin1 ablation degrades the fusion oncogene PML-RARα and treats APL in cell and animal models and human patients. ATRA-induced Pin1 ablation also inhibits triple negative breast cancer cell growth in human cells and in animal models by acting on many Pin1 substrate oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, ATRA simultaneously blocks multiple Pin1-regulated cancer-driving pathways, an attractive property for treating aggressive and drug-resistant tumors. PMID:25849135

  18. Proteotranscriptomic Profiling of 231-BR Breast Cancer Cells: Identification of Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dun, Matthew D; Chalkley, Robert J; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Scott, Rodney J; Falkenby, Lasse G; Cairns, Murray J; Larsen, Martin R; Bradshaw, Ralph A; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-09-01

    Brain metastases are a devastating consequence of cancer and currently there are no specific biomarkers or therapeutic targets for risk prediction, diagnosis, and treatment. Here the proteome of the brain metastatic breast cancer cell line 231-BR has been compared with that of the parental cell line MDA-MB-231, which is also metastatic but has no organ selectivity. Using SILAC and nanoLC-MS/MS, 1957 proteins were identified in reciprocal labeling experiments and 1584 were quantified in the two cell lines. A total of 152 proteins were confidently determined to be up- or down-regulated by more than twofold in 231-BR. Of note, 112/152 proteins were decreased as compared with only 40/152 that were increased, suggesting that down-regulation of specific proteins is an important part of the mechanism underlying the ability of breast cancer cells to metastasize to the brain. When matched against transcriptomic data, 43% of individual protein changes were associated with corresponding changes in mRNA, indicating that the transcript level is a limited predictor of protein level. In addition, differential miRNA analyses showed that most miRNA changes in 231-BR were up- (36/45) as compared with down-regulations (9/45). Pathway analysis revealed that proteome changes were mostly related to cell signaling and cell cycle, metabolism and extracellular matrix remodeling. The major protein changes in 231-BR were confirmed by parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry and consisted in increases (by more than fivefold) in the matrix metalloproteinase-1, ephrin-B1, stomatin, myc target-1, and decreases (by more than 10-fold) in transglutaminase-2, the S100 calcium-binding protein A4, and l-plastin. The clinicopathological significance of these major proteomic changes to predict the occurrence of brain metastases, and their potential value as therapeutic targets, warrants further investigation.

  19. Proteotranscriptomic Profiling of 231-BR Breast Cancer Cells: Identification of Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Brain Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Matthew D.; Chalkley, Robert J.; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A.; Scott, Rodney J.; Falkenby, Lasse G.; Cairns, Murray J.; Larsen, Martin R.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are a devastating consequence of cancer and currently there are no specific biomarkers or therapeutic targets for risk prediction, diagnosis, and treatment. Here the proteome of the brain metastatic breast cancer cell line 231-BR has been compared with that of the parental cell line MDA-MB-231, which is also metastatic but has no organ selectivity. Using SILAC and nanoLC-MS/MS, 1957 proteins were identified in reciprocal labeling experiments and 1584 were quantified in the two cell lines. A total of 152 proteins were confidently determined to be up- or down-regulated by more than twofold in 231-BR. Of note, 112/152 proteins were decreased as compared with only 40/152 that were increased, suggesting that down-regulation of specific proteins is an important part of the mechanism underlying the ability of breast cancer cells to metastasize to the brain. When matched against transcriptomic data, 43% of individual protein changes were associated with corresponding changes in mRNA, indicating that the transcript level is a limited predictor of protein level. In addition, differential miRNA analyses showed that most miRNA changes in 231-BR were up- (36/45) as compared with down-regulations (9/45). Pathway analysis revealed that proteome changes were mostly related to cell signaling and cell cycle, metabolism and extracellular matrix remodeling. The major protein changes in 231-BR were confirmed by parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry and consisted in increases (by more than fivefold) in the matrix metalloproteinase-1, ephrin-B1, stomatin, myc target-1, and decreases (by more than 10-fold) in transglutaminase-2, the S100 calcium-binding protein A4, and l-plastin. The clinicopathological significance of these major proteomic changes to predict the occurrence of brain metastases, and their potential value as therapeutic targets, warrants further investigation. PMID:26041846

  20. Bone-targeted therapy for metastatic breast cancer-Where do we go from here? A commentary from the BONUS 8 meeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofu; Amir, Eitan; Singh, Gurmit; Clemons, Mark; Addison, Christina

    2014-03-01

    The annual Bone and The Oncologist New Updates (BONUS 8) conference focuses on the current understanding and dilemmas in the treatment and prevention of bone metastasis in cancer, as well as novel research on bone homeostasis and cancer-induced bone loss. We present commentaries from experts for their own take on where they feel the field of bone-targeted therapies for metastatic breast cancer is moving, or needs to move, if we are to make further progress.

  1. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  2. Oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer metastasis to bone: inhibition by targeting the bone microenvironment in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holen, I; Walker, M; Nutter, F; Fowles, A; Evans, C A; Eaton, C L; Ottewell, P D

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials have shown that adjuvant Zoledronic acid (ZOL) reduces the development of bone metastases irrespective of ER status. However, post-menopausal patients show anti-tumour benefit with ZOL whereas pre-menopausal patients do not. Here we have developed in vivo models of spontaneous ER+ve breast cancer metastasis to bone and investigated the effects of ZOL and oestrogen on tumour cell dissemination and growth. ER+ve (MCF7, T47D) or ER-ve (MDA-MB-231) cells were administered by inter-mammary or inter-cardiac injection into female nude mice ± estradiol. Mice were administered saline or 100 μg/kg ZOL weekly. Tumour growth, dissemination of tumour cells in blood, bone and bone turnover were monitored by luciferase imaging, histology, flow cytometry, two-photon microscopy, micro-CT and TRAP/P1NP ELISA. Estradiol induced metastasis of ER+ve cells to bone in 80-100 % of animals whereas bone metastases from ER-ve cells were unaffected. Administration of ZOL had no effect on tumour growth in the fat pad but significantly inhibited dissemination of ER+ve tumour cells to bone and frequency of bone metastasis. Estradiol and ZOL increased bone volume via different mechanisms: Estradiol increased activity of bone forming osteoblasts whereas administration of ZOL to estradiol supplemented mice decreased osteoclast activity and returned osteoblast activity to levels comparable to that of saline treated mice. ER-ve cells require increased osteoclast activity to grow in bone whereas ER+ve cells do not. Zol does not affect ER+ve tumour growth in soft tissue, however, inhibition of bone turnover by ZOL reduced dissemination and growth of ER+ve breast cancer cells in bone.

  3. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  4. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  5. Rac1 contributes to trastuzumab resistance of breast cancer cells: Rac1 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dokmanovic, Milos; Hirsch, Dianne S; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin

    2009-06-01

    Although treatment with trastuzumab improves outcomes for women with ErbB2-positive breast cancer, many patients who achieve an initial response to trastuzumab subsequently acquire resistance within 1 year. Rac1, a Ras-like small GTPase, has been implicated in the control of cell growth and morphology and is believed to be associated with breast cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we show that when parental SKBR3 cells become resistant to trastuzumab, Rac1 activity is increased, leading to altered cell morphology, which is accompanied by significant cytoskeleton disorganization. Furthermore, both trastuzumab-mediated down-regulation of ErbB2 and epidermal growth factor-induced down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor are impaired in the trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells, indicating that the endocytic down-regulation of ErbB receptors is compromised in the resistant cells. This results in an aberrant accumulation of ErbB2 on the cell surface and enhanced ErbB2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity in trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells. Additionally, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1G12V in parental SKBR3 cells reduces sensitivity to trastuzumab. After reduction of Rac1 activity by NSC23766, a specific Rac1 inhibitor, trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells display a cellular morphology similar to parental SKBR3 cells. Moreover, we show that NSC23766 restores trastuzumab-mediated endocytic down-regulation of ErbB2 and reduces extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity in resistant SKBR3 cells. Our findings highlight an important role for Rac1 in trastuzumab resistance of human breast cancer cells and identify the impaired trastuzumab-mediated endocytic down-regulation of ErbB2 as a novel mechanism of trastuzumab resistance. The significant effects of NSC23766 on trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3 cells warrant further study of NSC23766 as a potential treatment of trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers.

  6. miR-520b Regulates Migration of Breast Cancer Cells by Targeting Hepatitis B X-interacting Protein and Interleukin-8*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Zhang, Jianli; Cui, Wenjing; Kong, Guangyao; Zhang, Shuai; Yue, Lin; Bai, Xiao; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Weiying; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in tumor metastasis. Recently, we reported that the level of miR-520b is inversely related to the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-520b in breast cancer cell migration. We found that miR-520b suppressed the migration of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential, including MDA-MB-231 and LM-MCF-7 cells, although the inhibition of miR-520b enhanced the migration of low metastatic potential MCF-7 cells. We further discovered that miR-520b directly targets the 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) of either hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) or interleukin-8 (IL-8), which has been reported to contribute to cell migration. Surprisingly, tissue array assays showed that 75% (38:49) and 94% (36:38) of breast cancer tissues and metastatic lymph tissues, respectively, were positive for HBXIP expression. Moreover, overexpression of HBXIP was able to promote the migration of MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to regulate IL-8 transcription by NF-κB, suggesting that the two target genes of miR-520b are functionally connected. In addition, we found that miR-520b could indirectly regulate IL-8 transcription by targeting HBXIP. Thus, we conclude that miR-520b is involved in regulating breast cancer cell migration by targeting HBXIP and IL-8 via a network in which HBXIP promotes migration by stimulating NF-κB-mediated IL-8 expression. These studies point to HBXIP as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:21343296

  7. miR-520b regulates migration of breast cancer cells by targeting hepatitis B X-interacting protein and interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Zhang, Jianli; Cui, Wenjing; Kong, Guangyao; Zhang, Shuai; Yue, Lin; Bai, Xiao; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Weiying; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2011-04-15

    MicroRNAs play important roles in tumor metastasis. Recently, we reported that the level of miR-520b is inversely related to the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-520b in breast cancer cell migration. We found that miR-520b suppressed the migration of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential, including MDA-MB-231 and LM-MCF-7 cells, although the inhibition of miR-520b enhanced the migration of low metastatic potential MCF-7 cells. We further discovered that miR-520b directly targets the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of either hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) or interleukin-8 (IL-8), which has been reported to contribute to cell migration. Surprisingly, tissue array assays showed that 75% (38:49) and 94% (36:38) of breast cancer tissues and metastatic lymph tissues, respectively, were positive for HBXIP expression. Moreover, overexpression of HBXIP was able to promote the migration of MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to regulate IL-8 transcription by NF-κB, suggesting that the two target genes of miR-520b are functionally connected. In addition, we found that miR-520b could indirectly regulate IL-8 transcription by targeting HBXIP. Thus, we conclude that miR-520b is involved in regulating breast cancer cell migration by targeting HBXIP and IL-8 via a network in which HBXIP promotes migration by stimulating NF-κB-mediated IL-8 expression. These studies point to HBXIP as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  8. A Prospective Pathologic Study to Define the Clinical Target Volume for Partial Breast Radiation Therapy in Women With Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Brandon T.; Deb, Siddhartha; Fox, Stephen; Hill, Prudence; Collins, Marnie; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine an appropriate clinical target volume for partial breast radiation therapy (PBRT) based on the spatial distribution of residual invasive and in situ carcinoma after wide local excision (WLE) for early breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective pathologic study of women potentially eligible for PBRT who had re-excision and/or completion mastectomy after WLE for early breast cancer or DCIS. A pathologic assessment protocol was used to determine the maximum radial extension (MRE) of residual carcinoma from the margin of the initial surgical cavity. Women were stratified by the closest initial radial margin width: negative (>1 mm), close (>0 mm and {<=}1 mm), or involved. Results: The study population was composed of 133 women with a median age of 59 years (range, 27-82 years) and the following stage groups: 0 (13.5%), I (40.6%), II (38.3%), and III (7.5%). The histologic subtypes of the primary tumor were invasive ductal carcinoma (74.4%), invasive lobular carcinoma (12.0%), and DCIS alone (13.5%). Residual carcinoma was present in the re-excision and completion mastectomy specimens in 55.4%, 14.3%, and 7.2% of women with an involved, close, and negative margin, respectively. In the 77 women with a noninvolved radial margin, the MRE of residual disease, if present, was {<=}10 mm in 97.4% (95% confidence interval 91.6-99.5) of cases. Larger MRE measurements were significantly associated with an involved margin (P<.001), tumor size >30 mm (P=.03), premenopausal status (P=.03), and negative progesterone receptor status (P=.05). Conclusions: A clinical target volume margin of 10 mm would encompass microscopic residual disease in >90% of women potentially eligible for PBRT after WLE with noninvolved resection margins.

  9. Genomic profiling of breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent advances in the application of advanced genomic technologies towards the identification of biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. Recent findings Advances in high-throughput genomic profiling such as massively parallel sequencing have enabled researchers to catalogue the spectrum of somatic alterations in breast cancers. These tools also hold promise for precision medicine through accurate patient prognostication, stratification, and the dynamic monitoring of treatment response. For example, recent efforts have defined robust molecular subgroups of breast cancer and novel subtype-specific oncogenes. In addition, previously unappreciated activating mutations in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have been reported, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. Genomic profiling of cell-free tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells has been used to monitor disease burden and the emergence of resistance, and such ‘liquid biopsy’ approaches may facilitate the early, noninvasive detection of aggressive disease. Finally, single-cell genomics is coming of age and will contribute to an understanding of breast cancer evolutionary dynamics. Summary Here, we highlight recent studies that employ high-throughput genomic technologies in an effort to elucidate breast cancer biology, discover new therapeutic targets, improve prognostication and stratification, and discuss the implications for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25502431

  10. Treatment Optimization Using Computed Tomography-Delineated Targets Should be Used for Supraclavicular Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liengsawangwong, Raweewan; Yu, T.-K.; Sun, T.-L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Salephour, Mohammad; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-11-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of optimized CT treatment planning offered better coverage of axillary level III (LIII)/supraclavicular (SC) targets than the empirically derived dose prescription that are commonly used. Materials/Methods: Thirty-two consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent CT treatment planning of a SC field were evaluated. Each patient was categorized according to body mass index (BMI) classes: normal, overweight, or obese. The SC and LIII nodal beds were contoured, and four treatment plans for each patient were generated. Three of the plans used empiric dose prescriptions, and these were compared with a CT-optimized plan. Each plan was evaluated by two criteria: whether 98% of target volume receive >90% of prescribed dose and whether < 5% of the irradiated volume received 105% of prescribed dose. Results: The mean depth of SC and LIII were 3.2 cm (range, 1.4-6.7 cm) and 3.1 (range, 1.7-5.8 cm). The depth of these targets varied according across BMI classes (p = 0.01). Among the four sets of plans, the CT-optimized plans were the most successful at achieving both of the dosimetry objectives for every BMI class (normal BMI, p = .003; overweight BMI, p < .0001; obese BMI, p < .001). Conclusions: Across all BMI classes, routine radiation prescriptions did not optimally cover intended targets for every patient. Optimized CT-based treatment planning generated the most successful plans; therefore, we recommend the use of routine CT simulation and treatment planning of SC fields in breast cancer.

  11. Targeted polymersome delivery of siRNA induces cell death of breast cancer cells dependent upon Orai3 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Pangburn, Todd O; Georgiou, Katerina; Bates, Frank S; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2012-09-01

    Polymersomes, polymeric vesicles that self-assemble in aqueous solutions from block copolymers, have been avidly investigated in recent years as potential drug delivery agents. Past work has highlighted peptide-functionalized polymersomes as a highly promising targeted delivery system. However, few reports have investigated the ability of polymersomes to operate as gene delivery agents. In this study, we report on the encapsulation and delivery of siRNA inside of peptide-functionalized polymersomes composed of poly(1,2-butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). In particular, PR_b peptide-functionalized polymer vesicles are shown to be a promising system for siRNA delivery. PR_b is a fibronectin mimetic peptide targeting specifically the α(5)β(1) integrin. The Orai3 gene was targeted for siRNA knockdown, and PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles encapsulating siRNA were found to specifically decrease cell viability of T47D breast cancer cells to a certain extent, while preserving viability of noncancerous MCF10A breast cells. siRNA delivery by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was compared to that of a current commercial siRNA transfection agent, and produced less dramatic decreases in cancer cell viability, but compared favorably in regards to the relative toxicity of the delivery systems. Finally, delivery and vesicle release of a fluorescent encapsulate by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was visualized by confocal microscopy, and colocalization with cellular endosomes and lysosomes was assessed by organelle staining. Polymersomes were observed to primarily release their encapsulate in the early endosomal intracellular compartments, and data may suggest some escape to the cytosol. These results represent a promising first generation model system for targeted delivery of siRNA.

  12. Co-targeting the IGF system and HIF-1 inhibits migration and invasion by (triple-negative) breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, M; Gariboldi, M B; Taiana, E; Bonzi, M C; Craparotta, I; Pagin, M; Monti, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metastatic triple-negative breast cancer is mostly incurable, due to lack of suitable drug targets. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system could provide such a target, and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R)-directed agents are already available, but seem unable to control all the complexities of the system, including crosstalk with hypoxia-inducible pathways. Methods: Migration of triple-negative MDA-231 breast cancer cells and its modulation by IGFs, the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and the IGF-2-sequestering monoclonal antibody MAB292 were assessed by the scratch wound healing and Boyden chamber assays; the effect of topotecan (inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)) under hypoxia was also evaluated. Constitutive as well as drug-modulated levels of components of the IGF and HIF-1 pathways were evaluated by western blotting and qPCR. Results: IGF-induced migration of MDA-231 cells was not abrogated by the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541, whereas IGF-2 sequestration by MAB292 significantly reduced cell migration. Under hypoxia, topotecan was also effective, likely by reducing HIF-1-induced IGF-2 release. Simultaneous targeting of IGF-1R and IGF-2 or HIF-1 completely abolished cell migration. Conclusions: IR activation may account for the failure of NVP-AEW541 to suppress MDA-231 cell migration. Ligand-targeting compounds, or co-inhibition of the IGF and HIF-1 systems, may prevent activation of compensatory signalling, thereby providing a valuable addition to IGF-1R inhibitor-based therapies. PMID:24853185

  13. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, George L; Copeland, Trisha; Khaodhiar, Lalita; Buckley, Rita B

    2003-03-01

    Obesity, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle-all common conditions in breast cancer patients-are likely to be associated with poor survival and poor quality of life in women with breast cancer. Diet-related factors are thought to account for about 30% of cancers in developed countries. Most studies of diet and healthcare have focused on the role of single nutrients, foods, or food groups in disease prevention or promotion. Recent cancer guidelines on nutrition and physical activity emphasize diets that promote maintenance of a healthy body weight and a prudent dietary pattern that is low in red and processed meats and high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Except for dietary fat, few nutritional factors in adult life have been associated with breast cancer. Extensive data from animal model research, international correlations linking fat intake and breast cancer rates, and case-control studies support the hypothesis that a high-fat diet is conducive to the development of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Conflicting findings from cohort studies, however, have created uncertainty over the role of dietary fat in breast cancer growth and recurrence. Results from large-scale nutritional intervention trials are expected to resolve such issues. As new and improved data on dietary factors and patterns accumulate, dietary guidelines for cancer risk reduction will become more focused.

  14. Development, Characterization and Validation of Trastuzumab-Modified Gold Nanoparticles for Molecularly Targeted Radiosensitization of Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Niladri

    The overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) in 20--25% of human breast cancers was investigated as a target for development of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) based radiosensitizer for improving the efficacy of neoadjuvant X-radiation therapy of the disease. HER-2 targeted AuNPs were developed by covalently conjugating trastuzumab, a Health Canada approved monoclonal antibody for the treatment of HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer, to 30 nm AuNPs. Trastuzumab conjugated AuNPs were efficiently internalized by HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer cells (as assessed by darkfield microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) and increased DNA damage from X-radiation in these cells by more than 5-fold. To optimize delivery of AuNPs to HER-2-overexpressing tumors, high resolution microSPECT/CT imaging was used to track the in vivo fate of 111In-labelled non-targeted and HER-2 targeted AuNPs following intravenous (i.v.) or intratumoral (i.t.) injection. For i.v. injection, the effects of GdCl3 (for deactivation of macrophages) and non-specific (anti-CD20) antibody rituximab (for blocking of Fc mediated liver and spleen uptake) were studied. It was found that HER-2 targeting via attachment of trastuzumab paradoxically decreased tumor uptake as a result of faster elimination of the targeted AuNPs from the blood while improving internalization in HER-2-positive tumor cells as compared to non-targeted AuNPs. This phenomenon could be attributed to Fc-mediated recognition and subsequent sequestration of trastuzumab conjugated AuNP by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Blocking of the RES did not increase tumor uptake of either HER-2 targeted or non-targeted AuNPs. Following i.t. injection, our results suggest that Au-NTs redistribute over time and traffick to the liver via the ipsilateral axillary lymph node leading to comparable exposure as seen with i.v. administration. In contrast, targeted AuNPs are bound and internalized by HER-2

  15. Enhanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Degradation in Breast Cancer Cells by Lysosome-Targeting Gold Nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Ha, Ji Won; Yue, Jun; Odom, Teri W

    2015-10-27

    This paper describes how gold nanoparticle nanoconstructs can enhance anticancer effects of lysosomal targeting aptamers in breast cancer cells. Nanoconstructs consisting of anti-HER2 aptamer (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HApt) densely grafted on gold nanostars (AuNS) first targeted HER2 and then were internalized via HER2-mediated endocytosis. As incubation time increased, the nanoconstruct complexes were found in vesicular structures, starting from early endosomes to lysosomes as visualized by confocal fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy. Within the target organelle, lysosomes, HER2 was degraded by enzymes at low pH, which resulted in apoptosis. At specific time points related to the doubling time of the cancer cells, we found that accumulation of HER2-HApt-AuNS complexes in lysosomes, lysosomal activity, and lysosomal degradation of HER2 were positively correlated. Increased HER2 degradation by HApt-AuNS triggered cell death and cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase inhibition of cell proliferation. This work shows how a perceived disadvantage of nanoparticle-based therapeutics-the inability of nanoconstructs to escape from vesicles and thus induce a biological response-can be overcome by both targeting lysosomes and exploiting lysosomal degradation of the biomarkers.

  16. N-Acetylglucosaminyl 1-Phosphate Transferase: An Excellent Target for Developing New Generation Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aditi; Martinez, Juan A.; Longas, Maria O.; Zhang, Zhenbo; Santiago, Jesus; Baksi, Krishna; Banerjee, Dipak K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies from our laboratory have explained that breast tumor progression can be attenuated by targeting the N-linked glycoproteins of the tumor microvasculature and that of tumor cells alike with a protein N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin. Absence of N-glycosylation leads to an accumulation of un- or mis-folded proteins in the ER and the cell develops “ER stress”. The result is cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis mediated by unfolded protein response (upr) signaling. Tunicamycin inhibited in vitro and in vivo (Matrigel™ implants in athymic nude mice) angiogenesis in a dose dependent manner. The action is irreversible and survived under tumor microenvironment, i.e., in the presence of FGF-2 or VEGF or higher serum concentration. Importantly, tunicamycin prevented the progression of double negative (ER-/PR-/Her2+) and triple negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) breast tumors by ∼55% - 65% in three weeks in athymic nude mice [Balb/c(nu/nu)]. Analyses of paraffin sections exhibited “ER stress” in both microvasculature and in tumor tissue. PMID:25408354

  17. The potential utility of acetyltanshinone IIA in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancer: Induction of cancer cell death by targeting apoptotic and metabolic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guerram, Mounia; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Yousef, Bashir Alsiddig; Hamdi, Aida Mejda; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed; Yuan, Zi-Qiao; Luo, Hou-Wei; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Increased lipogenesis and protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression and is under intense investigation as a potential antineoplastic target. Acetyltanshinone IIA (ATA) is a compound that was obtained from chemical modifications of tanshinone IIA (TIIA), a potent anticancer agent extracted from the dried roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. A previous investigation indicated that ATA is more effective in inhibiting the growth of breast cancer especially cells with HER2 overexpression. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating this cytotoxic effect on HER2-positive breast cancer remained undefined. Studies described here report that ATA induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in the HER2-positive MDA-MB-453, SK-BR-3, and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the ATA-induced apoptosis effect is associated with remarkably down-regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EGFR/HER2 and inhibition of their downstream pro-survival signaling pathways. Interestingly, ATA was found to trigger oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses and to activate AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) leading to inactivation of key enzymes involved in lipid and protein biogenesis. Intraperitoneal administration of ATA significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-453 xenografts in athymic mice without causing weight loss and any other side effects. Additionally, transwell migration, invasion, and wound healing assays revealed that ATA could suppress tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that ATA may have broad utility in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancers. PMID:26068969

  18. ERRα-Regulated Lactate Metabolism Contributes to Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunghee; Chang, Ching-Yi; Safi, Rachid; Liu, Xiaojing; Baldi, Robert; Jasper, Jeff S; Anderson, Grace R; Liu, Tingyu; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Dewhirst, Mark W; Wood, Kris C; Locasale, Jason W; McDonnell, Donald P

    2016-04-12

    Imaging studies in animals and in humans have indicated that the oxygenation and nutritional status of solid tumors is dynamic. Furthermore, the extremely low level of glucose within tumors, while reflecting its rapid uptake and metabolism, also suggests that cancer cells must rely on other energy sources in some circumstances. Here, we find that some breast cancer cells can switch to utilizing lactate as a primary source of energy, allowing them to survive glucose deprivation for extended periods, and that this activity confers resistance to PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. The nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα), was shown to regulate the expression of genes required for lactate utilization, and isotopomer analysis revealed that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ERRα activity compromised lactate oxidation. Importantly, ERRα antagonists increased the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, highlighting the potential clinical utility of this drug combination. PMID:27050525

  19. Targeted inactivation of β1 integrin induces β3 integrin switching, which drives breast cancer metastasis by TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Parvani, Jenny G.; Galliher-Beckley, Amy J.; Schiemann, Barbara J.; Schiemann, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumorigenesis and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programs cooperate in converting transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) from a suppressor to a promoter of breast cancer metastasis. Although previous reports associated β1 and β3 integrins with TGF-β stimulation of EMT and metastasis, the functional interplay and plasticity exhibited by these adhesion molecules in shaping the oncogenic activities of TGF-β remain unknown. We demonstrate that inactivation of β1 integrin impairs TGF-β from stimulating the motility of normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells (MECs) and elicits robust compensatory expression of β3 integrin solely in malignant MECs, but not in their normal counterparts. Compensatory β3 integrin expression also 1) enhances the growth of malignant MECs in rigid and compliant three-dimensional organotypic cultures and 2) restores the induction of the EMT phenotypes by TGF-β. Of importance, compensatory expression of β3 integrin rescues the growth and pulmonary metastasis of β1 integrin–deficient 4T1 tumors in mice, a process that is prevented by genetic depletion or functional inactivation of β3 integrin. Collectively our findings demonstrate that inactivation of β1 integrin elicits metastatic progression via a β3 integrin–specific mechanism, indicating that dual β1 and β3 integrin targeting is necessary to alleviate metastatic disease in breast cancer patients. PMID:24006485

  20. Block copolymer micelles target Auger electron radiotherapy to the nucleus of HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Bryan; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2012-02-13

    Intracellular trafficking of Auger electron emitting radionuclides to perinuclear and nuclear regions of cells is critical to realizing their full therapeutic potential. In the present study, block copolymer micelles (BCMs) were labeled with the Auger electron emitter indium-111 ((111)In) and loaded with the radiosensitizer methotrexate. HER2 specific antibodies (trastuzumab fab) and nuclear localization signal (NLS; CGYGPKKKRKVGG) peptides were conjugated to the surface of the BCMs to direct uptake in HER2 expressing cells and subsequent localization in the cell nucleus. Cell uptake and intracellular distribution of the multifunctional BCMs were evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines with different levels of HER2 expression. Indeed cell uptake was found to be HER2 density dependent, confirming receptor-mediated internalization of the BCMs. Importantly, conjugation of NLS peptides to the surface of BCMs was found to result in a significant increase in nuclear uptake of the radionuclide (111)In. Successful nuclear targeting was shown to improve the antipoliferative effect of the Auger electrons as measured by clonogenic assays. In addition, a significant radiation enhancement effect was observed by concurrent delivery of low-dose MTX and (111)In in all breast cancer cell lines evaluated.

  1. p38γ MAPK Is a Therapeutic Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer by Stimulation of Cancer Stem-Like Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaomei; Yin, Ning; Ma, Shao; Lepp, Adrienne; Tang, Jun; Jing, Weiqing; Johnson, Bryon; Dwinell, Michael B; Chitambar, Christopher R; Chen, Guan

    2015-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly progressive and lacks established therapeutic targets. p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (gene name: MAPK12) is overexpressed in TNBC but how overexpressed p38γ contributes to TNBC remains unknown. Here, we show that p38γ activation promotes TNBC development and progression by stimulating cancer stem-like cell (CSC) expansion and may serve as a novel therapeutic target. p38γ silencing in TNBC cells reduces mammosphere formation and decreases expression levels of CSC drivers including Nanog, Oct3/4, and Sox2. Moreover, p38γ MAPK-forced expression alone is sufficient to stimulate CSC expansion and to induce epithelial cell transformation in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p38γ depends on its activity to stimulate CSC expansion and breast cancer progression, indicating a therapeutic opportunity by application of its pharmacological inhibitor. Indeed, the non-toxic p38γ specific pharmacological inhibitor pirfenidone selectively inhibits TNBC growth in vitro and/or in vivo and significantly decreases the CSC population. Mechanistically, p38γ stimulates Nanog transcription through c-Jun/AP-1 via a multi-protein complex formation. These results together demonstrate that p38γ can drive TNBC development and progression and may be a novel therapeutic target for TNBC by stimulating CSC expansion. Inhibiting p38γ activity with pirfenidone may be a novel strategy for the treatment of TNBC.

  2. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  3. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  4. Biodistribution of antibody-targeted and non-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles in a breast cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Kett, Warren; NDong, Christian; Griswold, Karl E.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) hyperthermia is a novel therapeutic strategy currently under consideration for the treatment of various cancer types. Systemic delivery of IONP followed by non-invasive activation via a local alternating magnetic field (AMF) results in site-specific energy deposition in the IONP-containing tumor. Targeting IONP to the tumor using an antibody or antibody fragment conjugated to the surface may enhance the intratumoral deposition of IONP and is currently being pursued by many nanoparticle researchers. This strategy, however, is subject to a variety of restrictions in the in vivo environment, where other aspects of IONP design will strongly influence the biodistribution. In these studies, various targeted IONP are compared to non-targeted controls. IONP were injected into BT-474 tumor-bearing NSG mice and tissues harvested 24hrs post-injection. Results indicate no significant difference between the various targeted IONP and the non-targeted controls, suggesting the IONP were prohibitively-sized to incur tumor penetration. Additional strategies are currently being pursued in conjuncture with targeted particles to increase the intratumoral deposition.

  5. Biodegradable Chitosan Magnetic Nanoparticle Carriers for Sub-Cellular Targeting Delivery of Artesunate for Efficient Treatment of Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Natesan; Abimanyu, Sugumaran; Vinoth, Jeevanesan; Sekar, Ponnusamy Chandra

    2010-12-01

    Artesunate is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, the active principle extracted from Artemisia annua. It possesses good anti-proliferative activity and anti-angiogenic activity with very low toxicity to normal healthy cells. The drawback of most cancer drugs is their inability to accumulate selectively in the cancerous cells. So, large quantities of doses have to be administered to get the required therapeutic concentration in the target site and it resulted in many serious side effects due to the exposure of healthy cells to higher concentrations of cytotoxic drugs. The problem may be solved by selectively and quantitatively accumulating the drug at target site using magnetic nanoparticles guided by an externally applied magnetic field. A modest attempt has been made in this present study, the artesunate magnetic nanoparticle was successfully formulated using two forms of chitosan and evaluated for its in-vitro characteristics like surface morphology, particle size and distribution, zeta potential, magnetic susceptibility, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity and in-vitro drug release. The synthesized magnetite size was 73 nm and the size of developed magnetic nanoparticles of artesunate was in the range of 90 to 575 nm. Acetic acid soluble chitosan at low concentration exhibit highest encapsulation efficiency and drug loading whereas increase in water soluble chitosan concentration increases the encapsulation efficiency and drug loading in formulations. The developed chitosan magnetic nanoparticles of artesunate shows better release characteristics and may be screened for its in-vivo breast cancer activity.

  6. Imaging of Her2-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for Breast Cancer Detection: Comparison of SQUID-detected Magnetic Relaxometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly S.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Tessier, T. E.; Trujillo, Jason E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Monson, Todd C.; Stevens, Tyler E.; Huber, Dale L.; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Bryant, Howard C.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, non-invasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125,000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T2-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15,600 cells in a 150 μl volume, with r1 = 1.1 mM−1s−1 and r2 = 166 mM−1s−1. Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies. PMID:22539401

  7. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  9. The clinicopathological significance and drug target potential of FHIT in breast cancer, a meta-analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunshu; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Jun; Xu, Junming; Xu, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    FHIT is a bona fide tumor-suppressor gene and its loss contributes to tumorigenesis of epithelial cancers including breast cancer (BC). However, the association and clinicopathological significance between FHIT promoter hypermethylation and BC remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis and literature review to investigate the clinicopathological significance of FHIT methylation in BC. A detailed literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. The data were extracted and assessed by two reviewers independently. Odds ratios with 95% corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. A total of seven relevant articles were available for meta-analysis, which included 985 patients. The frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in invasive ductal carcinoma compared to benign breast disease, the pooled odds ratio was 8.43, P<0.00001. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly different between stage I/II and stage III/IV, odds ratio was 2.98, P=0.06. In addition, FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly associated with ER and PR status. FHIT hypermethylation was not significantly correlated with premenopausal and postmenopausal patients with invasive ductal carcinoma. In summary, our meta-analysis indicated that the frequency of FHIT hypermethylation was significantly increased in BC compared to benign breast disease. The rate of FHIT hypermethylation in advanced stages of BC was higher than in earlier stages; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Our data suggested that FHIT methylation could be a diagnostic biomarker of BC carcinogenesis. FHIT is a potential drug target for development of demethylation treatment for patients with BC. PMID:26491255

  10. Methyl Sulfone Blocked Multiple Hypoxia- and Non-Hypoxia-Induced Metastatic Targets in Breast Cancer Cells and Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joan McIntyre; Caron, Jane McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancer causes 90% of cancer deaths. Unlike many primary tumors, metastatic tumors cannot be cured by surgery alone. Metastatic cancer requires chemotherapy. However, metastatic cells are not easily killed by chemotherapy. These problems with chemotherapy are caused in part by the metastatic cell niche: hypoxia. Here we show that the molecule, methyl sulfone, normalized metastatic metabolism of hypoxic breast cancer and melanoma cells by altering several metabolic functions of the cells. Under hypoxia, methyl sulfone decreased expression of the master regulator of hypoxia, HIF-1α, and reduced levels of the glycolytic enzymes, PKM2, LDHA, GLUT1, the pro-angiogenic protein, VEGF, and the iron-sulfur metabolism molecules, miR-210 and transferrin, all of which promote metastasis. Conversely, methyl sulfone increased levels of ISCU1/2 and ferroportin, proteins associated with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis in normal cells. These data identify methyl sulfone as a multi-targeting molecule that blocks the survival/proliferative effect of hypoxia on metastatic cells and brings normality back to cellular metabolism. PMID:26536104

  11. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. An in-vivo study for targeted delivery of copper-organic complex to breast cancer using chitosan polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Arindam; Laha, Dipranjan; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Roy, Somenath; Das, Dipak Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a strategy for targeted delivery of metal-diketo complex, "bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper(II)" to breast cancer cells both in-vitro and in-vivo. This metal-organic complex induced ROS and subsequently DNA damage as well as mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed. The mitochondria rupture further triggered apoptosis. For in-vitro targeting strategies, two different approaches were employed, folic acid or her-2 specific peptide (KCCYSL) was attached to stearic acid-modified polymeric Chitosan nanoparticles loaded with metal-organic complex "bis(2,4-pentanedionato)copper(II)". This was tested on two pairs of isogenic cells (FR+/FR- MCf-7 and her2+ /her2- MCF-7) and it was observed that cells expressing the receptor were susceptible to the drug whereas non-expressing isogenic cells were almost un-affected. During in-vivo studies, mice receiving targeted delivery of bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper (II) had increased survivability and reduced tumor volume compared to non-targeted drug delivery. During toxicity studies for liver enzymes it was also found that the mice receiving targeted drug did not show any sign of liver damage as well as other histology changes.

  13. An in-vivo study for targeted delivery of copper-organic complex to breast cancer using chitosan polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Arindam; Laha, Dipranjan; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Roy, Somenath; Das, Dipak Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a strategy for targeted delivery of metal-diketo complex, "bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper(II)" to breast cancer cells both in-vitro and in-vivo. This metal-organic complex induced ROS and subsequently DNA damage as well as mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed. The mitochondria rupture further triggered apoptosis. For in-vitro targeting strategies, two different approaches were employed, folic acid or her-2 specific peptide (KCCYSL) was attached to stearic acid-modified polymeric Chitosan nanoparticles loaded with metal-organic complex "bis(2,4-pentanedionato)copper(II)". This was tested on two pairs of isogenic cells (FR+/FR- MCf-7 and her2+ /her2- MCF-7) and it was observed that cells expressing the receptor were susceptible to the drug whereas non-expressing isogenic cells were almost un-affected. During in-vivo studies, mice receiving targeted delivery of bis(2,4-pentanedionato) copper (II) had increased survivability and reduced tumor volume compared to non-targeted drug delivery. During toxicity studies for liver enzymes it was also found that the mice receiving targeted drug did not show any sign of liver damage as well as other histology changes. PMID:27524027

  14. A common promoter hypomethylation signature in invasive breast, liver and prostate cancer cell lines reveals novel targets involved in cancer invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Cao; Li, Chen Chen; Yu, Patricia; Arakelian, Ani; Tanvir, Imrana; Khan, Haseeb Ahmed; Rabbani, Shafaat

    2015-01-01

    Cancer invasion and metastasis is the most morbid aspect of cancer and is governed by different cellular mechanisms than those driving the deregulated growth of tumors. We addressed here the question of whether a common DNA methylation signature of invasion exists in cancer cells from different origins that differentiates invasive from non-invasive cells. We identified a common DNA methylation signature consisting of hyper- and hypomethylation and determined the overlap of differences in DNA methylation with differences in mRNA expression using expression array analyses. A pathway analysis reveals that the hypomethylation signature includes some of the major pathways that were previously implicated in cancer migration and invasion such as TGF beta and ERBB2 triggered pathways. The relevance of these hypomethylation events in human tumors was validated by identification of the signature in several publicly available databases of human tumor transcriptomes. We shortlisted novel invasion promoting candidates and tested the role of four genes in cellular invasiveness from the list C11orf68, G0S2, SHISA2 and TMEM156 in invasiveness using siRNA depletion. Importantly these genes are upregulated in human cancer specimens as determined by immunostaining of human normal and cancer breast, liver and prostate tissue arrays. Since these genes are activated in cancer they constitute a group of targets for specific pharmacological inhibitors of cancer invasiveness. SUMMARY Our study provides evidence that common DNA hypomethylation signature exists between cancer cells derived from different tissues, pointing to a common mechanism of cancer invasiveness in cancer cells from different origins that could serve as drug targets. PMID:26427334

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Her2-NLP peptide conjugates targeting circulating breast cancer cells: cellular uptake and localization by fluorescent microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huawei; Singh, Ajay N; Sun, Xiankai; Peng, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a fluorescent Her2-NLP peptide conjugate consisting of Her2/neu targeting peptide and nuclear localization sequence peptide (NLP) and assess its cellular uptake and intracellular localization for radionuclide cancer therapy targeting Her2/neu-positive circulating breast cancer cells (CBCC). Fluorescent Cy5.5 Her2-NLP peptide conjugate was synthesized by coupling a bivalent peptide sequence, which consisted of a Her2-binding peptide (NH2-GSGKCCYSL) and an NLP peptide (CGYGPKKKRKVGG) linked by a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain with 6 repeating units, with an activated Cy5.5 ester. The conjugate was separated and purified by HPLC and then characterized by Maldi-MS. The intracellular localization of fluorescent Cy5.5 Her2-NLP peptide conjugate was assessed by fluorescent microscopic imaging using a confocal microscope after incubation of Cy5.5-Her2-NLP with Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells and Her2/neu negative control breast cancer cells, respectively. Fluorescent signals were detected in cytoplasm of Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells (SKBR-3 and BT474 cell lines), but not or little in cytoplasm of Her2/neu negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), after incubation of the breast cancer cells with Cy5.5-Her2-NLP conjugates in vitro. No fluorescent signals were detected within the nuclei of Her2/neu positive SKBR-3 and BT474 breast cancer cells, neither Her2/neu negative MDA-MB-231 cells, incubated with the Cy5.5-Her2-NLP peptide conjugates, suggesting poor nuclear localization of the Cy5.5-Her2-NLP conjugates localized within the cytoplasm after their cellular uptake and internalization by the Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells. Her2-binding peptide (KCCYSL) is a promising agent for radionuclide therapy of Her2/neu positive breast cancer using a β(-) or α emitting radionuclide, but poor nuclear localization of the Her2-NLP peptide conjugates may limit its use for eradication of Her2/neu-positive CBCC using I-125 or other Auger electron

  16. [Epidemiology of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cuevas, Sergio A; Capurso García, Marino

    2006-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor worldwide. In recent years there has been observed an increase in its frequency, especially in developing countries, as Mexico, where mortality is arriving to the first cause of death in females. This is, in part, due to a delayed diagnosis, most frequently done in locally advances stages with a low cure rate. This is a review of all risk factors: age, sex, personal and familial history, genetic syndromes, associated breast disease, geographic distribution, body structure and environmental, hormonal, reproductive and dietary factors. It is concluded that breast cancer is a public health problem in developed and developing countries, and the best methods to drop mortality for breast cancer is the wide use of screening mammography in women at risk, in order to find cancers at initial stages and offer the adequate treatment.

  17. Anacardic acid inhibits estrogen receptor alpha-DNA binding and reduces target gene transcription and breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, David J.; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Isaacs, Susan M.; Dougherty, Susan M.; Imbert-Fernandez, Yoannis; Cunningham, Albert R.; Chen, Chunyuan; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2010-01-01

    Anacardic acid (2-hydroxy-6-alkylbenzoic acid) is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical with established anticancer activity in cell and animal models. The mechanisms by which anacardic acid inhibits cancer cell proliferation remain undefined. Anacardic acid 24:1ω5 (AnAc 24:1ω5) was purified from geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) and shown to inhibit the proliferation of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive MCF-7 and endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells with greater efficacy than ERα-negative primary human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells, and MDA-MB-231 basal-like breast cancer cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in a cell-specific manner. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited estradiol (E2)-induced estrogen response element (ERE) reporter activity and transcription of the endogenous E2-target genes: pS2, cyclin D1, and cathepsin D in MCF-7 cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 did not compete with E2 for ERα or ERβ binding, nor did AnAc 24:1ω5 reduce ERα or ERβ steady state protein levels in MCF-7 cells; rather, AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited ER-ERE binding in vitro. Virtual Screening with the molecular docking software Surflex evaluated AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with ERα ligand binding and DNA binding domains (LBD and DBD) in conjunction with experimental validation. Molecular modeling revealed AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with the ERα DBD but not the LBD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments revealed that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited E2-ERα interaction with the endogenous pS2 gene promoter region containing an ERE. These data indicate that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an ER-dependent manner by reducing ER-DNA interaction and inhibiting ER-mediated transcriptional responses. PMID:20197399

  18. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  19. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  20. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  1. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27178684

  4. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-09-30

    A method for treatment and amelioration of breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial, squamous cells, prostate cancer and melanoma in a patient comprising targeting Id-1 or Id-2 gene expression with a delivery vehicle comprising a product which modulates Id-1 or Id-2 expression.

  5. Liposome encapsulated Disulfiram inhibits NFκB pathway and targets breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Zhipeng; Brown, Sarah; Kannappan, Vinodh; Tawari, Patricia Erebi; Jiang, Wenguo; Irache, Juan M.; Tang, James Z.; Britland, Stephen; Armesilla, Angel L.; Darling, John L.; Tang, Xing; Wang, Weiguang

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are pan-resistant to different anticancer agents and responsible for cancer relapse. Disulfiram (DS), an antialcoholism drug, targets CSCs and reverses pan-chemoresistance. The anticancer application of DS is limited by its very short half-life in the bloodstream. This prompted us to develop a liposome-encapsulated DS (Lipo-DS) and examine its anticancer effect and mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. The relationship between hypoxia and CSCs was examined by in vitro comparison of BC cells cultured in spheroid and hypoxic conditions. To determine the importance of NFκB activation in bridging hypoxia and CSC-related pan-resistance, the CSC characters and drug sensitivity in BC cell lines were observed in NFκB p65 transfected cell lines. The effect of Lipo-DS on the NFκB pathway, CSCs and chemosensitivity was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The spheroid cultured BC cells manifested CSC characteristics and pan-resistance to anticancer drugs. This was related to the hypoxic condition in the spheres. Hypoxia induced activation of NFκB and chemoresistance. Transfection of BC cells with NFκB p65 also induced CSC characters and pan-resistance. Lipo-DS blocked NFκB activation and specifically targeted CSCs in vitro. Lipo-DS also targeted the CSC population in vivo and showed very strong anticancer efficacy. Mice tolerated the treatment very well and no significant in vivo nonspecific toxicity was observed. Hypoxia induced NFκB activation is responsible for stemness and chemoresistance in BCSCs. Lipo-DS targets NFκB pathway and CSCs. Further study may translate DS into cancer therapeutics. PMID:25277186

  6. Women and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lippman, M E

    1987-01-01

    One in every 12 women will develop breast cancer; the incidence increases with age, dietary fat intake, caloric intake, height, and weight. The 10-year survival rate of breast cancer patients who refuse therapy is virtually zero. Segmental mastectomy plus radiation and lumpectomy, combined with systemic (adjuvant)chemotherapy, are alternatives under investigation at the National Institutes of Health that may increase the survival rate by decreasing metastatic complications.

  7. Aspirin and atenolol enhance metformin activity against breast cancer by targeting both neoplastic and microenvironment cells.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Giovanna; Orecchioni, Stefania; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Reggiani, Francesca; Mancuso, Patrizia; Calleri, Angelica; Gregato, Giuliana; Labanca, Valentina; Rossi, Teresa; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana; Bertolini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Metformin can induce breast cancer (BC) cell apoptosis and reduce BC local and metastatic growth in preclinical models. Since Metformin is frequently used along with Aspirin or beta-blockers, we investigated the effect of Metformin, Aspirin and the beta-blocker Atenolol in several BC models. In vitro, Aspirin synergized with Metformin in inducing apoptosis of triple negative and endocrine-sensitive BC cells, and in activating AMPK in BC and in white adipose tissue (WAT) progenitors known to cooperate to BC progression. Both Aspirin and Atenolol added to the inhibitory effect of Metformin against complex I of the respiratory chain. In both immune-deficient and immune-competent preclinical models, Atenolol increased Metformin activity against angiogenesis, local and metastatic growth of HER2+ and triple negative BC. Aspirin increased the activity of Metformin only in immune-competent HER2+ BC models. Both Aspirin and Atenolol, when added to Metformin, significantly reduced the endothelial cell component of tumor vessels, whereas pericytes were reduced by the addition of Atenolol but not by the addition of Aspirin. Our data indicate that the addition of Aspirin or of Atenolol to Metformin might be beneficial for BC control, and that this activity is likely due to effects on both BC and microenvironment cells. PMID:26728433

  8. Side effects of bone-targeted therapies in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Christoph; Schuetz, Florian

    2014-10-01

    In up to 75% of cases, advanced breast cancer patients eventually develop bone metastases with often debilitating skeletal-related events (SREs). Osteoclast inhibitors are commonly used as therapeutic mainstay with clinical studies showing superiority of denosumab over bisphosphonates (e.g., zoledronate) for the prevention of SREs. The present review discusses the adverse event profile of these agents, and addresses the prevention and management of untoward side effects. Adverse events associated with osteoclast inhibitors comprise osteonecrosis of the jaw and hypocalcemia. Hypocalcemia is more common with denosumab, particularly in severe renal dysfunction. During therapy, the appropriate prevention of these adverse events includes close attention to dental health, avoidance of invasive dental procedures, supplementation with calcium and vitamin D unless patients are hypercalcemic, and regular monitoring of relevant serum values. Relating to the risk of nephrotoxicity, bisp