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Sample records for breast conservation treatment

  1. [Post-treatment sequelae after breast cancer conservative surgery].

    PubMed

    Delay, E; Gosset, J; Toussoun, G; Delaporte, T; Delbaere, M

    2008-04-01

    Thanks to the earlier detection of breast cancer, the advent of neoadjuvant therapy and the development of more effective surgical procedures reducing treatment sequelae, conservative treatment has dramatically expanded over the past 15 years. Several factors have recognized negative aesthetic consequences for breast cancer patients: being overweight, having voluminous or on the contrary, very small breasts, having a tumor located in the lower quadrant, having high breast-tumor: breast-volume ratio. Tissue injuries induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, such as shrinking, fibrosis or induration, maximize the deleterious impact of surgery. The results of conservative treatment also deteriorate with time: weight gain is common and may result in increased breast asymmetry. Patients undergoing conservative treatment may experience sequelae including various degrees of the following dimorphisms, all possibly responsible for minor or even major breast deformity: breast asymmetry, loss of the nipple/areola complex, scar shrinkage and skin impairment, irregular shape and position of the nipple and areola. Various sensory symptoms have also been reported following conservative treatment, with patients complaining of hypo- or dysesthesia or even suffering actual pain. Breast lymphedema is also a common incapacitating after-effect that is believed to be largely underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Finally, like mastectomy, conservative breast surgery may induce serious psychological distress in patients who suffer the loss of physical integrity, womanhood or sexual arousal. Clinicians must be aware of the radiological changes indicative of late cancer recurrence. There are four types of modifications as follows: increased breast density, architectural distortion at the surgical site and formation of scar, mammary fat necrosis, and occurrence of microcalcifications. The management of sequelae of conservative breast treatment must therefore involve a multidisciplinary

  2. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J; Paletta, C; Hartrampf, C R

    1986-01-01

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A-C. FIGS. 2A-C. FIG. 3. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A-C. FIGS. 5A-C. FIG. 7. PMID:3010888

  3. Breast conservation treatment with perioperative interstitial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Mansfield, C.M.; Jewell, W.R.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-10-01

    Limited resection of the breast combined with radiation has proved to be as effective as more radical surgery in treating early breast cancer. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, the radiotherapy consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to deliver an interstitial boost dose to the tumor bed with iridium-192 immediately following the surgical procedure. An axillary node dissection is also performed at the time of lumpectomy. A dose of 2000 cGy is delivered to the tumor bed between 40 and 60 h. Two to three weeks later, 4500-5000 cGy is delivered to the entire breast with external beam radiation over 5-5.5 weeks. One hundred breasts in 98 patients were so treated between June 1982 and February 1986, with 2 carcinomas in situ, 40 stage I, 51 stage II, and 7 stage III cancers, consisting of 2 TIS, 54 T1, 39 T2, and 5 T3 lesions. Locoregional control with a median follow-up of 31 months was 98%. One recurrence was in a different quadrant, and the other revealed predominantly the in situ component. Immediate implant did not compromise wound healing or cosmesis. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in 88% of the breasts. Our preliminary results appear to suggest a better local control with immediate interstitial irradiation.

  4. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  5. A Novel Segment Classification for Multifocal and Multicentric Breast Cancer to Facilitate Breast-Conservation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mona P

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservation treatment (BCT) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy for the treatment of unifocal breast cancer. Multifocal and multicentric breast cancers (MFMCBC) challenge conventional indications for BCT and are often treated with mastectomy. Following progress in treatment strategies for unifocal tumors, there was a movement to evaluate the use of BCT for MFMCBC. Now a growing body of evidence from retrospective data has emerged, demonstrating acceptable local control and overall survival rates with BCT for MFMCBC. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. One of the possible barriers to such trials is the absence of a standardized classification and nomenclature for MFMCBC at this point in time. A novel segment classification is presented in this article in an endeavor to overcome this deficiency and allow future work on this issue.

  6. Breast Conserving Treatment for Breast Cancer: Dosimetric Comparison of Sequential versus Simultaneous Integrated Photon Boost

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Truus; Heuninckx, Karina; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background. Breast conserving surgery followed by whole breast irradiation is widely accepted as standard of care for early breast cancer. Addition of a boost dose to the initial tumor area further reduces local recurrences. We investigated the dosimetric benefits of a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) compared to a sequential boost to hypofractionate the boost volume, while maintaining normofractionation on the breast. Methods. For 10 patients 4 treatment plans were deployed, 1 with a sequential photon boost, and 3 with different SIB techniques: on a conventional linear accelerator, helical TomoTherapy, and static TomoDirect. Dosimetric comparison was performed. Results. PTV-coverage was good in all techniques. Conformity was better with all SIB techniques compared to sequential boost (P = 0.0001). There was less dose spilling to the ipsilateral breast outside the PTVboost (P = 0.04). The dose to the organs at risk (OAR) was not influenced by SIB compared to sequential boost. Helical TomoTherapy showed a higher mean dose to the contralateral breast, but less than 5 Gy for each patient. Conclusions. SIB showed less dose spilling within the breast and equal dose to OAR compared to sequential boost. Both helical TomoTherapy and the conventional technique delivered acceptable dosimetry. SIB seems a safe alternative and can be implemented in clinical routine. PMID:25162031

  7. Twenty-year incidence and patterns of contralateral breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E. . E-mail: hill@xrt.upenn.edu; Harris, Eleanor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to determine the incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CLB) after treatment for early-stage breast cancer with breast-conserving treatment (BCT), and to observe patterns of CLB presentation. Methods: Medical records of 1,801 women treated for unilateral AJCC Stage 0-II breast cancer with BCT between 1977 and 2000 were analyzed as a retrospective cohort. Results: The incidence of any CLB at 20 years was 15.4%. The annual risk of developing any CLB remained constant at approximately 0.75% per year after treatment. The median time to any CLB was 8.2 years (range, 0.5-26.5 years). No difference in incidence of CLB was demonstrated in patients with primary invasive carcinoma vs. DCIS (p = 0.84). The majority of patients (83%) developing CLB tumors developed invasive disease. The risk of developing an invasive CLB did not differ significantly for patients with DCIS vs. those with primary invasive carcinoma (p = 0.20). The method of detection of the primary tumor (mammography vs. physical examination) was not predictive of detection of the CLB (p = 0.20). Finally, the location of CLB tumors was not affected by that of prior tumors (p 0.82). Conclusions: The risk of development of CLB persists for at least 20 years after treatment for early-stage breast cancer. CLB tumors are frequently invasive, and their location is not influenced by location of prior tumors. Mammography and physical examination remain essential after BCT for detection of a contralateral breast cancer, regardless of the method of detection of the primary tumor.

  8. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  9. Partial breast irradiation as second conservative treatment for local breast cancer recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel . E-mail: jean-michel.hannoun-levi@fccc.edu; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Ellis, Steve; Teissier, Eric; Alzieu, Claude; Lallement, Michel; Cowen, Didier

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Mastectomy is the treatment of reference for local relapse after breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to document the feasibility and the results of associating lumpectomy with partial breast irradiation by interstitial brachytherapy (IB) as local treatment for an isolated ipsilateral BC local recurrence (LR). Methods and materials: Between 1975 and 1996 at Marseille and Nice Cancer Institutes, 4026 patients received lumpectomy and radiotherapy (RT) (50-80 Gy) for a localized breast cancer of which 473 presented a LR. Among these patients, 69 (14.6%) received a second lumpectomy followed by IB, which delivered 30 Gy (Nice, n = 24) or 45-50 Gy (Marseille, n = 45) with 3 to 8 {sup 192}Ir wires in 1 or 2 planes on the 85% isodose. Results: Median age at LR was 58.2 years, median follow-up since primary BC was 10 years, and median follow-up after the second conservative treatment was 50.2 months (range, 2-139 months). Immediate tolerance was good in all cases. Grade 2 to 3 long-term complications (LTC) according to IB dose were 0%, 28%, and 32%, respectively, for 30 Gy, 45 to 46 Gy, and 50 Gy (p 0.01). Grade 2 to 3 LTC according to total dose were 4% and 30%, respectively, for total doses (initial RT plus IB) {<=} 100 Gy or >100 Gy (p = 0.008). Logistic regression showed that the only factor associated with Grade 2 to 3 complications was higher IB doses (p = 0.01). We noted 11 second LRs (LR2), 10 distant metastases (DM), and 5 specific deaths. LR2 occurred either in the tumor bed (50.8%) or close to the tumor bed (34.3%) or in another quadrant (14.9%). Kaplan-Meier 5-year freedom from (FF) LR2 (FFLR2), FFDM, and DFS were 77.4%, 86.7%, and 68.9%, respectively. Overall 5-year survival (OS) was 91.8%. Univariate analysis showed the following factors associated with a higher FFLR2: (1) number of wires used for IB (3-4 vs. 5-8 wires, p = 0.006), (2) IB doses (30-45 Gy vs. 46-60 Gy, p = 0.05), (3) number of planes (1 vs. 2, p = 0.05), (4) interval between

  10. Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment With Radiation in Women With Prior Nonbreast Malignancy and Subsequent Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nemani, Deepika; Vapiwala, Neha Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Little information has been reported regarding outcomes after treatment for patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. This report analyzes the outcomes in patients with Stage I and II breast cancer after breast conservation treatment (BCT) with a prior nonbreast malignancy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 66 women with invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. All patients were treated with breast conservation surgery followed by definitive breast irradiation between 1978 and 2003. Median ages at diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and prior malignancy were 57 and 50 years, respectively. The median interval between the prior malignancy and breast cancer was 7.0 years. Median and mean follow-up times after BCT were 5.3 and 7.0 years. Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82-98%) and 78% (95% CI, 59-89%), respectively. There were 4 patients (6%) with local failure and 10 patients (15%) with distant metastases. The 10-year rate of local failure rate was 5% (95% CI, 2-16%) and freedom from distant metastases was 78% (95% CI, 61-88%). No obvious differences in survival or local control were noted compared with the reported results in the literature for patients with invasive breast cancer alone. Conclusions: Both overall survival and local control at 5 and 10 years were comparable to rates observed in early-stage breast cancer patients without a prior malignancy. Prior nonbreast malignancy is not a contraindication to BCT, if the primary cancer is effectively controlled.

  11. The evolution of accelerated, partial breast irradiation as a potential treatment option for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer considering breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Goffinet, Don R

    2004-12-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a safe, effective alternative to mastectomy for many women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. This approach involves local excision of the malignancy with tumor-free margins, followed by 5-7 weeks of external beam whole breast (WB) radiotherapy (XRT) to minimize the risk of an in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Though clearly beneficial, the extended course of almost daily postoperative radiotherapy interrupts normal activities and lengthens care. Additional options are now available that shorten the radiotherapy treatment time to 1-5 days (accelerated) and focus an increased dose of radiation on just the breast tissue around the excision cavity (partial breast). Recent trials with accelerated, partial breast irradiation (APBI) have shown promise as a potential replacement to the longer, whole breast treatments for select women with early-stage breast cancer. Current APBI approaches include interstitial brachytherapy, intracavitary (balloon) brachytherapy, and accelerated external beam (3-D conformal) radiotherapy, all of which normally complete treatment over 5 days, while intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) condenses the entire treatment into a single dose delivered immediately after tumor excision. Each approach has benefits and limitations. This study covers over 2 decades of clinical trials exploring APBI, discusses treatment variables that appear necessary for successful implementation of this new form of radiotherapy, compares and contrasts the various APBI approaches, and summarizes current and planned randomized trials that will shape if and how APBI is introduced into routine clinical care. Some of the more important outcome variables from these trials will be local toxicity, local and regional recurrence, and overall survival. If APBI options are ultimately demonstrated to be as safe and effective as current whole breast radiotherapy approaches, breast conservation may become an even more appealing choice, and the

  12. Regional Nodal Recurrence After Breast Conservation Treatment With Radiotherapy for Women With Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, J. Nicholas Vapiwala, Neha; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes for women presenting with regional lymph node recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiotherapy for Stage I and II invasive breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Of the women with pathologic Stage I and II invasive breast carcinoma treated with breast conservation treatment at University of Pennsylvania, 29 developed regional nodal recurrence as their first site of failure. An analysis of the patterns of regional nodal recurrence and their prognosis after recurrence was undertaken. The median follow-up from regional nodal recurrence was 5.4 years. Results: The pattern of regional nodal recurrence was as follows: 14 (48%) with simultaneous local and axillary recurrence, 7 (24%) with recurrence in the axilla only, 5 (17%) with recurrence in the supraclavicular region only, and 3 (10%) with multiple nodal sites of recurrence. For the entire study group, the 5-, 10-, and 15-year overall survival rate was 70%, 37%, and 28%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival rate for patients with locoregional recurrence was 32% compared with 45% for patients with regional-only recurrence (p = 0.50). The 10-year overall survival rate for patients with axillary recurrence discovered on pathologic examination of the mastectomy specimen was 31% compared with 42% for patients with palpable regional lymphadenopathy (p = 0.83). Conclusion: Patients with regional nodal recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiotherapy for early-stage breast carcinoma are potentially salvageable. The prognosis after regional nodal recurrence was not significantly different when stratified by the presence or absence of simultaneous in-breast recurrence or the method of detection.

  13. Cosmetic Outcomes and Complications Reported by Patients Having Undergone Breast-Conserving Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Metz, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years, much work in treatment of breast cancer has contributed to improvement of cosmetic and functional outcomes. The goal of breast-conservation treatment (BCT) is avoidance of mastectomy through use of lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation. Modern data demonstrate 'excellent' or 'good' cosmesis in >90% of patients treated with BCT. Methods and Materials: Patient-reported data were gathered via a convenience sample frame from breast cancer survivors using a publically available, free, Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. During use of the tool, breast cancer survivors are queried as to the cosmetic appearance of the treated breast, as well as perceived late effects. All data have been maintained anonymously with internal review board approval. Results: Three hundred fifty-four breast cancer survivors having undergone BCT and voluntarily using this tool were queried with regard to breast cosmesis and perceived late effects. Median diagnosis age was 48 years, and median current age 52 years. 'Excellent' cosmesis was reported by 27% (n = 88), 'Good' by 44% (n = 144), 'Fair' by 24% (n = 81), and 'Poor' by 5% (n = 18). Of the queries posted to survivors after BCT, late effects most commonly reported were cognitive changes (62%); sexual concerns (52%); changes in texture and color of irradiated skin (48%); chronic pain, numbness, or tingling (35%); and loss of flexibility in the irradiated area (30%). Survivors also described osteopenia/osteoporosis (35%), cardiopulmonary problems (12%), and lymphedema (19%). Conclusions: This anonymous tool uses a convenience sample frame to gather patient reported assessments of cosmesis and complications after breast cancer. Among the BCT population, cosmetic assessment by survivors appears less likely to be 'excellent' or 'good' than would be expected, with 30% of BCT survivors reporting 'fair' or 'poor' cosmesis. Patient reported incidence of chronic pain, as well as cognitive and

  14. Locoregional Recurrence by Tumor Biology in Breast Cancer Patients after Preoperative Chemotherapy and Breast Conservation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jwa, Eunjin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Ja Young; Park, Young Hee; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine whether breast cancer subtype can affect locoregional recurrence (LRR) and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and Methods We evaluated 335 consecutive patients with clinical stage II-III breast cancer who received NAC plus BCT from 2002 to 2009. Patients were classified according to six molecular subtypes: luminal A (hormone receptor [HR]+/HER2–/Ki-67 < 15%, n=113), luminal B1 (HR+/HER2–/Ki-67 ≥ 15%, n=33), luminal B2 (HR+/HER2+, n=83), HER2 with trastuzumab (HER2[T+]) (HR–/HER2+/use of trastuzumab, n=14), HER2 without trastuzumab (HER2[T–]) (HR–/HER2+, n=31), and triple negative (TN) (HR–/HER2–, n=61). Results After a median follow-up period of 7.2 years, 26 IBTRs and 37 LRRs occurred. The 5-year LRR-free survival rates were luminal A, 96.4%; B1, 93.9%; B2, 90.3%; HER2(T+), 92.9%; HER2(T–), 78.3%; and TN, 79.6%. The 5-year IBTR-free survival rates were luminal A, 97.2%; B1, 93.9%; B2, 92.8%; HER2(T+), 92.9%; HER2(T–), 89.1%; and TN, 84.6%. In multivariate analysis, HER2(T–) (IBTR: hazard ratio, 4.2; p=0.04 and LRR: hazard ratio, 7.6; p < 0.01) and TN subtypes (IBTR: hazard ratio, 6.9; p=0.01 and LRR: hazard ratio, 8.1; p < 0.01) were associated with higher IBTR and LRR rates. A pathologic complete response (pCR) was found to show correlation with better LRR and a tendency toward improved IBTR controls in TN patients (IBTR, p=0.07; LRR, p=0.03). Conclusion The TN and HER2(T–) subtypes predict higher rates of IBTR and LRR after NAC and BCT. A pCR is predictive of improved IBTR or LRR in TN subtype. PMID:26910473

  15. Breast-Conserving Treatment With Partial or Whole Breast Irradiation for Low-Risk Invasive Breast Carcinoma-5-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Polgar, Csaba Fodor, Janos; Major, Tibor; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Loevey, Katalin; Orosz, Zsolt; Sulyok, Zoltan; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Kasler, Miklos

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a randomized study comparing the survival and cosmetic results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected patients with T1 N0-1mi, Grade 1-2, nonlobular breast cancer without presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after breast-conserving surgery to receive 50 Gy/25 fractions WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multicatheter brachytherapy (BT; n = 88) or 50 Gy/25 fractions electron beam (EB) irradiation (n = 40). Results: At a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local recurrence was 4.7% and 3.4% in the PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p = 0.50). There was no significant difference in the 5-year probability of overall survival (94.6% vs. 91.8%), cancer-specific survival (98.3% vs. 96.0%), and disease-free survival (88.3% vs. 90.3%). The rate of excellent to good cosmetic result was 77.6% in the PBI group (81.2% after HDR BT; 70.0% after EB) and 62.9% in the control group (52.2% after telecobalt; 65.6% after 6-9-MV photons; p{sub WBI/PBI} = 0.009). Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using interstitial HDR implants or EB to deliver radiation to the tumor bed alone for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with carefully designed HDR multicatheter implants compared with the outcome after WBI.

  16. Trends and Patterns of Breast Conservation Treatment in Hong Kong: 1994-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. Soong, Inda S.; Sze, Henry; Choi, C.-W.; Yeung, M.-W.; Ng, W.-T.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation treatment (BCT) was quite unpopular in Hong Kong until the early 1990s, but the trends and patterns of BCT use in the past 14 years have not been studied since. The purpose of this study was to identify the latest trends and patterns. Methods and Materials: All consecutive cases of female breast cancer referred to a community oncology center in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 2,375 women with T1-2 invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery, 1,137 (48%) had T1 ({<=}2 cm) disease and 1,238 (52%) had T2 (>2 cm-{<=}5 cm) disease. Median patient age was 51 years (range, 24-95 years); 65% patients had their surgery in public hospitals. Results: Of the total patient cohort, 2,153 (91%) patients presented with palpable breast masses and only 104 (4%) with mammographically detected cancers. Overall, 721 (30%) and 1,654 (70%) patients underwent BCT and mastectomy, respectively. There was no significant increase in the BCT rates (31%, SD 5%; p = 0.804) or mammographic detection rates (5%, SD 1%; p = 0.125) in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007. In multivariate analyses, age {<=}50 years (OR 2.479; p < 0.001), mammographically detected tumors (OR 1.868; p = 0.007), T1 tumors (OR 3.159; p < 0.001), surgeries in private hospitals (OR 1.288; p = 0.018), and negative nodal status (OR 1.886; p < 0.001) were independent factors predictive of a higher likelihood of a woman having BCT. Conclusions: Our results indicate a satisfactory acceptance of BCT by patients who are young and have small tumors, node-negative disease, or surgery in private hospitals. However, the continuing unpopularity of breast screening is likely a major factor limiting the broad use of BCT.

  17. Outcomes after breast conservation treatment with radiation in women with ductal carcinoma in situ and prior nonbreast malignancy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Deepika N; Vapiwala, Neha; Solin, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is controversial, as not all patients progress to invasive carcinoma. This report analyzes the outcomes after breast conservation treatment (BCT) with radiation in patients with DCIS following prior malignancy at another anatomic site. The study cohort was comprised of 14 women with DCIS who were treated between 1978 and 2003. The median age at diagnosis of DCIS was 54 years (mean 56; range 37-78) and for the prior nonbreast malignancy was 44 years (mean 47; range 27-76). All patients underwent breast conservation surgery followed by whole breast radiation and tumor bed boost. The median and mean follow-up times after treatment of DCIS were 8.0 and 9.1 years, respectively (range 2-18). The median and mean interval period between the prior malignancy and DCIS was 6.0 and 8.2 years, respectively (range 1-30). There was one (7%) local failure, two (14%) contralateral breast cancers, and one (7%) death from breast cancer that occurred 7 years after BCT following contralateral invasive breast cancer. In this cohort of 14 patients treated for DCIS of the breast after a prior nonbreast malignancy, treatment for DCIS resulted in a high rate of local control and should be considered for curative intent.

  18. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  19. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco Sacco, Mariano; Loi, Gianfranco; Masini, Laura; Ferrante, Daniela; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Ronco, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Carriero, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

  20. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  1. Long-Term Clinical and Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment for Women With Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma According to the Type of Breast Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Chacko, David; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Vapiwala, Neha; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The present study was performed to compare outcomes after breast conservation treatment with iridium-192 implant boost vs. electron boost. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1983, 141 patients were treated with whole breast radiotherapy followed by iridium-192 boost after breast-conserving surgery. They were matched 1:1 to patients treated with electron boost. Outcome measures included survival, local recurrence, cosmesis, and complications. Results: Median follow-up was 16.7 and 12.6 years for the implant vs. electron groups (p < 0.001). Rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival at 10/20 years did not differ between the groups, nor did patterns of first failure. Patients in the electron group were more likely to have excellent/good cosmesis than those in the implant group 1 year after radiotherapy (p = 0.014); this trend continued through 10 years but did not reach statistical significance at years 5/10. Complication rates were similar, although patients receiving electron boost seemed less likely to develop breast fibrosis than did those receiving implant boost (23/141 vs. 58/141, respectively, incidence rate ratio 0.7, p = 0.17). Conclusions: Twenty-year data demonstrate no difference in rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, overall survival, or patterns of failure between groups treated with these two well-described radiotherapy boost techniques. Better cosmesis was observed in the electron group 1 year after radiotherapy, with a trend continuing for 10 years. The incidence of complications was similar between the groups, with a trend toward increased fibrosis in patients receiving implant boost.

  2. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K.; Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W.; Sause, William T.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  4. Conservative and radical oncoplastic approches in the surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, G; Magno, S; Fabbri, C; Chiesa, F; Di Leone, A; Moschella, F; Scafetta, I; Scaldaferri, A; Fragomeni, S; Adesi Barone, L; Terribile, D; Salgarello, M; Masetti, R

    2008-01-01

    In the attempt to optimise the balance between the risk of local recurrence and the cosmetic outcomes in breast surgery, new surgical procedures, so-called oncoplastic techniques, have been introduced in recent years. The term oncoplastic surgery refers to surgery on the basis of oncological principles during which the techniques of plastic surgery are used, mostly for reconstructive and cosmetic reasons. The advantage of the oncoplastic surgery for breast cancer is the possibility of performing a wider excision of the tumour with a good cosmetic result. Oncoplastic surgery is a broad concept that can be used for several different combinations of oncological surgery and plastic surgery: excision of the tumour by reduction mammoplasty, tumour excision followed by remodelling mammoplasty, mastectomy with immediate reconstruction of the breast and partial mastectomy with reconstruction. Careful patient selection and preoperative planning are key components for the success of any oncoplastic operation for breast cancer. Accurate preoperative evaluation of the clinical and biological features of the tumour as well as of the morphological aspects of the breast allow the surgeon to make a decision if a conservative or radical approach is preferable and select the most effective oncoplastic surgical technique. In this review we summarise the indications, advantages and limitations of several oncoplastic procedures. PMID:19146201

  5. Who should not undergo breast conservation?

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2013-08-01

    Optimal local control is one of the three main aims of breast cancer treatment (next to optimal regional control and reducing the risk of distant relapses by adequate systemic treatments). To this end, many women desire breast conservation provided local control is comparable to that of ablative procedures, the cosmetic outcome is good and side effects of treatment are limited. To achieve this delicate balance the following should be part of the information to the patient with an operable breast cancer: Patients should have an open discussion with there care providers to enable a shared decision: this will lead to less anxiety and stress with the best satisfaction and recovery. The possibility of breast conservation should always be explored. Even with equal local control and survival outlook, quite a minority (about 20%) of patients opt for ablative procedures (with or without breast reconstruction). Higher risk of local relapse (i.e. persistent cancer growth in the breast) is associated with higher risk of distant disease and subsequent risk of dying of breast cancer. Rough estimates indicate that for every four local relapses one patient may die from breast cancer due to persistent disease. This estimate may vary substantially with the type of cancers (see dr. Morrow), age at diagnosis, application and duration of systemic treatments. To limit the negative effect on overall survival through local relapses, it is generally accepted that for early breast cancer local relapse rates should be within the limit of 1% per year, or within 10% at 10 years. Current population based overviews and hospital based studies show that the risk of local relapse after breast conservations are very well below this limit, being around 2-3% at 5 years. There is no absolute risk threshold of local relapse incidence above which breast conservation is absolutely contra indicated: this will remain an individual decision. Oncoplastic procedures should widely be available to adjust to the

  6. The Impact of Comorbidities on Outcomes for Elderly Women Treated With Breast-Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R. Hwang, W.-T.; Urtishak, Sandra L.; Plastaras, John; Kinosian, Bruce; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer incidence increases with age and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly women, but is not well studied in this population. Comorbidities often impact on the management of breast cancer in elderly women. Methods and Materials: From 1979 to 2002, a total of 238 women aged 70 years and older with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma of the breast underwent breast-conservation therapy. Outcomes were compared by age groups and comorbidities. Median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 70-89 years). Age distribution was 122 women (51%) aged 70-74 years, 71 women (30%) aged 75-79 years, and 45 women (19%) aged 80 years or older. Median follow-up was 6.2 years. Results: On outcomes analysis by age groups, 10-year cause-specific survival rates for women aged 70-74, 75-79, and 80 years or older were 74%, 81%, and 82%, respectively (p = 0.87). Intercurrent deaths at 10 years were significantly higher in older patients: 20% in those aged 70-74 years, 36% in those aged 75-79 years, and 53% in those 80 years and older (p = 0.0005). Comorbidities were not significantly more common in the older age groups and did not correlate with cause-specific survival adjusted for age. Higher comorbidity scores were associated with intercurrent death. Conclusions: Older age itself is not a contraindication to standard breast-conservation therapy, including irradiation. Women of any age with low to moderate comorbidity indices should be offered standard breast-conservation treatment if otherwise clinically eligible.

  7. [Lipomodelling for correction of breast conservative treatment sequelae. Medicolegal aspects. Expert opinion on five problematic clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Gosset, J; Flageul, G; Toussoun, G; Guérin, N; Tourasse, C; Delay, E

    2008-04-01

    In our unit, breast cancer patients suffering mild sequelae of conservative cancer treatment receive fat transfer (lipomodelling), following a precise protocol, based on mammographic and ultrasound examinations and MRI. Available data do not seem to indicate any deleterious impact on patient outcome, notably in view of radiological images, but recurrence (or rather occurrence of new ipsilateral or contralateral cancer) is frequent. The correlation between new or recurrent breast cancer and lipomodelling is high; misinterpretations are possible and frequently arise. The present paper is a description of five complex clinical cases and a discussion of the medicolegal issues that may possibly arise; it also provides tentative expert evaluation of the cases. Clinical findings are reported and analyzed. The second step is a discussion of the radiological impact of lipomodelling, and of the problems caused by the transfer of potentially malignant cells when no preoperative diagnosis of recurrence is made; the morphological and esthetic benefits of the method are described, as well as the potential beneficial impact of fat transfer, notably associated with lower breast density and injections of fat stem cells. Our conclusion is that specialized radiologists, as well as plastic surgery and oncology experts should address the question of fat transfer in operated breast cancer patients and give their reasoned opinion about potentially litigious cases. This would help minimize or solve the conflicts between patients, doctors and experts. Establishing common ground between the different stakeholders would allow the development of the technique, as lipomodelling is, according to our experience, a tremendous advance in the treatment of sequelae from conservative breast cancer surgery.

  8. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  9. Radiobiological advantages of an immediate interstitial boost dose in conservative treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, E.C.; Krishnan, L.; Cytaki, E.P.; Woolf, C.D.; Henry, M.M.; Lin, F.; Jewell, W.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Minimum surgery with irradiation is emerging as one of the main modalities of therapy for operable early breast cancer. Between June 1982 and June 1986, 110 breasts with Tis, T1 to T3 lesions have been treated at our institution with lumpectomy and interstitial irradiation to the tumor bed with Iridium-192 perioperatively followed by external beam irradiation. There have been two local recurrences at or near the vicinity of the primary, at a median follow-up of 60 months. To analyze the parameters that might have contributed to the local control, we have examined the treatment volumes, prescribed dose to the tumor bed, dose at the core of the tumor bed, and dose to the surrounding normal tissue. Immediate interstitial implant has the radiobiological advantage of delivering continuous low dose irradiation, immediately upon removal of gross tumor to residual foci. Implantation of the afterloading catheters intraoperatively facilitates accurate dose delivery and avoidance of geographical misses. By precise treatment of any residual foci, immediately upon removal of the gross mass, perioperative interstitial irradiation improves local control and by facilitating less radical surgical excision, leads to better cosmetic results.

  10. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT) Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II) for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Aoyama, Nobutaka; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Kariya, Shinji; Hamada, Norihiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Onogawa, Masahide; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT) using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand) has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter) of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane) prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non-surgical BCT can be

  11. Reexcision and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of local relapse after breast conservation: an alternative to salvage mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sulyok, Zoltán; Major, Tibor; Fröhlich, Georgina; Takácsi-Nagy, Zoltán; Fodor, János

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of second breast-conserving surgery with reirradiation using perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of local recurrence developing after previous breast-conserving therapy. Material and methods Between 1999 and 2007, twelve patients with isolated local recurrence initially treated for breast carcinoma with the use of conservative surgery and radiation therapy, underwent a repeat breast-conserving surgery and perioperative high-dose-rate multicatheter brachytherapy. Breast cancer related events, late side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed retrospectively. Results At a median follow-up of 56 months (range: 8-112) second local recurrence has not occurred, yielding a 100% mastectomy-free survival. Four patients (33.3%) developed subsequent distant metastasis and died of breast cancer. The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival was 65.6%, 78.6%, and 78.6%, respectively. Cosmetic results were rated good, fair, poor and unknown in 6 (50%), 2 (17%), 1 (8%) and 3 (25%) patients, respectively. Grade 2 skin toxicity and fibrosis occurred in 1 (8%) and 2 (17%) patients. Asymptomatic fat necrosis was detected in 6 (50%) women. No patient developed grade 3-4 late side effects. Conclusions Second breast-conserving surgery followed by partial breast reirradiation is a safe and effective option for the management of selected patients developing local recurrence after previous breast-conserving therapy. Perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy with adequate fractionation may decrease the risk of second local relapse with acceptable cosmetic results and low rate of late side effects.

  12. Knowledge and preference for breast conservation therapy among women without breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lazovich, D; Raab, K K; Gurney, J G; Chen, H

    2000-01-01

    We interviewed 419 adult women in Minnesota, who were selected at random and without a history of breast cancer, to ascertain what percentage could correctly report that cure was the same for breast conservation therapy and mastectomy, what percentage would state a preference for breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and characteristics associated with these outcomes. Nearly all women (n = 360; 86%) had heard of both mastectomy and breast conservation therapy; among these women, 37% correctly reported that the two treatments were equally efficacious. Given a scenario where they were diagnosed with breast cancer amenable to either treatment, 58% of participants stated a preference for breast conservation therapy. Older women were less likely than younger women to know that cure was the same for breast conservation therapy and mastectomy (adjusted OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.2, 1.0), and women residing in urban areas were more likely to prefer breast conservation therapy over mastectomy compared to rural residents (adjusted OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1. 3, 3.8). Comparing these findings to women diagnosed with breast cancer in Minnesota, breast conservation therapy was found to be performed less frequently than preference for such therapy among women in our study would suggest. Educating women prior to diagnosis about breast cancer treatment options, and exploring reasons for the gap between actual utilization of breast conservation therapy and prediagnosis preference, may be indicated.

  13. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  14. Breast Conservation Surgery: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan; Achuthan, Raj; Turton, Philip; Lansdown, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Breast conservation surgery is available to the vast majority of women with breast cancer. The combination of neoadjuvant therapies and oncoplastic surgical techniques allows even large tumours to be managed with a breast-conserving approach. The relationship between breast size and the volume of tissue to be excised determines the need for volume displacement or replacement. Such an approach can also be used in the management of carefully selected cases of multifocal or multicentric breast cancer. The role of novel techniques, such as endoscopic breast surgery and radiofrequency ablation, is yet to be precisely defined. PMID:22295209

  15. Delayed breast cellulitis: An evolving complication of breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Newlin, Heather; Morris, Christopher G.; Haigh, Linda S.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price . E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Delayed breast cellulitis (DBC) is characterized by the late onset of breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth. This retrospective study analyzes the risk factors and clinical course of DBC. Methods and Materials: From 1985 through 2004, 580 sequential women with 601 stage T0-2N0-1 breast cancers underwent breast conserving therapy. Cases of DBC were identified according to accepted clinical criteria: diffuse breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth occurring >3 months after definitive surgery and >3 weeks after radiotherapy. Potential risk factors analyzed included patient comorbidity, operative technique, acute complications, and details of adjunctive therapy. Response to treatment and long-term outcome were analyzed to characterize the natural course of this syndrome. Results: Of the 601 cases, 16%, 52%, and 32% were Stage 0, I, and II, respectively. The overall incidence of DBC was 8% (50/601). Obesity, ecchymoses, T stage, the presence and aspiration of a breast hematoma/seroma, removal of >5 axillary lymph nodes, and arm lymphedema were significantly associated with DBC. The median time to onset of DBC from the date of definitive surgery was 226 days. Ninety-two percent of DBC patients were empirically treated with antibiotics. Fourteen percent required more invasive intervention. Twenty-two percent had recurrent episodes of DBC. Ultimately, 2 patients (4%) underwent mastectomy for intractable breast pain related to DBC. Conclusion: Although multifactorial, we believe DBC is primarily related to a bacterial infection in the setting of impaired lymphatic drainage and may appear months after completion of radiotherapy. Invasive testing before a trial of antibiotics is generally not recommended.

  16. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast With Close or Focally Involved Margins Following Breast-Conserving Surgery: Treatment With Reexcision or Radiotherapy With Increased Dosage

    SciTech Connect

    Monteau, Amelie; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Kirova, Youlia M.; Fourchotte, Virginie; Bollet, Marc A.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Asselain, Bernard; Salmon, Remy J. M.D.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Following breast-conserving surgery for DCIS, reexcision before radiotherapy is recommended when margins are close or involved. We investigated whether an additional radiation dose could replace reexcision. Methods: We selected 208 women with DCIS of the breast treated with breast-conserving surgery between 1992 and 2002 who had either close margins (< 2 mm) (89 pts) or focally (< 1 mm) or minimally (1-15 mm) involved margins (119 pts). Sixty-one patients (29%) underwent reexcision before irradiation and 147 patients (71%) received breast irradiation with boost, without reexcision. Results: Median follow-up was 89 months. Median age was 53 years with 7 patients less than 41. Involved margins were less frequent in the non reexcision group than in the reexcised group (50% vs. 74%, p = 0.0019). All other clinical and histological features were comparable. Median whole-breast radiation dose was 50 Gy. Median total doses to the tumour bed were 67 Gy (range, 45-77) and 60 Gy (range, 46-74), respectively (p < 0.0001). Of the 61 reexcised patients, 56% had residual DCIS and 6% had invasive cancer. Six underwent a mastectomy for persistent margin involvement. Seven-year locoregional failure rates were 9.3% without, and 9.6% with reexcision (ns). No differences were observed when adjusting for margin status. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with close (< 2 mm) or focally/minimally involved margins, reexcision may be avoided and satisfactory local control achieved by increasing the radiation dose to the tumour bed to at least 66 Gy. These results only apply to patients older than 40 and would need confirmation in independent series.

  17. Total Mastectomy or Breast Conservation Therapy? How Radiation Oncologist Accessibility Determines Treatment Choice and Quality: A SEER Data-base Analysis.

    PubMed

    Churilla, Thomas M; Donnelly, Patrick E; Leatherman, Erin R; Adonizio, Christian S; Peters, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Mastectomy and breast conservation therapy (BCT) are equivalent in survival for treatment of early stage breast cancer. This study evaluated the impact of radiation oncologist accessibility on choice of breast conserving surgery (BCS) versus mastectomy, and the appropriate receipt of radiotherapy after BCS. In the National Cancer Institute Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results data base, the authors selected breast cancer cases from 2004 to 2008 with the following criteria: T2N1M0 or less, lobular or ductal histology, and treatment with simple or partial mastectomy. We combined the Health Resources and Services Administration Area Resource File to define average radiation oncologist density (ROD) by county over the same time period. We evaluated tumor characteristics, demographic information, and ROD with respect to BCS rates and receipt of radiation therapy after BCS in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 118,773 cases analyzed, mastectomy was performed 33.2% of the time relative to BCS. After adjustment for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS versus mastectomy were directly associated with ROD (multiplicative change in odds for a single unit increase in ROD [95% CI] = 1.02 [1.01-1.03]; p < 0.001). Adjuvant radiation therapy was not administered in 28.2% of BCS cases. When adjusting for demographic and tumor variables, the odds of having BCS without adjuvant radiation were inversely associated with ROD (0.95 [0.94-0.97]; p < 0.001). We observed a direct relationship between ROD and BCS rates independent of demographic and tumor variables, and an inverse trend for omission of radiotherapy after BCS. Access to radiation oncologists may represent an important factor in surgical choice and receiving appropriate BCT in early stage breast cancer.

  18. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  19. Comparison of two techniques of interstitial pulsed dose rate boost brachytherapy in conservative treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tarnawska, Zofia; Blukis, Andrzej; Badzio, Andrzej; Jaskiewicz, Janusz; Jassem, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to compare selected parameters of implants and natural dose volume histograms for two techniques of interstitial pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR BT) as a boost to the tumour bed in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Material and methods Data of T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients who underwent BCT with BT boost between 05.2002 and 12.2008 were analysed. Ninety two patients were implanted with rigid tubes after breast irradiation (group A) and 96 had a peri-operative BT with an intra-operative flexible tube placement and subsequent whole breast radiotherapy (group B). In both groups PDR BT of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h) was administered based on Paris system rules, and volume optimization using BT planning system PLATO. Results Three-plane implant was used in 62% and 8% of patients in group A and B, respectively, and two-plane implant in 38% of group A and in 84% of group B, with a median of 11 and 9 tubes respectively. The average volume for the prescribed dose (V100) was 42.0 ± 25.4 cc (group A) and 34.1 ± 19.7 cc (group B), respectively (p = 0.017). The individual V50 and V200 were similar. Quality index (QI) was not impacted by the technique of BT (mean QI was 1.80 ± 0.10 and 1.75 ± 0.46 for the groups A and B, respectively). Uniformity index (UI) in respective groups was 1.60 ± 0.10 and 1.52 ± 0.21 (p = 0.001). Conclusions Implant volume encompassed by prescribed dose was significantly lower with intra-operative plastic tubes placement. In respect to the QI, these two BT techniques were comparable. The target volume coverage by the dose distribution as defined by UI was better for rigid tubes.

  20. Surgical Considerations After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Breast Conservation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Thomas A; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2015-05-01

    The increasing use of chemotherapy before surgery has affected a number of local-regional treatment decisions including surgical and radiation management of the breast, management of axillary lymph nodes, and the indications for postmastectomy radiation. In this monograph, we will focus on surgical and radiation management as components of breast conservation therapy. The early randomized trials that compared neoadjuvant to adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer demonstrated that rates of breast conservation can be increased when chemotherapy is sequenced first. This was a direct consequence of high response rates seen with neoadjuvant treatment, which permitted downstaging of a large primary tumor to a volume that permitted breast-conserving surgery. Some initial studies found higher rates of breast recurrences with this approach but over time, with improved multidisciplinary coordination and proper patient selection, rates of breast recurrences have improved to the excellent levels achieved when surgery is performed first. New clinical trials are also ongoing to define the role of sentinel lymph node surgery and regional lymph node radiation.

  1. Assessing cosmetic results after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria João; Oliveira, Helder; Cardoso, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    "Taking less treating better" has been one of the major improvements of breast cancer surgery in the last four decades. The application of this principle translates into equivalent survival of breast cancer conserving treatment (BCT) when compared to mastectomy, with a better cosmetic outcome. While it is relatively easy to evaluate the oncological results of BCT, the cosmetic outcome is more difficult to measure due to the lack of an effective and consensual procedure. The assessment of cosmetic outcome has been mainly subjective, undertaken by a panel of expert observers or/and by patient self-assessment. Unfortunately, the reproducibility of these methods is low. Objective methods have higher values of reproducibility but still lack the inclusion of several features considered by specialists in BCT to be fundamental for cosmetic outcome. The recent addition of volume information obtained with 3D images seems promising. Until now, unfortunately, no method is considered to be the standard of care. This paper revises the history of cosmetic evaluation and guides us into the future aiming at a method that can easily be used and accepted by all, caregivers and caretakers, allowing not only the comparison of results but the improvement of performance.

  2. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery.

  3. Breast Retraction Assessment: an objective evaluation of cosmetic results of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Patterson, M.P.; Hill, L.R.; Vora, N.; Desai, K.R.; Archambeau, J.O.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Breast Retraction Assessment (BRA) is an objective evaluation of the amount of cosmetic retraction of the treated breast in comparison to the untreated breast in patients who receive conservative treatment for breast cancer. A clear acrylic sheet supported vertically and marked as a grid at 1 cm intervals is employed to perform the measurements. Average BRA value in 29 control patients without breast cancer was 1.2 cm. Average BRA value in 27 patients treated conservatively for clinical Stage I or II unilateral breast cancer was 3.7 cm. BRA values in breast cancer patients ranged from 0.0 to 8.5 cm. Patients who received a local radiation boost to the primary tumor bed site had statistically significantly less retraction than those who did not receive a boost. Patients who had an extensive primary tumor resection had statistically significantly more retraction than those who underwent a more limited resection. In comparison to qualitative forms of cosmetic analysis, BRA is an objective test that can quantitatively evaluate factors which may be related to cosmetic retraction in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer.

  4. Randomized, prospective assessment of moisturizer efficacy for the treatment of radiation dermatitis following radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Ogita, Mami; Akahane, Keiko; Haga, Chiori; Ito, Ryoko; Arai, Satoru; Ishida, Yasushi; Tsukada, Yoichiro; Kawamori, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effect of heparinoid moisturizer use after acute skin damage for patients receiving whole-breast radiotherapy after lumpectomy is understudied. Methods A total of 30 patients were randomly assigned to receive heparinoid moisturizer (Group M), and 32 patients comprised the control group (Group C). Patients in Group M were instructed to apply heparinoid moisturizer from 2 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy, and to continue to use the moisturizer until 3 months after completion of whole-breast radiotherapy. Group C patients were instructed to not apply any topical moisturizer during the study period. The relative ratio of skin water content ratio (RWCR(t) = (It /Nt)/(I0/N0)) between irradiated and non-irradiated field was calculated. Signs and symptoms were also assessed. The primary endpoint was the difference in relative ratio of skin water content ratio between 2 and 4 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy. Results In Group C, relative ratio of skin water content ratio dropped to 0.80 ± 0.15 at 2 weeks and maintained the low level at 4 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy. Similarly, in Group M, relative ratio of skin water content ratio dropped to 0.81 ± 0.19 at 2 weeks (prior to application), however, it returned to baseline level (1.05 ± 0.23) at 4 weeks (2 weeks after application). The arithmetic difference of relative ratio of skin water content ratio in Group M was 0.24 ± 0.23 and was significantly larger than in Group C (0.06 ± 0.15; P < 0.01). Skin dryness and desquamation were less severe in Group M. Conclusions The application of heparinoid moisturizer for 2 weeks following whole-breast radiotherapy significantly increased water content and helped improve skin dryness and desquamation compared with no use of moisturizer. PMID:26491204

  5. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  6. Small-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A new approach that is superior to fixed-field IMRT in optimizing dosimetric and treatment-relevant parameters for patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Hu, Tao; Chen, Yeshan

    2016-08-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is considered to deliver a better dose distribution and to shorten treatment time. There is a lack of research regarding breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using VMAT with prone positioning. We developed a new small-arc VMAT methodology and compared it to conventional (fixed-field) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the dosimetric and treatment relevant parameters for breast cancer patients in the prone position.Ten early-stage breast cancer patients were included in this exploratory study. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation scan in the prone position and for each patient, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated using the Monaco planning system. Two symmetrical partial arcs were applied in the VMAT plans. The angle ranges of the 2 arcs were set to approximately 60° to 100° and 220° to 260°, with small adjustments to maximize target coverage, while minimizing lung and heart exposure. The IMRT plans used 4 fixed fields. Prescribed doses were 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The target coverage, homogeneity, conformity, dose to organs at risk (OAR), treatment time, and monitor units (MU) were evaluated.Higher median conformal index (CI) and lower homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) were respectively observed in VMAT and plans group (CI, 95% vs 91%; HI, 0.09 vs 0.12; P < 0.001). The volumes of ipsilateral lung receiving 30, 20, 10, and 5 Gy were lower for VMAT (P < 0.01), being 10%, 14.9%, 25.9%, and 44.9%, respectively, compared to 11.79%, 17.32%, 30.27%, and 50.58% for the IMRT plans. The mean lung dose was also reduced from 10.6 ± 1.8 to 9.6 ± 1.4 Gy (P = 0.001). The volumes of the heart receiving 30 and 40 Gy were similar for the 2 methods. In addition, the median treatment time (161 vs 412 seconds; P < 0.001) and the mean MU (713 vs 878; P < 0.001) were lower for VMAT.Small-arc VMAT plan improved CI and HI for the

  7. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  8. Are breast conservation and mastectomy equally effective in the treatment of young women with early breast cancer? Long-term results of a population-based cohort of 1,451 patients aged ≤ 40 years.

    PubMed

    van der Sangen, Maurice J C; van de Wiel, Fenneke M M; Poortmans, Philip M P; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Roumen, Rudi M H; Ernst, Miranda F; Tutein Nolthenius-Puylaert, M Cathelijne B J E; Voogd, Adri C

    2011-05-01

    To compare the effectiveness of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy, all women aged ≤ 40 years, treated for early-stage breast cancer in the southern part of the Netherlands between 1988 and 2005, were identified. A total of 562 patients underwent mastectomy and 889 patients received BCT. During follow-up, 23 patients treated with mastectomy and 135 patients treated with BCT developed a local relapse without previous or simultaneous evidence of distant disease. The local relapse risk for patients treated with mastectomy was 4.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-6.4) at 5 years and reached a plateau after 6 years at 6.0% (95% CI 3.5-8.5). After BCT, the 5-, 10- and 15-year risks were 8.3% (95% CI 6.3-10.5), 18.4% (95% CI 15.0-21.8) and 28.2% (95% CI 23.0-33.4), respectively (P < 0.0001). Adjuvant systemic therapy following BCT reduced the 15-year local relapse risk from 32.9% (95% CI 26.7-39.1) to 16.1% (95% CI 9.1-23.1), (P = 0.0007). In conclusion, local tumor control in young patients with early-stage breast cancer is worse after BCT than after mastectomy. Adjuvant systemic therapy significantly improves local control following BCT and also for that reason it should be considered for most patients ≤ 40 years. Long-term follow-up is highly recommended for young patients after BCT, because even with systemic treatment an annual risk of local relapse of 1% remains up to 15 years after treatment.

  9. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes between Breast Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy and Mastectomy Alone in Patients with T1-2 Stage and 1-3 Axillary Lymph Nodes in the Era of Modern Adjuvant Systemic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Won; Chun, Mison; Han, Sehwan; Jung, Yong Sik; Choi, Jin Hyuk; Kang, Seok Yun; Jang, Hyunsoo; Jo, Sunmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in the treatment of T1–2 primary tumor with 1–3 positive lymph nodes is controversial. We compared treatment outcomes between breast conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy (BCS+RT) and total mastectomy alone (TM) in the setting of modern adjuvant systemic treatments. Methods Patients with T1–2 primary breast cancer and 1–3 positive lymph nodes who were treated between 2001 and 2011 were divided into 2 groups based on the treatment approach: BCS+RT (n = 169) and TM (n = 117). All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy including taxanes. Adjuvant endocrine therapy was administered to patients with positive hormone receptors according to their menstrual status. Results During a median follow-up of 76.5 months, 21 patients (7.3%) experienced locoregional recurrence as the first event, including 7 patients (4.1%) in the BCS+RT group and 14 patients (12.0%) in the TM group. The 5-year cumulative incidence rate of locoregional recurrence was 2.5% for BCS+RT versus 9.5% for TM (p = 0.016). Competing risk regression analysis revealed that TM was associated with a relative risk for locoregional recurrence of 5.347 (p = 0.003). TM was also associated with a significantly lower 5-year disease-free survival rate compared with BCS+RT (hazard ratio, 2.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.090–3.759; p = 0.026). Conclusion To improve treatment outcomes for TM even after modern systemic treatments, postmastectomy radiotherapy might be required for patients with T1–2 primary breast cancer and 1–3 positive lymph nodes. PMID:27685357

  10. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  12. Conservative surgery for multifocal/multicentric breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) breast cancer is regularly considered a relative contraindication for breast-conserving therapy (BCT). There are two reasons for this wide spread notion: However, we concur that if optimal 'cytoreductive surgery' is achieved this will result in good local control (i.e. in-breast relapse <10% at 10 years). This can only be achieved on the basis of the right imaging, image guidance for non-palpable foci, and tumor free (invasive as well as ductal carcinoma in situ) margins after adequate pathological assessment. Surgery must then be followed by whole breast irradiation and systemic treatments as indicated by primary cancer biology. Careful planning and adaptive application of oncoplastic techniques will result in an optimal cosmetic results. The meticulous work of Roland Holland and coworkers(1) in the early 1980's on whole breast specimen showed invasive foci at more then 2 cm distance from the invasive primary cancer in more then 40% of specimen. Although multiple tumor foci may occur in up to 60% of mastectomy specimens, equivalent survival outcomes were observed in prospective trials comparing BCT and mastectomy for clinically unifocal lesions, suggesting that the majority of these foci are not, or do not become, biologically relevant or clinically significant with appropriate treatment. As diagnostic tools advance, MF and MC tumors are more commonly diagnosed. Cancers that previously would have been classified as unifocal now can be detected as MF or MC. In addition, locoregional treatment modalities have improved significantly over the past decade. More recent studies reflect these advances in diagnosis and treatment. Studies evaluated staging MRI showed that up to 19% of woman with diagnosed breast cancer harbor a second malignant ipsilateral lesion. These findings should only have consequences when additional lesions are proven cancer. Multiple enhancing lesions on MRI are in itself not an indication for a mastectomy. The

  13. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  14. Predicting which patients actually receive radiation following breast conserving therapy in Canadian populations

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Keegan; Lock, Michael; Richard, Lucie; Boldt, Gabriel; Brackstone, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Canadian women with breast cancer may choose breast conserving therapy as their course of treatment, requiring both breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. However, more than 15% of Canadian women fail to receive the appropriate radiation therapy, putting them at increased risk for recurrence. Age, distance from their radiation therapy centre and stage of disease affect patients’ likelihood of receiving prescribed radiation therapy. We propose a nomogram that allows physicians to predict which patients will and will not receive radiation. This nomogram, once validated, could be used to guide decision making when choosing between breast conserving therapy and mastectomy as the treatment course and thereby change the practice of breast cancer management. PMID:27438052

  15. Surgical resection margins after breast-conserving surgery: Senonetwork recommendations.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Taffurelli, Mario; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Aristei, Cynthia; Trentin, Chiara; Cassano, Enrico; Pietribiasi, Francesca; Corso, Giovanni; Munzone, Elisabetta; Tondini, Carlo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Cataliotti, Luigi; Santini, Donatella

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports findings of the "Focus on Controversial Areas" Working Party of the Italian Senonetwork, which was set up to improve the care of breast cancer patients. After reviewing articles in English on the MEDLINE system on breast conserving surgery for invasive carcinoma, the Working Party presents their recommendations for identifying risk factors for positive margins, suggests how to manage them so as to achieve the highest possible percentage of negative margins, and proposes standards for investigating resection margins and therapeutic approaches according to margin status. When margins are positive, approaches include re-excision, mastectomy, or, as second-line treatment, radiotherapy with a high boost dose. When margins are negative, boost administration and its dose depend on the risk of local recurrence, which is linked to biopathological tumor features and surgical margin width. Although margin status does not affect the choice of systemic therapy, it may delay the start of chemotherapy when further surgery is required. PMID:27103209

  16. [How can breast-conserving surgery be improved even more?].

    PubMed

    Rutgers, Emiel J T

    2012-01-01

    Due to population-wide screening and increased awareness of breast cancer by women, more early-stage diagnoses are being made. Breast-conserving surgery, performed according to well-established guidelines, results in the same level of local control and long-term survival as mastectomy for the same indication. The Dutch Cancer Registry has demonstrated an average local relapse rate at 5 years of about 3% in a follow-up study of breast-cancer patients. A study published in this issue show a high complete resection rate and less excised tissue volume as compared to other localisation techniques or excision by palpation only. There are two provisions: the tumour and its gross delineation must be visible by ultrasound, and the breast surgeon needs to learn the technique and apply it sensibly. Generally speaking, ultrasound-guided breast-conserving resection of invasive breast cancer may well lead to more initially complete resections and better cosmetic results.

  17. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Massoome; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Kaviani, Ahmad; Hashemi, Esmat; Montazeri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS) and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P < 0.01). There were no associations between BCS practice and the other variables studied. The most frequent reasons for not performing BCS were uncertainty about conservative therapy results (46%), uncertainty about the quality of available radiotherapy services (32%), and the probability of patients' non-compliance in radiotherapy (32%). Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance). PMID:15811187

  18. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  19. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  20. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  1. [Leg ulcer: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Fradique, Caldeira; Pupo, Alexandra; Quaresma, Luísa; Palma-Rosa, Ana; Fernandes, Mário; Silva, Gualdino; Almeida, Heitor; Diogo, Cláudia; Pinho, Ana Catarina

    2011-01-01

    During 16 years 202 patients with leg ulcer have been studied prospectively. Whenever possible, cure has been obtained in ambulatory, which was the main objective. Surgery was preferentially made after the cure of the ulcer. From the 202 patients, 166 have made a prolonged follow-up. Cure in ambulatory has been obtained in 91% of the patients. We stress the importance of the direct control of all the treatment by the responsible doctor.

  2. [The importance of histological verification in the conservative surgery of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Marinova, L; Todorov, I; Terziev, I

    1996-01-01

    The place and significance of the histological verification in the team method of approach in case of conservative breast cancer treatment are discussed. An accent is made on the histological risk factors increasing the recurrence appearance probability that gathers such patients in a high risk group. On the basis of our own material representing breast cancer patients treated in the period 1987-1993 the significance of the histological verification in the treatment approach is estimated. Requirements for comprehensive histological verification being much needed for breast cancer patients are risen for the pathohistologists.

  3. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  4. [Neck chylous fistula: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    López Otero, Maria J; Fernández López, Maria T; Outeiriño Blanco, E; Álvarez Vázquez, P; Pinal Osorio, I; Iglesias Diz, D

    2010-01-01

    Injury to the thoracic duct, leading to chyle leak, occurs in 1-2,5% of patients who undergo neck dissection. Associated complications include malnutrition, immune compromise, fistula formation and carotid blowout. No definitive treatment algorithm can be deduced from the current literature, but on last reviews, there is an agreement on the conservative management. Medical management is based on that decreasing chyle flow will allow for spontaneous closure of the chyle leak. Conservative treatment includes: closed vacuum drainage, bed-rest, nutrition modification and synthetic somatostatin analog. Nutrition modification involves a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), enteral nutrition with high percentage of MCT or parenteral nutrition.

  5. Systematic review: conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several conservative (i.e., nonpharmacologic, nonsurgical) treatments exist for secondary lymphedema. The optimal treatment is unknown. We examined the effectiveness of conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema, as well as harms related to these treatments. Methods We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials®, AMED, and CINAHL from 1990 to January 19, 2010. We obtained English- and non-English-language randomized controlled trials or observational studies (with comparison groups) that reported primary effectiveness data on conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema. For English-language studies, we extracted data in tabular form and summarized the tables descriptively. For non-English-language studies, we summarized the results descriptively and discussed similarities with the English-language studies. Results Thirty-six English-language and eight non-English-language studies were included in the review. Most of these studies involved upper-limb lymphedema secondary to breast cancer. Despite lymphedema's chronicity, lengths of follow-up in most studies were under 6 months. Many trial reports contained inadequate descriptions of randomization, blinding, and methods to assess harms. Most observational studies did not control for confounding. Many studies showed that active treatments reduced the size of lymphatic limbs, although extensive between-study heterogeneity in areas such as treatment comparisons and protocols, and outcome measures, prevented us from assessing whether any one treatment was superior. This heterogeneity also precluded us from statistically pooling results. Harms were rare (< 1% incidence) and mostly minor (e.g., headache, arm pain). Conclusions The literature contains no evidence to suggest the most effective treatment for secondary lymphedema. Harms are few and unlikely to cause major clinical problems. PMID:22216837

  6. [Conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Odland, J O; Maltau, J M; Tollan, A

    1991-01-30

    During the last decades the incidence of ectopic pregnancy has been steadily rising. The chosen therapy has usually been unilateral salpingectomy. Recently, different conservative (tube-preserving) treatment-modalities have been introduced in clinical practice. We have tried conservative treatment by local injection of prostaglandin F2a (total dose 2-4 mg) directly into the tubal pregnancy and, if feasible, also into the corpus luteum graviditate. The treatment was successful in 13 out of 16 patients. In one patient laparotomia was performed because of pain, and revealed a haematoma in fossa Douglasi. Reinjection of prostaglandin was necessary in one patient because of rising HCG titres. One patient was hospitalized for four days because of nausea and pain. The treatment was otherwise successful. The method may be useful as a non-surgical alternative in haemodynamically stable patients without tubal rupture. Further studies are needed to evaluate the outcome in terms of future fertility.

  7. Breast Conservation Therapy: The Influence of Molecular Subtype and Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, Senem; Broadwater, Gloria; Marks, Lawrence B.; Clough, Robert; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors, especially margin status and molecular subtype, in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,058 Stage I or II breast cancer patients treated with BCT (surgical excision plus radiotherapy) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, from 1985-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional receptor analyses were used as surrogate markers for molecular subtype classification (luminal A, luminal B, Her2 positive, and basal like). Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), failure-free survival, and locoregional control (LRC) were computed by use of Kaplan-Meier plots. We analyzed prognostic variables for significance using Cox proportional hazards univariate and multivariate analysis. The study was approved by the Duke University Medical Center Institutional Review Board. Results: The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 18-89 years). Of the patients, 80% had T1 disease and 66% N0 disease pathologically. With a median follow-up of 9.8 years, an in-breast recurrence developed in 53 patients and 10 patients had nodal failure. For all patients, the 10-year CSS rate was 94%; LRC rate, 94%; and failure-free survival rate, 88%. Luminal A patients had a CSS rate of 95% and LRC rate of 99%. Basal-type patients appeared to do worse, with regard to both CSS rate (74%) and LRC rate (76%), but the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. LRC rates of patients with negative margins (widely negative, close, and extent of margin not known) were virtually identical (93%, 96%, and 94%, respectively). Those with positive margins appeared to fare slightly worse based on LRC rate (88%), but again, the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: BCT remains the treatment of choice for early-stage breast cancer

  8. Hypofractionation with no boost after breast conservation in early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arcadipane, Francesca; Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Colle, Chiara; Rondi, Nadia; Di Muzio, Jacopo; Pelle, Emanuela; Martini, Stefania; Ala, Ada; Airoldi, Mario; Donadio, Michela; De Sanctis, Corrado; Castellano, Isabella; Ragona, Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local control, survival and toxicity profile of a consecutive cohort of early-stage breast cancer (EBC) patients treated with adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy (HF) with no boost delivered to the lumpectomy cavity, after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 493 women affected with EBC were treated with HF (46 Gy/20 fractions or 40.05 Gy/15 fractions) to the whole breast without boost to tumor bed, because of age and/or favorable tumor characteristics. The primary endpoint was 5-year actuarial local control (LC); secondary endpoints included survival, toxicity profile and cosmesis. Median follow-up was 57 months (range 6-124). Actuarial 5-year overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and LC were 96.3, 98.9, 97.8 and 98.6 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, tumor stage (T1 vs. T2) and hormonal status (positive vs. negative estrogen receptors) were significantly correlated with LC. Only 2 % of patients experienced ≥G3 acute skin toxicity. Late toxicity was mild with only 1 case of G3 fibrosis. Most of the patients (95 %) had good-excellent cosmetic results. HF to the whole breast with no boost delivered to the tumor bed is a safe and effective option for a population of low-risk breast cancer patients after BCS, with excellent 5-year LC, mild toxicity profile and promising cosmetic outcome. A subgroup of patients with larger tumors and/or with no estrogen receptor expression may potentially benefit from treatment intensification with a boost dose to the lumpectomy cavity. PMID:27573380

  9. Interrogating a Multifactorial Model of Breast Conserving Therapy with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Remi; Garbey, Marc; Moore, Linda W.; Bass, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Most women with early stage breast cancer do not require removal of the entire breast to treat their cancer; instead, up to 70% of women can be effectively and safely treated by breast conserving therapy (BCT) with surgical removal of the tumor only (lumpectomy) followed by radiation treatment of the remaining breast tissue. Unfortunately, the final contour and cosmesis of the treated breast is suboptimal in approximately 30% of patients. The ability to accurately predict breast contour after BCT for breast cancer could significantly improve patient decision-making regarding the choice of surgery for breast cancer. Our overall hypothesis is that the complex interplay among mechanical forces due to gravity, breast tissue constitutive law distribution, inflammation induced by radiotherapy and internal stress generated by the healing process play a dominant role in determining the success or failure of lumpectomy in preserving the breast contour and cosmesis. We have shown here from a first patient study that even in the idealistic situation of excellent cosmetic outcome this problem requires multiscale modeling. We propose a method to decide which component of the model works best for each phase of healing and what parameters should be considered dominant and patient specific. This patient study is part of a clinical trial registered on ClinicalTrial.gov, identifier NCT02310711. PMID:25906048

  10. Conservative treatment modalities in retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Bhavna; Jain, Amit; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on various conservative treatment modalities available for the treatment of retinoblastoma and their effectiveness, when used alone or in combination. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched through 2012 for published peer reviewed data on conservative treatment modalities for retinoblastoma. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumors, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermotherapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results. It is important to recognize that today, several treatment options are available that can obviate the need for enucleation, and cure the cancer with preservation of functional vision. A thorough knowledge and understanding of these conservative treatment modalities is essential for appropriate management. PMID:24104705

  11. Integrated breast cancer surgical treatment: novel aspects of minimally-invasive treatments.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Gianluca; Sanchez, Alejandro M; DI Leone, Alba; Magno, Stefano; Moschella, Francesca; Accetta, Cristina; Natale, Maria; Masetti, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has been undergoing continuous and profound changes over the last 40 years. The evolution from aggressive and mutilating treatment to conservative approach has been long but constant, despite the controversies arising every time a new procedure came to light. Today, the esthetic satisfaction of breast cancer patients coupled with oncological safety is the goal of the modern breast surgeon. Breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the gold standard approach for patients with early stage breast cancer and the recent introduction of "oncoplastic techniques" has furtherly increased the use of breast-conserving procedures. Mastectomy still remains a valid surgical alternative in selected cases and is usually associated with immediate reconstructive procedures. New surgical procedures called "conservative mastectomies" are emerging as techniques that combine oncological safety and esthetic outcome by entirely removing the breast parenchyma sparing the breast skin and nipple-areola complex. Staging of the axilla has also gradually evolved toward less aggressive approaches with the adoption of sentinel node biopsy and new therapeutic strategies are emerging in patients with a pathological positivity in sentinel lymph node biopsy. The present special article will highlight the new surgical treatment options, which are more and more effective and respectful of breast cancer patients.

  12. Management of the Regional Lymph Nodes Following Breast-Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: An Evolving Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2014-11-15

    Radiation therapy to the breast following breast conservation surgery has been the standard of care since randomized trials demonstrated equivalent survival compared to mastectomy and improved local control and survival compared to breast conservation surgery alone. Recent controversies regarding adjuvant radiation therapy have included the potential role of additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. This review summarizes the evolution of regional nodal management focusing on 2 topics: first, the changing paradigm with regard to surgical evaluation of the axilla; second, the role for regional lymph node irradiation and optimal design of treatment fields. Contemporary data reaffirm prior studies showing that complete axillary dissection may not provide additional benefit relative to sentinel lymph node biopsy in select patient populations. Preliminary data also suggest that directed nodal radiation therapy to the supraclavicular and internal mammary lymph nodes may prove beneficial; publication of several studies are awaited to confirm these results and to help define subgroups with the greatest likelihood of benefit.

  13. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  14. Breast Augmentation after Conservation Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, James; Hsieh, Frank; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data regarding outcomes for patients undergoing breast augmentation with implants after breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. This retrospective study examined outcomes for patients with breast implant-only augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. Methods: Between June 1998 and December 2010, 671 women underwent prosthetic breast reconstruction. Nineteen patients (2.8%) underwent an augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. The mean age was 55.8 years (range, 40–69 years). Sixteen of these patients underwent one-stage implant-only breast augmentation, whereas 3 patients underwent two-stage expander and then implant augmentation. Results: All surgeries were successful. The average size of breast implant used was 258.7 g. Seven patients also received contralateral augmentation with an average implant size of 232.2 g. One patient received oral antibiotics for minor wound infection. Patients were judged to have an excellent (14/19; 73.7%), good (3/19; 15.8%), or fair (2/19; 10.5%) cosmetic result. Conclusion: The breasts of selected patients with breast cancer after BCS and radiotherapy. with asymmetry can be adequately augmented with breast implants alone. PMID:27536475

  15. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  16. Breast cancer: a 21 year experience with conservative surgery and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, R.M.; Wilkinson, R.H.; Mahoney, L.J.; Reid, J.G.; MacDonald, W.D.

    1982-06-01

    Evidence is presented from a study of 680 patients followed over a period of 21 years that conservative treatment of breast cancer by local excision of the primary tumor followed by breast irradiation yields results equivalent to the traditional radical approach, with the added benefit of an excellent cosmetic result and improved quality of life. The relative survivals were 83% at 5 years and 71% at 10 years. There was no difference in survival when radiation was given. Breast irradiation significantly reduced relapse in the breast, but axillary irradiation did not influence relapse at this site. Relapse in the breast alone was not detrimental to survival if treated appropriately. Axillary relapse indicated a much poorer prognosis as might be expected.

  17. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy is a standard therapy for early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, recent developments in oncoplastic surgery have improved cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, a breast surgeon’s current role in BCS is not only to perform a curative resection of cancerous lesions with adequate surgical margins, but also to preserve the shape and appearance of the treated breast. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery (EBCS), which has the advantage of a less noticeable scar, was developed more than ten years ago. Recently, some clinical studies have reported the feasibility, oncological outcomes, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction of EBCS. Herein, we will review the EBCS clinical studies that have been conducted so far and discuss current issues regarding this operative method. PMID:25083503

  18. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  19. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  20. Mammographic compression after breast conserving therapy: Controlling pressure instead of force

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, J. E. de Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Heeten, G. J. den

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: X-ray mammography is the primary tool for early detection of breast cancer and for follow-up after breast conserving therapy (BCT). BCT-treated breasts are smaller, less elastic, and more sensitive to pain. Instead of the current force-controlled approach of applying the same force to each breast, pressure-controlled protocols aim to improve standardization in terms of physiology by taking breast contact area and inelasticity into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential for pressure protocols to reduce discomfort and pain, particularly the number of severe pain complaints for BCT-treated breasts. Methods: A prospective observational study including 58 women having one BCT-treated breast and one untreated nonsymptomatic breast, following our hospital's 18 decanewton (daN) compression protocol was performed. Breast thickness, applied force, contact area, mean pressure, breast volume, and inelasticity (mean E-modulus) were statistically compared between the within-women breast pairs, and data were used as predictors for severe pain, i.e., scores 7 and higher on an 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Curve-fitting models were used to estimate how pressure-controlled protocols affect breast thickness, compression force, and pain experience. Results: BCT-treated breasts had on average 27% smaller contact areas, 30% lower elasticity, and 30% higher pain scores than untreated breasts (allp < 0.001). Contact area was the strongest predictor for severe pain (p < 0.01). Since BCT-treatment is associated with an average 0.36 dm{sup 2} decrease in contact area, as well as increased pain sensitivity, BCT-breasts had on average 5.3 times higher odds for severe pain than untreated breasts. Model estimations for a pressure-controlled protocol with a 10 kPa target pressure, which is below normal arterial pressure, suggest an average 26% (range 10%–36%) reduction in pain score, and an average 77% (range 46%–95%) reduction of the odds for severe pain

  1. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2014-05-01

    Many newer agents in combination are being studied in the front-line treatment of women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC), but the story in the endocrine arena is more about the wise use of new strategies to overcome endocrine resistance, because no new antihormonal agents have been approved in the past decade. During his presentation at the NCCN 19th Annual Conference, Dr. William Gradishar explored what's new in the treatment of MBC, focusing primarily on enhancing the effect of endocrine therapy to overcome resistance with newer targeted agents such as everolimus, reevaluating the role of rebiopsy on disease progression and measuring circulating tumor cells as a surrogate of response to treatment, and reviewing the effective treatment regimens for HER2-positive disease.

  2. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dhakal, Sanjaya; Yamashiro, Gladys; Issell, Brian F

    2002-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS) in women with early stage breast cancer. Methods Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR) from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. Results The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. Conclusions In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy. PMID:11879527

  3. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28%) presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy could bring clear advantages

  4. Oncological Safety of Breast Conservation Surgery in Young Females.

    PubMed

    Muralee, Madhu; Mathew, Arun Peter; Cherian, Kurian; Chandramohan, K; Augustine, Paul; Prabhakar, Jem; Ahamed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    Breast conservation surgery (BCS) is the standard of care in early breast cancer. The oncological safety of this procedure has been proven beyond doubt in several randomised control trials. But there are concerns regarding the safety of this procedure in young females. The concern is regarding increased risk of local recurrence. This issue has not been addressed in any major trial. In this prospective study we intend to look into the oncological safety of BCS in young patients who are less than forty years of age. PMID:27651695

  5. Altered lymphatic drainage after breast-conserving surgery and axillary node dissection: local recurrence with contralateral intramammary nodal metastases.

    PubMed

    Wellner, Rachel; Dave, Jasmine; Kim, Unsup; Menes, Tehillah S

    2007-02-01

    A review of the literature shows that lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel node biopsy are feasible in patients with previous breast and axillary surgery and could be especially warranted because in these patients, lymphatic drainage might not include the axillary basin. We report a case of a woman with recurrent breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. The patient was found to have metastases in the contralateral intramammary lymph nodes. Demonstrating that such patterns do occur after previous treatment for breast cancer carries implications for the staging and management of these patients. PMID:17386126

  6. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment fact sheet ePublications Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet Print this fact sheet Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet (PDF, 943 KB) Related information ...

  7. Clinical analysis of intraoperative radiotherapy during breast-conserving surgery of early breast cancer in the Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Qinfu; Wang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) have been reported when used either as a boost at the time of surgery or as the sole radiation treatment, the clinical safety and cosmetic outcome of IORT in the Chinese Han population has not. This report reviews oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for Chinese Han breast cancer patients who received IORT either as a boost or as their sole radiation treatment at our hospital. Method From July 2008 to December 2012, 50 early-stage Chinese Han breast cancer patients received BCS and IORT, either as boost or as their sole radiation treatment. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, according to our institution's guidelines. Patients were followed to determine oncologic events, short-term toxicity and overall cosmesis. Results With a median follow-up of 51.8 months (range 22.6 months to 75.7 months), 2 patients (4.0%) developed local relapses and were salvaged by mastectomy. There were no metastases and no deaths. The average wound healing time was 17 days. Three patients (6.0%) developed postoperative infection, 5 patients (10.0%) had delayed wound healing, and 2 patients (4.0%) experienced wound edema. There were no lyponecrosis or hematomas observed. The evaluation of cosmetic outcome showed 44 patients (88.0%) graded as excellent or good while 6 patients (12.0%) were graded as fair or poor. No patients experienced radiotherapy related acute hematological toxicity, but 3 patients (6.0%), all IORT boost patients, developed skin pigmentation. Conclusion For early-stage breast cancer patients, intraoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery in the Chinese Han population is both safe and reliable and has resulted in very acceptable cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26517686

  8. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  9. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  11. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  12. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  13. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. )

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  14. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  15. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  16. Long-term outcomes after breast conservation therapy for early stage breast cancer in a community setting.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Susan A; Botnick, Leslie E; Rose, Christopher M; Malcolm, Arnold W; Ozohan, Mary Lou; Mena, Raul; Llamas, Lupe; Tao, May Lin

    2006-01-01

    We, as a large community practice, retrospectively reviewed our experience in treating early stage breast cancer to determine rates of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), disease outcomes after such treatment, and risk factors for local recurrence. A hospital tumor registry was used to identify breast cancer cases diagnosed between 1987 and 2003. Rates of BCT and radiotherapy were examined using primary treatment data. For subsequent disease outcomes analyses, cases were limited to only those treated between 1987 and 1994 to allow for adequate follow-up. For the subset of 521 T1-2N0 patients treated with BCT, we calculated crude rates of first failure at 8 years, with outcomes classified as local failure (LF), distant or regional node failure (DNF), dead without failure (DWF), or alive without failure (AWF). Polychotomous logistic regression was done to assess the influence of age at diagnosis, tumor grade, total radiation dose to the tumor bed, and use of systemic therapy. From 1987 to 2003, rates of BCT went from 69% to 89% and the rate of radiation after breast-conserving surgery was 90%. For the subset of 521 T1-2N0 patients treated with BCT who had at least 8 years of follow-up, median age was 58 years, 15% had grade 1 tumors, 83% had T1 tumors, 4.6% had positive margins, 83% got a total radiation dose >or=60 Gy to the tumor bed, and 51% had systemic therapy. At 8 years, 7% of patients had LF, 8% DNF, 10% were DWF, and 75% were AWF. Patient age (p = 0.076), tumor grade (p = 0.056), use of systemic therapy (p = 0.077), and radiation dose (p = 0.127) had borderline significant effects on the risk of LF versus AWF. The majority of patients in this community were treated with BCT and most received radiotherapy. Local control was excellent and comparable to that seen in large academic centers.

  17. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings.

  18. Evaluation of automated breast volume scanner for breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anqian; Zhu, Luoxi; Tan, Yanjuan; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Qingqing; Bao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The present is a retrospective study examining the use of automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) for guiding breast conservation surgery in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 142 patients with pathologically confirmed DCIS were initially included in the study. The patients underwent preoperative examination by conventional ultrasound and by ABVS. The BI-RADS category system was used to identify benign and malignant lesions, after which breast conservation surgery was performed, and the therapeutic effects were compared. DCIS lesions were found in each quadrant of the breasts. Typical symptoms included: Duct ectasia and filling in 23 cases, mass (mainly solid, occasionally cystic, with or without calcification) in 38 cases, hypoechoic area (with or without calcification) in 33 cases, calcifications (simple) in 23 cases, and architectural distortion in 17 cases. In addition, 110 cases (82.1%) were detected as grade ≥4 according to the BI-RADS category, and 92 cases (68.7%) were considered malignant lesions following conventional ultrasound scanning. The detection rate of ABVS was significantly higher than that of conventional ultrasound (χ2=268.000, P<0.001). The average tumor diameter was 2.5±0.8 cm using ABVS and 2.0±0.9 cm using conventional ultrasound (the former being significantly higher than the latter; t=6.325, P=0.034). Eight patients (5.6%) had recurrences of the cancer, and the tumor diameter in the 8 patients was significantly larger using ABVS as compared to conventional ultrasound. In the diagnosis of DCIS, ABVS was superior to conventional ultrasound scanner in guiding breast conservation surgery and predicting recurrence. However, large-scale studies are required for confirmation of the findings. PMID:27698816

  19. Increasing trends in the use of breast-conserving surgery in California.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C R; Cohen, R; Schlag, R; Wright, W E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine temporal trends in breast-conserving surgery in California from 1988 through 1995. METHODS: Logistic regression was used to analyze data on 104,466 cases of early-stage breast cancer reported to the California Cancer Registry. RESULTS: A monotonically increasing trend in breast-conserving surgery was detected after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, stage at diagnosis, and neighborhood education level. Breast-conserving surgery increased at similar rates among all racial/ethnic groups. Older age, Asian or Hispanic race/ethnicity, late-stage diagnosis, and residence in an undereducated neighborhood were factors associated with lower use of breast-conserving surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Although disparities are evident, use of breast-conserving surgery increased steadily in all groups examined in this study. PMID:10667193

  20. Outcome analysis of 541 women undergoing breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David A; Wood, Benjamin C; Knoll, Gregory M; Chang, Shu C; Crantford, John C; Bharti, Gaurav D; Levine, Edward A; Thompson, James T

    2012-05-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) has evolved as a favorable approach to the management of early-stage breast cancer. Shortcomings of BCT include the potential need for re-excision in the event of positive tumor margins as well as the untoward sequelae of radiation therapy. Both of those factors have led to a substantial proportion of patients undergoing BCT who ultimately report suboptimal aesthetic outcomes. Application of plastic surgery principles to the management of this patient subset has been shown to be beneficial from both an oncologic and cosmetic perspective.The aim of this study was to identify factors that may predict which patients would benefit most from involvement of a plastic surgeon before BCT. A retrospective analysis was performed on 762 patients undergoing lumpectomy during a 10-year study period at a single institution. Younger women and patients with tumor size approaching 2 cm were noted to have a significantly higher likelihood of oncologic outcomes that ultimately required breast reconstruction. Integration of oncoplastic techniques in the surgical management of patients undergoing BCT would likely contribute to improvement in aesthetic outcomes and overall patient satisfaction.

  1. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  2. Oncoplastic surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Dorr, Julio; Angrigiani, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Advances in reconstructive breast surgery with new materials and techniques now allow us to offer our patients the best possible cosmetic results without the risks associated with oncological control of the disease. These advances, in both oncological and plastic surgery, have led to a new specialisation, namely oncoplastic breast surgery, which enables us to undertake large resections and, with advance planning, to prevent subsequent deformities. This is particularly important when more than 30% of the breast volume is removed, as it allows us to obtain precise information for conservative surgery according to the site of the lesion, and also allows us to set the boundary between conservative surgery and mastectomy. Given the existence of new alloplastic materials and new reconstructive techniques, it is essential for our patients that surgeons involved in breast cancer treatment are trained in both the oncological as well as the reconstructive and aesthetic fields, to enable them to provide the best loco-regional treatment with the best cosmetic results. PMID:23441139

  3. Locoregional treatments for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Eiermann, W; Vallis, K A

    2012-08-01

    The absence of drug-targetable receptors in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) makes the use of targeted systemic therapy inappropriate for this breast cancer subgroup. Although patients with TNBC show sensitivity to some chemotherapy regimens, in early-stage disease greater emphasis is placed on locoregional treatments, based on surgery and radiation therapy (RT). Ongoing improvements in both screening and surgical techniques have reduced the need for radical surgical intervention in all breast cancers, and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by RT is now increasingly common for all tumour types. However, while evidence has clearly established the importance of post-surgical RT for favourable long-term outcomes in breast cancer, it is less well-established as to where and under which conditions more radical surgeries than BCS, such as modified radical mastectomy (MRM), may be indicated for TNBC. A high proportion of TNBC tumours are BRCA1-mutated and therefore patients with this type of tumour are at a potentially elevated risk of ipsilateral or contralateral recurrence. In addition, while some studies indicate that post-BCS locoregional TNBC relapse rates generally appear similar to other tumour types, some evidence suggests that distant relapse rates may be higher. There is evidence that some subtypes of TNBC may require MRM rather than BCS for optimal long-term outcomes. More research is needed to establish whether TNBC-specific approaches to locoregional treatment may be required.

  4. Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment and Survival for Women with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ellen P.; Ngo, Long H.; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Chirikos, Thomas N.; Li, Donglin; Drews, Reed E.; Iezzoni, Lisa I.

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery combined with axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy or mastectomy are definitive treatments for women with early-stage breast cancer. Little is known about breast cancer treatment for women with disabilities. Objective To compare initial treatment for early-stage breast cancer between women with and without disabilities and to examine the association of treatment differences and survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 11 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program tumor registries. Participants 100 311 women who received a diagnosis of stage I to IIIA breast cancer at 21 to 64 years of age from 1988 to 1999. Women who qualified for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare at breast cancer diagnosis were considered disabled. Measurements Receipt of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy. For women who had breast-conserving surgery (n = 49 166), the authors examined receipt of radiotherapy and axillary lymph node dissection. Survival was measured from diagnosis until death or until 31 December 2001. Results Women with SSDI and Medicare coverage had lower rates of breast-conserving surgery than other women (43.2% vs. 49.2%; adjusted relative risk, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.76 to 0.84]). Among women who had breast-conserving surgery, women with SSDI and Medicare coverage were less likely than other women to receive radiotherapy (adjusted relative risk, 0.83 [CI, 0.77 to 0.90]) and axillary lymph node dissection (adjusted relative risk, 0.81 [CI, 0.74 to 0.90]). Women with SSDI and Medicare coverage had lower survival rates than those of other women in all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.02 [CI, 1.88 to 2.16]) and breast cancer–specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.31 [CI, 1.18 to 1.45]). Results were similar after adjustment for treatment differences. Limitations Findings are limited to women who qualified for SSDI and Medicare. No data on adjuvant chemotherapy and

  5. Vaginal Health During Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy J; Bober, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    There are increasing numbers of breast cancer survivors. Chemotherapy or endocrine therapy result in effects on vaginal health that may affect quality of life. These effects may impact sexual function, daily comfort, or the ability to perform a pelvic examination. Vulvovaginal atrophy, or genitourinary syndrome of menopause, may be treated with nonhormonal or hormonal measures. Breast cancer survivors who are menopausal and/or on endocrine therapy should be screened for issues with vaginal health and counseled about treatment options.

  6. True Recurrence Versus New Primary: An Analysis of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrences After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Truong, Pauline T.; McDonald, Rachel E.; Alexander, Cheryl; Ross, Louetta; Ryhorchuk, Aleata; Watson, Peter H.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) can occur in 5-20% of women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Two entities of IBTR have been described: true recurrence (TR), suggested to be regrowth of disease at the tumor bed, and new primary (NP), distinct from the index lesion in histology and location. This study compared survival outcomes between two patient cohorts classified clinically as having either TR or NP. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 1999, 6,020 women were referred to the BC Cancer Agency with newly diagnosed pT1-2, N0-1, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery. Of these, 289 patients had pathologically confirmed IBTR. Retrospective analysis was performed, and a set of decision rules was applied to classify cases as TR or NP based on change in histology, grade, hormone receptor status, and tumor location. Of 289 patients, 129 (45%) were classified as having TR and 139 (48%) as having NP; 21 (7%) were unclassified. Results: The distributions of age at diagnosis, age at recurrence, and histopathologic factors were similar in the TR and NP cohorts (all p > 0.05). The mean time to recurrence was shorter in TR patients than in NP patients (4.8 years vs. 6.3 years, p = 0.001). Treatment of the IBTR did not differ between the two groups. In the TR and NP cohorts, breast cancer-specific survival was 55.7% vs. 61.3% (p = 0.93), and overall survival was 43.7% vs. 54.8% (p = 0.53). Conclusions: Time to recurrence is significantly shorter in patients with IBTR classified as true recurrence compared to new primary. Non-statistically significant trends for less favorable survival were observed for patients with TR. Further investigation of the hypothesis that TR and NP tumors are distinct entities with different survival prognoses will require standardized pathology review and molecular analyses.

  7. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. PMID:25940058

  8. [Conservative treatment of the splenic traumas].

    PubMed

    Miniello, Stefano; Nacchiero, Michele; Balzanelli, Mario Giosuè; Cristallo, Graziana; Cavallo, Margherita; Lissidini, Germana

    2005-01-01

    Authors hope for a growing diffusion of conservative treatments for lien's lesions, to avoid the asplenia syndrome, and the unfavourable implications derive from, above all immunodepression that increases septic risk. They report their experience about conservative choices for spleens traumatic injures and emphasize the absolute need of select the appropriate patients for those procedure, that must require: haemodynamics stability; not geriatric age; type I and II, according to Buntain's classifications, ien's lesions, and attentive selection of the patients carriers of type III lesions; absence of preceding spleens injures, opportunity of monitor patients, in immediate postoperative, in intensive care units. Authors suggest that one of the essential condition for the correct selection and achievement of conservative treatments of traumatic lien's injures, is the team work of the surgeon, of the anesthesiologist, of the radiologist. Conclude maintain that, conservative procedure for lien's lesions, must find a growing diffusion, but mention that is appropriate to not extend those treatments indications over the encoded ones.

  9. [Conservative treatment of dry eye].

    PubMed

    Hefner, J; Reinshagen, H

    2014-11-01

    The use of topic anti-inflammatory drugs has become very important in the treatment of dry eye disease. Besides the basic therapy including tear replacement, use of serum eye drops and mucolytic eye drops, the topical application of corticosteroids and cyclosporin A is more commonly used in moderate to severe forms of dry eye disease. The consistent treatment of Meibomian gland dysfunction as a frequent reason for evaporative dry eye is also of particular importance. Understanding the chronicity of the disease and long-term compliance are the essential for successful therapy of this widespread disease.

  10. [Conservative treatment of dry eye].

    PubMed

    Hefner, J; Reinshagen, H

    2014-11-01

    The use of topic anti-inflammatory drugs has become very important in the treatment of dry eye disease. Besides the basic therapy including tear replacement, use of serum eye drops and mucolytic eye drops, the topical application of corticosteroids and cyclosporin A is more commonly used in moderate to severe forms of dry eye disease. The consistent treatment of Meibomian gland dysfunction as a frequent reason for evaporative dry eye is also of particular importance. Understanding the chronicity of the disease and long-term compliance are the essential for successful therapy of this widespread disease. PMID:25275793

  11. Aesthetic Evaluation in Oncoplastic and Conservative Breast Surgery: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meszaros, Paolo; Baldelli, Ilaria; Bisso, Nadia; Franchelli, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    Background: In conservative breast surgery, the achievement of a satisfactory cosmetic result could be challenging; oncoplastic techniques may be helpful in many cases. A comparative analysis was performed among 3 groups of patients undergoing oncoplastic techniques plus external radiation therapy or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and breast conservative surgery plus external radiation therapy; long-term oncologic results in terms of disease relapse and aesthetic outcomes were compared. Methods: Ninety-six patients were considered: 32 patients treated with oncoplastic surgery, 16 then subjected to radiotherapy (group 1) and another 16 treated with IORT (group 2); 64 patients treated by conservative surgery and radiotherapy formed the control group (group 3). Patients were asked to give a judgment on the cosmetic result considering the following parameters: breast symmetry, appearance of the residual scar, symmetry between the 2 nipple-areola complexes, global aesthetic judgment, and satisfaction about the result. Results: With respect to the oncological and aesthetic outcome, the statistical significance of the results obtained in the 3 groups was calculated using the chi-square test. The results, processed by the chi-square test, were not statistically significant; however, the overall judgments expressed by the patients of all 3 groups were more than satisfactory (scores greater than or equal to 6). Conclusions: In our experience, when the inclusion criteria are satisfied and the equipment is available, oncoplastic techniques associated with IORT should be considered the treatment of choice for breast cancer in early stage. The excellent cosmetic results and patient’s satisfaction encourage us to continue on this way. PMID:26034646

  12. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer.

  13. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  14. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  15. Utility of Clinical Breast Exams in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events after Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Adesoye, Taiwo; SB, Edge; ES, Burnside; DJ, Vanness; M, Yu; Y, Si; D, McKellar; DP, Winchester; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical exams, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by exam alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. Methods A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n=11,099) were identified from 1,217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality was collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n=4,854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Results Local-regional events were detected in 5.5% (n=265). 83% were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17% within ipsilateral lymph nodes. 48% of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29% by patients, and 10% on clinical exam. Overall, 0.5% of the 4,854 patients had a local-regional event detected on exam. Exams detected a higher proportion of lymph node (8/45) compared to in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Discussion Clinical exams, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that exams are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality. PMID:27491784

  16. Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

  17. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  18. Extreme Oncoplasty: Breast Conservation for Patients Who Need Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1

  19. Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation: new standard in early breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Su; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Noorie; Lee, Sea-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) has been proved effective and safe and even better for late or acute radiation toxicity for early breast cancer. Moreover, it improves patient convenience, quality of life and is expected to be advantageous in the medical care system by reducing overall cost. In this review, we examined key randomized trials of HF-WBI, focusing on adequate patient selection as suggested by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) guideline and the radiobiologic aspects of HF-WBI in relation to its adoption into clinical settings. Further investigation to identify the current practice pattern or cost effectiveness is warranted under the national health insurance service system in Korea. PMID:27306774

  20. Long-term results of breast conservation in Chinese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Liu, Juin; Hao, Xi-Shan; Yu, Yong; Fang, Zhi-Yi; Liu, Jun-Tian; Niu, Yun; Fentiman, Ian S

    2009-01-01

    Between July 1989 and December 2002, 172 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were treated by breast conservation therapy (BCT). All underwent quadrantectomy and axillary node clearance. Minimum follow-up was 5 years and 79 (52%) were followed for >10 years. At 5 years, local relapse-free and overall survival rates were 98.3% and 98.3%. The 10-year rates were 95% and 94%, respectively. The 10-year local recurrence rate was higher in patients with involved margins (33.3% versus 2.7%, p = 0.0272). Furthermore 10-year death rates in margin positive patients were higher (18.2% versus 2.5%, p = 0.0486). Excellent or good cosmetic results were achieved in 54%. BCT is a reasonable option for early stage breast cancer in Chinese women but margin status is the most important determinant of local recurrence. Negative margins are required for optimal local control and minimization of distant metastasis.

  1. Utility of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, Rebecca L; Flitcroft, Kathy; Snook, Kylie L; Boyle, Frances M; Spillane, Andrew J

    2015-05-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a legitimate alternative to first-line surgical therapy for the treatment of breast cancer patients, as level one evidence shows the effect on overall survival is equivalent to that of adjuvant chemotherapy. In the treatment of women with operable breast cancer, NAC provides a number of potential advantages including: improving the chance of achieving breast-conserving surgery, improving cosmesis after breast-conserving surgery, downstaging the breast and axilla, allowing time to fully consider surgical options, time for genetic testing and facilitating breast reconstruction in otherwise high-risk patients. However, in Australia, NAC is poorly utilized with less than 3% of women with operable breast cancer receiving NAC. This review discusses the potential harms and benefits of NAC, discusses areas of controversy in the use of NAC and describes how we have used NAC in our own practice. We conclude that if it is obviously necessary for the newly presenting breast cancer patient to have chemotherapy as part of the treatment, it is worth considering NAC. In many patients, the potential benefits of NAC outweigh the harms. However, maximizing these benefits is closely aligned with appropriate patient selection and timely multidisciplinary team communication.

  2. Treatments for breast engorgement during lactation

    PubMed Central

    Mangesi, Lindeka; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast engorgement is a painful and unpleasant condition affecting large numbers of women in the early postpartum period. During a time when mothers are coping with the demands of a new baby it may be particularly distressing. Breast engorgement may inhibit the development of successful breastfeeding, lead to early breastfeeding cessation, and is associated with more serious illness, including breast infection. Objectives To identify the best forms of treatment for women who experience breast engorgement. Search methods We identified studies for inclusion through the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (February 2010). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials where treatments for breast engorgement were evaluated. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed eligibility for inclusion and carried out data extraction. Main results We included eight studies with 744 women. Trials examined a range of different treatments for breast engorgement: acupuncture (two studies), cabbage leaves (two studies), cold gel packs (one study), pharmacological treatments (two studies) and ultrasound (one study). For several interventions (ultrasound, cabbage leaves, and oxytocin) there was no statistically significant evidence that interventions were associated with a more rapid resolution of symptoms; in these studies women tended to have improvements in pain and other symptoms over time whether or not they received active treatment. There was evidence from one study that, compared with women receiving routine care, women receiving acupuncture had greater improvements in symptoms in the days following treatment, although there was no evidence of a difference between groups by six days, and the study did not have sufficient power to detect meaningful differences for other outcomes (such as breast abscess). A study examining protease complex reported findings favouring intervention groups although it is more than

  3. Conservative treatment for repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C

    2001-10-01

    Various conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive strain injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.

  4. Conservative treatment planning in veneer replacement.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Armstrong, Sandra; Maia, Rodrigo Rocha

    2016-04-01

    This clinical report describes a conservative treatment in veneer replacement where diastemas, malalignment, and midline shift were the main modifying factors. When replacement veneers are indicated, the definitive results can only be accurately predicted after an esthetic reanalysis of the existing restorations. PMID:26602148

  5. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  6. Cording Following Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Jean; Miller, Cynthia L; Specht, Michelle C; Skolny, Melissa N; Jammallo, Lauren S; Horick, Nora; Elliott, Krista; Niemierko, Andrzej; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment for breast cancer may result in the formation of palpable cords in the axillary region. Our aim was to evaluate cording incidence, risk factors, and association with upper extremity functional impairment and measured arm volume change. Methods We included 308 patients with unilateral breast cancer prospectively screened for upper extremity lymphedema, symptoms and function. Patients were assessed pre- and post-operatively and at 3 – 8 month intervals with perometer arm measurements and the LEFT-BC questionnaire. Cording was determined by patient self-report. The cumulative incidence of cording and its association with clinicopathologic factors, upper extremity functional impairment, and measured arm volume change were analyzed. Results 31.5% (97/308) of patients reported cording, with a cumulative incidence of 36.2% at 24 months post-operative. Clinicopathologic factors significantly associated with cording by multivariate analysis included axillary lymph node dissection (p<.0001) and younger age at diagnosis (p=0.0005). Cording was associated with increased functional impairment (p=0.0018) and an arm volume increase of ≥5% (p=0.028). Conclusions Cording following breast cancer treatment is common, and may occur beyond the post-operative period. Our findings emphasize the importance of identifying patients at high risk for cording, and developing strategies to minimize functional impairment and arm volume elevation associated with cording. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of interventions for cording following breast cancer treatment. PMID:23813304

  7. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer with aminoglutethimide.

    PubMed

    Asbury, R F; Bakemeier, R F; Fölsch, E; McCune, C S; Savlov, E; Bennett, J M

    1981-04-15

    Seventy-three women with metastatic breast cancer were treated with aminoglutethimide and dexamethasone. No complete responses occurred. Ten patients (16%) achieved partial responses (mean duration, 12 months). The proportions of patients responding by disease site were breast (50%), nodes (33%), skin (23%), bone (16%), lung (11%), and liver (7%). Response did not correlate with age, menopausal status, performance status, or cortisol suppression. Ninety percent of responders had had previous responses to hormonal manipulations. No responses occurred in estrogen receptor negative patients. An additional 20% of patients had disease stabilization of eight or more months (mean, 17 months). Severe bone pain was present in 47 patients and was relieved in 19. Side effects occurred in 75% but caused discontinuation of therapy in only four patients. Somnolence, nausea, rash, Cushings syndrome, and leukopenia were the most frequent side effects. Aminoglutethimide with dexamethasone is an effective hormonal treatment for metastatic breast cancer.

  8. Breast Conservation Therapy Versus Mastectomy: Shared Decision-Making Strategies and Overcoming Decisional Conflicts in Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Margenthaler, Julie A; Ollila, David W

    2016-10-01

    Although breast-conserving therapy is considered the preferred treatment for the majority of women with early-stage breast cancer, mastectomy rates in this group remain high. The patient, physician, and systems factors contributing to a decision for mastectomy are complicated. Understanding the individual patient's values and goals when making this decision is paramount to providing a shared decision-making process that will yield the desired outcome. The cornerstones of this discussion include education of the patient, access to decision-aid tools, and time to make an informed decision. However, it is also paramount for the physician to understand that a significant majority of women with an informed and complete understanding of their surgical choices will still prefer mastectomy. The rates of breast conservation versus mastectomy should not be considered a quality measure alone. Rather, the extent by which patients are informed, involved in decision-making, and undergoing treatments that reflect their goals is the true test of quality. Here we explore some of the factors that impact the patient preference for breast conservation versus mastectomy and how shared decision-making can be maximized for patient satisfaction.

  9. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905

  10. Water-conserving cooling tower treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mathie, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Water conservation in cooling towers and evaporative coolers can finally become a reality. Also, fouled closed hot and chilled water systems can be restored to near original efficiency using the same technology. The barrier limiting the traditional water treatment industry from serious involvement in water conservation is the lack of a really good chemical to control scale. Poor scale inhibitors are the reason for a heavy bleed. Minerals concentrated by evaporation is wasted to the sewer while low solids make-up water fills the tower. Water conservation is important because of the increasing usable water shortage, the cost to add infrastructure to deliver increasing amounts of water to accommodate growth and the limitations imposed on disposal to the sewer. Now, due to innovations in chemical treatment, users of cooling towers and evaporative coolers can conserve water. In this presentation the author assumes the audience has some knowledge of traditional water treatment. Except for a few general references to establish common understanding, the author confines his remarks to discussing an advanced technology developed by DIAS, Inc., and the economics of its use.

  11. Patient preferences regarding intraoperative versus external beam radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael D; Conolly, Jay; Park, Catherine; Sakata, Theadora; Mohan, Aron J; Harrison, Brittany L; Hayes, Mitchell; Esserman, Laura J; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A Trial is an international randomized, prospective trial comparing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for equivalence to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in selected low-risk patients; early results suggest that outcomes are similar. In addition to effectiveness data and cost considerations, the preferences of patients should help inform practice. This study was undertaken to explore and quantify preference in choosing between IORT and the current standard, EBRT. Eligible subjects were current or past candidates for breast-conserving surgery and radiation being seen at the University of California, San Francisco Breast Care Center. A trade-off technique varying the risk of local recurrence for IORT was used to quantify any additional accepted risk that these patients would accept to receive either treatment. Patients were first presented with a slideshow comparing EBRT with the experimental IORT option before being asked their preferences given hypothetical 10-year local recurrence risks. Patients were then given a questionnaire on demographic, social and clinical factors. Data from 81 patients were analyzed. The median additional accepted risk to have IORT was 2.3 % (-9 to 39 %), mean 3.2 %. Only 7 patients chose to accept additional risk for EBRT; 22 accepted IORT at no additional risk; and the remaining 52 chose IORT with some additional risk. Patients weigh trade-offs of risks and benefits when presented with medical treatment choices. Our results show that the majority of breast cancer patients will accept a small increment of local risk for a simpler delivery of radiation. Further studies that incorporate outcome and side effect data from the TARGIT-A trial clarify the expected consequences of a local recurrence, and include an expanded range of radiation options that could help guide clinical decision making in this area. PMID:24292868

  12. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  13. Continuing Risk of Ipsilateral Breast Relapse After Breast-Conserving Therapy at Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Kreike, Bas; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Velde, Tony van de; Borger, Jacques; Peterse, Hans; Rutgers, Emiel; Bartelink, Harry; Vijver, Marc J. van de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Currently, the local treatment of most patients with early invasive breast cancer consists of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We have previously reported on the risk factors for ipsilateral breast relapse (IBR) in 1,026 patients treated with BCT after a median follow-up of 5.5 years. In the present study, we evaluated the IBR incidence and the risk factors for IBR after prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: We updated the disease outcome for all 1,026 patients using the clinical information collected from the medical registration of The Netherlands Cancer Institute and performed step-wise proportional hazard Cox regression analysis to identify the risk factors associated with an increased risk of IBR after BCT at long-term follow-up. Results: After a median follow-up of 13.3 years, 114 patients had developed an IBR as the first event. The IBR rate was 9.3% and 13.8%, respectively, at 10 and 15 years. Also, the increase in IBR was continuous without reaching a plateau, even after 15 years. Univariate analysis showed that involved surgical resection margins, young age, vascular invasion, and the presence and quantity of an in situ component are risk factors for IBR. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor-positive surgical resection margins (hazard ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-5.2, p = 0.0002) or the presence of vascular invasion (hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2, p = 0.004) is the major independent risk factor for IBR. Conclusions: The data from long-term follow-up showed a constant increase in IBR among patients treated by BCT, even after 15 years, without reaching a plateau. Involved surgical resection margins and vascular invasion were the most important risk factors for IBR.

  14. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan; Palen, Job van der; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  15. Outcomes in Black Patients With Early Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Michael A.; Mell, Loren K.; Hasselle, Michael D.; Karrison, Theodore G.; MacDermed, Dhara; Meriwether, Amber; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2011-02-01

    Background: The race-specific impact of prognostic variables for early breast cancer is unknown for black patients undergoing breast conservation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 1,231 consecutive patients {>=}40 years of age with Stage I-II invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy at the University of Chicago Hospitals and affiliates between 1986 and 2004. Patients were classified as either black or nonblack. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the effects of known prognostic factors and interactions with race. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 82 months. Thirty-four percent of patients were black, and 66% were nonblack (Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian). Black patients had a poorer 10-year overall survival (64.6% vs. 80.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.06) and 10-year disease-free survival (58.1% vs. 75.4%; HR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.89) compared with nonblack patients. Tumor sizes were similar between nonblack and black patients with mammographically detected tumors (1.29 cm vs. 1.20 cm, p = 0.20, respectively). Tumor size was significantly associated with overall survival (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.96) in black patients with mammographically detected tumors but not in nonblack patients (HR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.78-1.53), suggesting that survival in black patients depends more strongly on tumor size in this subgroup. Tests for race-size method of detection interactions were statistically significant for overall survival (p = 0.049), locoregional control (p = 0.036), and distant control (p = 0.032) and borderline significant for disease-free survival (p = 0.067). Conclusion: Despite detection at comparable sizes, the prognostic effect of tumor size in patients with mammographically detected tumors is greater for black than in nonblack patients.

  16. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  17. The rate of breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer is not influenced by the surgical strategy of excisional biopsy followed by the definitive procedure.

    PubMed

    Petrik, D W; McCready, D R; Goel, V; Pinfold, S P; Sawka, C A

    2001-01-01

    Increased emphasis on breast conservation and the primacy of the patient's preferences has led to the promotion and increased use of a two-step surgical strategy (definitive operation only after a final tissue diagnosis from a biopsy done on a previous visit) in the treatment of early breast cancer, with the assumption being that this is more conducive to the performance of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). We sought to test this by examining the effect of the surgical strategy (one-step versus two-step) on the operation performed (BCS versus mastectomy). A random sample of women with node-negative breast cancer diagnosed in 1991 in Ontario was drawn from the Ontario Cancer Registry database and matched to the Canadian Institute of Health Information and Ontario Health Insurance Plan databases (n = 643). This provided information on the timing and nature of all surgical procedures performed as well as patient, tumor, hospital, and surgeon characteristics. The surgical strategy was defined as either a one-step procedure (biopsy and definitive surgery performed at the same time) or a two-step procedure (surgical biopsy and pathologic diagnosis, followed by definitive surgery at a later date). The axillary lymph node dissection was used to define the definitive procedure. BCS was employed in 68% of patients, and this did not differ significantly between the one-step and two-step groups (66% versus 70%). Patients with palpable lesions had a significantly lower rate of breast conservation than those with nonpalpable lesions. Other variables associated with a lower rate of BCS were larger tumor size, presence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and central or multifocal tumors. The use of a one-step procedure was associated with a patient age of more than 50 years, a palpable mass, tumor size larger than 1 cm, previous fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, absence of extensive DCIS, and surgery in an academic setting. Breast conservation was not affected by the

  18. Contralateral axillary node metastasis from recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoko; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Junko; Koyama, Masamichi

    2014-02-01

    Sentinel lymph node detection (SLND) with radiocolloid has become widely used for evaluation of nodal metastasis in primary breast cancer. However, the procedure for recurrent breast cancer is not well established. Contralateral axillary node metastasis is uncommon. We report 2 cases of contralateral axillary node metastasis with recurrent breast cancer. In the first case, contralateral node metastasis was found by SLND. In the other case without SLND, contralateral node metastasis developed after resection of local recurrence. FDG-avid contralateral node was pathologically diagnosed as metastasis. The SLND might be useful in patients with local recurrence after conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:24368539

  19. TRAM flap breast reconstruction after radiation treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J K; Bostwick, J; Bried, J T; Mackay, G; Landry, J; Benton, J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with and without radiation treatment before their breast reconstruction were compared to study the relationship of radiation to flap-related complications. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM) flap for breast reconstruction involves a a vascular pedicle and recipient bed, both included in the radiated field of patients undergoing adjunctive therapy. Detailed reviews of flap-related complications in this subgroup of patients have been limited. METHODS: One hundred eight patients with radiation treatment who subsequently underwent a TRAM flap breast reconstruction were compared with 572 patients with no radiation treatment before similar reconstruction. Flap-related complications, radiation dosage, time, fields, relationships between risk factors, and complications were studied. RESULTS: Overall complication rates were comparable between the two groups. Only fat necrosis (> 10% of total reconstruction) was found to be statistically significant (17.6% vs. 10.1%, p = 0.03228). No difference was found for fat necrosis in unipedicled vs. bipedicled flaps controlled for radiation (17.7% vs. 17.4%). Obesity and radiation therapy were associated with fat necrosis and major infection in a logistic regression. Significant abdominal scarring was also associated with major infection (p = 0.0044). CONCLUSIONS: In this, the largest reported series, radiation therapy was associated with increased fat necrosis and major infection. The use of the TRAM flap was not found to be prohibitive in radiated patients and should still be the first choice in this subgroup of patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:7794079

  20. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  1. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  2. Current controversies in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Gianluca; Terribile, Daniela; Magno, Stefano; Fabbri, Cristina; D'Alba, Pierfrancesco; Chiesa, Federica; Di Leone, Alba; Scafetta, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive form of breast cancer, has increased markedly in recent decades, and DCIS now accounts for approximately 20% of breast cancers diagnosed by mammography. Laboratory and patient data suggest that DCIS is a precursor lesion for invasive cancer. Controversy exists with regard to the optimal management of DCIS patients. In the past, mastectomy was the primary treatment for patients with DCIS, but as with invasive cancer, breast-conserving surgery has become the standard approach. A mini-review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ is presented, and the roles and dilemmas of surgery, radiotherapy and endocrine therapy are discussed. PMID:18958961

  3. Reoperation costs in attempted breast-conserving surgery: a decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, R.E.; Baliski, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery (bcs) is the preferred surgical approach for most patients with early-stage breast cancer. Frequently, concerns arise about the pathologic margin status, resulting in an average reoperation rate of 23% in Canada. No consensus has been reached about the ideal reoperation rate, although 10% has been suggested as a target. Upon undergoing reoperation, many patients choose mastectomy and breast reconstruction, which add to the morbidity and cost of patient care. We attempted to identify the cost of reoperation after bcs, and the effect that a reduction in the reoperation rate could have on the B.C. health care system. Methods A decision tree was constructed to estimate the average cost per patient undergoing initial bcs with two reoperation frequency scenarios: 23% and 10%. The model included the direct medical costs from the perspective of the B.C. health care system for the most common surgical treatment options, including breast reconstruction and postoperative radiation therapy. Results Costs ranged from a low of $8,225 per patient with definitive bcs [95% confidence interval (ci): $8,061 to $8,383] to a high of $26,026 for reoperation with mastectomy and delayed reconstruction (95% ci: $23,991 to $28,122). If the reoperation rate could be reduced to 10%, the average saving would be $1,055 per patient undergoing attempted bcs (95% ci: $959 to $1,156). If the lower rate were to be achieved in British Columbia, it would translate into a savings of $1.9 million annually. Summary The implementation of initiatives to reduce reoperation after bcs could result in significant savings to the health care system, while potentially improving the quality of patient care. PMID:27803595

  4. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  5. Medial tibial stress syndrome: conservative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R Michael; Lavallee, Mark E

    2009-10-07

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as "shin splints," is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes (Willems T, Med Sci Sports Exerc 39(2):330-339, 2007; Korkola M, Amendola A, Phys Sportsmed 29(6):35-50, 2001; Hreljac A, Med Sci Sports Exerc 36(5):845-849, 2004). Although often not serious, it can be quite disabling and progress to more serious complications if not treated properly. Often, the cause of MTSS is multi-factorial and involves training errors and various biomechanical abnormalities. Few advances have been made in the treatment of MTSS over the last few decades. Current treatment options are mostly based on expert opinion and clinical experience. The purpose of this article is to review published literature regarding conservative treatment options for MTSS and provide recommendations for sports medicine clinicians for improved treatment and patient outcomes.

  6. Factors Associated with the Incidence of Local Recurrences of Breast Cancer in Women Who Underwent Conservative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Juliana Rodrigues; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2014-01-01

    Conservative surgery is considered the procedure of choice for women who are affected by early stage tumours. The local recurrence of cancer as a consequence of breast tissue conservation is a growing concern. This study aimed to describe the sociodemographic and clinical profiles of women who had local recurrences of breast cancer after conservative surgery and to examine the associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and the incidence of tumour recurrence in these women. The retrospective cohort included 880 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent conservative surgery between January 2000 and December 2010. Recurrences occurred in 60 patients, and the mean age of the women at diagnosis was 48.8 years. Predictive factors for local recurrence were young age (<39 years) (P = 0.028 and OR = 10.93), surgical margin involvement (P = 0.001 and OR = 3.66), and Her-2 overexpression (P = 0.045 and OR = 1.94). The establishment of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics might help to select optimum treatments, which is a crucial challenge for public health in Brazil, especially with regard to reductions of surgery and hospitalisation expenditures in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde—SUS). PMID:25530886

  7. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  8. Perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery in women with breast cancer: an anatomical study for breast-conservation surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Maeda, Hironori; Tanaka, Yousuke; Hamada, Norihiko; Nishioka, Akihito; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-05-01

    Breast reconstruction after breast-conservation surgery is an important issue for breast cancer patients. Various factors are associated with complications, of which blood flow is one of the more important. The perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery (ITA) are key contributors to blood flow in the anterior chest wall. The present study examined the distributions and depths of the perforating branches of the internal thoracic artery using a multi-detector row-computed tomography (MDCT) angiography. The subjects in this prospective study comprised of 38 women with suspected breast cancer who underwent MDCT angiography. The images were analyzed on computer using transverse MDCT source data and volume renderings. A total of 47 perforating branches were found, with 27 (57.4%) originating in the second, 6 (12.8%) in the third and fourth, 5 (10.6%) in the first and 2 branches (4.3%) originating in the fifth intercostal space, with one branch (2.1%) originating opposite the first intercostal space. A strong correlation was identified between the distance from the skin to the branch and adipose thickness at the shallowest and deepest points (P<0.001). The distributions and depths of the perforating branches of ITA identified in this study may be helpful in immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery.

  9. [Conservative treatment of female urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kerdraon, Jacques; Denys, Pierre; Amarenco, Gérard

    2011-09-01

    Female urinary incontinence can be improved by nonsurgical pharmacologic as well as non-pharmacologic treatments. Hygiene and dietary rules apply to all forms of incontinence. If overweight, weight loss improves stress urinary incontinence. There are levels of evidence to show that pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy improve incontinence. Duloxetine is better than placebo for improvement of quality of life and for the impression of an improvement, but its place is still not determined in the algorithm of conservative treatments. The effects of vaginal electrostimulation and oestrogen are inconsistent or inhomogeneous. In case of urgency incontinence, anticholinergics remain the first line treatment and the place of stimulation of posterieur tibial nerve is still to be defined.

  10. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  11. [Distal radius fractures: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Mark, G; Ryf, C

    1993-07-01

    The "classical" Colles fracture of the distal radius is the most common fracture in the adult. In order to reduce the still rather high rate of permanent disability, this fracture involving a functionally important joint requires accurate reduction. The AO-fracture classification introduced by Müller not only defines the severity of an injury, but also allows for decision-making as to the most adequate treatment. Besides the purely conservative management by closed reduction and plaster cast for the type-A fractures, we have a number of other treatment modalities for the more complex-B and C-type fractures, such as closed reduction and percutaneous K-wire application or the use of the small external fixator as well as open reduction and internal fixation by plates and screws for a few selected indications. PMID:8211844

  12. Income level and regional policies, underlying factors associated with unwarranted variations in conservative breast cancer surgery in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geographical variations in medical practice are expected to be small when the evidence about the effectiveness and safety of a particular technology is abundant. This would be the case of the prescription of conservative surgery in breast cancer patients. In these cases, when variation is larger than expected by need, socioeconomic factors have been argued as an explanation. Objectives: Using an ecologic design, our study aims at describing the variability in the use of surgical conservative versus non-conservative treatment. Additionally, it seeks to establish whether the socioeconomic status of the healthcare area influences the use of one or the other technique. Methods 81,868 mastectomies performed between 2002 and 2006 in 180 healthcare areas were studied. Standardized utilization rates of breast cancer conservative (CS) and non-conservative (NCS) procedures were estimated as well as the variation among areas, using small area statistics. Concentration curves and dominance tests were estimated to determine the impact of income and instruction levels in the healthcare area on surgery rates. Multilevel analyses were performed to determine the influence of regional policies. Results Variation in the use of CS was massive (4-fold factor between the highest and the lowest rate) and larger than in the case of NCS (2-fold), whichever the age group. Healthcare areas with higher economic and instruction levels showed highest rates of CS, regardless of the age group, while areas with lower economic and educational levels yielded higher rates of NCS interventions. Living in a particular Autonomous Community (AC), explained a substantial part of the CS residual variance (up to a 60.5% in women 50 to 70). Conclusion The place where a woman lives -income level and regional policies- explain the unexpectedly high variation found in utilization rates of conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:21504577

  13. [Modern surgical treatment of breast cancer. 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue into the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 3rd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27644928

  14. Latissimus dorsi reconstruction: a good option for patients with failed breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Mark E; Perdikis, Galen; Sternberg, Erez G; TerKonda, Sarvam P; Waldorf, James C

    2006-08-01

    The majority of patients with breast carcinoma are being treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT): lumpectomy and postoperative radiation. Local recurrence reported at 8% to 11% is often treated with salvage mastectomy. This has led to a growing group of patients requiring breast reconstruction after failed BCT. Reluctance to use the latissimus dorsi flap (LDF) has resulted from reports of high implant capsular contracture rates. We present a series of 12 patients who underwent LDF reconstruction after the development of recurrent breast cancer after BCT. All 12 patients had a satisfactory esthetic result. Despite previous radiation, the capsular contracture rate was 12.5% (median follow up, 50 months; range, 20-93 months). The most common complication was donor site seroma in 25% (3 of 12) of cases. The LDF yielded satisfactory esthetic results with a low capsular contracture rate. Despite prior radiation, LDF remains a good option for breast reconstruction after failure of BCT.

  15. Pattern of local recurrence after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. . E-mail: G_Freedman@FCCC.edu; Anderson, Penny R.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Nicolaou, Nicos

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Most recurrences in the breast after conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation have been reported to occur within the same quadrant as the initial primary tumor. We analyzed the long-term risk of recurrence by area of the breast after whole-breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: In all, 1,990 women with Stage 0-II breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery and whole-breast irradiation from 1970-1998. Stage was ductal carcinoma in situ in 237, T1 in 1273, and T2 in 480 patients. Of 120 local recurrences, 71 were classified as true local (confined to the original quadrant) and 49 as elsewhere (involving outside the original quadrant). Kaplan-Meier methodology was used to calculate 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year rates of recurrence (95% confidence intervals in parentheses). The median follow-up is 80 months. Results: There was no apparent difference in the 15-year rate of true local vs. elsewhere recurrence, but the time to recurrence was different. The rate of true local recurrence was 2%, 5%, and 7% (5-9%) at 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. The recurrences elsewhere in the breast were rare at 5 (1%) and 10 (2%) years, but increased to 6 (3-9%) at 15 years. This 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers of 13% (10-16%). Conclusions: Recurrence elsewhere in the breast is rare for the first 10 years, but by 15 years is nearly equal to true local recurrence even after whole-breast irradiation. The 15-year rate of elsewhere recurrence was half the rate of contralateral breast cancers. This may indicate a therapeutic effect of whole-breast radiation for other areas of the breast. Very long follow-up will be needed for partial breast irradiation with or without tamoxifen to show that the risk of elsewhere recurrence is not significantly different than after whole-breast irradiation.

  16. The Dynamic Tumor Bed: Volumetric Changes in the Lumpectomy Cavity During Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Brendan; Indelicato, Daniel J. Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Snead, Felicia E.; Morris, Christopher G.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude of volume change in the postoperative tumor bed before and during radiotherapy, and to identify any factors associated with large volumetric change. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with early-stage or preinvasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy at our institution between June 2006 and October 2007. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the breast were obtained shortly after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy (RT) for treatment planning, and, if applicable, before the tumor bed boost. Postoperative changes, seroma, and surgical clips were used to define the tumor bed through consensus agreement of 3 observers (B.P., D.I., and J.L.). Multiple variables were examined for correlation with volumetric change. Results: Between the first and last scan obtained (median time, 7.2 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased at least 20% in 86% of patients (n = 31) and at least 50% in 64% of patients (n = 23). From the postoperative scan to the planning scan (median time, 3 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased by an average of 49.9%, or approximately 2.1% per postoperative day. From planning scan to boost scan (median interval, 7 weeks), the median tumor bed volume decreased by 44.6%, at an average rate of 0.95% per postoperative day. No single factor was significantly associated with a change in tumor bed volume greater than 20%. Conclusions: The average postlumpectomy cavity undergoes dramatic volumetric change after surgery and continues this change during RT. The rate of change is inversely proportional to the duration from surgery. In this study no factors studied predicted large volumetric change.

  17. Appendicitis/diverticulitis: diagnostics and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Morgenstern, Julia; Schanz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Appendicitis and diverticulitis are very common entities that show some similarities in diagnosis and course of disease. Both are widely believed to be simple clinical diagnoses, which is in contrast to scientific evidence. An accurate diagnosis has to describe not only the initial detection, but particularly the severity of the disease. It is based mainly on cross-sectional imaging by ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT). Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis and is mandatory in complicated cases. Antibiotic therapy is similarly effective in uncomplicated appendicitis, but long-term results are not sufficiently known. Treatment of diverticulitis is related to the disease status. Complications such as perforation and bleeding require intervention. Uncomplicated diverticulitis as graded by US or CT are subject to conservative management, in the form of outpatient or hospital care. It is an unresolved debate as to whether antibiotic treatment offers benefits. Mesalazine seems at least to improve pain. The real challenge is treatment of recurrent diverticulitis. Lifestyle measures such as nutritional habits and physical activity are found to influence diverticular disease. Besides immunosuppression, obesity is a significant risk factor for complicated diverticulitis. Whether any medication such as chronic antibiotics, probiotics or mesalazine offers benefits is unclear. The indication for sigmoid resection has changed; it is no longer given by the number of attacks, but rather by structural changes as depicted by cross-sectional imaging.

  18. Conservative and surgical treatment of haemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Altomare, Donato F; Giuratrabocchetta, Simona

    2013-09-01

    The management of haemorrhoids has evolved rapidly during the past few decades. Several new treatments have been proposed with the aim of reducing patients' postoperative pain, time to return to normal life, risk of early and late complications, and recurrence rate. Although conservative treatment based on dietary and lifestyle changes can help the majority of patients, and rubber band ligation and phlebotonic drugs can effectively treat grade I and II haemorrhoids, surgery is required for the most advanced stages. Milligan-Morgan haemorrhoidectomy is considered to be the gold-standard approach for grade IV haemorrhoids. An increasing number of minimally invasive treatment options, including mucopexy with or without mucosal resection and haemorrhoid artery ligation, have now been proposed for the management of grade III haemorrhoids. These approaches aim to correct the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the aetiology of haemorrhoids. An increased risk of recurrence is the price to pay for these minimally invasive and less painful treatments, but the sparing of the sensitive anoderm and a rapid return to normal life without pain are greatly appreciated by patients. An algorithm for the management of haemorrhoids using evidence-based medicine is also presented here.

  19. Breast conservation is a safe method in patients with small cancer of the breast. Long-term results of three randomised trials on 1,973 patients.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, U; Salvadori, B; Luini, A; Greco, M; Saccozzi, R; del Vecchio, M; Mariani, L; Zurrida, S; Rilke, F

    1995-09-01

    Breast conservation has become well-established in the treatment of early mammary carcinoma. However, a standardised treatment modality has not emerged. We have analysed the data from 1,973 patients treated in three consecutive randomised trials by four different radiosurgical procedures: Halsted mastectomy, quadrantectomy plus radiotherapy, lumpectomy plus radiotherapy, and quadrantectomy without radiotherapy, to compare the outcomes of these procedures in terms of local recurrence rate and overall survival. Eligibility criteria were similar in the three trials, and comparability between the four subgroups was excellent. Median follow-up for all patients was 82 months. The annual rates of local recurrence varied markedly according to the treatment. Patients treated with Halsted mastectomy and quadrantectomy plus radiotherapy had low annual rates of local recurrence (0.20 and 0.46, respectively) while both lumpectomy plus radiotherapy and quadrantectomy without radiotherapy had significantly higher rates (2.45 and 3.28, respectively). Patients under 45 years of age had a much higher incidence of local recurrences, while in women over 55 years local recurrences were much less frequent. Overall survival curves were identical in the four groups of patients, so that the three breast conserving radiosurgical procedures had the same survival rates as Halsted mastectomy. However, local recurrence rates were markedly influenced by the treatment method, patient age and specific histological features.

  20. Breast cancer in elderly women: presentation, survival, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Law, T M; Hesketh, P J; Porter, K A; Lawn-Tsao, L; McAnaw, R; Lopez, M J

    1996-04-01

    Recent data suggest that breast cancer in elderly women does not present as more advanced disease, nor is survival significantly inferior to that in younger women. Unfortunately, until recently, older women have been excluded from clinical trials that have determined survival benefit in both screening and treatment modalities. Unless co-morbid conditions adversely affect one's life expectancy or tolerance to therapy, older women should be treated with standard surgical procedures (including breast conservation, if so desired) for early-stage disease, as outcome is comparable to that in younger patients. Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy has proven survival benefit in women over 70 years of age with estrogen receptor-positive tumors and should be considered in all women with tumors greater than 1 cm in size. Older women may experience more chemotherapy-related toxicities. However, for those with a significant risk of recurrence due to tumor size or lymph node status, chemotherapy can be safely administered when factors such as age-related decline in creatinine clearance and co-morbid conditions are considered. Hormonal therapy (tamoxifen) is usually the first-line treatment option over chemotherapy for metastatic disease in the elderly unless the patient has an estrogen receptor-negative tumor, visceral-dominant disease, or significant disease-related symptoms. In the latter settings, chemotherapy can provide improved or more rapid response proportions but does not affect long-term survival.

  1. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Aidan T.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  2. Breast cancer among the oldest old: tumor characteristics, treatment choices, and survival.

    PubMed

    Schonberg, Mara A; Marcantonio, Edward R; Li, Donglin; Silliman, Rebecca A; Ngo, Long; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2010-04-20

    PURPOSE Few data are available on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and survival for women age 80 years or older. PATIENTS AND METHODS We used the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data set from 1992 to 2003 to examine tumor characteristics, treatments (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery [BCS] with radiation therapy or alone, or no surgery), and outcomes of women age 80 years or older (80 to 84, 85 to 89, > or = 90 years) with stage I/II breast cancer compared with younger women (age 67 to 79 years). We used Cox proportional hazard models to examine the impact of age on breast cancer-related and other causes of death. Analyses were performed within stage, adjusted for tumor and sociodemographic characteristics, treatments received, and comorbidities. Results In total, 49,616 women age 67 years or older with stage I/II disease were included. Tumor characteristics (grade, hormone receptivity) were similar across age groups. Treatment with BCS alone increased with age, especially after age 80. The risk of dying from breast cancer increased with age, significantly after age 80. For stage I disease, the adjusted hazard ratio of dying from breast cancer for women age > or = 90 years compared with women age 67 to 69 years was 2.6 (range, 2.0 to 3.4). Types of treatments received were significantly associated with age and comorbidity, with age as the stronger predictor (26% of women age > or = 80 years without comorbidity received BCS alone or no surgery compared with 6% of women age 67 to 79 years). CONCLUSION Women age > or = 80 years have breast cancer characteristics similar to those of younger women yet receive less aggressive treatment and experience higher mortality from early-stage breast cancer. Future studies should focus on identifying tumor and patient characteristics to help target treatments to the oldest women most likely to benefit.

  3. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  4. Current Status of Diagnosis And Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer in Beijing, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-mei; Wang, Ning; Ouyang, Tao; Yang, Lei; Song, Ming-yang; Lin, Ben-yao; Xie, Yun-tao; Li, Jin-feng; Pan, Kai-feng; You, Wei-cheng; Zhang, Lian

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the status of diagnosis and treatment of primary breast cancer in Beijing, 2008. Methods All the patients who were diagnosed as primary breast cancer in Beijing in 2008 were enrolled in this study. Information of these patients, including the features of tumors, clinical diagnosis and treatment was collected, and filled in the well-designed questionnaire forms by trained surveyors. The missing data was partly complemented through telephone interviews. Results A total of 3473 Beijing citizens were diagnosed as primary breast cancer (25 patients with synchronal bilateral breast cancer) in Beijing, 2008. Of them 82.09% were symptomatic. 19.02% and 34.11% were diagnosed using fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and core needle biopsy (CNB), respectively. 15.92% received sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and 24.27% received breast conserving surgery (BCS). Among 476 cases with Her-2 positive, only 96 received anti-Her-2 therapy. We found that the standardization level varied in hospitals of different grades, with higher level in Grade-III hospitals. Of note, some breast cancer patients received non-standard primary tumor therapy: 65.63% of the patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) received axillary lymph node dissection and 36.88% received chemotherapy; 25.89% of the patients underwent breast conserving surgery without margin status; 12.10% of the patients received chemotherapy less than 4 cycles. Conclusion Although most breast cancer patients received basic medical care, the mode of diagnosis and treatment should be improved and should be standardized in the future in Beijing. PMID:23467615

  5. Cosmetic outcome 1-5 years after breast conservative surgery, irradiation and systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Gyöngyi; Varga, Zoltán; Lázár, György; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2012-04-01

    The late side-effects of the local therapy of early breast cancer depend on many patient- and therapy-related parameters. We aimed at investigating the factors that influence the cosmetic and functional outcomes among our breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and conformal radiotherapy, with or without adjuvant systemic therapy. A study was made of the association of the cosmetic outcome after a median follow-up time of 2.4 years and the clinical data on 198 patients extracted from a prospectively compiled database. Breast tenderness occurred more frequently among patients ≤50 years old (p < 0.05). Long-term side effects were related to radiotherapy-related factors the most, while no effect of the systemic therapy could be detected. The risk of hyperpigmentation, breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 18%, 23% and 7%, respectively for every 100 cm(3) increase in the irradiated breast volume, while that of breast edema and breast fibrosis increased by 21% and 12%, respectively for every 10 cm(3) increase in the boost volume. Patients who received a photon boost were significantly more likely to develop breast edema and fibrosis than those who received electrons (p < 0.005). Dose inhomogeneity was related to the volume of the irradiated breast (p = 0.037). Dyspigmentation developed more often among patients older than 50 years, while smoking favoured both dyspigmentation and teleangiectasia. Breast edema was related to dyspigmentation (p = 0.003), fibrosis (p < 0.001) and breast asymmetry (p = 0.032), whereas none of these abnormalities were associated with teleangiectasia. Body image changes were more frequent at a younger age (p < 0.005), while the need to change clothing habits occurred more often at an older age (p < 0.05). Radiotherapy-related parameters appear to exert the greatest effect on the overall cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy.

  6. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women.

  7. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    PubMed

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent. PMID:26035158

  8. Preliminary Results of Electron Intraoperative Therapy Boost and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery in Premenopausal Women

    SciTech Connect

    Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Zerini, Dario M.D.; Morra, Anna; Galimberti, Viviana M.D.; Gatti, Giovanna M.D.; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Paolo; Ciocca, Mario M.Sc.; Sangalli, Claudia D.M.; Fodor, Cristiana D.M.; Veronesi, Umberto

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and preliminary data on late toxicity of a pilot study of boost with electron intraoperative therapy followed by hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (HEBRT) of the whole breast. Methods and Materials: Between June 2004 and March 2007, 211 women with a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery. During surgery, an electron intraoperative therapy boost of 12 Gy was administered to the tumor bed. Adjuvant local treatment was completed with HEBRT, consisting of a course of 13 daily fractions of 2.85 Gy to the whole breast to a total dose of 37.05 Gy. Acute toxicity of the breast was evaluated at the end of HEBRT and at 1 month of follow-up. Late toxicity was recorded at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Results: We report the data from 204 patients. The maximal acute skin toxicity was observed at the end of HEBRT (182 patients evaluable) with 7 (3.8%) Grade 3, 52 (28.6%) Grade 2, 123 (67.6%) Grade 1, and no Grade 0 or Grade 4 cases. A total of 108 patients were evaluated for late toxicity. The recorded late skin toxicity was Grade 4 in 1 patient (0.9%), Grade 3 in 1 patient, and Grade 2 or less in 106 patients (98.2%). Conclusions: The results of this study have shown that electron intraoperative therapy followed by HEBRT allows for the delivery of a high dose to the tumor bed and an adequate dose to the whole breast. This treatment is feasible, compliance is high, and the rate of acute toxicity and the preliminary data on chronic toxicity seem acceptable.

  9. Systemic treatment of early breast cancer--a biological perspective.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sally; Stopeck, Alison; Rugo, Hope S

    2011-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer affecting women worldwide. In the United States, over 90% of tumors are diagnosed as either in situ or localized to the breast or regional lymph nodes. Surgical treatment and adjuvant radiotherapy play an important role in loco-regional treatment of early stage breast cancer. Systemic adjuvant therapy is targeted towards isolated circulating and/or disseminated tumor cells to prevent systemic recurrence. This review will describe the diverse tumor biology of human breast cancer and how it influences decisions with regard to the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:21480257

  10. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  11. Is standard breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in elderly breast cancer patients justified? A prospective measurement of acute toxicity according CTC-classification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast conserving therapy (BCT) is an accepted treatment for early-stage breast cancer. This study aimed to measure prospectively acute radiation-related toxicity and to create a comprehensive data base for long-term temporal analyses of 3D conformal adjuvant radiotherapy. The specific aspect of age has been neglected by traditional research. Therefore, the impact of age on acute BCT toxicity should be also specifically adressed. Methods Toxicity was measured in 109 patients at initiation (t1), during radiotherapy (t2-t7), and 6 weeks after treatment completion (t8) using a new topographic module. Organ systems were recorded in 15 scales and scored according to symptom intensity (grade 0-5) based on CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) -classification. Radiotherapy was virtually CT-based planned and applied with 6-MeV-photons. Mean total dose was 60.1 Gy. Patients were stratified by age in 3 Groups: <50, 50-60, and >60 years. Results Registered toxicity was generally low. Mean overall-grade climbed from 0.29-0.40 (t1-t7), and dropped to 0.23 (t8). Univariate analyses revealed slightly higher toxicity in older (> 60 years) versus young patients (< 50 years) in 2 scales only: breast-symmetry (p = 0.033), and arm function (p = 0.007). However, in the scale "appetite" toxicity was higher in younger (< 50 years) versus older (> 60 years) patients (p = 0.039). Toxicity differences in all other scales were not significant. Between older (> 60 years) and midaged patients (50-60 years) no significant differences in toxicity were found. This was also true for the comparison between young (< 50 years) versus midaged patient groups (50-60 years). Conclusion The treatment concept of BCT for breast cancer is generally well tolerated. The toxicity-measurement with the new topographic module is feasible. Not modified standard treatment for BC should be performed in elderly women. PMID:21050439

  12. Cardiac morbidity and mortality in women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Catherine K; Li, Xiaohong; Starr, Jason; Harris, Eleanor E R

    2011-01-01

    Left-sided breast irradiation has been associated with increased risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality in some studies. This study examines the cardiac toxicity of irradiation in left- versus right-sided patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The medical records of 129 patients with DCIS treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) at the Moffitt Cancer Center from 1986 to 2002 were reviewed and data regarding subsequent breast cancer and cardiac events were recorded. There were 59 left-sided and 70 right-sided patients treated. Mean age was 55 years. At 8 years, there was no significant difference observed between right- and left-sided breast cancer patients in the development of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, valvular disease, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac-related death. Among those patients with left-sided breast cancer, 13.5% of patients developed a cardiovascular event compared to 7% of right-sided patients (p = 0.25). The overall survival at 8 years was 96% and the relapse-free survival was 85%. There were no significant differences in cardiac mortality or morbidity between right- and left-sided DCIS patients treated with BCT. Longer follow-up will be required to ascertain whether late events are more prevalent in left-sided patients.

  13. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  14. Intraoperative Ultrasound in the Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eggemann, H; Ignatov, T; Beni, A; Costa, S D; Ortmann, O; Ignatov, A

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the value of intraoperative ultrasound in breast-conserving operations and to compare it with standard procedures. Methods: For this purpose 307 women with palpable breast cancers and 116 patients with non-palpable breast cancers were compared retrospectively. In the group with palpable breast cancers 177 patients were treated by US-guided operations and 130 patients underwent palpation-guided breast-conserving operations. As primary outcomes, the resection margins and the rate of re-operations were evaluated. Results: With regard to disease-free resection margins, intraoperative ultrasound was significantly superior to palpation alone. In the group of patients in whom the tumours were extirpated with the help of palpation, R1 resections were observed almost twice as often (16.9 %) as in the US-guided group (8.5 %). In the group with non-palpable breast cancers, intraoperative ultrasound was employed in 61 patients. As a control, 43 cases were evaluated in whom the breast-conserving operation was performed after wire marking. In this group US-guided tumour removal proved to be superior to that after wire marking for tumours that did not exhibit any intraductal components. Otherwise the redo resection rate was reduced by use of ultrasound. Furthermore, the surgeon was able by means of intraoperative ultrasound to identify "problematic" margins and to excise them in the same sitting. Conclusions: The US-guided, breast-conserving operations led to a lower rate of R1 resections and redo operations in comparison to operations with palpation alone or those after wire marking.

  15. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8–14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18–25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  16. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8-14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18-25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  17. Lipoplatin Treatment in Lung and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Manuela; Gianni, Lorenzo; Santelmo, Carlotta; Drudi, Fabrizio; Castellani, Cinzia; Affatato, Alessandra; Nicolini, Mario; Ravaioli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of cisplatin in cancer treatment represents an important achievement in the oncologic field. Many types of cancers are now treated with this drug, and in testicular cancer patients major results are reached. Since 1965, other compounds were disovered and among them carboplatin and oxaliplatin are the main Cisplatin analogues showing similar clinical efficacy with a safer toxicity profile. Lipoplatin is a new liposomal cisplatin formulation which seems to have these characteristics. Lipoplatin was shown to be effective in NSCLC both in phase 2 and phase 3 trials, with the same response rate of Cisplatin, a comparable overall survival but less toxicity. A new protocol aiming to elucidate the double capacity of Lipoplatin to act as a chemotherapeutic and angiogenetic agent in triple-negative breast cancer patients is upcoming. PMID:22295201

  18. Surgical Treatment Differences Among Latina and African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Koithan, Mary; Ruiz, Ester; Glover, Johanna Uriri; Juarez, Gloria; Choi, Myunghan; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe breast cancer treatment choices from the perspectives of Latina and African American breast cancer survivors. Design An interdisciplinary team conducted a mixed-methods study of women treated for stages I–IV breast cancer. Setting Participants’ homes in metropolitan areas. Sample 39 participants in three groups: monolingual Spanish-speaking Latinas (n = 15), English-speaking Latinas (n = 15), and African American women (n = 9). Methods Individual participant interviews were conducted by racially and linguistically matched nurse researchers, and sociodemographic data were collected. Content and matrix analysis methods were used. Main Research Variables Perceptions of breast cancer care. Findings High rates of mastectomy were noted for early-stage treatment (stage I or II). Among the participants diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, the majority of English-speaking Latinas (n = 9) and African American women (n = 4) received a mastectomy. However, the majority of the Spanish-speaking Latina group (n = 5) received breast-conserving surgery. Four factors influenced the choice of mastectomy over lumpectomy across the three groups: clinical indicators, fear of recurrence, avoidance of adjuvant side effects, and perceived favorable survival outcomes. Spanish-speaking Latinas were more likely to rely on physician treatment recommendations, and the other two groups used a shared decision-making style. Conclusions Additional study is needed to understand how women select and integrate treatment information with the recommendations they receive from healthcare providers. Among the Spanish-speaking Latina group, limited English proficiency, the use of translators in explaining treatment options, and a lack of available educational materials in Spanish are factors that influenced reliance on physician recommendations. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses were notably absent in supporting the women’s treatment decision making

  19. Breast Cancer: subgroups specific blood-biomarkers for early / predictive diagnosis and personalized treatment — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Breast-conserving lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be an alternative strategy, competitive to mastectomy, in preventing mortality caused by breast cancer. However, besides negative short-term effects (blood flow disturbances, painful erythema, etc.) breast irradiation causes severe long-term side-effects (leucopenia, anemia, breast edema, fibrosis, increase of angiosarcoma, leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes). Therefore, the identification of individual susceptibility to radiation and improved patient-specific radiotherapy planning are highly desirable for personalised treatment in breast cancer. Why early and predictive diagnosis is crucial for long-term outcomes of breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among women with an average incidence rate of 10-12 per 100 women. In 2005, breast cancer led to 502,000 deaths worldwide. Advanced stages of breast cancer lead to the development of metastasis predominantly in the lymph nodes, bone, lung, skin, brain, and liver. Although breast-MRI is currently the most sensitive diagnostic tool for breast imaging, its specificity is limited resulting in a negative impact for surgical management in approximately 9 % of cases. Early diagnosis has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial, enabling significantly enhanced therapy efficiency and possibly full recovery.

  20. [Diagnostics and conservative treatment of anal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Geile, Dorothea; Osterholzer, Georg; Rosenberg, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Anal incontinence is diagnosed primarily by clinical and proctologic examination. Etiological factors of the disease are found in 85% of the patients by additional examinations. Motility dysfunction of colon and rectum has to be excluded (stenosis, dyschezia, internal hernias). Because anal incontinence is a multifactorial disease as a rule, the single compounds have to be diagnosed and have to undergo therapy. Accordingly, useful investigations are: endorectal ultrasound (defect of muscle, inflammatory or tumour infiltration), manometry (alteration of either anal resting pressure and/or anal squeezing pressure) and surface electromyography (ability of contraction, duration of contraction, strength). Neurophysiological examinations are: needle electromyography, pudendal nerve latency time measurement (PNLT). The occurrence of nerve damage determines the outcome of operative intervention! Conservative treatment is indicated in 80 to 90% of all patients, even higher when one includes all patients in the perioperative period. Possible therapy modalities are: nutrition consultation, physiotherapy, pelvic floor training, biofeedback training of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles, electrostimulation and the combination of both (EMG-triggered electrostimulation). Short-term results are satisfying in up to 85% of patients, but later, successful results depend on the patient's willingness or ability to continue training, and on his/her age.

  1. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  2. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  3. Exploring circulating micro‐RNA in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Máire‐Caitlín; Sweeney, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy amongst females worldwide. In recent years the management of this disease has transformed considerably, including the administration of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting. Aside from increasing rates of breast conserving surgery and enabling surgery via tumour burden reduction, use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting allows monitoring of in vivo tumour response to chemotherapeutics. Currently, there is no effective means of identifying chemotherapeutic responders from non‐responders. Whilst some patients achieve complete pathological response (pCR) to chemotherapy, a good prognostic index, a proportion of patients derive little or no benefit, being exposed to the deleterious effects of systemic treatment without any knowledge of whether they will receive benefit. The identification of predictive and prognostic biomarkers could confer multiple benefits in this setting, specifically the individualization of breast cancer management and more effective administration of chemotherapeutics. In addition, biomarkers could potentially expedite the identification of novel chemotherapeutic agents or increase their efficacy. Micro‐RNAs (miRNAs) are small non‐coding RNA molecules. With their tissue‐specific expression, correlation with clinicopathological prognostic indices and known dysregulation in breast cancer, miRNAs have quickly become an important avenue in the search for novel breast cancer biomarkers. We provide a brief history of breast cancer chemotherapeutics and explore the emerging field of circulating (blood‐borne) miRNAs as breast cancer biomarkers for the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Established molecular markers of breast cancer are outlined, while the potential role of circulating miRNAs as chemotherapeutic response predictors, prognosticators or potential therapeutic targets is discussed. PMID:26756433

  4. Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazal, S K; Fallowfield, L; Blamey, R W

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction). Psychosocial morbidity and satisfaction were studied retrospectively using self-evaluation questionnaires. The three different surgical groups were cross-matched into four different age group. Significant statistical differences existed between the three procedures regarding satisfaction and psychosocial morbidity (anxiety, depression, body image, sexuality and self-esteem) in favour of wide local excision followed by breast reconstruction. Greatest morbidity was seen in the mastectomy group. Patient satisfaction of cosmetic outcome and psychosocial aspects was greater with wide local excision than with breast reconstruction or mastectomy. However, since wide local excision is indicated in only a group of patients, breast reconstruction should be an option available to patients requiring mastectomy.

  5. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  6. Treatment options for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of different subtypes, characterized by their different clinicopathological characteristics, prognoses and responses to treatment. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer sensitive to hormonal treatments, as well as in patients whose malignant cells overexpress or amplify HER2. In contrast, mainly due to the lack of molecular targets, little progress has been made in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recent improved understanding of the natural history, pathophysiology, and molecular features of triple-negative breast cancers have provided new insights into management and therapeutic strategies for women affected with this entity. Ongoing and planned translational clinical trials are likely to optimize and improve treatment of women with this disease. PMID:20979652

  7. [Conservative or operative treatment for chondropathia patellae?].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Rau, R

    1980-04-01

    Results of the conservative and operative therapy in chondropathia patellae are reported. A high percentage of freedom from symptoms was achieved by physiotherapeutic measures and intra-articular Arteparon-injections.

  8. Prevention and management of lymphedema after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Shaila J; Chen, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the arm after breast cancer treatment continues to challenge clinicians worldwide. In this review, we examine the main modalities, both nonsurgical and surgical, to prevent and treat this as yet incurable condition. PMID:25772311

  9. Treatment helps young women preserve fertility during breast cancer chemo

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have found that young women with breast cancer were able to better preserve their fertility during cancer treatments by using hormone-blocking drug injections that put them into temporary menopause. The results announced today at the annual me

  10. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  11. Preventive treatments for breast cancer: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Alés-Martínez, J E; Ruiz, A; Chacón, J I; Lluch Hernández, A; Ramos, M; Córdoba, O; Aguirre, E; Barnadas, A; Jara, C; González, S; Plazaola, A; Florián, J; Andrés, R; Sánchez Rovira, P; Frau, A

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a burden for western societies, and an increasing one in emerging economies, because of its high incidence and enormous psychological, social, sanitary and economic costs. However, breast cancer is a preventable disease in a significant proportion. Recent developments in the armamentarium of effective drugs for breast cancer prevention (namely exemestane and anastrozole), the new recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to use preventative drugs in women at high risk as well as updated Guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Society of Clinical Oncology should give renewed momentum to the pharmacological prevention of breast cancer. In this article we review recent major developments in the field and examine their ongoing repercussion for breast cancer prevention. As a practical example, the potential impact of preventive measures in Spain is evaluated and a course of practical actions is delineated.

  12. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2-3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  13. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2-3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer.

  14. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  15. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  16. The Association Between Biological Subtype and Isolated Regional Nodal Failure After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Raad, Rita Abi; Sreedhara, Meera B.A.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Harris, Jay R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of isolated regional nodal failure (RNF) among women with invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) and to determine factors, including biological subtype, associated with RNF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 1,000 consecutive women with invasive breast cancer who received breast-conserving surgery and RT from 1997 through 2002. Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy; none received trastuzumab. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was done in 617 patients (62%). Of patients with one to three positive nodes, 34% received regional nodal irradiation (RNI). Biological subtype classification into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, and basal subtypes was based on estrogen receptor status-, progesterone receptor status-, and HER-2-status of the primary tumor. Results: Median follow-up was 77 months. Isolated RNF occurred in 6 patients (0.6%). On univariate analysis, biological subtype (p = 0.0002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.008), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.02), and Grade 3 histology (p = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher RNF rates. Compared with luminal A, the HER-2 (p = 0.01) and basal (p = 0.08) subtypes were associated with higher RNF rates. The 5-year RNF rate among patients with one to three positive nodes treated with tangents alone was 2.4%; we could not identify a subset of these patients with a substantial risk of RNF. Conclusions: Isolated RNF is a rare occurrence after breast-conserving therapy. Patients with the HER-2 (not treated with trastuzumab) and basal subtypes appear to be at higher risk of developing RNF although this risk is not high enough to justify the addition of RNI. Low rates of RNF in patients with one to three positive nodes suggest that tangential RT without RNI is reasonable in most patients.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of Harmonic technology compared with conventional techniques in mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery with lymphadenectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hang; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Ferko, Nicole C; Patel, Leena; Soleas, Ireena M; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background Mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) are important treatment options for breast cancer patients. A previous meta-analysis demonstrated that the risk of certain complications can be reduced with the Harmonic technology compared with conventional methods in mastectomy. However, the meta-analysis did not include studies of BCS patients and focused on a subset of surgical complications. The objective of this study was to compare Harmonic technology and conventional techniques for a range of clinical outcomes and complications in both mastectomy and BCS patients, including axillary lymph node dissection. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing Harmonic technology and conventional methods in breast cancer surgery. Outcome measures included blood loss, drainage volume, total complications, seroma, necrosis, wound infections, ecchymosis, hematoma, hospital length of stay, and operating time. Risk of bias was analyzed for all studies. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models for mean differences of continuous variables and a fixed-effects model for risk ratios of dichotomous variables. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Across surgery types, compared to conventional techniques, Harmonic technology reduced total complications by 52% (P=0.002), seroma by 46% (P<0.0001), necrosis by 49% (P=0.04), postoperative chest wall drainage by 46% (P=0.0005), blood loss by 38% (P=0.0005), and length of stay by 22% (P=0.007). Although benefits generally appeared greatest in mastectomy patients with lymph node dissection, Harmonic technology showed significant reductions in complications in the BCS study subgroup. Conclusion In this meta-analysis of both mastectomy and BCS procedures, the use of Harmonic technology reduced the risk of most complications by about half across breast cancer surgery patients. These benefits may be due to superior hemostatic capabilities of Harmonic

  18. What's New in Research and Treatment in Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... men What`s new in research and treatment in breast cancer in men? Research into the causes, prevention, and ... and research are done in women. Causes of breast cancer and breast cancer prevention Studies continue to uncover ...

  19. New treatment option for women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a common breast cancer prevention drug, tamoxifen, in preventing breast cancer recurrence in young women who also receive post-surgical treatment to suppress ovarian funct

  20. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  1. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  2. Lipid-based nanocarriers for breast cancer treatment - comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Talluri, Siddartha Venkata; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Karri, Veera Venkata Satyanarayana Reddy; Tummala, Shashank; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cancer-related disease as the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among women. Curative options for breast cancer are limited, therapeutically substantial and associated with toxicities. Emerging nanotechnologies exhibited the possibility to treat or target breast cancer. Among the nanoparticles, various lipid nanoparticles namely, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles have been developed over the years for the breast cancer therapy and evidences are documented. Concepts are confined in lab scale, which needs to be transferred to large scale to develop active targeting nanomedicine for the clinical utility. So, the present review highlights the recently published studies in the development of lipid-based nanocarriers for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26430913

  3. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies. PMID:26799758

  4. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies.

  5. Older women's experience with breast cancer treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    Schonberg, Mara A; Birdwell, Robyn L; Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Hintz, Lindsay; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Wertheimer, Michael D; Silliman, Rebecca A

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand older women's experience with breast cancer treatment decisions. We conducted a longitudinal study of non-demented, English-speaking women ≥ 65 years recruited from three Boston-based breast imaging centers. We interviewed women at the time of breast biopsy (before they knew their results) and 6 months later. At baseline, we assessed intention to accept different breast cancer treatments, sociodemographic, and health characteristics. At follow-up, we asked women about their involvement in treatment decisions, to describe how they chose a treatment, and influencing factors. We assessed tumor characteristics through chart abstraction. We used quantitative and qualitative analyses. Seventy women (43 ≥ 75 years) completed both interviews and were diagnosed with breast cancer; 91 % were non-Hispanic white. At baseline, women 75+ were less likely than women 65-74 to report that they would accept surgery and/or take a medication for ≥ 5 years if recommended for breast disease. Women 75+ were ultimately less likely to receive hormonal therapy for estrogen receptor positive tumors than women 65-74. Women 75+ asked their surgeons fewer questions about their treatment options and were less likely to seek information from other sources. A surgeon's recommendation was the most influential factor affecting older women's treatment decisions. In open-ended comments, 17 women reported having no perceived choice about treatment and 42 stated they simply followed their physician's recommendation for at least one treatment choice. In conclusion, to improve care of older women with breast cancer, interventions are needed to increase their engagement in treatment decision-making.

  6. Perioperative interstitial irradiation in the conservative management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Jewell, W.R.; Mansfield, C.M.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-11-01

    Conservation of the breast in early breast cancer with limited resection and radiation is proving to be as effective as modified radical mastectomy in survival and in loco-regional control. Management at the University of Kansas Medical Center consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to facilitate perioperative irradiation with Iridium-192 to the tumor bed. An axillary node dissection is also performed at that time. Two to 3 weeks later external beam irradiation is delivered to the entire breast. One hundred and twenty-three breasts in 120 patients have been treated between June 1982 and June 1986. There were 49 pathological Stage I, 63 Stage II, 8 Stage III carcinomas, and 3 carcinomas in situ, consisting of 72 T1, 43 T2, 5 T3, and 3 TIS lesions. Patients have been followed for a median of 30 months. One patient had a ''true'' recurrence in the breast. Another patient developed recurrence in a different quadrant. Ninety percent of the patients had good to excellent cosmetic results, 7% were considered fair, and 3% had poor results. Seven patients developed mild arm edema, 4 were found to have moderate edema, and 1 had severe arm edema. Our preliminary results indicate that interstitial irradiation immediately after excision results in excellent local control, with very satisfactory cosmesis and no morbidity due to the simultaneous excision and irradiation.

  7. The role of preoperative systemic treatment in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Habib-Lisik, Maja; Zięba, Agnieszka; Potemski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The goal of preoperative pharmacotherapy in patients with breast cancer is to enable breast conserving surgery in stage T3N0-1M0 or radical mastectomy in patients with primary inoperative tumors (T1-4N0-3M0). The choice of optimal treatment should be based not only on risk factors resulting from the stage but also on predicted cancer responsiveness to the treatment. The breast cancer subtypes defined by immunohistochemical profile (expression of ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67) are characterized by different responsiveness to therapy. Complete response confirmed by histopathological evaluation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a positive prognostic factor in some breast cancer subtypes. This marker is not of value in postmenopausal patients with ER/PR+ HER2– tumors, who are candidates for neoadjuvant hormone therapy. These patients have a good prognosis if in a histopathological report after surgery there are features such as pT1, pN0, Ki67 < 3%, and ER Allred score ≥ 3. The goal of the paper is to present current knowledge about preoperative pharmacotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27358586

  8. Rotator cuff tear: physical examination and conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common shoulder diseases. It is interesting that some rotator cuff tears are symptomatic, whereas others are asymptomatic. Pain is the most common symptom of patients with a tear. Even in patients with an asymptomatic tear, it may become symptomatic with an increase in tear size. Physical examination is extremely important to evaluate the presence, location, and extent of a tear. It also helps us to understand the mechanism of pain. Conservative treatment often works. Patients with well-preserved function of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are the best candidates for conservative treatment. After a successful conservative treatment, the symptom once disappeared may come back again. This recurrence of symptoms is related to tear expansion. Those with high risk of tear expansion and those with less functional rotator cuff muscles are less likely to respond to conservative treatment. They may need a surgical treatment.

  9. Factors associated with patients in the Scottish Highlands who chose mastectomy when suitable for breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Majid; Hubbard, Gill; Abbott, Nick; Daltrey, Ian; Mullen, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite being suitable for breast conservation surgery (BCS) a proportion of women choose mastectomy. This study aimed to assess the pre-operative pathological and geographic factors associated with choosing mastectomy rather than BCS in a single centre that serves a large geographical area encompassing urban, rural and remote island populations. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients suitable for BCS between January 2011 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pre-operative pathological features were compared using the Pearson chi squared test as was distance to the treatment centre from the patient’s home. A questionnaire was sent to all those who chose mastectomy to identify the factors that influenced their decision. Results A total of 446 patients suitable for BCS were identified of which 46 (11%) chose to undergo mastectomy. Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to present symptomatically (P=0.009), have tumours larger than 20 mm at diagnostic imaging (P=0.001) and have positive axillary staging (P=0.004). Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to live remotely (P=0.051). Those patients who chose mastectomy felt this gave a better long-term outcome (18 patients, 44%) and peace of mind (14 patients, 34%). Conclusions Adverse pre-operative pathological features were associated with patients choosing mastectomy rather than BCS. There was a trend for patients who chose mastectomy to live remotely from the treatment centre. Patients choosing mastectomy most commonly cited a better long-term outcome and peace of mind as the reason behind their decision. Understanding what influences a patient’s surgical choice will allow clinicians and patients to engage in a fully informed pre-operative decision making process. PMID:27563559

  10. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer. PMID:25114865

  11. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-08-10

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer. PMID:25114865

  12. Outcome After Conservative Surgery and Breast Irradiation in 5,717 Patients With Breast Cancer: Implications for Supraclavicular Nodal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Scotti, Vieri; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Detti, Beatrice; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Cardillo, Carla Deluca; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and predictive factors of patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy to the whole breast only, without supraclavicular nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 5,717 patients with pT1-T4 breast cancer were treated at the University of Florence. The median age of the patient population was 55 years (range, 30-80 years). All patients were followed for a median of 6.8 years (range, 1-27 years). Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended in 1,535 patients (26.9%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 2,951 patients (51.6%). The patients were split into three groups according to number of positive axillary nodes (PAN): P1, negative axillary lymph nodes; P2, one to three PAN; P3, more than three PAN. Results: The P3 patients had a higher incidence of supraclavicular fossa recurrence (SFR) compared with P2 and P1 patients. However, the incidence of SFR in P3 patients was low (only 5.5%), whereas the incidence of distant metastases (DM) was 27.2%. Distant metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor for breast cancer survival. Additionally, in the subgroup of patients who developed local recurrence, DM was the most important death predictor. Conclusion: Our series suggests that isolated SFR in patients who did not receive supraclavicular radiotherapy is infrequent, as well as in those patients who have more than three PAN, and SFR seems not to influence the outcome, which depends on DM occurrence.

  13. Surgical treatment of early breast cancer in day surgery.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Casà, Luigi; Noto, Antonio; Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2007-01-01

    Quadrantectomy and associated sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is currently employed in most breast surgery centres as the gold standard in the treatment of early breast cancer. This approach has a modest morbidity and can usually be performed in a day-surgery regimen, leading to best acceptance by the patients. This reports outlines the experience of our Breast Unit with quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery for early breast cancer. One hundred patients presenting to our institution with primary invasive breast cancer measuring less than 3 cm and clinically negative axillary nodes underwent quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery. For 60 women with breast cancer the sentinel node was negative, so the only definitive surgical treatment was performed in the day-surgery regimen; 40 patients with positive sentinel nodes were hospitalised a second time for axillary dissection. In these patients that needed clearance of the axilla, SLNB was performed on the only positive node in 22 cases (55%). None of the patients admitted for quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery required re-hospitalisation after discharge. All patients proved to be fully satisfied with early discharge from hospital when questioned on the occasion of subsequent monitoring. Short-stay surgical programs in early invasive breast cancer treatment are feasible today owing to the availability of less invasive approaches such as quadrantectomy and SLNB. There are two main pointers to a distinct advantage for this kind of approach, i.e. recovery and psychological adjustment. Recovery from surgery is faster and the patient tends to play down the seriousness of the operation and to have a better mental attitude to neoplastic disease. Moreover, when performing quadrantectomy with SLNB in day surgery fewer than 50% of breast cancer patients (40% in our experience) require another surgical treatment, concluding the surgery in a single session. PMID:18019641

  14. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  15. Breast-Conserving Therapy: Radiotherapy Margins for Breast Tumor Bed Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Nijkamp, Jasper; Elkhuizen, Paula

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction position variability of the excision cavity (EC) and to compare the rib and breast surface as surrogates for the cavity. Additionally, we sought to determine the required margin for on-line, off-line and no correction protocols in external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients were studied who had been treated in the supine position for 28 daily fractions. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were regularly acquired according to a shrinking action level setup correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration of the ribs and sternum. The position of the excision area was retrospectively analyzed by gray value cone-beam computed tomography-to-computed tomography registration. Subsequently, three setup correction strategies (on-line, off-line, and no corrections) were applied, according to the rib and breast surface registrations, to estimate the residual setup errors (systematic [{sigma}] and random [{sigma}]) of the excision area. The required margins were calculated using a margin recipe. Results: The image quality of the cone-beam computed tomography scans was sufficient for localization of the EC. The margins required for the investigated setup correction protocols and the setup errors for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 8.3 mm ({sigma} = 3.0, {sigma} = 2.6), 10.6 mm ({sigma} = 3.8, {sigma} = 3.2), and 7.7 mm ({sigma} = 2.7, {sigma} = 2.9) for the no correction strategy; 5.6 mm ({sigma} = 2.0, {sigma} = 1.8), 6.5 mm ({sigma} = 2.3, {sigma} = 2.3), and 4.5 mm ({sigma} = 1.5, {sigma} = 1.9) for the on-line rib strategy; and 5.1 mm ({sigma} = 1.8, {sigma} = 1.7), 4.8 mm ({sigma} = 1.7, {sigma} = 1.6), and 3.3 mm ({sigma} = 1.1, {sigma} = 1.6) for the on-line surface strategy, respectively. Conclusion: Considerable geometric uncertainties in the position of the EC relative to the bony anatomy and breast surface have been observed. By using registration of the breast

  16. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  17. Does Axillary Boost Increase Lymphedema Compared With Supraclavicular Radiation Alone After Breast Conservation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Shelly B. Freedman, Gary M.; Li Tianyu; Anderson, Penny R.; Ross, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine independent predictors of lymphedema (LE) after breast radiotherapy and to quantify added risks of LE from regional node irradiation (RNI). Materials and Methods: A total of 2,579 women with T1-2, N 0-3, M0 breast cancer treated with breast conservation between 1970 and 2005 were studied. A total of 2,169 patients (84%) received radiation to the breast (B), 226 (8.8%) to the breast and supraclavicular LNs (B+SC), and 184 (7.1%) to the breast, supraclavicular LNs, and a posterior axillary boost (B+SC+PAB). Median follow-up was 81 months (range, 3-271). Results: Eighteen percent of patients developed LE. LE risks were as follows: 16% (B), 23% (B+SC), and 31% (B+SC+PAB) (p < 0.0001). LE severity was greater in patients who had RNI (p = 0.0002). On multivariate analysis, RT field (p < 0.0001), obesity index (p = 0.0157), systemic therapy (p = 0.0013), and number of LNs dissected (p < 0.0001) independently predicted for LE. In N1 patients, the addition of a SC to tangents (p < 0.0001) and the addition of a PAB to tangents (p = 0.0017) conferred greater risks of LE, but adding a PAB to B+SC RT did not (p = 0.8002). In the N2 patients, adding a PAB increased the risk of LE 4.5-fold over B+SC RT (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: LE predictors included number of LNs dissected, RNI, obesity index, and systemic therapy. LE risk increased when a SC or PAB were added in the N1 subgroup. In the N2 patients, a PAB increased the risk over B+SC. The decision to boost the axilla must be weighed against the increased risk of LE that it imposes.

  18. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P < .05). Compared to FP-FIF, IP-IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage

  19. Impact of different type of cancer treatment on the effectiveness of breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Szloch, Joanna; Marczyk, Elżbieta; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Komorowski, Andrzej L

    2016-08-01

    For women undergoing mastectomy as part of their breast cancer treatment, breast reconstruction is an important part of therapy. However, neoadjuvant, adjuvant treatments as well as other patient-related factors can compromise the results of breast reconstruction techniques. In this article we have reviewed current approaches to the management of complications and risks that neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies pose on breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Non-treatment related factors influencing reconstruction techniques were reviewed as well. PMID:27562472

  20. Impact of different type of cancer treatment on the effectiveness of breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Szloch, Joanna; Marczyk, Elżbieta; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    For women undergoing mastectomy as part of their breast cancer treatment, breast reconstruction is an important part of therapy. However, neoadjuvant, adjuvant treatments as well as other patient-related factors can compromise the results of breast reconstruction techniques. In this article we have reviewed current approaches to the management of complications and risks that neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies pose on breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Non-treatment related factors influencing reconstruction techniques were reviewed as well. PMID:27562472

  1. Clinicopathologic features and long-term outcome of patients with medullary breast carcinoma managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Vu-Nishino; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Ahrens, Willam A.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical characteristics and outcome of medullary carcinoma to infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast in a large cohort of conservatively managed patients with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Chart records of patients with invasive breast cancer managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at the therapeutic radiology facilities of Yale University School of Medicine before 2001 were reviewed. Forty-six cases (1971-2001) were identified with medullary histology; 1,444 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma served as a control group. Results: The medullary cohort presented at a younger age with a higher percentage of patients in the 35 years or younger age group (26.1% vs. 6.6%, p < 0.00001). Twelve patients with medullary histology underwent genetic screening, and 6 patients were identified with deleterious mutations. This group showed greater association with BRCA1/2 mutations compared with screened patients in the control group (50.0% vs. 15.8%, p 0.0035). The medullary cohort was also significantly associated with greater T stage and tumor size (37.0% vs. 17.2% T2, mean size 3.2 vs. 2.5 cm, p 0.00097) as well as negative ER (84.9% vs. 37.6%, p < 0.00001) and PR (87.5% vs. 48.1%, p = 0.00001) status. As of February 2003, median follow-up times for the medullary and control groups were 13.9 and 14.0 years, respectively. Although breast relapse-free rates were not significantly different (76.7% vs. 85.2%), 10-year distant relapse-free survival in the medullary cohort was significantly better than in the control group (94.9% vs. 77.5%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Despite poor clinicopathologic features, patients with medullary histology demonstrate favorable long-term distant relapse-free survival. Local control rates of patients with medullary and infiltrating ductal carcinoma are comparable. These findings suggest that patients diagnosed with medullary carcinoma are appropriate candidates for

  2. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2- locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  3. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2− locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  4. Oral health after breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Amódio, Juliana; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Carrara, Helio Humberto Angotti; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimaraes; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; dos Reis, Francisco José Candido

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral health can affect a patient's general health and quality of life. Given the increase in breast cancer survival rates, investigations of factors influencing the quality of life of survivors have gained importance. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize oral health in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We conducted a matched case-control study. Forty-eight women who survived breast cancer (age 62.1±9.1 years) and 48 healthy controls (age 61.8±8.6 years) were included. For each case and control, a complete oral evaluation chart was completed. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic periodontal disease was 98% in breast cancer survivors and 87% in controls. The breast cancer survivors had a median of 16 remaining teeth, whereas controls had a median of 22 remaining teeth (p = 0.03). The percentage of sites with gingival bleeding was 16.05% (0-100%) in breast cancer survivors and 0% (0-72%) in controls (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chronic periodontal disease and tooth loss were highly prevalent in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. To improve survivors' quality of life, a preventive oral health evaluation should be available prior to cancer treatment. PMID:25518024

  5. Surgical margins in breast-conserving therapy: current trends and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Lucchini, Roberta; Santoprete, Stefano; Bistoni, Giovanni; Avenia, Stefano; Triola, Roberto; Avenia, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate surgical margins represent a high risk for adverse clinical outcome in breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer. The majority of studies report positive resection margins in 20% to 40% of the patients who underwent BCT. This may result in an increased local recurrence (LR) rate or additional surgery and, consequently, adverse effects on cosmesis, psychological distress, and health costs. In the literature, various risk factors are reported to be associated with positive margin status after lumpectomy, which may allow the surgeon to distinguish those patients with a higher “a priori” risk for re-excision. However, most risk factors are related to tumor biology and patient characteristics, which cannot be modified as such. Therefore, efforts to reduce the number of positive margins should focus on optimizing the surgical procedure itself, because the surgeon lacks real time intraoperative information on the presence of positive resection margins during breast-conserving surgery. This review presents the status of pre- and intraoperative modalities currently used in BCT. Furthermore, innovative intraoperative approaches, such as positron emission tomography, radio-guided occult lesion localization, and near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging, are addressed, which have to prove their potential value in improving surgical outcome and reducing the need for re-excision in BCT.

  6. Clinical Outcome of Breast Conservation Therapy for Breast Cancer in Hong Kong: Prognostic Impact of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence and 2005 St. Gallen Risk Categories

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. . E-mail: tkokyau@gmail.com; Soong, Inda S.; Chan, K.; Chan, M.; Cheung, P.; Lau, H.W.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of breast conservation therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancers in our predominantly Chinese population. Methods and Materials: Clinical outcomes of 412 T1-2 invasive breast cancers treated by wide local excision and external radiotherapy from 1994 to 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. Only 7% lesions were first detected by mammograms. Adjuvant tamoxifen and chemotherapy were added in 74% and 45% patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 5.4 years. The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate, distant failure-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 4%, 92%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. The 5-year distant failure-free survival for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk categories (2005 St. Gallen) were 98%, 91%, and 80%, respectively (p 0.0003). Cosmetic results were good to excellent in more than 90% of the assessable patients. Grade 3 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 4.461; 95% CI, 1.216-16.360; p = 0.024), age (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.846-0.990; p = 0.027), and close/positive final margins (HR, 3.499; 95% CI, 1.141-10.729; p = 0.028) were significant independent risk factors for IBTR. Both St. Gallen risk categories (p = 0.003) and IBTR (HR, 5.885; 95% CI, 2.494-13.889; p < 0.0005) were independent prognostic factors for distant failure-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the low percentage of mammographically detected lesions, the overall clinical outcome of BCT for invasive breast cancers in the Chinese population is comparable to the Western series. The 2005 St. Gallen risk category is a promising clinical tool, but further validation by large studies is warranted.

  7. [Indications and counter-indications for non-mutilating treatment of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cosendey, B A

    1992-05-01

    Progress achieved in understanding the biology of breast cancer, as well as the desire of patients to avoid major mutilation, have resulted in ever increasing indications for breast-conserving surgery. Such indications depend on two considerations: the medical consideration which seeks to achieve the same rate of control of loco-regional disease as mutilating surgery and the aesthetic consideration, permitting a satisfactory result on a functional plane. Nevertheless, a case of breast cancer appearing unifocal under clinical examination and radiology is frequently accompanied by tumoral intramammal dissemination, the evaluation of which after histological examination varies according to the author. Should the coexistence of cancer in situ and invasive cancer radically modify the choice of therapy? It seems absurd to accept non-mutilating surgery for invasive cancer and to choose mutilating treatment for certain cases of cancer in situ. Although there appears to be only relative counter-indication for conservatory treatment in cases of advanced cancer (T3N1b and above), it is not recommended in the presence of several types of histology and in certain specific circumstances when associated with cancer in situ. A review of the literature will enable us to cover in detail other risk factors and to enumerate indications and counter-indications for non-mutilating treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  9. Cost of treatment for breast cancer in central Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hoang Lan, Nguyen; Laohasiriwong, Wongsa; Stewart, John Frederick; Tung, Nguyen Dinh; Coyte, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, cases of breast cancer have been on the rise in Vietnam. To date, there has been no study on the financial burden of the disease. This study estimates the direct medical cost of a 5-year treatment course for women with primary breast cancer in central Vietnam. Methods Retrospective patient-level data from medical records at the Hue Central Hospital between 2001 and 2006 were analyzed. Cost analysis was conducted from the health care payers’ perspective. Various direct medical cost categories were computed for a 5-year treatment course for patients with breast cancer. Costs, in US dollars, discounted at a 3% rate, were converted to 2010 after adjusting for inflation. For each cost category, the mean, standard deviation, median, and cost range were estimated. Median regression was used to investigate the relationship between costs and the stage, age at diagnosis, and the health insurance coverage of the patients. Results The total direct medical cost for a 5-year treatment course for breast cancer in central Vietnam was estimated at $975 per patient (range: $11.7–$3,955). The initial treatment cost, particularly the cost of chemotherapy, was found to account for the greatest proportion of total costs (64.9%). Among the patient characteristics studied, stage at diagnosis was significantly associated with total treatment costs. Patients at later stages of breast cancer did not differ significantly in their total costs from those at earlier stages however, but their survival time was much shorter. The absence of health insurance was the main factor limiting service uptake. Conclusion From the health care payers’ perspective, the Government subsidization of public hospital charges lowered the direct medical costs of a 5-year treatment course for primary breast cancer in central Vietnam. However, the long treatment course was significantly influenced by out-of-pocket payments for patients without health insurance. PMID:23394855

  10. Breast cancer and sexuality: multi-modal treatment options.

    PubMed

    Krychman, Michael L; Katz, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The sexual consequences of breast cancer and its treatments are well known and previously reviewed. Alterations in body image, with or without breast reconstruction, changes in sexual self-esteem and self-efficacy, vulvovaginal atrophy as a result of chemotherapy and/or adjuvant hormone therapy, and loss of libido secondary to dyspareunia and body image issues are common in survivors of breast cancer. Medications that are prescribed for long-term use including those in the class of aromatase inhibitors can have far-reaching implications on quality of life by contributing to vulvar and vaginal atrophic changes. While this is an important issue, there are few widely accepted treatments that have been evaluated for efficacy and safety for these sexual challenges in the breast cancer population. However, progress is being made in finding new and innovative solutions for many of the sexual problems faced by breast cancer survivors and their partners. Many institutions are now compelled to address survivorship concerns and addressing sexuality and intimacy are paramount issues in survivorship care. In this article, we present the evidence for the multimodal approach to the management of sexuality concerns in the breast cancer survivor. Pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and psychosocial interventions will be reviewed. PMID:22151953

  11. Breast cancer treatment and ethnicity in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, survival and mortality are well documented; but few studies have reported on disparities in breast cancer treatment. This paper compares the treatment received by breast cancer patients in British Columbia (BC) for three ethnic groups and three time periods. Values for breast cancer treatments received in the BC general population are provided for reference. Methods Information on patients, tumour characteristics and treatment was obtained from BC Cancer Registry (BCCR) and BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) records. Treatment among ethnic groups was analyzed by stage at diagnosis and time period at diagnosis. Differences among the three ethnic groups were tested using chi-square tests, Fisher exact tests and a multivariate logistic model. Results There was no significant difference in overall surgery use for stage I and II disease between the ethnic groups, however there were significant differences when surgery with and without radiation were considered separately. These differences did not change significantly with time. Treatment with chemotherapy and hormone therapy did not differ among the minority groups. Conclusion The description of treatment differences is the first step to guiding interventions that reduce ethnic disparities. Specific studies need to examine reasons for the observed differences and the influence of culture and beliefs. PMID:20406489

  12. Implantable magnetic nanocomposites for the localized treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2014-12-01

    This paper explores the potential of implantable magnetic nanocomposites for the localized treatment of breast cancer via hyperthermia. Magnetite (Fe3O4)-reinforced polydimethylsiloxane composites were fabricated and characterized to determine their structural, magnetic, and thermal properties. The thermal properties and degree of optimization were shown to be strongly dependent on material properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The in-vivo temperature profiles and thermal doses were investigated by the use of a 3D finite element method (FEM) model to simulate the heating of breast tissue. Heat generation was calculated using the linear response theory model. The 3D FEM model was used to investigate the effects of MNP volume fraction, nanocomposite geometry, and treatment parameters on thermal profiles. The implications of the results were then discussed for the development of implantable devices for the localized treatment of breast cancer.

  13. A review of the management of ductal carcinoma in situ following breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Boxer, M M; Delaney, G P; Chua, B H

    2013-12-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous, pre-malignant disease accounting for 10-20% of all new breast tumours. Evidence shows a statistically significant local control benefit for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for all patients. The baseline recurrence risk of individual patients varies according to clinical-pathological criteria and in selected patients, omission of RT may be considered, following a discussion with the patient. The role of adjuvant endocrine therapy remains uncertain. Ongoing studies are attempting to define subgroups of patients who are at sufficiently low risk of recurrence that RT may be safely omitted; investigating RT techniques and dose fractionation schedules; and defining the role of endocrine therapy. Future directions in the management of patients with DCIS will include investigation of prognostic and predictive biomarkers to inform individualised therapy tailored to the risk of recurrence.

  14. Intraoperative assessment of margins in breast conserving therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Lee, Andy H; Price, Roger I; Waring, Kaylene

    2014-04-01

    Approximately one quarter of patients undergoing breast conserving therapy for breast cancer will require a second operation to achieve adequate clearance of the margins. A number of techniques to assess margins intraoperatively have been reported. This systematic review examines current intraoperative methods for assessing margin status. The final pathology status, statistical measures including accuracy of tumour margin assessment, average time impact on the procedure and second operation rate, were used as criteria for comparison between studies. Although pathological methods, such as frozen section and imprint cytology performed well, they added on average 20-30 min to operation times. An ultrasound probe allows accurate examination of the margins and delivers results in a timely manner, yet it has a limited role with DCIS where calcification is present and in multifocal cancer. Further research is required in other intraoperative margin assessment techniques, such as mammography, radiofrequency spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography.

  15. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer.

  16. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  17. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  18. Young women with locally advanced breast cancer who achieve breast conservation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a low local recurrence rate.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Raeshell S; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Meyers, Michael O; Deal, Allison M; Burrows, Emily M; Drobish, Amy A; Anders, Carey K; Carey, Lisa A

    2011-07-01

    Women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) who are breast conservation (BCT) candidates after neoadjuvant chemotherapy have the best long-term outcome and low local-regional recurrence (LRR) rates. However, young women are thought to have a higher risk of LRR based on historical data. This study sought to evaluate LRR rates in young women who undergo BCT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 122 women aged 45 years or younger with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage II to III breast cancer, excluding T4d, treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from 1991 to 2007 from a prospective, Institutional Review Board-approved, single-institution database. Data were analyzed using Fisher eExact test, Wilcoxon tests, and the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Fifty-four (44%) patients had BCT and 68 (56%) mastectomy. Forty-six per cent were estrogen receptor-positivity and 28 per cent overexpressed Her2. Mean pretreatment T size was 5.6 cm in the BCT group and 6.7 cm in the mastectomy group (P = 0.04). LRR rates were no different after BCT compared with mastectomy (13 vs 18%, P = 0.6). Higher posttreatment N stage (P < 0.001) and AJCC stage (P = 0.008) were associated with LRR but not pretreatment staging. Disease-free survival was better for patients achieving BCT, with 5-year disease-free survival rates of 82 per cent (95% CI, 69 to 90%) compared with 58 per cent (95% CI, 45 to 69%) for mastectomy (P = 0.03). Young women with LABC who undergo BCT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy appear to have similar LRR rates compared with those with mastectomy. This suggests that neoadjuvant chemotherapy may identify young women for whom BCT may have an acceptable risk of LRR.

  19. Immediate reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator flaps after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ken; Fujikawa, Masakazu; Tashima, Hiroki; Saito, Takuya; Sotsuka, Yohei; Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in perforator flap surgical techniques have allowed for safe and reliable autologous tissue transfer with minimal donor-site morbidity. Between April 2012 and January 2013, we performed immediate breast reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator (MCFAP) flaps in 15 patients after breast-conserving surgery. The flaps were harvested from patients in the lithotomy position, while a second surgical team simultaneously conducted tumour resection. Of the 15 procedures performed, three flaps were dissected as true perforator flaps, while 12 flaps were dissected as muscle-sparing perforator flaps. The mean flap weight was 138.5 g (range, 77-230 g) and the mean pedicle length was 5.7 cm (range, 3.0-9.0 cm). Recipient vessels for anastomosis were serratus branches in 10 patients, internal mammary vessels in three patients and thoracodorsal vessels in two patients. The mean duration of surgery was 6.74 h (range, 5.65-9.45 h). There were no major complications requiring surgical intervention. Researchers observed partial flap necrosis, which manifested as small firm lesions in two patients, as well as local wound infection and dehiscence in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. There were no instances of donor-site seroma formation or lymphoedema in any of the patients. An objective assessment of postoperative photographs showed that cosmetic results were mostly satisfactory. Donor-site scars along the medial groin crease were inconspicuous and readily concealed by clothing. Given its reliable vascularity and minimal donor-site morbidity, the free MCFAP flap can be a good alternative for partial breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery.

  20. Understanding the Challenges of Adjuvant Treatment Measurement and Reporting in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bickell, Nina A.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Wellner, Jill; Fei, Kezhen; Franco, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Background Healthcare accrediting organizations and insurers increasingly require reporting of clinical data, and cancer treatment is one area of enhanced scrutiny. Objectives To compare rates of received versus reported adjuvant breast cancer treatments, and to assess barriers to measuring and reporting treatments to the tumor registry (TR) of a high-volume medical center with both hospital-based and community-based oncologists. Research Design We calculated rates of received treatments using data collected using chart abstraction (N = 115) and compared these with rates of reported treatments from the TR (N = 535). We conducted 31 indepth interviews with clinical and administrative informants. Asking about perceptions of the TR, current reporting methods, and reporting barriers. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using deductive and inductive methods. Results Rates of reported versus received treatments were radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery 22% versus 84% (P < 0.0001); chemotherapy for stage 2 or 3: 17% versus 79% (P < 0.0001); hormonal therapy for stage 2 or 3: 1% versus 91% (P < 0.0001). Comparing community-based versus hospital-based oncologists’ rates reported to the TR, we found the following differences: radiation therapy post-breast conserving surgery 12% versus 32% (< 0.0001); chemotherapy 8% versus 29% (< 0.0001); and hormonal therapy 0% versus 3% (0.09).We found 4 key barriers to measuring and reporting poor understanding about the TR, limited information technology capabilities, poor communication, and mistrust. Conclusions Efforts to improve cancer care quality by improved treatment reporting must overcome key barriers, especially those involving information exchange and mistrust. Communications between the TR and oncology practices must improve to facilitate better treatment measurement and reporting. PMID:22214980

  1. Early ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after breast conservation affect survival: An analysis of the National Cancer Institute randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Joseph P.; Danforth, David N.; Albert, Paul; Sciuto, Linda C. B.S.N.; Smith, Sharon L.; Camphausen, Kevin A.; Poggi, Matthew M. . E-mail: MMPoggi@Bethesda.med.navy.mil

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conservation therapy (BCT) on survival. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-one women were randomized to BCT. Patients with an IBTR were analyzed to determine survival. Analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and time-dependent covariate Cox models. Results: At a median follow-up of 18.4 years, 27 patients had an IBTR. The median survival time after IBTR was 13.1 years. The 5-year survival rate was 91.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.5-100%). The 10-year survival rate was 54.3% (95% CI, 35.8-82.6%). According to a Cox model with time-dependent covariates, the hazard ratio or relative risk of dying for those with an IBTR at <5.3 years after BCT relative to patients without an IBTR after BCT is 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.12%; p = 0.04). The hazard ratio for those who relapse after 5.3 years is 0.59 (95% CI, 0.22-1.61%; p = 0.31). Age at randomization, original tumor size, and the presence of positive regional nodes at initial presentation were not found to be associated with decreased survival. Conclusions: There seems to be a significant association of early IBTR after BCT with decreased survival. Local control should be maximized.

  2. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo; Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  3. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments.

  4. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. PMID:27258052

  5. Analysis of Treatment Efficacy, Cosmesis, and Toxicity Using the MAMMOSITE Breast Brachytherapy Catheter to Deliver Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: The William Beaumont Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K. Kenneth; Vicini, Frank A. Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter; Ghilezan, Michel; Gilbert, Samuel B.S.; Kunzman, Jonathan B.S.; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To review our institution's experience of treating patients with the MammoSite (Cytyc Corp., Marlborough, MA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), for determining short-term treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to April 2006, 80 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) received adjuvant radiation using the MammoSite (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions prescribed to 1.0 cm from the balloon surface). Twenty-three patients (29%) had Stage 0 breast cancer, 46 (57%) had Stage I breast cancer, and 11 (14%) had Stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up was 22.1 months. Results: Two ipsilateral breast-tumor recurrences (IBTRs) (2.5%) developed for a 3-year actuarial rate of 2.9% (no regional failures were observed). On molecular-based clonality assay evaluation, both recurrences were clonally related. Younger age at diagnosis was the only variable associated with IBTR (continuous variable, p = 0.044; categorical variable [<55 years vs. {>=}55 years], p = 0.012). The percentages of patients with good/excellent cosmetic results at 12 and 36 months were 96.9% and 88.2%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with applicator-to-skin spacing <7 mm and those who received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy exhibited lower rates of good/excellent cosmetic results, though the association was not statistically significant. The overall incidence of symptomatic seromas and any seromas was 10% and 45%, respectively. The overall incidence of fat necrosis and infections was 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Early-stage breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant APBI using the MammoSite catheter exhibited a 3-year treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity similar to those observed with other forms of interstitial APBI at this length of follow-up.

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh Chen, C.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

  7. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  8. Controversies on cosmetic outcomes in black women after breast conservation therapy: hyperperception or hyperpigmentation?

    PubMed

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M; Brown, Carol L

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies have reported inferior cosmetic outcomes after breast conservation surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy in black women. However, cosmetic analysis scales contemporarily utilized in the field of radiation oncology rely largely on subjective visual and tactile perception. These methods are undeniably fraught with intraobserver and interobserver variability. Herein, we uncover how and why these methods may unwittingly and disparately misjudge cosmetic outcomes in black women, and the clinical ramifications thereof. In addition, we highlight more objective cosmetic outcomes assessment programs that promise to yield more reproducible and unbiased results.

  9. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  10. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  11. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  12. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Remi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified 'field-in-field' technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347-1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349-1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0-63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0-57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  13. [Erectile dysfunction: conservative treatment and new approaches].

    PubMed

    Henriet, B; Roumeguère, T

    2012-01-01

    Recent societal evolutions have enabled more and more men to talk about erectile dysfunction (ED). There is a strong association between ED and cardiovascular disease and ED should now be considered as an early clinical evidence of vascular disorder. Inhibitors of the PDE-5 have revolutionized the treatment of ED. The three currently drugs (sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil) available as first-line therapeutic option, are well tolerated and highly effective in improving erectile function. All the potential cardiac and vascular effects of PDE-5 inhibitors have recently been reviewed. Despite the fact that million patients with ED worldwide have been successfully treated with one of these PDE5 inhibitors, some men are always difficult to treat. Several new PDE-5 inhibitors have recently been developed and are now being investigated in trials. However 30% of patients need alternative therapies and intracavernous injections are the most successful second-line treatment. Some of new therapeutic approaches are currently under investigation such as gene transfer therapy and stem cells therapy, melanocortin activators or extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Such approaches are still at an early stage but remain exciting new targets in difficult to treat patients.

  14. Giant mid-esophageal diverticulum. Conservative treatment of postoperative leakage.

    PubMed

    Dallatomasina, S; Casaccia, M; Chessa, M; Serrano, J; Nardi, I; Troilo, B; Miggino, M; Valente, U

    2009-01-01

    Mid-esophageal diverticula are rare entities. Only symptomatic patients usually receive surgical treatment. Esophageal leakage is one of the most common complications after these procedures. Though in literature, operative management is the preferred treatment for esophageal fistula, conservative approach is described in case of small leaks. We report a case of an operated giant mid-esophageal diverticulum complicated with an esophageal fistula. The patient underwent a surgical treatment and recovered completely.

  15. Effect of Breast Volume on Treatment Reproducibility on a Tomotherapy Unit in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Offerman, Shannon; Lamba, Michael; Lavigne, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the volume of a patient's breast is correlated with reliable daily setup in treatment of breast cancer with a helical tomotherapy treatment unit. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with breast cancer were treated on a helical tomotherapy unit. During simulation, kilovoltage CT images were obtained for treatment planning. These were fused with daily megavoltage CT scans, and after setup based on skin marks and laser alignment the necessary shifts were carried out. The magnitude of daily shifts (in millimeters) was retrospectively obtained from the daily image fusions, and the breast volume was obtained from the treatment plan. A total of 873 fusion scans were reviewed. Random error for absolute and directional daily shifts was evaluated for correlation to volume. Variation over time was also evaluated. Results: Mean (SD) random shift for all patients in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions was 2.7 (2.0), 3.1 (1.5), and 3.2 (2.6) mm, respectively. Mean (SD) absolute distance shifted was 6.0 (3.5) mm. There was no significant correlation between mean absolute or mean directional daily shift and breast volume (0.08, 0.08, 0.22, and 0.07, respectively). There was no correlation between setup variation and time. Conclusions: In this cohort, there was no correlation between breast volume and degree of daily shift. There was no correlation between time course and setup variation. Therefore, setup variation does not improve or degrade with repeated treatment setups.

  16. Patient demographics and treatment for early breast cancer: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Osborn, G D; Hodin, M; Drew, P J; Fielder, H; Vaughan-Williams, E; Sweetland, H M

    2006-06-01

    This study aims to examine relationships between demographic factors and treatment choice for early breast cancer (T2/N<1). Two hundred and two patients were offered modified radical mastectomy (MRM), breast conserving therapy (BCT) or MRM and reconstruction and interviewed at a University Hospital and oncology centre in South Wales. Median age at treatment was 57 (32-90) years. Seventy-one patients (35%) choose MRM, 10 (5%) MRM and reconstruction and 121 (60%) BCT. Median age of women choosing MRM was 61 and 55 for BC (P<0.0001). Single women (P=0.009) and those with no family history of breast cancer (P=0.02) were more likely to choose MRM. There was no difference between treatment choice and method of cancer detection and the age at which the patient left education (P=0.065). Mean histological tumour diameter was smaller for women choosing BC (15 mm) than for women choosing mastectomy (17 mm; P=0.014). There was no association between tumour grade and treatment choice.

  17. Treatment of HER2-positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2) is overexpressed and/or amplified in ~ 15% of breast cancer patients and was identified a quarter century ago as a marker of poor prognosis. By 1998, antibody therapy targeting the HER2 pathway was shown to demonstrably improve progression-free and overall survival in metastatic disease, and in 2005 evidence of improvement in disease-free and overall survival from the first generation of trastuzumab adjuvant trials became available. However, not all patients with HER2 overexpression benefit from trastuzumab. Second-generation studies in metastatic disease led to the approval of several new HER2-targeted therapies using small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as lapatinib, new HER2/HER3 antibodies such as pertuzumab, and the new antibody chemotherapy conjugate ado-trastuzumab emtansine. These successes supported the launch of second-generation adjuvant trials testing single and dual HER2-targeted agents, administered concomitantly or sequentially with chemotherapy that will soon complete accrual. HER2-positive breast cancer in the setting of HER2-targeted therapy is no longer associated with poor prognosis, and recent guidance by the US Food and Drug Administration suggests that pathologic response to HER2-targeted therapy given preoperatively may allow an earlier assessment of their clinical benefit in the adjuvant setting. An adjuvant trial of trastuzumab in patient whose tumors express normal levels of HER2 and trials of single/dual HER2-targeting without chemotherapy are also ongoing. In this article, we review the current data on the therapeutic management of HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:24360619

  18. Impact of intraoperative specimen mammography on margins in breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Tomoka; Sawaki, Masataka; Ishiguro, Junko; Adachi, Yayoi; Kotani, Haruru; Yoshimura, Akiyo; Hattori, Masaya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    A positive resection margin is one of the most significant risk factors for local breast cancer recurrence following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Intraoperative specimen mammography (SMMG) is routinely used to evaluate the surgical margin at our institution. The aim of the present study was to assess the adequacy of SMMG for margin assessment. The patient cohort included 174 women who underwent BCS in 2006. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG were assessed by comparing the margins assessed by histological and radiological methods. It was also examined whether the rate of positive histological margins was decreased by re-excision following SMMG evaluation. A total of 23 false-negatives and 6 false-positives were determined by SMMG. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG margin assessment for patients with primary breast cancer were 20.6 and 94.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 50% and the negative predictive value was 82.2%. A subgroup analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of SMMG in cases with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher compared with those in invasive ductal carcinoma. Furthermore, the positive histological margin rate was not affected by re-excision. Although the general usefulness of intraoperative SMMG was not proven, this procedure may be useful in specific cases, particularly those with DCIS and those diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy. A prospective study with exact criteria and a standard procedure is required. PMID:27588192

  19. Offering Choice of Surgical Treatment to Women with Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallowfield, Lesley

    1997-01-01

    Few differences in quality of life results are reported between different primary surgical treatments for breast cancer. Assumptions regarding the role of informed choice in psychosocial morbidity have not been substantiated, and fewer women than expected take an active role in decision making. Rigorous research is needed. (Author/EMK)

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of accessory breast cancer in 11 patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHUO; YU, YONG-HUA; QU, WEI; ZHANG, YONG; LI, JIA

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of accessory breast cancer, and contribute valuable information regarding this rare tumour to the current literature, ultimately facilitating the development of improved treatment strategies. The present study reported the cases of 11 patients with accessory breast cancer. The patients with accessory breast cancer were admitted between January 2002 and June 2014, and the patient records were retrospectively analysed. All patients presented with a tumour that was localised in the axilla. Out of these patients, there were 8 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma and 3 patients with invasive lobular carcinoma. The follow-up periods for patients ranged between 4 and 54 months. Out of the 5 patients that experienced neoplasm metastases, 4 patients succumbed to the disease. In total, 6 patients remain alive with no evidence of disease. Accessory breast cancer is a progressive tumour, and long-term follow-up is required. A comprehensive treatment strategy may be an effective treatment option for patients; however, the optimal time at which to commence chemotherapy and the role of combined radiotherapy and endocrine therapy require additional investigation. PMID:26622750

  1. Closed internal degloving injury with conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Lin; Lee, Wei-Che; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2008-02-01

    In the emergency department, we frequently manage patients with multiple contusions and bruise over the trunk without severe injuries. Emergency department discharge is a common option for these patients, and we may neglect the existence of closed internal degloving injury, which is a soft tissue injury with pelvic trauma, combining the subcutaneous tissue torn away from the underlying fascia followed by a cavity being filled with hematoma and liquefied fat created in the next few days (Harefuah 2006;145:111-3:66, J Trauma 1997;42:1046). We report the unusual occurrence of this entity in an 18-year-old man. He encountered a scooter accident and experienced a few days of hospitalization because of thoracispinal (T10 and T11) process fracture. He was discharged, but a fluctuating mass developed at the lumbar area 10 days later. The comprehensive survey excluded the cerebrospinal fluid leakage associated with spinal fracture, and internal degloving injury was diagnosed. Percutaneous drainage with compressive bondage was aggressively used. Even though the treatment course was time consuming, the lesion eventually disappeared 10 months after his first visit. PMID:18272136

  2. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  3. Legitimising fatigue after breast-cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackereth, Peter; Farrell, Carole; Bardy, Joy; Molassiotis, Alexander; Finnegan-John, Jenny

    This study aimed to explore the experience of women living with fatigue following chemotherapy for breast cancer. Six focus groups were conducted (n=40); all participants had taken part in a multi-site acupuncture trial. There were three to seven people per focus group. Additionally, two people attended one-to-one interviews and four people provided written responses to the trigger questions. The audiotapes from these sessions were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. Participants raised concerns about fatigue possibly being a symptom of the cancer coming back or a sign of senility. Respondents described the effects of fatigue on relationships, sexuality, social life, home life and returning to work. The Coping with Fatigue booklet ( Macmillan Cancer Support, 2011 ) was discussed in terms of legitimising the experience of cancer-related fatigue and explaining symptoms to family and work colleagues. More research work is required to evaluate non-pharmaceutical interventions and advice to support women living with fatigue after chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  4. Late effects of cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sushma

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy,both reduces the risk of local recurrence and extends overall survival in patients with breast cancer (BC). Concerns have, however, been raised about the risk of acute and chronic side effects in breast cancer survivors as the number of treated individuals is large and their expected survival is long compared to most patients with other malignant diseases. Cardiac toxicity, reproductive dysfunction, pneumonitis (RP),arm lymph edema, neuropathy, skin changes are examples of the wide range of complications that has been associated with adjuvant treatment.

  5. Defining central themes in breast cancer biology by differential proteomics: conserved regulation of cell spreading and focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Sun, Mai; Hood, Brian L; Flint, Melanie S; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease, an observation that underscores the importance of elucidating conserved molecular characteristics, such as gene and protein expression, across breast cancer cell types toward providing a greater understanding of context-specific features central to this disease. Motivated by the goal of defining central biological themes across breast cancer cell subtypes, we conducted a global proteomic analysis of three breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231, and compared these to a model of nontransformed mammary cells (MCF10A). Our results demonstrate modulation of proteins localized to the extracellular matrix, plasma membrane, and nucleus, along with coordinate decreases in proteins that regulate "cell spreading," a cellular event previously shown to be dysregulated in transformed cells. Protein interaction network analysis revealed the clustering of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a fundamental regulator of cell spreading, with several proteins identified as mutually, differentially abundant across breast cancer cell lines that impact expression and activity of FAK, such as neprilysin and keratin 19. These analyses provide insights into conservation of protein expression across breast cancer cell subtypes, a subset of which warrants further investigation for their roles in the regulation of cell spreading and FAK in breast cancer.

  6. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of whole-mount pathology processing for patients with early breast cancer undergoing breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, N.J. Look; Clarke, G.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holloway, C.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obtaining accurate histopathologic detail for breast lumpectomy specimens is challenging because of sampling and loss of three-dimensional conformational features with conventional processing. The whole-mount (wm) technique is a novel method of serial pathologic sectioning designed to optimize cross-sectional visualization of resected specimens and determination of margin status. Methods Using a Markov chain cohort simulation cost-effectiveness model, we compared conventional processing with wm technique for breast lumpectomies. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from the perspective of the Canadian health care system and compared using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (icers) for cost per quality-adjusted life–year (qaly) over a 10-year time horizon. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model with willingness-to-pay (wtp) thresholds of $0–$100,000. Costs are reported in adjusted 2014 Canadian dollars, discounted at a rate of 3%. Results Compared with conventional processing, wm processing is more costly ($19,989 vs. $18,427) but generates 0.03 more qalys over 10 years. The icer is $45,414, indicating that this additional amount is required for each additional qaly obtained. The model was robust to all variance in parameters, with the prevalence of positive margins accounting for most of the model’s variability. Conclusions After a wtp threshold of $45,414, wm processing becomes cost-effective and ultimately generates fewer recurrences and marginally more qalys over time. Excellent baseline outcomes for the current treatment of breast cancer mean that incremental differences in survival are small. However, the overall benefit of the wm technique should be considered in the context of achieving improved accuracy and not just enhancements in clinical effectiveness. PMID:26985143

  8. Survival and disease-free benefits with mastectomy versus breast conservation therapy for early breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Gao, Bo; Cheng, Zhi-Yuan; Jin, Jiaxin; Yang, Ke-Hu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present meta-analysis was to estimate the magnitude of survival and disease-free benefits from mastectomy compared with breast conservation therapy (BCT) in patients with early breast cancer. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Chinese biomedical literature database from their inception to May 2015. All the data were independently extracted from the publications by two reviewers. Results regarding the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in the meta-analysis were expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Nine randomized control trials were eligible for final meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed that mastectomy provided significant benefit in OS compared with BCT (HR 1.09, 95 % CI 1.01-1.19; P = 0.03). Sensitivity analysis gives similar OS estimates (HR 1.12, 95 % CI 1.01-1.25). In the subgroup analysis of patients according to tumor size, the pooled HRs for OS indicated that there is a borderline statistical difference between two arms in the subgroup with tumor size ranging between ≥2 cm and <5 cm (HR 1.09, 95 % CI 1.00-1.19), but subgroup analysis of tumor size <2 cm showed no statistically significant difference in OS (HR 1.08, 95 % CI 0.88-1.33) when comparing the BCT arm with the mastectomy arm. There was no significant difference in DFS between BCT and mastectomy groups (HR 1.08, 95 % CI 0.99-1.18; P = 0.08). Sensitivity analysis also gives similar DFS estimates (HR 1.11, 95 % CI 0.96-1.27). Subgroup analysis indicated that the pooled HRs for DFS did not favor mastectomy arm or BCT arm either in the subgroup with tumor size <2 cm (HR 1.09, 95 % CI 0.78-1.52) or in the subgroup with tumor size ranging between ≥2 cm and <5 cm (HR 1.08, 95 % CI 0.99-1.18) according to tumor size. Five-year OS decreased from 70 to 68 % with BCT. The present meta-analysis indicated that mastectomy might provide slight OS benefit compared with BCT in early

  9. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  10. Natural cures for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Shareef, Munazza; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Sarfraz, Maliha

    2016-05-01

    For centuries, herbs and plants have been used for medicinal purposes and as food as well. This review concerns about different types of plants that retain the immune stimulating and anti-tumor properties. Large variety of active phytochemicals such as carotenoids, flavonoids, ligands, polyphenolics, terpenoids, sulfides, lignans and plant sterols has been identified in different types of herbs. These phytochemicals have different mechanisms of action. They either stimulate the protective enzyme like glutathione transferase or prevent the cell proliferation. This review has centered on the biochemical properties of Allium sativum, Echinacea, Curcuma longa, Arctium lappa, Camellia sinensis, Panax ginseng and Flax seed. Extracts and juices of Withania somnifera, Amoora rohituka, Dysoxylum binectariferum and Vaccinium macrocarpon, respectively also used as anti-breast cancer. The volatile oils and extracts of these herbs and plants inhibit the synthesis of mevalonate that lessen the tumor growth and cholesterol synthesis. PMID:27275107

  11. Manual lymphatic drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ezzo, Jeanette; Manheimer, Eric; McNeely, Margaret L; Howell, Doris M; Weiss, Robert; Johansson, Karin I; Bao, Ting; Bily, Linda; Tuppo, Catherine M; Williams, Anne F; Karadibak, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Background More than one in five patients who undergo treatment for breast cancer will develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). BCRL can occur as a result of breast cancer surgery and/or radiation therapy. BCRL can negatively impact comfort, function, and quality of life (QoL). Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), a type of hands-on therapy, is frequently used for BCRL and often as part of complex decongestive therapy (CDT). CDT is a fourfold conservative treatment which includes MLD, compression therapy (consisting of compression bandages, compression sleeves, or other types of compression garments), skin care, and lymph-reducing exercises (LREs). Phase 1 of CDT is to reduce swelling; Phase 2 is to maintain the reduced swelling. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of MLD in treating BCRL. Search methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, WHO ICTRP (World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trial Registry Platform), and Cochrane Breast Cancer Group’s Specialised Register from root to 24 May 2013. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of women with BCRL. The intervention was MLD. The primary outcomes were (1) volumetric changes, (2) adverse events. Secondary outcomes were (1) function, (2) subjective sensations, (3) QoL, (4) cost of care. Data collection and analysis We collected data on three volumetric outcomes. (1) LE (lymphedema) volume was defined as the amount of excess fluid left in the arm after treatment, calculated as volume in mL of affected arm post-treatment minus unaffected arm post-treatment. (2) Volume reduction was defined as the amount of fluid reduction in mL from before to after treatment calculated as the pretreatment LE volume of the affected arm minus the post-treatment LE volume of the affected arm. (3) Per cent reduction was defined as the proportion of fluid reduced relative to the baseline excess volume, calculated as volume

  12. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  13. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  14. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  15. Impact of breast MRI on surgical treatment, axillary approach, and systemic therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mameri, Claudia S; Kemp, Claudio; Goldman, Suzan M; Sobral, Luiz A; Ajzen, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how often breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brings additional information that influences management of patients with breast cancer concerning surgical treatment, axillary lymph node approach, and systemic therapy. From July 2004 to July 2005, 99 patients recently diagnosed with breast cancer in clinical stages 0, I, and II were prospectively evaluated about their therapeutic plans, at first based on usual protocol (physical examination, mammography and ultrasound) and next going through bilateral breast MR. Examinations were carried out at 1.5 T on five sequences of FSPGR 3D for 90 seconds (four post-gadolinium diethylenetriaminepenta acetic acid 0.16 mM/Kg). Parameters analyzed on MRI were extension of primary lesion; detection of multifocality, multicentricity, or contra lateral lesion; muscular or skin involvement; and presence of lymph node involvement. Pathologic confirmation of additional lesions was achieved by core or excisional biopsy. MRI made 69 additional findings in 53 patients. Fifty-one findings were true-positives (51/69 = 73.9%) including 16 larger single lesions; 18 cases of multifocality; 7 cases of multicentricity; 3 cases of contra lateral lesion; 5 cases of lymph node involvement (one of them involved medial thoracic chain); 1 with muscular involvement; 1 with skin involvement. MRI has changed previous management plans in 44.4% of 99 patients. We observed increase in mastectomies (26.8%) on axillary lymph node dissection (25%) and changes on systemic therapy (20.2%), all because of additional MRI true-positive findings. Breast MRI alters significantly the rate of mastectomy, the approach of axillary chain for staging, and the use of systemic therapy because of its accuracy in evaluating breast cancer local extent. PMID:18476882

  16. Dosimetric Effects of Setup Uncertainties on Breast Treatment Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harron, Elizabeth Christine McCallum, Hazel Mhairi; Lambert, Elizabeth Lyn; Lee, Daniela; Lambert, Geoffrey David

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the dosimetric impact of setup errors during the delivery of radiotherapy to the breast, and use this information to make recommendations on intervention tolerances for portal imaging of breast treatments. Translational and rotational setup errors were simulated for 10 recent breast patients using an Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system. The effect of these errors on the breast and tumor bed target volumes receiving 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose were assessed. For the majority of patients, shifts of up to 10 mm or a 4 deg. patient rotation about the cranio-caudal axis had no significant effect on the dose distribution. Changes in dosimetry were more likely if the reference plan contained large hot or cold spots. For a typical patient, it is estimated that a shift of 5 mm in any one direction, or a 2 deg. patient rotation would not cause more than a 5% change in the target volume receiving between 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose. If combinations of errors occur, greater dosimetric changes would be expected. It is concluded that individual patient shifts of up to 5 mm or rotations about the cranio-caudal axis of 2 deg. or less are unlikely to affect dose-volume histogram parameters by an amount judged as clinically significant. Setup errors exceeding these values may cause large dosimetric changes for some patients, particularly those with larger hot or cold regions in the dose distribution, and intervention is therefore recommended.

  17. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. Quality of evidence A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Main message Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Conclusion Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. PMID:27737976

  18. High-frequency ultrasound for intraoperative margin assessments in breast conservation surgery: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to breast imaging, ultrasound offers the potential for characterizing and distinguishing between benign and malignant breast tissues due to their different microstructures and material properties. The aim of this study was to determine if high-frequency ultrasound (20-80 MHz) can provide pathology sensitive measurements for the ex vivo detection of cancer in margins during breast conservation surgery. Methods Ultrasonic tests were performed on resected margins and other tissues obtained from 17 patients, resulting in 34 specimens that were classified into 15 pathology categories. Pulse-echo and through-transmission measurements were acquired from a total of 57 sites on the specimens using two single-element 50-MHz transducers. Ultrasonic attenuation and sound speed were obtained from time-domain waveforms. The waveforms were further processed with fast Fourier transforms to provide ultrasonic spectra and cepstra. The ultrasonic measurements and pathology types were analyzed for correlations. The specimens were additionally re-classified into five pathology types to determine specificity and sensitivity values. Results The density of peaks in the ultrasonic spectra, a measure of spectral structure, showed significantly higher values for carcinomas and precancerous pathologies such as atypical ductal hyperplasia than for normal tissue. The slopes of the cepstra for non-malignant pathologies displayed significantly greater values that differentiated them from the normal and malignant tissues. The attenuation coefficients were sensitive to fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, and invasive lobular carcinoma. Specificities and sensitivities for differentiating pathologies from normal tissue were 100% and 86% for lobular carcinomas, 100% and 74% for ductal carcinomas, 80% and 82% for benign pathologies, and 80% and 100% for fat necrosis and adenomas. Specificities and sensitivities were also determined for differentiating each pathology type from the other

  19. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  20. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotheapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and periphereal lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (actuarial) is 83%. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder results from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications, 18 were mild and 3 were serious.These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned. The results also compared with the great majority of surgical series reported in the literature, allowing us to conclude that patients treated with radiation have nothing to lose and much to gain by preserving the breast.

  1. New Treatment Option for Young Women with Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment option for young women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer Posted: June 1, 2014 Contact: NCI Press Office 301-496-6641 A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a ...

  2. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carla, Ripamonti; Fabio, Trippa; Gloria, Barone; Ernesto, Maranzano

    2013-01-01

    In breast cancer patients, bone is the most common site of metastases. Medical therapies are the basic therapy to prevent distant metastases and recurrence and to cure them. Radiotherapy has a primary role in pain relief, recalcification and stabilization of the bone, as well as the reduction of the risk of complications (e.g., bone fractures, spinal cord compression). Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclastic-mediated bone resorption are a well-established, standard-of-care treatment option to reduce the frequency, severity and time of onset of the skeletal related events in breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Moreover bisphosphonates prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss. Recent data shows the anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates, in particular, in postmenopausal women and in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression. Pain is the most frequent symptom reported in patients with bone metastases, and its prevention and treatment must be considered at any stage of the disease. The prevention and treatment of bone metastases in breast cancer must consider an integrated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26237068

  3. Primary female breast sarcoma: clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming; Mackley, Heath B.; Drabick, Joseph J.; Harvey, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast sarcoma (PBS) is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies with limited publications. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics of PBS and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Median age of PBS was 55–59 years and median OS was 108 months. Age, overlap or entire breast involvement, tumor histology, and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. In the multivariable analysis, tumor size, lymph node involvement, distant metastasis and histologic grade were correlated with survival outcomes (P < 0.001). In M0 patients, mastectomy was associated with worse survival outcomes compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR], 1.80; 95% CI, 1.31–2.47), regardless of tumor size, tumor grade, tumor histology or radiation history. Adjuvant radiation improved survival outcomes in patients with tumor size >5 cm (adjHR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43–0.91), but not in patients with tumor size ≤ 5 cm. Our study demonstrated clinicopathological characteristics of PBS in the US population and supports performing BCS if R0 resection can be achieved, with radiation if tumor size is over 5 cm. PMID:27510467

  4. Primary female breast sarcoma: clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Mackley, Heath B; Drabick, Joseph J; Harvey, Harold A

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast sarcoma (PBS) is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies with limited publications. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics of PBS and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Median age of PBS was 55-59 years and median OS was 108 months. Age, overlap or entire breast involvement, tumor histology, and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. In the multivariable analysis, tumor size, lymph node involvement, distant metastasis and histologic grade were correlated with survival outcomes (P < 0.001). In M0 patients, mastectomy was associated with worse survival outcomes compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR], 1.80; 95% CI, 1.31-2.47), regardless of tumor size, tumor grade, tumor histology or radiation history. Adjuvant radiation improved survival outcomes in patients with tumor size >5 cm (adjHR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.91), but not in patients with tumor size ≤ 5 cm. Our study demonstrated clinicopathological characteristics of PBS in the US population and supports performing BCS if R0 resection can be achieved, with radiation if tumor size is over 5 cm. PMID:27510467

  5. Local regional effectiveness of surgery and radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, E.D.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1985-05-01

    Although gross tumor can be controlled with high doses of radiation therapy, control is achieved at the expense of severe radiation sequelae. In order to improve tumor control with minimum complications, the field of treatment should contain only subclinical disease. This article reviews the successful combination of surgery for the removal of gross cancer and radiation of moderate dose for the treatment of subclinical disease in patients with breast cancer. In patients with clinically favorable and operable disease, the combination of a radical or modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy of 5000 rad to the peripheral lymphatics and chest wall can secure 90% of the treated areas. For patients with locally and regionally advanced breast cancer, the combination of a simple mastectomy and dissection of the lateral axilla followed by postoperative irradiation of 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the chest wall, axilla, and peripheral lymphatic areas will control more than 85% of the patients treated as compared with approximately 70% control when surgery or radiotherapy alone is used, even with chemotherapy. Yet another clinical application of the subclinical disease concept is the successful combination of conservation surgery (whether segmental mastectomy, quadrantectomy, or wide excision) for gross tumor in the breast and axilla and irradiation for residual microscopic and multiple foci of tumor, yielding more than 90% control of locoregional disease with survival rates equal to those patients treated with radical or modified radical mastectomy. Results of multiple clinical trials and reported series are reviewed.

  6. Observed outcomes on the use of oxidized and regenerated cellulose polymer for breast conserving surgery – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rassu, Pier Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidized regenerated cellulose polymer (ORCP) may be used for reshaping and filling lack of volume in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The study aimed to observe both the aesthetic and diagnostic outcomes in patients with different age, BMI, breast volume, and breast tissue composition over 36 months after BCS with ORCP. Patients and methods 18 patients with early breast cancer and with proliferative benign lesions underwent BCS with ORCP that was layered in three-dimensional wafer, and placed into the Chassaignac space between the mammary gland and the fascia of pectoralis major with no fixation. After surgery, patients started a clinical and instrumental 36-month follow-up with mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cytological examination with fine needle aspiration when seroma occurred. Results Below the median age of 66 years old no complications were observed even in case both of overweight, and large breasts with low density. Over the median age seromas occurred with either small or large skin retraction, with the exception of 1 patient having quite dense breasts and low BMI, which had no complications. In elderly patients, 1 case with quite dense breasts and high BMI showed severe seroma and skin retraction, while 1 case with low BMI and less dense breasts highlighted milder complications. Conclusion During 36 months after BCS with ORCP, a significant correlation between positive diagnostic and aesthetic outcomes and low age, dense breasts, and low BMI of patient was observed. Despite of the few number of cases, either low BMI, or high breast density improved the aesthetic outcomes and reduced the entity of complications even in the elderly patients. PMID:26865976

  7. Design and validation of two optical beacons for guidewire localization in breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca Anne; McAleavey, Stephen A; Schiffhauer, Linda M; Zavislan, James

    2013-06-10

    Stereotactically placed guidewires are used for indicating the location of a nonpalpable carcinoma in breast-conserving surgery. Pathologists use the end of the embedded guidewire to guide sectioning during intraoperative margin assessment, but they do not currently have a tool to indicate the location of the guidewire end for informed sectioning. We present analysis and experimental testing of two optical methods for localizing the end of an embedded fiber-optic guidewire: the first uses irradiance emitted from the fiber to indicate the location of the guidewire end, while the second system uses the fiber optic to create a photoacoustic pulse for localization. Both systems locate the end of the guidewire within ±5 mm, which ensures that the lesion of interest is bisected during sectioning. The accuracy of the irradiance-based beacon is influenced by standard margin paints, so the photoacoustic beacon proved more useful under current tissue-handling protocols.

  8. Monitor unit calculations for breast or chest wall treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, P C; Ames, T; Howard-Ames, T; Kohut, H; Heleba, V; Krishnamoorthy, J

    1989-01-01

    Tangential breast fields always "flash" beyond the surface of the patient. Since the portion of the beam that is in air does not contribute scatter, external beam treatment planning computers that utilize stored beam data can lead to dose errors of up to 10%. These errors can be reduced by using an irregular field calculation program to adjust the monitor units to account for the loss of scatter.

  9. Outcomes of conservative treatment for ruptured lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Fang-Da; Liu, Jin-Tao; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The authors set up a prospective study of the effect of conservative treatment on a ruptured lumbar disc herniation in 89 patients, between June 2008 and June 2010. Seventy-two patients (81%) improved, while the other 17 (19%) needed surgery. The JOA score (best possible result: 29) was found to be significantly improved in the 72 patients of the conservative group, at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years (t-test: p < 0.001). At final follow-up, after 2 years, 84.7% of the patients in the conservative group had a good or excellent result. However, if the 17 surgical cases were included, this proportion dropped to 68.5%. The volume of the protrusion decreased significantly in the 72 patients of the conservative group: from 1422.52 +/- 539.10 mm3 to 102735 +/- 585.51 mm3 (paired t-test: p < 0.001). There was a definite correlation, in the conservative group, between the final resorption rate on the one hand and the percentage of combined excellent and good results on the other hand (72 cases; Spearman rank correlation coefficient: r 0.01 = 0.470, p < 0.001). PMID:24563981

  10. A prognosis classifier for breast cancer based on conserved gene regulation between mammary gland development and tumorigenesis: a multiscale statistical model.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingpu; Chen, Baozhen; Guan, Pengfei; Kang, Yujia; Lu, Zhongxian

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel cancer genes for molecular therapy and diagnosis is a current focus of breast cancer research. Although a few small gene sets were identified as prognosis classifiers, more powerful models are still needed for the definition of effective gene sets for the diagnosis and treatment guidance in breast cancer. In the present study, we have developed a novel statistical approach for systematic analysis of intrinsic correlations of gene expression between development and tumorigenesis in mammary gland. Based on this analysis, we constructed a predictive model for prognosis in breast cancer that may be useful for therapy decisions. We first defined developmentally associated genes from a mouse mammary gland epithelial gene expression database. Then, we found that the cancer modulated genes were enriched in this developmentally associated genes list. Furthermore, the developmentally associated genes had a specific expression profile, which associated with the molecular characteristics and histological grade of the tumor. These result suggested that the processes of mammary gland development and tumorigenesis share gene regulatory mechanisms. Then, the list of regulatory genes both on the developmental and tumorigenesis process was defined an 835-member prognosis classifier, which showed an exciting ability to predict clinical outcome of three groups of breast cancer patients (the predictive accuracy 64∼72%) with a robust prognosis prediction (hazard ratio 3.3∼3.8, higher than that of other clinical risk factors (around 2.0-2.8)). In conclusion, our results identified the conserved molecular mechanisms between mammary gland development and neoplasia, and provided a unique potential model for mining unknown cancer genes and predicting the clinical status of breast tumors. These findings also suggested that developmental roles of genes may be important criteria for selecting genes for prognosis prediction in breast cancer. PMID:23565194

  11. A prognosis classifier for breast cancer based on conserved gene regulation between mammary gland development and tumorigenesis: a multiscale statistical model.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingpu; Chen, Baozhen; Guan, Pengfei; Kang, Yujia; Lu, Zhongxian

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel cancer genes for molecular therapy and diagnosis is a current focus of breast cancer research. Although a few small gene sets were identified as prognosis classifiers, more powerful models are still needed for the definition of effective gene sets for the diagnosis and treatment guidance in breast cancer. In the present study, we have developed a novel statistical approach for systematic analysis of intrinsic correlations of gene expression between development and tumorigenesis in mammary gland. Based on this analysis, we constructed a predictive model for prognosis in breast cancer that may be useful for therapy decisions. We first defined developmentally associated genes from a mouse mammary gland epithelial gene expression database. Then, we found that the cancer modulated genes were enriched in this developmentally associated genes list. Furthermore, the developmentally associated genes had a specific expression profile, which associated with the molecular characteristics and histological grade of the tumor. These result suggested that the processes of mammary gland development and tumorigenesis share gene regulatory mechanisms. Then, the list of regulatory genes both on the developmental and tumorigenesis process was defined an 835-member prognosis classifier, which showed an exciting ability to predict clinical outcome of three groups of breast cancer patients (the predictive accuracy 64∼72%) with a robust prognosis prediction (hazard ratio 3.3∼3.8, higher than that of other clinical risk factors (around 2.0-2.8)). In conclusion, our results identified the conserved molecular mechanisms between mammary gland development and neoplasia, and provided a unique potential model for mining unknown cancer genes and predicting the clinical status of breast tumors. These findings also suggested that developmental roles of genes may be important criteria for selecting genes for prognosis prediction in breast cancer.

  12. Multimodal treatment of aggressive forms of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, D; Voiculescu, S; Cristian, D; Constantinescu, F; Popa, E; Burcos, T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aggressive breast cancer is an invasive form with G3, G4 differentiation degree, the absence of receptors for estrogen and progesterone and the absence or presence of HER2 (+ or 3+) gene. The final diagnosis is established by cumulating the clinical, paraclinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis. Material and method: 84 out of 268 aggressive breast cancer cases were presented in the study, which were operated in October 2011-September 2013. The inclusion and exclusion criteria are exposed in the study lot and the treatment schemes. Results: For the study lot (lot A made up of 36 cases, lot B made up of 41 cases, lot C made up of 7 cases) the distribution was presented on age groups, histopathological and immunohistochemical classification, etiologic factors, type of surgery, postoperative staging and complications. Conclusions: The treatment of aggressive breast cancer depends on the level of the aggressiveness of the disease, the biologic status and the age that imposes the order of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgical treatment and target therapy. PMID:25408768

  13. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotherapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and peripheral lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (acturarial) is 83%. There have been 10 failures: 8 distant, 1 local (in axilla, controlled by surgery, actually NED), and 1 local and distant (scar and brain). Both failures were found with 12 months after treatment, and 8/10 of the failures within 24 months. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder resulted from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications 18 were mild and 3 were serious. Of those 3 serious complications (3.6%), 2 were a result of radiotherapy, and one because an ill-advised axillary dissection prior to radiotherapy gave a negative axilla and a serious arm edema and painful shoulder. This was the worst complication in the total of 83 patients. These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned.

  14. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Unnikrishnan, Nandini; Kapoor, Vikram; Arora, Dhruv; Khinnavar, Poonam K.

    2014-01-01

    An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD. PMID:25254122

  15. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. Methods and analysis All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case–control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about ‘fat grafting and breast reconstruction’ and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and

  16. [Prophylaxis, diagnosis and conservative treatment of chronic lower extremities ischaemia].

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, Cezary B

    2005-01-01

    The most frequent cause underlying the chronic lower extremities ischaemia is atheromatosis. As the basic symptom of the disease, intermittent claudication exerts essential impact upon the state of patient's health as it causes the limitation or the loss of the ability of unassisted walking and, effectively, also the deterioration of the quality of his or her life. The discovery of the etiopathogenesis of atheromatosis and correct assessment of risk factors involved are the elementary conditions of proper administering of pharmacological treatment as well as the basis for adequate planning of necessary prophylactic steps. In such cases, the diagnostic process ought to involve obtaining data from the patient's medical history and his or her physical examination, as well as determining his or her ankle-brachial index (ABI) and information derived from ultrasonographic examination performed at non-invasive diagnostics laboratory. The resultant treatment ought to focus on the improvement of the patient's functional efficiency. Before the necessity of surgical treatment is considered it is recommended to determine a plan for conservative treatment. Adequate diagnosis combined with an early commencement of conservative treatment in the cases of chronic lower extremities ischaemia frequently prove effective in arresting the development of the disease and, consequently, render invasive treatment unnecessary--thus resulting in the improvement of patient's quality of life.

  17. Leiomyomas of the kidney: emphasis on conservative diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Romero, Frederico R; Kohanim, Sahar; Lima, Guilherme; Permpongkosol, Sompol; Fine, Samson W; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Leiomyomas are benign mesenchymal tumors that rarely occur in the kidney. We present the reports of three renal leiomyomas diagnosed and treated at our institution during the past 10 years. On the basis of our experience, preoperative diagnosis may be possible through image-guided percutaneous biopsy, and conservative treatment with either expectant management or minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery should always be considered.

  18. Breast cancer in Brazil: epidemiology and treatment challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cecilio, Adma Poliana; Takakura, Erika Tomie; Jumes, Jaqueline Janaina; dos Santos, Jeane Wilhelm; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Panis, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Notwithstanding the advances in tumor research, diagnosis, and treatment, breast cancer is still a challenge worldwide. This global burden of disease has been associated with population aging and the persistence of cancer-related behaviors. The number of women diagnosed with breast cancer has been estimated as increasing, especially in middle-income countries such as Brazil. Estimates from the Instituto Nacional de Câncer (INCA) point to breast cancer as the major malignant neoplasia in Brazilian women and the main cause of death from cancer in the country. This fact has been associated with increased life expectancy, urbanization, and cancer-related behaviors. Given this scenario, it is clear that there is a need for identifying and discussing which factors have substantially contributed to this growing number of cases in Brazil, including access to treatment, prevention and early diagnosis, weaknesses of the local health policy, and intrinsic genetic peculiarities of the Brazilian population. This review aims to address the role of such factors. PMID:25678813

  19. Rheumatoid symptoms following breast cancer treatment: a controlled comparison.

    PubMed

    Andrykowski, M A; Curran, S L; Carpenter, J S; Studts, J L; Cunningham, L; McGrath, P C; Sloan, D A; Kenady, D E

    1999-08-01

    The prevalence of rheumatoid symptoms following breast cancer (BC) treatment was examined. Breast cancer patients (n = 111) who were a mean of 27.6 months postcompletion of BC treatment and 99 otherwise healthy women with benign breast problems (BBP) completed a self-report measure that assessed current joint pain, swelling, and stiffness, as well as measures of quality of life. Results supported a hypothesized link between BC and rheumatoid symptoms: (1) the BC group was more likely to report joint stiffness lasting more than 60 min following morning waking; (2) the prevalence of unilateral or bilateral joint point or swelling was greater (P < 0.10) in the BC group for four of 10 joint-symptom combinations examined, with differences between the BC and BBP groups in upper extremity joint swelling particularly pronounced; and (3) 41% of the BC group reported that current rheumatoid symptoms exceeded those experienced prior to diagnosis. Within the BC group, the data did not support postchemotherapy rheumatism as an explanation for rheumatoid symptoms. Rather, data suggested that symptoms were associated with surgical management of BC. Finally, among women in the BC group with the most severe joint pain, only a minority were receiving medication for these symptoms. Given the relationship between rheumatoid symptoms and quality of life, more systematic research examining potential contributing factors such as menopausal status, concurrent lymphedema, and weight gain is warranted.

  20. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  1. Factors Associated with Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A.; Akingbola, Titilola S.; Hewlett, Sandra A.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Cole, Helen V.; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study…

  2. Breast cancer causes and treatment: where are we going wrong?

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    This discussion paper seeks to provoke thoughts about cancer research in general, and why breast cancer in particular is not yet “curable”. It asks the question – are we looking at the disease in the right way? Should we regard cancer as a progressive state, which is part of aging? Should we tailor treatment to “reset” the system or slow progression rather than try using toxic and aggressive therapy to kill every cancer cell (and sometimes also the patient)? The thesis is presented that we need to revisit our fundamental beliefs about the disease and then ask why we cling to beliefs that clearly are no longer valid. The paper also questions the role of ethics boards in hampering research and discusses the concept that breast cancer is an industry with vested interests involving profiteering by preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic players. Finally, the paper suggests some ways forward based on emerging concepts in system biology and epigenetics. PMID:24648764

  3. Novel targeted agents for the treatment of advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Máximo; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; Alvarez, Ricardo H

    2012-05-01

    The discovery of the molecular processes involved in cancer development has led to the design of an array of targeted agents. These agents, directed to specific proteins in the machinery of cancer cells, interfere with vital cascades involved in cell invasion, metastasis, apoptosis, cell-cycle control and angiogenesis. In breast cancer, the main pathways studied and targeted by drugs are the HER2 pathway, EGFR, VEGF, PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K-M-Tor), IGF/IGFR, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1, HDAC and many others. In this review, we present the most promising studies of these new targeted therapies and novel combination of targeted therapies with cytotoxic agents for the treatment of breast cancer patients. PMID:22571614

  4. Breast-Conservative Surgery With Close or Positive Margins: Can the Breast Be Preserved With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost?

    SciTech Connect

    Guinot, Jose Luis . E-mail: jguinot@fivo.org; Roldan, Susana; Maronas, Maria; Tortajada, Isabel; Carrascosa, Maria; Chust, Maria Luisa; Estornell, Marian; Mengual, Jose Luis; Arribas, Leoncio

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the likelihood of preserving the breast in women who show close or positive margins after conservative surgery for early breast carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Since 1996, 125 women with less than 5 mm or positive margins and positive separate cavity margin sampling were entered in a prospective trial with high-dose radiotherapy. A standard dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast was followed by a high-dose-rate brachytherapy application delivering 3 fractions of 4.4 Gy in 24 hours. The median follow-up was 84 months. Results: There were only seven local recurrences, with an actuarial local control rate of 95.8% at 5 years and 91.1% at 9 years. Actuarial overall and cause-specific survival rates were 92.6% and 95% at 5 years and 86.7% and 90.4% at 9 years, respectively. Late fibrosis was the most common complication, in 30% of patients, with good or excellent cosmetic results in 77%. The final result was that 95.2% of breasts were preserved. Conclusions: Close or positive-margin breast cancer can be well managed with a high-dose boost in a wide tumor bed by means of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This technique can avoid mastectomy or poor cosmetic resection, with minimal risk of local or general failure.

  5. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  6. Long-term Outcomes of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lalani, Nafisha; Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Done, Susan J.; Miller, Naomi; Youngson, Bruce; Tuck, Alan; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Chang, Martin C.; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Whole-breast radiation therapy (XRT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may decrease the risk of local recurrence, but the optimal dose regimen remains unclear. Past studies administered 50 Gy in 25 fractions (conventional); however, treatment pattern studies report that hypofractionated (HF) regimens (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) are frequently used. We report the impact of HF (vs conventional) on the risk of local recurrence after BCS for DCIS. Methods and Materials: All women with DCIS treated with BCS and XRT in Ontario, Canada from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatment and outcomes were assessed through administrative databases and validated by chart review. Survival analyses were performed. To account for systematic differences between women treated with alternate regimens, we used a propensity score adjustment approach. Results: We identified 1609 women, of whom 971 (60%) received conventional regimens and 638 (40%) received HF. A total of 489 patients (30%) received a boost dose, of whom 143 (15%) received conventional radiation therapy and 346 (54%) received HF. The median follow-up time was 9.2 years. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-65 years). On univariate analyses, the 10-year actuarial local recurrence–free survival was 86% for conventional radiation therapy and 89% for HF (P=.03). On multivariable analyses, age <45 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4; P<.0001), high (HR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.3; P=.02) or intermediate nuclear grade (HR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.6; P=.04), and positive resection margins (HR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.1; P=.05) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. HF was not significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence compared with conventional radiation therapy on multivariate analysis (HR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2; P=.34). Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence among individuals treated with HF regimens

  7. The use of sequential X-ray, CT and MRI in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyu; Tan, Hongna; Gao, Jianbo; Wei, Yan; Yu, Zhan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgeries. In total, 76 patients with indications for breast-conserving surgery due to complicated breast cancer participated in the study and were assigned to either control or observation group (n=38 per group). The patients in the control group were evaluated with two sets of random combinations of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT or MRI with ultrasound inspection, whereas the patients in the observation group were evaluated by sequential inspection methods of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI. A comparison of surgery outcomes, incidence of complications, rate of positive surgical margins, and recurrence and survival rates in the groups during a follow-up period of 24 months was made. Comparisons of the preoperative evaluation results for tumor number, average maximum diameter, number of lymphatic metastatic groups and number of metastatic lymph nodes in the observation group showed the numbers to be significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conversely, the comparisons of age, tumor distribution and T-staging yielded no significant differences, validating the analysis. The percentage of successful breast-conserving surgeries in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the incidence of complications in the observation group was lower (P<0.05). The rate of positive surgical margins and the recurrence rate of cancer in the observation group were lower than those in the control group, and the survival rate in the observation group was higher, with differences having statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, the sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI during the preoperative evaluation for breast-conserving surgery positively affects

  8. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  9. Conservative treatment of a femoral neck fracture following nail removal.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Claudio; Dondi, Alessandra; Pietrogrande, Luca

    2013-07-01

    With increased longevity, the management of fragility fractures in the elderly is becoming more frequent. In particular, hip fractures have considerable importance due to the significant morbidity and mortality. A 67-year-old woman underwent intramedullary nail (IMN) removal inserted for a pertrochanteric fracture that had occurred 20 months earlier. This was indicated due to continuous discomfort related to the protruding apex of the implant over the great trochanter. Due to pain persistence two days after surgery, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed, documenting a minimally displaced impacted subcapital femoral neck fracture. Conservative management with close radiographic follow-up was conducted. After six months, the patient had returned to previous daily activities and a satisfactory range of motion was achieved without pain on walking. The purpose of our paper is to discuss the decision of removing hardware in the elderly osteoporotic patient and to analyze the possibility to conservatively treat an impacted minimally displaced subcapital fracture occurring after the removal of an IMN inserted previously for the treatment of a trochanteric fracture. In the elderly population with decreased bone quality, the removal of intramedullary implants of the proximal femur should be carefully evaluated, and osteoporotic patients undergoing reduction and fixation of femoral fractures should be encouraged to start antiosteoporotic therapy (bisphosphonate, teriparatide) to reduce the risk of further bone loss. Conservative treatment should be considered for the management of lesser symptomatic minimally displaced impacted fractures, where the inherent stability of the fracture allows rapid healing without further surgical attempts.

  10. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631... RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 631.7 Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. (a) The...

  11. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631... RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 631.7 Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. (a) The...

  12. Conservative Treatment for Bilateral Displaced Proximal Humerus Head Fracture.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Corlay, Ruy E; Velutini-Becker, Ricardo; Aguilar-Alcalá, Luis D

    2016-01-01

    Proximal humerus fracture represents five to eight percent of all fractures and is twice as common in women than in men. Most cases of displaced fracture of the proximal humerus are treated surgically; it is probable that more cases are preferred to be treated surgically greater than required. The optimal treatment for these fractures remains controversial, but physicians have a tendency to treat via open reduction and fixation with angular locking plates or glenohumeral arthroplasty.  We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with bilateral displaced proximal humeral fracture. Conservative treatment was initiated with two hanging casts, achieving radiological reduction on week one. After two additional weeks of casting, treatment continued with radiologic control and home physical therapy, ultimately an excellent functional outcome and adequate radiological reduction was obtained.    Even in bilaterally displaced proximal humerus fractures, conservative treatment can be an efficient option, reducing complications, reaching adequate functional results and acceptable radiographic reduction.​. PMID:27489750

  13. Conservative Treatment for Bilateral Displaced Proximal Humerus Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Velutini-Becker, Ricardo; Aguilar-Alcalá, Luis D

    2016-01-01

    Proximal humerus fracture represents five to eight percent of all fractures and is twice as common in women than in men. Most cases of displaced fracture of the proximal humerus are treated surgically; it is probable that more cases are preferred to be treated surgically greater than required. The optimal treatment for these fractures remains controversial, but physicians have a tendency to treat via open reduction and fixation with angular locking plates or glenohumeral arthroplasty.  We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with bilateral displaced proximal humeral fracture. Conservative treatment was initiated with two hanging casts, achieving radiological reduction on week one. After two additional weeks of casting, treatment continued with radiologic control and home physical therapy, ultimately an excellent functional outcome and adequate radiological reduction was obtained.    Even in bilaterally displaced proximal humerus fractures, conservative treatment can be an efficient option, reducing complications, reaching adequate functional results and acceptable radiographic reduction.​ PMID:27489750

  14. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  15. [Conservative treatment of hepatic injuries. Management and course].

    PubMed

    Carles, J; Dubuisson, V; Douws, C; Chahine, Z; Grenier, N; Videau, J

    From January 1986 to June 1994, 252 cases of closed liver trauma were treated in an emergency setting. Non surgical conservative management, after a complete imaging work-up including CT scan in all cases, was applied in 142 cases (56.3%) with no hemodynamic complication. The spontaneous outcome in these cases was quite favourable in 131 (92.2%); all lesions had disappeared in 4 to 36 weeks. Complications were observed in only 6 cases: 2 intrahepatic abscesses managed with percutaneous drainage were not further complicated, 1 biliari fistula required surgical exploration, 1 intrahepatic bilioma was drained percutaneously, 1 disinsertion of the gallbladder was treated by laparoscopy and 1 operation for bleeding was required 48 hours after the trauma in 1 case. No deaths could be directly imputed to the liver trauma, 5 patients died from neurological causes. Non-surgical conservative treatment combined with strict prolonged surveillance is a reliable management option for patients with closed liver trauma. PMID:7648902

  16. [Acute small bowel obstruction: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Schwenter, F; Dominguez, S; Meier, R; Oulhaci-de Saussure, W; Platon, A; Gervaz, P; Morel, P

    2011-06-22

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common clinical syndrome caused mainly by postoperative adhesions. In complement to clinical and biological evaluations, CT scan has emerged as a valuable imaging modality and may provide reliable information. The early recognition of signs suggesting bowel ischemia is essential for urgent operation. However appropriate management of SBO remains a common clinical challenge. Although a conservative approach can be successful in a substantial percentage of selected patients, regular and close re-assessement is mandatory. Any persistance or progression of the critical symptoms and signs should indeed lead to surgical exploration. Here we review the principles of adhesive SBO management and suggest a decision procedure for conservative versus surgical treatment.

  17. Improved Outcomes of Breast-Conserving Therapy for Patients With Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Sreedhara, Meera; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2{sup +} DCIS. Methods and Materials: We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40-52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8-18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. Results: With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup -}, 27 were ER/PR{sup +}HER-2{sup +}, 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup +}, and 6 were ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}HER-2{sup -}. On univariable analysis, HER-2{sup +}was significantly associated with Grade III, ER{sup -}/PR{sup -}, central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2{sup +}. Conclusions: In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated

  18. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, Vratislav; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Bani, Mayada; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was < 3 cm, resection margins were clear by at least 2 mm, no lymph node metastases existed, age was >35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects {>=}Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  19. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  20. Improving size, lymph node metastatic rate, breast conservation, and mortality of invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island women, a well-screened population.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Natalie G; Cady, Blake; Fulton, John P; Law, Calvin; Chung, Maureen A

    2012-10-01

    The beneficial impact of screening mammography on breast cancer outcome continues to be debated as demonstrated by guidelines published by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. A previous report from Rhode Island, which has a very high rate of mammographic screening, demonstrated significant improvements in invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality through 2001. This report updates data through 2008 to determine whether previous favorable trends continued. Rhode Island Cancer Registry data regarding invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality in 17,522 female residents diagnosed between 1987 and 2008, inclusive, were analyzed for demographic and pathological factors. Data were analyzed by four time periods: 1987-1992, 1993-1998, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008 and overall. Statistically significant improvements occurred over the four successive time periods, in mean cancer size (23.7, 20.9, 19.6, and 19.3 mm, p < 0.0001), pathologic grade (Grade I: 12, 15, 19, and 17 %; Grade III 57, 41, 36, and 35 %, p < 0.0001), breast conserving surgery (38, 56, 67, and 71 %, p < 0.0001) and mortality (37.3, 31.4, 25.1, and 22.6 per 100,000/year, p < 0.0001). The results showed that high screening rates favorably impacted presentation of and mortality from invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island. From 1987 to 2008, there has been a 39 % decline in breast cancer mortality considering 5 year periods (37.3 vs. 22.6 deaths per 100,000) and 41 % comparing the period from 1990 to 2008, which may exceed the goal of 50 % mortality reduction by 2015 established by the American Cancer Society.

  1. Which is better to multiple rib fractures, surgical treatment or conservative treatment?

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Yi; Gao, Zong-Li; Zhao, Tian-Cheng; He, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the surgery and conservative treatment of multiple fractured ribs, we designed a randomized controlled trial in the single center of thoracic surgery ward. After admission condition assessment (general clinical evaluation, operation condition assessment, the digital method of pain assessment), the selected multiple fractured rib patients were told to choose surgery or conservative treatment, according to the patient will undergo surgery or conservative treatment. In the acute phase, compared with conservative treatment, patients with mechanical ventilation in time (mechanical ventilation time MV) (3.7 ± 1.4 vs. 9.5 ± 4.3), ICU stay time (8.2 ± 4.3 vs. 14.6 ± 3.2), total hospitalization days (15.3 ± 6.4 vs. 26.5 ± 6.9), the incidence of pneumonia (6.7% vs. 19.1%), mortality (1.3% vs. 5.3%) and pain score on patients (3.3 vs. 5.8) of surgical treatment group were significant lower (P < 0.05). The number of tracheostomy in surgical patients with conservative treatment (4 vs. 7) was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In chronic phase, the surgical patients compared with patients with conservative treatment in the chest wall pain (2.9 ± 1.2 vs. 5.6 ± 1.7), chest wall tension (13.3% vs. 57.3%), dyspnea (5.3% vs. 22.4%) and chest wall deformity rate (4% vs. 93.5%) were lower significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the surgical treatment of multiple fractured ribs could ease the acute chest pain, reduce the mechanical ventilation time and incidence of pneumonia, shorten the hospitalization days and total hospitalization days in the ICU and alleviate the forward chest wall discomfort. The speedy recovery and long-term quality of patients' life had improved significantly. PMID:26221350

  2. Which is better to multiple rib fractures, surgical treatment or conservative treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Yi; Gao, Zong-Li; Zhao, Tian-Cheng; He, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    To compare the surgery and conservative treatment of multiple fractured ribs, we designed a randomized controlled trial in the single center of thoracic surgery ward. After admission condition assessment (general clinical evaluation, operation condition assessment, the digital method of pain assessment), the selected multiple fractured rib patients were told to choose surgery or conservative treatment, according to the patient will undergo surgery or conservative treatment. In the acute phase, compared with conservative treatment, patients with mechanical ventilation in time (mechanical ventilation time MV) (3.7 ± 1.4 vs. 9.5 ± 4.3), ICU stay time (8.2 ± 4.3 vs. 14.6 ± 3.2), total hospitalization days (15.3 ± 6.4 vs. 26.5 ± 6.9), the incidence of pneumonia (6.7% vs. 19.1%), mortality (1.3% vs. 5.3%) and pain score on patients (3.3 vs. 5.8) of surgical treatment group were significant lower (P < 0.05). The number of tracheostomy in surgical patients with conservative treatment (4 vs. 7) was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In chronic phase, the surgical patients compared with patients with conservative treatment in the chest wall pain (2.9 ± 1.2 vs. 5.6 ± 1.7), chest wall tension (13.3% vs. 57.3%), dyspnea (5.3% vs. 22.4%) and chest wall deformity rate (4% vs. 93.5%) were lower significantly (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the surgical treatment of multiple fractured ribs could ease the acute chest pain, reduce the mechanical ventilation time and incidence of pneumonia, shorten the hospitalization days and total hospitalization days in the ICU and alleviate the forward chest wall discomfort. The speedy recovery and long-term quality of patients’ life had improved significantly. PMID:26221350

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging- Versus Computed Tomography-Based Target Volume Delineation of the Glandular Breast Tissue (Clinical Target Volume Breast) in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giezen, Marina; Kouwenhoven, Erik; Scholten, Astrid N.; Coerkamp, Emile G.; Heijenbrok, Mark; Jansen, Wim P.A.; Mast, Mirjam E.; Petoukhova, Anna L.; Struikmans, Henk

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine MRI and CT for glandular breast tissue (GBT) volume delineation and to assess interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Fifteen breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and MRI, consecutively, in the treatment position. Four observers (two radiation oncologists and two radiologists) delineated the GBT according to the CT and separately to the MR images. Volumes, centers of mass, maximum extensions with standard deviations (SD), and interobserver variability were quantified. Observers viewed delineation differences between MRI and CT and delineation differences among observers. Results: In cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions, GBT volumes were delineated larger using MRI when compared with those delineated with CT. Center of mass on MRI shifted a mean (SD) 17% (4%) into the cranial direction and a mean 3% (4%) into the dorsal direction when compared with that on the planning CT. Only small variations between observers were noted. The GBT volumes were approximately 4% larger on MRI (mean [SD] ratio MRI to CT GBT volumes, 1.04 [0.06]). Findings were concordant with viewed MRI and CT images and contours. Conformity indices were only slightly different; mean conformity index was 77% (3%) for MRI and 79% (4%) for CT. Delineation differences arising from personal preferences remained recognizable irrespective of the imaging modality used. Conclusions: Contoured GBT extends substantially further into the cranio-lateral and cranio-medial directions on MRI when compared with CT. Interobserver variability is comparable for both imaging modalities. Observers should be aware of existing personal delineation preferences. Institutions are recommended to review and discuss target volume delineations and to design supplementary guidelines if necessary.

  4. Weekly Paclitaxel in the Adjuvant Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Molin; Martino, Silvana; Jones, Vicky; Perez, Edith A.; Saphner, Tom; Wolff, Antonio C.; Sledge, George W.; Wood, William C.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND We compared the efficacy of two different taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, given either weekly or every 3 weeks, in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. METHODS We enrolled 4950 women with axillary lymph node–positive or high-risk, lymph node–negative breast cancer. After randomization, all patients first received 4 cycles of intravenous doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide at 3-week intervals and were then assigned to intravenous paclitaxel or docetaxel given at 3-week intervals for 4 cycles or at 1-week intervals for 12 cycles. The primary end point was disease-free survival. RESULTS As compared with patients receiving standard therapy (paclitaxel every 3 weeks), the hazard ratio for disease-free survival was 1.27 among those receiving weekly paclitaxel (P = 0.006), 1.23 among those receiving docetaxel every 3 weeks (P = 0.02), and 1.09 among those receiving weekly docetaxel (P = 0.29) (with a hazard ratio >1 favoring the groups receiving experimental therapy). As compared with standard therapy, weekly paclitaxel was also associated with improved survival (hazard ratio, 1.32; P = 0.01). An exploratory analysis of a subgroup of patients whose tumors expressed no human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 protein found similar improvements in disease-free and overall survival with weekly paclitaxel treatment, regardless of hormone-receptor expression. Grade 2, 3, or 4 neuropathy was more frequent with weekly paclitaxel than with paclitaxel every 3 weeks (27% vs. 20%). CONCLUSIONS Weekly paclitaxel after standard adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide improves disease-free and overall survival in women with breast cancer. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00004125.) PMID:18420499

  5. Conservative Treatment of Carpometacarpal Dislocation of the Three Last Fingers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Posterior carpometacarpal (CMC) dislocation is a rare condition. Treatment is usually surgical though no strict consensus can be found upon literature review. If diagnosed early and no associated fractures are found, CMC dislocation could benefit from conservative treatment comprising closed reduction and splint immobilisation. We report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with a posterior dislocation of the third, fourth, and fifth CMC joints after a fall of 1.5 meters, treated by external reduction under procedural sedation and immobilisation with a cast for 6 weeks. Evolution was excellent with no relapse observed during follow-up. Our aim is to increase physician awareness of CMC dislocation so that they seek this injury in the emergency department. Unrecognised CMC dislocation can lead to neurovascular injuries as well as chronic instability and early articular degeneration. PMID:27703817

  6. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  7. 76 FR 47518 - Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of “Smart” Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 430 and 431 Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of ``Smart'' Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of...

  8. A systematic review of decision aids for patients making a decision about treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicholas Zdenkowski; Butow, Phyllis; Tesson, Stephanie; Boyle, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Several complex treatment decisions may be offered to women with early stage breast cancer, about a range of treatments from different modalities including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids can facilitate shared decision-making and improve decision-related outcomes. We aimed to systematically identify, describe and appraise the literature on treatment decision aids for women with early breast cancer, synthesise the data and identify breast cancer decisions that lack a decision aid. A prospectively developed search strategy was applied to MEDLINE, the Cochrane databases, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and abstract databases from major conferences. Data were extracted into a pre-piloted form. Quality and risk of bias were measured using Qualsyst criteria. Results were synthesised into narrative format. Thirty-three eligible articles were identified, evaluating 23 individual treatment decision aids, comprising 13 randomised controlled trial reports, seven non-randomised comparative studies, eight single-arm pre-post studies and five cross-sectional studies. The decisions addressed by these decision aids were: breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy (+/- reconstruction); use of chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy; radiotherapy; and fertility preservation. Outcome measures were heterogeneous, precluding meta-analysis. Decisional conflict decreased, and knowledge and satisfaction increased, without any change in anxiety or depression, in most studies. No studies were identified that evaluated decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Decision aids are available and improved decision-related outcomes for many breast cancer treatment decisions including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy could not be found, and may be warranted.

  9. Breast conserving therapy with accelerated partial breast versus external beam whole breast irradiation: comparison of imaging sequela and complications in a matched population.

    PubMed

    Monticciolo, Debra L; Biggs, Kelly; Gist, Ashley K; Sincleair, Spencer T; Hajdik, Rodney L; Nipper, Michael L; Schnitker, James B

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the imaging sequela and complications of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with those occurring in patients treated with standard external beam therapy. Patient selection included those who met the criteria for possible ABPI: age 45 or older; cancer stage T1N0M0 or ductal carcinoma in situ 3 cm or less, and negative surgical margins. One hundred and ninety seven had complete records and films available for review. Ninety-seven (49%) were treated with APBI (MammoSite) and 100(51%) were treated with external beam. Image findings for APBI versus external beam were: distortion 90(93%) versus 83(83%), seroma 67(69%) versus 7(7%), skin edema 52(54%) versus 47(47%), increased stroma 75(77%) versus 66(66%), calcifications 10(10%) versus 6(6%), and fat necrosis 12(12%) versus 6(6%). For APBI, skin and stromal edema was more commonly focal. At imaging, the seroma rate was statistically and significantly different between the two treatment modes (p < 0.0001). For patients treated with APBI, seroma formation was not related to balloon size and only weakly related to lumpectomy cavity size. The complication rate was significantly higher for those treated with APBI (36 versus 20%) and the types and treatment of complications differed. There were three recurrences among the APBI group and none among those treated with external beam radiation. PMID:21306469

  10. Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, J.; Stevenson, T.R.; Nahai, F.; Hester, T.R.; Coleman, J.J.; Jurkiewicz, M.J.

    1984-10-01

    Major complications of radiation directed to the breast, axilla, and mediastinum were treated in 54 patients from 1974 to 1983. A classification of these complications facilitates both an understanding of the pattern of injury and the development of a treatment plan. Classification: I. Breast necrosis; II. Radionecrosis and Chest Wall Ulceration; III. Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis with Median Sternotomy Wound Failure After Coronary Revascularization; IV. Brachial Plexus Pain and Paresis; V. Lymphedema and Axillary Cicatrix; VI. Radiation-induced Neoplasia. The treatment has evolved during the 10-year study period to excision of the necrotic wound, including any tumor, and closure with a transposed muscle or musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi (II, III, V) or rectus abdominis (I, II, VI). This strategy reflects a change from primary use of the omentum during the first years of the study. The vascularity, oxygen and antibiotic delivery of these muscle and musculocutaneous flaps promote wound healing, usually with one operation. The transfer of these muscles has not caused significant functional deficits.

  11. Triple-negative breast cancer: treatment challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Joëlle; Lousberg, Laurence; Schroeder, Hélène; Jerusalem, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are defined by the absence of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the absence of HER2 overexpression. These cancers represent a heterogeneous breast cancer subtype with a poor prognosis. Few systemic treatment options exist besides the use of chemotherapy (CT). The heterogeneity of the disease has limited the successful development of targeted therapy in unselected patient populations. Currently, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. However, intense research is ongoing to identify specific targets and develop additional and better systemic treatment options. Standard adjuvant and neoadjuvant regimens include anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, and taxanes. Platinum-based CT has been proposed as another CT option of interest in TNBC. We review the role of this therapy in general, and particularly in patients carrying BRCA germ-line mutations. Available data concerning the role of platinum-based CT in TNBC were acquired primarily in the neoadjuvant setting. The routine use of platinum-based CT is not yet recommended by available guidelines. Many studies have reported the molecular characterization of TNBCs. Several actionable targets have been identified. Novel therapeutic strategies are currently being tested in clinical trials based on promising results observed in preclinical studies. These targets include androgen receptor, EGFR, PARP, FGFR, and the angiogenic pathway. We review the recent data on experimental drugs in this field. We also discuss the recent data concerning immunologic checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27284266

  12. Radiation to the breast. Complications amenable to surgical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J; Stevenson, T R; Nahai, F; Hester, T R; Coleman, J J; Jurkiewicz, M J

    1984-01-01

    Major complications of radiation directed to the breast, axilla, and mediastinum were treated in 54 patients from 1974 to 1983. A classification of these complications facilitates both an understanding of the pattern of injury and the development of a treatment plan. Classification: I. Breast necrosis; II. Radionecrosis and Chest Wall Ulceration; III. Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis with Median Sternotomy Wound Failure After Coronary Revascularization; IV. Brachial Plexus Pain and Paresis; V. Lymphedema and Axillary Cicatrix; VI. Radiation-induced Neoplasia. The treatment has evolved during the 10-year study period to excision of the necrotic wound, including any tumor, and closure with a transposed muscle or musculocutaneous flap of latissimus dorsi (II, III, V) or rectus abdominis (I, II, VI). This strategy reflects a change from primary use of the omentum during the first years of the study. The vascularity, oxygen and antibiotic delivery of these muscle and musculocutaneous flaps promote wound healing, usually with one operation. The transfer of these muscles has not caused significant functional deficits. Images FIG. 1. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A-D. FIG. 4. FIGS. 5A and B. FIGS. 6A-D. FIGS. 7A and B. PMID:6486905

  13. [Monitoring of patients with breast cancer after multimodal treatment].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Marcela Martínez; de la Torre, Celia B Flores; Basurto, Carlos Sánchez; Forgach, Ernesto Sánchez

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is a frequent neoplasm in Latin America. Its control implies surveillance for about 10 years after diagnosis. The possibilities of metastatic disease depend on stage at diagnosis and the treatment administered to the patient. It is important that all medical centers implement their own follow-up that fits its needs. Surveillance must include physical therapy, attention to psychosocial aspects as well as treatment for toxicity, secondary effects, recurrence and second primaries. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) includes monthly self-examination, annual mammography, office visits every three months for the first three years, and then biannual visits for the next two years and then annually. Randomized studies and the Cochrane database have proved that intensive follow-up is of no value compared with periodic appointments and annual mammography. Existing evidence suggests that postoperative surveillance of breast cancer patients is extremely expensive, time consuming and of no benefit in terms of survival. Most of recurrences present out of context from follow up visits. Thus, efficacy of routine doctor visits is questionable and a prospective study is needed to outline the adequate strategy.

  14. Towards an optimal multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer treatment for older women.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Nemica; Menjak, Ines; Trudeau, Maureen; Mehta, Rajin; Wright, Frances; Leahey, Angela; Ellis, Janet; Gallagher, Damian; Moore, Jennifer; Bristow, Bonnie; Kay, Noreen; Szumacher, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer presents specifc concerns that are unique to the needs of older female patients. While treatment of early breast cancer does not vary greatly with age, the optimal management of older women with breast cancer often requires complex interdisciplinary supportive care due to multiple comorbidities. This article reviews optimal approaches to breast cancer in women 65 years and older from an interdisciplinary perspective. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE, choosing articles concentrated on the management of older breast cancer patients from the point of view of several disciplines, including geriatrics, radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, psychooncology, palliative care, nursing, and social work. This patient population requires interprofessional collaboration from the time of diagnosis, throughout treatment and into the recovery period. Thus, we recommend an interdisciplinary program dedicated to the treat ment of older women with breast cancer to optimize their cancer care. PMID:26897863

  15. Frequency and Correlates of Posttraumatic-Stress-Disorder-Like Symptoms after Treatment for Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Matthew J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed Quality Of Life (QOL) and symptoms similar to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women posttreatment for breast cancer. Negatively related PTSD symptomatology to QOL, income, and age. Time since treatment, type of cytotoxic treatment, and stage of disease were unrelated to PTSD symptoms. Suggests that in breast cancer survivors,…

  16. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Naku Ghartey Jnr, Frank; Anyanful, Akwasi; Eliason, Sebastian; Mohammed Adamu, Saanid; Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana. PMID:27635263

  17. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana. PMID:27635263

  18. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana.

  19. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  20. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  2. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  3. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Goyal, Sharad; Harris, Lyndsay; Chung, Gina; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  4. Conservative treatment of retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Pelaz, Andrés Coca; Allende, Ana Vivanco; Llorente Pendás, Jose Luis; Nieto, Carlos Suárez

    2009-07-01

    Parapharyngeal and retropharyngeal infections, which can potentially cause life-threatening complications, could be treated conservatively with no need for surgical drainage. A retrospective analysis of all patients diagnosed with retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal infections was performed. Information regarding age, sex, presenting symptoms, physical examination, laboratory and imaging evaluations, management, duration of hospital stay, and complications were reviewed. Seven children were identified, 4 with retropharyngeal abscess and 3 with parapharyngeal abscess. All but 1 patient were under 7 years old, and all were treated with intravenous amoxicilin/clavulanic acid and corticosteroids. Torticollis and fever were present in all the patients. The mean length of hospital stay was 7 days. There were no complications associated. We demonstrate that retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses can be treated medically, reserving the surgical drainage for complicated cases. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics and corticosteroids is a safe option, reducing the durations of symptoms and the length of hospital stay.

  5. [Lithotripsy in the conservative treatment of salivary stones].

    PubMed

    Vavrina, J; Müller, W; Schlegel, C

    1997-03-25

    Otolaryngologists and generalists as well are commonly involved in the evaluation and management of salivary gland stones. Most patients present with a history of recurrent swelling and pain in the gland, associated with eating. Up to date conservative therapy was limited to the treatment of the acute sialadenitis, which may develop as a consequence of the obstruction and often recurs until the function of the salivary gland ceases. Surgical treatment depends on the location of the calculus. Distal stones can be removed trans-orally by dilatation or incision of the duct, whereas those near the hilus and intraglandular stones required excision of the gland, including the disadvantage of a scar and the risk of injury to cranial nerves. Extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy is a new noninvasive method, which allows to destroy intra- and extraglandular salivary stones, mostly without the need of local or general anesthesia. Reported disintegration rates vary from 14% to 85%, depending on site and size of the calculus. About 80% of the patients remain symptomless Lithotripsy of salivary stones is a cost-effective, additional treatment modality to surgery and may be employed on an outpatient basis.

  6. Quality-of-life considerations in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Toralf; Gerber, Bernd

    2010-10-01

    should not be a contraindication to breast-conserving surgery (BCS) because QOL appears somewhat better after conservative surgical treatment. Avoiding axillary surgery and undergoing sentinel lymph node dissection in elderly patients are both associated with better short-term QOL. However, conventional axillary surgery has little effect on long-term QOL in older women. The advent of innovative radiotherapy techniques has resulted in marked improvements in short-term tolerability together with reductions in the incidence and severity of late normal tissue damage. A potential alternative to conventional postoperative radiotherapy after BCS in the future is the intraoperative radiotherapy technique. Chemotherapy has considerable effects on QOL in breast cancer patients. Most studies found that overall QOL was maintained or improved in patients receiving either aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen but patients reported different adverse effects. For the majority of older breast cancer survivors, cancer-specific well-being and general emotional health do not change substantially after a breast cancer diagnosis. In summary, issues related to baseline co-morbidities in frail elderly, the adverse effects of novel chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel) or target drugs (biologicals) and compliance in the elderly population should receive more attention in evaluations of QOL in elderly breast cancer patients. Future studies that include QOL measurements should also provide details on the data collection and quality control methodologies used. PMID:20883059

  7. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  8. Vitamin D: Are We Ready to Supplement for Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Crew, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a potentially modifiable risk factor that may be targeted for breast cancer prevention and treatment. Preclinical studies support various antitumor effects of vitamin D in breast cancer. Numerous observational studies have reported an inverse association between vitamin D status, including circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, and breast cancer risk. The relationship between vitamin D and mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk, remains unclear. Studies analyzing the link between genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D pathway genes and breast cancer incidence and prognosis have yielded inconsistent results. Vitamin D deficiency among breast cancer patients has been associated with poorer clinical outcomes and increased mortality. Despite a number of clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, the efficacy, optimal dosage of vitamin D, and target blood level of 25(OH)D for breast cancer prevention have yet to be determined. Even with substantial literature on vitamin D and breast cancer, future studies need to focus on gaining a better understanding of the biologic effects of vitamin D in breast tissue. Despite compelling data from experimental and observational studies, there is still insufficient data from clinical trials to make recommendations for vitamin D supplementation for breast cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23533810

  9. Mechanosensitivity in the upper extremity following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, Betty; Boyd, Benjamin S; Byl, Nancy; Dodd, Marylin

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Descriptive, cross-sectional. Introduction Breast cancer (BC) treatments place the nervous system at risk, which may contribute to upper extremity (UE) mechanosensitivity. Purpose of the Study To evaluate elbow extension range of motion (EE-ROM) during upper limb neurodynamic testing (ULNT) post-BC treatment. Methods ULNT EE-ROM was measured for 145 women post-BC treatment. Women were sub-grouped by presence/absence of pain and lymphedema Results Mean EE-ROM during ULNT1 was −22.3° (SD: 11.9°) on the unaffected limb and −25.99° (SD 13.1°) on the affected limb. The women with pain and lymphedema had the greatest limitation in EE-ROM during ULNT1 testing, particularly of their affected limb (−33.8°, SD 12.9). Symptoms were reported more frequently in the affected chest, shoulder, arm, elbow, and hand. The intensity of symptoms was greater at the affected chest (p=0.046), shoulder (p=0.033) and arm (p=0.039). Conclusions Women with lymphedema and pain after BC treatment may present with altered neural mechanosensitivity. PMID:24084387

  10. The impact of age on local control in women with pT1 breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, J J; van der Palen, J; Meerwaldt, J H

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of young age with regard to local control in a prospective cohort of 1085 women with pathological T1 tumours treated with breast conservative treatment (BCT). Patients were divided into two age groups: 40 years or younger, 7.8%, and older than 40 years, 92.2%. With a median follow-up of 71 months, the local recurrence rate was 10.6% in women < or =40 years, and 3.7% in older women. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was significantly different for the two age groups, respectively 89%, < or =40 years, and 97.6%, >40 years (P=0.0046). A separate analysis showed a significantly decreased LRFS for young women with a positive family history, 75.4% versus 98.4% 5-year LRFS for older women. A worse LRFS for young women with a negative lymph node status was also observed, respectively 84% versus 98% 5-year LRFS (both P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, taking into account the pre-treatment and treatment factors, age < or =40 years, was the only significant predictor of a decreased LRFS. Thus, young age is an important factor in relation to local control. In a subset analysis, this significant adverse effect of young age on outcome appears to be limited to the node-negative patients and those with a positive family history. To date, there is no evidence that young women with pT1 breast cancer, treated by mastectomy have an improved outcome when compared with those treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Taking into account results from a subset analysis suggests that giving systemic therapy to a subgroup of women who are < or =40 years, node-negative and/or have a positive family history might give a better local control. PMID:11576834

  11. The impact of age on local control in women with pT1 breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, J J; van der Palen, J; Meerwaldt, J H

    2001-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of young age with regard to local control in a prospective cohort of 1085 women with pathological T1 tumours treated with breast conservative treatment (BCT). Patients were divided into two age groups: 40 years or younger, 7.8%, and older than 40 years, 92.2%. With a median follow-up of 71 months, the local recurrence rate was 10.6% in women < or =40 years, and 3.7% in older women. The local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was significantly different for the two age groups, respectively 89%, < or =40 years, and 97.6%, >40 years (P=0.0046). A separate analysis showed a significantly decreased LRFS for young women with a positive family history, 75.4% versus 98.4% 5-year LRFS for older women. A worse LRFS for young women with a negative lymph node status was also observed, respectively 84% versus 98% 5-year LRFS (both P<0.001). In a multivariate analysis, taking into account the pre-treatment and treatment factors, age < or =40 years, was the only significant predictor of a decreased LRFS. Thus, young age is an important factor in relation to local control. In a subset analysis, this significant adverse effect of young age on outcome appears to be limited to the node-negative patients and those with a positive family history. To date, there is no evidence that young women with pT1 breast cancer, treated by mastectomy have an improved outcome when compared with those treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Taking into account results from a subset analysis suggests that giving systemic therapy to a subgroup of women who are < or =40 years, node-negative and/or have a positive family history might give a better local control.

  12. Liposome-based drug delivery in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, John W

    2002-01-01

    Drug delivery systems can in principle provide enhanced efficacy and/or reduced toxicity for anticancer agents. Long circulating macromolecular carriers such as liposomes can exploit the 'enhanced permeability and retention' effect for preferential extravasation from tumor vessels. Liposomal anthracyclines have achieved highly efficient drug encapsulation, resulting in significant anticancer activity with reduced cardiotoxicity, and include versions with greatly prolonged circulation such as liposomal daunorubicin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. Pegylated liposomal doxorubucin has shown substantial efficacy in breast cancer treatment both as monotherapy and in combination with other chemotherapeutics. Additional liposome constructs are being developed for the delivery of other drugs. The next generation of delivery systems will include true molecular targeting; immunoliposomes and other ligand-directed constructs represent an integration of biological components capable of tumor recognition with delivery technologies. PMID:12052251

  13. Postherpetic neuralgia: clinical experience with a conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Niv, D; Ben-Ari, S; Rappaport, A; Goldofski, S; Chayen, M; Geller, E

    1989-12-01

    Ninety-seven consecutive cases of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) were retrospectively reviewed. Patients comprised 49 women and 48 men with a mean age of 71.6 years. The most common painful locations were the chest and upper back (34%), abdomen and lower back (25.2%), and face (20.2%). Burning pain was the most common type of pain (61.3%). Lancinating pain was reported by 40% and throbbing pain by 22.6%. Treatments included drugs (mainly tricyclic antidepressant, anticonvulsant, and neuroleptic drugs), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and dry needling of muscles in the affected dermatomes. Positive response to treatment occurred in 18.5% of the patients after one visit. In 9.3% of the patients, the pain still could not be controlled after 10 visits of 2-week intervals. TENS proved to be effective in patients whose skin sensation was preserved. It was concluded that in most PHN cases, pain can be effectively controlled by conservative noninvasive therapy.

  14. 76 FR 56126 - Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of “Smart” Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... information (RFI) in the Federal Register (76 FR 47518) to request information on the treatment of ``smart... on ``smart'' appliances published August 5, 2011 (76 FR 47518) if they are received no later than... Parts 430 and 431 Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of ``Smart'' Appliances in Energy...

  15. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  16. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  17. Innovative combination of therapeutic mammoplasty and expandable-implant breast augmentation for immediate partial breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Choo, A.M.H.; Forouhi, P.; Malata, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic mammoplasty is used in the treatment of suitably-sized and appropriately-located breast cancers to achieve adequate cancer excision, resulting in well-shaped but smaller breasts. In patients wishing to maintain or increase their breast size, simultaneous augmentation will be required. Presentation of case A 48-year-old female underwent an “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy”. She required mastectomy for a multifocal cancer of the right breast and breast conservation for a unifocal localised cancer in the upper part of the left breast. She requested right immediate breast reconstruction and hoped for larger breasts than she had. Due to complications during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the right reconstruction plan was changed from a deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap to an implant-based technique. On the left, an extended superomedial pedicle therapeutic mammoplasty was combined with a subpectoral augmentation using an expandable-implant. Discussion The use of expandable-implants for reconstruction of partial mastectomy defects in combination with therapeutic mammoplasty has not been reported. This case report shows that such “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is feasible. Conclusion A “novel” oncoplastic technique herein termed “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is described for partial breast reconstruction during the treatment of a patient with bilateral breast cancer. It enabled adequate treatment of her cancer while reshaping the breast and achieving the desired larger breast size. It should be considered in selected breast-conservation patients who wish to maintain or increase their breast size. PMID:27132043

  18. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winter, M C; Coleman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, significantly reduce the risk of skeletal complications in metastatic bone disease and also prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss (CTIBL). However, more recently, there has been increasing data indicating that bisphosphonates exhibit anti-tumour activity, possibly via both indirect and direct effects, and can potentially modify the metastatic disease process providing more than just supportive care. The evidence from previous studies of an anti-tumour effect of bisphosphonates was inconclusive, with conflicting evidence from adjuvant oral clodronate trials. However, more recent trials using zoledronic acid have shown benefits in terms of disease-free and overall survival outcomes in certain subgroups, most evidently in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression, and in women in established menopause at trial entry. In the adjuvant setting, the use of bisphosphonates has also been focused on the prevention and treatment of CTIBL and recent guidelines have defined treatment strategies for CTIBL. The role of bisphosphonates in CTIBL in early breast cancer is well defined. There have been mixed results from large adjuvant metastasis-prevention studies of bisphosphonates, but there are strong signals from large subgroups analyses of randomised phase III trials suggesting significant anti-tumour beneficial effects in specific patient populations.

  19. Role of breast-feeding in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Huffman, S L; Combest, C

    1990-09-01

    Recent studies have again shown the beneficial effects of breast-feeding in preventing morbidity and mortality from diarrhoea in infants. A case-control study in Brazil has shown that young infants who are not breast-fed have a 25-time greater risk of dying of diarrhoea than those who are exclusively breast-fed. A longitudinal study in the urban slums of Lima, Peru found that exclusively breast-fed infants have a reduced risk of diarrhoeal morbidity when compared with infants receiving only water in addition to breast-milk. Both these studies, along with numerous others in developing countries, point to the need to extend the duration of exclusive breast-feeding to at least 4-6 months. A review of concerned studies throughout the world shows that even in malnourished women, breast-milk output is sufficient to maintain growth of infants up to this age. The addition of early food supplements to infants fed under prevailing environmental conditions in developing countries leads to their increased diarrhoeal attacks and associated reduced food intake. This results in worsened nutritional status of the affected infants. Breast-feeding helps maintain hydration status during diarrhoeal episodes. Studies in Peru, India, and Nigeria have shown that breast-feeding can be continued during diarrhoea when the infants often refuse other foods, specially non-human milk. Thus, breast-feeding is important in providing necessary calories and protein during a time when a loss of appetite for other foods is common. Diarrhoeal disease control programmes need to modify service delivery to ensure that breast-feeding mothers are not separated from their infants while being treated with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) as inpatients or outpatients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) should be given to infants with cup and spoon rather than bottles, in order not to interfere with suckling. When in a health system bottles are used for treatment, an implicit credibility is given to their role in

  20. Incorporating the surgical treatment of symptomatic macromastia into a Breast Cancer Unit: could this be a useful management policy?

    PubMed

    Hernanz, Fernando; Santos, Rosa

    2011-04-01

    Oncoplastic Breast Surgery (OBS) is becoming an integral part of breast cancer management, but training is difficult and not easily available. We propose a bold management policy: the introduction of the reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit (BCU) as treatment for symptomatic macromastia. This management policy could bring about clear advantages both to patients (larged-breasted patients and those with a breast cancer) and surgeons.

  1. [Treatment Ideas and Methods for Treating Breast Cancer Guided by Molecular Classification].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-jie; Wang, Zhao-xia; Wan, Dong-gui; Li, Pei-wen

    2016-04-01

    The gene types of breast cancer can be classified into three types according to its molecules: Luminal type A, Luminal type B, HER-2-positive type, triple negative type. Authors combined pathological characteristics of breast cancer, biological characteristics, and comprehensive treatment, used syndrome typing based medication, and explored treatment meticulous ideas and methods of "treating the same disease with different methods" as well as "different treatment methods in accordance with patients individually". PMID:27323624

  2. Breast Cancer and Married Couples: Research on the Couple and Treatment of the Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ross E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed research on effects of breast cancer on 20 married pairs and extends results to practical aspects of doing such research and attempting treatment of breast cancer patients. Measures of individual psychological adjustment and dyadic adjustment found that both spouses appeared well adjusted and reported excellent quality of life. Interviews…

  3. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  4. [Autologous fat grafting in the breast: oncological implications].

    PubMed

    Nizet, J-L; Gonzalez, A; Peulen, O; Castronovo, V

    2011-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting for breast is increasing dramatically. This fat injection needs accurate technical conditions, and shows very good and long-lasting clinical results. Nevertheless, in breast conservative treatment sequellae, fat injection could lead to difficulties in breast imaging, but also there is some concerns about the potential oncologic risks of these procedures.

  5. Australian women's prediagnostic decision-making styles, relating to treatment choices for early breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Budden, Lea M; Pierce, Penny F; Hayes, Barbara A; Buettner, Petra G

    2003-01-01

    Women diagnosed with early breast cancer are now asked by their doctors to choose from a range of options for their preferred medical treatment plan. Little information is known about women's treatment decision-making and therefore nurses do not have evidence to guide this decision support. The aim of this descriptive survey was to investigate the prediagnostic decision-making behavior of a sample (N = 377) of Australian women, regarding their treatment choices for early breast cancer. The data were collected using the Pre-Decision Portfolio Questionnaire (PDPQ) by Pierce (1996), which includes the Michigan Assessment of Decision Styles (MADS). Of 366 participating women, 19.9% strongly agreed to all three items of the MADS factor Deferring Responsibility; 0.3% strongly agreed to all four factors of Avoidance; 32.7% strongly agreed on all four items of Information Seeking; and 63.4% strongly agreed to all five items of Deliberation. Women showed a variety of preferred decision styles, depending on age, education, occupation and employment status. Only 36% of women indicated it was critically important to "get the treatment over as soon as possible;" 55% to "participate in selecting treatment;" and 53% to "read a lot of information:" The understanding of factors that are important to women when they are making decisions for medical treatment is a mandatory step in designing customized evidence-based decision support, which can be delivered by nurses to help women during this distressing experience.

  6. Systemic treatment strategies for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Budhi Singh; Sharma, Suresh C; Chanana, Priyanka; Jhamb, Swaty

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the lack of immunohistochemical expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (EGFR2). Most TNBC has a basal-like molecular phenotype by gene expression profiling and shares clinical and pathological features with hereditary BRCA1 related breast cancers. This review evaluates the activity of available chemotherapy and targeted agents in TNBC. A systematic review of PubMed and conference databases was carried out to identify randomised clinical trials reporting outcomes in women with TNBC treated with chemotherapy and targeted agents. Our review identified TNBC studies of chemotherapy and targeted agents with different mechanisms of action, including induction of synthetic lethality and inhibition of angiogenesis, growth and survival pathways. TNBC is sensitive to taxanes and anthracyclins. Platinum agents are effective in TNBC patients with BRCA1 mutation, either alone or in combination with poly adenosine diphosphate polymerase 1 inhibitors. Combinations of ixabepilone and capecitabine have added to progression-free survival (PFS) without survival benefit in metastatic TNBC. Antiangiogenic agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with chemotherapy produced only modest gains in PFS and had little impact on survival. TNBC subgroups respond differentially to specific targeted agents. In future, the treatment needs to be tailored for a specific patient, depending on the molecular characteristics of their malignancy. TNBC being a chemosensitive entity, combination with targeted agents have not produced substantial improvements in outcomes. Appropriate patient selection with rationale combinations of targeted agents is needed for success. PMID:24829859

  7. Oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery in breast cancer treatment Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Joannis G

    2016-01-01

    Il trattamento chirurgico del carcinoma della mammella ha subito profondi cambiamenti negli ultimi anni. Vari studi hanno dimostrato l’equivalenza in termini di risultati oncologici tra mastectomia e chirurgia conservativa della mammella seguita da radioterapia. La chirurgia conservativa della mammella offre nella maggior parte dei casi risultati favorevoli dal un punto di vista estetico. Ciononostante, in un 10-30% dei casi, i risultati estetici sono deludenti. In questi casi, la chirurgia oncoplastica della mammella che coniuga tecniche di chirurgia oncologica con quelle proprie della chirurgia plastica ha permesso di superare il conflitto tra estensione della resezione tumorale e risultato estetico finale. Varie tecniche di chirurgia oncoplastica sono state proposte e sono sempre più adottate per facilitare la conservazione e preservare l’estetica della mammella. Questa revisione sistematica si propone di valutare i risultati oncologici e cosmetici di chirurgia oncoplastica conservativa conservativa della mammella. Questo lavoro è stata condotto usando dei criteri ben definiti di inclusione ed esclusione, per gli articoli pubblicati fino al 31 luglio 2015. Un totale di 106 articoli sono stati identificati per potenziale inclusione ed esaminati in dettaglio. Dopo una selezione adeguata, 11 articoli hanno formato la base di questo lavoro. Questo studio è stato inizialmente progettato per identificare e poi revisionare dopo un processo di selezione rigoroso, gli articoli pubblicati con il più alto livello di evidenza su chirurgia oncoplastica della mammella. Revisioni sistematiche e metanalisi, non sono stati inclusi per ragioni metodologiche. I risultati di questo lavoro dimostrano che le ricadute locali adoperando la chirurgia oncoplastica non superano il 7%. Margini liberi sono stati recuperati nel 86% dei casi. Buoni risultati cosmetici sono stati ottenuti in 86% dei casi. Ciononostante, si deve riferire che la maggior parte degli studi pubblicati hanno mostrato delle debolezze significative, tra cui l’assenza di un disegno robusto e limiti metodologici, che influenzano negativamente la generalizzabilità dei risultati. Le attuali evidenze a sostegno dell’efficacia di chirurgia oncoplastica si basano su studi mal progettati e etodologicamente indeboliti. Ulteriori studi e in particolare studi randomizzati controllati, sono tenuti a valutare la sicurezza oncologica e i risultati estetici di chirurgia oncoplastica della mammella, riportando elementi sui risultati oncologici a lungo termine, i risultati estetici e tassi di sopravvivenza delle pazienti trattate con questa tecnica.

  8. A Stable and Conservative Interface Treatment of Arbitrary Spatial Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Nordstrom, Jan; Gottlieb, David

    1998-01-01

    Stable and accurate interface conditions are derived for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The conditions are functionally independent of the spatial order of accuracy and rely only on the form of the discrete operator. We focus on high-order finite-difference operators that satisfy the summation-by-parts (SBP) property. We prove that stability is a natural consequence of the SBP operators used in conjunction with the new boundary conditions. In addition, we show that the interface treatments are conservative. New finite-difference operators of spatial accuracy up to sixth order are constructed: these operators satisfy the SBP property. Finite-difference operators are shown to admit design accuracy (p(sup th)-order global accuracy) when (p - 1)(sup th)-order stencil closures are used near the boundaries if the physical boundary conditions are implemented to at least p(sup th)-order accuracy. Stability and accuracy are demonstrated on the nonlinear Burgers' equation for an twelve-subdomain problem with randomly distributed interfaces.

  9. Can genetic testing guide treatment in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Tutt, Andrew; Ashworth, Alan

    2008-12-01

    In the last 15 years, our understanding of genes that predispose to breast cancer has increased enormously. Germline alleles have been identified that have a modest effect on the risk of breast cancer, but there remain only a handful of genes in which mutation substantially elevates the risk of breast cancer. These include BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PTEN. Whilst breast cancer occurring in patients in Li-Fraumeni and Cowden's syndrome families is of great importance, the more frequent scenario is that of women, or indeed of men, presenting with breast cancer with an underlying germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Should these individuals be treated differently because they have had a breast cancer or are at risk of the disease because of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation? In this review, we consider whether BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation influences the choice of breast screening and breast cancer prevention strategies. Furthermore, for women with an established breast cancer whether their mutation directly influences (1) baseline prognosis, (2) the results of local surgical and radiation therapy, (3) the benefits from adjuvant systemic therapy and finally (4) whether selection or avoidance of particular systemic agents is guided by the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation?

  10. Breast cancer treatment among African American women in north St. Louis, Missouri.

    PubMed

    Connors, Shahnjayla K; Goodman, Melody S; Noel, Lailea; Chavakula, Neeraja N; Butler, Dwayne; Kenkel, Sandi; Oliver, Cheryl; McCullough, Isaac; Gehlert, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    Similar to disparities seen at the national and state levels, African American women in St. Louis, Missouri have higher breast cancer mortality rates than their Caucasian counterparts. We examined breast cancer treatment (regimens and timing) in a sample of African American breast cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2008 while residing in a North St. Louis cluster (eight zip codes) of late stage at diagnosis. Data were obtained from medical record extractions of women participating in a mixed-method study of breast cancer treatment experiences. The median time between diagnosis and initiation of treatment was 27 days; 12.2% of the women had treatment delay over 60 days. These findings suggest that treatment delay and regimens are unlikely contributors to excess mortality rates for African American women diagnosed in early stages. Conflicting research findings on treatment delay may result from the inconsistent definitions of treatment delay and variations among study populations. Breast cancer treatment delay may reduce breast cancer survival; additional research is needed to better understand the points at which delays are most likely to occur and develop policies, programs, and interventions to address disparities in treatment delay. There may also be differences in treatment-related survivorship quality of life; approximately 54% of the women in this sample treated with mastectomies received breast reconstruction surgery. Despite the high reconstruction rates, most women did not receive definitive completion. African American women have higher reconstruction complication rates than Caucasian women; these data provide additional evidence to suggest a disparity in breast reconstruction outcomes by race.

  11. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  12. Ophthalmic Metastasis of Breast Cancer and Ocular Side Effects from Breast Cancer Treatment and Management: Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, Theodore; Koutsandrea, Chryssanthi; Kardara, Evgenia; Ladas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases occurring in women, and its incidence increases over the years. It is the main site of origin in ocular metastatic disease in women, and, due to its hematogenous nature of metastatic spread, it affects mainly the uveal tissue. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the clinical manifestations of the breast cancer ocular metastatic disease, alongside the side effects of the available treatment options for the management and regression of the systematic and ophthalmic disease. PMID:26078956

  13. Lapatinib for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Takeda, A; Picot, J; von Keyserlingk, C; Clegg, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lapatinib for the treatment of advanced or metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The scope included women with advanced, metastatic or recurrent HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who have had previous therapy that includes trastuzumab. Outcomes were time to progression, progression-free survival, response rates, overall survival, health-related quality of life and adverse effects. The submission's evidence came from one randomised controlled trial (RCT) of reasonable methodological quality, although it was not powered to detect a statistically significant difference in mean overall survival. Median time to progression was longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm than in the capecitabine monotherapy arm {27.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.4 to 49.4] versus 18.6 [95% CI 9.1 to 36.9] weeks; hazard ratio 0.57 [95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; p = 0.00013]}. Median overall survival was very similar between the groups [67.7 (95% CI 58.9 to 91.6) versus 66.6 (95% CI 49.1 to 75.0) weeks; hazard ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.12; p = 0.177)]. Median progression-free survival was statistically significantly longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine group than in the capecitabine monotherapy group [27.1 (95% CI 24.1 to 36.9) versus 17.6 (95% CI 13.3 to 20.1) weeks; hazard ratio 0.55 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.74); p = 0.000033]. The manufacturer's economic model to estimate progression-free and overall survival for patients with HER2-positive advanced/metastatic breast cancer who had relapsed following treatment with an anthracycline, a taxane and trastuzumab was appropriate for the disease area. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for lapatinib plus

  14. Interventions to Enhance Breast Cancer Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment among Racial and Ethnic Minority Women

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Christopher M.; Blackman, Dionne J.; Peek, Monica E.

    2009-01-01

    The authors conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify interventions designed to enhance breast cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment among minority women. Most trials in this area have focused on breast cancer screening, while relatively few have addressed diagnostic testing or breast cancer treatment. Among patient-targeted screening interventions, those that are culturally tailored or addressed financial or logistical barriers are generally more effective than reminder-based interventions, especially among women with fewer financial resources and those without previous mammography. Chart-based reminders increase physician adherence to mammography guidelines but are less effective at increasing clinical breast examination. Several trials demonstrate that case management is an effective strategy for expediting diagnostic testing after screening abnormalities have been found. Additional support for these and other proven health care organization-based interventions appears justified and may be necessary to eliminate racial and ethnic breast cancer disparities. PMID:17881627

  15. Racial disparities in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment by hormone receptor and HER2 status

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Li, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Background African American and Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive forms of breast cancer. Disparities within each subtype of breast cancer have not been well documented. Methods Using data from 18 SEER cancer registries, we identified 102,064 women aged 20 years or older, diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2010–2011, and with known stage, hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 status. Associations between race/ethnicity and cancer stage and receipt of guideline concordant treatment were evaluated according to HR/HER2 status. Results Overall, African American and Hispanic women were 30–60% more likely to be diagnosed with stage II–IV breast cancer compared to Non-Hispanic whites. African American women had 40–70% higher risks of stage IV breast cancer across all four subtypes. American Indian/Alaska Native women had a 3.9-fold higher risk of stage IV triple negative breast cancer. African American and Hispanic whites were 30–40% more likely to receive non-guideline concordant treatment for breast cancer overall and across subtypes. Conclusions Women in several racial/ethnic groups are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced stage breast cancer. African American and American Indian/Alaska native women in particular had the highest risk of being diagnosed with stage IV triple negative breast cancer. African American and Hispanic women were also consistently at higher risk of not receiving guideline concordant treatment across subtypes. Impact These findings provide important characterization of which subtypes of breast cancer racial/ethnic disparities in stage and treatment persist. PMID:26464428

  16. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  17. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Christopher; LeRoy, Angie; Karuga, Maryanne

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26247972

  18. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro® polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  19. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro(®) polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  20. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Hiraku Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Kazuya; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  1. Increased Risk of Locoregional Recurrence for Women With T1-2N0 Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Treated With Modified Radical Mastectomy Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Compared With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkarim, Bassam S.; Cuartero, Julie; Hanson, John; Deschênes, Jean; Lesniak, David; Sabri, Siham

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) associated with locoregional treatment of women with primary breast cancer tumors negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (triple-negative breast cancer [TNBC]). Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with TNBC were identified from a cancer registry in a single institution (n=768). LRR-free survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine risk of LRR on the basis of locoregional management: breast-conserving therapy (BCT; ie, lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy [RT]) and modified radical mastectomy (MRM) in the TNBC population and T1-2N0 subgroup. Results At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, 77 patients (10%) with TNBC developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival was 94%, 85%, and 87% in the BCT, MRM, and MRM + RT groups, respectively (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, MRM (compared with BCT), lymphovascular invasion and lymph node positivity were associated with increased LRR. Conversely, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with decreased risk of LRR. For patients with T1-2N0 tumors, 5-year LRR-free survival was 96% and 90% in the BCT and MRM groups, respectively (P =.027), and MRM was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR compared with BCT (hazard ratio, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.12 to 5.75; P= .0264). Conclusion Women with T1-2N0 TNBC treated with MRM without RT have a significant increased risk of LRR compared with those treated with BCT. Prospective studies are warranted to investigate the benefit of adjuvant RT after MRM in TNBC. PMID:21670451

  2. Comparisons of Oncologic Outcomes between Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) and Non-TNBC among Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Jee Ye; Ryu, Jegyu; Park, Seho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The optimum local surgical strategy regarding breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is controversial. To investigate whether BCT is appropriate for patients with TNBC, we evaluated the clinical outcomes of BCT in women with TNBC compared to those of women without TNBC, using a large, single-center cohort. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 1533 women (TNBC n=321; non-TNBC n=1212) who underwent BCT for primary breast cancer between 2000 and 2010. Clinicopathological characteristics, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Tumors from the TNBC group had a higher T stage (T2 37.4% vs. 21.0%, p<0.001), a lower N stage (N0 86.9% vs. 75.5%, p<0.001), and a higher histologic grade (Grade III 66.8% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001) than the non-TNBC group. There were no differences in 5-year LRFS rates between the TNBC and non-TNBC groups (98.7% vs. 97.8%, p=0.63). The non-TNBC group showed a slightly better 5-year OS than the TNBC group; however, the difference was not significant (96.2% vs. 97.3%, p=0.72). In multivariate analyses, TNBC was not associated with poor clinical outcomes in terms of LRFS and OS [hazard ratio (HR) for LRFS=0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10–1.31; HR for OS=1.03, 95% CI: 0.31–3.39]. Conclusion TNBC patients who underwent BCT showed non-inferior locoregional recurrence compared to non-TNBC patients with BCT. Thus, BCT is an acceptable surgical approach in patients with TNBC. PMID:27401651

  3. 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after breast conserving surgery: Correlation with molecular markers of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozguven, Salih; Inanir, Sabahat; Turoglu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; Ugurlu, Mustafa Umit; Gulluoglu, Bahadir

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) early after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in patients with breast cancer (BC) and whether we can determine which molecular biomarkers of breast carcinoma put the patients at risk. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study involved 88 patients with histologically proven T1 or T2 BC, who were treated with BCS and underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT study. The correlation between biological markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2], and Ki-67) of the primary tumor and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings was analyzed. Results: 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated the presence of BC disease (locoregional disease [LRD], distant metastases, or contralateral BC) in 26 of 88 patients (29.5%). Regarding immunohistochemical profiles, BC expressing high levels of Ki-67 were associated with an increased percentage of LRD, which was the major recurrence pattern on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Although the BC disease was observed more commonly in patients with HER2 positivity compared to those of HER2 negative, the difference did not reach statistical significance. The patients with T2 tumor or a higher histopathological grade had a higher percentage of BC disease. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that patients with early stage BC treated with BCS have a remarkable risk of the presence of BC even early after surgery, and there was a clinically important relationship between 18F-FDG PET/CT findings and biological markers of BC. These findings suggest that high-risk molecular biomarkers (Ki-67, HER2) can be taken into account in the decision-making the process for both preoperative imaging and planning of the surgical approach. PMID:27385883

  4. Factors Associated with Persistently Positive Margin Status after Breast-Conserving Surgery in Women with Breast Cancer: An Analysis of the National Cancer Database.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jonathan; Lannin, Donald; Killelea, Brigid; Horowitz, Nina; Chagpar, Anees B

    2016-08-01

    Margin status after definitive breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is a key predictor of local tumor recurrence. This study utilized the National Cancer Database, which captures 70 per cent of all cancer cases nationally, to determine factors associated with persistently positive margins status post-BCS. From 1998 to 2010, there were 1,170,284 patients with stage 0 to 3 breast cancer who underwent BCS. After final definitive surgery, 7.3 per cent of patients had positive margins. On bivariate analysis, persistently positive margin status post-BCS was correlated with patient age, race, ethnicity, comorbidities, facility type and location, tumor size, grade, presence of invasive disease, lymph node positivity, as well as receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, patients who were black, with multiple comorbidities, living in a Pacific state, who had larger, high-grade, node-positive invasive tumors, who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to have persistently positive margins (P < 0.05). Although the goal of BCS is the attainment of negative margins, 7.3 per cent of patients have persistently positive margins after definitive surgery. These patients tend to have more aggressive disease and greater comorbidities, and are less likely to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. PMID:27657593

  5. Five-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing total mastectomy and segmental mastectomy with or without radiation in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Bauer, M.; Margolese, R.; Poisson, R.; Pilch, Y.; Redmond, C.; Fisher, E.; Wolmark, N.; Deutsch, M.; Montague, E.

    1985-03-14

    In 1976 the authors began a randomized trial to evaluate breast conservation by a segmental mastectomy in the treatment of State I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm in size. The operation removes only sufficient tissue to ensure that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. Women were randomly assigned to total mastectomy, segmental mastectomy alone, or segmental mastectomy followed by breast irradiation. All patients had auxillary dissections, and patients with positive nodes received chemotherapy. Life-tables estimates based on data from 1843 women indicated that treatment by segmental mastectomy, with or without breast irradiation, resulted in disease-free, distant-disease-free, and overall survival at five years that was no worse than that after total breast removal. In fact, disease-free survival after segmental mastectomy plus radiation was better than disease-free survival after total mastectomy, and overall survival after segmental mastectomy, with or without radiation, was better than overall survival after total mastectomy. A total of 92.3% of women treated with radiation remained free of breast tumor at five years, as compared with 72.1% of those receiving no radiation. Among patients with positive nodes 97.9% of women treated with radiation and 63.8% of those receiving no radiation remained tumor-free, although both groups received chemotherapy. They conclude that segmental mastectomy, followed by breast irradiation in all patients and adjuvant chemotherapy in women with positive nodes, is appropriate therapy for Stage I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm, provided that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. 23 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Tomatis, Stefano; Valli, Maria Carla; Guzzetti, Renata; Tonoli, Sandro; Bertoni, Filippo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Meregalli, Sofia; Asnaghi, Diego; Arienti, Virginia; Pradella, Renato; Cafaro, Ines

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors.

  7. Does it matter where you live? Treatment variation for breast cancer in Yorkshire. The Yorkshire Breast Cancer Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, R.; Rider, L.; Smith, A.; MacAdam, A.

    1995-01-01

    Over 27,000 patients with breast cancer were identified from cancer registry data from 1978 to 1992 and differences in treatment practice across the 16 districts of Yorkshire studied. A total of 50 surgeons treated more than an average of ten cases a year. Surgeons who expressed an interest in breast cancer were more likely to treat a greater number of patients than those who had no special interest in the disease and offered patients chemotherapy, hormone therapy and radiotherapy more often. The average regional mastectomy rate fell from 70% to 44% over this period, but the rate varied between districts from 13% to 87%, with those at the extremes occupying these positions year on year. The rate of uptake of radiotherapy varied between districts from 13% to 58% over the period 1978-92. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 5% to 19% and hormone therapy from 19% to 80% over this time period. An audit of the facilities available within each district carried out in early 1994 also showed considerable variation, although all districts now have access to a nurse specialist. There were wide variations in treatment offered to patients with breast cancer. Patients in some districts were denied access to chemo- and and radiotherapy despite published guidelines showing these modalities to be useful. It is recommended that patients are referred to units with an interest in breast cancer rather than to general surgical out-patients. PMID:7779723

  8. Is Ki-67 Expression Prognostic for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)?

    SciTech Connect

    Hafeez, Farhaan; Neboori, Hanmanth J.; Harigopal, Malini; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yang, Qifeng; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein whose expression is strongly up-regulated in proliferating cells and can be used to determine the growth fraction in clonal cell populations. Although there are some data to suggest that Ki-67 overexpression may be prognostic for endpoints such as survival or postmastectomy recurrence, further elucidation of its prognostic significance is warranted. Specifically after breast conservation therapy (BCT) (defined in this setting as breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy), whether Ki-67 predicts for locoregional recurrence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess Ki-67 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients to determine whether a significant independent association between Ki-67 and locoregional relapse exists. Methods and Materials: Ki-67 staining was conducted on a tissue microarray of 438 patients previously treated with BCT, and expression was analyzed with clinicopathologic features and outcomes from our database. Results: Ki-67 expression was more prevalent in black patients (37% of black patients vs 17% of white patients, P<.01), younger patients (27% of patients aged ≤50 years vs 15% of patients aged >50 years, P<.01), estrogen receptor (ER)–negative tumors (25% of ER-negative tumors vs 17% of ER-positive tumors, P=.04), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu–positive tumors (35% of HER2-positive tumors vs 18% of HER2-negative tumors, P=.01), and larger tumors (26% of T2 tumors vs 16% of T1 tumors, P=.03). On univariate/multivariate analysis, Ki-67 did not predict for overall survival (74.4% vs 72.6%), cause-specific survival (82.9% vs 82.1%), local relapse-free survival (83.6% vs 88.5%), distant metastasis-free survival (76.1% vs 81.4%), recurrence-free survival (65.5% vs 74.6%), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (81.6% vs 84.7%): P>.05 for all. Conclusions: Ki-67 appears to be a surrogate marker for aggressive disease and

  9. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field.

  10. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field. PMID:27312135

  11. The expanding role of pertuzumab in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Horno, I; Cortés, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer tumors that demonstrate gene amplification or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are classified as HER2-positive. They account for approximately 15% of all breast cancers and represent an adverse prognostic factor. Over the past years, many new therapies have become available for the treatment of breast cancer. Particularly, the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer has developed with the arrival of anti-HER2 targeted therapies that have been proven to increase survival in both the metastatic and early-stage settings of the disease. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting HER2, significantly improves survival in HER2-positive breast cancer. Nevertheless, it is still a challenge to evolve anti-HER2 therapies, as the disease may progress. Pertuzumab inhibits HER2 by binding to a different HER2 epitope than trastuzumab and represents a complementary mechanism of action to trastuzumab. The efficacy and safety of pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab with or without chemotherapy have been demonstrated in both advanced and early stages of HER2-positive breast cancer. Herein, we review the available data on the use of pertuzumab for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26056489

  12. Management of Breast Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cary; McCloskey, Susan A; Peddi, Parvin F

    2016-10-01

    Breast sarcomas are exceptionally rare mesenchymal neoplasms composed of many histologic subtypes. Therapy is guided by principles established in the management of extremity sarcomas. The anatomic site does influence treatment decisions, particularly the surgical management. Surgery should be undertaken with the aim of achieving a widely negative margin. Selected patients can be managed with breast-conserving surgery. Breast reconstruction is increasingly being undertaken for selected patients. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are used selectively for large, high-grade sarcomas for which there is significant concern for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27542642

  13. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  14. Differences in outcome for positive margins in a large cohort of breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, Jan J; Van Der Palen, Job; Ong, Francisca; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H

    2007-01-01

    A study of the possible difference in outcome for positive margins for invasive carcinoma (IC) versus ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and with regard to different age categories in a large prospective cohort of patients with invasive breast cancer. A total of 2 291 BCT were analyzed. Margins were positive for IC in 8.7% and for DCIS in 4.6%. The median follow-up was 83 months. The 10-year local recurrence-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS for women < or = 40 years were 84.4% vs. 34.6% (HR 4.5) vs. 67.5%, and for women >40 years 94.7% vs. 92.6% vs. 82.6% (HR4.2). The 10-year distant disease-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS women < or = 40 years were 72.0% vs. 39.7% (HR 3.4) vs. 77.8%. The disease-specific survival showed a significant relation to positive margins for IC in young women. The effect of positive margin for IC seems to be limited to young women only, and is not only restricted to local control, but also to distant metastasis and survival. On the other hand a positive margin for DCIS is a risk factor for local control in women >40 years. PMID:17453365

  15. Differences in outcome for positive margins in a large cohort of breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Jobsen, Jan J; Van Der Palen, Job; Ong, Francisca; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H

    2007-01-01

    A study of the possible difference in outcome for positive margins for invasive carcinoma (IC) versus ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and with regard to different age categories in a large prospective cohort of patients with invasive breast cancer. A total of 2 291 BCT were analyzed. Margins were positive for IC in 8.7% and for DCIS in 4.6%. The median follow-up was 83 months. The 10-year local recurrence-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS for women < or = 40 years were 84.4% vs. 34.6% (HR 4.5) vs. 67.5%, and for women >40 years 94.7% vs. 92.6% vs. 82.6% (HR4.2). The 10-year distant disease-free survival for negative margins vs. positive margins for IC vs. positive for DCIS women < or = 40 years were 72.0% vs. 39.7% (HR 3.4) vs. 77.8%. The disease-specific survival showed a significant relation to positive margins for IC in young women. The effect of positive margin for IC seems to be limited to young women only, and is not only restricted to local control, but also to distant metastasis and survival. On the other hand a positive margin for DCIS is a risk factor for local control in women >40 years.

  16. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality.

  17. [Neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ena, G

    2011-09-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment is the standard therapy for inflammatory and locally advanced breast cancer but is also applied in patients with primary operable breast cancer to facilitate breast-conserving surgery. Disease-free survival and overall survival are equivalent between patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and patient receiving the same regimen postoperatively. Nevertheless, pathologic complete response can be a predictive indicator of long-term outcomes. Initially encompassing chemotherapy, it is actually extended to hormonotherapy for hormonoresponsive tumor and to targeted therapy such as trastuzumab for the HER2 positive tumor. The neoadjuvant approach of breast cancer will provide better understanding of breast cancer biology and promote translational research. In this paper, a review of the role of preoperative treatment in the management of breast cancer disease is discussed.

  18. Biomarkers and outcome after tamoxifen treatment in node-positive breast cancers from elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Daidone, M G; Luisi, A; Martelli, G; Benini, E; Veneroni, S; Tomasic, G; De Palo, G; Silvestrini, R

    2000-01-01

    The predictive role of tumour proliferative rate and expression of p53, bcl-2 and bax proteins, alone and in association with tumour size, nodal involvement and oestrogen receptors (ER), was analysed on 145 elderly patients (≥70 years of age) with histologically assessed node-positive breast cancers treated with radical or conservative surgery plus radiotherapy followed by adjuvant tamoxifen for at least 1 year. The 7-year probability of relapse was significantly higher for patients with tumours rapidly proliferating (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.0, P = 0.01), overexpressing p53 (HR = 4.4, P = 0.0001), weakly or not exhibiting bcl-2 (HR = 1.9, P = 0.02), without ERs (HR = 3.4, P = 0.0001) or with ≥ 4 positive lymph nodes (HR = 2.3, P = 0.003) than for patients with tumours expressing the opposite patho-biological profile. Conversely, tumour size and bax expression failed to influence relapse-free survival. Adjustment for the duration of tamoxifen treatment did not change these findings. Oestrogen receptors, cell proliferation, p53 accumulation and bcl-2 expression were also predictive for overall survival. Within ER-positive tumours, cell proliferation, p53 accumulation, bcl-2 expression and lymph node involvement provided significant and independent information for relapse and, in association, identified subgroups of patients with relapse probabilities of 20% (low-risk group, exhibiting only one unfavourable factor) to 90% (high-risk group, exhibiting three unfavourable factors). Such data could represent the initial framework for a biologically tailored therapy even for elderly patients and highlight the importance of a patho-biological characterization of their breast cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646876

  19. Prevention and treatment of lymphedema after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Price, J; Purtell, J R

    1997-09-01

    Through personal experience, these two health care professionals discovered that the threat of lymphedema and its risk factors is often underestimated by clinicians. What they learned may help you provide better care for your patients with breast cancer.

  20. Concerns about Breast Cancer, Pain, and Fatigue in Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Primary Treatment.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Chelsea R; Fisher, Hannah M; Antoni, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer often endorse psychosocial concerns prior to treatment, which may influence symptom experiences. Among these, low perceived social support relates to elevated fatigue. Those with low social support perceptions may also experience a greater sense of rejection. We sought to determine if social rejection concerns post-surgery predict fatigue interference 12 months later in women with non-metastatic breast cancer. Depressive symptoms and pain severity after completion of adjuvant therapy (six months post-surgery) were examined as potential mediators. Women (N = 240) with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited 2-10 weeks post-surgery. Multiple regression analyses examined relationships among variables adjusting for relevant covariates. Greater rejection concerns at study entry predicted greater fatigue interference 12 months later (p < 0.01). Pain severity after adjuvant therapy partially mediated the relationship between social rejection concerns and fatigue interference, with significant indirect (β = 0.06, 95% CI (0.009, 0.176)) and direct effects (β = 0.18, SE = 0.07, t(146) = 2.78, p < 0.01, 95% CI (0.053, 0.311)). Therefore, pain levels post-treatment may affect how concerns of social rejection relate to subsequent fatigue interference. Interventions targeting fears of social rejection and interpersonal skills early in treatment may reduce physical symptom burden during treatment and into survivorship. PMID:27571115

  1. Concerns about Breast Cancer, Pain, and Fatigue in Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Primary Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Chelsea R.; Fisher, Hannah M.; Antoni, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer often endorse psychosocial concerns prior to treatment, which may influence symptom experiences. Among these, low perceived social support relates to elevated fatigue. Those with low social support perceptions may also experience a greater sense of rejection. We sought to determine if social rejection concerns post-surgery predict fatigue interference 12 months later in women with non-metastatic breast cancer. Depressive symptoms and pain severity after completion of adjuvant therapy (six months post-surgery) were examined as potential mediators. Women (N = 240) with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited 2–10 weeks post-surgery. Multiple regression analyses examined relationships among variables adjusting for relevant covariates. Greater rejection concerns at study entry predicted greater fatigue interference 12 months later (p < 0.01). Pain severity after adjuvant therapy partially mediated the relationship between social rejection concerns and fatigue interference, with significant indirect (β = 0.06, 95% CI (0.009, 0.176)) and direct effects (β = 0.18, SE = 0.07, t(146) = 2.78, p < 0.01, 95% CI (0.053, 0.311)). Therefore, pain levels post-treatment may affect how concerns of social rejection relate to subsequent fatigue interference. Interventions targeting fears of social rejection and interpersonal skills early in treatment may reduce physical symptom burden during treatment and into survivorship. PMID:27571115

  2. [Primary systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Takada, Masahiro; Toi, Masakazu

    2007-11-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer has achieved a higher response rate with the combination of anthracycline and taxane. Molecular targeted agents, such as trastuzumab, are expected to enhance the effectiveness of treatment. The main objectives of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are to reduce tumor size, increase breast conserving rate, identify treatment response, adjust the following treatment strategy, and develop a new treatment using biological specimens. Recently, there has been an increasing demand to provide a tailored treatment in neoadjuvant chemotherapy with establishment of genetic testing for biological markers and adjustment of therapeutic strategy following identification of the early treatment response. We reviewed recent advances in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  3. [Treatment of psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and the breast feeding : Psychotherapy and other nondrug therapies].

    PubMed

    Kittel-Schneider, S; Reif, A

    2016-09-01

    The majority of women suffering from psychiatric disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding prefer psychotherapy and other nonpharmacological treatment over psychopharmacological treatment although the risk of malformations and postnatal complications in children exposed to psychopharmacological drugs must be regarded as acceptable in moderate to severely ill patients. Data are lacking, but several psychotherapeutic and biological treatments as well as noninvasive brain stimulation procedures have been investigated to treat depressive episodes and anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding. In mild to moderate depressive episodes different psychotherapy treatments and counseling are significantly more effective in reducing depressive symptoms than no treatment.The same seems to be true for anxiety disorders; however, studies on this are sparse. Treatment by telephone and internet also seems to improve symptoms, which is of interest especially in the less flexible group of breast feeding women and for the development of future health care structures. Noninvasive stimulation treatment has been shown to be an effective nonpharmacological therapeutic option. Data for other recent noninvasive brain stimulation treatments and biological treatments as well as exercise therapy are sparse. In severe and delusional cases as well as treatment-resistant depressive episodes, electroconvulsive therapy should be considered in pregnant women. Because several patients prefer nonpharmacological therapy during this period, those should be applied if available and feasible. Regarding nonpharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia during pregnancy and the breast feeding, no recommendation can currently be given.

  4. [Treatment of psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and the breast feeding : Psychotherapy and other nondrug therapies].

    PubMed

    Kittel-Schneider, S; Reif, A

    2016-09-01

    The majority of women suffering from psychiatric disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding prefer psychotherapy and other nonpharmacological treatment over psychopharmacological treatment although the risk of malformations and postnatal complications in children exposed to psychopharmacological drugs must be regarded as acceptable in moderate to severely ill patients. Data are lacking, but several psychotherapeutic and biological treatments as well as noninvasive brain stimulation procedures have been investigated to treat depressive episodes and anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding. In mild to moderate depressive episodes different psychotherapy treatments and counseling are significantly more effective in reducing depressive symptoms than no treatment.The same seems to be true for anxiety disorders; however, studies on this are sparse. Treatment by telephone and internet also seems to improve symptoms, which is of interest especially in the less flexible group of breast feeding women and for the development of future health care structures. Noninvasive stimulation treatment has been shown to be an effective nonpharmacological therapeutic option. Data for other recent noninvasive brain stimulation treatments and biological treatments as well as exercise therapy are sparse. In severe and delusional cases as well as treatment-resistant depressive episodes, electroconvulsive therapy should be considered in pregnant women. Because several patients prefer nonpharmacological therapy during this period, those should be applied if available and feasible. Regarding nonpharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia during pregnancy and the breast feeding, no recommendation can currently be given. PMID:27448177

  5. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2014-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:24771774

  6. Nanotechnology-based treatment for chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Rachman, Ilya M.; Senn, Sean; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-08-01

    Background: Treatment of metastatic cancer remains a formidable clinical challenge. Better therapeutic options with improved tissue penetration and tumor cell uptake are urgently needed. Targeted nanotherapy, for improved delivery, and combinatory drug administration aimed at inhibiting chemo-resistance may be the solution. Purpose: The study was performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of polymeric PEG-PE micelles, co-loaded with curcumin (CUR) and doxorubicin (DOX), and targeted with anti-GLUT1 antibody (GLUT1) against MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: MDA-MB-231 DOX-resistant cells were treated with non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted CUR and DOX micelles as a single agent or in combination. Tumor cells were also inoculated in female nude mice. Established tumors were treated with the micellar formulations at a dose of 6 mg/kg CUR and 1 mg/kg DOX every 2 d for a total of 7 injections. Results: CUR+DOX-loaded micelles decorated with GLUT1 had a robust killing effect even at low doses of DOX in vitro. At the doses chosen, non-targeted CUR and CUR+DOX micelles did not exhibit significant tumor inhibition versus control. However, GLUT1-CUR and GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles showed a significant tumor inhibition effect with an improvement in survival. Conclusion: We showed a dramatic improvement in efficacy between the non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted formulations both in vitro and in vivo. Also, importantly, the addition of CUR to the micelle, has restored sensitivity to DOX, with resultant tumor growth inhibition. Hence, we confirmed that GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles are effective in vitro and in vivo and deserve further investigation.

  7. Successful conservative treatment of chronic atlantoaxial rotatory fixation in a child with torticollis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pei-Te; Chung, Hsin-Yeh; Wang, Jue-Long; Lew, Henry L

    2010-09-01

    A 7-yr-old girl was diagnosed with atlantoaxial rotatory fixation, a serious but treatable cause of acquired torticollis in children and not well known by clinical physicians. Two and a half years after conservative treatment, she had recovered completely. This case report suggests that if the patient has no previous adequate rehabilitation treatment, then conservative treatments are effective for chronic but stable atlantoaxial rotatory fixation.

  8. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  9. Axillary web syndrome following secondary breast-conserving surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Axillary web syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity in the early postoperative period after axillary surgery. Case presentation A patient developed axillary web syndrome after secondary breast surgery and recovered in 3 weeks through physical therapy and using Aescuven Forte. Discussion The pathogenesis of axillary web syndrome is not clear. It is reported that axillary surgery is the main cause. The presented case indicates that tissue injury might be an important cause of axillary web syndrome. Though axillary web syndrome is self-limiting, special physical therapy and Aescuven Forte can shorten the natural duration. Conclusion Secondary breast surgery could cause axillary web syndrome. Physical therapy and Aescuven Forte could shorten the duration of the self-limited morbidity. PMID:23327341

  10. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  11. CE: A Review of Common Oral Treatments for Breast Cancer: Improving Patient Safety in Nononcology Settings.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; DiCenso, Dina; Buckley, Mary; Villanueva, Rosalie

    2016-10-01

    : Breast cancer patients are living longer with the disease than ever before. According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 3 million women in the United States are currently living with a breast cancer diagnosis, and many seek care in nononcology settings, whether for treatment, acute symptoms and complaints related to their cancer diagnosis, or unrelated concerns. Yet many nononcology providers are unfamiliar with the various oral agents used to treat breast cancer, and their possible adverse effects and drug interactions. It is imperative that all providers be aware of these agents and know when a patient is currently taking or has taken them. This article provides an overview of the most common oral treatments for breast cancer and discusses common adverse effects and management.

  12. CE: A Review of Common Oral Treatments for Breast Cancer: Improving Patient Safety in Nononcology Settings.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; DiCenso, Dina; Buckley, Mary; Villanueva, Rosalie

    2016-10-01

    : Breast cancer patients are living longer with the disease than ever before. According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 3 million women in the United States are currently living with a breast cancer diagnosis, and many seek care in nononcology settings, whether for treatment, acute symptoms and complaints related to their cancer diagnosis, or unrelated concerns. Yet many nononcology providers are unfamiliar with the various oral agents used to treat breast cancer, and their possible adverse effects and drug interactions. It is imperative that all providers be aware of these agents and know when a patient is currently taking or has taken them. This article provides an overview of the most common oral treatments for breast cancer and discusses common adverse effects and management. PMID:27655158

  13. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  14. [Conservative treatment of severe renal trauma after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Bruschini, Homero; Torricelli, Fábio; Lopes, Roberto Nicomedes

    2011-01-01

    Subcapsular and perinephric hematomas are relatively common after shock-wave lithotripsy, but high-grade kidney injuries are extremely rare. We present the first case of a high-grade kidney injury after shock-wave lithotripsy managed conservatively. A 57-year-old white female patient with left 1.5cm superior ureteral calculi was submitted to shock-wave lithotripsy.

  15. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  16. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  17. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  18. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Pan, I-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Teressa; Liang, Ji-An; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  19. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  20. Sentinel lymph node metastasis after neoadjuvant treatment in breast cancer: Any size matters?

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Isabel T

    2015-01-01

    One of the advantages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) treatments is its ability to convert patients who need a mastectomy in breast conservative surgery. NAC has also increased the conversion of node positive patients into node negative in around 40% allowing the use of sentinel node biopsy (SLN) in this setting. Timing of SLN biopsy after NAC has been a subject of debate. In patients with clinically node negative before NAC, rates of success and false negative rates of SLN after NAC are similar to those in the adjuvant setting, so SLN after NAC in previous negative axilla has been incorporated in the staging of the axilla. More controversial is its use in patients with positive axillary nodes before NAC who convert to node negative after NAC. Several randomized studies have reported the identification rates and the false negative rates of the SLN after NAC, concordant in the importance of surgical technique. As there is an agreement in the abandon of the immunohistochemistry (IHC) for SLN in the adjuvant setting as SLN IHC detected metastasis appear to have no impact on overall survival, in patients with SLN after NAC the inclusion of isolated tumor cell (ITC) as positive nodes lowers the false negative rates of the technique, suggesting the importance of assessing the SLN by IHC after NAC and considering it as residual disease. Longer follow up is needed to determine the prognostic implications of ITC in the SLN after NAC. PMID:26677431

  1. Lymphedema following breast cancer treatment and impact on quality of life: a review.

    PubMed

    Taghian, Nadine R; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; O'Toole, Jean; Skolny, Melissa N

    2014-12-01

    Lymphedema resulting from breast cancer treatment is a chronic condition which can significantly compromise quality of life. We sought to review various aspects of breast-cancer related lymphedema including measurement techniques, definitions, risk factors, and specifically, impact on physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of women treated for breast cancer. For the purpose of this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed for articles on lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment published since 1997. While improvements in breast cancer therapy have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of lymphedema, the overall negative impact the condition has on patients and survivors has remained unchanged. The development of lymphedema results in physical impairments including compromised function, diminished strength, fatigue, and pain in the affected arm. Affected women may have decreased self-confidence resulting from a distorted body image. Negative emotions reported by women with lymphedema include anxiety, frustration, sadness, anger, fear, and increased self-consciousness. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment remains a significant quality of life issue, with known consequences related to a woman's physical, psychological, and emotional well-being.

  2. Lymphedema following breast cancer treatment and impact on quality of life: a review.

    PubMed

    Taghian, Nadine R; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; O'Toole, Jean; Skolny, Melissa N

    2014-12-01

    Lymphedema resulting from breast cancer treatment is a chronic condition which can significantly compromise quality of life. We sought to review various aspects of breast-cancer related lymphedema including measurement techniques, definitions, risk factors, and specifically, impact on physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of women treated for breast cancer. For the purpose of this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed for articles on lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment published since 1997. While improvements in breast cancer therapy have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of lymphedema, the overall negative impact the condition has on patients and survivors has remained unchanged. The development of lymphedema results in physical impairments including compromised function, diminished strength, fatigue, and pain in the affected arm. Affected women may have decreased self-confidence resulting from a distorted body image. Negative emotions reported by women with lymphedema include anxiety, frustration, sadness, anger, fear, and increased self-consciousness. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment remains a significant quality of life issue, with known consequences related to a woman's physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. PMID:25085806

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  4. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication. PMID:26824094

  5. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  6. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  7. Impact of Radiation in Critical Organs in Radiotherapy Treatment of Breast and Lung Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-02-01

    Various 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques are commonly used in the treatment of cancerous tumors at appropriate prescription doses (PDs). The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of radiation in heart and lungs in left breast and left lung cancer patients treated using 3DCRT techniques. Treatment plans for the eight breast cancer patients (n=8), eight lung cancer patients at early stage (m=8), and eight lung cancer patients at stage II and III (k=8) were evaluated. Relative complication probabilities (RCPs) for the irradiated organs were computed from the plans using HART [Med. Phys. 36, p.2547 (2009)] program at PD. The RCPs were found to be (i) 2.3% (n=8, PD=56 Gy), 6.4% (m=8, PD=30.7 Gy), and 16.7% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the heart, (ii) 1% (n=6, PD=58.4 Gy) for the left lung, and (iii) 7% (m=6, PD=31 Gy) and 5.3% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the whole lung. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages in the treatment of breast cancer. Therefore, simple 3DCRT based whole-breast irradiation and partial lung treatment techniques can offer promising results while adequately sparing the organs in the treatment of breast and lung cancers. )

  8. New developments in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nahta, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 20%–30% of metastatic breast cancers show increased expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) tyrosine kinase. Two HER2-specific therapies are currently approved for clinical treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer. Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody against HER2 and is approved for first-line treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Lapatinib is a small molecule dual inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and HER2 tyrosine kinases, and is approved for trastuzumab-refractory disease. Although trastuzumab is a highly effective therapy for patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, a significant number of patients in the initial clinical trials of trastuzumab monotherapy showed resistance to trastuzumab-based therapy. Further, among those who did respond, the initial trials indicated that the median time to progression was less than 1 year. Similarly, lapatinib is effective in a subset of trastuzumab-refractory cases, but the majority of patients display resistance. This review discusses the multiple molecular mechanisms of resistance that have been proposed in the literature. In addition, novel agents that are being tested for efficacy against HER2-positive breast cancer, including the antibodies pertuzumab and trastuzumab-DM1 and the immunotoxin affitoxin, are reviewed. The introduction of trastuzumab has revolutionized the clinical care of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and has resulted in dramatic reductions in recurrences of early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer. The development and implementation of gene- and protein-based assays that measure potential molecular predictors of trastuzumab resistance will allow individualization of HER2-targeted therapeutic approaches, and may ultimately improve treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23869176

  9. Targeting MCM2 function as a novel strategy for the treatment of highly malignant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shinya; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kurata, Morito; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Highly malignant tumors express high levels of the minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) protein, which is associated with advanced tumor grade, advanced stage, and poor prognosis. In a previous study, we showed that Friend leukemia virus (FLV) envelope protein gp70 bound MCM2, impaired its nuclear translocation, and enhanced DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in FLV-infected hematopoietic cells when the cells expressed high levels of MCM2. Here, we show that MCM2 is highly expressed in clinical samples of invasive carcinoma of the breast, especially triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and in cancer stem cell (CSC) marker-positive breast cancer cells. To generate a cancer therapy model using gp70, we introduced the gp70 protein into the cytoplasm of murine breast cancer cells that express high levels of MCM2 by conjugating the protein transduction domain (PTD) of Hph-1 to gp70 (Hph- 1-gp70). Hph-1-gp70 was successfully transduced into the cytoplasm of breast cancer cells. The transduced protein enhanced the DNA damage-induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, an MCM2-targeted strategy using Hph-1-gp70 treatment to induce DNA damage might be a successful therapy for highly malignant breast cancers such as TNBC and for the eradication of CSC-like cells from breast cancer tissue. PMID:26430873

  10. Dosimetric effects of air pocket sizes in MammoSite treatment as accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Jessica; Blough, Melissa

    2009-12-23

    MammoSite Brachytherapy System had been used as one of the Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) techniques since 2002. The clinical results from several clinical institutions had shown comparable treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity, to other APBI techniques. During MammoSite treatment, air cavities had been one of the primary issues causing treatment cancellation or delay. With the tolerance of the air volume less than 10% of the total Planning Target Volume (PTV) been set, there is still no data available to show the actual dose delivered to the breast tissue with the existence of the air pocket. In this paper, Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP5) was used to model a hypothesis MammoSite phantom with different sizes of air pockets, and compared to the calculation results from the treatment planning system (TPS) without heterogeneous corrections. It was found that without heterogeneous corrections, the difference between the TPS and MCNP5 calculations in the air cavity surface doses and PTV point doses can be up to 2.02% and 3.61%, respectively, with the balloon and air pocket size combinations calculated in this paper. Based on the distance from the point of interest to the balloon surface, an approximate dose can be calculated using the linear relationship found in this study. These equations provide a quick and simple way to predict the actual dose delivered to the breast soft tissue located within the PTV. With the equation applied to the dose from the TPS, the dose error caused by the air pocket during MammoSite treatment can be reduced to the minimum.

  11. Rationale and pre-clinical efficacy of a novel anti-EMP2 antibody for the treatment of invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maoyong; Maresh, Erin L.; Helguera, Gustavo F.; Kiyohara, Meagan; Qin, Yu; Ashki, Negin; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Aziz, Najib; Gordon, Lynn K.; Braun, Jonathan; Elshimali, Yahya; Soslow, Robert A.; Penichet, Manuel L.; Goodglick, Lee; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in biology and medicine, the incidence and mortality due to breast cancer world-wide is still unacceptably high. Thus, there is an urgent need to discover new molecular targets. In this paper, we show evidence for a novel target in human breast cancer, the tetraspan protein epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2). Using tissue tumor arrays, protein expression of EMP2 was measured and found to be minimal in normal mammary tissue, but it was upregulated in 63% of invasive breast cancer tumors and in 73% of triple negative tumors tested. To test the hypothesis that EMP2 may be a suitable target for therapy, we constructed a fully human IgG1 antibody specific for a conserved domain of human and murine EMP2. Treatment of breast cancer cells with the anti-EMP2 IgG1 significantly inhibited EMP2 mediated signaling, blocked FAK/Src signaling, inhibited invasion, and promoted apoptosis in vitro. In both human xenograft and syngeneic metastatic tumor monotherapy models, anti-EMP2 IgG1 retarded tumor growth without detectable systemic toxicity. This anti-tumor effect was in part attributable to a potent ADCC response as well as direct cytotoxicity induced by the monoclonal antibody. Together, these results identify EMP2 as a novel therapeutic target for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24448822

  12. Conservative surgical treatment for a giant thoracoabdominal benign teratoma.

    PubMed

    Catania, A; D'Andrea, V; Panzironi, G; Biancari, F; De Antoni, E

    1997-06-01

    The authors describe an adult patient with a giant, cystic teratoma (33 x 22 x 18 cm) involving the posterior mediastinum and retroperitoneum. A conservative surgical approach consisting of a partial endocystectomy plus injections of tetracycline into the residual cavity, was performed. Two months after surgery, a CT scan showed a 6 x 5 x 3 cm residual cyst. The authors believe that the excision of the inner surface of the cystic lesion and the intracystic administration of tetracycline, may successfully prevent the accumulation of fluid which is the main cause of the progressive enlargement of such benign cystic teratomas.

  13. Human decellularized adipose tissue scaffold as a model for breast cancer cell growth and drug treatments.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Lina W; Huang, Zhao; Meng, Weixu; Fan, Xuejun; Zhang, Ningyan; Zhang, Qixu; An, Zhiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Human adipose tissue extracellular matrix, derived through decellularization processing, has been shown to provide a biomimetic microenvironment for adipose tissue regeneration. This study reports the use of human adipose tissue-derived extracellular matrix (hDAM) scaffolds as a three-dimensional cell culturing system for the investigation of breast cancer growth and drug treatments. The hDAM scaffolds have similar extracellular matrix composition to the microenvironment of breast tissues. Breast cancer cells were cultured in hDAM scaffolds, and cell proliferation, migration, morphology, and drug responses were investigated. The growth profiles of multiple breast cancer cell lines cultured in hDAM scaffolds differed from the growth of those cultured on two-dimensional surfaces and more closely resembled the growth of xenografts. hDAM-cultured breast cancer cells also differed from those cultured on two-dimensional surfaces in terms of cell morphology, migration, expression of adhesion molecules, and sensitivity to drug treatment. Our results demonstrated that the hDAM system provides breast cancer cells with a biomimetic microenvironment in vitro that more closely mimics the in vivo microenvironment than existing two-dimensional and Matrigel three-dimensional cultures do, and thus can provide vital information for the characterization of cancer cells and screening of cancer therapeutics.

  14. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets.

  15. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age {<=} 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  16. Breast Cancer: Conventional Diagnosis and Treatment Modalities and Recent Patents and Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Nounou, Mohamed I.; ElAmrawy, Fatema; Ahmed, Nada; Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Goda, Satyanarayana; Syed-Sha-Qhattal, Hussaini

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide. However, increased survival is due to the dramatic advances in the screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments. Over the course of the last decade, many acquisitions have taken place in this critical field of research in the pharmaceutical industry. Advances in molecular biology and pharmacology aided in better understanding of breast cancer, enabling the design of smarter therapeutics able to target cancer and respond to its microenvironment efficiently. Patents and research papers investigating diagnosis and treatment strategies for breast cancer using novel technologies have been surveyed for the past 15 years. Various nanocarriers have been introduced to improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs, including liposomes, polymeric micelles, quantum dots, nanoparticles, and dendrimers. This review provides an overview of breast cancer, conventional therapy, novel technologies in the management of breast cancer, and rational approaches for targeting breast cancer. HIGHLIGHTS Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. However, survival rates vary widely, optimistically heading toward a positive trend. Increased survival is due to the drastic shift in the screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments. Different strategies of breast cancer classification and staging have evolved over the years. Intrinsic (molecular) subtyping is essential in clinical trials and well understanding of the disease. Many novel technologies are being developed to detect distant metastases and recurrent disease as well as to assess response to breast cancer management. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take novel breast cancer therapeutics to potential clinical application. Most of the recent research papers and patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the breast tumor

  17. [Conservative treatment of facial wrinkles in the hands of the plastic surgeon].

    PubMed

    Brüner, S; Deb, R; Germann, G

    2003-09-01

    The conservative treatment of facial wrinkles is an integral part of the growing market for aesthetic surgery. Unfortunately, physicians of any specialty and even nonphysicians tried to occupy this lucrative field without providing serious information and knowledge about a holistic plastic surgical concept, which includes second- and third-step aesthetic surgical procedures when conservative treatment does not suffice. The following article outlines and critically evaluates the current state of knowledge.

  18. A conservative treatment approach using direct composite resins for anterior teeth eroded by lemon sucking.

    PubMed

    Passos, Vanara Florencio; de Souza, Andre Mattos Brito; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Bombonatti, Juliana Campos Fraga Soares; Santiago, Sergio Lima

    2013-08-01

    An excessively acidic diet results in the progressive deterioration of dental health, with functional, esthetic, and biological consequences. Previously, rehabilitation required placing numerous full crowns and root canal treatments; however, with improved adhesive techniques, a more conservative approach may be utilized to preserve tooth structure. This article describes 2 cases that utilized conservative dental treatments (involving direct composite resins with minimal preparation of the tooth structure) to treat eroded dentition induced by lemon sucking. PMID:23928446

  19. Precision medicine in breast cancer: genes, genomes, and the future of genomically driven treatments.

    PubMed

    Stover, Daniel G; Wagle, Nikhil

    2015-04-01

    Remarkable progress in sequencing technology over the past 20 years has made it possible to comprehensively profile tumors and identify clinically relevant genomic alterations. In breast cancer, the most common malignancy affecting women, we are now increasingly able to use this technology to help specify the use of therapies that target key molecular and genetic dependencies. Large sequencing studies have confirmed the role of well-known cancer-related genes and have also revealed numerous other genes that are recurrently mutated in breast cancer. This growing understanding of patient-to-patient variability at the genomic level in breast cancer is advancing our ability to direct the appropriate treatment to the appropriate patient at the appropriate time--a hallmark of "precision cancer medicine." This review focuses on the technological advances that have catalyzed these developments, the landscape of mutations in breast cancer, the clinical impact of genomic profiling, and the incorporation of genomic information into clinical care and clinical trials.

  20. PERTUZUMAB FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUSLY UNTREATED HER2-POSITIVE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M.B.; Reardon, J.; Olson, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Pertuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed at the dimerization domain of the receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) receptor. It possesses a unique and complimentary mechanism of action compared to trastuzumab, which has historically been the cornerstone of therapy for HER2-amplified breast cancer. Clinical trials demonstrate improved outcomes, with minimal increases in toxicity with the addition of pertuzumab to trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, indicating the advantage of dual HER2 receptor blockade. Pertuzumab is approved as first-line therapy in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, with future opportunities to investigate its efficacy in other stages of breast cancer, as well as in the treatment of other malignancies. PMID:23170307

  1. Prognosis of Treatment Response (Pathological Complete Response) in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikas, Jason B.; Low, Walter C.; Burgio, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Pertaining to the female population in the USA, breast cancer is the leading cancer in terms of annual incidence rate and, in terms of mortality, the second most lethal cancer. There are currently no biomarkers available that can predict which breast cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy with both sensitivity and specificity > 80%, as mandated by the latest FDA requirements. In this study, we have developed a prognostic biomarker model (complex mathematical function) that—based on global gene expression analysis of tumor tissue collected during biopsy and prior to the commencement of chemotherapy—can identify with a high accuracy those patients with breast cancer (clinical stages I–III) who will respond to the paclitaxel-fluorouracil-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy and will experience pathological complete response (Responders), as well as those breast cancer patients (clinical stages I–III) who will not do so (Non-Responders). Most importantly, both the application and the accuracy of our breast cancer prognostic biomarker model are independent of the status of the hormone receptors ER, PR, and HER2, as well as of the ethnicity and age of the subjects. We developed our prognostic biomarker model with 50 subjects [10 responders (R) and 40 non-responders (NR)], and we validated it with 43 unknown (new and different) subjects [10 responders (R) and 33 non-responders (NR)]. All 93 subjects were recruited at five different clinical centers around the world. The overall sensitivity and specificity of our prognostic biomarker model were 90.0% and 91.8%, respectively. The nine most significant genes identified, which comprise the input variables to the mathematical function, are involved in regulation of transcription; cell proliferation, invasion, and migration; oncogenesis; suppression of immune response; and drug resistance and cancer recurrence. PMID:22619502

  2. A role for the androgen receptor in the treatment of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Davis, Carter T; Silberman, Sandra; Spector, Neil; Zhang, Tian

    2016-02-01

    Male breast cancer (BC) is relatively rare, making up less than 1% of all breast cancer cases in the United States. Treatment guidelines for male BC are derived from studies on the treatment of female BC, and are based molecular and clinical characteristics, such as hormone receptor positivity. For female estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers, the standard of care includes three classes of endocrine therapies: selective estrogen receptor modulators, aromatase inhibitors, and pure anti-estrogens. In contrast to female ER+ breast cancers, there is less known about the optimal treatment for male ER+ BC. Furthermore, in contrast to ER, less is known about the role of the androgen receptor (AR) in male and female BC. We report here the treatment of a 28-year-old man with metastatic AR+, ER+ breast cancer otherwise refractory to chemotherapy, who has had a durable clinical response to hormonal suppression with the combination of aromatase inhibition (Letrozole) in conjunction with a GnRH agonist (Leuprolide).

  3. The treatment of breast engorgement with Serrapeptase (Danzen): a randomised double-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kee, W H; Tan, S L; Lee, V; Salmon, Y M

    1989-02-01

    We evaluated an anti-inflammatory enzyme drug Danzen (Serrapeptase: Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd.) on 70 patients complaining of breast engorgement. These patients were randomly divided into 2 groups, a treatment group and a placebo group. A single observer, unaware of the group the patients were in, assessed the severity of each of the symptoms and signs of breast engorgement before treatment was commenced, and daily for 3 days, during which therapy was administered. Danzen was noted to be superior to placebo for improvement of breast pain, breast swelling and induration and while 85.7% of the patients receiving Danzen had "Moderate to Marked" improvement, only 60.0% of the patients receiving placebo had a similar degree of improvement. "Marked" improvement was found in 22.9% of the treatment group and 2.9% of the placebo group. These differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.05). No adverse reactions were reported with the use of Danzen. Danzen is a safe and effective method for the treatment of breast engorgement.

  4. Older patients with breast cancer: is there bias in the treatment they receive?

    PubMed Central

    van de Water, Willemien

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide and as breast cancer incidence increases with increasing age, over 40% of new cases are diagnosed in women older than 65 years of age. However, older patients are not treated to the same extent as younger patients and increasing age at diagnosis predicts deviation from guidelines for all treatment modalities. Evidence-based medicine in older patients is lacking as they are usually excluded from clinical trials often because of existing comorbidities and limited life expectancy. Accordingly, there is a higher competing risk of death from other causes than breast cancer compared with younger patients and this may have led to the false interpretation that prognosis of breast cancer in older patients is relatively good. However, every treatment modality should be evaluated during treatment decision making. Multimodal therapy should not be routinely withheld as data show that disease-specific mortality increases with age, probably due to undertreatment. Prognostic markers, fitness and comorbidities rather than chronological age should determine optimal, individualized therapy. It is recommended that treatment decisions should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting, ideally in combination with any form of geriatric assessment, to improve breast cancer outcome in the older population. PMID:23118807

  5. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  6. Breast density measurements using ultrasound tomography for patients undergoing tamoxifen treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Boyd, Norman; Gierach, Gretchen

    2013-03-01

    Women with high breast density have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Women treated with the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer experience a 50% reduction in risk of contralateral breast cancer and overall reduction of similar magnitude has been identified among high-risk women receiving the drug for prevention. Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce mammographic density, and in the IBIS-1 chemoprevention trial, risk reduction and decline in density were significantly associated. Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an imaging modality that can create tomographic sound speed images of the breast. These sound speed images are useful because breast density is proportional to sound speed. The aim of this work is to examine the relationship between USTmeasured breast density and the use of tamoxifen. So far, preliminary results for a small number of patients have been observed and are promising. Correlations between the UST-measured density and mammographic density are strong and positive, while relationships between UST density with some patient specific risk factors behave as expected. Initial results of UST examinations of tamoxifen treated patients show that approximately 45% of the patients have a decrease in density in the contralateral breast after only several months of treatment. The true effect of tamoxifen on UST-measured density cannot yet be fully determined until more data are collected. However, these promising results suggest that UST can be used to reliably assess quantitative changes in breast density over short intervals and therefore suggest that UST may enable rapid assessment of density changes associated with therapeutic and preventative interventions.

  7. Minimally invasive porcelain veneers: indications for a conservative esthetic dentistry treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Strassler, Howard E

    2007-11-01

    Patients have many restorative options for changing the appearance of their teeth. The most conservative restorative treatments for changing the appearance of teeth include tooth bleaching, direct composite resin veneers, and porcelain veneers. Patients seeking esthetic treatment should undergo a comprehensive clinical examination that includes an esthetic evaluation. When selecting a conservative treatment modality, the use of minimally invasive or no-preparation porcelain veneers should be considered. As with any treatment decision, the indications and contraindications must be considered before a definitive treatment plan is made. Long-term research has demonstrated a 94% survival rate for minimally invasive porcelain veneers. While conservation of tooth structure is important, so is selecting the right treatment modality for each patient based on clinical findings.

  8. Nonisocentric Treatment Strategy for Breast Radiation Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang Xing, Lei; Horst, Kathleen C.; Bush, Karl

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To propose a nonisocentric treatment strategy as a special form of station parameter optimized radiation therapy, to improve sparing of critical structures while preserving target coverage in breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: To minimize the volume of exposed lung and heart in breast irradiation, we propose a novel nonisocentric treatment scheme by strategically placing nonconverging beams with multiple isocenters. As its name suggests, the central axes of these beams do not intersect at a single isocenter as in conventional breast treatment planning. Rather, the isocenter locations and beam directions are carefully selected, in that each beam is only responsible for a certain subvolume of the target, so as to minimize the volume of irradiated normal tissue. When put together, the beams will provide an adequate coverage of the target and expose only a minimal amount of normal tissue to radiation. We apply the nonisocentric planning technique to 2 previously treated clinical cases (breast and chest wall). Results: The proposed nonisocentric technique substantially improved sparing of the ipsilateral lung. Compared with conventional isocentric plans using 2 tangential beams, the mean lung dose was reduced by 38% and 50% using the proposed technique, and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving ≥20 Gy was reduced by a factor of approximately 2 and 3 for the breast and chest wall cases, respectively. The improvement in lung sparing is even greater compared with volumetric modulated arc therapy. Conclusions: A nonisocentric implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy has been proposed for breast radiation therapy. The new treatment scheme overcomes the limitations of existing approaches and affords a useful tool for conformal breast radiation therapy, especially in cases with extreme chest wall curvature.

  9. Sorafenib in breast cancer treatment: A systematic review and overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zafrakas, Menelaos; Papasozomenou, Panayiota; Emmanouilides, Christos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the current role of sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor in the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS An extensive search of the literature until March 2016 was carried out in Medline and clinicaltrials.gov, by using the search terms “sorafenib” and “breast cancer”. Papers found were checked for further relevant publications. Overall, 21 relevant studies were found, 18 in advanced breast cancer (16 in stage IV and two in stages III-IV) and three in early breast cancer. RESULTS Among studies in advanced breast cancer, there were two trials with sorafenib as monotherapy, four trials of sorafenib in combination with taxanes, two in combination with capecitabine, one with gemcitabine and/or capecitabine, one with vinorelbine, one with bevacizumab, one with pemetrexed and one with ixabepilone, three trials of sorafenib in combination with endocrine therapy and two trials in women with brain metastases undergoing whole brain radiotherapy. In addition, there was one trial of sorafenib added to standard chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, and two trials in the neoadjuvant setting. In general, sorafenib was well tolerated in breast cancer patients, though its dosage had to be adjusted in some trials, and discontinuation rates were high, particularly for the combination of sorafenib with anastrozole. Sorafenib monotherapy and combinations with taxanes, bevacizumab and ixabepilone showed inadequate efficacy, while efficacy results from combinations with gemcitabine and/or capecitabine and possibly tamoxifen were more promising. CONCLUSION At present, sorafenib should not be used for the treatment of breast cancer outside of clinical trials and more clinical data are needed in order to support its standard use in breast cancer therapy. PMID:27579253

  10. [Breast cancer: end of treatment issues and set up of nursing follow up in the Italian Switzerland Breast Unit].

    PubMed

    Pedrazzani, Carla; Anelli, Simona; Manganiello, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    It's widely recognized the important role that nurses can have in identifying and managing problems of various kinds resulting from the illness and treatment in survivor cancer patients, so that clinical nursing follow-up programs for cancer patients are now widely diffused internationally. The aim of the following study is the detection of the main physical, emotional, social-familial problems of women with breast cancer followed by the Italian Switzerland Breast Unit, after the end of treatment in order to better target the activation of a nursing follow-up program. This is a descriptive study. Data were collected through a questionnaire mailed to all patients who underwent surgery in the Breast Unit from 2005 to 2009 for a total of 527 patients. The statistical analysis of data was carried out on a total of 202 patients. Fatigue is the physical problem most highlighted by the sample of women (52%), followed by bone pain and / or muscle pain (45.5%) and hot flushes (44.1%). On an emotional level, fear and worry are reported by 40.1% of women, followed by sadness reported by 31.3% of women. Regarding the socio-familial aspect, one of 5 women shows working difficulties (21.2%). Statistically significant correlations are highlighted between some problems and some contextual variables (age, type of treatment, time from the end of treatment). The study has allowed to characterize this population in the specific context and to structure a nursing follow-up program which is active since January 2012.

  11. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  12. Conservative treatments for rheumatoid arthritis in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Anain, Joseph M; Bojrab, Angela R; Rhinehart, Francine C

    2010-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease that attacks peripheral joints, causing their destruction. Several pharmacologic therapies and physical modalities are available for its treatment. Because of the progressive nature of RA, complementary and alternative medicine therapy in conjunction with conventional medicine is administered to patients with RA. This article discusses the presence of undiagnosed RA in the foot and ankle and reviews the concurrent nonoperative measures in treatment, including pharmacologic and physical modalities.

  13. Impact of breast cancer treatments on sleep disturbances - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rute; Fontes, Filipa; Pereira, Susana; Gonçalves, Marta; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2014-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in women with breast cancer; side effects of cancer treatment may worsen pre-existing sleep problems and have been pointed to as important determinants of their incidence. Therefore, we aimed to assess the association between different types of breast cancer treatment and sleep disturbances, through a systematic review. Medline (using PubMed), CINAHL Plus with full text, PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central) were searched from inception to January 2014. Studies that evaluated samples of women with breast cancer, assessed sleep disturbances with standardized sleep-specific measures, and provided data for different cancer treatments were eligible. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies evaluated insomnia, five studies assessed sleep quality, two provide data on general sleep disturbances and two analysed specific sleep parameters. Women submitted to chemotherapy, or radiotherapy, tended to report higher levels of sleep disturbances. More heterogeneous findings were observed regarding the effect of surgical treatment and hormonal therapy. However, a sound assessment of the impact of these treatments was hampered by differences across studies regarding the outcomes assessed, reporting bias and the fact that most studies did not control for the effect of potential confounders. The present review highlights the potential relation between breast cancer treatments and sleep disturbances, particularly of chemotherapy, though more robust evidence is needed for a proper understanding of these associations.

  14. Menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer: prevalence and treatment preferences.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Myra S; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Mittal, Sangeeta; Sikka, Pooja; Ramirez, Amanda-Jane; Fentiman, Ian; Hamed, Hisham

    2004-11-01

    Menopausal symptoms are common and problematic for women receiving adjuvant treatment for breast cancer and management presents a challenge. This cross-sectional descriptive study aimed to investigate the experience of menopausal symptoms, current management and treatment preferences of 113 patients with breast cancer. These women (who were prescribed tamoxifen and were on average 3 years post-diagnosis) were recruited from a breast unit database. They completed the Hot Flush and Night Sweats Questionnaire (HFNSQ), the Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) and subscales of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 and the BR23, as well as questions about treatments. Forty-four of this sample were also interviewed. The prevalence of hot flushes and night sweats was 80 and 72%, respectively (average 30 per week). Having more problematic hot flushes and night sweats were associated with more anxiety and sleep problems (WHQ), and with poorer emotional and social functioning and worse body image (EORTC-QLQ-C30). The women had used a range of treatments for menopausal symptoms but there was often no evidence for the efficacy for many of these treatments. Strongest preferences were for non-medical treatments, particularly vitamins and herbal remedies and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). The evidence for the effectiveness of the former is weak, whereas CBT has been shown to reduce menopausal symptoms, but needs to be evaluated in a population of women who have been treated for breast cancer.

  15. On the Conservative Interface Treatment for Multi-Block Viscous Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Shyy, W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure-based multi-block computational method is developed for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear grid systems. The scheme is based on the semi-implicit type flow solver with the staggered grid. Issues concerning the mass and momentum flux treatments at the discontinuous grid interface are addressed. Systematic numerical experiments for different interface treatments involving (1) straightforward interpolation, (2) globally conservative scheme, and (3) locally conservative scheme have been conducted. It is demonstrated that mass conservation has to be maintained locally, at the grid interface, with accuracy compatible with that of the scheme used in interior domain. Direct interpolation or globally conservative interface treatment of mass flux can not yield solutions with desirable accuracy.

  16. Clinical and radiologic outcomes of surgical and conservative treatment of type III acromioclavicular joint injury.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emilio; López-Franco, Mariano; Arribas, Ignacio M

    2006-01-01

    The management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of posttraumatic anatomic alterations after surgical or conservative treatment of type III injuries and to analyze their effect on the outcome. Forty-three patients were evaluated retrospectively, clinically and radiographically, at a 12-month minimum follow-up. Thirty-two were treated surgically, using the Phemister technique, and 11 had conservative treatment. A comparison of the overall clinical results in both groups showed no statistically significant differences. The acromioclavicular joint was anatomically reduced in only half of the surgical patients. Those shoulders treated surgically showed a significantly higher incidence of osteoarthritis and coracoclavicular ligament ossification. Differences in clavicular deformity or osteolysis were not significant. None of these abnormalities had any influence on the clinical result. Because operative and conservative treatments achieve equally good clinical results and surgery carries a higher risk of osteoarthritis, we recommend managing this injury conservatively.

  17. Survival after local treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacking, E A; Dent, D M; Gudgeon, C A; Prescott, R

    1985-05-25

    A 10-year survival rate of 82% was found in 517 women with early localized breast cancer (pathological stage T1-2N0M0) who had been treated with local therapy alone (total mastectomy and axillary clearance). Factors influencing survival were tumour size (T1 versus T2) and age; patients older than 50 years fared better than younger patients at 5 years but this advantage had disappeared at 10 years. Receptor status influenced disease-free survival, but not survival. Recurrence developed in 93 patients--systemic in 46 and local in 47. Support for the contention that all breast cancer is systemic was thus not found at 10 years, and the value of local therapy alone in node-negative women was endorsed.

  18. Cardiovascular Late Effects and Exercise Treatment in Breast Cancer: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica M; Adams, Scott C; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Jones, Lee W

    2016-07-01

    Advances in detection and supportive care strategies have led to improvements in cancer-specific and overall survival after a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. These improvements, however, are associated with an increase in competing forms of morbidity and mortality, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD). Indeed, in certain subpopulations of patients, CVD is the leading cause of mortality after early breast cancer, and these women also have an increased risk of CVD-specific morbidity, including an elevated incidence of coronary artery disease and heart failure compared with their sex- and age-matched counterparts. Exercise treatment is established as the cornerstone of primary and secondary prevention of CVD in multiple clinical populations. The potential benefits of exercise treatment to modulate CVD or CVD risk factors before, immediately after, or in the months/years after adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer have received limited attention. We discuss the risk and extent of CVD in patients with breast cancer, review the pathogenesis of CVD, and highlight existing evidence from select clinical trials investigating the efficacy of structured exercise treatment across the CVD continuum in early breast cancer. PMID:27343744

  19. CE: Late and Long-Term Sequelae of Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Megan; Keenan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    : More than 12% of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives, and 78% of them can be expected to survive for at least 15 years. More than 2.8 million breast cancer survivors currently reside in the United States. After breast cancer treatment, as many as 90% of survivors report physical problems that can reduce functional ability, produce or exacerbate emotional problems, negatively affect body image, and diminish quality of life. Many survivors will seek care for late and long-term effects of treatment, which will not necessarily be recognized as such by health care providers and appropriately treated. In this article, the authors discuss the underlying causes of late and long-term sequelae of breast cancer treatment and describe effective assessment and management strategies. They focus specifically on the most common and potentially debilitating upper body effects of breast cancer surgery and external radiation therapy: lymphedema, axillary web syndrome, postmastectomy pain syndrome, rotator cuff syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, arthralgias, cervical radiculopathy, and brachial plexopathy. PMID:27171589

  20. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  1. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Trastuzumab in the Adjuvant Treatment for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aboutorabi, Ali; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Salehi, Masoud; Ghiasipour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has shown a significant survival advantage of trastuzumab. Although extant work in developed countries examin