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Sample records for breast therapeutic genetic

  1. Exploring breast with therapeutic ductoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sheldon Marc

    2014-01-01

    Breast lesions are thought to arise mostly from the epithelium of ductal lining. Conventional imaging could only show indirect images of suspected lesions which are confirmed by percutaneous biopsies. However, ductoscopy provides direct images of the ductal epithelium which is the source of most malignant and papillary lesions. As an advance of current ductoscopy systems, pathologic nipple discharge (PND) could be treated ductoscopically by miniaturized endo-baskets or wires. Our goal is to discuss current intraductal technology which enables diagnostic and therapeutic advance for breast lesions that cause nipple discharge. PMID:25083507

  2. Exploring breast with therapeutic ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Balci, Fatih Levent; Feldman, Sheldon Marc

    2014-05-01

    Breast lesions are thought to arise mostly from the epithelium of ductal lining. Conventional imaging could only show indirect images of suspected lesions which are confirmed by percutaneous biopsies. However, ductoscopy provides direct images of the ductal epithelium which is the source of most malignant and papillary lesions. As an advance of current ductoscopy systems, pathologic nipple discharge (PND) could be treated ductoscopically by miniaturized endo-baskets or wires. Our goal is to discuss current intraductal technology which enables diagnostic and therapeutic advance for breast lesions that cause nipple discharge.

  3. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  4. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D

    1994-07-01

    It has been recognized for some time that a family history of breast cancer is associated rather strongly with a woman's own risk of developing the disease. Recent segregation analyses of population-based data on familial patterns provide evidence for a rare autosomal dominant allele that increases a carrier's susceptibility to breast cancer. The estimated proportion of breast cancer patients who carry this allele declines sharply with age at diagnosis. Empirical estimates of the risk associated with particular patterns of family history of breast cancer indicate the following: (1) having any first-degree relative with breast cancer increases a woman's risk of breast cancer 1.5-3-fold, depending on age, (2) having multiple first degree relatives affected is associated with particularly elevated risks, (3) having a second-degree relative affected increases the risk by approximately 50%, (4) affected family members on the maternal side and the paternal side contribute similarly to the risk, (5) a family history of breast cancer is associated with bilateral disease, and (6) breast cancer in males is associated with breast cancer in female relatives in much the same way as is breast cancer in women. Ovarian cancer clearly has been shown to be associated with breast cancer in families, and genetic linkage has provided strong evidence for a breast-ovarian cancer gene located somewhere on chromosome 17q. At the population level, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer may be at least as predictive of a woman's risk for developing breast cancer as is having a second-degree relative with breast cancer. Considerably weaker evidence points to a possible familial relationship between breast and endometrial cancer and between breast cancer in women and prostatic cancer in males. The clinical applications of the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer are complicated by uncertainty as to the efficacy of mammographic screening in women under the age of 50. For the vast

  5. Therapeutic Implications of Cellular Heterogeneity and Plasticity in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Michael D.; Burness, Monika L.; Wicha, Max S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular heterogeneity represents one of the greatest challenges in cancer therapeutics. In many malignancies, this heterogeneity is generated during tumor evolution through a combination of genetic alterations and epigenetic events that recapitulate normal developmental processes including stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Many, if not most, tumors display similar hierarchal organization, at the apex of which are “stem-like cells” that drive tumor growth, mediate metastasis and contribute to treatment resistance. Using breast cancer as a model, we discuss how an improved understanding of tumor cellular heterogeneity and plasticity may lead to development of more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:26340526

  6. Bacterial Effector Nanoparticles as Breast Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herrera Estrada, Lina; Padmore, Trudy J; Champion, Julie A

    2016-03-07

    Bacterial pathogens trigger cell death by a variety of mechanisms, including injection of effector proteins. Effector proteins have great potential as anticancer agents because they efficiently subvert a variety of eukaryotic signaling pathways involved in cancer development, drug resistance, and metastasis. In breast cancer, MAPK and NFκB pathways are known to be dysregulated. YopJ, an effector from Yersinia pestis, downregulates MAPK and NFκB pathways to induce cell death in specific cell types. We expressed YopJ in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), forming self-assembled protein nanoparticles with diameters of 100 nm. YopJ-GST nanoparticles efficiently delivered protein to cells, replacing the need for the pathogen secretion mechanism for effector delivery to cells. These nanoparticles induced dose and time dependent death in SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. After 72 h, 97% of cells died, significantly more than with the same molar dose of doxorubicin. Treatment with sublethal doses of nanoparticles decreased cell migration in vitro and downregulated the MAPK ERK 1/2 pathway, which has been correlated to metastasis. Exposure to a panel of breast cancer cell lines showed that YopJ-GST nanoparticles are cytotoxic to different subtypes, including doxorubicin resistant cells. However, they were not cytotoxic to NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Thus, YopJ-GST nanoparticles demonstrate the potential of effector proteins as breast cancer therapeutics with selective cytotoxicity and the capacity to decrease metastatic predictive behaviors.

  7. Clinical Implementation of Novel Targeted Therapeutics in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Mary D; Bernhardt, Erica B; Miller, Todd W

    2016-11-01

    The majority of advanced breast cancers have genetic alterations that are potentially targetable with drugs. Through initiatives such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), data can be mined to provide context for next-generation sequencing (NGS) results in the landscape of advanced breast cancer. Therapies for targets other than estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and HER2, such as cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, were recently approved based on efficacy in patient subpopulations, but no predictive biomarkers have been found, leaving clinicians to continue a trial-and-error approach with each patient. Next-generation sequencing identifies potentially actionable alterations in genes thought to be drivers in the cancerous process including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), and mutant HER2. Epigenetically directed and immunologic therapies have also shown promise for the treatment of breast cancer via histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1 and 3, programmed T cell death 1 (PD-1), and programmed T cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Identifying biomarkers to predict primary resistance in breast cancer will ultimately affect clinical decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in the first-line setting. However, the bulk of medical decision-making is currently made in the secondary resistance setting. Herein, we review the clinical potential of PI3K, AKT, FGFRs, mutant HER2, HDAC1/3, PD-1, and PD-L1 as therapeutic targets in breast cancer, focusing on the rationale for therapeutic development and the status of clinical testing. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2454-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0091 TITLE: Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer : Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic PRINCIPAL...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer : Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic 5b...activity in breast cancer as a single agent and in combination with exemestane. Activity is seen in both triple negative AR+ BC and also ER+AR+ BC

  9. Targeting Energy Metabolic Pathways as Therapeutic Intervention for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Intervention for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yan Cheng, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Pennsylvania State University...Targeting Energy Metabolic Pathways as Therapeutic Intervention for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0649 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...causes of cancer mortality in women. Current therapies for breast cancer mainly target molecular signaling pathways that promote tumor cell

  10. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers . A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary ... will develop breast cancer . Some breast cancers that cluster in families are associated with inherited mutations in ...

  11. [Therapeutic approaches using genetically modified cells].

    PubMed

    Anliker, Brigitte; Renner, Matthias; Schweizer, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Medicinal products containing genetically modified cells are, in most cases, classified as gene therapy and cell therapy medicinal products. Although no medicinal product containing genetically modified cells has been licensed in Europe yet, a variety of therapeutic strategies using genetically modified cells are in different stages of clinical development for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. In this chapter, several examples of promising approaches are presented, with an emphasis on gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiencies and on tumour immunotherapy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor or a recombinant T-cell receptor.

  12. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  13. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-24

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification.

  14. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  15. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2016-12-02

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR's therapeutic role in breast cancer.

  16. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR’s therapeutic role in breast cancer. PMID:27918430

  17. Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

    2014-08-10

    There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients' overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current "state of play" with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk's role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  18. Obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the female malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in the industrialized world. Although early diagnosis has contributed to therapeutic success, breast cancer remains a major health issue. In the last few year the hormone therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancer has evolved achieving significant clinical results; at the same time, it has enabled us to better define the role of estrogens in the etiopathogenesis of this tumour. Weight increase and obesity have been identified as the most important risk and prognostic factors for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the association of obesity with postmenopausal breast cancer. Specific obesity-associated factors, including leptin, insulin and inflammatory mediators, seem to influence breast cancer growth and prognosis independently of estrogens and at least in part by interacting with estrogen signalling at a cellular level. Therefore, a careful assessment of the nutritional status and body composition is paramount for a proper therapeutic approach for postmenopausal breast carcinoma. The use of antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory drugs associated with conventional hormone therapies and dietary/physical interventions could offer a new therapeutic approach for breast carcinoma that develops in the context of adiposity.

  19. Breast Cancer: Current Molecular Therapeutic Targets and New Players.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the most frequent cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Breast cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease classified into hormone-receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 overexpressing (HER2+) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) based on histological features. Endocrine therapy, the mainstay of treatment for hormone-responsive breast cancer involves use of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), selective estrogen receptor downregulators (SERDs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 such as tamoxifen and trastuzumab have been the most extensively used therapeutics for breast cancer. Crosstalk between ER and other signalling networks as well as epigenetic mechanisms have been envisaged to contribute to endocrine therapy resistance. TNBC, a complex, heterogeneous, aggressive form of breast cancer in which the cells do not express ER, progesterone receptor or HER2 is refractory to therapy. Several molecular targets are being explored to target TNBC including androgen receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Receptors, protein tyrosine kinases, phosphatases, proteases, PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, microRNAs (miRs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potential therapeutic targets. miR-based therapeutic approaches include inhibition of oncomiRs by antisense oligonucleotides, restoration of tumour suppressors using miR mimics, and chemical modification of miRs. The lnRNAs HOTAIR, SPRY4-IT1, GAS5, and PANDAR, new players in tumour development and prognosis may have theranostic applications in breast cancer. Several novel classes of mechanism-based drugs have been designed and synthesised for treatment of breast cancer. Integration of nucleic acid sequencing studies with mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and posttranslational modifications as

  20. Etiology of breast cancer I. Genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The subject of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on the genetic aspect of its etiology. A number of studies using various approaches gave the same results: the familial form occurs earlier and there is a higher risk in female members of the breast-cancer families. An association between breast cancer and cancer of certain other sites among women is reported. Cytogenetic studies of “cancer families” revealed increased frequency of aneuploidy in some members. However, the role of chromosome abnormalities in carcinogenesis is still not clear. PMID:4577599

  1. Malignant masses in the therapeutically irradiated breast

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, D.D.; Libshitz, H.I.; Montague, E.D.

    1980-10-01

    Mammography is of value in following the response of malignant masses after radiation therapy. Clinical error in evaluating mass size may be considerable, particularly in large breasts or breasts that are contracted and firm. Mammograms of 40 patients treated primarily with irradiation for breast cancer, taken from 3 weeks to 130 months after treatment, were reviewed. The malignant mass markedly diminished or disappeared after radiation therapy in most patients. The rate at which such changes occur is temporally related to the irradiation. Residual radiographically or clinically identifiable mass may persist even in sterilized cancers. Scarring and/or distortion occur frequently. The necessity for mammographic evaluation to determine tumor response and possible recurrence is emphasized, and a mammographic schedule is suggested to facilitate follow-up.

  2. A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0082 TITLE: A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast...COVERED 1 2012 - 3 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...analysis of genetic alterations in human breast cancers has revealed that individual tumors accumulate mutations in approximately ninety different genes

  3. Glomerular diseases: genetic causes and future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Inagi, Reiko

    2010-09-01

    The glomerulus consists of capillary tufts, a mesangial cell component and the Bowman capsule. The glomerular filtration barrier is composed of glomerular endothelial cells, a basement membrane, and podocytes. Particular components of the slit diaphragm and the glomerular basement membrane strictly orchestrate the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. The basement membrane is made of a highly crosslinked macromolecular meshwork of type IV collagen, proteoglycans, and laminin. Genetic forms of glomerular disease are predominantly caused by genetic defects in these molecular structures or in factors that regulate the glomerular filtration barrier. In addition, abnormal IgA1 glycosylation can increase susceptibility to IgA nephropathy. Dysregulation of the complement system or of platelet activation can lead to the development of endocapillary lesions, which manifest as thrombotic microangiopathy. Glomerular dysfunction is also encountered in several genetic metabolic and mitochondrial disorders. Discoveries of mutations in a range of genes have provided new insights into the mechanisms of glomerular disease. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the genetics and therapeutics of a number of glomerular diseases.

  4. Validating therapeutic targets through human genetics.

    PubMed

    Plenge, Robert M; Scolnick, Edward M; Altshuler, David

    2013-08-01

    More than 90% of the compounds that enter clinical trials fail to demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to gain regulatory approval. Most of this failure is due to the limited predictive value of preclinical models of disease, and our continued ignorance regarding the consequences of perturbing specific targets over long periods of time in humans. 'Experiments of nature' - naturally occurring mutations in humans that affect the activity of a particular protein target or targets - can be used to estimate the probable efficacy and toxicity of a drug targeting such proteins, as well as to establish causal rather than reactive relationships between targets and outcomes. Here, we describe the concept of dose-response curves derived from experiments of nature, with an emphasis on human genetics as a valuable tool to prioritize molecular targets in drug development. We discuss empirical examples of drug-gene pairs that support the role of human genetics in testing therapeutic hypotheses at the stage of target validation, provide objective criteria to prioritize genetic findings for future drug discovery efforts and highlight the limitations of a target validation approach that is anchored in human genetics.

  5. FGFR-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Antonella; Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Normanno, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease and several molecular drivers regulate its progression. Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is frequently deregulated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Due the involvement of the FGFR/FGF axis in the pathogenesis and progression of tumors, FGFR-targeted agents might represent a potential therapeutic option for breast cancer patients. Areas covered: This review offers an overview of targeted agents against FGFRs and their clinical development in breast cancer. The most relevant literature and the latest studies in the Clinicaltrial.com database have been discussed. Expert opinion: FGFR inhibition has been recently considered as a promising therapeutic option for different tumor types. However, preliminary results of clinical trials of FGFR inhibitors in breast cancer have been quite disappointing. In order to increase the clinical benefit of FGFR therapies in breast cancer, future studies should focus on: understanding the role of the various FGFR aberrations in cancer progression; identifying potential biomarkers to select patients that could benefit of FGFR inhibitors and developing therapeutic strategies that improve the efficacy of these agents and minimize toxicities.

  6. Appearance of the therapeutically irradiated breast on whole-breast water-path ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.E.; Kopans, D.B.

    1983-05-01

    The sonographic appearance of the breast on whole-breast water-path ultrasonography in 30 patients with prior therapeutic irradiation for carcinoma is described. Skin thickening, a nonspecific increase in echogenicity of the subcutaneous fat, loss of volume, and architectural asymmetry are the prominent features.

  7. Genetic epidemiology of early onset breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, D; Marlow, A; Royle, G; Collins, A; Morton, N E

    1994-01-01

    Risks for breast cancer when there is a family history of the disease are usually calculated using data from segregation analyses which favour a single dominant gene with high penetrance. There are, however, at least three loci known to be associated with familial breast cancer (p53, BRCA1, and an as yet unpublished locus) and the frequencies and penetrances of these genes are not likely to be the same. We have attempted to address the problem of which genetic parameters should be used to calculate risks for different patterns of familial breast cancer. Data from 384 nuclear families ascertained through a proband selected for early onset breast cancer were subjected to complex segregation analysis, correcting for ascertainment bias resulting from selection for severe phenotype. Age of onset of breast cancer, incorporated as severity, provides additional information to the segregation model over and above that given by assigning liability classes on the basis of age at observation. The use of this additional parameter in the analysis is described. There is fair agreement between estimates from this sample and previous predictions from consecutive probands and consultands. The differences suggest more than one rare dominant gene for susceptibility to breast cancer, with different penetrances. Although refinements of segregation analysis will help to delineate these different genes, perfect resolution will require identification of the mutant alleles. Methods to estimate genetic parameters under genotype specific mortality need to be developed. Meanwhile, we suggest that high and low estimates of penetrance be used in risk estimation for genetic counselling, and as a guide to candidates for entry into clinical trials of screening and chemoprevention in breast cancer. PMID:7891376

  8. New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches to Eradicating Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    instigation, microenvironment, bone marrow cells, canine , mouse models 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...recurrence, therapeutic resistance, systemic instigation, microenvironment, bone marrow cells, canine , mouse models 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: The PI is...human breast tumor cell clones that represent DTCs from patients with TNBC. This collection of cell clones is ideal for distinguishing consequential

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases as breast cancer drivers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Radisky, Evette S.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been identified as poor prognosis markers for breast cancer patients and as drivers of many facets of the tumor phenotype in experimental models. Early enthusiasm for MMPs as therapeutic targets was tempered following disappointing clinical trials that utilized broad spectrum, small molecule catalytic site inhibitors. However, subsequent research has continued to define key roles for MMPs as breast cancer promoters, to elucidate the complex roles that that these proteins play in breast cancer development and progression, and to identify how these roles are linked to specific and unique biochemical features of individual members of the MMP family. Here, we provide an overview of the structural features of the MMPs, then discuss clinical studies identifying which MMP family members are linked with breast cancer development and new experimental studies that reveal how these specific MMPs may play unique roles in the breast cancer microenvironment. We conclude with a discussion of the most promising avenues for development of therapeutic agents capable of targeting the tumor-promoting properties of MMPs. PMID:25961550

  10. Therapeutic blockade of Foxp3 in experimental breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Moreno Ayala, Mariela A; Gottardo, María Florencia; Imsen, Mercedes; Asad, Antonela S; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Casares, Noelia; Lasarte, Juan José; Seilicovich, Adriana; Candolfi, Marianela

    2017-07-29

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) impair the clinical benefit of cancer immunotherapy. To optimize the antitumor efficacy of therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, we aimed to inhibit Foxp3, a transcription factor required for Treg function. Mice bearing established syngeneic LM3 and 4T1 breast tumors were treated with antitumor DC vaccines and a synthetic peptide (P60) that has been shown to inhibit Foxp3. Treatment with P60 improved the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccines in these experimental models. In addition, monotherapy with P60 inhibited tumor growth in immunocompetent as well as in immuno-compromised animals bearing established tumors. We found expression of Foxp3 in human and murine breast tumor cells. P60 inhibited IL-10 secretion in breast cancer cells that expressed Foxp3. Our results suggest that Foxp3 blockade improves the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccines by inhibition of Tregs and through a direct antitumor effect. This strategy could prove useful to neutralize the immunosuppressive microenvironment and to boost antitumor immunity in breast cancer.

  11. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  12. Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling Share Tweet ... knowledge for others with this disease,” Prowell says. Breast Cancer Symptoms for Men Each year, about 2,000 ...

  13. Genetically Engineered Mice as Experimental Tools to Dissect the Critical Events in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Mitchell E.; Das, Swadesh K.; Emdad, Luni; Windle, Jolene J.; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of pathogenesis of breast cancer has greatly benefited from breakthrough advances in both genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models and xenograft transplantation technologies. The vast array of breast cancer mouse models currently available is testimony to the complexity of mammary tumorigenesis and attempts by investigators to accurately portray the heterogeneity and intricacies of this disease. Distinct molecular changes that drive various aspects of tumorigenesis, such as alterations in tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and drug resistance have been evaluated using the currently available GEM breast cancer models. GEM breast cancer models are also being exploited to evaluate and validate the efficacy of novel therapeutics, vaccines, and imaging modalities for potential use in the clinic. This review provides a synopsis of the various GEM models that are expanding our knowledge of the nuances of breast cancer development and progression and can be instrumental in the development of novel prevention and therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:24889535

  14. Epigenetics as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to alterations in gene expression due to modifications in histone acetylation and DNA methylation at the promoter regions of genes. Unlike genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations are not due to modifications in the gene primary nucleotide sequence. The importance of epigenetics in the initiation and progression of breast cancer has led many investigators to incorporate this novel and exciting field in breast cancer drug development. Several drugs that target epigenetic alterations, including inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), are currently approved for treatment of hematological malignancies and are available for clinical investigation in solid tumors. In this manuscript, we review the critical role of epigenetics in breast cancer including the potential for epigenetic alterations to serve as biomarkers determining breast cancer prognosis and response to therapy. We highlight initial promising results to date with use of epigenetic modifiers in patients with breast cancer and the ongoing challenges involved in the successful establishment of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22836913

  15. Genetic therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Foster, Helen; Popplewell, Linda; Dickson, George

    2012-07-01

    Despite an expansive wealth of research following the discovery of the DMD gene 25 years ago, there is still no curative treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, there are currently many promising lines of research, including cell-based therapies and pharmacological reagents to upregulate dystrophin via readthrough of nonsense mutations or by upregulation of the dystrophin homolog utrophin. Here we review genetic-based therapeutic strategies aimed at the amelioration of the DMD phenotype. These include the reintroduction of a copy of the DMD gene into an affected tissue by means of a viral vector; correction of the mutated DMD transcript by antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping to restore the open reading frame; and direct modification of the DMD gene at a chromosomal level through genome editing. All these approaches are discussed in terms of the more recent advances, and the hurdles to be overcome if a comprehensive and effective treatment for DMD is to be found. These hurdles include the need to target all musculature of the body. Therefore any potential treatment would need to be administered systemically. In addition, any treatment needs to have a long-term effect, with the possibility of readministration, while avoiding any potentially detrimental immune response to the vector or transgene.

  16. Congenital Aniridia: Clinic, Genetics, Therapeutics, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Silva, R.; Falcão-Reis, F.; Rocha-Sousa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare condition related to a deficiency in the PAX6 gene expression, which may occur as a result of a family inheritance or a sporadic occurrence. Additionally, this condition may occur as an isolated ocular phenotype or in association with a systemic syndrome. The most common abnormality is iris hypoplasia; however, a panocular disease which also affects the cornea, anterior chamber of the eye, lens, and the posterior segment with presence of optic nerve and foveal hypoplasia is also evident. The development of keratopathy, glaucoma, and cataract is frequent and its presence has implications in the patient's visual acuity. Managing aniridia is challenging since the focus is on treating the previously mentioned disorders, and the outcomes are often disappointing. In this paper, we shall review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical characteristics of patients with aniridia. We shall also make a review of the therapeutic options for the several conditions affecting this syndrome and consider the genetics and prognostic factors. PMID:27355034

  17. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  18. [New therapeutical strategies in metastatic hormone-dependent breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Vilquin, Paul; Cohen, Pascale; Maudelonde, Thierry; Tredan, Olivier; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bachelot, Thomas; Heudel, Pierre-Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancer is the first example of cancer treated by targeted therapy for more than 30 years. Blocking estrogen pathway was the first therapeutical strategy for this subtype of breast cancer, and remains the principle of current standard treatment. Despite the efficacy of drugs used in endocrine therapy, hormone resistance is a major problem for the management of patients with hormone-dependent breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss the development of strategies targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, CDK4/6 (Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4/6) and FGFR (Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor) in hormone-dependent metastatic breast cancer (ER+). Recent results of clinical trials showed that combination of endocrine therapy with such pharmacological inhibitors is a promising strategy to overcome endocrine resistance. Mutated forms and isoforms of ERα have been recently discovered and its targeting could represent an therapeutic alternative. Future progress will focus on the identification of new compounds and combinations with other targeted therapies to improve the efficacy of such inhibitors in clinical practice.

  19. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06 -1- 0420 TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...We propose to study the ability of quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients. We

  20. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  1. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine on a metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Khori, Vahid; Arjmand Abbassi, Yasaman; Vesovic, Milica; Soleymani, Ali; Najafi, Farhood

    2016-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that alpha-solanine can inhibit tumor growth in cell culture and animal models of breast cancer. However, solanine is insoluble in common solvents; therefore, we developed a special nanoparticle with high-capacity solubility. The present study is aimed to deliberate the therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine (DNS) on a metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After DNS preparation and dosing procedures, forty-five mice were equally divided into five groups to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNS on mammary tumor-bearing mice. Compared to solanine, DNS significantly suppressed the proliferation of 4 T1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DNS showed a remarkable safety rate of up to 10mg/kg. A significant decrease in white blood-cell count was seen at 20mg/kg DNS in comparison with control animals. Mice treated with DNS had smaller tumor volume (mm(3)) in comparison with control and solanine groups. Moreover, the incidence of the breast tumor metastases was about 67% in the control animals, where as solanine and DNS 1mg/kg were about 22% and 0%, respectively. Furthermore, the number of metastases per mouse varied from one to three. The tissues of tumor, brain, liver, spleen, and lung showed higher expression levels of Bcl-2 but lower expression levels of Bax, MMP-2, MMP-9, mTOR, and Akt in DNS-treated mice than control and solanine groups. The findings suggest that DNS has a more impactful therapeutic effect than solanine on 4 T1-induced breast tumorigenesis via influencing the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jill E. Slansky...24 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...ENHANCING  THE  BREADTH  AND  EFFICACY  OF  THERAPEUTIC   VACCINES  FOR  BREAST   CANCER ,  we  have  made  clear

  4. Genetic tests to identify risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Julie A; Venne, Vickie; Berse, Brygida

    2015-05-01

    To describe the currently available genetic tests that identify hereditary risk for breast cancer. Systematic review of scientific literature, clinical practice guidelines, and data published by test manufacturers. Changes in gene patent laws and advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in rapid expansion of genetic testing. While BRCA1/2 are the most recognized genes linked to breast cancer, several laboratories now offer multi-gene panels to detect many risk-related mutations. Genetic testing will be increasingly important in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. Oncology and advanced practice nurses must understand risk factors, significance of various genetic tests, and patient counseling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with breast size (p<5·10−8): rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently) rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH), and a third (ZNF365) is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG) have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk. PMID:22747683

  6. Genetic Induction of Cytolytic Susceptibility in Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Street, Fort Detrick, MD 21702-5012 AUTHORITY USAMRMC ltr, dtd 28 July 2003 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED AD GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-98-1-8324 TITLE: Genetic ...FUNDING NUMBERS Genetic Induction of Cytolytic Susceptibility in Breast Cancer Cells DAMD17-98-1-8324 6. AUTHOR(S) James L. Cook, M.D. 7. PERFORMING...gene expression in breast cancer cells. The objective of these studies is to obtain genetic information to complement the biological data presented

  7. Understanding EGFR Signaling in Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Overexpression and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Khan, Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs/HERs) and downstream signaling pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies including breast cancer and its resistance to treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Consequently, several monoclonal antibodies as well as small molecule inhibitors targeting these pathways have emerged as therapeutic tools in the recent past. However, studies have shown that utilizing these molecules in combination with chemotherapy has yielded only limited success. This review describes the current understanding of EGFRs/HERs and associated signaling pathways in relation to development of breast cancer and responses to various cancer treatments in the hope of pointing to improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Also, we review the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in disease and the potential to target these cells.

  8. Genetic alterations of histone lysine methyltransferases and their significance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Holowatyj, Andreana; Yang, Zeng-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HMTs), a large class of enzymes that catalyze site-specific methylation of lysine residues on histones and other proteins, play critical roles in controlling transcription, chromatin architecture, and cellular differentiation. However, the genomic landscape and clinical significance of HMTs in breast cancer remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of approximately 50 HMTs in breast cancer and identified associations among recurrent copy number alterations, mutations, gene expression, and clinical outcome. We identified 12 HMTs with the highest frequency of genetic alterations, including 8 with high-level amplification, 2 with putative homozygous deletion, and 2 with somatic mutation. Different subtypes of breast cancer have different patterns of copy number and expression for each HMT gene. In addition, chromosome 1q contains four HMTs that are concurrently or independently amplified or overexpressed in breast cancer. Copy number or mRNA expression of several HMTs was significantly associated with basal-like breast cancer and shorter patient survival. Integrative analysis identified 8 HMTs (SETDB1, SMYD3, ASH1L, SMYD2, WHSC1L1, SUV420H1, SETDB2, and KMT2C) that are dysregulated by genetic alterations, classifying them as candidate therapeutic targets. Together, our findings provide a strong foundation for further mechanistic research and therapeutic options using HMTs to treat breast cancer. PMID:25537518

  9. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel...Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W91ZSQ-5323-N656 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT We have developed a bead capture assay for quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes in breast cancer

  10. Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH06-1-0420 TITLE: Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel...2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer Microvesicles as a Novel Plasma Biomarker and Therapeutic Target (IDEA) 5b. GRANT...14. ABSTRACT We have developed a bead capture assay for quantitation of breast cancer tumor microvesicles (MV) to predict clinical outcomes

  11. Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jill E. Slansky CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado School of Medicine Auro...COVERED 2 2013 – 24 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing the Breadth of Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5a...15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, tumor antigens, T cell receptor, cancer vaccine 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  12. Pathway-based discovery of genetic interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xu, Zack Z; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Lange, Carol A; Myers, Chad L

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the second largest cause of cancer death among U.S. women and the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic variants associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, but these still explain less than half of the estimated genetic contribution to the disease. Combinations of variants (i.e. genetic interactions) may play an important role in breast cancer susceptibility. However, due to a lack of statistical power, the current tests for genetic interactions from GWAS data mainly leverage prior knowledge to focus on small sets of genes or SNPs that are known to have an association with breast cancer. Thus, many genetic interactions, particularly among novel variants, remain understudied. Reverse-genetic interaction screens in model organisms have shown that genetic interactions frequently cluster into highly structured motifs, where members of the same pathway share similar patterns of genetic interactions. Based on this key observation, we recently developed a method called BridGE to search for such structured motifs in genetic networks derived from GWAS studies and identify pathway-level genetic interactions in human populations. We applied BridGE to six independent breast cancer cohorts and identified significant pathway-level interactions in five cohorts. Joint analysis across all five cohorts revealed a high confidence consensus set of genetic interactions with support in multiple cohorts. The discovered interactions implicated the glutathione conjugation, vitamin D receptor, purine metabolism, mitotic prometaphase, and steroid hormone biosynthesis pathways as major modifiers of breast cancer risk. Notably, while many of the pathways identified by BridGE show clear relevance to breast cancer, variants in these pathways had not been previously discovered by traditional single variant association tests, or single pathway enrichment analysis that does not consider SNP

  13. A new era: melanoma genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ko, Justin M; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    We have recently witnessed an explosion in our understanding of melanoma. Knowledge of the molecular basis of melanoma and the successes of targeted therapies have pushed melanoma care to the precipice of a new era. Identification of significant pathways and oncogenes has translated to the development of targeted therapies, some of which have produced major clinical responses. In this review, we provide an overview of selected key pathways and melanoma oncogenes as well as the targeted agents and therapeutic approaches whose successes suggest the promise of a new era in melanoma and cancer therapy. Despite these advances, the conversion of transient remissions to stable cures remains a vital challenge. Continued progress towards a better understanding about the complexity and redundancy responsible for melanoma progression may provide direction for anti-cancer drug development. Copyright © 2010 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0548 TITLE: Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0548...antigen discovery. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer , immunotherapy, vaccine, antigens 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  15. Male breast cancer: genetics, epigenetics, and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, P; Silvestri, V; Tommasi, S; Pinto, R; Danza, K; Falchetti, M; Gulino, M; Frati, P; Ottini, L

    2013-11-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease compared with female BC and our current understanding regarding breast carcinogenesis in men has been largely extrapolated from the female counterpart. We focus on differences between the ethical issues related to male and female BC patients. A systematic literature search by using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/), was carried out to provide a synopsis of the current research in the field of MBC genetics, epigenetics and ethics. Original articles and reviews published up to September 2012 were selected by using the following search key words to query the PubMed website: 'male breast cancer', 'male breast cancer and genetic susceptibility', 'male breast cancer and epigenetics', 'male breast cancer and methylation', 'male breast cancer and miRNA', 'male breast cancer and ethics'. As in women, three classes of breast cancer genetic susceptibility (high, moderate, and low penetrance) are recognized in men. However, genes involved and their impact do not exactly overlap in female and male BC. Epigenetic alterations are currently scarcely investigated in MBC, however, the different methylation and miRNA expression profiles identified to date in female and male BCs suggest a potential role for epigenetic alterations as diagnostic biomarkers. Overall, much still needs to be learned about MBC and, because of its rarity, the main effort is to develop large consortia for moving forward in understanding MBC and improving the management of MBC patients on a perspective of gender medicine.

  16. Sarcoma of bone following therapeutic irradiation for breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.A.; Rodger, A.; Langlands, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    Four patients with sarcoma arising in bone following therapeutic irradiation for breast carcinoma are presented, along with a review of the 40 patients who have been previously reported in the literature. The majority of these lesions arose in the scapula and the most frequently reported histology is osteosarcoma. The incidence of these lesions has been reported as 0.05% to 0.23% in three previous series. The average latent period between irradiation and the diagnosis of the sarcoma is 10.9 years with a range of 4.5-24 years. The average survival following diagnosis in this series was 2.4 months, which is comparable to other series. However, one patient treated by forequarter amputation and another treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy survived 4 and 3 years, respectively.

  17. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Shashni, Babita; Sharma, Karun; Dhillon, Sarinder K.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar R.; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2013-01-01

    PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23431283

  18. Potential therapeutic targets in energy metabolism pathways of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rowshan Ara; Hossain, Sazzad; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2017-03-30

    Mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes make cancer cells proliferate indefinitely. As they possess almost all mechanisms for cell proliferation and survival like healthy cells, it is difficult to specifically target cancer cells in the body. Current treatments in most of the cases are harmful to healthy cells as well. Thus, it would be of great prudence to target specific characters of cancer cells. Since cancer cells avidly use glucose and glutamine to survive and proliferate by upregulating the relevant enzymes and their specific isoforms having important regulatory roles, it has been of great interest recently to target the energy-related metabolic pathways as part of the therapeutic interventions. This paper summarizes the roles of energy metabolism and their cross-talks with other important signaling pathways in regulating proliferation, invasion and metastasis in breast cancer. As breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease, a clear understanding of the variations of energy metabolism in different molecular subtypes would help in treating each type with a very customized, safer and efficient treatment regimen, by targeting specific glucose metabolism and related pathways with gene silencing nucleic acid sequences or small molecule drugs, or the combination of both.

  19. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  20. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-10-03

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  1. Bone marrow endothelium-targeted therapeutics for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mai, Junhua; Huang, Yi; Mu, Chaofeng; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Rong; Guo, Xiaojing; Xia, Xiaojun; Volk, David E; Lokesh, Ganesh L; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Gorenstein, David G; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2014-08-10

    Effective treatment of cancer metastasis to the bone relies on bone marrow drug accumulation. The surface proteins in the bone marrow vascular endothelium provide docking sites for targeted drug delivery. We have developed a thioaptamer that specifically binds to E-selectin that is overexpressed in the vasculature of tumor and inflammatory tissues. In this study, we tested targeted delivery of therapeutic siRNA loaded in the E-selectin thioaptamer-conjugated multistage vector (ESTA-MSV) drug carrier to bone marrow for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis. We evaluated tumor type- and tumor growth stage-dependent targeting in mice bearing metastatic breast cancer in the bone, and carried out studies to identify factors that determine targeting efficiency. In a subsequent study, we delivered siRNA to knock down expression of the human STAT3 gene in murine xenograft models of human MDA-MB-231 breast tumor, and assessed therapeutic efficacy. Our studies revealed that the CD31(+)E-selectin(+) population accounted for 20.8%, 26.4% and 29.9% of total endothelial cells respectively inside the femur of mice bearing early, middle and late stage metastatic MDA-MB-231 tumors. In comparison, the double positive cells remained at a basal level in mice with early stage MCF-7 tumors, and jumped to 23.9% and 28.2% when tumor growth progressed to middle and late stages. Accumulation of ESTA-MSV inside the bone marrow correlated with the E-selectin expression pattern. There was up to 5-fold enrichment of the targeted MSV in the bone marrow of mice bearing early or late stage MDA-MB-231 tumors and of mice with late stage, but not early stage, MCF-7 tumors. Targeted delivery of STAT3 siRNA in ESTA-MSV resulted in knockdown of STAT3 expression in 48.7% of cancer cells inside the bone marrow. Weekly systemic administration of ESTA-MSV/STAT3 siRNA significantly extended survival of mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis. In conclusion, targeting the overexpressed E

  2. Fanconi anemia: a model disease for studies on human genetics and advanced therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Surrallés, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, malformations, and chromosome fragility. We review the recent discovery of FA genes and efforts to develop genetic therapies for FA in the last five years. Because current data exclude FANCM as an FA gene, 15 genes remain bona fide FA genes and three (FANCO, FANCR and FANCS) cause an FA like syndrome. Monoallelic mutations in 6 FA associated genes (FANCD1, FANCJ, FANCM, FANCN, FANCO and FANCS) predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. The products of all these genes are involved in the repair of stalled DNA replication forks by unhooking DNA interstrand cross-links and promoting homologous recombination. The genetic characterization of patients with FA is essential for developing therapies, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a savior sibling donor after embryo selection, gene therapy, or genome editing using genetic recombination or engineered nucleases. Newly acquired knowledge about FA promises to provide therapeutic strategies in the near future.

  3. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer in Britain.

    PubMed

    Iselius, L; Slack, J; Littler, M; Morton, N E

    1991-05-01

    A complex segregation analysis was conducted on two British series (one consecutive series of probands with breast cancer and one series ascertained through a normal consultand). Altogether there were 1248 nuclear families with breast cancer. A dominant gene with a frequency of 0.003 giving a lifetime penetrance of 0.83 is favoured. Ovarian, endometrial and cancers associated with the SBLA syndrome, as well as benign breast disease, were significantly more common in familial breast cancer than in families of single cases. Probands in families with more than one individual with breast cancer were non-significantly younger than isolated probands.

  4. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Yin, Xiaoyao; Zhong, Jing; Guan, Naiyang; Luo, Zhigang; Min, Lishan; Yao, Xing; Bo, Xiaochen; Dai, Licheng; Bai, Hui

    2017-01-01

    With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation. PMID:28245581

  5. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yin, Xiaoyao; Zhong, Jing; Guan, Naiyang; Luo, Zhigang; Min, Lishan; Yao, Xing; Bo, Xiaochen; Dai, Licheng; Bai, Hui

    2017-02-24

    With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic aspects of breast cancer progression and therapy.

    PubMed

    Byler, Shannon; Goldgar, Sarah; Heerboth, Sarah; Leary, Meghan; Housman, Genevieve; Moulton, Kimberly; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2014-03-01

    Although breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that is challenging to characterize and treat, the recent explosion of genetic and epigenetic research may help improve these endeavors. In the present review, we use genetic diversity to characterize and classify different types of breast cancer. We also discuss genetic and epigenetic changes that are involved in the development of different breast cancer types and examine how these changes affect prognosis. It appears that while a combination of mutations and copy number changes determine the type of breast cancer, epigenetic alterations may be the primary initiators of cancer development. Understanding these critical biomarkers and molecular changes will advance our ability to effectively treat breast cancer. Next, we examine potential drug therapies directed at epigenetic changes, as such epigenetic drug treatments may prove useful for treating patient-specific tumors, breast cancer progenitor cells, and drug-resistant cells. Lastly, we discuss on mechanisms of carcinogenesis, including a novel hypothesis outlining the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer progenitor cells and metastasis. Overall, breast cancer subtypes may have a similar epigenetic signal that promotes cancer development, and treatment may be most effective if both epigenetic and genetic differences are targeted.

  7. Breast cancer, genetics, and age at first pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H T; Albano, W A; Layton, M A; Kimberling, W J; Lynch, J F

    1984-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer shows a distinctive natural history characterised by an earlier age of onset, excess bilaterality, vertical transmission, heterogeneous tumour associations, and improved survival when compared to its sporadic counterpart. To date, very little attention has been given to interrelationships between breast cancer risk factors and genetics. In the general population, early age of first term pregnancy has been generally accepted as protective against breast cancer. In addition, recent findings suggest that an early age of first pregnancy may be associated with an earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis. We studied the age at first pregnancy and age at onset of breast cancer among 162 females at 50% genetic risk, 72 of whom had already developed the disease. We then compared them to 154 consecutively ascertained breast cancer patients from the Creighton Cancer Center. In the hereditary subset (1) early first term pregnancy did not alter the frequency of breast cancer; (2) early age at first term pregnancy was not associated with an earlier age at cancer diagnosis; and (3) age of breast cancer onset in nulliparous females was not significantly lower than that in females having at least one term pregnancy. We speculate, therefore, that in our hereditary population, pregnancy does not influence the natural history of breast cancer in the same way that it does in the population at large. PMID:6716424

  8. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in breast tumor metastases.

    PubMed

    Almendro, Vanessa; Kim, Hee Jung; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Gönen, Mithat; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Argani, Pedram; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Sukumar, Saraswati; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic disease is the main cause of cancer-related mortality due to almost universal therapeutic resistance. Despite its high clinical relevance, our knowledge of how cancer cell populations change during metastatic progression is limited. Here, we investigated intratumor genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity during metastatic progression of breast cancer. We analyzed cellular genotypes and phenotypes at the single cell level by performing immunoFISH in intact tissue sections of distant metastatic tumors from rapid autopsy cases and from primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases collected before systemic therapy. We calculated the Shannon index of intratumor diversity in all cancer cells and within phenotypically distinct cell populations. We found that the extent of intratumor genetic diversity was similar regardless of the chromosomal region analyzed, implying that it may reflect an inherent property of the tumors. We observed that genetic diversity was highest in distant metastases and was generally concordant across lesions within the same patient, whereas treatment-naïve primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases were frequently genetically more divergent. In contrast, cellular phenotypes were more discordant between distant metastases than primary tumors and matched lymph node metastases. Diversity for 8q24 was consistently higher in HER2(+) tumors compared with other subtypes and in metastases of triple-negative tumors relative to primary sites. We conclude that our integrative method that couples ecologic models with experimental data in human tissue samples could be used for the improved prognostication of patients with cancer and for the design of more effective therapies for progressive disease. ©2014 AACR

  9. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Mining and modeling human genetics for autism therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel G; Ehlers, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    A growing understanding of the genetic origins of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the impact of ASD risk genes on synaptic function presents new opportunities for drug discovery. Large-scale human genetics studies have begun to reveal molecular pathways and potential therapeutic drug targets. Subsequent validation and characterization of ASD risk genes in mouse models holds promise for defining relevant cellular mechanisms and brain circuits associated with the core behavioral symptoms of autism. Here we review recent advances in the molecular therapeutics in ASDs and discuss opportunities and obstacles for converting emerging biology into new medicines. We present emerging concepts on the impact of risk genes during development and adulthood that define points of intervention. We further highlight ongoing clinical trials in patients with syndromic forms of autism. These clinical studies will be an important test of the utility of human genetics as a starting point for drug discovery in ASDs.

  11. Silk fibroin rods for sustained delivery of breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Tuna; Lovett, Michael L; Giangregorio, Raffaella; Coonahan, Erin; Kaplan, David L

    2014-10-01

    breast cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetics, biomarkers, and control of breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Albano, W A; Heieck, J J; Mulcahy, G M; Lynch, J F; Layton, M A; Danes, B S

    1984-09-01

    More has been written about the epidemiology of breast cancer than possibly any other form of cancer affecting mankind. However, in the face of this intense interest, only a paucity of attention has been given to the role of genetics in its etiology. This review represents an attempt by the investigators to provide a comprehensive coverage of hereditary breast cancer. Included are pertinent endogeneous and exogeneous risk factors, which in certain circumstances, may significantly influence the role of primary genetic factors. Hereditary breast cancer is heterogeneous. When discussing the subject, therefore, one must be precise relevant to the particular heterogeneous form of concern, based on differing tumor associations. It is probably not appropriate to discuss "hereditary breast cancer" without qualification of the specific hereditary breast cancer syndrome of concern; i.e., the SBLA syndrome, breast/ovarian cancer syndrome, and others. This reasoning also applies to attempts at linking biomarkers to hereditary breast cancer. Finally, in addition to ongoing discussions on the cardinal principles that associate with hereditary forms of breast cancer, its frequency, and new developments in biomarkers, we have provided surveillance/management programs that embrace those facets of the natural history of this disease.

  13. The Evolution of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: From Biology to Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Anders, Carey K; Abramson, Vandana; Tan, Tira; Dent, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is clinically defined as lacking expression of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (ER), and HER2. Historically, TNBC has been characterized by an aggressive natural history and worse disease-specific outcomes compared with other breast cancer subtypes. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has allowed for the dissection of TNBC into molecular subtypes (i.e., basal-like, claudin-low). Within TNBC, several subtypes have emerged as "immune-activated," consistently illustrating better disease outcome. In addition, NGS has revealed a host of molecular features characteristic of TNBC, including high rates of TP53 mutations, PI3K and MEK pathway activation, and genetic similarities to serous ovarian cancers, including inactivation of the BRCA pathway. Identified genetic vulnerabilities of TNBC have led to promising therapeutic approaches, including DNA-damaging agents (i.e., platinum salts and PARP inhibitors), as well as immunotherapy. Platinum salts are routinely incorporated into the treatment of metastatic TNBC; however, best outcomes are observed among those with deficiencies in the BRCA pathway. Although the incorporation of platinum in the neoadjuvant care of patients with TNBC yields higher pathologic complete response (pCR) rates, the impact on longer-term outcome is less clear. The presence of immune infiltrate in TNBC has shown both a predictive and prognostic role. Checkpoint inhibitors, including PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors, are under investigation in the setting of metastatic TNBC and have shown responses in initial clinical trials. Finally, matching emerging therapeutic strategies to optimal subtype of TNBC is of utmost importance as we design future research strategies to improve patient outcome.

  14. Proteogenomic integration reveals therapeutic targets in breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-lin; Li, Shunqiang; Mertins, Philipp; Cao, Song; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; Mani, D. R.; Clauser, Karl R.; Tanioka, Maki; Usary, Jerry; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Xie, Ling; Yoon, Christopher; Qiao, Jana W; Wrobel, John; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Hoog, Jeremy; Singh, Purba; Niu, Beifung; Guo, Zhanfang; Sun, Sam Qiancheng; Sanati, Souzan; Kawaler, Emily; Wang, Xuya; Scott, Adam; Ye, Kai; McLellan, Michael D.; Wendl, Michael C.; Malovannaya, Anna; Held, Jason M.; Gillette, Michael A.; Fenyö, David; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Davies, Sherri R.; Perou, Charles M.; Ma, Cynthia; Reid Townsend, R.; Chen, Xian; Carr, Steven A.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Ding, Li

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled extensive analysis of cancer proteomes. Here, we employed quantitative proteomics to profile protein expression across 24 breast cancer patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Integrated proteogenomic analysis shows positive correlation between expression measurements from transcriptomic and proteomic analyses; further, gene expression-based intrinsic subtypes are largely re-capitulated using non-stromal protein markers. Proteogenomic analysis also validates a number of predicted genomic targets in multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. However, several protein/phosphoprotein events such as overexpression of AKT proteins and ARAF, BRAF, HSP90AB1 phosphosites are not readily explainable by genomic analysis, suggesting that druggable translational and/or post-translational regulatory events may be uniquely diagnosed by MS. Drug treatment experiments targeting HER2 and components of the PI3K pathway supported proteogenomic response predictions in seven xenograft models. Our study demonstrates that MS-based proteomics can identify therapeutic targets and highlights the potential of PDX drug response evaluation to annotate MS-based pathway activities. PMID:28348404

  15. New Therapeutic Strategies for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Székely, Borbála; Silber, Andrea L M; Pusztai, Lajos

    2017-02-15

    Relatively few clinically important therapeutic advances have occurred in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) since the introduction of taxanes as adjuvant therapy over 20 years ago. However, this is rapidly changing due to a variety of conceptually important clinical trials and emerging new options such as immune checkpoint inhibitors and antibody-drug conjugates. Evidence also increasingly supports that platinum drugs and inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, or PARP, are particularly effective in the treatment of germline BRCA-mutant cancers, including TNBC. An important development in early-stage TNBC was the recognition that extensive residual cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy identifies patients who remain at high risk for recurrence. This has led to the design of two ongoing adjuvant trials (one testing pembrolizumab, the other investigating platinum drugs and capecitabine) that offer a "second chance" to improve the survival of patients with residual cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Genomic analysis of TNBC has revealed large-scale transcriptional, mutational, and copy number heterogeneity, without any frequently recurrent mutations, other than TP53. Consistent with this molecular heterogeneity, most targeted agents, so far, have demonstrated low overall activity in unselected TNBC, but important "basket" trials are ongoing.

  16. Screening for genetic disorders: therapeutic abortion and IVF.

    PubMed

    Michael, M; Buckle, S

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines a proposal to make use of IVF techniques to provide an alternative to therapeutic abortion of fetuses with genetic abnormalities. We begin by describing the proposed procedure, and then show that, considered in itself, it is morally on a par with therapeutic abortion. However, once the wider practical implications are brought into view, the proposed new procedure loses its initial appeal. The pros and cons are not sufficiently clear-cut entirely to rule out the IVF procedure, so the paper concludes by indicating some further complications which may follow, should the procedure come to be adopted.

  17. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84) and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89). Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46). Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  18. Emerging therapeutic targets in metastatic progression: a focus on breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Kang, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the underlying cause of death for the majority of breast cancer patients. Despite significant advances in recent years in basic research and clinical development, therapies that specifically target metastatic breast cancer remain inadequate, and represents the single greatest obstacle to reducing mortality of late-stage breast cancer. Recent efforts have leveraged genomic analysis of breast cancer and molecular dissection of tumor-stromal cross-talk to uncover a number of promising candidates for targeted treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Rational combinations of therapeutic agents targeting tumor-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental components provide a promising strategy to develop precision treatments with higher specificity and less toxicity. In this review, we discuss the emerging therapeutic targets in breast cancer metastasis, from tumor-intrinsic pathways to those that involve the host tissue components, including the immune system. PMID:27000769

  19. PAX6 aniridia syndrome: clinics, genetics, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Dae Hee; Kim, Hyuna

    2017-09-01

    Aniridia is a rare and panocular disorder affecting most of the ocular structures which may have significant impact on vision. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical features, genetics, and therapeutic options for this disease and to provide an update of current knowledge and latest research findings. Aside from the ocular features, a variety of associated systemic abnormalities, including hormonal, metabolic, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and neurologic pathologies have been reported in children with aniridia. Although mutations in PAX6 are a major cause of aniridia, genetic defects in nearby genes, such as TRIM44 or ELP4, have also been reported to cause aniridia. Recent improvement in genetic testing technique will help more rapid and precise diagnosis for aniridia. A promising therapeutic approach called nonsense suppression therapy has been introduced and successfully used in an animal model. Aniridia is a challenging disease. The progressive nature of this condition and its potential complications require continuous and life-long ophthalmologic care. Genetic diagnosis for aniridia is important for establishing definitive molecular characterization as well as identifying individuals at high risk for Wilms tumor. Recent advancement in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of this disease offers promise for the approaches to treatment.

  20. Could HER2 Heterogeneity Open New Therapeutic Options in Patients with HER2-Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0444 TITLE: Could HER2 Heterogeneity Open New Therapeutic Options in Patients with HER2- Primary Breast Cancer ...HER2- Primary Breast Cancer ? 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0444 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gary Ulaner 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...negative primary breast cancer . An initial nine patients have completed the trial. Five patients demonstrated suspicious foci on 89 Zr-trastuzumab

  1. Nonviral delivery of genetic medicine for therapeutic angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yang, Fan; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Genetic medicines that induce angiogenesis represent a promising strategy for the treatment of ischemic diseases. Many types of nonviral delivery systems have been tested as therapeutic angiogenesis agents. However, their delivery efficiency, and consequently therapeutic efficacy, remains to be further improved, as few of these technologies are being used in clinical applications. This article reviews the diverse nonviral gene delivery approaches that have been applied to the field of therapeutic angiogenesis, including plasmids, cationic polymers/lipids, scaffolds, and stem cells. This article also reviews clinical trials employing nonviral gene therapy and discusses the limitations of current technologies. Finally, this article proposes a future strategy to efficiently develop delivery vehicles that might be feasible for clinically relevant nonviral gene therapy, such as high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries of biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The genetics of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ford, D.; Easton, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    A number of genes are known to be involved in inherited susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. In the context of high-risk families the most important genes are BRCA1 on chromosome 17q, which is associated with a high penetrance of both breast and ovarian cancer, and BRCA2 on chromosome 13q, which causes a high risk of breast cancer but a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Other high-risk cancer genes that confer increased risks of breast or ovarian cancer in addition to other cancers include the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer genes and the TP53 gene, which causes breast cancer as part of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The predisposing mutations in these genes are relatively rare in the population. More common genes which are associated with an increased, but lower, risk of breast cancer are the ataxiatelangiectasia gene and the HRAS1 gene. This paper reviews recent progress in mapping and cloning of these susceptibility genes, and provides estimates of the cancer risks associated with each gene and the frequency of predisposing mutations. PMID:7547224

  3. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  4. Insights into Orphan Nuclear Receptors as Prognostic Markers and Novel Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aesoy, Reidun; Clyne, Colin D.; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence asserting the importance of orphan nuclear receptors (ONRs) in cancer initiation and progression. In breast cancer, there is a lot unknown about ONRs in terms of their expression profile and their transcriptional targets in the various stages of tumor progression. With the classification of breast tumors into distinct molecular subtypes, we assess ONR expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and with patient outcomes. Complementing this, we review evidence implicating ONR-dependent molecular pathways in breast cancer progression to identify candidate ONRs as potential prognostic markers and/or as therapeutic targets. PMID:26300846

  5. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Adank, Muriel A; Hes, Frederik J; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. The 1100delC mutation in the CHEK2-gene may explain the occurrence of breast cancer in about 5% of non-BRCA1/2 families in the Netherlands. In the general population the CHEK2*1100delC mutation confers a slightly increased breast cancer risk, but in a familial breast cancer setting this risk is between 35-55% for first degree female carriers. Female breast cancer patients with the CHEK2*1100delC mutation are at increased risk of contralateral breast cancer and may have a less favourable prognosis. Female heterozygous CHEK2*1100delC mutation carriers are offered annual mammography and specialist breast surveillance between the ages of 35-60 years. Prospective research in CHEK2-positive families is essential in order to develop more specific treatment and screening strategies.

  6. Inflammatory breast cancer: unique biological and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A

    2015-11-01

    Through the concerted efforts of many patients, health-care providers, legislators, and other supporters, the past decade has seen the development of the first clinics dedicated to the care of patients with inflammatory breast cancer in the USA and other countries. Together with social networking, advocacy, and education, a few specialised centres have had substantial increases in patient numbers (in some cases ten times higher), which has further expanded the community of science and advocacy and increased the understanding of the disease process. Although inflammatory breast cancer is considered rare, constituting only 2-4% of breast cancer cases, poor prognosis means that patients with the disease account for roughly 10% of breast cancer mortality annually in the USA. I propose that the unique presentation of inflammatory breast cancer might require specific, identifiable changes in the breast parenchyma that occur before the tumour-initiating event. This would make the breast tissue itself a tumour-promoting medium that should be treated as a component of the pathology in multidisciplinary treatment and should be further studied for complementary targets to inhibit the pathobiology that is specific to inflammatory breast cancer.

  7. The interplay of endocrine therapy, steroid pathways and therapeutic resistance: Importance of androgen in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Takanori; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-09-13

    A great majority of breast carcinomas expresses estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogens have crucial roles in the progress of breast carcinomas. Endocrine therapy targeting ER and/or intratumoral estrogen production significantly improved clinical outcomes of the patients with ER-positive breast carcinomas. However, resistance to endocrine therapy is often observed and significant number of patients will recur after the treatment. In addition, treatment for the patients with triple-negative breast carcinomas (negative for all ER, progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2) are limited to cytotoxic chemotherapy and novel therapeutic targets need to be identified. In breast carcinoma tissues, not only ER but androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed, suggesting pivotal roles of androgens in the progress of breast carcinomas. Growing interest on androgen action as possible therapeutic target has been taken, but androgen action seems quite complicated in breast carcinomas and inconsistent findings has been also proposed. In this review, we will summarize recent studies regarding intratumoral androgen production and its regulation as well as distinct subset of breast carcinomas characterized by activated AR signaling and recent clinical trial targeting AR in the patients with either ER-positive and ER-negative breast carcinomas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Mammographic breast density and breast cancer: evidence of a shared genetic basis

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Jajini S; Thompson, Deborah J; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Turnbull, Clare; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth ML; Luben, Robert N; Loos, Ruth J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Rommens, Johanna; Paterson, Andrew D; Martin, Lisa J; Vachon, Celine M; Scott, Christopher G; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Couch, Fergus J; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Boyd, Norman F; Hall, Per; Hopper, John L; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rahman, Nazneen; Easton, Douglas F

    2012-01-01

    Percent mammographic breast density (PMD) is a strong heritable risk factor for breast cancer. However, the pathways through which this risk is mediated are still unclear. To explore whether PMD and breast cancer have a shared genetic basis, we identified genetic variants most strongly associated with PMD in a published meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and used these to construct risk scores for 3628 breast cancer cases and 5190 controls from the UK2 GWAS of breast cancer. The signed per-allele effect estimates of SNPs were multiplied with the respective allele counts in the individual and summed over all SNPs to derive the risk score for an individual. These scores were included as the exposure variable in a logistic regression model with breast cancer case-control status as the outcome. This analysis was repeated using ten different cut-offs for the most significant density SNPs (1-10% representing 5,222-50,899 SNPs). Permutation analysis was also performed across all 10 cut-offs. The association between risk score and breast cancer was significant for all cut-offs from 3-10% of top density SNPs, being most significant for the 6% (2-sided P=0.002) to 10% (P=0.001) cut-offs (overall permutation P=0.003). Women in the top 10% of the risk score distribution had a 31% increased risk of breast cancer [OR= 1.31 (95%CI 1.08-1.59)] compared to women in the bottom 10%. Together, our results demonstrate that PMD and breast cancer have a shared genetic basis that is mediated through a large number of common variants. PMID:22266113

  9. Mammographic breast density and breast cancer: evidence of a shared genetic basis.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Jajini S; Thompson, Deborah J; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Turnbull, Clare; Brown, Judith; Leyland, Jean; Warren, Ruth M L; Luben, Robert N; Loos, Ruth J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Rommens, Johanna; Paterson, Andrew D; Martin, Lisa J; Vachon, Celine M; Scott, Christopher G; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Couch, Fergus J; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Stone, Jennifer; Li, Jingmei; Eriksson, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Boyd, Norman F; Hall, Per; Hopper, John L; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rahman, Nazneen; Easton, Douglas F

    2012-03-15

    Percent mammographic breast density (PMD) is a strong heritable risk factor for breast cancer. However, the pathways through which this risk is mediated are still unclear. To explore whether PMD and breast cancer have a shared genetic basis, we identified genetic variants most strongly associated with PMD in a published meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and used these to construct risk scores for 3,628 breast cancer cases and 5,190 controls from the UK2 GWAS of breast cancer. The signed per-allele effect estimates of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were multiplied with the respective allele counts in the individual and summed over all SNPs to derive the risk score for an individual. These scores were included as the exposure variable in a logistic regression model with breast cancer case-control status as the outcome. This analysis was repeated using 10 different cutoff points for the most significant density SNPs (1%-10% representing 5,222-50,899 SNPs). Permutation analysis was also conducted across all 10 cutoff points. The association between risk score and breast cancer was significant for all cutoff points from 3% to 10% of top density SNPs, being most significant for the 6% (2-sided P = 0.002) to 10% (P = 0.001) cutoff points (overall permutation P = 0.003). Women in the top 10% of the risk score distribution had a 31% increased risk of breast cancer [OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-1.59] compared with women in the bottom 10%. Together, our results show that PMD and breast cancer have a shared genetic basis that is mediated through a large number of common variants.

  10. Retroelements and Genetic Instability in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Bailey-Penrod,J., Raz,A. and Sarkar,F.H. (1998) Galectin - 3 and L I retrotransposons in human breast carcinomas. Breast Cancer Res. Treat., 49, 171-183. 11...AGENCY USE ONLY 2. REPORT DATE 3 . REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED (Leave blank) April 2005 Annual Summary (1 Apr 02 - 31 Mar 05) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5...length L1.3 mRNAs. Li polyA signals can be functional when fragments of L1.3 element are inserted into 3 ’ UTRs of genes. This unique attenuation

  11. Recent genetic findings in schizophrenia and their therapeutic relevance.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Over 100 loci are now associated with schizophrenia risk as identified by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome-wide association studies. These findings mean that 'genes for schizophrenia' have unquestionably been found. However, many questions remain unanswered, including several which affect their therapeutic significance. The SNPs individually have minor effects, and even cumulatively explain only a modest fraction of the genetic predisposition. The remainder likely results from many more loci, from rare variants, and from gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. The risk SNPs are almost all non-coding, meaning that their biological significance is unclear; probably their effects are mediated via an influence on gene regulation, and emerging evidence suggests that some key molecular events occur during early brain development. The loci include novel genes of unknown function as well as genes and pathways previously implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, e.g. NMDA receptor signalling. Genes in the latter category have the clearer therapeutic potential, although even this will be a challenging process because of the many complexities concerning the genetic architecture and mediating mechanisms. This review summarises recent schizophrenia genetic findings and some key issues they raise, particularly with regard to their implications for identifying and validating novel drug targets. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Recent genetic findings in schizophrenia and their therapeutic relevance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 loci are now associated with schizophrenia risk as identified by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome-wide association studies. These findings mean that ‘genes for schizophrenia’ have unquestionably been found. However, many questions remain unanswered, including several which affect their therapeutic significance. The SNPs individually have minor effects, and even cumulatively explain only a modest fraction of the genetic predisposition. The remainder likely results from many more loci, from rare variants, and from gene–gene and gene–environment interactions. The risk SNPs are almost all non-coding, meaning that their biological significance is unclear; probably their effects are mediated via an influence on gene regulation, and emerging evidence suggests that some key molecular events occur during early brain development. The loci include novel genes of unknown function as well as genes and pathways previously implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, e.g. NMDA receptor signalling. Genes in the latter category have the clearer therapeutic potential, although even this will be a challenging process because of the many complexities concerning the genetic architecture and mediating mechanisms. This review summarises recent schizophrenia genetic findings and some key issues they raise, particularly with regard to their implications for identifying and validating novel drug targets. PMID:25315827

  13. Breast MRI in nonpalpable breast lesions: a randomized trial with diagnostic and therapeutic outcome – MONET – study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Nicky HGM; Borel Rinkes, Inne HM; Mali, Willem PTM; van den Bosch, Maurice AAJ; Storm, Remmert K; Plaisier, Peter W; de Boer, Erwin; van Overbeeke, Adriaan J; Peeters, Petra HM

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increasing interest in MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic modality for the work-up of suspicious breast lesions. The additional value of Breast MRI lies mainly in its capacity to detect multicentric and multifocal disease, to detect invasive components in ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and to depict the tumor in a 3-dimensional image. Breast MRI therefore has the potential to improve the diagnosis and provide better preoperative staging and possibly surgical care in patients with breast cancer. The aim of our study is to assess whether performing contrast enhanced Breast MRI can reduce the number of surgical procedures due to better preoperative staging and whether a subgroup of women with suspicious nonpalpable breast lesions can be identified in which the combination of mammography, ultrasound and state-of-the-art contrast-enhanced Breast MRI can provide a definite diagnosis. Methods/Design The MONET – study (MR mammography Of Nonpalpable BrEast Tumors) is a randomized controlled trial with diagnostic and therapeutic endpoints. We aim to include 500 patients with nonpalpable suspicious breast lesions who are referred for biopsy. With this number of patients, the expected 12% reduction in surgical procedures due to more accurate preoperative staging with Breast MRI can be detected with a high power (90%). The secondary outcome is the positive and negative predictive value of contrast enhanced Breast MRI. If the predictive values are deemed sufficiently close to those for large core biopsy then the latter, invasive, procedure could possibly be avoided in some women. The rationale, study design and the baseline characteristics of the first 100 included patients are described. Trial registration Study protocol number NCT00302120 PMID:18045470

  14. S14 as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Months 9-12 As shown in Fig. 2, two siRNAs caused a substantial knockdown of S14 mRNA and protein in the cells. Importantly, the siRNAs also...inhibited the expression of the FAS gene, and caused apoptotic death of the breast cancer cells. This thus provides validation of S14 as a potential...including FAS, and S14 knockdown causes breast cancer cell apoptosis. The S14 locus at 11q13 is amplified in ~13% of breast cancers, but the

  15. Glutamine Synthetase Is a Genetic Determinant of Cell Type–Specific Glutamine Independence in Breast Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2011-01-01

    Although significant variations in the metabolic profiles exist among different cells, little is understood in terms of genetic regulations of such cell type–specific metabolic phenotypes and nutrient requirements. While many cancer cells depend on exogenous glutamine for survival to justify the therapeutic targeting of glutamine metabolism, the mechanisms of glutamine dependence and likely response and resistance of such glutamine-targeting strategies among cancers are largely unknown. In this study, we have found a systematic variation in the glutamine dependence among breast tumor subtypes associated with mammary differentiation: basal- but not luminal-type breast cells are more glutamine-dependent and may be susceptible to glutamine-targeting therapeutics. Glutamine independence of luminal-type cells is associated mechanistically with lineage-specific expression of glutamine synthetase (GS). Luminal cells can also rescue basal cells in co-culture without glutamine, indicating a potential for glutamine symbiosis within breast ducts. The luminal-specific expression of GS is directly induced by GATA3 and represses glutaminase expression. Such distinct glutamine dependency and metabolic symbiosis is coupled with the acquisition of the GS and glutamine independence during the mammary differentiation program. Understanding the genetic circuitry governing distinct metabolic patterns is relevant to many symbiotic relationships among different cells and organisms. In addition, the ability of GS to predict patterns of glutamine metabolism and dependency among tumors is also crucial in the rational design and application of glutamine and other metabolic pathway targeted therapies. PMID:21852960

  16. Therapeutic Mechanism of BET Bromodomain Inhibitor in Breast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    dispensing system (BioTek EL406), at 1,000 cells per well in 50 μl of media. Drugs were delivered in DMSO by robotic pin transfer with a JANUS workstation...Farber Breast Cancer Tissue Microarray (TMA) consists of primary TNBC samples from approximately 83 patients who underwent definitive breast surgery ...are the following: staging, tumour pathology, diagnostic and follow-up tests performed, treatments administered ( surgery , radiation and systemic

  17. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, Mayana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country. PMID:27575431

  18. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in MDS: Do Molecular Genetics Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Many studies over the past decade have together identified genes that are recurrently mutated in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We will summarize how this information has informed our understanding of disease pathogenesis and behavior, with an emphasis on how this information may inform therapeutic strategies. Recent findings Genomic sequencing techniques have allowed for the identification of many recurrently mutated genes in MDS, with the most common mutations being found in epigenetic modifiers and components of the splicing machinery. While many mutations are associated with clinical outcomes and disease phenotypes, at the current time they add relatively little to already robust clinical prognostic algorithms. However, as molecular genetic data is accumulated in larger numbers of patients, it is likely that the clinical significance of co-occurring mutations and less common mutations will come to light. Finally, mutated genes may identify biologically distinct subgroups of MDS that may benefit from novel therapies, and a subset of these genes may themselves serve as therapeutic targets. Summary Advances in our knowledge of the molecular genetics of MDS have significantly improved our understanding of the disease biology and promise to improve tools for clinical decision-making and identify new therapies for patients. PMID:26825694

  19. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  20. Uptake rates for breast cancer genetic testing: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ropka, Mary E; Wenzel, Jennifer; Phillips, Elayne K; Siadaty, Mir; Philbrick, John T

    2006-05-01

    Individuals and families dealing with the possibility of hereditary cancer risk face numerous decisions, including whether to obtain genetic testing. The purpose of this article is to determine what is known about the rate at which people obtain cancer genetic testing. Using MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCHINFO plus reviewing reference lists of relevant articles, we identified 40 studies in May 2002 that addressed breast cancer-related decisions, enrolled adult participants, were published in 1990 or more recently, were peer-reviewed primary clinical studies, addressed genetic testing either alone or in combination with genetic counseling, and reported rates at which participants showed interest in and/or underwent cancer genetic testing. Information regarding study design, participants, and genetic testing uptake rates was recorded. Each article was reviewed for methodologic quality using a flexible quality review system applicable to all study types. Of the 40 studies, 25 provided information about hypothetical genetic testing decisions, 14 about real decisions, and 1 about both. Mean hypothetical uptake was 66% (range, 20-96%) and real uptake was 59% (range, 25-96%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses found that decision type (real/hypothetical), personal and family history of breast cancer, and variability in sampling strategy, recruitment setting, and criteria for real and hypothetical uptake were independently associated with uptake. Our systematic review identified additional explanations for uptake variability (investigator influences, small sample sizes, variability in target populations, lack of clearly described sampling strategies, sampling methods open to bias, and variability in reporting associated risk factors). In addition to clinical characteristics, research methodologic issues are likely to be major determinants of variability in published breast cancer genetic testing uptake rates. An understanding of these issues will clarify to clinicians

  1. [Trisomy 21 and breast cancer: A genetic abnormality which protects against breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Martel-Billard, C; Cordier, C; Tomasetto, C; Jégu, J; Mathelin, C

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality and one of the main causes of intellectual disability. The tumor profile of T21 patients is characterized by the low frequency of solid tumors including breast cancer. The objective of this work was to analyze the literature to find possible clues for the low frequency of breast cancer in T21 persons with a focus on one hand to the various risks and protective factors against breast cancer for women T21, and on the other hand to changes in the expression of different genes located on chromosome 21. T21 women have hormonal and societal risk factors for breast cancer: frequent nulliparity, lack of breastfeeding, physical inactivity and high body mass index. The age of menopause, earlier in T21 women, has a modest protective effect against breast cancer. The low rate of breast tumors in T21 women is probably mainly linked to the reduced life expectancy compared to the general population (risk of death before the age of onset of the majority of breast cancers) and the presence of a third chromosome 21, characterizing the disease. It might lead to the increased expression of a number of genes contributing directly or undirectly to tumor suppression, decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, changes in the mammary stroma of persons T21 could have an inhibitory role on the development of breast tumors. The low frequency of breast cancers for T21 patients may not only be explained by hormonal and societal factors, but also by genetic mechanisms which could constitute an interesting axis of research in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic testing for inherited breast cancer risk in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Kessler, Lisa Jay; Mitchell, Edith

    2005-01-01

    As genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations is increasingly integrated into the clinical management of high-risk women, it will be important to understand barriers and motivations for genetic counseling among women from underserved minority groups to ensure equitable access to these services. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to synthesize literature on knowledge and attitudes about genetic counseling and testing for inherited breast cancer risk in African Americans. We also review studies that evaluated genetic testing intentions in this population. We conducted a search of the PubMed database to identify studies related to BRCA1/2 testing in African Americans that were published between 1995 and 2003. Overall, studies have evaluated ethnic differences in knowledge and attitudes about genetic testing or have compared African American and Caucasian women in terms of genetic testing intentions. These studies have shown that knowledge about breast cancer genetics and exposure to information about the availability of testing is low among African Americans, whereas expectations about the benefits of genetic testing are endorsed highly. However, much less is known about the psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in African Americans. Additional research is needed to understand barriers and motivations for participating in genetic testing for inherited cancer risk in African Americans. The lack of studies on psychological functioning, cancer surveillance, and preventive behaviors following testing is a significant void; however, for these studies to be conducted, greater access to genetic counseling and testing in African Americans will be needed.

  3. DNA damage repair in breast cancer and its therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Ali, Reem; Rakha, Emad A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Bryant, Helen E

    2017-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) involves the activation of numerous cellular activities that repair DNA lesions and maintain genomic integrity, and is critical in preventing tumorigenesis. Inherited or acquired mutations in specific genes involved in the DNA damage response, for example the breast cancer susceptibility genes 1/2 (BRCA1/2), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and P53 are associated with various subtypes of breast cancer. Such changes can render breast cancer cells particularly sensitive to specific DNA damage response inhibitors, for example BRCA1/2 germline mutated cells are sensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. The aims of this review are to discuss specific DNA damage response defects in breast cancer and to present the current stage of development of various DDR inhibitors (namely PARP, ATM/ATR, DNA-PK, PARG, RECQL5, FEN1 and APE1) for breast cancer mono- and combination therapy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phospho-TCTP as a therapeutic target of Dihydroartemisinin for aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lucibello, Maria; Adanti, Sara; Antelmi, Ester; Dezi, Dario; Ciafrè, Stefania; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Nicotera, Giuseppe; Sica, Lorenzo; De Braud, Filippo; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2015-03-10

    Upregulation of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is associated with poorly differentiated aggressive tumors, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism(s) are still debated. Here, we show that in breast cancer cell lines TCTP is primarily localized in the nucleus, mostly in the phosphorylated form.The effects of Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an anti-malaria agent that binds TCTP, were tested on breast cancer cells. DHA decreases cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death by targeting the phosphorylated form of TCTP. Remarkably, DHA enhances the anti-tumor effects of Doxorubicin in triple negative breast cancer cells resulting in an increased level of apoptosis. DHA also synergizes with Trastuzumab, used to treat HER2/neu positive breast cancers, to induce apoptosis of tumor cells.Finally, we present new clinical data that nuclear phospho-TCTP overexpression in primary breast cancer tissue is associated with high histological grade, increase expression of Ki-67 and with ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. Notably, phospho-TCTP expression levels increase in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors, suggesting a possible role of phospho-TCTP as a new prognostic marker.In conclusion, the anti-tumor effect of DHA in vitro with conventional chemotherapeutics suggests a novel therapeutic strategy and identifies phospho-TCTP as a new promising target for advanced breast cancer.

  5. Interest, awareness, and perceptions of genetic testing among Hispanic family members of breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Aparicio-Ting, Fabiola E; de Majors, Sandra San Miguel; Miller, Alexander R

    2006-01-01

    To provide a preliminary description of the interest, awareness, and perceptions of genetic testing among Hispanics with a family history of breast cancer This cross-sectional pilot study used interpersonal structured interviews for data collection. We interviewed 48 Hispanics without breast cancer but who had a family member with breast cancer; participants lived in San Antonio and the surrounding area. The outcomes were interest in breast cancer genetic testing, awareness about genetic testing, perceived risk of carrying a breast cancer susceptibility gene, and the perceived benefits and risks associated with a genetic test. Items previously used in research regarding interest and perceived genetic risk and a previously validated benefits and risks-limitations scale for genetic testing commonly used by other researchers were used to measure the outcomes. Awareness of genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility was very low, yet most (82%) participants were interested in a genetic test for breast cancer susceptibility. Participants were more likely to identify with the benefits than the potential risks of genetic testing. The most highly endorsed benefits were to know to take better care of one's self and to undergo more frequent screening. Hispanics seem to have positive perceptions about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. However, the high level of interest in genetic testing may be driven by a lack of knowledge about genetic testing. Culturally sensitive and appropriate educational programs about breast cancer genetic testing and the surrounding issues are needed for the Hispanic population.

  6. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications of Histone Epigenetic Modulators in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Louise; Gallagher, William M; O'Connor, Darran P; Ní Chonghaile, Tríona

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and great advancements have been made for individualised patient treatment. Through understanding the underlying altered biology in the different subtypes of breast cancer, targeted therapeutics have been developed. Unfortunately, resistance to targeted therapy, intrinsic or acquired, is a recurring theme in cancer treatment. Epigenetic-mediated resistance to targeted therapy has been identified across different types of cancer. In addition, tumorigenesis has also been linked to altered expression of epigenetic modifiers. Due to the reversible nature of epigenetic modifications, epigenetic proteins are appealing as therapeutic targets in both the primary and relapsed/resistant setting. In this review, we will discuss the current state of targetable epigenetic histone modifications and their diagnostic and therapeutic implications in breast cancer.

  7. Bilingual Educational Tool for Breast Cancer Genetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    decision. We propose the development of a bilingual (Spanish- English) reusable, fifth-grade level, self-paced instrument for use in genetics education prior to discussions of informed consent or risk assessment.

  8. Developmental therapeutics for inflammatory breast cancer: Biology and translational directions

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Rossi, Giovanna; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chae, Young Kwang; Gradishar, William J; Giles, Francis J; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer, which accounts for approximately 3% of cases of breast malignancies. Diagnosis relies largely on its clinical presentation, and despite a characteristic phenotype, underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Unique clinical presentation indicates that IBC is a distinct clinical and biological entity when compared to non-IBC. Biological understanding of non-IBC has been extrapolated into IBC and targeted therapies for HER2 positive (HER2+) and hormonal receptor positive non-IBC led to improved patient outcomes in the recent years. This manuscript reviews recent discoveries related to the underlying biology of IBC, clinical progress to date and suggests rational approaches for investigational therapies. PMID:27926493

  9. Developmental therapeutics for inflammatory breast cancer: Biology and translational directions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo; Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Rossi, Giovanna; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chae, Young Kwang; Gradishar, William J; Giles, Francis J; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer, which accounts for approximately 3% of cases of breast malignancies. Diagnosis relies largely on its clinical presentation, and despite a characteristic phenotype, underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Unique clinical presentation indicates that IBC is a distinct clinical and biological entity when compared to non-IBC. Biological understanding of non-IBC has been extrapolated into IBC and targeted therapies for HER2 positive (HER2+) and hormonal receptor positive non-IBC led to improved patient outcomes in the recent years. This manuscript reviews recent discoveries related to the underlying biology of IBC, clinical progress to date and suggests rational approaches for investigational therapies.

  10. Cancer stem cells in solid and liquid tissues of breast cancer patients: characterization and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chiotaki, Rena; Polioudaki, Hara; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) represent a heterogeneous subpopulation of rare cells within breast cancer tumors, displaying an enhanced tumor initiating capability and underlying disease progression and therapy resistance. Unraveling their phenotypic, biological and functional profile is a major challenge in the context of diminishing patient mortality. In this review, following a brief description on how cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their microenvironment contribute to tumor preservation and heterogeneity, we summarize the current literature regarding the molecular signature of BCSCs either localized in the primary tumor or circulating in the blood of breast cancer patients. We present recent data on specific stem and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers designating the BCSC subpopulation and underline their pathogenic significance. The molecular characterization of BCSCs has promoted the design of novel therapeutic approaches targeting the BCSC subpopulation which are currently being experimentally and clinically evaluated. We highlight recent advances on the development of novel BCSC-targeting therapeutic strategies including the inhibition of cell signaling pathways, differentiation therapy, metabolic interference and nucleotide-, bio- and nano-technology based approaches. Eliminating the chemo- and radio-resistance properties of breast cancer tumor cells via BCSC-directed therapies, combined to conventional therapeutic approaches, will augment the effectiveness of breast cancer treatment and improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients.

  11. Oncogenic mechanisms of Lin28 in breast cancer: new functions and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Seifer, Benjamin J.; Ye, Chenyang; Chen, Yongxia; Jia, Yunlu; Chen, Cong; Shen, Jianguo; Wang, Linbo; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Jichun

    2017-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Lin28 is best known for the critical role in cell development, recent researches also have implied its oncogenic function in various human cancers, including breast cancer. Specifically, aberrant Lin28 participates in multiple pathological processes, such as proliferation, metastasis, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, metabolism, immunity and inflammation as well as stemness. In this review, we summarize the let-7-dependent and let-7-independent mechanism regulated by Lin28, focusing on its relation with tumor hallmarks in breast cancer, and subsequently discuss our present knowledge of Lin28 to develop a molecular-based therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. PMID:28147339

  12. Oncogenic mechanisms of Lin28 in breast cancer: new functions and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hanchu; Zhao, Wenhe; Wang, Ji; Seifer, Benjamin J; Ye, Chenyang; Chen, Yongxia; Jia, Yunlu; Chen, Cong; Shen, Jianguo; Wang, Linbo; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Jichun

    2017-04-11

    The RNA binding protein Lin28 is best known for the critical role in cell development, recent researches also have implied its oncogenic function in various human cancers, including breast cancer. Specifically, aberrant Lin28 participates in multiple pathological processes, such as proliferation, metastasis, radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, metabolism, immunity and inflammation as well as stemness. In this review, we summarize the let-7-dependent and let-7-independent mechanism regulated by Lin28, focusing on its relation with tumor hallmarks in breast cancer, and subsequently discuss our present knowledge of Lin28 to develop a molecular-based therapeutic strategy against breast cancer.

  13. Role of adipokines and cytokines in obesity-associated breast cancer: therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sajid; Shukla, Samriddhi; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is the cause of a large proportion of breast cancer incidences and mortality in post-menopausal women. In obese people, elevated levels of various growth factors such as insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are found. Elevated insulin level leads to increased secretion of estrogen by binding to the circulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). The increased estrogen-mediated downstream signaling favors breast carcinogenesis. Obesity leads to altered expression profiles of various adipokines and cytokines including leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β. The increased levels of leptin and decreased adiponectin secretion are directly associated with breast cancer development. Increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines within the tumor microenvironment promote tumor development. Efficacy of available breast cancer drugs against obesity-associated breast cancer is yet to be confirmed. In this review, we will discuss different adipokine- and cytokine-mediated molecular signaling pathways involved in obesity-associated breast cancer, available therapeutic strategies and potential therapeutic targets for obesity-associated breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel therapeutic strategies for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a very heterogeneous group of breast diseases. Currently, the backbone of therapy for TNBC is mainly chemotherapy as there are no effective specific targeted agents approved to treat TNBC. Despite initial responses to chemotherapy, resistance frequently and rapidly develops and metastatic TNBC has a poor prognosis. Therefore, new targeted strategies are, accordingly, urgently needed. This article discusses the recent developments in targeted agents explored for TNBC, aiming to offer novel therapeutic strategies that can potentially assist in designing personalized therapeutics in the future as well as provide the basis for further research in an attempt to target TNBC. PMID:27799799

  15. Therapeutic and Imaging Applications of Dopamine Receptors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    neuroblastoma ,31 leukemia,29 ovarian,32 breast29,33,34 and colon33 cancer cells. However, most studies did not identify which DAR was expressed in their...the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Neuropharmacology 2007; 53: 724–732. 32 Moreno-Smith M, Lu C, Shahzad MM, Pena GN, Allen JK, Stone RL et al

  16. Therapeutic potential of stem cells expressing suicide genes that selectively target human breast cancer cells: Evidence that they exert tumoricidal effects via tumor tropism

    PubMed Central

    YI, BO-RIM; CHOI, KELVIN J.; KIM, SEUNG U.; CHOI, KYUNG-CHUL

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide and is classified into ductal and lobular carcinoma. Breast cancer as well as lobular carcinoma is associated with various risk factors such as gender, age, female hormone exposure, ethnicity, family history and genetic risk factor-associated genes. Genes associated with a high risk of developing breast cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, PTEN, CHEK2 and ATM. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy are used to treat breast cancer but these therapies, except for surgery, have many side-effects such as alopecia, anesthesia, diarrhea and arthralgia. Gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GEPT) or suicide gene therapy, may improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy without side-effects. GEPT most often involves the use of a viral vector to deliver a gene not found in mammalian cells and that produces enzymes which can convert a relatively non-toxic prodrug into a toxic agent. Examples of these systems include cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC), carboxyl esterase/irinotecan (CE/CPT-11), and thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV). Recently, therapies based on genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) using a GEPT system have received a great deal of attention for their clinical and therapeutic potential to treat breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential of GESTECs via tumor tropism effects and therapeutic efficacy against several different types of cancer cells. GESTECs represent a useful tool for treating breast cancer without inducing injuries associated with conventional therapeutic modalities. PMID:22736197

  17. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  18. Immunology and breast cancer: toward a new way of understanding breast cancer and developing novel therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Isabelle; Azim, Hatem A; Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-06-01

    Every cancer triggers an immune response that constitutes an important first-line protection against cancer progression. In breast cancer, there is an increasing awareness of the relationship between the immune system and tumor evolution. The tumor microenvironment is composed of a variety of immune cells that can control or arrest malignant progression. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy have been shown to modulate this immune microenvironment. Recently, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes have emerged as a predictive and prognostic biomarker in early breast cancer. In addition, immune gene expression signatures have been shown to be associated with prognosis in triple-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer. Such findings have increased interest in the development of immunotherapeutic agents for breast cancer, and multiple clinical trials of anticancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors are ongoing. In this review, we summarize what is known about the relationship between immunity and breast carcinoma, explore the relevance of this information to the clinical and research settings, and give a portrait of new therapeutic strategies using immunotherapy in breast cancer.

  19. Proinflammatory cytokines in breast cancer: mechanisms of action and potential targets for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Jodi E; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2010-09-01

    Inflammation within the tumor microenvironment correlates with increased invasiveness and poor prognosis in many types of cancer, including breast cancer. The cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) are critical mediators of the inflammatory response. Numerous studies have also linked these cytokines to breast cancer progression. As a result, the mechanisms by which these cytokines promote breast cancer have been recently explored using both in vitro and in vivo models. The results from these studies have led to speculation regarding the possible usefulness of targeting these cytokines in breast cancer patients. This review summarizes the most recent studies pertaining to the mechanisms by which proinflammatory cytokines promote breast cancer. Furthermore, the possibilities of targeting these inflammatory mediators in breast cancer patients using inhibitors that are currently being used in the clinic for other inflammatory conditions are discussed. Understanding both the mechanisms by which inflammatory mediators promote breast cancer and the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory drugs in treating breast cancer will lead to novel therapeutic regimens to treat this devastating disease.

  20. Luminal-B breast cancer and novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has led to a new molecular classification of breast cancer characterized by four intrinsic subtypes: basal-like, HER2-positive, luminal A, and luminal B. Despite expressing estrogen receptor, the luminal-B subtype confers increased risk of early relapse with endocrine therapy compared with the luminal-A subtype. Although luminal-B definitions vary, the hallmark appears to be increased expression of proliferation-related genes. Several biological pathways are identified as possible contributors to the poor outcomes, and novel agents targeting these pathways are being developed with aims to improve survival. We review the definition of luminal-B breast cancer, its pathological and clinical features, and potential targets for treatment. PMID:22217398

  1. SXR, A Novel Target for Breast Cancer Therapeutics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    transient transfection assays (see Additional file 1: supplementary Figure 2A). The phtoestrogen- rutin did not activate SXR in transfection assays so...cells were cultured in the presence of a concentration series (1, 10 and 100 μM) of test compounds or controls (solvent, rutin ). To measure the integrated...proliferation of breast cancer cells in proliferation assay. Rutin , which did not activate SXR in transfection assays, lacked any effect on prolifera- tion

  2. Targeting Energy Metabolic Pathways as Therapeutic Intervention for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    2 kinase; pyruvate kinase M2; energy metabolism; apoptosis ; breast cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...tumor cells to hypoxia, as indicated by a decrease in cellular viability (Fig. 2C) and an increase in apoptosis (Fig. 2D) in the hypoxic tumor cells...Keener KJ, Zhang L, Kimball SR, Harvey H, Jefferson LS, Yang JM. Integrated Regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by EEF2K controls cellular fate and

  3. Therapeutic and Imaging Applications of Dopamine Receptors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    using a μPET scanner (Siemens Inveon). A CT scan was also acquired for anatomical reference, and was overlaid with PET images. Images were acquired...124I. Fig 11. PET / CT images of TISCH ligand within the striatum. 124I-labeled TISCH was injected to the tail vein in male rats. PET scan was...A systematic review of positron emission tomography ( PET ) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( PET / CT ) for the diagnosis of breast

  4. Anti-Angiogenesis Therapeutic Indicators in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Knopp, M. V., Brix , G.. Junkermann, H. J., Sinn. H. P. MR mam- ing angiogenesis using macromolecular contrast media: Status mography with pharmacokinetic...Essig, M., Debus, J., Knopp, M. V.. Engenhart- primary breast cancer to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Eur. Radiol. Cabilic, R.. Schonberg, S. 0., Brix ...Engenhart, R.. Knopp, M. V., Brix , G., Grandy, M.. 16. Torts, P. S., Brix , G.. Buckley, D. L., Evelhoch, J. L., Henderson, E., Essig, M., Miltner, P

  5. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Haitao; Yao, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are 8-12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12). CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  6. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Haitao; Yao, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12). CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26356032

  7. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-28

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract.

  8. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  9. Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer and the Potential Development of Therapeutic Tools.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Anaya-Ruiz, Maricruz; Pérez-Santos, Martín; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca D

    2017-10-05

    Alternative splicing is a key molecular mechanism now considered as a hallmark of cancer that has been associated with the expression of distinct isoforms during the onset and progression of the disease. The leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide is breast cancer, and even when the role of alternative splicing in this type of cancer has been established, the function of this mechanism in breast cancer biology is not completely decoded. In order to gain a comprehensive view of the role of alternative splicing in breast cancer biology and development, we summarize here recent findings regarding alternative splicing events that have been well documented for breast cancer evolution, considering its prognostic and therapeutic value. Moreover, we analyze how the response to endocrine and chemical therapies could be affected due to alternative splicing and differential expression of variant isoforms. With all this knowledge, it becomes clear that targeting alternative splicing represents an innovative approach for breast cancer therapeutics and the information derived from current studies could guide clinical decisions with a direct impact in the clinical advances for breast cancer patients nowadays.

  10. Breast cancer genetic testing: more than a medical management tool.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Dawn; Conroy, Sherrill A

    2015-10-01

    Knowing whether a harmful hereditary mutation exists in BRCA1 and BRCA2 can enable women to make informed decisions regarding surveillance and surgery options to manage risk. Given the attention in the media about BRCA genetic testing, nurses need to revisit how this knowledge may affect a woman's sense of self and the forces that may influence this decision. This article aims to understand how complex the decision to undergo genetic testing may be for some women by exploring the impact of genetic knowledge on the self, changes to customary definitions for health and illness, and ethical issues and social forces that may influence genetic testing decisions. A review of the literature was undertaken to understand how genetic knowledge may alter meanings attached to the breast and how health is defined, and to identify ethical concerns and social forces that may affect a woman's decision to undergo or decline an offer for genetic testing. An understanding and awareness of the potential benefits and harms of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing, as well as the social forces that may influence a woman's decision to undergo or decline an offer for genetic testing and the commitment to remain open to the uniqueness of each woman's situation, may enhance the nurse-patient relationship and result in a decision that is ethically in the best interest of the patient.

  11. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  12. BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Background: Myc activation is common in breast cancer , correlated with triple negative disease, and associated with mortality. Thus, understanding...Myc-driven breast cancer will facilitate knowledge of triple negative disease, a subtype of breast cancer with poor outcome and limited treatment...tolerance of Myc driven stress and as putative new therapeutic entry points for Myc-driven breast cancer . Our preliminary data indicate that BUD31

  13. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of tumorigenesis of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emde, Anna; Köstler, Wolfgang J.; Yarden, Yosef

    2010-01-01

    1. Abstract The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is overexpressed in approximately 25% of breast cancers. HER2 acts as a signal amplifier for its siblings, namely three different transmembrane receptors that collectively bind with 11 distinct growth factors of the EGF family. Thus, overexpression of HER2 confers aggressive invasive growth in preclinical models and in patients. Specific therapies targeting HER2 include monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as heat shock protein and sheddase inhibitors. Two of these drugs have shown impressive – yet mostly transient – efficacy in patients with HER2 overexpressing breast cancer. We highlight the biological roles of HER2 in breast cancer progression, and overview the available therapeutic armamentarium directed against this receptor-kinase molecule. Focusing on the mechanisms that confer resistance to individual HER2 targeting agents, we envisage therapeutic approaches to delay or overcome the evolvement of resistance in patients. PMID:20951604

  14. mTOR function and therapeutic targeting in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephen H; Harvey, Amanda J

    2017-01-01

    The mTOR pathway was discovered in the late 1970s after the compound and natural inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin was isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. mTOR is serine/threonine kinase belonging to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase related kinase (PIKK) family. It forms two distinct complexes; mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 has a key role in regulating protein synthesis and autophagy whilst mTORC2 is involved in regulating kinases of the AGC family. mTOR signaling is often over active in multiple cancer types including breast cancer. This can involve mutations in mTOR itself but more commonly, in breast cancer, this is related to an increase in activity of ErbB family receptors or alterations and mutations of PI3K signaling. Rapamycin and its analogues (rapalogues) bind to the intercellular receptor FKBP12, and then predominantly inhibit mTORC1 signaling via an allosteric mechanism. Research has shown that inhibition of mTOR is a useful strategy in tackling cancers, with it acting to slow tumor growth and limit the spread of a cancer. Rapalogues have now made their way into the clinic with the rapalogue everolimus (RAD-001/Afinitor) approved for use in conjunction with exemestane, in post-menopausal breast cancer patients with advanced disease who are HER-2 negative (normal expression), hormone receptor positive and whose prior treatment with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors has failed. Testing across multiple trials has proven that everolimus and other rapalogues are a viable way of treating certain types of cancer. However, rapalogues have shown some drawbacks both in research and clinically, with their use often activating feedback pathways that counter their usefulness. As such, new types of inhibitors are being explored that work via different mechanisms, including inhibitors that are ATP competitive with mTOR and which act to perturb signaling from both mTOR complexes. PMID:28400999

  15. Development of KGF Antagonist as a Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    growth and induce aromatase( Arom ) activity. MCI-7 cells and primary cultured normal human breast epithelial cells (E(") were treated with recombinant FGF...ELISA. Arom activity was determined by measuring the amount of 311,0 released into culture medium after cells were pulsed with [I fl-3H...androstenedione. DNA synthesis was significantly elevated by 79.52% at a FGF-10 cone oF I Ong/ml in MCF-7 cells. Arom activity was also significantly increased at

  16. Therapeutic oophorectomy in disseminated carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Puga, F J; Welch, J S; Bisel, H F

    1976-08-01

    Of 145 women with metastatic breast carcinoma who survived palliative surgical castration, 40.7% had objective remission and another 11.0% had subjective improvement. Favorable response was more frequent in ovulating patients who had small masses of recurrent tumor in fewer locations, with skeletal spread especially well tolerated. Palliation appeared to be related to the site of metastatic disease and numbers (mass) of metastatic sites, but not to the age of the patient, tumor histology, or the disease-free interval. Survival was better for the patients who showed improvement after castration. Such improvement may predict continued relief from the use of other modalities of systemic treatment.

  17. The Cancer Worry Scale Revised for Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Anita; Vigna, Cristina; Gremigni, Paola

    2017-05-19

    The Cancer Worry Scale was revised to be used in breast cancer genetic counseling (CWS-GC). This scale is used to identify dimensions that are relevant in the genetic counseling context, such as worry about developing breast cancer, impact of worries on daily life, and risk perception in women attending a counseling session for BRCA1/2 mutations. The aim of this study was to estimate the psychometric properties of the CWS-GC in a sample of Italian women. A total of 304 women aged 19 to 90 years, 58% with history and 42% with no history of breast or ovarian cancer, participated in the study. Validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change of the CWS-GC were assessed. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested a 2-factor structure of the CWS-GC measuring cancer worry and risk perception and with Cronbach's α coefficients of .90 and .70, respectively. Criterion validity was attested by substantial yet not overlapping correlations with anxiety and fear of medical procedures. In a subsample of 50 women, test-retest reliability at a 4-week interval ranged from 0.70 to 0.87, and the CWS-GC was able to detect small to medium changes 1 month after genetic counseling. Overall, the CWS-GC showed good psychometric characteristics in this population. The CWS-GC would be appropriate for use by healthcare professionals to better understand how women react and adapt to information on genetic cancer risk to provide them with emotional support and encourage surveillance behaviors.

  18. Therapeutic horseback riding in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cerulli, Claudia; Minganti, Carlo; De Santis, Chiara; Tranchita, Eliana; Quaranta, Federico; Parisi, Attilio

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the physiologic and psychological effects of an equine-assisted therapy protocol (EAT) in breast cancer survivors. Twenty women (mean age, 45.61±2.71 years) whose breast cancer treatment had concluded at least 6 months previously underwent a screening protocol to certify their eligibility to participate in noncompetitive sports. The patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=10) or a control group (n=10). Intervention patients participated in a 16-week EAT protocol consisting of 2 hours of activity per week. All patients were tested before and after the intervention for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), fat mass percentage, total body water percentage, strength of principal muscular groups (measured on five weight-lifting machines [leg press, leg extension, leg curl, shoulder press, vertical traction]), and quality of life using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire (FACIT-F). After intervention, the intervention group showed an improvement in VO2max (28.29%; p<.001), a decrease in fat mass percentage (change, -7.73%; p<0.002), an increase in total body water percentage (6.90%; p=0.027), and an increase in strength (leg press, 17.75% [p=0.018]; leg extension, 21.55% [p=0.005]; leg curl, 26.04% [p<0.001]; shoulder press, 49.72% [p=0.003]; vertical traction, 19.27% [p=0.002]). Furthermore, the increase in the three FACIT-F scores (FACIT-F trial outcome: 9.29% [p=0.010]; Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General total score, 14.80% [p=0.022]; FACIT-F total score, 11.48% [p=0.004]) showed an increase in quality of life. No significant changes for any variable were found for the control group. EAT had positive effects on both physiologic and psychological measures, enhancing quality of life of breast cancer survivors. RESULTS suggest a new method for rehabilitation intervention strategies after cancer in a nonmedical environment.

  19. Therapeutic Implications of the Molecular and Immune Landscape of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Ana C; Lacerda, Manuela; Figueiredo, Paulo; Simões, Sérgio; Dias, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2017-09-14

    Treatment and management of breast cancer imposes a heavy burden on public health care, and incidence rates continue to increase. Breast cancer is the most common female neoplasia and primary cause of death among women worldwide. The recognition of breast cancer as a complex and heterogeneous disease, comprising different molecular entities, was a landmark in our understanding of this malignancy. Valuing the impact of the molecular characteristics on tumor behavior enabled a better assessment of a patient's prognosis and increased the predictive power to therapeutic response and clinical outcome. Molecular heterogeneity is also prominent in the triple-negative breast cancer subtype, and is reflected by the distinct prognostic and patient's sensitivity to treatment, being chemotherapy the only systemic treatment currently available. From a therapeutic perspective, gene expression profiling of triple-negative tumors has notably contributed to the exploration of new druggable targets and brought to light the need to align these patients to the various therapies according to their triple-negative subtype. Additionally, the higher amount of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and the prevalence of an increased expression of PD-1 receptor and its ligand, PD-L1, in triple-negative tumors, created a new treatment opportunity with immune checkpoint inhibitors. This manuscript addresses the current knowledge on the molecular and immune profiles of breast cancer, and its impact on the development of targeted therapies, with a particular emphasis on the triple-negative subtype.

  20. Neuro-vascular link: from genetic insights to therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and nerves (neurogenesis) is of great medical relevance. It is well known that dysregulation of angiogenesis leads to tissue ischemia, cancer, inflammation and other disorders, while a dysfunction of the nerve system contributes to motorneuron disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALs) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The observations of Andreas Vesalius--Belgian anatomist of the 16th century--that patterning ofvessels and nerves show more than remarkable similarities, are currently revisited in exciting studies. Indeed, often, vessels and nerves even track alongside each other. Recent genetic studies revealed that vessels and nerves share many more common principles and signals for navigation, proliferation and survival than previously suspected. For instance, gene inactivation studies in mice and zebrafish showed that axon guidance signals regulate vessel navigation. Conversely, prototypic angiogenic factors such as VEGF control neurogenesis and regulate axon and neuron guidance, independently of their angiogenic activity. The next coming years promise to become an exciting journey to further unravel the molecular basis and explore the therapeutic potential of the neurovascular link.

  1. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Frozen sections were cut and analyzed for tumor by the Univ of CO Pathology Core and sent on dry ice to the laboratory of collaborator Dr. Chip...D’Amato N, Richer JK. Endocrine therapy for triple negative breast cancer. Oral presentation at Pathology Grand Rounds, University of Colorado Anschutz...Whippany, NJ “Landscape of Androgen Receptors in Breast Cancer Subtypes” July 2015 Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Pathology Grand Rounds

  2. The protective and therapeutic effects of alpha-solanine on mice breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Saeed; Khodayari, Hamid; Kouhpayeh, Seyed Amin; Karimi, Aliasghar; Zamani, Mina; Azizian, Saleh; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali

    2013-10-15

    Alpha-solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid, is found in leaves and fruits of plants as a defensive agent against fungi, bacteria and insects. Herein, we investigated solanine toxicity in vitro and in vivo, and assessed its protective and the therapeutic effects on a typical animal model of breast cancer. The study conducted in three series of experiments to obtain (i) solanine effects on cell viability of mammary carcinoma cells, (ii) in vivo toxicity of solanine, and (iv) the protective and therapeutic effects of solanine on animal model of breast cancer. Alpha-solanine significantly suppressed proliferation of mouse mammary carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, 5 mg/kg solanine has been chosen for assessing its protective and therapeutic effects in mice breast cancer. Tumor take rate in the solanine-treated group was zero compared with a 75% rate in its respective control group (P<0.05). The average tumor size and weight were significantly lower in solanine-treated animals than its respective control ones (P<0.05). Proapoptotic Bax protein expression increased in breast tumor by solanine compared with its respective control group (P<0.05). Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression found to be lower in solanine-treated animals (P<0.05). Proliferative and angiogenic parameters greatly decreased in solanine-treated mice (P<0.05). Data provide evidence that solanine exerts a significant chemoprotective and chemotherapeutic effects on an animal model of breast cancer through apoptosis induction, cell proliferation and angiogenesis inhibition. These findings reveal a new therapeutic potential for solanine in cancer.

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Alternative Translation Initiation in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    investigation within the next 6 months. Cell type specific cancer cell killing of the prototype oncolytic poliovirus , PVS-RIPO, depends on selective...demanded by FDA. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Translation, eIF4E, eIF4G, IRES, Cancer, Poliovirus 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...genetically recombinant poliovirus . Moreover, my work has laid the groundwork for correlative testing and efficacy studies of a vast array of protein kinase

  4. Increased osmolality of breast milk with therapeutic additives

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, L; Bokiniec, R; King, C; Weaver, G; Edwards, A

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the changes in the osmolality of expressed breast milk (EBM) after the addition of seven additives and four proprietary fortifiers commonly used during neonatal intensive care. Methods: The osmolality of 5 ml EBM was measured with increasing doses of 6% NaCl, caffeine, sodium ironedetate, folic acid, and multivitamin drops. Sodium acid phosphate and chloral hydrate were added to 8 ml EBM, and the fortifiers were added to standard volumes of EBM. Dose-effect curves were plotted, and the volume of milk that must be added to the above additives to maintain osmolality below 400 mOsm/kg was calculated. Results: The osmolality of the pure additives ranged from 242 to 951 mOsm/kg. There was a significant increase in the osmolality of EBM with increasing doses of all additives except caffeine. The osmolality of EBM with many additives in clinically used dosages potentially exceeded 400 mOsm/kg. The greatest increase occurred with sodium ironedetate syrup, where the osmolality of EBM increased to 951.57 (25.36) mOsm/kg. Proprietary fortifiers increased the osmolality of EBM to a maximum of 395 mOsm/kg. Conclusion: Routine additives can significantly increase the osmolality of EBM to levels that exceed current guidelines for premature infant feeding. A simple guide for clinical use is presented, which indicates the amount of milk required as diluent if hyperosmolality is to be avoided. PMID:15499144

  5. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: A potential new therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Methods Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Results Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Conclusions Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:24678876

  6. Calcitriol restores antiestrogen responsiveness in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells: a potential new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martínez, Nancy; Díaz, Lorenza; Ordaz-Rosado, David; García-Quiroz, Janice; Barrera, David; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Ibarra-Sánchez, María J; Esparza-López, José; Camacho, Javier; Larrea, Fernando; García-Becerra, Rocío

    2014-03-29

    Approximately 30% of breast tumors do not express the estrogen receptor (ER) α, which is necessary for endocrine therapy approaches. Studies are ongoing in order to restore ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if calcitriol induces ERα expression in ER-negative breast cancer cells, thus restoring antiestrogen responses. Cultured cells derived from ERα-negative breast tumors and an ERα-negative breast cancer cell line (SUM-229PE) were treated with calcitriol and ERα expression was assessed by real time PCR and western blots. The ERα functionality was evaluated by prolactin gene expression analysis. In addition, the effects of antiestrogens were assessed by growth assay using the XTT method. Gene expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Ether-à-go-go 1 (EAG1) was also evaluated in cells treated with calcitriol alone or in combination with estradiol or ICI-182,780. Statistical analyses were determined by one-way ANOVA. Calcitriol was able to induce the expression of a functional ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells. This effect was mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), since it was abrogated by a VDR antagonist. Interestingly, the calcitriol-induced ERα restored the response to antiestrogens by inhibiting cell proliferation. In addition, calcitriol-treated cells in the presence of ICI-182,780 resulted in a significant reduction of two important cell proliferation regulators CCND1 and EAG1. Calcitriol induced the expression of ERα and restored the response to antiestrogens in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. The combined treatment with calcitriol and antiestrogens could represent a new therapeutic strategy in ERα-negative breast cancer patients.

  7. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  8. Therapeutic effects of cytoprotective agent on breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinjia; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Yu, Zhuang; Wang, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Most patients will choose breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery, while radiotherapy will damage skin and soft tissue so that will have adverse effect on reconstruction. In this study, we assume that the usage of Amifostine can reduce the incidence of complications after breast reconstruction so that provides more choices of reconstruction operation. Dividing SD rats into surgical placement expansion material group (include 15 ml normal saline) and simple operation group. Then further divide the former into non intervention group , radiation group and Radiation therapy combined with Amie amifostine treatment group. The decubation is 45 days after operation. Macroscopic evaluate the complications of skin and soft tissue by ImageJ. There is no obvious complications of skin and soft tissue for control group, radiotherapy alone group and radiotherapy with application of Amifostine group by macroscopic evaluation. The animals that are in expanded object group, damage probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is lower than that of radiotherapy alone group (30% vs. 69%, P=0.041). ImageJ shows the necrosis probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is obvious lower than radiotherapy alone group (6.96% vs. 12.94%, P=0.019). In conclusion, prevention and treatment of Amifostine can significantly reduce the complications of skin and soft tissue which is helpful to breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery. PMID:26885163

  9. Therapeutic effects of cytoprotective agent on breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjia; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Yu, Zhuang; Wang, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Most patients will choose breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery, while radiotherapy will damage skin and soft tissue so that will have adverse effect on reconstruction. In this study, we assume that the usage of Amifostine can reduce the incidence of complications after breast reconstruction so that provides more choices of reconstruction operation. Dividing SD rats into surgical placement expansion material group (include 15 ml normal saline) and simple operation group. Then further divide the former into non intervention group , radiation group and Radiation therapy combined with Amie amifostine treatment group. The decubation is 45 days after operation. Macroscopic evaluate the complications of skin and soft tissue by ImageJ. There is no obvious complications of skin and soft tissue for control group, radiotherapy alone group and radiotherapy with application of Amifostine group by macroscopic evaluation. The animals that are in expanded object group, damage probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is lower than that of radiotherapy alone group (30% vs. 69%, P=0.041). ImageJ shows the necrosis probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is obvious lower than radiotherapy alone group (6.96% vs. 12.94%, P=0.019). In conclusion, prevention and treatment of Amifostine can significantly reduce the complications of skin and soft tissue which is helpful to breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery.

  10. Breast cancer genetic risk profile is differentially associated with interval and screen-detected breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Holm, J; Bergh, J; Eriksson, M; Darabi, H; Lindström, L S; Törnberg, S; Hall, P; Czene, K

    2015-03-01

    Polygenic risk profiles computed from multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer have been shown to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. We evaluated whether this genetic risk stratification can also be applied to discriminate between screen-detected and interval cancers, which are usually associated with clinicopathological and survival differences. A 77 single-nucleotide polymorphism polygenic risk score (PRS) was constructed for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. PRS was inspected as a continuous (per standard deviation increment) variable in a case-only design. Modification of the PRS by mammographic density was evaluated by fitting an additional interaction term. PRS weighted by breast cancer overall estimates was found to be differentially associated with 1865 screen-detected and 782 interval cancers in the LIBRO-1 study {age-adjusted odds ratio (OR)perSD [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.91 [0.83-0.99], P = 0.023}. The association was found to be more significant for PRS weighted by ER-positive breast cancer estimates [ORperSD = 0.90 (0.82-0.98), P = 0.011]. This result was corroborated by two independent studies [combined ORperSD = 0.87 (0.76-1.00), P = 0.058] with no evidence of heterogeneity. When enriched for 'true' interval cancers among nondense breasts, the difference in the association with PRS in screen-detected and interval cancers became more pronounced [ORperSD = 0.74 (0.62-0.89), P = 0.001], with a significant interaction effect between PRS and mammographic density (Pinteraction = 0.017). To our knowledge, this is the first report looking into the genetic differences between screen-detected and interval cancers. It is an affirmation that the two types of breast cancer may have unique underlying biology. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Breast cancer presenting in the midline without a lesion in the breast: a therapeutic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Rohan; Poovamma, C U; Shilpy, Chauhan; Prema, M; Anthony, Pais

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer presenting in the midline of the chest and without a primary focus in the breast is extremely rare. A 48 year old post-menopausal lady presented with a rapidly enlarging lump over the middle of her chest along with bilateral axillary lymph nodes. Clinical and imaging tests failed to demonstrate a focus of cancer in either of the breasts. Incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed it to be an infiltrating ductal carcinoma. As no guidelines exist to manage such patients, she was started on neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Following a good response to chemotherapy, she underwent wide local excision of the lesion with bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy. She subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  12. Autophagy and Apoptotic Crosstalk: Mechanism of Therapeutic Resistance in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Joelle; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    While breast cancer patients benefit from the use of HER2 inhibitors, many fail therapy and become resistant to treatment, indicating a critical need to prevent treatment failure. A number of studies have emerged that highlight the catabolic process of autophagy in breast cancer as a mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy and targeted inhibitors. Furthermore, recent research has begun to dissect how autophagy signaling crosstalks with apoptotic signaling. Thus, a possible strategy in fighting resistance is to couple targeting of apoptotic and autophagy signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss how cellular response by autophagy circumvents cell death to promote resistance of breast cancers to HER2 inhibitors, as well as the potential avenues of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26997868

  13. The FGF/FGFR axis as a therapeutic target in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Lindsey K.; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is a vital component of both embryonic and postnatal mammary gland development, which has prompted researchers to investigate both its relevance to breast cancer and its potential as a therapeutic target. Deregulated FGFR signaling during breast cancer occurs through various mechanisms, including amplification of the receptor genes, aberrant ligand expression, receptor mutations and translocations. Recent experimental outcomes involving both animal models and human breast cancer cell lines have led to the initiation of multiple early clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of small molecule FGFR inhibitors. In this article we review both the most recent discoveries and the need for further investigation of the mechanisms through which FGF/FGFR signaling has emerged as an oncogenic driver. PMID:25400686

  14. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  15. Founder populations and their uses for breast cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Neuhausen, Susan L

    2000-01-01

    Numerous founder mutations have been reported in BRCA1 and BRCA2. For genetic screening of a population with a founder mutation, testing can be targeted to the mutation, allowing for a more rapid and less expensive test. In addition, more precise estimates of the prior probability of carrying a mutation and of the likelihood of a mutation carrier developing cancer should be possible. For a given founder mutation a large number of carriers are available, so that focused scientific studies of penetrance, expression, and genetic and environmental modifiers of risk can be performed. Finally, founder populations may be a powerful resource to localize additional breast cancer susceptibility loci, because of the reduction in locus heterogeneity. PMID:11250694

  16. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for human breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a prototype of the newly developed, second-generation, hybrid polar compounds. It is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with high potency for inducing cell differentiation of cultured murine erythroleukemia cells. Studies with SAHA have primarily been performed with hematopoietic tumor cells. Here we extent these studies with SAHA to human breast cancer cell lines in an attempt to find better therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435, as well as normal cells, including the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, and fibroblasts, were treated with SAHA. Cells assayed for cell survival by using trypan blue exclusion assay, colony formation assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. The effects of SAHA on cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins were examined by Western blots analysis. The identification of additional target genes was carried out by differential display (DD) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: SAHA inhibited clonogenic growth of MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These cells were more sensitive to SAHA-mediated cytotoxic effects than normal breast epithelial cells and fibroblasts. The cytotoxic effects of SAHA on breast cancer cells were manifested by G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptosis. The pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, blocked SAHA-induced cell death, DNA laddering, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, indicating the involvement of caspases in SAHA-mediated apoptosis. In addition, SAHA modulated cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins. For example, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21WAF1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 were induced, and retinoblastoma protein pRb was hypophosphorylated. Moreover, SAHA induced several genes associated with differentiation and/ or growth inhibition. These genes encode gelsolin

  17. Functional Analysis and Therapeutic Potential of miR-708 in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Our objective is to dissect the epigenetic regulation of miR-708, so that epigenetic therapies can be considered for metastatic breast cancer, and...evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of synthetic miR-708. Dissecting the epigenetic regulation of miR-708 will generate translational opportunities for...patients with TNBC. For example, insights into the role of PRC2 to directly mediate miR-708 silencing will allow the evaluation of epigenetic

  18. The application of gold nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kafshdooz, Leila; Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Razban, Zohreh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    The development of specialized nanoparticles (NPs) for use in the detection and treatment of cancer is increasing. In the last few years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been greatly studied in biological and photothermal therapeutic status. AuNPs can bind to a wide range of organic molecules, and their synthesis is easy. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of AuNPs, their contributions to tumor destruction, their toxicity, and their potential in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer.

  19. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Brajão de Oliveira, Karen; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; de Almeida, Felipe Campos; Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton Freire; Trugilo, Kleber Paiva; Guembarovski, Alda Fiorina Maria Losi; Jorge Sobrinho, Walter; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold) than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status). Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p = 0.301). In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p = 0.757); however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p < 0.01). All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26576337

  20. Timing of critical genetic changes in human breast disease.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Hoffman, Laurel R; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer development has been characterized as a nonobligatory sequence of histological changes from normal epithelium through invasive malignancy. Although genetic alterations are thought to accumulate stochastically during tumorigenesis, little is known about the timing of critical mutations. This study examined allelic imbalance (AI) in tissue samples representing a continuum of breast cancer development to examine the evolution of genomic instability. Laser-microdissected DNA samples were collected from histologically normal breast specimens (n = 25), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH, n = 16), ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS, n = 37), and stage I to III invasive carcinomas (n = 72). Fifty-two microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly deleted in breast cancer were used to assess patterns of AI. AI frequencies were <5% in histologically normal and ADH specimens, 20% in DCIS lesions, and approximately 25% in invasive tumors. Mann-Whitney tests showed (1) that levels of AI in ADH samples did not differ significantly from those in histologically normal tissues and (2) that AI frequencies in DCIS lesions were not significantly different from those in invasive carcinomas. ADH and DCIS samples, however, differed significantly (P < .0001). DCIS lesions contain levels of genomic instability that are characteristic of advanced invasive tumors, and this suggests that the biology of a developing carcinoma may already be predetermined by the in situ stage. Observations that levels of AI in ADH lesions are similar to those in disease-free tissues provide a genomic rationale for why prevention strategies at the ADH level are successful and why cases with ADH involving surgical margins do not require further resection.

  1. Impact of genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Loader, Starlene; Shields, Cleveland G; Rowley, Peter T

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we have reported a clinical trial in which any woman in a defined geographic region who had a qualifying family history and who was referred by her physician or who was identified through a regional cancer registry was offered free genetic counseling, BRCA testing, and recommendations based on test results. Each family was represented by one affected and one unaffected person. Of the 87 families actually tested, 13 were found to have deleterious mutations. To assess the impact of the counseling and testing process, we contacted the tested individuals 1 month and 1 year after receiving the test result and those with an abnormal test result after 4 years. Index subjects, we found, differed significantly from relatives. Before coming for counseling, index subjects perceived both their general health and emotional health as worse than did their relatives. After counseling and testing, index subjects continue to worry more about breast cancer than do relatives. Affected subjects, we found, differed significantly from unaffected subjects. Before counseling, affected subjects knew more about breast cancer, perceived their general health as poorer, and reported greater adherence to recommended breast cancer surveillance than did unaffected subjects. After counseling and testing, affected subjects were less satisfied than unaffected subjects with having been tested. This study indicates that the group most prone to distress by cancer risk genetic counseling and testing is not the recruited relatives, nor even those affected with cancer, but rather the index patients themselves. The index patients, i.e., the ones who want the risk information most, appear to undergo the most stress in obtaining it.

  2. Chk1 as a new therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Albiges, Laurence; Goubar, Aïcha; Scott, Véronique; Vicier, Cécile; Lefèbvre, Céline; Alsafadi, Samar; Commo, Frédéric; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Lazar, Vladimir; Dessen, Philippe; Delaloge, Suzette; André, Fabrice; Quidville, Virginie

    2014-06-01

    Bioinformatics analyses of pathways and genes differentially expressed between malignant and benign lesions could allow discovering new therapeutic targets. Here, we identified Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) as a potent therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Differential gene expression between TNBC, other malignant and benign lesions was performed on two breast cancer datasets. Chk1 was targeted using RNA interference or chemical inhibitor in several TNBC cell lines. DNA repair pathway was identified as one mostly deregulated pathway in TNBC as compared to benign lesions. Chk1 was identified as candidate target among the 35 genes included in this pathway. Gene expression analysis revealed that Chk1 gene was significantly overexpressed in TNBC as compared to non-TNBC and benign lesions. Depletion of Chk1 protein expression induced a marked reduction of cell viability and led to mitotic catastrophe in TNBC cells. Chemical Chk1 inhibitor decreased survival in TNBC cells, and transcriptome analyze revealed a modulation of gene expression profile in response to Chk1 treatment. These findings suggest that Chk1 may represent a therapeutic target in TNBC, and provide a rationale to evaluate Chk1 inhibitors in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and therapeutic relevance of the metabolic oncogene fatty acid synthase in HER2+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Vellon, Luciano; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Buxó, Maria; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Serra, Dolors; García, Jordi; Lupu, Ruth; Menendez, Javier A

    2017-07-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a key lipogenic enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and a druggable metabolic oncoprotein that is activated in most human cancers. We evaluated whether the HER2-driven lipogenic phenotype might represent a biomarker for sensitivity to pharmacological FASN blockade. A majority of clinically HER2-positive tumors were scored as FASN overexpressors in a series of almost 200 patients with invasive breast carcinoma. Re-classification of HER2-positive breast tumors based on FASN gene expression predicted a significantly inferior relapse-free and distant metastasis-free survival in HER2+/FASN+ patients. Notably, non-tumorigenic MCF10A breast epithelial cells engineered to overexpress HER2 upregulated FASN gene expression, and the FASN inhibitor C75 abolished HER2-induced anchorage-independent growth and survival. Furthermore, in the presence of high concentrations of C75, HER2-negative MCF-7 breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 (MCF-7/HER2) had significantly higher levels of apoptosis than HER2-negative cells. Finally, C75 at non-cytotoxic concentrations significantly reduced the capacity of MCF-7/HER2 cells to form mammospheres, an in vitro indicator of cancer stem-like cells. Collectively, our findings strongly suggest that the HER2-FASN lipogenic axis delineates a group of breast cancer patients that might benefit from treatment with therapeutic regimens containing FASN inhibitors.

  4. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  5. Therapeutic touch, quiet time, and dialogue: perceptions of women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne E; Sullivan, Patricia; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Samarel, Nelda

    2004-05-01

    To compare the perceptions of women with breast cancer to an experimental therapeutic touch (TT) plus dialogue nursing intervention with perceptions of a control quiet time plus dialogue nursing intervention. Qualitative study based on the Science of Unitary Human Beings. Data collected as part of a larger experimental study of the effects of TT on pre- and postoperative anxiety and mood and postoperative pain in women with breast cancer. 18 women with early-stage breast cancer. Telephone interviews at the completion of an experimental or control nursing intervention administered in the women's homes before and after breast cancer surgery. Women's perceptions of participation in a study of the effects of dialogue and TT or quiet time. Content analysis of transcribed telephone interviews revealed few differences in participants' perceptions of experimental and control interventions. Only participants who received the experimental intervention reported body sensations, and only participants in the control group inquired about the study and its purpose. Regardless of experimental or control intervention participation, women expressed feelings of calmness, relaxation, security, and comfort and a sense of awareness. The few women who commented about the nurse who administered the experimental or control intervention indicated that the nurse was empathetic, concerned, supportive, or helpful. The women regarded either nursing intervention as a positive experience. Some also expressed positive regard for the research nurse. Nurses who are not trained in the administration of TT may use quiet time and dialogue to enhance feelings of calmness and relaxation in patients with breast cancer.

  6. SF3B1 mutations constitute a novel therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Sarah L; Leonidou, Andri; Wai, Patty; Marchiò, Caterina; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Sapino, Anna; Salomon, Anne-Vincent; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta; Natrajan, Rachael C

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in RNA splicing have been found to occur at relatively high frequencies in several tumour types including myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, uveal melanoma, and pancreatic cancer, and at lower frequencies in breast cancer. To investigate whether dysfunction in RNA splicing is implicated in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, we performed a re-analysis of published exome and whole genome sequencing data. This analysis revealed that mutations in spliceosomal component genes occurred in 5.6% of unselected breast cancers, including hotspot mutations in the SF3B1 gene, which were found in 1.8% of unselected breast cancers. SF3B1 mutations were significantly associated with ER-positive disease, AKT1 mutations, and distinct copy number alterations. Additional profiling of hotspot mutations in a panel of special histological subtypes of breast cancer showed that 16% and 6% of papillary and mucinous carcinomas of the breast harboured the SF3B1 K700E mutation. RNA sequencing identified differentially spliced events expressed in tumours with SF3B1 mutations including the protein coding genes TMEM14C, RPL31, DYNL11, UQCC, and ABCC5, and the long non-coding RNA CRNDE. Moreover, SF3B1 mutant cell lines were found to be sensitive to the SF3b complex inhibitor spliceostatin A and treatment resulted in perturbation of the splicing signature. Albeit rare, SF3B1 mutations result in alternative splicing events, and may constitute drivers and a novel therapeutic target in a subset of breast cancers.

  7. Mevalonate metabolism regulates Basal breast cancer stem cells and is a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Ginestier, Christophe; Monville, Florence; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Cervera, Nathalie; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Finetti, Pascal; Guille, Arnaud; Larderet, Gaelle; Viens, Patrice; Sebti, Said; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle

    2012-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that breast tumors are organized in a hierarchy, with a subpopulation of tumorigenic cancer cells, the cancer stem cells (CSCs), which sustain tumor growth. The characterization of protein networks that govern CSC behavior is paramount to design new therapeutic strategies targeting this subpopulation of cells. We have sought to identify specific molecular pathways of CSCs isolated from 13 different breast cancer cell lines of luminal or basal/mesenchymal subtypes. We compared the gene expression profiling of cancer cells grown in adherent conditions to those of matched tumorsphere cultures. No specific pathway was identified to be commonly regulated in luminal tumorspheres, resulting from a minor CSC enrichment in tumorsphere passages from luminal cell lines. However, in basal/mesenchymal tumorspheres, the enzymes of the mevalonate metabolic pathway were overexpressed compared to those in cognate adherent cells. Inhibition of this pathway with hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase blockers resulted in a reduction of breast CSC independent of inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis and of protein farnesylation. Further modulation of this metabolic pathway demonstrated that protein geranylgeranylation (GG) is critical to breast CSC maintenance. A small molecule inhibitor of the geranylgeranyl transferase I (GGTI) enzyme reduced the breast CSC subpopulation both in vitro and in primary breast cancer xenografts. We found that the GGTI effect on the CSC subpopulation is mediated by inactivation of Ras homolog family member A (RHOA) and increased accumulation of P27(kip1) in the nucleus. The identification of protein GG as a major contributor to CSC maintenance opens promising perspectives for CSC targeted therapy in basal breast cancer.

  8. Current aspects of therapeutic reduction mammaplasty for immediate early breast cancer management: An update

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conservation surgery (BCS) is established as a safe surgical treatment for most patients with early breast cancer. Recently, advances in oncoplastic techniques are capable of preserving the breast form and quality of life. Although most BCS defects can be managed with primary closure, the aesthetic outcome may be unpredictable. Among technical options, therapeutic reduction mammaplasty (TRM) remains a useful procedure since the BCS defect can be repaired and the preoperative appearance can be improved, resulting in more proportional breasts. As a consequence of rich breast tissue vascularization, the greater part of reduction techniques have based their planning on preserving the pedicle of the nipple-areola complex after tumor removal. Reliable circulation and improvement of a conical shape to the breast are commonly described in TRM reconstructions. With an immediate approach, the surgical process is smooth since both procedures can be carried out in one operative setting. Additionally, it permits wider excision of the tumor, with a superior mean volume of the specimen and potentially reduces the incidence of margin involvement. Regardless of the fact that there is no consensus concerning the best TRM technique, the criteria is determined by the surgeon’s experience, the extent/location of glandular tissue resection and the size of the defect in relation to the size of the remaining breast. The main advantages of the technique utilized should include reproducibility, low interference with the oncological treatment and long-term results. The success of the procedure depends on patient selection, coordinated planning and careful intra-operative management. PMID:24527398

  9. SF3B1 mutations constitute a novel therapeutic target in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L; Leonidou, Andri; Wai, Patty; Marchiò, Caterina; Ng, Charlotte KY; Sapino, Anna; Salomon, Anne-Vincent; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta; Natrajan, Rachael C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in RNA splicing have been found to occur at relatively high frequencies in several tumour types including myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, uveal melanoma, and pancreatic cancer, and at lower frequencies in breast cancer. To investigate whether dysfunction in RNA splicing is implicated in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, we performed a re-analysis of published exome and whole genome sequencing data. This analysis revealed that mutations in spliceosomal component genes occurred in 5.6% of unselected breast cancers, including hotspot mutations in the SF3B1 gene, which were found in 1.8% of unselected breast cancers. SF3B1 mutations were significantly associated with ER-positive disease, AKT1 mutations, and distinct copy number alterations. Additional profiling of hotspot mutations in a panel of special histological subtypes of breast cancer showed that 16% and 6% of papillary and mucinous carcinomas of the breast harboured the SF3B1 K700E mutation. RNA sequencing identified differentially spliced events expressed in tumours with SF3B1 mutations including the protein coding genes TMEM14C, RPL31, DYNL11, UQCC, and ABCC5, and the long non-coding RNA CRNDE. Moreover, SF3B1 mutant cell lines were found to be sensitive to the SF3b complex inhibitor spliceostatin A and treatment resulted in perturbation of the splicing signature. Albeit rare, SF3B1 mutations result in alternative splicing events, and may constitute drivers and a novel therapeutic target in a subset of breast cancers. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:25424858

  10. Clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with breast tuberculosis: Analysis of 46 Cases.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Murat Ozgur; Sağlam, Cemile; Ağca, Filiz D; Terzioğlu, Serdar G

    2016-01-01

    Breast tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tubercular infection. Our aim is to highlight the nonspecific clinical presentations, diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic approaches of mammarian tuberculosis. Forty-six patients diagnosed with breast tuberculosis between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical features, all diagnostic methods, and the outcomes of treatment were analysed. All cases were female with a mean age of 36.4 years. Breast mass and pain were the most common complaints. While 34.8% of the cases had a physical examination with suspicions for malignancy, 43.5% of the patients had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4 or 5 lesions suggested malignancy radiologically. Definitive diagnosis was based on histopathologic examination through core needle biopsy (n = 29), excisional biopsy (n = 12), and open biopsy (n = 5) taken from the abscess wall during drainage. Standard antiTB therapy for 6 months was given to all cases. Thirty-three patients recovered with standard 6-month therapy while extended treatment for 9-12 months was needed in 13 (28.2%) cases. Surgery was carried out in 17 cases. Two patients developed recurrence. Breast tuberculosis can be easily confused with breast cancer, suppurative abscess, and other causes of granulomatous mastitis, both clinically and radiologically. A multidisciplinary approach is required to prevent diagnostic delays and unnecessary surgical interventions. Although antiTB therapy is the mainstay treatment of breast TB, surgery is usually indicated in patients refractory to medical treatment.

  11. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Detroit, MI RESULTS BACKGROUND Androgen Receptor Signaling in ER/PgR+ Breast Cancer  Estrogen receptor (ER)/ progesterone receptor (PgR...phenotypes. – Distinct subtypes are classified by the presence of estrogen (ER), progesterone (PgR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors...Exclusion Criteria Stage 1 • Severe concurrent disease, infection, or comorbidity • Pregnancy or lactation • Known/suspected brain metastases or

  12. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  13. Breast cancer risk assessment using genetic variants and risk factors in a Singapore Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic variants for breast cancer risk identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Western populations require further testing in Asian populations. A risk assessment model incorporating both validated genetic variants and established risk factors may improve its performance in risk prediction of Asian women. Methods A nested case-control study of female breast cancer (411 cases and 1,212 controls) within the Singapore Chinese Health Study was conducted to investigate the effects of 51 genetic variants identified in previous GWAS on breast cancer risk. The independent effect of these genetic variants was assessed by creating a summed genetic risk score (GRS) after adjustment for body mass index and the Gail model risk factors for breast cancer. Results The GRS was an independent predictor of breast cancer risk in Chinese women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of breast cancer for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of the GRS were 1.26 (0.90 to 1.76), 1.47 (1.06 to 2.04) and 1.75 (1.27 to 2.41) respectively (P for trend <0.001). In addition to established risk factors, the GRS improved the classification of 6.2% of women for their absolute risk of breast cancer in the next five years. Conclusions Genetic variants on top of conventional risk factors can improve the risk prediction of breast cancer in Chinese women. PMID:24941967

  14. Genetic counseling for women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Burke, W; Culver, J O; Bowen, D; Lowry, D; Durfy, S; McTiernan, A; Andersen, M R

    2000-02-28

    Women with a family history of breast cancer often over-estimate their personal risk for cancer and may view themselves as candidates for genetic testing even when the likelihood of an informative test result is low. We report here on genetic counseling of women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer, defined as women who have one or more biological relatives with breast cancer but whose pedigree suggests a low likelihood of autosomal dominant transmission. A genetic counseling protocol based on traditional genetic counseling strategies was developed with additional components added to address the needs of women with moderately increased breast cancer risk. These additional components included information about non-genetic risk factors, comparisons of high and moderate risk pedigrees, and evaluation of personal risk based on both genetic and nongenetic risk factors. Most participants liked the genetic counseling and found it useful. At baseline, participants over-estimated both their personal risk of breast cancer and that of the average woman. After counseling, estimates of personal and average risk of breast cancer were lower, although both remained higher than actual risk. Most participants reported that they felt less worried about breast cancer after receiving their personal-risk estimate. At baseline, most women judged themselves to be candidates for genetic testing and expressed interest in testing. The number who considered themselves candidates for testing was reduced after counseling (60% versus 82%) but still constituted a majority. Similarly, interest in testing was partially reduced by counseling (60% versus 91%). We conclude that genetic counseling can help women with an intermediate family history of breast cancer to develop more accurate views of their risk, reduce their breast cancer worry, and aid some of them in developing a more realistic view of genetic testing.

  15. Therapeutic effect of taxanes on metastatic breast cancer of various immunohistochemical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    FUKADA, IPPEI; ARAKI, KAZUHIRO; KOBAYASHI, KOKORO; KOBAYASHI, TAKAYUKI; HORII, RIE; AKIYAMA, FUTOSHI; TAKAHASHI, SHUNJI; IWASE, TAKUJI; ITO, YOSHINORI

    2016-01-01

    Taxane drugs play a central role in chemotherapy for breast cancer. However, previous studies have reported that taxanes are relatively ineffective in patients with operable luminal breast cancer compared with other subtypes. Between January 2000 and August 2008, 293 patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with taxanes in The Cancer Institute Hospital of The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and were included in the present study. The patients were divided into 4 subtypes based on the immunohistochemically evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. The clinicopathological features, response rate (RR) and time to progression (TTP) were analyzed retrospectively. In total, 159 patient tissues were classified as luminal type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2−), 28 patient tissues were classified as luminal-HER2 type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2+), 57 patient tissues were classified as HER2 type (ER−, PgR− and HER2+), and 49 patient tissues were classified as triple-negative type (ER−, PgR− and HER2−). Among the 4 subtypes, the clinical benefit rate was 51.6, 78.6, 71.9 and 40.8%, respectively. There were significant differences in TTP between subtypes (median TTP, 8.3 months in luminal, 14.1 months in luminal-HER2, 10.6 months in HER2, and 4.2 months in triple-negative; P<0.001). Patients with luminal type tumors had a significantly longer TTP than patients with triple-negative type tumors. The present data suggested that the immunohistochemical subtypes were associated with the therapeutic effect of taxanes for metastatic breast cancer and that taxanes yielded an acceptable RR and TTP in luminal metastatic breast cancer. Additional investigations are required to elucidate the predictive markers of taxane therapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer in each immunohistochemical subtype. PMID:27347197

  16. A therapeutic target for hormone-independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, D. K.; Cruz, A.; Pettit, N.; Mutter, G. L.; Pardee, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The action of the steroid hormone estradiol (E2) is mediated via interaction with a specific receptor (ER) that initiates a series of events downstream, leading to the modulation of hormone-responsive genes and cell proliferation. Antihormones also bind, but do not confer the active configuration to ER, thereby, blocking the transmission of E2-ER-initiated signals for cell proliferation. Although these compounds qualify for successful therapy of ER-positive [ER (+)] breast cancer patients, only a fraction of patients responds to antihormone treatment. In this study, the functional status of ER is determined to identify alternative targets for therapy of antihormone-resistant ER (+) breast cancers. METHOD: The interaction of ER with a specific DNA sequence, designated as E2 response element (ERE), was targeted to assess the functional state of ER. ER-ERE complex formation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and by a newly developed technique, based on the preferential binding of DNA-protein complex to a nitrocellulose membrane (NMBA) that measures both total and functional fraction of ER. RESULTS: The NMBA assay identified functional variants of ER among ER (+) breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsy specimens. ER of (21PT) cells did not bind E2 and these cells were tamoxifen (TAM) resistant. However 21PT cells were sensitive to a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist, W7, that blocked ERE-ER complex formation. CONCLUSIONS: ER variants of the 21PT type were detected among breast cancer biopsy specimens, emphasizing the significance of an alternative therapeutic target for TAM-resistant ER (+) human breast cancers with compounds such as W7. PMID:11474128

  17. Does therapeutic touch ease the discomfort or distress of patients undergoing stereotactic core breast biopsy? A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Frank, Leslie Smith; Frank, James L; March, David; Makari-Judson, Grace; Barham, Ruth B; Mertens, Wilson C

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether therapeutic touch administered at the time of stereotactic core biopsy of suspicious breast lesions results in a reduction in anxiety and pain. Randomized, patient-blinded, controlled trial of either Krieger-Kunz therapeutic touch administered by a trained practitioner or a sham intervention mimicking therapeutic touch delivered during core biopsy. Stereotactic breast biopsy unit of a comprehensive breast center. Women with mammographically detected, nonpalpable breast lesions requiring biopsy. Changes in pain and anxiety measured by visual analog scales immediately before and after stereotactic core biopsy. A total of 82 patients were accrued: 42 received actual therapeutic touch and 40 sham therapeutic touch. No significant differences were found between the arms for age, ethnicity, educational background, or other demographic data. The sham arm had a preponderance of left breast biopsies (48% vs 58%; P = 0.07) and received a slightly higher volume of epinephrine-containing local anesthetic (6.5 +/- 6.1 vs 4.5 +/- 4.5 mL; P = 0.09). Therapeutic touch patients were more likely to have an upper breast lesion location (57% vs 53%; P = 0.022). No significant differences between the arms were seen regarding postbiopsy pain (P = 0.95), anxiety (P = 0.66), fearfulness, or physiological parameters. Similarly, no differences were seen between the arms when change in parameters from prebiopsy to postbiopsy was considered for any of the psychological or physiological variables measured. These findings persisted when confounding variables were controlled for. Women undergoing stereotactic core breast biopsy received no significant benefit from therapeutic touch administered during the procedure. Therapeutic touch cannot be routinely recommended for patients in this setting.

  18. Novel nanosystem to enhance the antitumor activity of lapatinib in breast cancer treatment: Therapeutic efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Shi-Jiang; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Zuo, Wen-Shu; Liu, Ping; Pang, Bo; Liu, Kai

    2015-10-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the therapeutic performance of polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles towards the delivery of lapatinib (LPT) in breast cancers. We have successfully developed the lapatinib-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanosystem and showed its therapeutic potential in in vitro and in vivo models of breast cancer. The nanoformulations consisted of a polymeric core (poly[lactide-co-glycolide]-D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [PLGA-TPGS]), which was then enveloped by a PEGylated lipid layer (DSPE-PEG) (PLPT) to maintain the structural integrity. The PLPT formulation controlled the drug release in pH 7.4 conditions and accelerated the release at pH 5.5 conditions. The PLPT showed a remarkable cellular internalization and efficiently killed the MCF-7 cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, LPT-loaded nanoparticles effectively induced apoptosis of cancer cells than compared to free LPT. Pharmacokinetic data suggested that nanoparticles could significantly enhance the blood circulation time of LPT by reducing the uptake by a reticuloendothelial system (RES). The prolonged blood circulation of PLPT could allow the preferential accumulation of drug in the tumor tissues. Importantly, PLPT significantly reduced the tumor burden of cancerous mice and effectively controlled the tumor cell proliferation. TUNEL assay further showed a greater apoptosis of tumor tissues in the PLPT treated mice group. Our results suggest that the use of a hybrid system may allow a decrease in the dosage regimen without the loss of therapeutic effect. Overall, lapatinib-loaded hybrid nanoparticles hold great potential for achieving an optimal therapeutic effect in breast cancer treatment. The present anticancer drug delivery system could be potentially applied for the treatment of other cancers.

  19. Novel nanosystem to enhance the antitumor activity of lapatinib in breast cancer treatment: Therapeutic efficacy evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Shi-Jiang; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Zuo, Wen-Shu; Liu, Ping; Pang, Bo; Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the therapeutic performance of polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles towards the delivery of lapatinib (LPT) in breast cancers. We have successfully developed the lapatinib-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanosystem and showed its therapeutic potential in in vitro and in vivo models of breast cancer. The nanoformulations consisted of a polymeric core (poly[lactide-co-glycolide]-D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate [PLGA–TPGS]), which was then enveloped by a PEGylated lipid layer (DSPE-PEG) (PLPT) to maintain the structural integrity. The PLPT formulation controlled the drug release in pH 7.4 conditions and accelerated the release at pH 5.5 conditions. The PLPT showed a remarkable cellular internalization and efficiently killed the MCF-7 cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, LPT-loaded nanoparticles effectively induced apoptosis of cancer cells than compared to free LPT. Pharmacokinetic data suggested that nanoparticles could significantly enhance the blood circulation time of LPT by reducing the uptake by a reticuloendothelial system (RES). The prolonged blood circulation of PLPT could allow the preferential accumulation of drug in the tumor tissues. Importantly, PLPT significantly reduced the tumor burden of cancerous mice and effectively controlled the tumor cell proliferation. TUNEL assay further showed a greater apoptosis of tumor tissues in the PLPT treated mice group. Our results suggest that the use of a hybrid system may allow a decrease in the dosage regimen without the loss of therapeutic effect. Overall, lapatinib-loaded hybrid nanoparticles hold great potential for achieving an optimal therapeutic effect in breast cancer treatment. The present anticancer drug delivery system could be potentially applied for the treatment of other cancers. PMID:26177628

  20. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making.

  1. Photothermal therapeutic application of gold nanorods-porphyrin-trastuzumab complexes in HER2-positive breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xinmei; Guo, Ximing; An, Weiwei; Niu, Xingjian; Li, Suhan; Liu, Zhaoliang; Yang, Yue; Wang, Na; Jiang, Qicheng; Yan, Caichuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Qingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Gold nanorods are effective photothermal agents in diagnosis and treatment of cancer due to their specific near-infrared laser absorption. However, tumor photothermal therapy by nanorods alone is lack of targeting. Here, we described a novel nanocomplex made up of gold nanorods, porphyrin, and trastuzumab, called TGNs and investigated the TGN-mediated photothermal therapy as a potential alternative treatment of targeting HER2-positive breast cancers. By conjugating trastuzumab and porphyrin to the surface of gold nanorods, we have increased the targeting specificity and amplified the detecting effectiveness at the same time. TGN-mediated photothermal ablation by near-infrared laser led to a selective destruction of HER2-positive cancer cells and significantly inhibited tumor growth in mouse models bearing HER2 over-expressed breast cancer xenograft with less toxicity. Moreover, TGNs provided better therapeutic efficacy in comparison with the conventional molecule targeted therapy. Our current data suggest a highly promising future of TGNs for its therapeutic application in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers.

  2. Breast cancer as photodynamic therapy target: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency by overview of tumor complexity.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, María Julia; Vittar, Natalia Belén Rumie; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-12-10

    Photodynamic therapy is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure for eliminating selected malignant cells with specific light activation of a photosensitizer agent. Whereas interstitial and intra-operative approaches have been investigated for the ablation of a broad range of superficial or bulky solid tumors such as breast cancer, the majority of approved photodynamic therapy protocols are for the treatment of superficial lesions of skin and luminal organs. This review article will discuss recent progress in research focused mainly on assessing the efficacies of various photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy, as well as the combinatory strategies of various therapeutic modalities for improving treatments of parenchymal and/or stromal tissues of breast cancer solid tumors. Cytotoxic agents are used in cancer treatments for their effect on rapidly proliferating cancer cells. However, such therapeutics often lack specificity, which can lead to toxicity and undesirable side effects. Many approaches are designed to target tumors. Selective therapies can be established by focusing on distinctive intracellular (receptors, apoptotic pathways, multidrug resistance system, nitric oxide-mediated stress) and environmental (glucose, pH) differences between tumor and healthy tissue. A rational design of effective combination regimens for breast cancer treatment involves a better understanding of the mechanisms and molecular interactions of cytotoxic agents that underlie drug resistance and sensitivity.

  3. Breast cancer as photodynamic therapy target: Enhanced therapeutic efficiency by overview of tumor complexity

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, María Julia; Vittar, Natalia Belén Rumie; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure for eliminating selected malignant cells with specific light activation of a photosensitizer agent. Whereas interstitial and intra-operative approaches have been investigated for the ablation of a broad range of superficial or bulky solid tumors such as breast cancer, the majority of approved photodynamic therapy protocols are for the treatment of superficial lesions of skin and luminal organs. This review article will discuss recent progress in research focused mainly on assessing the efficacies of various photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy, as well as the combinatory strategies of various therapeutic modalities for improving treatments of parenchymal and/or stromal tissues of breast cancer solid tumors. Cytotoxic agents are used in cancer treatments for their effect on rapidly proliferating cancer cells. However, such therapeutics often lack specificity, which can lead to toxicity and undesirable side effects. Many approaches are designed to target tumors. Selective therapies can be established by focusing on distinctive intracellular (receptors, apoptotic pathways, multidrug resistance system, nitric oxide-mediated stress) and environmental (glucose, pH) differences between tumor and healthy tissue. A rational design of effective combination regimens for breast cancer treatment involves a better understanding of the mechanisms and molecular interactions of cytotoxic agents that underlie drug resistance and sensitivity. PMID:25493228

  4. Photothermal therapeutic application of gold nanorods-porphyrin-trastuzumab complexes in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xinmei; Guo, Ximing; An, Weiwei; Niu, Xingjian; Li, Suhan; Liu, Zhaoliang; Yang, Yue; Wang, Na; Jiang, Qicheng; Yan, Caichuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Qingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanorods are effective photothermal agents in diagnosis and treatment of cancer due to their specific near-infrared laser absorption. However, tumor photothermal therapy by nanorods alone is lack of targeting. Here, we described a novel nanocomplex made up of gold nanorods, porphyrin, and trastuzumab, called TGNs and investigated the TGN-mediated photothermal therapy as a potential alternative treatment of targeting HER2-positive breast cancers. By conjugating trastuzumab and porphyrin to the surface of gold nanorods, we have increased the targeting specificity and amplified the detecting effectiveness at the same time. TGN-mediated photothermal ablation by near-infrared laser led to a selective destruction of HER2-positive cancer cells and significantly inhibited tumor growth in mouse models bearing HER2 over-expressed breast cancer xenograft with less toxicity. Moreover, TGNs provided better therapeutic efficacy in comparison with the conventional molecule targeted therapy. Our current data suggest a highly promising future of TGNs for its therapeutic application in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancers. PMID:28155894

  5. TRPV2 is a novel biomarker and therapeutic target in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Mohamad; Ahirwar, Dinesh; Xiaoli, Zhang; Zhou, Xinyu; Lustberg, Maryam; Nasser, Mohd W; Shilo, Konstantin; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2016-05-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2 (TRPV2) is an ion channel that is triggered by agonists like cannabidiol (CBD). Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Chemotherapy is still the first line for the treatment of TNBC patients; however, TNBC usually gains rapid resistance and unresponsiveness to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that TRPV2 protein is highly up-regulated in TNBC tissues compared to normal breast tissues. We also observed that TNBC and estrogen receptor alpha negative (ERα-) patients with higher TRPV2 expression have significantly higher recurrence free survival compared to patients with lower TRPV2 expression especially those who were treated with chemotherapy. In addition, we showed that TRPV2 overexpression or activation by CBD significantly increased doxorubicin (DOX) uptake and apoptosis in TNBC cells. The induction of DOX uptake was abrogated by TRPV2 blocking or downregulation. In vivo mouse model studies showed that the TNBC tumors derived from CBD+DOX treated mice have significantly reduced weight and increased apoptosis compared to those treated with CBD or DOX alone. Overall, our studies for the first time revealed that TRPV2 might be a good prognostic marker for TNBC and ERα- breast cancer patient especially for those who are treated with chemotherapy. In addition, TRPV2 activation could be a novel therapeutic strategy to enhance the uptake and efficacy of chemotherapy in TNBC patients.

  6. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  7. Fucose decorated solid-lipid nanocarriers mediate efficient delivery of methotrexate in breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Singh, Bhupinder; Jain, Ashay; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Sharma, Rajeev; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-10-01

    The present study is designed to engineer fucose anchored methotrexate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to target breast cancer. The developed nano-carriers were characterized with respect to particle size, PDI, zeta potential, drug loading and entrapment, in-vitro release etc. The characterized formulations were used to comparatively assess cellular uptake, cell-viability, apoptosis, lysosomal membrane permeability, bioavailability, biodistribution, changes in tumor volume and animal survival. The ex-vivo results showed greater cellular uptake and better cytotoxicity at lower IC50 of methotrexate in breast cancer cells. Further, we observed increased programmed cell death (apoptosis) with altered lysosomal membrane permeability and better rate of degradation of lysosomal membrane in-vitro. On the other hand, in-vivo evaluation showed maximum bioavailability and tumor targeting efficiency with minimum secondary drug distribution in various organs with formulated and anchored nano-carrier when compared with free drug. Moreover, sizeable reduction in tumor burden was estimated with fucose decorated SLNs as compared to that seen with free MTX and SLNs-MTX. Fucose decorated SLNs showed promising results to develop therapeutic interventions for breast cancer, and paved a way to explore this promising and novel nano-carrier which enables to address breast cancer. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Factors associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis acceptance among women concerned about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Knapp, Caprice; Malo, Teri L; Friedman, Susan

    2009-10-01

    To assess sociodemographic, clinical, awareness, and attitudinal factors associated with acceptance of preimplantation genetic diagnosis among women concerned about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Participants (n = 962) were members of a national advocacy organization dedicated to empowering women at high risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer. Participants completed a web-based survey assessing factors associated with preimplantation genetic diagnosis acceptance. Factors significantly associated with acceptance in the bivariate analyses were used to build a logistic regression model. Among the 962 respondents, 318 (33.1%) selected the option that they would consider preimplantation genetic diagnosis, 367 (38.2%) would not consider preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and 277 (28.8%) selected "don't know." Significant predictors of preimplantation genetic diagnosis acceptance were the desire to have more children, having had a prenatal genetic test, preimplantation genetic diagnosis awareness, belief that preimplantation genetic diagnosis is acceptable for individuals at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, belief that preimplantation genetic diagnosis information should be given to individuals at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, concerns about preimplantation genetic diagnosis, perceived benefits of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and how preimplantation genetic diagnosis is considered. Women at increased risk for hereditary cancer may consider preimplantation genetic diagnosis as part of their reproductive decision making. Therefore, it is important to understand existing levels of awareness and attitudes toward this technology to provide optimal counseling and support.

  9. New therapeutic opportunities in epilepsy: a genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven

    2010-11-01

    Epilepsy is a common and serious neurological disorder. Despite recent advances in drug therapy, treatment for epilepsy is still largely empirical and rational prescribing based on the mechanism of action in an individual patient is generally not possible. Genetic studies have identified an increasing collection of disease-causing genes providing a fundamental molecular foundation on which to build this understanding, at least for some forms of epilepsy. The impact of these genetic discoveries is likely to be wide reaching-from the discovery and validation of new drug targets to the potential to enable rational prescribing based on genetic makeup and even further through animal experimentation to tease out molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to hyperexcitable neuronal networks causing epilepsy. Here we discuss how we can use knowledge of genetic mechanisms to improve treatment strategies now and into the future.

  10. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases.

  11. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  12. Identification of KLK10 as a therapeutic target to reverse trastuzumab resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Zhang, Yulong; Li, Jiaqiu; Zhu, Liyuan; Xu, Wenxia; Feng, Lifeng; Jin, Hongchuan; Wang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Trastuzumab, the first antibody widely used in anti-HER2 targeted therapy, dramatically improved the overall outcome of HER2 positive breast cancer patients. However, trastuzumab resistance emerged as a major problem in its clinical application. In order to explore mechanisms underlying trastuzumab resistance, we performed RNA-Seq to analyze the gene expression variation in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cell line. The sequencing result was then combined with the relevant data in TCGA database to conduct a co-expression analysis. We found a series of differentially expressed genes with potential contributions to trastuzumab resistance. Among them, KLK10 was verified to be a potential therapeutic target for reversing trastuzumab resistance. In summary, this study provides a new clue to screen molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for trastuzumab resistance. PMID:27825132

  13. New Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Therapeutics for Breast Cancer: An Assessment of Active-Targeting Inorganic Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-01-18

    Breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and mortality among women. Limitations in the current diagnostic methods and treatment approaches have led to new strategies to positively impact the survival rates and quality of life of breast cancer patients. Nanotechnology offers a real possibility of mitigating breast cancer mortality by early-stage cancer detection and more precise diagnosis as well as more effective treatments with minimal side effects. The current nanoplatforms approved for breast cancer therapeutics are based on passive tumor targeting using organic nanoparticles and have not provided the expected significant improvements in the clinic. In this review, we present the emerging approaches in breast cancer nanomedicine based on active targeting using versatile inorganic nanoplatforms with biomedical relevance, such as gold, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their efficacy in breast cancer imaging, drug and gene delivery, thermal therapy, combinational therapy, and theranostics in preclinical studies. The main challenges for clinical translation and perspectives are discussed.

  14. Developmental therapeutics for patients with breast cancer and central nervous system metastasis: current landscape and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Carneiro, B A; Wainwright, D A; Santa-Maria, C A; Kumthekar, P; Chae, Y K; Gradishar, W J; Cristofanilli, M; Giles, F J

    2016-10-03

    Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of metastatic disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent advances in the biological understanding of breast cancer have facilitated an unprecedented increase of survival in a subset of patients presenting with metastatic breast cancer. Patients with HER2 positive (HER2+) or triple negative breast cancer are at highest risk of developing CNS metastasis, and typically experience a poor prognosis despite treatment with local and systemic therapies. Among the obstacles ahead in the realm of developmental therapeutics for breast cancer CNS metastasis is the improvement of our knowledge on its biological nuances and on the interaction of the blood brain barrier with new compounds. This manuscript reviews recent discoveries related to the underlying biology of breast cancer brain metastases, clinical progress to date and suggests rational approaches for investigational therapies.

  15. The influence of genetic polymorphisms on the efficacy and side effects of anastrozole in postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Murtala B; Wei, Keat; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer is a common cause of cancer mortality among women. Several genetic factors have been implicated in its development. Current treatment guidelines for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer recommend that anastrozole [or any of the other two aromatase inhibitors (letrozole and exemestane)] is used as an alternative to tamoxifen or following several years of tamoxifen treatment. Nevertheless, this approach is still associated with many challenges, ranging from the recurrence of breast cancer to considerable interindividual variability in the tolerability of anastrozole, which may cause adverse effects, such as musculoskeletal symptoms, and lead to the withdrawal of many patients from treatment. Variabilities in the genes encoding the drug target (aromatase) or its metabolizing enzymes (CYP3A and UGT1A) contribute toward the interindividual variability in anastrozole's pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics. This paper reviews the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP19A1, CYP3A4, and UGT1A4 in the responses of female hormone receptor-positive postmenopausal breast cancer patients to anastrozole. Many reviews in the literature have suggested that the study of functional polymorphisms and investigation of relevant genetic markers may provide valuable information in predicting responses to anastrozole in terms of its therapeutic and adverse effects. Nevertheless, more studies are required before the knowledge of its pharmacogenomics can be applied to the individualization of treatment to ensure that patients receive the maximum benefits. Therefore, future analyses, including but not limited to genome-wide association studies, are encouraged to address some of the gray areas in the pharmacogenomics of anastrozole therapy in postmenopausal breast cancer cases; this will help in providing guidance for future pharmacogenomics protocols when anastrozole is utilized in patients' management.

  16. Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer? Evaluating Mammary Tumorigenesis and Progression Genetically Hyper-Muscular Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    1-0424 TITLE: Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer ? Evaluating Mammary Tumorigenesis and Progression in...SUBTITLE Does Skeletal Muscle Mass Influence Breast Cancer ? Evaluating Mammary 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Tumorigenesis and Progression in Genetically...activity independently reduce breast cancer . Conversely, obesity and insulin resistance are associated with increased breast cancer incidence

  17. Therapeutic Breast Massage in Lactation for the Management of Engorgement, Plugged Ducts, and Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Witt, Ann M; Bolman, Maya; Kredit, Sheila; Vanic, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Many women in developed countries do not meet their breastfeeding goals and wean early because of breast pain. This study aimed to describe clinical response to therapeutic breast massage in lactation (TBML) in the management of engorgement, plugged ducts, and mastitis. Breastfeeding women presenting with engorgement, plugged ducts, or mastitis who received TBML as part of their treatment were enrolled (n = 42). Data collected at the initial visit included demographic, history, and exam data pre-TBML and post-TBML. Email surveys sent 2 days, 2 weeks, and 12 weeks following the initial visit assessed pain and breastfeeding complications. A nested case control of engorged mothers (n = 73) was separately enrolled to compare engorgement severity. Reasons for the visit included engorgement (36%), plugged ducts (67%), and mastitis (29%). Cases, compared to controls, were significantly more likely to have severe engorgement (47% vs 7%, P < .001). Initial mean breast pain level among those receiving TBML was 6.4 out of 10. Following TBML, there was significant improvement in both breast (6.4 vs 2.8, P < .001) and nipple pain (4.6 vs 2.8, P = .013). All women reported immediate improvement in their pain level. At the 12-week survey, 65% found the massage treatment very helpful. The majority of the women with a new episode of mastitis or plugged duct during the study follow-up found the techniques learned during the office visit very helpful for home management of these episodes. In office, TBML is helpful for the reduction of acute breast pain associated with milk stasis. Mothers find TBML helpful both immediately in-office and for home management of future episodes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Mitochondrial Genetics Regulate Breast Cancer Tumorigenicity and Metastatic Potential.

    PubMed

    Feeley, Kyle P; Bray, Alexander W; Westbrook, David G; Johnson, Larry W; Kesterson, Robert A; Ballinger, Scott W; Welch, Danny R

    2015-10-15

    Current paradigms of carcinogenic risk suggest that genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors influence an individual's predilection for developing metastatic breast cancer. Investigations of tumor latency and metastasis in mice have illustrated differences between inbred strains, but the possibility that mitochondrial genetic inheritance may contribute to such differences in vivo has not been directly tested. In this study, we tested this hypothesis in mitochondrial-nuclear exchange mice we generated, where cohorts shared identical nuclear backgrounds but different mtDNA genomes on the background of the PyMT transgenic mouse model of spontaneous mammary carcinoma. In this setting, we found that primary tumor latency and metastasis segregated with mtDNA, suggesting that mtDNA influences disease progression to a far greater extent than previously appreciated. Our findings prompt further investigation into metabolic differences controlled by mitochondrial process as a basis for understanding tumor development and metastasis in individual subjects. Importantly, differences in mitochondrial DNA are sufficient to fundamentally alter disease course in the PyMT mouse mammary tumor model, suggesting that functional metabolic differences direct early tumor growth and metastatic efficiency.

  19. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  20. Targeting IKK in Basal-Like Breast Tumors as a Therapeutic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    therapeutic targets in this disease. Her2- overexpression was first shown to activate NF-kB over a decade ago ( Galang et al., 1996), however, the role that NF...family members involved in the canonical pathway, specifically the p65/p50 heterodimeric complex ( Galang et al., 1996; Biswas et al., 2004). Given this...epithelial cells and breast cancer cells from primary and metastatic sites using selective media. Cancer Res 53: 627–635. Galang CK, Garcia-Ramirez J, Solski

  1. Exploring the Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications of Aberrant Splicing in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Shtivelman et al., 1985) and TMPRSS2‐ERG  found  in many  cases of  prostate   cancer   (Tomlins  et  al.,  2005).  New  efforts  using  high...of TMPRSS2 and ETS Transcription Factor Genes in  Prostate   Cancer . Science, 310(5748), 644‐648.  ...Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications of Aberrant Splicing in Breast Cancer Dr. William Foulkes Sir Mortimer B. Davis- Jewish General Hospital

  2. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  3. HCN channelopathies: pathophysiology in genetic epilepsy and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Phillips, A Marie; Petrou, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) can act as pacemakers in the brain making them strong candidates for driving aberrant hypersynchronous network activity seen in epilepsy. Transcriptional changes in HCN channels occur in several animal models of epilepsy. However, only recently have genetic studies demonstrated sequence variation in HCN1 and HCN2 genes associated with human epilepsy. These include a triple proline deletion in HCN2 that increases channel function and occurs more often in patients with febrile seizure syndromes. Other HCNx gene variants have been described in idiopathic generalized epilepsy although the functional consequence of these remains unclear. In this review we explore potential cellular and network mechanisms involving HCN channels in the genetic epilepsies. We suggest how new genetic sequencing technology, medium-throughput functional assays and the ability to develop syndrome-specific animal models will provide a more comprehensive understanding of how I(h) contributes to pathogenic mechanisms underlying human genetic epilepsy. We also discuss what is known about the pharmacological manipulation of HCN channels in the context of epilepsy and how this may help future efforts in developing HCN-channel-based therapy. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T; Davies, Kay E

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene-replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re-establish muscle function. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  5. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  6. The role of chemokines in breast cancer pathology and its possible use as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Castro, Julieta I; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Carrero, Julio C; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system.

  7. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Arreola, M. Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Castro, Julieta I.; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Carrero, Julio C.; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system. PMID:25165728

  8. Genetic Variations May Help Identify Best Candidates for Preventive Breast Cancer Drugs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Newly discovered genetic variations may help predict breast cancer risk in women who receive preventive breast cancer therapy with the selective estrogen receptor modulator drugs tamoxifen andraloxifene, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study is published in the journal Cancer Discovery. "Our findings are important because we identified genetic factors that could eventually be used to select women who should be offered the drugs for prevention," said James Ingle, MD, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic. |

  9. Influence of microvesicles in breast cancer metastasis and their therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Arshad Malik, Muhammad Faraz

    2015-03-01

     Microvesicles are membranous sac structures released from cell surfaces of many eukaryotic cells. Their presence in the blood and urine also signify their potential use as biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of different diseases. At present, synthesis and release of these vesicles from mammary tumor cells and their role in disease progression requires further research. In this report, correlation of microvesicles along with breast cancer metastasis has been explored. Metastasis is a process of a non-randomized set of events, which begins with a loss of cancer cell adhesion at the primary tumor site. Later on, these cells invade the surrounding tissue and enter into circulation. After compromising host immune response, these cells extravasate and localized at the suitable distant site for a secondary growth. Involvement of microvesicles in modulating this process has also been observed. Microvesicles released from primary cancer cells may carry mRNA, miRNAs, DNA and various proteins. These vesicles may also influence multi drug resistance as observed in breast and leukemia cancer cell lines. A thorough understanding of microvesicles synthesis and their potential implication in metastasis would facilitate the design of novel therapeutic approach for breast cancer.

  10. miRNA – Therapeutic tool in breast cancer? Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge about involvement of microRNAs in breast cancer, and their potential in the clinic, published in scientific journals searched in Pubmed/Medline database until March 2014. Results MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of 21–25 nucleotide small RNAs molecules. Currently, it is well known that miRNA plays a key role in all cellular processes of the organism including tumour initiation and progression. Many studies have shown that circulating miRNAs are attractive, easily detectable tumour biomarkers. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is clinically established that different subtypes may respond differently to therapies, give metastases and present drug resistance. MicroRNAs have a potential as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools in breast cancer. Conclusion Molecular knowledge is crucial for choosing the most effective therapy for individual patients. MicroRNAs holds a great potential in anticancer therapy. PMID:25859396

  11. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and non-genetic risk factors in Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C.; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M.; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. Methods We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. Results We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele odds ratio (OR): 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.74–1.20), 1.20 (0.94–1.53) and 1.49 (1.28–1.75) for current, former and never hormone therapy users, respectively, P-interaction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72–1.42), 1.19 (0.98–1.45) and 1.69 (1.26–2.26) for never, <12 months, and >12 months breastfeeding, respectively, P-interaction 0.014]. Conclusions The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. Impact These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and non-genetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. PMID:26364163

  12. A targeted approach to genetic counseling in breast cancer patients: the experience of an Italian local project.

    PubMed

    La Verde, Nicla; Corsi, Fabio; Moretti, Anna; Peissel, Bernard; Dalu, Davide; Girelli, Serena; Fasola, Cinzia; Gambaro, Anna; Roversi, Gaia; Azzollini, Jacopo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Farina, Gabriella; Manoukian, Siranoush

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hereditary breast cancer (BC) may benefit from genetic counseling and testing for detection of causative mutations, definition of therapeutic and preventive strategies, and identification of at-risk relatives. Italy has few oncogenetic centers and genetic evaluation of all patients with BC is not feasible. Moreover, lack of uniformity in the selection of patients generates inappropriate referral to the geneticist. We designed a model that may represent a reproducible way to select patients at risk for hereditary BC, with the aims of rationalizing access to genetic centers and improving clinical management and surveillance. The genetic unit of a Cancer Center and the Departments of Oncology from 2 public Hospitals in Milan were involved in the project. After training sessions at the genetic unit, operators from the 2 hospitals evaluated all patients with BC attending a first oncologic visit, through a specific interview. Patients considered at risk of hereditary BC attended counseling at the genetic unit. Of 419 patients, 61 (14.5%) were eligible for genetic counseling after the interview. Of these, 46 (10.9%) strictly met testing criteria. Overall, 52 (12.4%) patients underwent genetic counseling and 47 were tested for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation. After genetic test results, the available options for treatment/surveillance were discussed by a multidisciplinary team, according to the level of genetic risk. It is possible to improve the process of referring patients with suspected hereditary BC for genetic risk assessment. The application of clinical screening reduced the genetics unit's workload and enabled optimization of time and resources.

  13. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    satellites ” resulted in reversion of the cells to an epithelial state, re-entry into the cell cycle, and restoration of their ability to generate both...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer...W81XWH-12-1-0107 Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

  14. TTK/hMPS1 is an attractive therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maire, Virginie; Baldeyron, Céline; Richardson, Marion; Tesson, Bruno; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Gravier, Eléonore; Marty-Prouvost, Bérengère; De Koning, Leanne; Rigaill, Guillem; Dumont, Aurélie; Gentien, David; Barillot, Emmanuel; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Depil, Stéphane; Cruzalegui, Francisco; Pierré, Alain; Tucker, Gordon C; Dubois, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a subgroup of breast cancers (BC) associated with the most aggressive clinical behavior. No targeted therapy is currently available for the treatment of patients with TNBC. In order to discover potential therapeutic targets, we searched for protein kinases that are overexpressed in human TNBC biopsies and whose silencing in TNBC cell lines causes cell death. A cohort including human BC biopsies obtained at Institut Curie as well as normal tissues has been analyzed at a gene-expression level. The data revealed that the human protein kinase monopolar spindle 1 (hMPS1), also known as TTK and involved in mitotic checkpoint, is specifically overexpressed in TNBC, compared to the other BC subgroups and healthy tissues. We confirmed by immunohistochemistry and reverse phase protein array that TNBC expressed higher levels of TTK protein compared to the other BC subgroups. We then determined the biological effects of TTK depletion by RNA interference, through analyses of tumorigenic capacity and cell viability in different human TNBC cell lines. We found that RNAi-mediated depletion of TTK in various TNBC cell lines severely compromised their viability and their ability to form colonies in an anchorage-independent manner. Moreover, we observed that TTK silencing led to an increase in H2AX phosphorylation, activation of caspases 3/7, sub-G1 cell population accumulation and high annexin V staining, as well as to a decrease in G1 phase cell population and an increased aneuploidy. Altogether, these data indicate that TTK depletion in TNBC cells induces apoptosis. These results point out TTK as a protein kinase overexpressed in TNBC that may represent an attractive therapeutic target specifically for this poor prognosis associated subgroup of breast cancer.

  15. TTK/hMPS1 Is an Attractive Therapeutic Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maire, Virginie; Baldeyron, Céline; Richardson, Marion; Tesson, Bruno; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Gravier, Eléonore; Marty-Prouvost, Bérengère; De Koning, Leanne; Rigaill, Guillem; Dumont, Aurélie; Gentien, David; Barillot, Emmanuel; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Depil, Stéphane; Cruzalegui, Francisco; Pierré, Alain; Tucker, Gordon C.; Dubois, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a subgroup of breast cancers (BC) associated with the most aggressive clinical behavior. No targeted therapy is currently available for the treatment of patients with TNBC. In order to discover potential therapeutic targets, we searched for protein kinases that are overexpressed in human TNBC biopsies and whose silencing in TNBC cell lines causes cell death. A cohort including human BC biopsies obtained at Institut Curie as well as normal tissues has been analyzed at a gene-expression level. The data revealed that the human protein kinase monopolar spindle 1 (hMPS1), also known as TTK and involved in mitotic checkpoint, is specifically overexpressed in TNBC, compared to the other BC subgroups and healthy tissues. We confirmed by immunohistochemistry and reverse phase protein array that TNBC expressed higher levels of TTK protein compared to the other BC subgroups. We then determined the biological effects of TTK depletion by RNA interference, through analyses of tumorigenic capacity and cell viability in different human TNBC cell lines. We found that RNAi-mediated depletion of TTK in various TNBC cell lines severely compromised their viability and their ability to form colonies in an anchorage-independent manner. Moreover, we observed that TTK silencing led to an increase in H2AX phosphorylation, activation of caspases 3/7, sub-G1 cell population accumulation and high annexin V staining, as well as to a decrease in G1 phase cell population and an increased aneuploidy. Altogether, these data indicate that TTK depletion in TNBC cells induces apoptosis. These results point out TTK as a protein kinase overexpressed in TNBC that may represent an attractive therapeutic target specifically for this poor prognosis associated subgroup of breast cancer. PMID:23700430

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Breast Reconstruction Surgery and Therapeutic Mammoplasty: Prospective Evaluation 1 Year Post-Surgery with BREAST-Q Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Laxmi; Busheri, Laleh; Dixit, Santosh; Patel, Chaula; Dhar, Upendra; Koppiker, Chaitanyanand

    2015-12-01

    Breast Cancer (BC) treatment leads to mutilation and destruction of breast shape with negative effects on body image and self-esteem.One of the main goals of reconstructive and oncoplastic breast surgery is to satisfy patients and improve their quality of life (QoL).Therefore, it is important to assess the patient experience post-surgery by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that focus on the patient's perception of the surgery and surgical care, as well as psychosocial well-being and physical functioning. The objective of the current study was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction such as breast appearance including implant type in a selective sample of women who underwent breast reconstruction surgery using implants. Participants in this prospective study were women, (age 26-75 years) that were newly diagnosed with breast carcinoma. All consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction between January 2013 and October 2014 were asked to complete the BREAST-Q questionnaire 1 year after surgery. 120 patients underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using implant. While 38 patients underwent reconstruction with opposite breast reduction symmertization, 27 patients underwent therapeutic mammoplasty. The response rate for BREAST-Q questionnaire completion was 98 % with 147 out of 150 study participants completed the questionnaire. From the data collected from 147 patients, the responses could be distributed into 4 distinct groups based on the reconstruction outcomes namely "very much satisfied" (93 %) or "definitely and mostly satisfied" (94 %) or "satisfied" with the outcome (88 %) or "definitely agree on having reconstruction rather than the alternative of having no breast "(91 %).The results showed significant improvement in all four areas that were evaluated after surgery namely satisfaction with the appearance of the breasts, psychosocial, sexual and physical well-being. While the reconstruction surgery had an overall

  17. Glutamine Sensitivity Analysis Identifies the xCT Antiporter as a Common Triple Negative Breast Tumor Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Luika A.; Holton, Thomas; Yuneva, Mariia; Louie, Raymond J.; Padró, Mercè; Daemen, Anneleen; Hu, Min; Chan, Denise A.; Ethier, Stephen P.; van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Polyak, Kornelia; McCormick, Frank; Gray, Joe W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A handful of tumor-derived cell lines form the mainstay of cancer therapeutic development, yielding drugs with impact typically measured as months to disease progression. To develop more effective breast cancer therapeutics and more readily understand their clinical impact, we constructed a functional metabolic portrait of 46 independently-derived breast cell lines. Our analysis of glutamine uptake and dependence identified a subset of triple negative samples that are glutamine auxotrophs. Ambient glutamine indirectly supports environmental cystine acquisition via the xCT antiporter, which is expressed on 1/3 of triple negative tumors in vivo. xCT inhibition with the clinically approved anti-inflammatory Sulfasalazine decreases tumor growth revealing a therapeutic target in breast tumors of poorest prognosis, and a lead compound for rapid, effective drug development. PMID:24094812

  18. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on common genetic variants in women of East Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wanqing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Guo, Xingyi; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Brennan, Paul; Chen, Shou-Tung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Ito, Hidemi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Teo, Soo H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Kang, Daehee; Xiang, Yongbing; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-08

    Approximately 100 common breast cancer susceptibility alleles have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The utility of these variants in breast cancer risk prediction models has not been evaluated adequately in women of Asian ancestry. We evaluated 88 breast cancer risk variants that were identified previously by GWAS in 11,760 cases and 11,612 controls of Asian ancestry. SNPs confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian women were used to construct a polygenic risk score (PRS). The relative and absolute risks of breast cancer by the PRS percentiles were estimated based on the PRS distribution, and were used to stratify women into different levels of breast cancer risk. We confirmed significant associations with breast cancer risk for SNPs in 44 of the 78 previously reported loci at P < 0.05. Compared with women in the middle quintile of the PRS, women in the top 1% group had a 2.70-fold elevated risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 2.15-3.40). The risk prediction model with the PRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.606. The lifetime risk of breast cancer for Shanghai Chinese women in the lowest and highest 1% of the PRS was 1.35% and 10.06%, respectively. Approximately one-half of GWAS-identified breast cancer risk variants can be directly replicated in East Asian women. Collectively, common genetic variants are important predictors for breast cancer risk. Using common genetic variants for breast cancer could help identify women at high risk of breast cancer.

  19. UCP2 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer cells to therapeutic agents by increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    Modulation of oxidative stress in cancer cells plays an important role in the study of the resistance to anticancer therapies. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) may play a dual role in cancer, acting as a protective mechanism in normal cells, while its overexpression in cancer cells could confer resistance to chemotherapy and a higher survival through downregulation of ROS production. Thus, our aim was to check whether the inhibition of UCP2 expression and function increases oxidative stress and could render breast cancer cells more sensitive to cisplatin (CDDP) or tamoxifen (TAM). For this purpose, we studied clonogenicity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cell viability, ROS production, apoptosis, and autophagy in MCF-7 and T47D (only the last four determinations) breast cancer cells treated with CDDP or TAM, in combination or without a UCP2 knockdown (siRNA or genipin). Furthermore, survival curves were performed in order to check the impact of UCP2 expression in breast cancer patients. UCP2 inhibition and cytotoxic treatments produced a decrease in cell viability and clonogenicity, in addition to an increase in ΔΨm, ROS production, apoptosis, and autophagy. It is important to note that CDDP decreased UCP2 protein levels, so that the greatest effects produced by the UCP2 inhibition in combination with a cytotoxic treatment, with regard to treatment alone, were observed in TAM+UCP2siRNA-treated cells. Moreover, this UCP2 inhibition caused autophagic cell death, since apoptosis parameters barely increased after UCP2 knockdown. Finally, survival curves revealed that higher UCP2 expression corresponded with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion, UCP2 could be a therapeutic target in breast cancer, especially in those patients treated with tamoxifen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo 1H MRS in the assessment of the therapeutic response of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Baek, Hyeon Man; Su, Min Ying; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2011-07-01

    MRI and in vivo MRS have rapidly evolved as sensitive tools for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in cancer research. In vivo MRS provides information on tumor metabolism, which is clinically valuable in the diagnosis and assessment of tumor response to therapy for the management of women with breast diseases. Several centers complement breast MRI studies with (1)H MRS to improve the specificity of diagnosis. Malignant breast tissues show elevated water-to-fat ratio and choline-containing compounds (total choline, tCho), and any effect of therapy on tissue viability or metabolism will be manifested as changes in these levels. Sequential (1)H MRS studies have shown significantly reduced tCho levels during the course of therapy in patients who were responders. However, there are challenges in using in vivo MRS because of the relatively low sensitivity in detecting the tCho resonance with decreased lesion size or significant reduction in the tumor volume during therapy. MRS is also technically challenging because of the low signal-to-noise ratio and heterogeneous distribution of fat and glandular tissues in the breast. MRS is best utilized for the diagnosis of focal masses, most commonly seen in patients with ductal-type neoplasms; however, it has limitations in detecting nonfocal masses, such as the linear pattern of tumors seen in invasive lobular carcinoma. Further work is required to assess the clinical utility of quantitative MRS, with the goal of automation, which will reduce the subjectivity currently inherent in both qualitative and semi-quantitative MRS.

  1. Breast papillomas: current management with a focus on a new diagnostic and therapeutic modality

    PubMed Central

    Al Sarakbi, W; Worku, D; Escobar, PF; Mokbel, K

    2006-01-01

    Breast papilloma is a term that describes an intraductal papillary configuration of the mammary epithelium on macroscopic or microscopic examination. It includes solitary intraductal papillomas, multiple papillomas, papillomatosis, and juvenile papillomatosis (JP). Recent advances in mammary ductoscopy (MD) have raised new possibilities in the diagnosis and treatment of breast papillomas. This technique represents an important diagnostic adjunct in patients with pathological nipple discharge (PND) by allowing direct visualisation and biopsy of intraductal lesions and guiding duct excision surgery. Treatment of breast papillomas often entails surgical duct excision for symptomatic relief and histopathological examination. Recently, more conservative approach has been adapted. MD-assisted microdochectomy should be considered the procedure of choice for a papilloma-related single duct discharge. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that MD has the potential to reduce the number of duct excision procedures and minimise the extent of surgical resection. Imaging-guided vacuum-assisted core biopsy can be diagnostic and therapeutic for papillomas seen on mammography and/or ultrasound. Patients with multiple papillomas do have an increased risk of developing cancer and should be kept under annual review with regular mammography (preferably digital mammography) if treated conservatively. Magnetic resonance (MR) can be also used in surveillance in view of its high sensitivity. Because the risk is small, long term and affects both breasts, long-term follow-up is more appropriate than prophylactic mastectomy. Patients who prove to have solitary duct papilloma have insufficient increase in the risk of subsequent malignancy to justify routine follow-up. PMID:16417642

  2. Vascular Anomalies: From Genetics toward Models for Therapeutic Trials

    PubMed Central

    Uebelhoer, Melanie; Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized abnormalities that occur during vascular development. Several causative genes have been identified not only for inherited but also for some sporadic forms, and the molecular pathways involved are becoming understood. This gives us the opportunity to generate animals carrying the causative genetic defects, which we hope model the phenotype seen in human patients. These models would enable us not only to test known antiangiogenic drugs, but also to develop novel approaches for treatment, directly targeting the mutated protein or molecules implicated in the pathophysiological signaling pathways. PMID:22908197

  3. Economic evaluation of using a genetic test to direct breast cancer chemoprevention in white women with a previous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda E; Dinh, Tuan A; Hinds, David A; Walser, Bryan L; Allman, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Tamoxifen therapy reduces the risk of breast cancer but increases the risk of serious adverse events including endometrial cancer and thromboembolic events. The cost effectiveness of using a commercially available breast cancer risk assessment test (BREVAGen™) to inform the decision of which women should undergo chemoprevention by tamoxifen was modeled in a simulated population of women who had undergone biopsies but had no diagnosis of cancer. A continuous time, discrete event, mathematical model was used to simulate a population of white women aged 40-69 years, who were at elevated risk for breast cancer because of a history of benign breast biopsy. Women were assessed for clinical risk of breast cancer using the Gail model and for genetic risk using a panel of seven common single nucleotide polymorphisms. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of using genetic risk together with clinical risk, instead of clinical risk alone, to determine eligibility for 5 years of tamoxifen therapy. In addition to breast cancer, the simulation included health states of endometrial cancer, pulmonary embolism, deep-vein thrombosis, stroke, and cataract. Estimates of costs in 2012 US dollars were based on Medicare reimbursement rates reported in the literature and utilities for modeled health states were calculated as an average of utilities reported in the literature. A 50-year time horizon was used to observe lifetime effects including survival benefits. For those women at intermediate risk of developing breast cancer (1.2-1.66 % 5-year risk), the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the combined genetic and clinical risk assessment strategy over the clinical risk assessment-only strategy was US$47,000, US$44,000, and US$65,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, for women aged 40-49, 50-59, and 60-69 years, respectively (assuming a price of US$945 for genetic testing). Results were sensitive to assumptions about patient adherence, utility of life while taking tamoxifen

  4. Genetics of the cardiometabolic syndrome: new insights and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2007-10-01

    Although the definition of the phenotype is imprecise, cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) includes a constellation of complex diseases such as type 2 diabetes, dislipidemias, central obesity and hypertension, proinflammatory and prothrombotic states, ovarian polycystosis and fatty liver. The genetics of each disease is complex in itself and varies in spectrum from monogenic and syndromic models of inheritance, usually rare, to the most common polygenic and multifactorial forms. In addition, human studies using the candidate-gene approach indicate that common genetic variants of several genes are associated with the development of CMS. Genome-wide scans have also provided several chromosomal regions associated with some of the components of CMS. In addition, through comparative genomics animal models can generate a map for candidate loci in humans and a promising approach is offered by bioinformatic tools for gene prioritization. Lastly, the involvement of genes whose products are already the targets for approved drugs, such as SLC6A4, PPARalpha and PPARgamma , in the development of CMS suggests new avenues for CMS pharmacological treatment.

  5. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  6. Radio-guided surgery improves outcome of therapeutic excision in non-palpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernandez, J F; Tanis, P J; Deurloo, E E; Nieweg, O E; Th Rutgers, E J; Kroon, B B R; Valdés Olmos, R A

    2004-03-01

    Intratumoral injection of a radiocolloid for lymphatic mapping enables the therapeutic excision of clinically occult breast cancer with the aid of a gamma-ray detection probe. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of radio-guided tumour excision in addition to a guide wire and to identify factors predicting clear margins. Sixty-five consecutive patients underwent radio-guided tumour excision after intratumoral injection of 99mTc-nanocolloid guided by ultrasound or stereotaxis. A localization wire was inserted after scintigraphy had been performed (group 1). The results were compared with retrospective data from 67 consecutive patients who underwent therapeutic wire-directed excision alone (group 2). Factors predicting clear margins (> or = 1 mm) were determined in a logistic regression model. Adequate margins were obtained in 83% of group 1 and in 64% of group 2 (P = 0.014). The invasive component was incompletely excised in two patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Further surgery was performed in four patients in group 1 and in 14 patients in group 2. Factors predictive of clear margins were decreasing pathological tumour diameter (P = 0.035), increasing weight of the specimen (P = 0.046), absence of microcalcifications (P = 0.004) and absence of carcinoma in situ component (P = 0.024). Radio-guided excision was an independent predictor of complete excision of the invasive component (P = 0.012). The application of radio-guided surgery combined with wire localization seems to improve the outcome of therapeutic excision of non-palpable invasive breast cancer compared with wire-directed excision alone.

  7. Practical aspects of genetic counseling in breast cancer: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Christinat, Alexandre; Pagani, Olivia

    2013-08-01

    In unselected populations, less than 10% of breast cancers are associated with germline mutations in predisposing genes. Breast cancer type 1 and 2 (BRCA1 and BRCA2) susceptibility genes are the most common involved genes and confer a 10-30 times higher risk of developing the disease compared to the general population. A personal or family history suggestive of inherited breast cancer syndrome may be further evaluated to assess the risk of genetic predisposition and the presence of a genetic mutation. Breast cancer genetic counseling should include a careful risk assessment with associated psychosocial evaluation and support, possible molecular testing, personalized discussion of results. Knowledge of BRCA status can influence individualized cancer risk-reduction strategies. i.e. active surveillance, prophylactic surgery and/or pharmacoprevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine. PMID:27279675

  9. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  10. Women's receptivity to testing for a genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaliki, H; Loader, S; Levenkron, J C; Logan-Young, W; Hall, W J; Rowley, P T

    1995-08-01

    Four hundred eighty-four patients undergoing mammography and 498 patients visiting their obstetrician-gynecologist were asked whether they would take a breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) test to detect a genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. More than 90% in both groups said they would take the test. Women were more likely to accept if they were regularly having breast examinations by a physician, believed that mammography effectively detects early breast cancer, and believed that early breast cancer is curable. If shown to have inherited a susceptibility, many reported that they would be very anxious, would want the test repeated, would examine their breasts more often than monthly, and would want mammography more often than yearly. Many also reported that they would recommend testing to relatives.

  11. Women's receptivity to testing for a genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chaliki, H; Loader, S; Levenkron, J C; Logan-Young, W; Hall, W J; Rowley, P T

    1995-01-01

    Four hundred eighty-four patients undergoing mammography and 498 patients visiting their obstetrician-gynecologist were asked whether they would take a breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) test to detect a genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. More than 90% in both groups said they would take the test. Women were more likely to accept if they were regularly having breast examinations by a physician, believed that mammography effectively detects early breast cancer, and believed that early breast cancer is curable. If shown to have inherited a susceptibility, many reported that they would be very anxious, would want the test repeated, would examine their breasts more often than monthly, and would want mammography more often than yearly. Many also reported that they would recommend testing to relatives. PMID:7625512

  12. Genetic analysis of mammographic breast density in adult women: evidence of a gene effect.

    PubMed

    Pankow, J S; Vachon, C M; Kuni, C C; King, R A; Arnett, D K; Grabrick, D M; Rich, S S; Anderson, V E; Sellers, T A

    1997-04-16

    The appearance of the female breast viewed by mammography varies considerably from one individual to another because of underlying differences in the relative proportions of fat, connective tissue, and glandular epithelium that combine to create a characteristic pattern of breast density. An association between mammographic patterns and family history of breast cancer has previously been reported. However, this association has not been found in all studies, and few data are available on possible genetic components contributing to mammographic breast density. Our purpose was to estimate familial correlations and perform complex genetic segregation analyses to test the hypothesis that the transmission of a major gene influences mammographic breast density. As part of a cohort study (initiated in 1944) of families with a history of breast cancer, the probands' female relatives who were older than 40 years were asked to obtain a routine mammogram. The mammograms of 1370 women from 258 independent families were analyzed. The fraction of the breast volume occupied by radiographically dense tissue was estimated visually from video displays of left or right mediolateral oblique views by one radiologist experienced in mammography who had no knowledge of individual relationships to the probands. Data on breast cancer risk factors were obtained through telephone interviews and mailed questionnaires. Unadjusted and adjusted familial correlations in breast density were calculated, and complex genetic segregation analyses were performed. Sister-sister correlations in breast density (unadjusted and adjusted for age and either body mass index, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, waist-to-hip ratio, number of live births, alcohol consumption, or cigarette smoking status) were all statistically significant (r = .16-.27; all P<.05 [two-sided]). Estimated mother-daughter correlations were smaller in magnitude (r = .01-.17) and not statistically significant. Segregation

  13. Genetically engineered murine models – Contribution to our understanding of the genetics, molecular pathology and therapeutic targeting of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chesler, Louis; Weiss, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) have made major contributions to a molecular understanding of several adult cancers and these results are increasingly being translated into the pre-clinical setting where GEMM will very likely make a major impact on the development of targeted therapeutics in the near future. The relationship of pediatric cancers to altered developmental programs, and their genetic simplicity relative to adult cancers provides unique opportunities for the application of new advances in GEMM technology. In neuroblastoma the well-characterized TH-MYCN GEMM is increasingly used for a variety of molecular-genetic, developmental and pre-clinical therapeutics applications. We discuss: the present and historical application of GEMM to neuroblastoma research, future opportunities, and relevant targets suitable for new GEMM strategies in neuroblastoma. We review the potential of these models to contribute both to an understanding of the developmental nature of neuroblastoma and to improved therapy for this disease. PMID:21958944

  14. Knowledge and perceptions of familial and genetic risks for breast cancer risk in adolescent girls

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Egleston, Brian L.; Schwartz, Lisa A.; Sands, Colleen B.; Shorter, Rebecca; Moore, Cynthia W.; Tuchman, Lisa; Rauch, Paula; Malhotra, Shreya; Rowan, Brianne; van Decker, Stephanie; Schmidheiser, Helen; Bealin, Lisa; Sicilia, Patrick; Daly, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests early events might modify adult breast cancer risk and many adolescents learn of familial and genetic risks for breast cancer. Little is known about how adolescent girls understand and respond to breast cancer risk. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 11-19 year-old girls at high-risk and population-risk for breast cancer evaluated knowledge and perceptions of breast cancer risk and risk modification. Framework analysis and descriptive statistics were utilized to analyze open-ended responses. Risk group and age differences were evaluated by Fisher’s exact and McNemar’s tests. Results 54 girls (86% of invited), 35 high-risk (65%) and 19 population-risk (35%) completed interviews. The most frequently reported risk for breast cancer was family history/hereditary predisposition (66%). Only 17% of girls were aware of BRCA1/2 genes. The majority (76%) of high-risk girls perceive themselves to be at increased risk for breast cancer, compared to 22% of population-risk girls (p=0.001). Half of girls reported that women can get breast cancer before 20 years old. The majority believe there are things women (70%) and girls (67%) can do to prevent breast cancer. Mother was the most frequently reported source of information for breast cancer among both high-risk (97%) and population-risk (89%) girls. Conclusion In this study, many high-risk girls perceive themselves to be at increased risk for breast cancer, and many girls believe that breast cancer can occur in teens. Yet, most girls believe there are things women and girls can do to prevent breast cancer. Research evaluating the impact of awareness and perceptions of breast cancer risk on psychosocial, health and risk behaviors is needed to develop strategies to optimize responses to cancer risk. PMID:23065030

  15. Comparing Mammography Abnormality Features to Genetic Variants in the Prediction of Breast Cancer in Women Recommended for Breast Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Elizabeth S; Liu, Jie; Wu, Yirong; Onitilo, Adedayo A; McCarty, Catherine A; Page, C David; Peissig, Peggy L; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Kitchner, Terrie; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of germline genetic variants associated with breast cancer has engendered interest in risk stratification for improved, targeted detection and diagnosis. However, there has yet to be a comparison of the predictive ability of these genetic variants with mammography abnormality descriptors. Our institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study utilized a personalized medicine registry in which participants consented to provide a DNA sample and to participate in longitudinal follow-up. In our retrospective, age-matched, case-controlled study of 373 cases and 395 controls who underwent breast biopsy, we collected risk factors selected a priori based on the literature, including demographic variables based on the Gail model, common germline genetic variants, and diagnostic mammography findings according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). We developed predictive models using logistic regression to determine the predictive ability of (1) demographic variables, (2) 10 selected genetic variants, or (3) mammography BI-RADS features. We evaluated each model in turn by calculating a risk score for each patient using 10-fold cross-validation, used this risk estimate to construct Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) curves, and compared the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of each using the DeLong method. The performance of the regression model using demographic risk factors was not statistically different from the model using genetic variants (P = 0.9). The model using mammography features (AUC = 0.689) was superior to both the demographic model (AUC = .598; P < 0.001) and the genetic model (AUC = .601; P < 0.001). BI-RADS features exceeded the ability of demographic and 10 selected germline genetic variants to predict breast cancer in women recommended for biopsy. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic potential of pomegranate (Punica granatum) for human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Deuk; Mehta, Rajendra; Yu, Weiping; Neeman, Ishak; Livney, Talia; Amichay, Akiva; Poirier, Donald; Nicholls, Paul; Kirby, Andrew; Jiang, Wenguo; Mansel, Robert; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Rabi, Thangaiyan; Kaplan, Boris; Lansky, Ephraim

    2002-02-01

    Fresh organically grown pomegranates (Punica granatum L.) of the Wonderful cultivar were processed into three components: fermented juice, aqueous pericarp extract and cold-pressed or supercritical CO2-extracted seed oil. Exposure to additional solvents yielded polyphenol-rich fractions ('polyphenols') from each of the three components. Their actions, and of the crude whole oil and crude fermented and unfermented juice concentrate, were assessed in vitro for possible chemopreventive or adjuvant therapeutic potential in human breast cancer. The ability to effect a blockade of endogenous active estrogen biosynthesis was shown by polyphenols from fermented juice, pericarp, and oil, which inhibited aromatase activity by 60-80%. Fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols, and whole seed oil, inhibited 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 from 34 to 79%, at concentrations ranging from 100 to 1,000 microg/ml according to seed oil > fermented juice polyphenols > pericarp polyphenols. In a yeast estrogen screen (YES) lyophilized fresh pomegranate juice effected a 55% inhibition of the estrogenic activity of 17-beta-estradiol; whereas the lyophilized juice by itself displayed only minimal estrogenic action. Inhibition of cell lines by fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols was according to estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) > estrogen-independent (MB-MDA-231) > normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). In both MCF-7 and MB-MDA-231 cells, fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols consistently showed about twice the anti-proliferative effect as fresh pomegranate juice polyphenols. Pomegranate seed oil effected 90% inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 at 100 microg/ml medium, 75% inhibition of invasion of MCF-7 across a Matrigel membrane at 10 microg/ml, and 54% apoptosis in MDA-MB-435 estrogen receptor negative metastatic human breast cancer cells at 50 microg/ml. In a murine mammary gland organ culture, fermented juice polyphenols effected 47% inhibition of cancerous

  17. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H.

    2015-11-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  18. L-Ferritin targets breast cancer stem cells and delivers therapeutic and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Ruiu, Roberto; Cadenazzi, Marta; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSC) have the unique biological properties necessary for tumor maintenance and spreading, and function as a reservoir for the relapse and metastatic evolution of the disease by virtue of their resistance to radio- and chemo-therapies. Thus, the efficacy of a therapeutic approach relies on its ability to effectively target and deplete CSC. In this study, we show that CSC-enriched tumorspheres from breast cancer cell lines display an increased L-Ferritin uptake capability compared to their monolayer counterparts as a consequence of the upregulation of the L-Ferritin receptor SCARA5. L-Ferritin internalization was exploited for the simultaneous delivery of Curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A, both entrapped in the L-Ferritin cavity. This theranostic system was able to impair viability and self-renewal of tumorspheres in vitro and to induce the regression of established tumors in mice. In conclusion, here we show that Curcumin-loaded L-Ferritin has a strong therapeutic potential due to the specific targeting of CSC and the improved Curcumin bioavailability, opening up the possibility of its use in a clinical setting. PMID:27579532

  19. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    c. Measure height, weight, waist and hip circumference d. Collect blood specimens Since receiving HSRRB approval on April 16t , 2004, we have been... metabolism , and breast cancer risk: a molecular epidemiologic study" (Ambrosone, PI)--Psychological and behavioral factors are investigated as potential...Behavior, estrogen metabolism , and breast cancer risk: a molecular epidemiologic study 10 Project 1: Behavior, estrogen metabolism , and breast cancer risk

  20. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism: clinical phenotype, genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raymond L

    2010-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP) is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of "status dystonicus," challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  1. Inhibition of the Rho GTPase, Rac1, decreases estrogen receptor levels and is a novel therapeutic strategy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Garcia, Maria Ines; Lyons, Leah; Xie, Yingqiu; Maiorino, Carol; Désiré, Laurent; Slingerland, Joyce; Burnstein, Kerry L

    2011-04-01

    Rac1, a Rho GTPase, modulates diverse cellular processes and is hyperactive in some cancers. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) in concert with intracellular signaling pathways regulates genes associated with cell proliferation, tumor development, and breast cancer cell survival. Therefore, we examined the possibility of Rac1 and ERα crosstalk in breast cancer cells. We found that Rac1 enhanced ERα transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells. Vav3, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Rac1, was an upstream mediator, and P21/Cdc42/Rac1 activating kinase-1 (Pak-1) was a downstream effector of Rac1 enhancement of ERα activity. These results suggest that Rac1 may prove to be a therapeutic target. To test this hypothesis, we used a small molecule Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, and found that EHT 1864 inhibited ERα transcriptional activity. Furthermore, EHT 1864 inhibited estrogen-induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells and decreased tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell growth. EHT 1864 decreased activity of the promoter of the ERα gene resulting in down-regulation of ERα mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, ERα down-regulation by EHT 1864 is the likely mechanism of EHT 1864-mediated inhibition of ERα activity and estrogen-stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation. Since ERα plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and the Rac inhibitor EHT 1864 down-regulates ERα expression and breast cancer cell proliferation, further investigation of the therapeutic potential of Rac1 targeting in the treatment of breast cancer is warranted.

  2. The cancer genetics and pathology of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deb, Siddhartha; Lakhani, Sunil R; Ottini, Laura; Fox, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon and poorly understood disease. Recent molecular studies have shown important differences from female breast cancer which are likely to influence treatment strategies from the current female-based management towards a more tailored approach. Significantly more MBCs than female breast cancers arise with an underlying germline cancer predisposition, and display a vastly different penetrance compared with females. Furthermore, the genophenotypical association of basal-like cancer with BRCA1 present in female breast cancer is not observed in male breast cancer. Differences in somatic changes between male and female breast cancer have also been reported, with particular enrichment of PIK3CA mutations and a paucity of TP53 mutations. In general, chromosomal-based changes, in particular regions of gains, are seen more frequently in male than female breast cancer and methylation is seen less frequently. Clinically, several molecular subtypes with prognostic relevance have been described, including chromosomal complex high and methylation high groups, and subgroups with profiling signatures pertaining to epithelial mesenchymal transition and hormonal therapy insensitivity. As with female breast cancer, attention to male specific multicentre trials based on the individual characteristics are needed, together with establishment of reliable preclinical models to understand more clearly the pathogenesis of male breast cancer and improve the general poor outcome of this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genetic counseling and testing for breast cancer risk in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2006-09-01

    Genetic testing for susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1/2 testing) has been available in clinical settings since 1996. Increasingly, such testing is helping women at increased risk make decisions about breast cancer screening and prevention. African American women have participated in genetic counseling and testing programs less than white women, despite greater rates of early onset disease and higher breast cancer mortality. The barriers and motivations for genetic testing among African American women are not well understood. This Issue Brief summarizes a series of studies that systematically explore African American women's beliefs and intentions about BRCA1/2 testing. The findings have been used to tailor genetic counseling programs to better serve this population.

  4. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Hines, Lisa M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Presson, Angela P.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P ARTP = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P ARTP = 0.03) and ER−/PR− tumors (P ARTP = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process. PMID:24670917

  5. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process.

  6. Spatial Proximity to Fibroblasts Impacts Molecular Features and Therapeutic Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells Influencing Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Janiszewska, Michalina; Place, Andrew E; Trinh, Anne; Rozhok, Andrii I; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Guerriero, Jennifer L; Shu, Shaokun; Ekram, Muhammad; Ishkin, Alexander; Cahill, Daniel P; Nikolsky, Yuri; Chan, Timothy A; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Schiff, Rachel; Osborne, Kent C; Letai, Antony; Polyak, Kornelia

    2016-11-15

    Using a three-dimensional coculture model, we identified significant subtype-specific changes in gene expression, metabolic, and therapeutic sensitivity profiles of breast cancer cells in contact with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). CAF-induced gene expression signatures predicted clinical outcome and immune-related differences in the microenvironment. We found that fibroblasts strongly protect carcinoma cells from lapatinib, attributable to its reduced accumulation in carcinoma cells and an elevated apoptotic threshold. Fibroblasts from normal breast tissues and stromal cultures of brain metastases of breast cancer had similar effects as CAFs. Using synthetic lethality approaches, we identified molecular pathways whose inhibition sensitizes HER2(+) breast cancer cells to lapatinib both in vitro and in vivo, including JAK2/STAT3 and hyaluronic acid. Neoadjuvant lapatinib therapy in HER2(+) breast tumors lead to a significant increase of phospho-STAT3(+) cancer cells and a decrease in the spatial proximity of proliferating (Ki67(+)) cells to CAFs impacting therapeutic responses. Our studies identify CAF-induced physiologically and clinically relevant changes in cancer cells and offer novel approaches for overcoming microenvironment-mediated therapeutic resistance. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6495-506. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Optimized DNA Vaccines to Specifically Induce Therapeutic CD8 T Cell Responses Against Autochthonous Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Niu, Guilian; Bradley, Norma; Celis, Esteban

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing CD8 T cell responses to antigens expressed by tumor cells are considered as attractive choices for the treatment and prevention of malignant diseases. Our group has previously reported that immunization with synthetic peptide corresponding to a CD8 T cell epitope derived from the rat neu oncogene administered together with a Toll-like receptor agonist as adjuvant, induced immune responses that translated into prophylactic and therapeutic benefit against autochthonous tumors in an animal model of breast cancer (BALB-neuT mice). DNA-based vaccines offer some advantages over peptide vaccines, such as the possibility of including multiple CD8 T cell epitopes in a single construct. Thus, we have evaluated the use of DNA vaccination for its ability to generate effective CD8 T cell responses against breast tumors expressing the rat neu oncogene. The results show that as with peptide vaccination, DNA-based vaccines were very effective in stimulating tumor-reactive CD8 T cell responses. Moreover, vaccination with modified DNA plasmids resulted in significant anti-tumor effects that were mediated by CD8 T cells without the requirement of generating antibodies to the product of rat neu. These results bear importance for the design of DNA vaccines for the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:18253731

  8. Prostaglandin E2 EP receptors as therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reader, Jocelyn; Holt, Dawn; Fulton, Amy

    2011-12-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid compounds that mediate many physiological effects. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) is the most abundant prostanoid in the human body, and synthesis of PGE(2) is driven by cyclooxygenase enzymes including COX-2. Both elevated expression of COX-2 and increased PGE(2) levels have been associated with many cancers including breast cancer. PGE(2) exerts its effect by binding to the E series of prostaglandin receptors (EP) which are G protein-coupled receptors. Four EP receptor subtypes exist, EP1-4, and each is coupled to different intracellular signaling pathways. As downstream effectors of the COX-2 pathway, EP receptors have been shown to play a role in breast and other malignancies and in cancer metastasis. The role of each EP receptor in malignant behavior is complex and involves the interplay of EP receptor signaling on the tumor cell, on stromal cells, and on host immune effector cells. While preclinical and epidemiological data support the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective COX-2 inhibitors (COXibs) for the prevention and treatment of malignancy, toxicities due to COXibs as well as less than promising results from clinical trials have laboratories seeking alternative targets. As knowledge concerning the role of EP receptors in cancer grows, so does the potential for exploiting EP receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment or prevention of cancer and cancer metastasis.

  9. Prostaglandin E2 EP Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reader, Jocelyn; Holt, Dawn; Fulton, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid compounds that mediate many physiological effects. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most abundant prostanoid in the human body and synthesis of PGE2 is driven by cyclooxygenase enzymes including COX-2. Both elevated expression of COX-2 and increased PGE2 levels have been associated with many cancers including breast cancer. PGE2 exerts its effect by binding to the E series of prostaglandin receptors (EP) which are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Four EP receptor subtypes exist, EP1–4, and each are coupled to different intracellular signaling pathways. As downstream effectors of the COX-2 pathway, EP receptors have been shown to play a role in breast and other malignancies and in cancer metastasis. The role of each EP receptor in malignant behavior is complex and involves the interplay of EP receptor signaling on the tumor cell, on stromal cells and on host immune effector cells. While preclinical and epidemiological data support the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and selective COX-2 inhibitors (COXibs) for the prevention and treatment of malignancy, toxicities due to COXibs as well as less than promising results from clinical trials have laboratories seeking alternative targets. As knowledge concerning the role of EP receptors in cancer grows, so does the potential for exploiting EP receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment or prevention of cancer and cancer metastasis. PMID:22002714

  10. Exosomal MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer towards Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sempere, Lorenzo F.; Keto, Jessica; Fabbri, Muller

    2017-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of microRNAs over 15 years ago, a myriad of research groups around the world sought to develop clinical applications in breast cancer for these short, noncoding, regulatory RNAs. While little of this knowledge has translated into the clinic, the recent research explosion on cell-to-cell communication via exosomes and other extracellular vesicles has rekindled interest in microRNA-based clinical applications. microRNAs appear to be a preferential and important cargo of exosomes in mediating biological effects in recipient cells. This review highlights recent studies on the biology of exosomal microRNAs (exo-miRNAs) and discusses potential clinical applications. From a diagnostic perspective, circulating exo-miRNAs may represent breast cancer cell content and/or tumor microenvironmental reactions to cancer cell growth. Thus, serum or plasma analysis of exo-miRNAs could be useful for early disease detection or for monitoring treatment response and disease progression. From a therapeutic perspective, exo-miRNAs derived from different cell types have been implicated in supporting or restraining tumor growth, conferring drug resistance, and preparing the metastatic niche. Strategies to interfere with the loading or delivery of tumor-promoting exo-miRNAs or to replenish tumor-suppressive miRNAs via exosomal delivery are under investigation. These recent studies provide new hope and opportunities, but study design limitations and technical challenges will need to be overcome before seriously considering clinical application of exo-miRNAs. PMID:28672799

  11. Current Practice of Therapeutic Mammaplasty: A Survey of Oncoplastic Breast Surgeons in England

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Marla, Sekhar; Nyanhongo, Donald; Kotecha, Sita; Basu, Narendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Therapeutic mammaplasty (TM) is a useful technique in the armamentarium of the oncoplastic breast surgeon (OBS). There is limited guidance on patient selection, technique, coding, and management of involved margins. The practices of OBS in England remain unknown. Methods. Questionnaires were sent to all OBS involved with the Training Interface Group. We assessed the number of TM cases performed per surgeon, criteria for patient selection, pedicle preference, contralateral symmetrisation, use of routine preoperative MRI, management of involved margins, and clinical coding. Results. We had an overall response rate of 43%. The most common skin resection technique utilised was wise pattern followed by vertical scar. Superior-medial pedicle was preferred by the majority of surgeons (62%) followed by inferior pedicle (34%). Twenty percent of surgeons would always proceed to a mastectomy following an involved margin, whereas the majority would offer reexcision based on several parameters. The main absolute contraindication to TM was tumour to breast ratio >50%. One in five surgeons would not perform TM in smokers and patients with multifocal disease. Discussion. There is a wide variation in the practice of TM amongst OBS. Further research and guidance would be useful to standardise practice, particularly management of involved margins and coding for optimal reimbursement. PMID:27110398

  12. Proteomic-Based Biosignatures in Breast Cancer Classification and Prediction of Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianbo; Whelan, Stephen A.; Lu, Ming; Shen, Dejun; Chung, Debra U.; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Chang, Helena R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based markers that classify tumor subtypes and predict therapeutic response would be clinically useful in guiding patient treatment. We investigated the LC-MS/MS-identified protein biosignatures in 39 baseline breast cancer specimens including 28 HER2-positive and 11 triple-negative (TNBC) tumors. Twenty proteins were found to correctly classify all HER2 positive and 7 of the 11 TNBC tumors. Among them, galectin-3-binding protein and ALDH1A1 were found preferentially elevated in TNBC, whereas CK19, transferrin, transketolase, and thymosin β4 and β10 were elevated in HER2-positive cancers. In addition, several proteins such as enolase, vimentin, peroxiredoxin 5, Hsp 70, periostin precursor, RhoA, cathepsin D preproprotein, and annexin 1 were found to be associated with the tumor responses to treatment within each subtype. The MS-based proteomic findings appear promising in guiding tumor classification and predicting response. When sufficiently validated, some of these candidate protein markers could have great potential in improving breast cancer treatment. PMID:22110952

  13. Macro-environment of breast carcinoma: frequent genetic alterations in the normal appearing skins of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moinfar, Farid; Beham, Alfred; Friedrich, Gerhard; Deutsch, Alexander; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Luschin, Gero; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A

    2008-05-01

    Genetic abnormalities in microenvironmental tissues with subsequent alterations of reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells play a key role in the breast carcinogenesis. Although a few reports have demonstrated abnormal fibroblastic functions in normal-appearing fibroblasts taken from the skins of breast cancer patients, the genetic basis of this phenomenon and its implication for carcinogenesis are unexplored. We analyzed 12 mastectomy specimens showing invasive ductal carcinomas. In each case, morphologically normal epidermis and dermis, carcinoma, normal stroma close to carcinoma, and stroma at a distant from carcinoma were microdissected. Metastatic-free lymphatic tissues from lymph nodes served as a control. Using PCR, DNA extracts were examined with 11 microsatellite markers known for a high frequency of allelic imbalances in breast cancer. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability were detected in 83% of the skin samples occurring either concurrently with or independently from the cancerous tissues. In 80% of these cases at least one microsatellite marker displayed loss of heterozygosity or microsatellite instability in the skin, which was absent in carcinoma. A total of 41% of samples showed alterations of certain loci observed exclusively in the carcinoma but not in the skin compartments. Our study suggests that breast cancer is not just a localized genetic disorder, but rather part of a larger field of genetic alterations/instabilities affecting multiple cell populations in the organ with various cellular elements, ultimately contributing to the manifestation of the more 'localized' carcinoma. These data indicate that more global assessment of tumor micro- and macro-environment is crucial for our understanding of breast carcinogenesis.

  14. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutics, Multiple Strategies Versus Using Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells With Notch Inhibitory Properties: Possibilities and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Sen, Utsav; Shenoy P, Sudheer

    2017-06-07

    Relapse cases of cancers are more vigorous and difficult to control due to the preponderance of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Such CSCs that had been otherwise dormant during the first incidence of cancer gradually appear as radiochemoresistant cancer cells. Hence, cancer therapeutics aimed at CSCs would be an effective strategy for mitigating the cancers during relapse. Alternatively, CSC therapy can also be proposed as an adjuvant therapy, along-with the conventional therapies. As regenerative stem cells (RSCs) are known for their trophic effects, anti-tumorogenicity, and better migration toward an injury site, this review aims to address the use of adult stem cells such as dental pulp derived; cord blood derived pure populations of regenerative stem cells for targeting CSCs. Indeed, pro-tumorogenicity of RSCs is of concern and hence has also been dealt with in relation to breast CSC therapeutics. Furthermore, as notch signaling pathways are upregulated in breast cancers, and anti-notch antibody based and sh-RNA based therapies are already in the market, this review focuses the possibilities of engineering RSCs to express notch inhibitory proteins for breast CSC therapeutics. Also, we have drawn a comparison among various possibilities of breast CSC therapeutics, about, notch1 inhibition. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-9, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. African American women's limited knowledge and experiences with genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Graves, Kristi D; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n = 13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n = 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community.

  16. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Pasacreta, Jeannie V

    2003-01-01

    The identification of the BRCA1/2 genes, and their possible etiologic relationship with various forms of inherited cancer, has been recognized universally as a cornerstone in the search for cancer's genetic link and has made it possible to identify specific individuals and families who harbor a mutation in one of these predisposition genes. Genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility may pose unanticipated psychological and social problems. Because of the recent availability of predisposition genetic testing, research efforts have begun to investigate factors that may influence an individual's intention to undergo testing and the psychosocial sequelae associated with testing. The purpose of this article is to provide an integrative review of the literature that will delineate what is currently known about the psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk. Important generalizations from the literature include: (a) a positive test for breast cancer susceptibility may ignite a psychological response similar to the diagnosis of breast cancer itself; (b) there is likely a subset of individuals at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer who are also at risk for sustained psychosocial problems; (c) available literature challenges a common notion that only individuals with a positive test result will need psychosocial services; and (d) at-risk individuals are basing health care decisions on genetic testing information, thus they are making important decisions under conditions of uncertainty. Clinical issues and directions for future research were highlighted.

  17. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Implications of human genetic variation in CRISPR-based therapeutic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Scott, David A; Zhang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    CRISPR-Cas genome-editing methods hold immense potential as therapeutic tools to fix disease-causing mutations at the level of DNA. In contrast to typical drug development strategies aimed at targets that are highly conserved among individual patients, treatment at the genomic level must contend with substantial inter-individual natural genetic variation. Here we analyze the recently released ExAC and 1000 Genomes data sets to determine how human genetic variation impacts target choice for Cas endonucleases in the context of therapeutic genome editing. We find that this genetic variation confounds the target sites of certain Cas endonucleases more than others, and we provide a compendium of guide RNAs predicted to have high efficacy in diverse patient populations. For further analysis, we focus on 12 therapeutically relevant genes and consider how genetic variation affects off-target candidates for these loci. Our analysis suggests that, in large populations of individuals, most candidate off-target sites will be rare, underscoring the need for prescreening of patients through whole-genome sequencing to ensure safety. This information can be integrated with empirical methods for guide RNA selection into a framework for designing CRISPR-based therapeutics that maximizes efficacy and safety across patient populations.

  19. Synergistic effect of therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-beta via apoptotic pathway in the metastatic mouse model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-02-02

    As an approach to improve treatment of breast cancer metastasis to the brain, we employed genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs, HB1.F3 cells) consisting of neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing cytosine deaminase and the interferon-beta genes, HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β. In this model, MDA-MB-231/Luc breast cancer cells were implanted in the right hemisphere of the mouse brain, while pre-stained GESTECs with redfluorescence were implanted in the contralateral brain. Two days after stem cells injection, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) was administrated via intraperitoneal injection. Histological analysis of extracted brain confirmed the therapeutic efficacy of GESTECs in the presence of 5-FC based on reductions in density and aggressive tendency of breast cancer cells, as well as pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis relative to a negative control. Additionally, expression of PCNA decreased in the stem cells treated group. Treatment of breast cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) increased the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative factor, BAX and p21 protein through phosphorylation of p53 and p38. Moreover, analysis of stem cell migratory ability revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells endogenously secreted VEGF, and stem cells expressed their receptor (VEGFR2). To confirm the role of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling in tumor tropism of stem cells, samples were treated with the VEGFR2 inhibitor, KRN633. The number of migrated stem cells decreased significantly in response to KRN633 due to Erk1/2 activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition. Taken together, these results indicate that treatment with GESTECs, particularly HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β co-expressing CD.IFN-β, may be a useful strategy for treating breast cancer metastasis to the brain in the presence of a prodrug.

  20. Breast cancer predisposition and brain hemispheric laterality specification likely share a common genetic cause.

    PubMed

    Klar, Amar J S

    2011-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer cases seen in women remain unexplained by simple Mendelian genetics. It is generally hypothesized that such non-familial, so-called sporadic cases, result from exposure of the affected individuals to a cancer-causing environment and/or from stochastic cell biological errors. Clearly, adverse environment exposure can cause disease, but is that necessarily the cause of most sporadic cases? Curiously, female breast cancer patients who were selected to prefer right-hand-use reportedly exhibited a higher incidence of reversed-brain hemispheric laterality when compared to that of the public at large. Notably, such a higher level of hemispheric reversal is also found in healthy, left-handed or ambidextrous persons. Based on the association between these disparate traits, a new hypothesis for the etiology of sporadic breast cancer cases is advanced here; breast cancer predisposition and brain laterality development likely share a common genetic cause.

  1. Therapeutic levels of lopinavir in late pregnancy and abacavir passage into breast milk in the Mma Bana Study, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Roger L; Rossi, Steven; Ogwu, Anthony; Moss, Mary; Leidner, Jean; Moffat, Claire; Lockman, Shahin; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Capparelli, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic data for lopinavir in late pregnancy and in breastfeeding are limited, and no data for abacavir in breast milk are available. Women in the Mma Bana Study initiated HAART from 18 to 34 weeks of gestation. We determined trough plasma and whole breast milk concentrations of lopinavir (LPV), abacavir (ABC), nevirapine (NVP), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (ZDV) among separate subsets of pregnant and breastfeeding women, and in plasma of exposed infants. Lopinavir was measured 1 month after starting HAART or 1 month postpartum, and other drugs were measured 1 month postpartum. Sampling occurred a median of 14 h (range 11-17) from last maternal drug ingestion. Although 50% higher median LPV levels were seen in postpartum than antepartum plasma (8.29 μg/ml versus 5.51 μg/ml; P = 0.02), antepartum levels with standard LPV dosing were therapeutic for all women (> 1.0 μg/ml). Very low LPV levels (< 0.25 μg/ml) were detected in breast milk. Median ABC levels in breast milk were 85% of those in plasma (0.057 μg/ml versus 0.067 μg/ml). Breast milk concentrations of NVP and 3TC were 27% and 74% of plasma levels, respectively. At these trough maternal time points, only NVP was detectable in potentially inhibitory levels in breastfeeding infants, and most infants had non-detectable levels of LPV, ABC, ZDV and 3TC via maternal breast milk. Standard LPV dosing achieved therapeutic levels in pregnancy and no appreciable concentrations in breast milk. ABC is detectable in breast milk at similar concentrations to plasma, but does not result in appreciable infant exposure.

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of TOX3 Expression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yoo-Jeong; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified low penetrance and high frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that contribute to genetic susceptibility of breast cancer. The SNPs at 16q12, close to the TOX3 and CASC16 genes, represent one of the susceptibility loci identified by GWAS, showing strong evidence for breast cancer association across various populations. To examine molecular mechanisms of TOX3 regulation in breast cancer, we investigated both genetic and epigenetic factors using cell lines and datasets derived from primary breast tumors available through The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). TOX3 expression is highly up-regulated in luminal subtype tumors compared to normal breast tissues or basal-like tumors. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses revealed significant associations of rs3803662 and rs4784227 genotypes with TOX3 expression in breast tumors. Bisulfite sequencing of four CpG islands in the TOX3 promoter showed a clear difference between luminal and basal-like cancer cell lines. 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine treatment of a basal-like cancer cell line increased expression of TOX3. TCGA dataset verified significantly lower levels of methylation of the promoter in luminal breast tumors with an inverse correlation between methylation and expression of TOX3. Methylation QTL (mQTL) analyses showed a weak or no correlation of rs3803662 or rs4784227 with TOX3 promoter methylation in breast tumors, indicating an independent relationship between the genetic and epigenetic events. These data suggest a complex system of TOX3 regulation in breast tumors, driven by germline variants and somatic epigenetic modifications in a subtype specific manner. PMID:27806084

  3. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  4. Interactions Between Genetic Variants and Breast Cancer Risk Factors in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Le Marchand, Loïc; Haiman, Christopher A.; Travis, Ruth C.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dostal, Lucie; Fournier, Agnes; Hankinson, Susan E.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; McCarty, Catherine A.; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Riboli, Elio; Sanchez, Maria José; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Skeie, Guri; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Zhang, Shumin; Ziegler, Regina G.; Hunter, David J.; Lindström, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, several genome-wide association studies have identified various genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Relatively little is known about the possible interactions between these loci and the established risk factors for breast cancer. Methods To assess interactions between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and established risk factors, we prospectively collected DNA samples and questionnaire data from 8576 breast cancer case subjects and 11 892 control subjects nested within the National Cancer Institute’s Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We genotyped 17 germline SNPs (FGFR2-rs2981582, FGFR2-rs3750817, TNRC9-rs3803662, 2q35-rs13387042, MAP3K1-rs889312, 8q24-rs13281615, CASP8-rs1045485, LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, COX11-rs6504950, RNF146-rs2180341, 6q25-rs2046210, SLC4A7-rs4973768, NOTCH2-rs11249433, 5p12-rs4415084, 5p12-rs10941679, RAD51L1-rs999737), and odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression to confirm previously reported associations with breast cancer risk. We performed likelihood ratio test to assess interactions between 17 SNPs and nine established risk factors (age at menarche, parity, age at menopause, use of hormone replacement therapy, family history, height, body mass index, smoking status, and alcohol consumption), and a correction for multiple testing of 153 tests (adjusted P value threshold = .05/153 = 3 × 10−4) was done. Case–case comparisons were performed for possible differential associations of polymorphisms by subgroups of tumor stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and age at diagnosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We confirmed the association of 14 SNPs with breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 2.57 × 10−3 –3.96 × 10−19). Three SNPs (LSP1-rs3817198, COL1A1-rs2075555, and RNF146-rs2180341) did not show association with breast cancer risk. After accounting for multiple testing, no statistically significant interactions were detected between

  5. Therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of tamoxifen loaded PLA nanoparticles for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjeev K; Ghosh, Somenath; Maiti, Pralay; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of tamoxifen (Tmx) loaded poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (Tmx-NPs) for breast cancer. An in vivo study was conducted to determine the effect of Tmx-NPs on DMBA induced mammary tumor in female Wistar rat. The experimental results showed that the mean diameter of Tmx-NPs was 224 ± 3 nm with 68 ± 2% (w/w) of entrapment efficiency. In in vivo study, the tumor size in rat was significantly reduced (P < 0.001) by treating Tmx-NPs as compared to pure Tmx and untreated group (control DMBA). Tmx-NPs showed the marked reduction in hepatotoxicity and renal toxicity when compared to pure Tmx as evidenced by histopathological examination of liver and kidney tissues as well as estimation of AST, ALT levels, and creatinine, urea, blood urea nitrogen levels. Oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation was estimated in spleen, liver and kidney and was found significantly high in pure Tmx treated group as compared to Tmx-NPs and control group. Immunological parameters like blastogenic response of splenocytes, TLC, DLC were studied and found significantly high in pure Tmx treated group but the variations were nonsignificant in Tmx-NPs group as compared to control. Thus, Tmx-NPs have significant therapeutic efficacy with reduced side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  7. Genetic anticipation of familial breast cancer with or without BRCA mutation in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Baek, Hyejin; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho; Haffty, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    We investigated genetic anticipation of breast or ovarian cancer in patients with familial breast cancer. Among 201 patients with breast cancer who had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, 95 families had affected familial members in the previous generation. Of these families, 2 were excluded because of insufficient data. From the 93 eligible families, 112 and 111 members were identified in the previous and proband generations, respectively. BRCA mutations were detected in 26 (28.0%) of the 93 probands. The median age at diagnosis of the first generation was 57 years and of the second generation was 40 years, which was a significant difference. The result from the mixed-effects model also demonstrated significant genetic anticipation (P < 0.0001). The expected age difference at onset of breast or ovarian cancer between the two generations was 17.06 years. BRCA mutation status did not influence the generational difference in age at diagnosis (17.99 vs. 16.62 y, P = 0.3973). Genetic counseling and early screening should be provided to women whose parent had a breast or ovarian cancer diagnosis.

  8. Morphology of breast cancer as a means of triage of patients for BRCA1 genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Farshid, Gelareh; Balleine, Rosemary L; Cummings, Margaret; Waring, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Women who have germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene are at substantially increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer but are otherwise normal. Currently, early age of onset of cancer and a strong family history are relied upon as the chief clues as to who should be offered genetic testing. Certain morphologic and immunohistochemical features are overrepresented in BRCA1-associated breast cancers but these differences have not been incorporated into the current selection criteria for genetic testing. Each of the 4 pathologists studied 30 known cases of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer from kConFab families. After reviewing the literature, we agreed on a semiquantitative scoring system for estimating the chances of presence of an underlying BRCA1 mutation, based on the number of the reported prototypic features present. After a time lag of 12 months, we each examined a series of 62 deidentified cases of breast cancer, inclusive of cases of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and controls. The controls included cases of BRCA2-associated breast cancer and sporadic cases. Our predictions had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value of 61%, and negative predictive value of 98%. For comparison the sensitivity of currently used selection criteria are in the range of 25% to 30%. The inclusion of morphologic and immunohistochemical features of breast cancers in algorithms to predict the likelihood of presence of germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene improves the accuracy of the selection process.

  9. Combined effects of antioxidant vitamin and NOS3 genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk in women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2012-02-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that there is wide heterogeneity in genetic predisposition to breast cancer and that breast cancer risk is determined by interactive effect between genetic and environmental factors. We investigated the combined effects of antioxidant vitamin intake and NOS3 genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk in a Korean population (Seoul Breast Cancer Study). Histologically confirmed breast cancer cases (n = 512) and age, menopause status-matched controls (n = 512) with no present or previous history of cancer were recruited from several teaching hospitals in Seoul during 2001-2003. Two genetic polymorphisms of NOS3 (298G > T and -786 T > C) were assessed by single base extension assays. No overall association between the individual NOS3 genotypes or diplotypes and breast cancer risk was found, although the difference between cases and controls in the frequency of the NOS3 894 G > T polymorphism showed borderline significance (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.52-1.06). There was no significant difference in energy intake or the intake of antioxidant vitamins between cases and controls, with the exception of vitamin E (OR = 0.49 lowest vs. highest quartile, P(trend) < 0.01). On the other hand, our results suggest that antioxidant vitamin intake may modify the effects of the NOS3 -786 T > C or 894 G > T genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk. Although a multiplicative interaction was not observed, the protective effect of β-carotene intake on breast cancer risk was observed predominantly in individuals with the TG:TG diplotype of NOS3 (OR = 0.68) but not observed with others diplotype. An inverse association between vitamin E intake and breast cancer risk was observed for individuals with the NOS3 786 TC + TT genotype and the NOS3 894 GG genotype. In addition, folic acid had a protective effect in the NOS3 786 TT and NOS3 894 GT + TT genotype. Our results suggest that intake of antioxidant vitamins might modify

  10. Ashkenazi Jews and Breast Cancer: The Consequences of Linking Ethnic Identity to Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt-Rauf, Sherry I.; Raveis, Victoria H.; Drummond, Nathan F.; Conte, Jill A.; Rothman, Sheila M.

    2006-01-01

    We explored the advantages and disadvantages of using ethnic categories in genetic research. With the discovery that certain breast cancer gene mutations appeared to be more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews, breast cancer researchers moved their focus from high-risk families to ethnicity. The concept of Ashkenazi Jews as genetically unique, a legacy of Tay–Sachs disease research and a particular reading of history, shaped this new approach even as methodological imprecision and new genetic and historical research challenged it. Our findings cast doubt on the accuracy and desirability of linking ethnic groups to genetic disease. Such linkages exaggerate genetic differences among ethnic groups and lead to unequal access to testing and therapy. PMID:17018815

  11. Ashkenazi Jews and breast cancer: the consequences of linking ethnic identity to genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Rauf, Sherry I; Raveis, Victoria H; Drummond, Nathan F; Conte, Jill A; Rothman, Sheila M

    2006-11-01

    We explored the advantages and disadvantages of using ethnic categories in genetic research. With the discovery that certain breast cancer gene mutations appeared to be more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews, breast cancer researchers moved their focus from high-risk families to ethnicity. The concept of Ashkenazi Jews as genetically unique, a legacy of Tay-Sachs disease research and a particular reading of history, shaped this new approach even as methodological imprecision and new genetic and historical research challenged it. Our findings cast doubt on the accuracy and desirability of linking ethnic groups to genetic disease. Such linkages exaggerate genetic differences among ethnic groups and lead to unequal access to testing and therapy.

  12. Delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics by genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Doering, Christopher B; Archer, David; Spencer, H Trent

    2010-09-30

    Several populations of adult human stem cells have been identified, but only a few of these are in routine clinical use. The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is arguably the most well characterized and the most routinely transplanted adult stem cell. Although details regarding several aspects of this cell's phenotype are not well understood, transplant of HSCs has advanced to become the standard of care for the treatment of a range of monogenic diseases and several types of cancer. It has also proven to be an excellent target for genetic manipulation, and clinical trials have already demonstrated the usefulness of targeting this cell as a means of delivering nucleic acid therapeutics for the treatment of several previously incurable diseases. It is anticipated that additional clinical trials will soon follow, such as genetically engineering HSCs with vectors to treat monogenic diseases such as hemophilia A. In addition to the direct targeting of HSCs, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to replace virtually any engineered stem cell therapeutic, including HSCs. We now know that for the broad use of genetically modified HSCs for the treatment of non-lethal diseases, e.g. hemophilia A, we must be able to regulate the introduction of nucleic acid sequences into these target cells. We can begin to refine transduction protocols to provide safer approaches to genetically manipulate HSCs and strategies are being developed to improve the overall safety of gene transfer. This review focuses on recent advances in the systemic delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics using genetically modified stem cells, specifically focusing on i) the use of retroviral vectors to genetically modify HSCs, ii) the expression of fVIII from hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of hemophilia A, and iii) the use of genetically engineered hematopoietic cells generated from iPS cells as treatment for disorders of hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics by genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B.; Archer, David; Spencer, H. Trent

    2010-01-01

    Several populations of adult human stem cells have been identified, but only a few of these are in routine clinical use. The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is arguably the most well characterized and the most routinely transplanted adult stem cell. Although details regarding several aspects of this cell’s phenotype are not well understood, transplant of HSCs has advanced to become the standard of care for the treatment of a range of monogenic diseases and several types of cancer. It has also proven to be an excellent target for genetic manipulation, and clinical trials have already demonstrated the usefulness of targeting this cell as a means of delivering nucleic acid therapeutics for the treatment of several previously incurable diseases. It is anticipated that additional clinical trials will soon follow, such as genetically engineering HSCs with vectors to treat monogenic diseases such as hemophilia A. In addition to the direct targeting of HSCs, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to replace virtually any engineered stem cell therapeutic, including HSCs. We now know that for the broad use of genetically-modified HSCs for the treatment of non-lethal diseases, e.g. hemophilia A, we must be able to regulate the introduction of nucleic acid sequences into these target cells. We can begin to refine transduction protocols to provide safer approaches to genetically manipulate HSCs and strategies are being developed to improve the overall safety of gene transfer. This review focuses on recent advances in the systemic delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics using genetically-modified stem cells, specifically focusing on i) the use of retroviral vectors to genetically modify HSCs, ii) the expression of fVIII from hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of hemophilia A, and iii) the use of genetically engineered hematopoietic cells generated from iPS cells as treatment for disorders of hematopoiesis. PMID:20869414

  14. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P < 0.05. The permutation-based probability of this occurring by chance was 0.335. These significant SNPs were genotyped in 75 human cancer cell lines from different tumour types to assess if there was an association between them and six epigenetic measures. No statistically significant association was found. However, a trend was observed: homozygotes for the rare alleles of the EHMT1, EHMT2 and PRDM2 had a mean value for both trimethylation of K9 and K27 of histone H3 remarkably different to the homozygotes for the common alleles. Thus, these preliminary observations suggest the possible existence of a functional consequence of harbouring these genetic variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  16. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  17. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, William J; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-05-01

    Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Genetic and Clinical Predictors for Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Stratification Among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shyr, Yu; Long, Jirong; Li, Guoliang; Li, Chun; Gu, Kai; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background Most of the genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have not been validated in Asian women. No risk assessment model that incorporates both genetic and clinical predictors is currently available to predict breast cancer risk in this population. Methods We analyzed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in recent genome-wide association studies mostly of women of European ancestry as being associated with the risk of breast cancer in 3039 case patients and 3082 control subjects who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. All participants were interviewed in person to obtain information regarding known and suspected risk factors for breast cancer. The c statistic, a measure of discrimination ability with a value ranging from 0.5 (random classification) to 1.0 (perfect classification), was estimated to evaluate the contribution of genetic and established clinical predictors of breast cancer to a newly established risk assessment model for Chinese women. Clinical predictors included in the model were age at menarche, age at first live birth, waist-to-hip ratio, family history of breast cancer, and a previous diagnosis of benign breast disease. The utility of the models in risk stratification was evaluated by estimating the proportion of breast cancer patients in the general population that could be accounted for above a given risk threshold as predicted by the models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Eight SNPs (rs2046210, rs1219648, rs3817198, rs8051542, rs3803662, rs889312, rs10941679, and rs13281615), each of which reflected a genetically independent locus, were found to be associated with the risk of breast cancer. A dose–response association was observed between the risk of breast cancer and the genetic risk score, which is an aggregate measure of the effect of these eight SNPs (odds ratio for women in the highest quintile of genetic risk score vs those in the lowest = 1

  19. The latest progress in research on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC): risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingli; Wu, Aiguo; Shao, Guoli; Peng, Haoyu; Wang, Mengchuan; Ji, Shufeng; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one type of breast cancer (BC), which is defined as negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2). Its origins and development seem to be elusive. And for now, drugs like tamoxifen or trastuzumab which specifically apply to ER, PR or Her2 positive BC seem unforeseeable in TNBC clinical treatment. Due to its extreme malignancy, high recurrence rate and poor prognosis, a lot of work on the research of TNBC is needed. This review aims to summarize the latest findings in TNBC in risk factors, possible therapeutic targets and possible prognostic makers.

  20. Characterizing Genetic Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Women of African Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Huo, Dezheng; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen A; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Chanock, Stephen J; Marchand, Loic Le; Olshan, Andrew F; Kolonel, Laurence N; Conti, David V; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Stram, Daniel O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2017-07-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 100 common genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk, the majority of which were discovered in women of European ancestry. Because of different patterns of linkage disequilibrium, many of these genetic markers may not represent signals in populations of African ancestry.Methods: We tested 74 breast cancer risk variants and conducted fine-mapping of these susceptibility regions in 6,522 breast cancer cases and 7,643 controls of African ancestry from three genetic consortia (AABC, AMBER, and ROOT).Results: Fifty-four of the 74 variants (73%) were found to have ORs that were directionally consistent with those previously reported, of which 12 were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Through fine-mapping, in six regions (3p24, 12p11, 14q13, 16q12/FTO, 16q23, 19p13), we observed seven markers that better represent the underlying risk variant for overall breast cancer or breast cancer subtypes, whereas in another two regions (11q13, 16q12/TOX3), we identified suggestive evidence of signals that are independent of the reported index variant. Overlapping chromatin features and regulatory elements suggest that many of the risk alleles lie in regions with biological functionality.Conclusions: Through fine-mapping of known susceptibility regions, we have revealed alleles that better characterize breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry.Impact: The risk alleles identified represent genetic markers for modeling and stratifying breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1016-26. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Use of a genetically engineered mouse model as a preclinical tool for HER2 breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Creedon, Helen; Balderstone, Lucy A.; Muir, Morwenna; Balla, Jozef; Gomez-Cuadrado, Laura; Tracey, Natasha; Loane, Joseph; Klinowska, Teresa; Muller, William J.; Brunton, Valerie G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies presents a major clinical problem. Although preclinical studies have identified a number of possible mechanisms, clinical validation has been difficult. This is most likely to reflect the reliance on cell-line models that do not recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity seen in human tumours. Here, we show the utility of a genetically engineered mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer (MMTV-NIC) to define mechanisms of resistance to the pan-HER family inhibitor AZD8931. Genetic manipulation of MMTV-NIC mice demonstrated that loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) conferred de novo resistance to AZD8931, and a tumour fragment transplantation model was established to assess mechanisms of acquired resistance. Using this approach, 50% of tumours developed resistance to AZD8931. Analysis of the resistant tumours showed two distinct patterns of resistance: tumours in which reduced membranous HER2 expression was associated with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and resistant tumours that retained HER2 expression and an epithelial morphology. The plasticity of the EMT phenotype was demonstrated upon re-implantation of resistant tumours that then showed a mixed epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype. Further AZD8931 treatment resulted in the generation of secondary resistant tumours that again had either undergone EMT or retained their original epithelial morphology. The data provide a strong rationale for basing therapeutic decisions on the biology of the individual resistant tumour, which can be very different from that of the primary tumour and will be specific to individual patients. PMID:26721874

  2. The therapeutic potential of mTOR inhibitors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Linda S; Martelli, Alberto M; Cocco, Lucio; Libra, Massimo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Abrams, Stephen L; McCubrey, James A

    2016-11-01

    Rapamycin and modified rapamycins (rapalogs) have been used to prevent allograft rejection after organ transplant for over 15 years. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been determined to be a key component of the mTORC1 complex which consists of the serine/threonine kinase TOR and at least five other proteins which are involved in regulating its activity. Some of the best characterized substrates of mTORC1 are proteins which are key kinases involved in the regulation of cell growth (e.g., p70S6K) and protein translation (e.g., 4E-BP1). These proteins may in some cases serve as indicators to sensitivity to rapamycin-related therapies. Dysregulation of mTORC1 activity frequently occurs due to mutations at, or amplifications of, upstream growth factor receptors (e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, HER2) as well as kinases (e.g., PI3K) and phosphatases (e.g., PTEN) critical in the regulation of cell growth. More recently, it has been shown that certain rapalogs may enhance the effectiveness of hormonal-based therapies for breast cancer patients who have become resistant to endocrine therapy. The combined treatment of certain rapalogs (e.g., everolimus) and aromatase inhibitors (e.g., exemestane) has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) and other drug regulatory agencies to treat estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer patients who have become resistant to hormonal-based therapies and have progressed. This review will summarize recent basic and clinical research in the area and evaluate potential novel therapeutic approaches. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Immune and genetic mechanisms in COPD: possible targets for therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Tzortzaki, Eleni G; Papi, Alberto; Neofytou, Eirini; Soulitzis, Nikolaos; Siafakas, Nikolaos M

    2013-02-01

    Genetic, immune and environmental interactions are key elements for the development of COPD. Cigarette smoking is considered the primary risk factor initiating inflammatory cascades in genetically susceptible individuals. The "danger signals" elicited by the injured cells of non-specific immunity induce the downstream activation of proinflammatory cascades and antigen-specific adaptive immune responses. The produced oxidative stress further damages the lung leading to acquired genetic changes (histone deacetylation, microsatellite DNA instability, DNA methylation, telomere shortening, miRNA alterations) due to an inefficient DNA repair machinery. On the other hand, augmented apoptosis, impaired efferocytosis and abnormal tissue remodeling contribute to the chronic inflammatory response and tissue destruction in COPD. This review focuses on the role of genetic, epigenetic and immune mechanisms in the development of COPD in order to put forward possible prognostic and therapeutic targets.

  4. CDK4 regulates cancer stemness and is a novel therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meiou; Zhang, Chenjing; Ali, Ayad; Hong, Xinyuan; Tian, Jun; Lo, Chieh; Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Burgos, Sergio A.; Ali, Suhad; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers exhibit very aggressive features and poor patient outcomes. These tumors are enriched in cancer stem cells and exhibit resistance to most treatments and chemotherapy. In this study, we found the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) to act as a cancer stem cell regulator and novel prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancers. We found CDK4 to be highly expressed in these tumors and its expression to correlate with poor overall and relapse free survival outcomes, high tumor grade and poor prognostic features of triple negative breast cancer patients. Moreover, we found that blocking CDK4 expression or kinase activity, using a pharmacological inhibitor prevented breast cancer stem cell self-renewal. Interestingly, suppression of CDK4 expression or kinase activity reversed the basal-B TNBC mesenchymal phenotype to an epithelial- and luminal-like phenotype which correlates with better clinical prognosis. Finally, blocking CDK4 activity efficiently eliminated both normal and chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells in triple negative breast cancers, highlighting CDK4 as a promising novel therapeutic target for these aggressive breast tumors. PMID:27759034

  5. Genetic ancestry and risk of mortality among U.S. Latinas with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; John, Esther M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Ziv, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies have reported that Latina women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer at more advanced stages and have poorer survival than non-Latina White women. However, Latinas are a heterogeneous group with individuals having different proportions of European, Indigenous American and African genetic ancestry. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic ancestry and survival after breast cancer diagnosis among 899 Latina women from the San Francisco Bay Area. Genetic ancestry was estimated from single nucleotide polymorphisms from an Affymetrix 6.0 array and we used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer-specific mortality (tests were two-sided). Women were followed for an average of 9 years during which 75 died from breast cancer. Our results showed that Individuals with higher Indigenous American ancestry had increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.57 per 25% increase in Indigenous American ancestry; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.29]. Adjustment for demographic factors, tumor characteristics, and some treatment information did not explain the observed association [HR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.12–2.74]. In an analysis in which ancestry was dichotomized, the hazard of mortality showed a two-fold increase when comparing women with <50% Indigenous American ancestry to women with ≥50% [HR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.10–3.24]. This was also reflected by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates (P for Log-Rank test of 0.003). Overall, results suggest that genetic factors and/or unmeasured differences in treatment or access to care should be further explored to understand and reduce ethnic disparities in breast cancer outcomes. PMID:24177181

  6. Risk assessment and genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Berliner, Janice L; Fay, Angela Musial

    2007-06-01

    These cancer genetic counseling recommendations describe the medical, psychosocial and ethical implications of identifying at-risk individuals for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) through cancer risk assessment, with or without genetic susceptibility testing. They were developed by members of the Practice Issues Subcommittee of the National Society of Genetic Counselors' Familial Cancer Risk Counseling Special Interest Group. The information contained in this document is derived from extensive review of the current literature on cancer genetic risk assessment as well as the professional expertise of genetic counselors with significant experience in education and counseling regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Critical components of the process include the ascertainment of medical and family histories, determination and communication of cancer risk, assessment of risk perception, education regarding the genetics of HBOC, discussion of molecular testing for HBOC if appropriate (including benefits, risks and limitations) and any necessary follow-up. These recommendations do not dictate an exclusive course of management or guarantee a specific outcome. Moreover, they do not replace the professional judgment of a health care provider based on the clinical situation of a client.

  7. Genetic variation in SIPA1 in relation to breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Mia M; Hunter, Kent; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M; Driver, Kristy; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A; Chanock, Stephen; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-04-01

    Genetic variation in SIPA1, signal-induced proliferation-associated gene 1, has been proposed to be associated with aggressive breast tumor characteristics related to metastasis and worse prognosis in humans and rodents. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located at -3092 (AT, rs3741378), and exon 14 + 14 (C>T, rs746429), and examined them in relation to breast cancer risk and overall survival, stratified by tumor characteristics in 2 independent case-control studies conducted in Poland (1,995 cases, 2,296 controls) and in Britain (2,142 cases, 2,257 controls). Vital status (n = 396 deaths) was available for 911 Polish and 1,919 British breast cancer cases with an average follow-up time of 5.5 years. Overall, we found no significant associations between genetic variants of SIPA1 SNPs and breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals (CI): rs931127-0.99, 0.93-1.06; rs3741378-1.03, 0.94-1.13; and, rs74642-0.98, 0.92-1.04). In both studies, SIPA1 polymorphisms were not related to overall mortality (per allele hazard ratios, 95% CI: 1.02, 0.88-1.17; 0.90, 0.72-1.11; 1.04, 0.90-1.21, respectively). Our results do not support a relationship between SIPA1 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk or subsequent survival.

  8. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    counseling and education sessions, (3) completing follow-up telephone interviews, (4) generating peer -reviewed manuscripts, and (5) presenting findings...Differences in Genetic Counseling and Testing Decisions - Genetic and Health Disparities Conference, Institute for Social Research, University of...

  9. The pros and cons of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Frank, T S; Braverman, A M

    1999-01-01

    Nearly 10% of breast and ovarian cancers develop as a direct consequence of an inherited flaw in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. The protein products of these genes suppress the development of cancer, in part by repairing damage in other genes. Women who inherit a nonfunctioning copy of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 therefore have a significantly elevated lifetime risk of breast cancer, especially at an early age. Identification of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility allows optimized medical management of an individual's increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Significantly, testing may also identify women in "high-risk" families who did not themselves inherit cancer susceptibility, allowing them to avoid unnecessary medical intervention. Choosing to be tested for breast and ovarian cancer risk is a complicated task, however. It takes into account concerns about insurance liability, family dynamics, and an individual's psychological needs. From the limited research, evidence suggests that for individuals in high-risk families it is more beneficial to know than not to know one's genetic status. Education and counseling may improve public perception about genetic testing for breast cancer.

  10. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Metastasis and Therapeutic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Brooke, Michael; Wicha, Max S.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several decades the traditional view of cancer being a homogeneous mass of rapid proliferating malignant cells is being replaced by a model of ever increasing complexity, which points out that cancers are complex tissues composed of multiple cell types. A large variety of immune and other host cells constitute the tumor microenvironment, which supports the growth and progression of the tumor where individual cancer cells evolve with increasing phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Furthermore, it has also become clear that, in addition to this cellular and genetic heterogeneity, most tumors exhibit a hierarchical organization composed of tumor cells displaying divergent lineage markers and at the apex of this hierarchy are cells capable of self-renewal. These “cancer stem cells” not only drive tumor growth, but also mediate metastasis and contribute to treatment resistance. Besides displaying remarkable genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, cancer stem cells maintain plasticity to transition between mesenchymal-like (EMT) and epithelial-like (MET) states in a process regulated by the tumor microenvironment. These stem cell state transitions may play a fundamental role in the process of tumor metastasis. In this review, we will discuss emerging knowledge regarding the plasticity of cancer stem cells and the role that this plasticity plays in tumor metastasis. We also discuss the implications of these findings for the development of cancer stem cell targeted therapeutics. PMID:25506895

  11. shRNA kinome screen identifies TBK1 as a therapeutic target for HER2+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tao; Liu, Jeff C; Chung, Philip E D; Uehling, David; Aman, Ahmed; Joseph, Babu; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Zhe; Schachter, Nathan F; Rottapel, Robert; Egan, Sean E; Al-Awar, Rima; Moffat, Jason; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2014-04-01

    HER2(+) breast cancer is currently treated with chemotherapy plus anti-HER2 inhibitors. Many patients do not respond or relapse with aggressive metastatic disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutics that can target HER2(+) breast cancer and potentiate the effect of anti-HER2 inhibitors, in particular those that can target tumor-initiating cells (TIC). Here, we show that MMTV-Her2/Neu mammary tumor cells cultured as nonadherent spheres or as adherent monolayer cells select for stabilizing mutations in p53 that "immortalize" the cultures and that, after serial passages, sphere conditions maintain TICs, whereas monolayer cells gradually lose these tumorigenic cells. Using tumorsphere formation as surrogate for TICs, we screened p53-mutant Her2/Neu(+) tumorsphere versus monolayer cells with a lentivirus short hairpin RNA kinome library. We identified kinases such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and the TGFβR protein family, previously implicated in HER2(+) breast cancer, as well as autophagy factor ATG1/ULK1 and the noncanonical IκB kinase (IKK), TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which have not been previously linked to HER2(+) breast cancer. Knockdown of TBK1 or pharmacologic inhibition of TBK1 and the related protein, IKKε, suppressed growth of both mouse and human HER2(+) breast cancer cells. TBK1/IKKε inhibition promoted cellular senescence by suppressing p65-NF-κB and inducing p16(Ink4a). In addition, TBK1/IKKε inhibition cooperated with lapatinib, a HER2/EGFR1-targeted drug, to accelerate apoptosis and kill HER2(+) breast cancer cells both in culture and in xenografts. Our results suggest that patients with HER2(+) breast cancer may benefit from anti-TBK1/IKKε plus anti-HER2 combination therapies and establish conditions that can be used to screen for additional TIC-specific inhibitors of HER2(+) breast cancer.

  12. Genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: responsibility and choice.

    PubMed

    d'Agincourt-Canning, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer has become an important part of clinical genetics practice. Although considerable work has focused on the psychological impact of this technology, there has been little research into the moral implications of genetic information on hereditary cancer families. In this article, the author examines moral issues related to individuals' decisions to seek or decline testing. In-depth interviews with 53 participants make up the core of the research. Analysis of participants' accounts illustrates how the decision to be tested (or not) interconnects with moral agency and aspects of self (embodied, familial-relational, and civic self). The findings form the foundation for inquiry into conceptualization of moral responsibility, autonomy, and choice. They also provide insight that might assist clinicians to understand more fully the needs and responses of those who seek genetic testing for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer.

  13. Breast Cancer Risk – From Genetics to Molecular Understanding of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, P. A.; Ekici, A. B.; Wachter, D. L.; Hein, A.; Bayer, C. M.; Häberle, L.; Loehberg, C. R.; Schneider, M.; Jud, S. M.; Heusinger, K.; Rübner, M.; Rauh, C.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    Several advancements over the last decade have triggered the developments in the field of breast cancer risk research. One of them is the availability of the human genome sequence along with cheap genotyping possibilities. Another is the globalization of research, which has led to the growth of research collaboration into large international consortia that facilitate the pooling of clinical and genotype data of hundreds of thousands of patients and healthy control individuals. This review concerns with the recent developments in breast cancer risk research and focuses on the discovery of new genetic breast cancer risk factors and their meaning in the context of established non-genetic risk factors. Finally the clinical application is highly dependent on the accuracy of breast cancer risk prediction models, not only for all breast cancer patients, but also for molecular subtypes, preferably for those which are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Recently risk prediction incorporates all possible risk factors, which include epidemiological risk factors, mammographic density and genetic risk factors. PMID:24771903

  14. Genetic markers as therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis: A game changer in clinical therapy?

    PubMed

    Ali, A M Mohamed Thoufic; Vino, S

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multi-systemic autoimmune disease unremitted by genetic and environmental factors. The factors are crucial but inadequate in the development of disease; however, these factors can be representative of potential therapeutic targets and response to clinical therapy. Insights into the contribution of genetic risk factors are currently in progress with studies querying the genetic variation, their role in gene expression of coding and non-coding genes and other mechanisms of disease. In this review, we describe the significance of genetic markers architecture of RA through genome-wide association studies and meta-analysis studies. Further, it also reveals the mechanism of disease pathogenesis investigated through the mutual findings of functional and genetic studies of individual RA-associated genes, which includes HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPB1, PADI4, PTPN22, TRAF1-C5, STAT4 and C5orf30. However, the genetic background of RA remains to be clearly depicted. Prospective efforts of the post-genomic and functional genomic period can travel toward real possible assessment of the genetic effect on RA. The discovery of novel genes associated with the disease can be appropriate in identifying potential biomarkers, which could assist in early diagnosis and aggressive treatment.

  15. [Epilepsy-new diagnostic tools, old drugs? : Therapeutic consequences of epilepsy genetics].

    PubMed

    Tacke, M; Neubauer, B A; Gerstl, L; Roser, T; Rémi, J; Borggraefe, I

    2017-09-20

    Recent advances in the field of epilepsy genetics have led to an increased fraction of patients with epilepsies where the etiology of the disease could be identified. Nevertheless, there is some criticism regarding the use of epilepsy genetics because in many cases the identification of a pathogenetic mutation does not lead to an adaptation of therapy or to an improved prognosis. In addition, the interpretation of genetic results might be complicated due to the considerable numbers of variants of unclear significance. This publication presents the arguments in favour of a broad use of genetic investigations for children with epilepsies. Several diseases where a genetic diagnosis does in fact have direct therapeutic consequences are mentioned. In addition, the indirect impact of an established etiology, encompassing the avoidance of unnecessary diagnostic measures, possibility of genetic counselling, and the easing of the psychologic burden for the caregivers, should not be underestimated. The arguments in favour of broad genetic diagnostics prevail notwithstanding the lack of relevant new developments regarding the therapy.

  16. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Dreyfus, Jill; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Ruiter, Rikje; Sanna, Serena; Buring, Julie E; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Franceschini, Nora; Hankinson, Susan E; Hofman, Albert; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Porcu, Eleonora; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rose, Lynda M; Splansky, Greta L; Stolk, Lisette; Uitterlinden, André G; Chanock, Stephen J; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Murabito, Joanne M; Ridker, Paul M; Stricker, Bruno H; Hunter, David J

    2012-03-20

    A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and breast cancer risk is unknown. In this study, we investigated 19 and 17 newly identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the ReproGen Consortium that have been associated with age at menarche and age at natural menopause, respectively, and assessed their associations with breast cancer risk in 6 population-based studies among up to 3,683 breast cancer cases and 34,174 controls in white women of European ancestry. In addition, we used these SNPs to calculate genetic risk scores (GRSs) based on their associations with each trait. After adjusting for age and potential population stratification, two age at menarche associated SNPs (rs1079866 and rs7821178) and one age at natural menopause associated SNP (rs2517388) were associated with breast cancer risk (p values, 0.003, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively). The odds ratios for breast cancer corresponding to per-risk-allele were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.24), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.15) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20), respectively, and were in the direction predicted by their associations with age at menarche or age at natural menopause. These associations did not appear to be attenuated by further controlling for self-reported age at menarche, age at natural menopause, or known breast cancer susceptibility loci. Although we did not observe a statistically significant association between any GRS for reproductive aging and breast cancer risk, the 4th and 5th highest quintiles of the younger age at menarche GRS had odds ratios of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.28) and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.27), respectively, compared to the lowest quintile. Our study suggests that three genetic variants, independent of their associations with age at menarche or age at

  17. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  18. Curcumin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer therapeutics and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Yallapu, Murali M; Othman, Shadi F; Curtis, Evan T; Bauer, Nichole A; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kumar, Deepak; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    The next generation magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with theranostic applications have attracted significant attention and will greatly improve nanomedicine in cancer therapeutics. Such novel MNP formulations must have ultra-low particle size, high inherent magnetic properties, effective imaging, drug targeting, and drug delivery properties. To achieve these characteristic properties, a curcumin-loaded MNP (MNP-CUR) formulation was developed. MNPs were prepared by chemical precipitation method and loaded with curcumin (CUR) using diffusion method. The physicochemical properties of MNP-CUR were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopy. The internalization of MNP-CUR was achieved after 6 hours incubation with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The anticancer potential was evaluated by a tetrazolium-based dye and colony formation assays. Further, to prove MNP-CUR results in superior therapeutic effects over CUR, the mitochondrial membrane potential integrity and reactive oxygen species generation were determined. Magnetic resonance imaging capability and magnetic targeting property were also evaluated. MNP-CUR exhibited individual particle grain size of ~9 nm and hydrodynamic average aggregative particle size of ~123 nm. Internalized MNP-CUR showed a preferential uptake in MDA-MB-231 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and demonstrated accumulation throughout the cell, which indicates that particles are not attached on the cell surface but internalized through endocytosis. MNP-CUR displayed strong anticancer properties compared to free CUR. MNP-CUR also amplified loss of potential integrity and generation of reactive oxygen species upon treatment compared to free CUR. Furthermore, MNP-CUR exhibited superior magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and significantly increased the targeting capability of CUR. MNP-CUR exhibits potent anticancer activity along with imaging and magnetic targeting capabilities. This

  19. Recent discoveries in the genetics of melanoma and their therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Amélie; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Dumaz, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma, tumors arising from melanocytes, has increased markedly over the past few years in many countries. Although early melanoma is curable through surgical excision, the prognosis of advanced melanoma is very poor, this tumor being resistant to current therapies. Thus there is a need for new therapies to improve the treatment of advanced melanoma. This review provides an overview of recent discoveries in the genetics of melanoma which could offer new therapeutic opportunities.

  20. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets.

  1. Genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer in Asia-moving forward.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava

    2016-06-01

    Genetic screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has gained much attention for the past decades. With the development of advanced sequencing technology, other novel breast cancer associated susceptibility genes, other than BRCA genes, have been identified recently. The prevalence of BRCA mutation is known to be different in the West and in the East, therefore it is important to understand the mutation spectrum locally and in Asia to improve early diagnosis and clinical management of hereditary breast cancer in the region. In this editorial, we sought to highlight the need of genetic screening in HBOC, and also highlight specific issues within Asia which may need to be addressed to help popularize its appropriate use in this region.

  2. RNAi: a potential new class of therapeutic for human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Attila A

    2011-11-01

    Dominant negative genetic disorders, in which a mutant allele of a gene causes disease in the presence of a second, normal copy, have been challenging since there is no cure and treatments are only to alleviate the symptoms. Current therapies involving pharmacological and biological drugs are not suitable to target mutant genes selectively due to structural indifference of the normal variant of their targets from the disease-causing mutant ones. In instances when the target contains single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), whether it is an enzyme or structural or receptor protein are not ideal for treatment using conventional drugs due to their lack of selectivity. Therefore, there is a need to develop new approaches to accelerate targeting these previously inaccessible targets by classical therapeutics. Although there is a cooling trend by the pharmaceutical industry for the potential of RNA interference (RNAi), RNAi and other RNA targeting drugs (antisense, ribozyme, etc.) still hold their promise as the only drugs that provide an opportunity to target genes with SNP mutations found in dominant negative disorders, genes specific to pathogenic tumor cells, and genes that are critical for mediating the pathology of various other diseases. Because of its exquisite specificity and potency, RNAi has attracted a considerable interest as a new class of therapeutic for genetic diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease (HD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), spinocerebellar ataxia, dominant muscular dystrophies, and cancer. In this review, progress and challenges in developing RNAi therapeutics for genetic diseases will be discussed.

  3. Effects of CYP2B6 genetic polymorphisms in patients receiving cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Haroun, F; Al-Shaar, L; Habib, R H; El-Saghir, N; Tfayli, A; Bazarbachi, A; Salem, Z; Shamseddine, A; Taher, A; Cascorbi, I; Zgheib, N K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the frequency of three CYP2B6 [CYP2B6*4 (rs2279343), CYP2B6*5 (rs3211371) and CYP2B6*9 (rs3745274)] alleles in patients with breast cancer receiving cyclophosphamide (CP) therapy and test whether these variants are predictors of CP-associated toxicity and efficacy. A total of 145 female breast cancer patients admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center for breast cancer-related therapy were included. Chart review was performed for collection of toxicity data. A time-to-event analysis was performed with a subset of 38 patients. The minor allele frequencies of CYP2B6*9, CYP2B6*4 and CYP2B6*5 were 0.27, 0.29 and 0.07, respectively. CYP2B6 *5/*6, *6/*9 or *6/*6 haplotypes were associated with a significantly shorter time to recurrence of the disease. There were no significant associations with myelo-toxicity. This is the first report on the pharmacogenetic profile of patients with breast cancer and the therapeutic and myelo-toxic behavior of CP in women from an Arab Middle Eastern country. Our results show that genotyping for these CYP2B6 alleles does not help in personalizing therapy from a toxicity perspective, and the association of shorter survival in these subjects with homozygous variants is interesting yet insufficient to justify routine genotyping prior to therapy, or to consider using a higher CP dose. Larger future studies or meta-analyses will be needed to further clarify the potential implication of these genetic polymorphisms.

  4. Barriers to participating in genetic counseling and BRCA testing during primary treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlich-Bakker, Kathryn J; ten Kroode, Herman F J; Wárlám-Rodenhuis, Carla C; van den Bout, Jan; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about reasons why eligible breast cancer patients decline BRCA mutation testing. They may withdraw at different stages during genetic counseling for different reasons. We prospectively studied perceived benefits and barriers to genetic counseling and BRCA testing in 102 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients approached for genetic counseling at the start of radiotherapy. Patients completed questionnaires and participated in interviews at different stages of the counseling protocol. Participation was not influenced by distress, knowledge about hereditary breast cancer, previous genetic testing in relatives, or perceived risks and barriers. Immediate decliners (n = 23) do not believe genetic testing is relevant for them. Patients who decline after pedigree compilation (n = 14) are more hesitant and anxious about the influence of the test result on their future often wishing to postpone further testing. Late decliners (n = 7) withdraw afraid of the test result and/or after a relative's objection. These decliners are not easily identified upon approach because they are similar to patients who receive a DNA test result (n = 58). Notwithstanding their decline, 81% agreed to the timing or would have preferred an earlier approach for genetic counseling. Decliners may make more informed decisions after tailored health education, including adequate risk information.

  5. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Naveen; Vohra, Shivani; Tu, Khin; Abdelmagid, Samir M.

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities. PMID:25530967

  6. Molecular, phenotypic aspects and therapeutic horizons of rare genetic bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Taha; Dhawan, Naveen; Bahl, Jaya; Gupta, Vineet; Vohra, Shivani; Tu, Khin; Abdelmagid, Samir M

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities.

  7. High dose ketoconazole: endocrine and therapeutic effects in postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A. L.; Cantwell, B. M.; Dowsett, M.

    1988-01-01

    Ketoconazole, an antifungal agent, inhibits in vitro C17-C20 lyase, an enzyme involved in androgen biosynthesis. Since adrenal and ovarian androgens are the main precursors of oestrogens in postmenopausal women, the endocrine and therapeutic effects of high dose ketoconazole (400 mg three times a day) were evaluated in 14 postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer. Testosterone levels were suppressed significantly (37%, P less than 0.025), as was dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, and androstenedione levels showed a similar but non-significant fall. Seventeen hydroxyprogesterone levels rose significantly, as would be expected if C17-C20 lyase was inhibited. There was no suppression of cortisol or oestrone levels. There was a small suppression of oestradiol concentrations, reflecting a decrease in its precursor, testosterone. Sex hormone binding globulin levels rose, which may be due to a decrease in testosterone. All the changes are compatible with C17-C20 lyase as a major site of action in vivo. No responses occurred in 12 patients treated with ketoconazole alone, but in 2 patients who were progressing on aminoglutethimide, testosterone levels were suppressed and in one patient a partial response occurred. Ketoconazole was poorly tolerated due to gastrointestinal toxicity. This study shows that C17-C20 lyase is a potential target for hormone therapy, and that sequential blockade of enzymes involved in oestrogen biosynthesis should be further evaluated. PMID:2974717

  8. Radiation-enhanced therapeutic targeting of galectin-1 enriched malignant stroma in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jyoti, Amar; Johnson, Sara E.; Swindell, Elden P.; Napier, Dana; Sethi, Pallavi; Chan, Ryan; Feddock, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Heidi L.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Mark Evers, B.

    2016-01-01

    Currently there are no FDA approved targeted therapies for Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). Ongoing clinical trials for TNBC have focused primarily on targeting the epithelial cancer cells. However, targeted delivery of cytotoxic payloads to the non-transformed tumor associated-endothelium can prove to be an alternate approach that is currently unexplored. The present study is supported by recent findings on elevated expression of stromal galectin-1 in clinical samples of TNBC and our ongoing findings on stromal targeting of radiation induced galectin-1 by the anginex-conjugated arsenic-cisplatin loaded liposomes using a novel murine tumor model. We demonstrate inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in response to the multimodal nanotherapeutic strategy using a TNBC model with orthotopic tumors originating from 3D tumor tissue analogs (TTA) comprised of tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The ‘rigorous’ combined treatment regimen of radiation and targeted liposomes is also shown to be well tolerated. More importantly, the results presented provide a means to exploit clinically relevant radiation dose for concurrent receptor mediated enhanced delivery of chemotherapy while limiting overall toxicity. The proposed study is significant as it falls in line with developing combinatorial therapeutic approaches for stroma-directed tumor targeting using tumor models that have an appropriate representation of the TNBC microenvironment. PMID:27223428

  9. Human neural stem cells can target and deliver therapeutic genes to breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyeung Min; Park, In H; Shin, Ji Y; Jin, Juyoun; Kang, Bong Gu; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Se Jeong; Jo, Mi-young; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2009-03-01

    The tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) led to the development of a novel strategy for delivering therapeutic genes to tumors in the brain. To apply this strategy to the treatment of brain metastases, we made a human NSC line expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer agent. In vitro, the F3.CD cells significantly inhibited the growth of tumor cell lines in the presence of the prodrug 5-FC. In vivo, MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells were implanted into the brain of immune-deficient mouse stereotactically, and F3.CD cells were injected into the contralateral hemisphere followed by systemic 5-FC administration. The F3.CD cells migrated selectively into the brain metastases located in the opposite hemisphere and resulted in significantly reduced volumes. The F3.CD and 5-FC treatment also decreased both tumor volume and number of tumor mass significantly, when immune-deficient mouse had MDA-MB-435 cells injected into the internal carotid artery and F3.CD cells were transplanted into the contralateral brain hemisphere stereotactically. Taken together, brain transplantation of human NSCs, encoding the suicide enzyme CD, combined with systemic administration of the prodrug 5-FC, is an effective treatment regimen for brain metastases of tumors.

  10. The Search for an Explanation: Breast Cancer in the Context of Genetic Inheritance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheu, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This case study is an in-depth examination of how Erika (a pseudonym) interpreted and understood her genetic test results for breast cancer susceptibility. Her experience is presented in the form of a biography, which was built from key passages retrieved from the semi structured interview the author conducted at Erika's home. The interview data…

  11. [Assisted Reproduction and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis in Patients Susceptible to Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Veselá, K; Kocur, T; Horák, J; Horňák, M; Oráčová, E; Hromadová, L; Veselý, J; Trávník, P

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproduction, as well as pregnancy itself, in patients with breast cancer or other hereditary type of cancer, is a widely discussed topic. In the past, patients treated for breast cancer were rarely involved in the discussion about reproductive possibilities or infertility treatment. However, current knowledge suggests, that breast cancer is neither a contraindication to pregnancy, nor to assisted reproduction techniques. On the contrary, assisted reproduction and preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods might prevent the transmission of genetic risks to the fetus. In this review we summarize data concerning pregnancy risks in patients with increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, we introduce current possibilities and approaches to fertility preservation prior to assisted reproduction treatment as well as novel methods improving the safety of fertility treatment. In the second part of this review, we focus on karyomapping--an advanced molecular genetic tool for elimination of germinal mutations in patients with predisposition to cancer. Moreover, the rapid development of preimplantation genetic diagnosis methods contributes to detection of both chromosomal aneuploidy and causal mutations in a relatively short time-span.

  12. The Search for an Explanation: Breast Cancer in the Context of Genetic Inheritance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheu, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This case study is an in-depth examination of how Erika (a pseudonym) interpreted and understood her genetic test results for breast cancer susceptibility. Her experience is presented in the form of a biography, which was built from key passages retrieved from the semi structured interview the author conducted at Erika's home. The interview data…

  13. Genetic polymorphisms associated with breast cancer in malaysian cohort.

    PubMed

    Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Munretnam, Khamsigan; Samsudin, Nurulhafizah; Lye, Say Hean; Hashim, Nikman Adli Nor; Ramzi, Nurul Hanis; Velapasamy, Sharmila; Wee, Ler Lian; Alex, Livy

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have discovered multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of common diseases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the replication of previously published SNPs that showed statistical significance for breast cancer in the Malaysian population. In this case-control study, 80 subjects for each group were recruited from various hospitals in Malaysia. A total of 768 SNPs were genotyped and analyzed to distinguish risk and protective alleles. A total of three SNPs were found to be associated with increased risk of breast cancer while six SNPs showed protective effect. All nine were statistically significant SNPs (p ≤ 0.01), five SNPs from previous studies were successfully replicated in our study. Significant modifiable (diet) and non-modifiable (family history of breast cancer in first degree relative) risk factors were also observed. We identified nine SNPs from this study to be either conferring susceptibility or protection to breast cancer which may serve as potential markers in risk prediction.

  14. Evaluating the performance of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) breast and ovarian genetic/familial high risk assessment referral criteria for breast cancer women in an Asian surgical breast clinic

    PubMed Central

    Borje, Eillen; Allen, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally, resources for genomic services vary. Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) breast and ovarian genetic/familial high risk assessment criteria for further genetic risk evaluation are useful, but lack specificity for reliably excluding patients with low a priori risk. This may result in patient overload in lesser-equipped genetics clinics. Since we use Manchester and the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) risk assessment models in our genetics clinic to determine whether genetic testing is warranted, we chose Manchester and BOADICEA as the reference standard to compare how the NCCN breast and ovarian genetic/familial high risk assessment criteria for further genetic risk evaluation performs against these two risk assessment models in referring breast cancer patients for genetic evaluation. Methods Breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2009–2011 were assessed using the NCCN criteria, Manchester and BOADICEA. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used to compare the NCCN criteria versus the Manchester and BOADICEA scoring systems in identifying high-risk patients. Results A total of 666 patients were included in the study. Percentages of high-risk patients resulting from Manchester and BOADICEA were 1.80% and 2.55%, respectively. Among the NCCN criteria, breast cancer and ≥1 close relatives with breast cancer at ≤50 years of age correlated best with Manchester and/or BOADICEA (c-statistic =0.831) with a false negative rate of 1.0%. Conclusions Breast cancer at any age and ≥1 close relative with breast cancer at ≤50 years of age exhibited the highest correlation with Manchester and/or BOADICEA, promising greater specificity compared to the other NCCN criteria for segregating high risk, Asian breast cancer patients for referral to a genetics clinic, nevertheless recognizing the inherent limitations of the scoring systems. PMID

  15. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene expression profiles of...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0106 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making Improve

  16. Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion. We have used FAC sorting data coming from human and mouse adult mammary gland , and coming from the fetal mammary rudiment, to define gene...AD_____________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0107 TITLE: Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of a Novel Embryonic Mammary Stem Cell Gene Signature to Improve Human Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutic

  17. Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    the hypothesis that MerTK-mediated efferocytosis by tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) is a major limitation to effective therapeutic responses...et al., 2013). We found that MerTK signaling, primarily in tumor associated macrophages, limits expansion of CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the tumor...lethality associated with post-partum breast cancers (Stanford et al., 2014). We also found that MerTK inhibition could block the exaggerated

  18. Association of Genetic Ancestry with Breast Cancer in Ethnically Diverse Women from Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. Methods We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the “Breast Cancer Care in Chicago” study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. Results As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54–0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56–0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02) and higher grade (p = 0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03) in nH Blacks. Conclusion Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups

  19. Association of genetic ancestry with breast cancer in ethnically diverse women from Chicago.

    PubMed

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the "Breast Cancer Care in Chicago" study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54-0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56-0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02) and higher grade (p = 0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03) in nH Blacks. Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups.

  20. Studies on nonsense mediated decay reveal novel therapeutic options for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D

    2009-01-01

    Scientific breakthroughs have often led to commercially viable patents mainly in the field of engineering. Commercialization in the field of medicine has been restricted mostly to machinery and engineering on the one hand and therapeutic drugs for common chronic ailments such as cough, cold, headache, etc, on the other. Sequencing of the human genome has attracted the attention of pharmaceutical companies and now biotechnology has become a goldmine for commercialization of products and processes. Recent advances in our understanding of basic biological processes have resulted in the opening of new avenues for treatment of human genetic diseases, especially single gene disorders. A significant proportion of human genetic disorders have been shown to be caused due to degradation of transcripts for specific genes through a process called nonsense mediated decay (NMD). The modulation of NMD provides a viable therapeutic option for treatment of several genetic disorders and therefore has been a good prospect for patenting and commercialization. In this review the molecular basis for NMD and attempts to treat genetic diseases which result from NMD are discussed.

  1. Genetic Studies on the Tripartite Glutamate Synapse in the Pathophysiology and Therapeutics of Mood Disorders.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Loch, Alexandre A; Carvalho, André F; Brunoni, André R; Haddad, Marie Reine; Henter, Ioline D; Zarate, Carlos A; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2017-03-01

    Both bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) have high morbidity and share a genetic background. Treatment options for these mood disorders are currently suboptimal for many patients; however, specific genetic variables may be involved in both pathophysiology and response to treatment. Agents such as the glutamatergic modulator ketamine are effective in treatment-resistant mood disorders, underscoring the potential importance of the glutamatergic system as a target for improved therapeutics. Here we review genetic studies linking the glutamatergic system to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of mood disorders. We screened 763 original genetic studies of BD or MDD that investigated genes encoding targets of the pathway/mediators related to the so-called tripartite glutamate synapse, including pre- and post-synaptic neurons and glial cells; 60 papers were included in this review. The findings suggest the involvement of glutamate-related genes in risk for mood disorders, treatment response, and phenotypic characteristics, although there was no consistent evidence for a specific gene. Target genes of high interest included GRIA3 and GRIK2 (which likely play a role in emergent suicidal ideation after antidepressant treatment), GRIK4 (which may influence treatment response), and GRM7 (which potentially affects risk for mood disorders). There was stronger evidence that glutamate-related genes influence risk for BD compared with MDD. Taken together, the studies show a preliminary relationship between glutamate-related genes and risk for mood disorders, suicide, and treatment response, particularly with regard to targets on metabotropic and ionotropic receptors.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics: a cure for cancer and other genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Chun-Jie, Huang; Ao, Zhou; Jamal, Muhammad; Zohaib, Ali; Khan, Farhan Ahmed; Hakim, Muthia Raihana; ShuJun, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is caused by a series of alterations in genome and epigenome mostly resulting in activation of oncogenes or inactivation of cancer suppressor genes. Genetic engineering has become pivotal in the treatment of cancer and other genetic diseases, especially the formerly-niche use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) associated with Cas9. In defining its superior use, we have followed the recent advances that have been made in producing CRISPR/Cas9 as a therapy of choice. We also provide important genetic mutations where CRISPRs can be repurposed to create adaptive immunity to fight carcinomas and edit genetic mutations causing it. Meanwhile, challenges to CRISPR technology are also discussed with emphasis on ability of pathogens to evolve against CRISPRs. We follow the recent developments on the function of CRISPRs with different carriers which can efficiently deliver it to target cells; furthermore, analogous technologies are also discussed along CRISPRs, including zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Moreover, progress in clinical applications of CRISPR therapeutics is reviewed; in effect, patients can have lower morbidity and/or mortality from the therapeutic method with least possible side-effects. PMID:27250031

  3. Bcl-2 family proteins in breast development and cancer: could Mcl-1 targeting overcome therapeutic resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michelle M.; Cook, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis, cell death executed by caspases, is essential to normal breast development and homeostasis. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signals are tightly regulated in normal breast epithelial cells. Dysregulation of this balance is required for breast tumorigenesis and increases acquired resistance to treatments, including molecularly targeted therapies, radiation and chemotherapies. The pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members interact with each other to maintain mitochondrial integrity and regulate cellular commitment to apoptosis. Among the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, Mcl-1 is uniquely regulated by numerous oncogenic signaling pathways. This review will focus on the role of Bcl-2 family proteins in normal breast development, breast tumorigenesis and acquired resistance to breast cancer treatment strategies, while highlighting Mcl-1 as a promising target to improve breast cancer tumor cell killing. PMID:25784482

  4. Insights into BRCA1/2 Genetic Counseling from Ethnically Diverse Latina Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Rajpal, Neha; Muñoz, Juliana; Peshkin, Beth N; Graves, Kristi D

    2017-04-04

    Despite the disproportionate underuse of genetic counseling and testing for BRCA1/2 (BRCA)-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) risk among Latinas, little is known about the associated barriers and facilitators. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 20 at-risk Latina women from diverse backgrounds. Eligible women were diagnosed with breast cancer <50 years, with or without a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer (>1 first-degree relative diagnosed <50 years). All interviews were conducted in Spanish, audio recorded, transcribed, and translated into English. Two bilingual coders used thematic analyses to identify 7 main themes. Results revealed very low levels of awareness and knowledge about HBOC and BRCA genetic counseling. Interestingly, for most Latinas, competing life demands and cultural concerns (fatalismo and destino) did not strongly influence personal beliefs about genetic counseling. In addition, older women were equally as interested in education, cancer prevention, and BRCA genetic counseling as younger women. These findings suggest that Latinas, regardless of age, increasingly acknowledge and prioritize their own health. Women reported their main motivator to undergo counseling was concern about family members' cancer risks. Main barriers included financial and insurance concerns, and lack of awareness about genetic services. Investigating the beliefs and attitudes of diverse populations of Latinas at risk for HBOC reveals logistical barriers to BRCA genetic counseling uptake within this under-represented community. Efforts are needed to provide at-risk Latina breast cancer survivors' knowledge of and access to genetic counseling and testing based on risk status and Latinas' increasing responsiveness and uptake of these services.

  5. Genetic Discoveries Drive Molecular Analyses and Targeted Therapeutic Options in the Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Ryan S; Goldstein, David B

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disease with substantial genetic contribution. We have recently made major advances in understanding the genetics and etiology of the epilepsies. However, current antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in nearly one third of patients. Most of these drugs were developed without knowledge of the underlying causes of the epilepsy to be treated; thus, it seems reasonable to assume that further improvements require a deeper understanding of epilepsy pathophysiology. Although once the rate-limiting step, gene discovery is now occurring at an unprecedented rapid rate, especially in the epileptic encephalopathies. However, to place these genetic findings in a biological context and discover treatment options for patients, we must focus on developing an efficient framework for functional evaluation of the mutations that cause epilepsy. In this review, we discuss guidelines for gene discovery, emerging functional assays and models, and novel therapeutics to highlight the developing framework of precision medicine in the epilepsies.

  6. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering.

  7. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer - Effects on Disease Prognosis and Therapeutic Protocols - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Stojanoski, Sinisa; Ristevska, Nevena; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Antevski, Borce; Petrushevska, Gordana

    2015-03-15

    The main prognostic factor in early staged breast cancer is the axillary lymph node metastatic affection. Sentinel lymph node biopsy, as a staging modality, significantly decreases surgical morbidity. The status of internal mammary lymph nodes gains an increased predictive role in grading breast carcinomas and modulation of postoperative therapeutic protocols. If positive, almost always are associated with worse disease outcome. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of internal mammary lymph node micrometastases has not been up to date precisely defined. To present a case of female patient clinically diagnosed as T1, N0, M0 (clinical TNM) ductal breast carcinoma with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. Dual method of scintigraphic sentinel lymph node detection using 99mTc-SENTI-SCINT and blue dye injection, intraoperative gamma probe detection, radioguided surgery and intraoperative ex tempore biopsy were used. We present a case of clinically T1, N0, M0 ductal breast cancer with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative ex tempore biopsy revealed micrometastases in the internal mammary node and no metastatic involvement of the axillary sentinel lymph node. Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastases improves N (nodal) grading of breast cancer by selecting a high risk subgroup of patients that require adjuvant hormone therapy, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J.

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  10. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Andrulis, Irene L; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A; Fasching, Peter A; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Martens, John W M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hopper, John L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M; Giles, Graham G; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2014-11-15

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer.

  11. Glo1 genetic amplification as a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shirong; Liang, Xiaodong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Chen, Xufeng; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Ma, Shenglin

    2014-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) gene aberrations is associated with tumorigenesis and progression in numerous cancers. In this study, we explored the role of Glo1 genetic amplification and expression in Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and Glo1 genetic amplification as potential therapeutic target for HCC. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and qRT-PCR to examine Glo1 genetic aberrations and Glo1 mRNA expression in paired tumor samples obtained from HCC patients. Glo1 genetic amplification was identified in a subset of HCC patient (6%, 3/50), and up-regulation of Glo1 expression was found in 48% (24/50) of tumor tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Statistic analysis showed that Glo1-upregulation significantly correlated with high serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Interfering Glo1 expression with shRNA knocking-down led to significant inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptosis in primarily cultured HCC cells carrying genetic amplified Glo1 gene, while no inhibitory effects on cell proliferation were observed in HCC cells with normal copies of Glo1 gene. Glo1 knockdown also inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in xenograft tumors established from primarily cultured HCC cells with Glo1 gene amplification. In addition, Glo1 knocking-down with shRNA interfering caused cellular accumulation of methylglyoxal, a Glo1 cytotoxic substrate. Our data suggested Glo1 pathway activation is required for cell proliferation and cell survival of HCC cells carrying Glo1 genetic amplification. Intervention of Glo1 activation could be a potential therapeutic option for patients with HCC carrying Glo1 gene amplification.

  12. Integrated in vivo genetic and pharmacologic screening identifies co-inhibition of EGRF and ROCK as a potential treatment regimen for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Iskit, Sedef; Lieftink, Cor; Halonen, Pasi; Shahrabi, Aida; Possik, Patricia A; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Peeper, Daniel S

    2016-07-12

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide among women. Despite several therapeutic options, 15% of breast cancer patients succumb to the disease owing to tumor relapse and acquired therapy resistance. Particularly in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), developing effective treatments remains challenging owing to the lack of a common vulnerability that can be exploited by targeted approaches. We have previously shown that tumor cells have different requirements for growth in vivo than in vitro. Therefore, to discover novel drug targets for TNBC, we performed parallel in vivo and in vitro genetic shRNA dropout screens. We identified several potential drug targets that were required for tumor growth in vivo to a greater extent than in vitro. By combining pharmacologic inhibitors acting on a subset of these candidates, we identified a synergistic interaction between EGFR and ROCK inhibitors. This combination effectively reduced TNBC cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest. These results illustrate the power of in vivo genetic screens and warrant further validation of EGFR and ROCK as combined pharmacologic targets for breast cancer.

  13. Integrated in vivo genetic and pharmacologic screening identifies co-inhibition of EGRF and ROCK as a potential treatment regimen for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iskit, Sedef; Lieftink, Cor; Halonen, Pasi; Shahrabi, Aida; Possik, Patricia A.; Beijersbergen, Roderick L.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide among women. Despite several therapeutic options, 15% of breast cancer patients succumb to the disease owing to tumor relapse and acquired therapy resistance. Particularly in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), developing effective treatments remains challenging owing to the lack of a common vulnerability that can be exploited by targeted approaches. We have previously shown that tumor cells have different requirements for growth in vivo than in vitro. Therefore, to discover novel drug targets for TNBC, we performed parallel in vivo and in vitro genetic shRNA dropout screens. We identified several potential drug targets that were required for tumor growth in vivo to a greater extent than in vitro. By combining pharmacologic inhibitors acting on a subset of these candidates, we identified a synergistic interaction between EGFR and ROCK inhibitors. This combination effectively reduced TNBC cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest. These results illustrate the power of in vivo genetic screens and warrant further validation of EGFR and ROCK as combined pharmacologic targets for breast cancer. PMID:27374095

  14. Genetics and pharmacology of longevity: the road to therapeutics for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Kinghorn, Kerri J; Bjedov, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Aging can be defined as the progressive decline in tissue and organismal function and the ability to respond to stress that occurs in association with homeostatic failure and the accumulation of molecular damage. Aging is the biggest risk factor for human disease and results in a wide range of aging pathologies. Although we do not completely understand the underlying molecular basis that drives the aging process, we have gained exceptional insights into the plasticity of life span and healthspan from the use of model organisms such as the worm Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Single-gene mutations in key cellular pathways that regulate environmental sensing, and the response to stress, have been identified that prolong life span across evolution from yeast to mammals. These genetic manipulations also correlate with a delay in the onset of tissue and organismal dysfunction. While the molecular genetics of aging will remain a prosperous and attractive area of research in biogerontology, we are moving towards an era defined by the search for therapeutic drugs that promote healthy aging. Translational biogerontology will require incorporation of both therapeutic and pharmacological concepts. The use of model organisms will remain central to the quest for drug discovery, but as we uncover molecular processes regulated by repurposed drugs and polypharmacy, studies of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, drug-drug interactions, drug toxicity, and therapeutic index will slowly become more prevalent in aging research. As we move from genetics to pharmacology and therapeutics, studies will not only require demonstration of life span extension and an underlying molecular mechanism, but also the translational relevance for human health and disease prevention.

  15. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in a breast clinic population: consideration for weight loss as a therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Angela; Scharf, Keith; Senthil, Maheswari; Solomon, Naveenraj; Garberoglio, Carlos; Lum, Sharon S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for breast cancer and weight loss may be associated with a decreased risk for breast cancer and its recurrence. We evaluated the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and obesity-related co-morbidities in a breast health clinic population to determine the potential need for weight loss intervention. A retrospective review was conducted of sequential patients seen at a breast health clinic from July 1 to December 31, 2011. Body mass index (BMI), reason for visit (breast cancer diagnosis, high risk for breast cancer, or benign condition), and presence of obesity-related co-morbidities were recorded. The 302 patients who met inclusion criteria had a median age of 52 years (10-91) and median BMI of 26 kg/m(2) (15.4-56.5). Overall, 36.8% of patients had a BMI between 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2); 32.1%, 25-29.9 kg/m(2); 14.2%, 30-34.9 kg/m(2); 8.3%, 35-39.9 kg/m(2); and 4.3%, ≥ 40 kg/m(2). Overweight or obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) occurred in 64.2% of breast cancer, 65.0% of high-risk, and 57.1% of benign patients (P value not significant). Criteria for bariatric surgery (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2) with ≥ 1 obesity-related co-morbidity or BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2)) were met in 8.2% of breast cancer, 16.7% of high-risk, and 11.5% of benign patients (P value not significant). Regardless of diagnosis, a significant proportion of patients visiting the breast health clinic meet criteria for weight loss intervention, including bariatric surgery. Weight management represents an underutilized therapeutic modality that could potentially decrease the risk of breast cancer and its recurrence, and improve overall prognosis. © 2013 Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery on behalf of American Society for Bariatric Surgery.

  16. Association between breast cancer genetic susceptibility variants and terminal duct lobular unit involution of the breast.

    PubMed

    Bodelon, Clara; Oh, Hannah; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Palakal, Maya; Sherman, Mark E; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Geller, Berta M; Vacek, Pamela M; Weaver, Donald L; Chicoine, Rachael E; Papathomas, Daphne; Xiang, Jackie; Patel, Deesha A; Khodr, Zeina G; Linville, Laura; Clare, Susan E; Visscher, Daniel W; Mies, Carolyn; Hewitt, Stephen M; Brinton, Louise A; Storniolo, Anna Maria; He, Chunyan; Chanock, Stephen J; Gierach, Gretchen L; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2017-02-15

    Terminal duct lobular units (TDLUs) are the predominant source of future breast cancers, and lack of TDLU involution (higher TDLU counts, higher acini count per TDLU and the product of the two) is a breast cancer risk factor. Numerous breast cancer susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, but whether they are associated with TDLU involution is unknown. In a pooled analysis of 872 women from two studies, we investigated 62 established breast cancer SNPs and relationships with TDLU involution. Poisson regression models with robust variance were used to calculate adjusted per-allele relative risks (with the non-breast cancer risk allele as the referent) and 95% confidence intervals between TDLU measures and each SNP. All statistical tests were two-sided; P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Overall, 36 SNPs (58.1%) were related to higher TDLU counts although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.25). Six of the 62 SNPs (9.7%) were nominally associated with at least one TDLU measure: rs616488 (PEX14), rs11242675 (FOXQ1) and rs6001930 (MKL1) were associated with higher TDLU count (p = 0.047, 0.045 and 0.031, respectively); rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs6472903 (8q21.11) were associated with higher acini count per TDLU (p = 0.007 and 0.027, respectively); and rs1353747 (PDE4D) and rs204247 (RANBP9) were associated with the product of TDLU and acini counts (p = 0.024 and 0.017, respectively). Our findings suggest breast cancer SNPs may not strongly influence TDLU involution. Agnostic genome-wide association studies of TDLU involution may provide new insights on its biologic underpinnings and breast cancer susceptibility.

  17. Issues of consent and feedback in a genetic epidemiological study of women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M; Ponder, M; Pharoah, P; Everest, S; Mackay, J

    2003-01-01

    Women (N=21) who had had breast cancer and had been enrolled in a large genetic breast cancer epidemiological study were interviewed about their experience of participation in the study, their attitudes to the confidentiality of data, and the feedback of personal and general research results. Collection of family history information seemed more salient in indicating the genetic nature of the study than the enrolment information sheet. There were no concerns about confidentiality. While participants would have welcomed general feedback about the results of the study and were critical that this had not been provided, the feedback of personal information proved complicated and, sometimes, difficult. It is suggested that individual feedback of genetic test information in epidemiological studies should be undertaken only when there are specific reasons. PMID:12672889

  18. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    traumas and current stressors (Green et al., 2000). Only one study ( Salmon et al., 2006) examined the specific relation between breast cancer-related...traumatic stress symptoms and childhood abuse. Salmon et al. assessed abuse using five self-report questions culled from published surveys, and...July 31 Salmon , P., Hill, J., Krespi, R., Clark, L., Fisher, J., & Holcombe, C. (2006). The role of child abuse and age in vulnerability to emotional

  19. Genetic basis for p53 overexpression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, A M; Humphrey, P A; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1991-01-01

    Overexpression of an activated form of the p53 protein may be involved in neoplastic transformation. We found widespread overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in 11 (22%) of 49 primary invasive human breast cancers. Northern blot analysis showed that this overexpression was not due to an increase in the steady-state level of p53 mRNA. The p53 gene was directly sequenced in 7 of these tumors with elevated levels of the protein and, in each case, a mutation that altered the coding sequence for p53 was found in a highly conserved region of the gene. Whereas 4 of these tumors contained only a mutant p53 allele, the other 3 tumors exhibited coding sequences from both a mutant and a wild-type allele. p53 mutations have previously been correlated with allelic loss of part of chromosome 17p that contains the p53 locus. Examination of all 49 breast tumors revealed a 61% frequency of deletion at or near the p53 locus. However, the presence of allelic deletion did not correlate with overexpression of the protein. Six tumors that were deleted but did not express high levels of the protein were sequenced and all retained a wild-type p53 allele. In this series of human breast cancers, overexpression of the p53 protein, not allelic loss on chromosome 17p, was always associated with mutation of the p53 gene. Images PMID:2052583

  20. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  1. Molecular genetics complexity impeding research progress in breast and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ishita; Burney, Ikram; Al-Moundhri, Mansour S.; Tamimi, Yahya

    2017-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer are heterogeneous diseases. While breast cancer accounts for 25% of cancers worldwide, ovarian cancer accounts for 3.5% of all cancers and it is considered to be the most lethal type of cancer among women. In Oman, breast cancer accounts for 25% and ovarian cancer for 4.5% of all cancer cases. Various risk factors, including variable biological and clinical traits, are involved in the onset of breast and ovarian cancer. Although highly developed diagnostic and therapeutic methods have paved the way for better management, targeted therapy against specific biomarkers has not yet shown any significant improvement, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer, which are associated with high mortality rates. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms underlying the pathology of these diseases is expected to improve their prevention, prognosis and management. The aim of the present study was to provide a comprehensive review and updated information on genomics and proteomics alterations associated with cancer pathogenesis, as reported by several research groups worldwide. Furthermore, molecular research in our laboratory, aimed at identifying new pathways involved in the pathogenesis of breast and ovarian cancer using microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), is discussed. Relevant candidate genes were found to be either up- or downregulated in a cohort of breast cancer cases. Similarly, ChIP analysis revealed that relevant candidate genes were regulated by the E2F5 transcription factor in ovarian cancer tissue. An ongoing study aims to validate these genes with a putative role as biological markers that may contribute to the development of targeted therapies for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:28685067

  2. A multistage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S P; Breyer, Joan P; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Parl, Fritz F; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5'-rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107-3'), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study [OR(Het): 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)], and a meta-analysis OR(Het) of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10(-4)) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each OR(Hom) was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor coactivator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer.

  3. Attitudes of obstetrician-gynecologists toward DNA testing for a genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S

    1996-10-01

    To assess knowledge and attitudes of area obstetrician-gynecologists toward DNA testing for genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. At a staff meeting of each of the Rochester area's hospitals that had an obstetric service, we assessed knowledge of inherited predisposition to breast cancer, presented the current status of testing for genetic susceptibility, and assessed attitudes toward such testing. The majority of the physicians surveyed believed that current BRCA1 testing can detect a genetic predisposition to breast cancer accurately enough to be clinically useful (81%) and that a young woman with a family history of breast cancer not currently having regular mammography is likely to benefit from DNA testing because a positive result may motivate her to start mammography earlier (88%). However, most respondents thought that women who test positive are likely to be excessively anxious (87%) and may be discriminated against for insurance purposes (75%). In response to an invitation to participate in a clinical trial of free BRCA1 screening, 74 (70%) desired to participate. Obstetrician-gynecologists expect women detected to have a BRCA1 mutation to be motivated to conduct surveillance, but also to experience anxiety and possible discrimination.

  4. [Genetic variants in miRNAs and its association with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Gómez, Susana; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel; Dolores-Vergara, Maria; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer represents the first cause of cancer death in females. At the molecular level, non-coding RNAs and especially microRNAs have played an important role in the origin and development of this neoplasm In the Anglo-Saxon population, diverse genetic variants in microRNA genes and in their targets are associated with the development of this disease. In the Mexican population it is not known if these or other variants exist. Identification of these or new variants in our population is fundamental in order to have a better understanding of cancer development and to help establish a better diagnostic strategy. DNA was isolated from mammary tumors, adjacent tissue and peripheral blood of Mexican females with or without cancer. From DNA, five microRNA genes and three of their targets were amplified and sequenced. Genetic variants associated with breast cancer in an Anglo- Saxon population have been previously identified in these sequences. In the samples studied we identified seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two had not been previously described and were identified only in women with cancer. The new variants may be genetic predisposition factors for the development of breast cancer in our population. Further experiments are needed to determine the involvement of these variants in the development, establishment and progression of breast cancer.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Reding, Kerryn W.; Weiss, Noel S.; Chen, Chu; Li, Christopher I.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Farin, Federico M.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Daling, Janet R.; Malone, Kathleen E.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway altered the risk of breast cancer alone or in combination, as well as whether menopausal hormone therapy (HT) modified the effect of these SNPs on breast cancer risk. Methods In a population-based case-control study of breast cancer, 891 cases and 878 controls were genotyped for six functional SNPs in the COMT, CYP1B1, GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 genes. Results Women homozygous with the T allele in CYP1B1*2 (Ser119; rs1056827) were at 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–2.46) times the risk of women homozygous with the G allele; women homozygous with the G allele in GSTP1 (Val105; rs1695) were at 0.73 (95% CI: 0.54–0.99) times the risk of breast cancer compared to women homozygous with the A allele. No other SNPs tested were associated with breast cancer to any appreciable degree. Potential gene-gene and gene-HT interactions were investigated. Conclusion With the exception of GSTP1 and possibly CYP1B1*2, our findings do not provide support for the role of genetic variation in the catechol estrogen metabolism pathway and breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. PMID:19383894

  6. Androgen Receptor Status Is a Prognostic Marker in Non-Basal Triple Negative Breast Cancers and Determines Novel Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulnur; Balci, Serdar; Irkkan, Cigdem; Paisie, Carolyn; Lovat, Francesca; Morrison, Carl; Zhang, Jianying; Scarpa, Aldo; Croce, Carlo M.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are a heterogeneous group of tumors characterized by poor patient survival and lack of targeted therapeutics. Androgen receptor has been associated with triple negative breast cancer pathogenesis, but its role in the different subtypes has not been clearly defined. We examined androgen receptor protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 678 breast cancers, including 396 triple negative cancers. Fifty matched lymph node metastases were also examined. Association of expression status with clinical (race, survival) and pathological (basal, non-basal subtype, stage, grade) features was also evaluated. In 160 triple negative breast cancers, mRNA microarray expression profiling was performed, and differences according to androgen receptor status were analyzed. In triple negative cancers the percentage of androgen receptor positive cases was lower (24.8% vs 81.6% of non-triple negative cases), especially in African American women (16.7% vs 25.5% of cancers of white women). No significant difference in androgen receptor expression was observed in primary tumors vs matched metastatic lesions. Positive androgen receptor immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with tumor grade (p<0.01) and associated with better overall patient survival (p = 0.032) in the non-basal triple negative cancer group. In the microarray study, expression of three genes (HER4, TNFSF10, CDK6) showed significant deregulation in association with androgen receptor status; eg CDK6, a novel therapeutic target in triple negative cancers, showed significantly higher expression level in androgen receptor negative cases (p<0.01). These findings confirm the prognostic impact of androgen receptor expression in non-basal triple negative breast cancers, and suggest targeting of new androgen receptor-related molecular pathways in patients with these cancers. PMID:24505496

  7. Androgen receptor status is a prognostic marker in non-basal triple negative breast cancers and determines novel therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Guler, Gulnur; Balci, Serdar; Irkkan, Cigdem; Paisie, Carolyn; Lovat, Francesca; Morrison, Carl; Zhang, Jianying; Scarpa, Aldo; Croce, Carlo M; Shapiro, Charles L; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are a heterogeneous group of tumors characterized by poor patient survival and lack of targeted therapeutics. Androgen receptor has been associated with triple negative breast cancer pathogenesis, but its role in the different subtypes has not been clearly defined. We examined androgen receptor protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis in 678 breast cancers, including 396 triple negative cancers. Fifty matched lymph node metastases were also examined. Association of expression status with clinical (race, survival) and pathological (basal, non-basal subtype, stage, grade) features was also evaluated. In 160 triple negative breast cancers, mRNA microarray expression profiling was performed, and differences according to androgen receptor status were analyzed. In triple negative cancers the percentage of androgen receptor positive cases was lower (24.8% vs 81.6% of non-triple negative cases), especially in African American women (16.7% vs 25.5% of cancers of white women). No significant difference in androgen receptor expression was observed in primary tumors vs matched metastatic lesions. Positive androgen receptor immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with tumor grade (p<0.01) and associated with better overall patient survival (p = 0.032) in the non-basal triple negative cancer group. In the microarray study, expression of three genes (HER4, TNFSF10, CDK6) showed significant deregulation in association with androgen receptor status; eg CDK6, a novel therapeutic target in triple negative cancers, showed significantly higher expression level in androgen receptor negative cases (p<0.01). These findings confirm the prognostic impact of androgen receptor expression in non-basal triple negative breast cancers, and suggest targeting of new androgen receptor-related molecular pathways in patients with these cancers.

  8. Genetics and Therapeutics in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis: the Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis; Patel, Ashish S.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting disease with significant phenotypic and genotypic variability. Though more common in adults, UC is being increasingly diagnosed in childhood. The subsequent lifelong course of disease results in challenges for the patient and physician. Currently, there is no medical cure for UC. Even though surgical removal of the colon can be curative, complications including infertility in females make colectomy an option often considered only when the disease presents with life-threatening complications or when medical management fails. One of the greatest challenges the clinician faces in the care of patients with UC is the inability to predict at diagnosis which patient is going to respond to a specific therapy or will eventually require surgery. This therapeutic conundrum frames the discussion to follow, specifically the concept of individualized or personalized treatment strategies based on genetic risk factors. As we move to therapeutics, we will elucidate traditional approaches and discuss known and novel agents. As we look to the future, we can expect increasing integrated approaches using several scientific disciplines to inform how genetic interactions shape and mold the pathogenesis and therapeutics of UC. PMID:26973787

  9. Genetic variations in TCF7L2 influence therapeutic response to sulfonylureas in Indian diabetics.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Dipali; Padh, Harish

    2016-11-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes, with considerable inter-individual variation in the hypoglycaemic response to sulfonylureas. Genetic variants in the gene encoding for transcription factor-7-like 2 (TCF7L2) have been associated with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to study the effect of variations in TCF7L2 on therapeutic response to sulfonylureas in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The effect of TCF7L2 rs12255372, rs7903146 and rs4506565 genotypes on glycaemic response was observed in 250 diabetic patients treated with sulfonylureas and sulfonylureas along with metformin. The genotyping tests were done by allele-specific multiplex PCR. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were used as phenotypic marker. 60% of sulfonylurea users did not achieve a target HbA1c levels of ⩽6.5% (48mmol/mol) (which denotes good control in diabetics). Genotype influenced response to sulfonylureas, with more treatment failure in the TT homozygotes in case of rs12255372 and rs4506565. The GG genotype at rs12255372 favourably influences treatment success with sulfonylurea therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes (p⩽0.05). At rs12255372, 70.5% GT or TT genotype failed to achieve therapeutic target, an absolute difference of 19% compared to GG homozygotes. Our preliminary data show that genetic variation at rs12255372 has a direct correlation with therapeutic success with sulfonylureas in type 2 diabetes, hence paving the way for better treatment outcomes in diabetics.

  10. Women's satisfaction with genetic counseling for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer: psychological aspects.

    PubMed

    Tercyak, Kenneth P; Demarco, Tiffani A; Mars, Bryn D; Peshkin, Beth N

    2004-11-15

    Women who participate in BRCA1/2 cancer genetic counseling do so for a variety of reasons, including learning quantitative risk information about their chances of developing hereditary breast-ovarian cancer at some point during their lifetimes. For these women, obtaining pre-test and disclosure genetic counseling with a professional affords them numerous potential benefits, including adequate preparation for, and accurate interpretation of, their test results. In consequence, women commonly report being highly satisfied with their cancer genetic counseling experience, even if the information learned through testing suggests they are at increased cancer risk. This occurrence raises an interesting question, namely, what are the psychological aspects of satisfaction with genetic counseling for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer in women? To answer this question, we administered the Genetic Counseling Satisfaction Scale (GCSS) to a convenience sample of 61 women participating in BRCA1/2 pretest genetic counseling, and re-administered the GCSS to approximately one-third of these women at disclosure. Available psychological data included personality, distress, and family functioning. In bivariate analyses, optimism and family functioning were positively associated with pretest satisfaction. With respect to satisfaction at disclosure, general and cancer-specific distress were negatively associated with satisfaction. Our findings suggest that psychological aspects of satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling vary, with individual differences and family functioning playing a role at pretest, and distress playing a role at disclosure. The implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  11. Breast and ovarian cancer referrals to the ACT Genetic Service: are we meeting guidelines?

    PubMed

    Aitken, Lucy; Warwick, Linda; Davis, Alison

    2017-03-01

    The ACT Genetic Service at The Canberra Hospital evaluates the genetic risk of individuals for inherited diseases, and provides counselling and genetic testing where appropriate. To evaluate the current referral practice for patients with a personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, and to assess whether these referrals are made according to eviQ cancer referral guidelines. A retrospective clinical audit of patients seen by the ACT Genetic Service for evaluation of genetic risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2015. Statistical analysis included Chi-squared and Poisson distribution tests. Of the 711 patients referred during the 30-month period, 671 were seen by the service. The number of patients seen increased steadily over the time period, as did waiting times. The majority of referrals were made by general practitioners (403/711; 57%) and oncologists (172/711; 24%). Of note, 300 of 711 (42%) of all referrals made to the service during this time period did not meet eviQ referral guidelines. Patients who met guidelines for referral were more likely both to be offered genetic testing and to have a positive result. Demand on the ACT Genetic Service increased over the time period assessed. As a significant proportion of patients did not meet eviQ cancer referral guidelines, it is worth reviewing the referral process in order to optimise utility of this limited resource. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Women’s Satisfaction with Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tercyak, Kenneth P.; DeMarco, Tiffani A.; Mars, Bryn D.; Peshkin, Beth N.

    2013-01-01

    Women who participate in BRCA1/2 cancer genetic counseling do so for a variety of reasons, including learning quantitative risk information about their chances of developing hereditary breast-ovarian cancer at some point during their lifetimes. For these women, obtaining pre-test and disclosure genetic counseling with a professional affords them numerous potential benefits, including adequate preparation for, and accurate interpretation of, their test results. In consequence, women commonly report being highly satisfied with their cancer genetic counseling experience, even if the information learned through testing suggests they are at increased cancer risk. This occurrence raises an interesting question, namely what are the psychological aspects of satisfaction with genetic counseling for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer in women? To answer this question, we administered the Genetic Counseling Satisfaction Scale (GCSS) to a convenience sample of 61 women participating in BRCA1/2 pre-test genetic counseling, and re-administered the GCSS to approximately one-third of these women at disclosure. Available psychological data included personality, distress, and family functioning. In bivariate analyses, optimism and family functioning were positively associated with pre-test satisfaction. With respect to satisfaction at disclosure, general and cancer-specific distress were negatively associated with satisfaction. Our findings suggest that psychological aspects of satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling vary, with individual differences and family functioning playing a role at pre-test, and distress playing a role at disclosure. The implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:15389697

  13. [Breast-feeding (part IV): Therapeutic uses, dietetic and addictions--guidelines for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Marcellin, L; Chantry, A A

    2015-12-01

    To describe the practical aspects of the use of the most commonly prescribed drugs during the postpartum period, the dietetic measures and the management of breast-feeding in case of addictive behaviors. Review of the literature between 1972 and May 2015 from the databases Medline, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, and international recommendations of learned societies. The precaution to stop breast-feeding when drugs are necessary is not justified in many situations (professional consensus). Aspirin at antiaggregant dose is allowed during breast-feeding while high doses are not recommended; NSAIDs with short half-life can be used (professional consensus). Precautions are needed in cases of use of morphonics (professional consensus). There is no justification to delay the initiation of breast-feeding in case of locoregional or general analgesia or for caesarean section. Antibiotic treatment does not justify discontinuing breast-feeding (professional consensus). Anxiolytics of the class of antihistaminic sedating H1 such as hydroxyzine (Atarax®) should not be prescribed in case of breast-feeding (professional consensus). Imaging does not justify to stop breast-feeding (professional consensus). Tobacco consumption is discouraged but is not a contraindication to breast-feed (professional consensus). It is recommended to avoid the consumption of alcohol (professional consensus). In case of occasional and moderate consumption of alcohol, delaying breast-feeding for a minimum of two hours is recommended (professional consensus). Cocaine consumption is a contraindication of breast-feeding (professional agreement), and breast-feeding is not recommended in case of cannabis use (professional consensus). Few drug treatments are not compatible with breast-feeding that can be continued in most of the cases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    tumor-reactive T cells , and generated tumor-reactive T cell clones from a number of breast cancer patient samples. We have worked out killing...assays to screen breast cancer patients’ tumor specific CD8+ T cells against autologous tumor cells and breast cancer cell lines. We have identified TCR...sequences from patients BC166 and BC81 CD8 T cell clones and downstream analysis of antigen specificity will be assessed by the Denver team. The

  15. Enhancing the Breadth and Efficacy of Therapeutic Vaccines for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    preferentially expressed by breast cancer stem cells . We will identify both MHC-I- and MHC-II-restricted antigens driving both CD8 and CD4 anti-tumor T...collaboration endeavoring to identify antigenic targets of breast cancer-infiltrating T cells . During this time, our group generated the breast cancer cell ...line lysates necessary to provide uniform sources of major antigens associated with each tumor subtype for stimulation of T cell clones isolated by

  16. Management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jatoi, Ismail; Anderson, William F

    2008-08-01

    The management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer requires careful planning. Women who have BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations are at increased risk for breast cancer and for other cancers as well, particularly ovarian cancer. Screening, prophlyactic surgery, and chemoprevention are commonly utilized strategies in the management of these patients, and women may choose more than one of these strategies. No randomized prospective trials have assessed the impact of these strategies specifically in mutation carriers. All patients should be informed that screening, prophylactic surgery, and chemoprevention have the potential for harm as well as benefit.

  17. Use of genetic algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancers from image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Baker, Jay A.

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation we explore genetic algorithms as a technique to train the weights in a feed forward neural network designed to predict breast cancer based on mammographic findings and patient history. Mammograms were obtained from 206 patients who obtained breast biopsies. Mammographic findings were recorded by radiologists for each patient. In addition, the outcome of the biopsy was recorded. Of the 206 cases, 73 were malignant while 133 were benign at the time of biopsy. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed to adjust the weights of an artificial neural network (ANN) so that the ANN would output the outcome of the biopsy when the mammographic findings were given as inputs. The GA is a technique for function optimization that reflects biological genetic evolution. The ANN was a fully connected feed- forward network using a sigmoid activation with 11 inputs, one hidden layer with 10 nodes, and one output node (benign/malignant). The GA approach allows much flexibility in selecting the function to be optimized. In this work both mean-squared error (MSE) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area (Az) were explored as optimization criteria. The system was trained using a bootstrap sampling. Optimizing for the two criteria result in different solutions. The 'best' solution was obtained by minimizing a linear combination of MSE and (1-Az). ROC areas were 0.82 plus or minus 0.07, somewhat less than those obtained using backpropagation for ANN training: 0.90 plus or minus 0.05. This is the first description of a genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis. The novel advantage of this technique is the ability to optimize the system for maximizing ROC area rather than minimizing mean squared error. A new technique for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer has been explored. The flexibility of the GA approach allows optimization of cost functions that have relevance to breast cancer prediction.

  18. Evaluation of breast cancer susceptibility using improved genetic algorithms to generate genotype SNP barcodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association is a challenging task for the identification and characterization of genes that increase the susceptibility to common complex multifactorial diseases. To fully execute genetic studies of complex diseases, modern geneticists face the challenge of detecting interactions between loci. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to detect the association of genotype frequencies of cancer cases and noncancer cases based on statistical analysis. An improved genetic algorithm (IGA) is proposed to improve the reliability of the GA method for high-dimensional SNP-SNP interactions. The strategy offers the top five results to the random population process, in which they guide the GA toward a significant search course. The IGA increases the likelihood of quickly detecting the maximum ratio difference between cancer cases and noncancer cases. The study systematically evaluates the joint effect of 23 SNP combinations of six steroid hormone metabolisms, and signaling-related genes involved in breast carcinogenesis pathways were systematically evaluated, with IGA successfully detecting significant ratio differences between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases. The possible breast cancer risks were subsequently analyzed by odds-ratio (OR) and risk-ratio analysis. The estimated OR of the best SNP barcode is significantly higher than 1 (between 1.15 and 7.01) for specific combinations of two to 13 SNPs. Analysis results support that the IGA provides higher ratio difference values than the GA between breast cancer cases and noncancer cases over 3-SNP to 13-SNP interactions. A more specific SNP-SNP interaction profile for the risk of breast cancer is also provided.

  19. Curcumin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer therapeutics and imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M; Othman, Shadi F; Curtis, Evan T; Bauer, Nichole A; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kumar, Deepak; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Background The next generation magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with theranostic applications have attracted significant attention and will greatly improve nanomedicine in cancer therapeutics. Such novel MNP formulations must have ultra-low particle size, high inherent magnetic properties, effective imaging, drug targeting, and drug delivery properties. To achieve these characteristic properties, a curcumin-loaded MNP (MNP-CUR) formulation was developed. Methods MNPs were prepared by chemical precipitation method and loaded with curcumin (CUR) using diffusion method. The physicochemical properties of MNP-CUR were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopy. The internalization of MNP-CUR was achieved after 6 hours incubation with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The anticancer potential was evaluated by a tetrazolium-based dye and colony formation assays. Further, to prove MNP-CUR results in superior therapeutic effects over CUR, the mitochondrial membrane potential integrity and reactive oxygen species generation were determined. Magnetic resonance imaging capability and magnetic targeting property were also evaluated. Results MNP-CUR exhibited individual particle grain size of ~9 nm and hydrodynamic average aggregative particle size of ~123 nm. Internalized MNP-CUR showed a preferential uptake in MDA-MB-231 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and demonstrated accumulation throughout the cell, which indicates that particles are not attached on the cell surface but internalized through endocytosis. MNP-CUR displayed strong anticancer properties compared to free CUR. MNP-CUR also amplified loss of potential integrity and generation of reactive oxygen species upon treatment compared to free CUR. Furthermore, MNP-CUR exhibited superior magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and significantly increased the targeting capability of CUR. Conclusion MNP-CUR exhibits potent anticancer activity along with imaging and

  20. Histamine H4 receptor: insights into a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide, and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Several studies underlined the critical role of histamine in breast cancer development and progression. This review addresses the latest evidence regarding the involvement of histamine and histamine receptors in breast cancer, focusing particularly in the histamine H4 receptor (H4R). Histamine concentration in breast cancer tissues was found to be higher than that in normal tissues of healthy controls by means of an increase in the activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme involved in histamine production. The expression of H4R in different experimental models and human biopsies, the associated biological responses, as well as the in vivo treatment of experimental tumors with H4R ligands is reviewed. Evidence demonstrates that the H4R exhibits a key role in histamine-mediated biological processes such as cell proliferation, senescence and apoptosis in breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the H4R and HDC genes and their association with breast cancer risk and malignancy reinforce the critical (patho)physiological role of H4R in breast cancer. In addition, H4R agonists display anti-tumor effects in vivo in a triple negative breast cancer model. The findings support the exploitation of the H4R as a molecular target for breast cancer drug development.

  1. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G; Hsu, Brian E; Tam, Christine E; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M

    2015-04-20

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors.

  2. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Hsu, Brian E.; Tam, Christine E.; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors. PMID:25823815

  3. MicroRNAs: New Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Therapy Prediction and Therapeutic Tools for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Gloria; Cava, Claudia; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in the initiation and progression of several human cancers, including breast cancer (BC), as strong evidence has been found that miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review presents the state of the art on the role of miRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of BC. Based on the results obtained in the last decade, some miRNAs are emerging as biomarkers of BC for diagnosis (i.e., miR-9, miR-10b, and miR-17-5p), prognosis (i.e., miR-148a and miR-335), and prediction of therapeutic outcomes (i.e., miR-30c, miR-187, and miR-339-5p) and have important roles in the control of BC hallmark functions such as invasion, metastasis, proliferation, resting death, apoptosis, and genomic instability. Other miRNAs are of interest as new, easily accessible, affordable, non-invasive tools for the personalized management of patients with BC because they are circulating in body fluids (e.g., miR-155 and miR-210). In particular, circulating multiple miRNA profiles are showing better diagnostic and prognostic performance as well as better sensitivity than individual miRNAs in BC. New miRNA-based drugs are also promising therapy for BC (e.g., miR-9, miR-21, miR34a, miR145, and miR150), and other miRNAs are showing a fundamental role in modulation of the response to other non-miRNA treatments, being able to increase their efficacy (e.g., miR-21, miR34a, miR195, miR200c, and miR203 in combination with chemotherapy).

  4. Doxorubicin-loaded micelle targeting MUC1: a potential therapeutics for triple negative breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Chittasupho, Chuda; Tima, Singkome; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2017-07-12

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease associated with poor prognosis and lack of validated targeted therapy. Thus chemotherapy is a main adjuvant treatment for TNBC patients, but it associates with severe toxicities. For a better treatment outcome, we developed an alternative therapeutic, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles targeting human mucin1 protein (MUC1) that is less toxic, more effective and targeted to TNBC. From many candidate peptides, QNDRHPR-GGGSK (QND) and HSQLPQV-GGGSK (HSQ), were identified computationally, synthesized and purified using solid phase peptide synthesis and semi-preparative HPLC. The peptides showed significant high binding to MUC1 expressing cells using a fluorescent microscope. The peptides were then conjugated on pegylated octadecyl lithocholate copolymer. DOX-encapsulated micelles were formed through self-assembly. MUC1-targeted micelles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Drug entrapment efficiency was examined using a microplate reader. Cytotoxicity and binding and uptake were also investigated. Two types of DOX-loaded micelles with different targeting peptides, QND or HSQ, were developed. DOX-loaded micelles were spherical in shape with average particle size around 300-320 nm. Drug entrapment efficiency of untargeted and targeted DOX micelles was about 71-93%. Targeted QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to free DOX and untargeted DOX micelles on BT549-Luc cells. In addition, significantly greater binding and uptake were observed for QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles on BT549-Luc and T47D cells. Taken together, these results suggested that QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles have a potential application in the treatment of TNBC-expressing MUC1. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Therapeutic Electromagnetic Field (TEMF) and gamma irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ivan L; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Short, Nicholas; Hardman, W Elaine; Williams, C Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Background The effects of a rectified semi-sinewave signal (15 mT amplitude, 120 pulses per second, EMF Therapeutics, Inc.) (TEMF) alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR) therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. Green fluorescence protein transfected cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: untreated controls; 10 minute daily TEMF; 200 cGy of IR every other day (total 800 cGy); IR plus daily TEMF. Some mice in each group were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR. TEMF treatment continued for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for: endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS or hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF). Results Most tumors <35 mm3 were white but tumors >35 mm3 were pink and had a vascularized capsule. The cortex within 100 microns of the capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at >100 microns from the capsule (subcortex). Tumors >35 mm3 treated with IR 24 hours previously or with TEMF had decreased blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic, HIF positive areas than tumors from the control group. Mice that received either IR or TEMF had significantly fewer lung metastatic sites and slower tumor growth than did untreated mice. No harmful side effects were attributed to TEMF. Conclusion TEMF therapy provided a safe means for retarding tumor vascularization, growth and metastasis. PMID:16045802

  6. MicroRNAs: New Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Therapy Prediction and Therapeutic Tools for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Gloria; Cava, Claudia; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in the initiation and progression of several human cancers, including breast cancer (BC), as strong evidence has been found that miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review presents the state of the art on the role of miRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of BC. Based on the results obtained in the last decade, some miRNAs are emerging as biomarkers of BC for diagnosis (i.e., miR-9, miR-10b, and miR-17-5p), prognosis (i.e., miR-148a and miR-335), and prediction of therapeutic outcomes (i.e., miR-30c, miR-187, and miR-339-5p) and have important roles in the control of BC hallmark functions such as invasion, metastasis, proliferation, resting death, apoptosis, and genomic instability. Other miRNAs are of interest as new, easily accessible, affordable, non-invasive tools for the personalized management of patients with BC because they are circulating in body fluids (e.g., miR-155 and miR-210). In particular, circulating multiple miRNA profiles are showing better diagnostic and prognostic performance as well as better sensitivity than individual miRNAs in BC. New miRNA-based drugs are also promising therapy for BC (e.g., miR-9, miR-21, miR34a, miR145, and miR150), and other miRNAs are showing a fundamental role in modulation of the response to other non-miRNA treatments, being able to increase their efficacy (e.g., miR-21, miR34a, miR195, miR200c, and miR203 in combination with chemotherapy). PMID:26199650

  7. An objective biochemical assessment of therapeutic response in metastatic breast cancer: a study with external review of clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M. R.; Turkes, A.; Pearson, D.; Griffiths, K.; Blamey, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A series of tumour related markers have been examined in 179 patients receiving primary endocrine therapy for metastatic breast cancer. Significant correlations between therapeutic response (UICC criteria after 6 months of treatment) and appropriate alterations in serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen, ferritin, c-reactive protein, orosomucoid and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, have been observed when changes in these markers were examined only at high serum concentrations. By combining these five markers a 'therapeutic index' of response has been devised which can be employed at an early stage of treatment in more than 90% of patients, giving an overall sensitivity/specificity of 90%/78% for therapeutic response or disease stabilisation over a 6-month period. The design of an objective measurement of response, which is easy to perform, has the potential to replace the existing, largely subjective. UICC criteria for retrospective judgement of response, and may also be used to direct systemic endocrine therapy. PMID:2137007

  8. Interleukin-6 is a potential therapeutic target in interleukin-6 dependent, estrogen receptor-α-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casneuf, Tineke; Axel, Amy E; King, Peter; Alvarez, John D; Werbeck, Jillian L; Verhulst, Tinne; Verstraeten, Karin; Hall, Brett M; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-01-01

    engraftment with siltuximab, fulvestrant, or combination therapy. Siltuximab alone was able to blunt MCF-7 engraftment. Similarly, siltuximab alone induced regressions in 90% (9/10) of tumors, which were established in the presence which were established in the presence of hMSC expressing human IL-6 and estrogen. Conclusion Given the established role for IL-6 in ERα-positive breast cancer, these data demonstrate the potential for anti-IL-6 therapeutics in breast cancer. PMID:26893580

  9. Subtype-Specific Radiation Response and Therapeutic Effect of FAS Death Receptor Modulation in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Zhou, Yingchun; Roy-Choudhury, Kingshuk; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Young, Kenneth; Hoang, Peter; Kirkpatrick, John P; Chi, Jen-Tsan A; Dewhirst, Mark W; Horton, Janet K

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy diagnosed among women and represents a heterogeneous group of subtypes. Radiation therapy is a critical component of treatment for breast cancer patients. However, little is known about radiation response among these intrinsic subtypes. In previous studies, we identified a significant induction of FAS after irradiation in biologically favorable breast cancer patients and breast cancer cell lines. Here, we expanded our study and investigated radiation response in a mouse model of breast cancer. MCF7 (luminal), HCC1954 (HER2(+)) or SUM159 (basal) cells were implanted orthotopically into the dorsal mammary fat pad of nude mice. These mice were then treated with different doses of radiation to assess tumor growth control. We further investigated the therapeutic effect of FAS modulation by silencing FAS in radiation-responsive tumors and injecting FAS agonist antibody into radiation-resistant tumors. Exposure to radiation inhibited MCF7, and to a lesser extent HCC1954 tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, SUM159 tumors were resistant to radiation. The estimated TCD50 values were 19.3 Gy for MCF7 and 44.9 Gy for SUM159. Radiation induced FAS expression in MCF7 tumors, but not SUM159 tumors. We found that silencing of FAS did not negatively impact radiation response in MCF7 tumors, possibly due to compensation by other apoptotic pathways. On the other hand, FAS activating antibody in combination with radiation treatment delayed SUM159 and HCC1954 tumor growth. However, it did not reach statistical significance compared to radiation treatment alone. Our results suggest that there is intrinsic variation in radiation response among breast cancer subtypes. FAS activation concurrent with radiation slows tumor growth in the radiation-resistant subtypes, but the effect was not significant. Alternative subtype-specific modulators of radiation response are under investigation.

  10. Genetic structure of Mexican Mestizo women with breast cancer based on three STR loci.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Rivera-Prieto, Roxana A; Ortíz-Lopez, Rocio; Rivas, Fernando; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this population genetics study was to compare the genetic structure of Mexican women with breast cancer (BrCa) with previously reported data of four random populations (Nuevo León, Hispanics, Chihuahua, and Central Region of Mexico). A sample of 115 unrelated women with BrCa and whose four grandparents were born in five zones of Mexico were interviewed at a reference hospital in Northeastern Mexico. Noncodifying STRs D7S820, D13S317, and D16S39 were analyzed; genotype distribution was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations for all three markers. Similar allele frequencies among four random populations and this selected population were found. According with this and previous studies using molecular and nonmolecular nuclear DNA markers not associated with any disease, Mexican Mestizo population is genetically homogeneous and therefore, genetic causes of BrCa are less heterogeneous, simplifying genetic epidemiologic studies.

  11. A Multistage Genetic Association Study Identifies Breast Cancer Risk Loci at 10q25 and 16q24

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S.; Breyer, Joan P.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Parl, Fritz F.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. Methods We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Results Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR 1.13 [1.07–1.20], P = 5.6 × 10−5), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10–1.31], P = 3.5 × 10−5). Conclusions Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. Impact The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model. PMID:22806168

  12. A multistage genetic association study identifies breast cancer risk loci at 10q25 and 16q24.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S; Breyer, Joan P; McReynolds, Kate M; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Parl, Fritz F; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

    2012-09-01

    Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.13 [1.07-1.20], P = 5.6 × 10(-5)), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10-1.31], P = 3.5 × 10(-5)). Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model. ©2012 AACR

  13. Genetic linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer: Results from 214 families

    SciTech Connect

    Easton, D.F.; Ford, D. ); Bishop, D.T.; Crockford, G.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative linkage study involving 214 breast cancer families, including 57 breast-ovarian cancer families; this represents almost all the known families with 17q linkage data. Six markers on 17q, spanning approximately 30 cM, were typed in the families. The aims of the study were to define more precisely the localization of the disease gene, the extent of genetic heterogeneity and the characteristics of linked families and to estimate the penetrance of the 17q gene. Under the assumption of no genetic heterogeneity, the strongest linkage evidence was obtained with D17S588. Multipoint linkage analysis allowing for genetic heterogeneity provided evidence that the predisposing gene lies between the markers D17S588 and D17S250, an interval whose genetic length is estimated to be 8.3 cM in males and 18.0 cM in females. This position was supported over other intervals by odds of 66:1. The location of the gene with respect to D17S579 could not be determined unequivocally. Under the genetic model used in the analysis, the best estimate of the proportion of linked breast-ovarian cancer families was 1.0 (lower LOD -- 1 limit 0.79). In contrast, there was significant evidence of genetic heterogeneity among the families without ovarian cancer, with an estimated 45% being linked. These results suggest that a gene(s) on chromosome 17q accounts for the majority of families in which both early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer occur but that other genes predisposing to breast cancer exist. By examining the fit of the linkage data to different penetrance functions, the cumulative risk associated with the 17q gene was estimated to be 59% by age 50 years and 82% by age 70 years. The corresponding estimates for the breast-ovary families were 67% and 76%, and those for the families without ovarian cancer were 49% and 90%; these penetrance functions did not differ significantly from one another. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic path of breast cancer: effectiveness, appropriateness, and costs – results from the DOCMa study

    PubMed Central

    Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Bonifacino, Adriana; Neglia, Cosimo; Benvenuto, Marco; Sambati, Francesco Vincenzo; Giolli, Lorenzo; Giovagnoli, Alessandra; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective An increase in breast cancer incidence has been documented in Italy and in other countries, and some women decide by themselves to undergo diagnostic examinations outside the official screening campaigns. The aim of this paper was to analyze – in terms of effectiveness, appropriate access, and related costs – the path spontaneously followed by a sample of Italian women for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. Subjects and methods A total of 143 women who consecutively referred themselves to the breast cancer outpatient facilities at the Sant’Andrea University Hospital in Rome from May to June 2007 were enrolled in the study, gave their consent, and were screened according to their individual risk factors for breast cancer. The entire diagnostic and therapeutic path followed in the previous 2 years by each of them, either at Sant’Andrea or in other medical facilities, was reviewed and evaluated in terms of its operative efficiency and fair economic value. Results The subjects’ mean age was 47.5 years (standard deviation 13.6 years); 55% of the women were <50 years old (28% <40 years), and were thus not included in the official screening campaigns; 97 women (70%) were requesting a routine control; and 49% of them had already undergone four to seven examinations before the enrollment, although no major risk factor was present in 73.5%. After enrollment in the study, nine of the patients had surgical interventions performed on them at Sant’Andrea’s, identifying five invasive carcinomas and two ductal in situ carcinomas and two benign lesions. Operative efficiency and fair economic value were found to be optimal only in diagnostic/therapeutic paths followed at Sant’Andrea. Conclusion The diagnostic path at Sant’Andrea’s specialized center for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy is characterized by higher operative efficiency and more sustainable costs than at general hospitals, outpatient facilities run by local health authorities, or

  15. [Knowledge and willingness of breast cancer patients from Shanghai for genetic counseling and gene testing].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Li, Zhengdong; Sun, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Beiqi; Zhuang, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the knowledge and willingness of breast cancers patients from Shanghai for genetic counseling and gene testing. A total of 428 patients filled out the questionnaire and the data was statistically analyzed. Most of the patients were unaware of genetic counseling and gene testing. But after a brief introduction, a majority of them were willing to accept genetic counseling and recommend their family members to participate. The willingness was education- and age-related. When told that gene testing may benefit themselves, 92.1% of the patients were willing to be tested. However, when told that gene testing may only benefit their family, only 33.9% of the patients were willing to join the testing. The acceptance was also age-, education- and family income-related. The difference was statistically significant. Moreover, the willingness ratio to participate the gene testing was lower than expected. Overall, 74.1% of the patients were willing to accept cheaper preliminary gene screening, whilst only 19.2% were willing to accept genetic testing of higher price. Despite of being told that testing results will be maintained as confidential, still 43.2% worried about adverse effects. Such patients tended to younger, from low-income families, with a family history of associated cancers, or personal history of other cancers. The difference was statistically significant. The majorities of patients do not know but are willing to accept genetic counseling and gene testing and recommend their family to participate. Lack of genetic knowledge, cost for the testing and concerns about discrimination are the obstacles for patients to participate in genetic counseling and gene testing. To spread the knowledge about breast cancer and establish a follow-up screening system for high-risk population may improve the tertiary prevention for breast cancer.

  16. Genetic variants in COX-2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and breast cancer risk: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study.

    PubMed

    Brasky, Theodore M; Bonner, Matthew R; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B; Nie, Jing; Tao, Meng Hua; Edge, Stephen B; Trevisan, Maurizio; Shields, Peter G; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2011-02-01

    Chronic inflammation has been consistently associated with cancers of several sites, including the breast, and inhibition of inflammation through the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been inversely associated with risk. As NSAIDs bind with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), genetic variation in COX-2 may influence breast cancer risk by affecting inflammatory response and response to NSAID use. We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for COX-2 and examined their association with risk of breast cancer in a population-based case-control study in Western New York. Cases had incident, first primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer (n = 1077). Controls (n = 1910) were randomly selected from NY Department of Motor Vehicles records (< 65) or Medicare rolls (≥ 65). Participants were queried on adult lifetime use of aspirin and recent use of ibuprofen. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). One SNP, rs2745559, was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03-1.46). Associations with other variants were not evident. Significant interaction (P interaction = 0.04) between recent aspirin use and rs4648261 was also observed. Variation in COX-2 was modestly associated with breast cancer risk, indicating that COX-2 may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Better understanding of the role of COX-2 genetic variation and interaction with NSAID use in breast carcinogenesis has potential to inform prevention strategies.

  17. Genetic variants in COX-2, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and breast cancer risk: the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Matthew R.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Nie, Jing; Tao, Meng Hua; Edge, Stephen B.; Trevisan, Maurizio; Shields, Peter G.; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been consistently associated with cancers of several sites, including the breast, and inhibition of inflammation through the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been inversely associated with risk. As NSAIDs bind with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), genetic variation in COX-2 may influence breast cancer risk by affecting inflammatory response and response to NSAID use. We identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for COX-2 and examined their association with risk of breast cancer in a population-based case–control study in Western New York. Cases had incident, first primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer (n = 1077). Controls (n = 1910) were randomly selected from NY Department of Motor Vehicles records (<65) or Medicare rolls (≥65). Participants were queried on adult lifetime use of aspirin and recent use of ibuprofen. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). One SNP, rs2745559, was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03–1.46). Associations with other variants were not evident. Significant interaction (P interaction = 0.04) between recent aspirin use and rs4648261 was also observed. Variation in COX-2 was modestly associated with breast cancer risk, indicating that COX-2 may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. Better understanding of the role of COX-2 genetic variation and interaction with NSAID use in breast carcinogenesis has potential to inform prevention strategies. PMID:20676755

  18. [Genetic diversity and immunological characteristics of malignant melanoma: the therapeutic spectrum].

    PubMed

    Doma, Viktória; Gulya, Ernő

    2015-04-01

    Malignant melanoma, originating from pigment cells, is a highly aggressive tumour affecting patients of any age group. Its incidence is rapidly growing. The most common form can be easily diagnosed by any physician. There are some well-known genetic (skin-, eye-, hair colour, naevi, melanoma in the personal/family history) and environmental (ultraviolet radiation) predisposing factors. Treatment is based on early diagnosis and excision. When metastasis occurs, the traditional chemo- and radiotherapy gives a low response rate. Recently some newly approved targeted therapies and immunomodulant drugs have become available. This review focuses on the classification and novel therapeutic approaches of malignant melanoma to provide guidance to clinicians.

  19. Molecular, genetic and stem cell-mediated therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Zanetta, Chiara; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease. It is the first genetic cause of infant mortality. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to the reduction of SMN protein. The most striking component is the loss of alpha motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis and eventually premature death. There is no current treatment other than supportive care, although the past decade has seen a striking advancement in understanding of both SMA genetics and molecular mechanisms. A variety of disease modifying interventions are rapidly bridging the translational gap from the laboratory to clinical trials. In this review, we would like to outline the most interesting therapeutic strategies that are currently developing, which are represented by molecular, gene and stem cell-mediated approaches for the treatment of SMA.

  20. Scalable human ES culture for therapeutic use: propagation, differentiation, genetic modification and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Rao, M

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells unlike most adult stem cell populations can replicate indefinitely while preserving genetic, epigenetic, mitochondrial and functional profiles. ESCs are therefore an excellent candidate cell type for providing a bank of cells for allogenic therapy and for introducing targeted genetic modifications for therapeutic intervention. This ability of prolonged self-renewal of stem cells and the unique advantages that this offers for gene therapy, discovery efforts, cell replacement, personalized medicine and other more direct applications requires the resolution of several important manufacturing, gene targeting and regulatory issues. In this review, we assess some of the advance made in developing scalable culture systems, improvement in vector design and gene insertion technology and the changing regulatory landscape.

  1. Molecular, genetic and stem cell-mediated therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetta, Chiara; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease. It is the first genetic cause of infant mortality. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to the reduction of SMN protein. The most striking component is the loss of alpha motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis and eventually premature death. There is no current treatment other than supportive care, although the past decade has seen a striking advancement in understanding of both SMA genetics and molecular mechanisms. A variety of disease modifying interventions are rapidly bridging the translational gap from the laboratory to clinical trials. In this review, we would like to outline the most interesting therapeutic strategies that are currently developing, which are represented by molecular, gene and stem cell-mediated approaches for the treatment of SMA. PMID:24400925

  2. The role of ovarian sex steroids in metabolic homeostasis, obesity, and postmenopausal breast cancer: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj; Pateetin, Prangwan

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer.

  3. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyan; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Renuse, Santosh; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S; Stearns, Vered; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor-α (ER) antagonist, is an important agent for the treatment of breast cancer. However, this therapy is complicated by the fact that a substantial number of patients exhibit either de novo or acquired resistance. To characterize the signaling mechanisms underlying this resistance, we treated the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with tamoxifen for over six months and showed that this cell line acquired resistance to tamoxifen in vitro and in vivo. We performed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling on the tamoxifen resistant and vehicle-treated sensitive cell lines to quantify the phosphorylation alterations associated with tamoxifen resistance. From >5600 unique phosphopeptides identified, 1529 peptides exhibited hyperphosphorylation and 409 peptides showed hypophosphorylation in the tamoxifen resistant cells. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that focal adhesion pathway was one of the most enriched signaling pathways activated in tamoxifen resistant cells. Significantly, we showed that the focal adhesion kinase FAK2 was not only hyperphosphorylated but also transcriptionally up-regulated in tamoxifen resistant cells. FAK2 suppression by specific siRNA knockdown or a small molecule inhibitor repressed cellular proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. More importantly, our survival analysis revealed that high expression of FAK2 is significantly associated with shorter metastasis-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Our studies suggest that FAK2 is a potential therapeutic target for the management of hormone-refractory breast cancers.

  4. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyan; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Renuse, Santosh; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S.; Stearns, Vered; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor-α (ER) antagonist, is an important agent for the treatment of breast cancer. However, this therapy is complicated by the fact that a substantial number of patients exhibit either de novo or acquired resistance. To characterize the signaling mechanisms underlying this resistance, we treated the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with tamoxifen for over six months and showed that this cell line acquired resistance to tamoxifen in vitro and in vivo. We performed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling on the tamoxifen resistant and vehicle-treated sensitive cell lines to quantify the phosphorylation alterations associated with tamoxifen resistance. From >5600 unique phosphopeptides identified, 1529 peptides exhibited hyperphosphorylation and 409 peptides showed hypophosphorylation in the tamoxifen resistant cells. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that focal adhesion pathway was one of the most enriched signaling pathways activated in tamoxifen resistant cells. Significantly, we showed that the focal adhesion kinase FAK2 was not only hyperphosphorylated but also transcriptionally up-regulated in tamoxifen resistant cells. FAK2 suppression by specific siRNA knockdown or a small molecule inhibitor repressed cellular proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. More importantly, our survival analysis revealed that high expression of FAK2 is significantly associated with shorter metastasis-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Our studies suggest that FAK2 is a potential therapeutic target for the management of hormone-refractory breast cancers. PMID:26330541

  5. The Role of Ovarian Sex Steroids in Metabolic Homeostasis, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:25866757

  6. NCCN Guidelines Insights: Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian, Version 2.2017.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Berry, Michael; Buys, Saundra S; Farmer, Meagan; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Kauff, Noah D; Khan, Seema; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer K; Madlensky, Lisa; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Reiser, Gwen; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Vinayak, Shaveta; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wick, Myra J; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary; Darlow, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian provide recommendations for genetic testing and counseling for hereditary cancer syndromes and risk management recommendations for patients who are diagnosed with a syndrome. Guidelines focus on syndromes associated with an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. The NCCN Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. The NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel's discussion and most recent recommendations regarding risk management for carriers of moderately penetrant genetic mutations associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer.

  7. Therapeutic targeting of amyloid precursor protein and its processing enzymes for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Hussain, Talib; Subaiea, Gehad M; Shakil, Shazi; Ahmad, Adnan

    2017-08-28

    Breast cancer cases in women are increasing at an alarming rate globally and extensive research is being conducted to identify a breakthrough medicine against this dreadful disease. In fact, researchers are looking for fresh targets to develop novel treatment strategies for cancer of the breasts. In this article, 'amyloid precursor protein' or (APP) and its processing enzymes are deeply studied so as to explore the same as prospective targets for breast cancer treatment. Even though most of the studies on APP and its processing enzymes have been performed on neuronal cells owing to their linkage with Alzheimer's disease, they are omnipresent on various non-neuronal cells also. Interestingly, APP and its processing enzymes have a role in the proliferation of cancer cells as well as in their growth, adherence and movement. Over-synthesis of APP and its processing enzymes are emerging as important hallmark features in breast cancer. It has been found that APP and its processing enzymes, i.e., g-secretase and a-secretase are strongly linked with breast cancer via Akt phosporylation and Notch signaling pathways. Thus, targeting APP or g-secretase or a-secretase could be considered as an effective strategy to treat breast cancer and even metastasis. There are various clinical trials which are in progress to explore the potential of g-secretase inhibitor against breast cancer. Hence, the present review is composed of two sections, one section deals with all the possible linkages of APP and APP processing enzymes (a-secretase, b-secretase and g-secretase) with breast cancer. However, the other section provides recent information on breast cancer treatment strategy using APP and APP processing enzymes as targets. We strongly believe that compilation of these studies would be beneficial to the scientist working in the field of 'breast cancer-treatment'. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  9. TCF21 genetic polymorphisms and breast cancer risk in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueren; Yang, Jiaojiao; Wang, Mingxi; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor 21 (TCF21) functions as a tumor suppressor and is inactivated in several types of cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether TCF21 genetic polymorphisms(rs2327429 T>C, rs2327430 T>C, rs2327433 A>G, rs12190287 C>G, rs7766238 G>A, rs4896011 T>A) are associated with the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women. Logistic regression analyses showed that TCF21 rs12190287 polymorphism was significantly associated with the reduced risk of breast cancer. Stratified analyses based on pathological type indicated that TCF21 rs12190287 polymorphism was only associated with the reduced risk of infiltrative ductal carcinoma. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that compared with those carrying rs12190287 CC genotype, subjects with GG genotype had higher expression levels of TCF21 mRNA in normal breast tissues. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the rs12190287 G allele weakened the binding affinity of hsa-miR-224 to TCF21 3′ UTR. These findings suggest that TCF21 rs12190287 polymorphism can regulate TCF21 expression and may serve as a potential marker for genetic susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:27270650

  10. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  11. Breast cancer, BRCA mutations, and attitudes regarding pregnancy and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Ashley H; Muse, Kimberly I; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K; Profato, Jessica; Litton, Jennifer K

    2014-08-01

    Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. ©AlphaMed Press.

  12. Constitutional genetic variation at the human aromatase gene (Cyp19) and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Siegelmann-Danieli, N; Buetow, K H

    1999-01-01

    The activity of the aromatase enzyme, which converts androgens into oestrogens and has a major role in regulating oestrogen levels in the breast, is thought to be a contributing factor in the development of breast cancer. We undertook this study to assess the role of constitutional genetic variation in the human aromatase gene (Cyp19) in the development of this disease. Our genotyping of 348 cases with breast cancer and 145 controls (all Caucasian women) for a published tetranucleotide repeat polymorphism at intron 4 of the Cyp19 gene revealed the presence of six common and two rare alleles. Contingency table analysis revealed a significant difference in allelic distribution between cases and controls (χ2 5df = 13.52, P = 0.019). The allele measuring 171 bp was over-represented in cases; of 14 individuals homozygous for this allele, 13 were cases. These individuals had a higher incidence of cancer in family members and an earlier age at diagnosis than other cases. In sequencing Cyp19's coding exons and regulatory regions, we discovered a perfect association between a silent polymorphism (G→A at Val80) and the high-risk genotype. Our conclusion is that constitutional genetic variation at the Cyp19 locus is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, with the 171-bp allele serving as the high-risk allele. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027313

  13. Genetic risk score and acute skin toxicity after breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Andrea; Vecoli, Cecilia; Mercuri, Antonella; Petruzzelli, Maria Fonte; D'Errico, Maria Patrizia; Portaluri, Maurizio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    Genetic predisposition has been shown to affect the severity of skin complications in breast cancer patients after radiotherapy. Limited data exist regarding the use of a genetic risk score (GRS) for predicting risk of tissue radiosensitivity. We evaluated the impact of different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms and oxidative stress response combined in a GRS on acute adverse effects induced by breast radiation therapy (RT). Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria in 59 breast cancer patients who received RT. After genotyping, a multilocus GRS was constructed by summing the number of risk alleles. The hazard ratio (HR) for GSTM1 was 2.4 (95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.1-5.3, p=0.04). The other polymorphisms were associated to an increased adverse radiosensitivity, although they did not reach statistical significance. GRS predicted roughly 40% risk for acute skin toxicity per risk allele (HR 1.37, 95% CI=1.1-1.76, p<0.01). Patients in the top tertile had a fivefold higher risk of skin reaction (HR 5.1, 95% CI=1.2-22.8, p=0.03). Our findings demonstrate that the joint effect of SNPs from oxidative stress and DNA damage repair genes may be a promising approach to identify patients with a high risk of skin reaction after breast RT.

  14. Gef gene therapy enhances the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin to combat growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Prados, Jose; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana Rosa; Ortiz, Rául; Segura, Ana; Boulaiz, Houria; Vélez, Celia; Caba, Octavio; Ramos, Juan Luís; Aránega, Antonia

    2010-05-01

    The potential use of combined therapy is under intensive study including the association between classical cytotoxic and genes encoding toxic proteins which enhanced the antitumour activity. The main aim of this work was to evaluate whether the gef gene, a suicide gene which has a demonstrated antiproliferative activity in tumour cells, improved the antitumour effect of chemotherapeutic drugs used as first-line treatment in the management of advanced breast cancer. MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were transfected with gef gene using pcDNA3.1-TOPO expression vector. To determine the effect of the combined therapy, MCF-7 transfected and non-transfected cells were exposed to paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin at different concentrations. The growth-inhibitory effect of gef gene and/or drugs was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis modulation was determined by flow cytometric analysis, DNA fragmentation and morphological analysis. Multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) from MCF-7 cells were used to confirm effectiveness of combined therapy (gef gene and drug). Our results demonstrate that combined therapy gef gene/drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel or doxurubicin) caused a decrease in cell viability. However, only the gef-doxorubicin (10 microM) combination induced a greater enhancement in the antitumour activity in MCF-7 cells. Most importantly, this combined strategy resulted in a significant synergistic effect, thus allowing lower doses of the drug to be used to achieve the same therapeutic effect. These results were confirmed using MTS in which volume decrease with combined therapy was greater than obtained using the gene therapy or chemotherapy alone, or the sum of both therapies. The cytotoxic effect of gef gene in breast cancer cells enhances the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin. This therapeutic approach has the potential to overcome some of the major limitations of conventional chemotherapy, and may therefore constitute a promising strategy for future

  15. Investigative and extrapolative role of microRNAs’ genetic expression in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Shirazi, Bushra; Memon, Zahida

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are non-coding ribonucleic acids consisting of about 18-22 nucleotide bases. Expression of several miRs can be altered in breast carcinomas in comparison to healthy breast tissue, or between various subtypes of breast cancer. These are regulated as either oncogene or tumor suppressors, this shows that their expression is misrepresented in cancers. Some miRs are specifically associated with breast cancer and are affected by cancer-restricted signaling pathways e.g. downstream of estrogen receptor-α or HER2/neu. Connection of multiple miRs with breast cancer, and the fact that most of these post transcript structures may transform complex functional networks of mRNAs, identify them as potential investigative, extrapolative and predictive tumor markers, as well as possible targets for treatment. Investigative tools that are currently available are RNA-based molecular techniques. An additional advantage related to miRs in oncology is that they are remarkably stable and are notably detectable in serum and plasma. Literature search was performed by using database of PubMed, the keywords used were microRNA (52 searches) AND breast cancer (169 searches). PERN was used by database of Bahria University, this included literature and articles from international sources; 2 articles from Pakistan on this topic were consulted (one in international journal and one in a local journal). Of these, 49 articles were shortlisted which discussed relation of microRNA genetic expression in breast cancer. These articles were consulted for this review. PMID:27375730

  16. DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors: No association with genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR and MTR

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Meng Hua; Shields, Peter G.; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B.; McCann, Susan E.; Platek, Mary; Krishnan, Shiva S.; Xie, Bin; Edge, Stephen B.; Winston, Janet; Vito, Dominica; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation is recognized as an important feature of breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation of genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MTR), two critical enzymes in one-carbon metabolism, may alter DNA methylation levels, and thus influence DNA methylation in breast cancer. We evaluated case-control association of MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms for cases strata defined by promoter methylation status for each of three genes, E- cadherin, p16, and RAR-β2 in breast cancer; in addition, we evaluated case-case comparisons of likelihood of promoter methylation in relation to genotypes using a population-based case-control study conducted in Western New York State. Methylation was evaluated with real time methylation-specific PCRs for 803 paraffin embedded breast tumor tissues from women with primary, incident breast cancer. We applied unordered polytomous regression and unconditional logistic regression to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We did not find any association of MTHFR and MTR polymorphisms with breast cancer risk stratified by methylation status nor between polymorphisms and likelihood of promoter methylation of any of the genes. There was no evidence of difference within strata defined by menopausal status, ER status, folate intake and lifetime alcohol consumption. Overall, we found no evidence that these common polymorphisms of the MTHFR and MTR genes are associated with promoter methylation of E- cadherin, p16, and RAR-β2 genes in breast cancer. PMID:19240236

  17. DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors: no association with genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR and MTR.

    PubMed

    Tao, Meng Hua; Shields, Peter G; Nie, Jing; Marian, Catalin; Ambrosone, Christine B; McCann, Susan E; Platek, Mary; Krishnan, Shiva S; Xie, Bin; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Vito, Dominica; Trevisan, Maurizio; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2009-03-01

    Aberrant promoter methylation is recognized as an important feature of breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation of genes for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MTR), two critical enzymes in the one-carbon metabolism, may alter DNA methylation levels and thus influence DNA methylation in breast cancer. We evaluated case-control association of MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms for cases strata-defined by promoter methylation status for each of three genes, E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 in breast cancer; in addition, we evaluated case-case comparisons of the likelihood of promoter methylation in relation to genotypes using a population-based case-control study conducted in Western New York State. Methylation was evaluated with real-time methylation-specific PCRs for 803 paraffin-embedded breast tumor tissues from women with primary, incident breast cancer. We applied unordered polytomous regression and unconditional logistic regression to derive adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We did not find any association of MTHFR and MTR polymorphisms with breast cancer risk stratified by methylation status nor between polymorphisms and likelihood of promoter methylation of any of the genes. There was no evidence of difference within strata defined by menopausal status, estrogen receptor status, folate intake, and lifetime alcohol consumption. Overall, we found no evidence that these common polymorphisms of the MTHFR and MTR genes are associated with promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta2 genes in breast cancer.

  18. Combining support vector machine with genetic algorithm to classify ultrasound breast tumor images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Lin, Shih-Wei; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2012-12-01

    To promote the classification accuracy and decrease the time of extracting features and finding (near) optimal classification model of an ultrasound breast tumor image computer-aided diagnosis system, we propose an approach which simultaneously combines feature selection and parameter setting in this study. In our approach ultrasound breast tumors were segmented automatically by a level set method. The auto-covariance texture features and morphologic features were first extracted following the use of a genetic algorithm to detect significant features and determine the near-optimal parameters for the support vector machine (SVM) to identify the tumor as benign or malignant. The proposed CAD system can differentiate benign from malignant breast tumors with high accuracy and short feature extraction time. According to the experimental results, the accuracy of the proposed CAD system for classifying breast tumors is 95.24% and the computing time of the proposed system for calculating features of all breast tumor images is only 8% of that of a system without feature selection. Furthermore, the time of finding (near) optimal classification model is significantly than that of grid search. It is therefore clinically useful in reducing the number of biopsies of benign lesions and offers a second reading to assist inexperienced physicians in avoiding misdiagnosis.

  19. Genetic predisposition directs breast cancer phenotype by dictating progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Theresa A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Klebba, Ina; Jones, Ainsley D.; Sedic, Maja; Gilmore, Hannah; Tung, Nadine; Naber, Stephen P.; Schnitt, Stuart; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Women with inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene have increased risk of developing breast cancer, but also exhibit a predisposition for the development of aggressive basal-like breast tumors. We report here that breast epithelial cells derived from patients harboring deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (BRCA1mut/+) give rise to tumors with increased basal differentiation relative to cells from BRCA1+/+ patients. Molecular analysis of disease-free breast tissues from BRCA1mut/+ patients revealed defects in progenitor cell lineage commitment even before cancer incidence. Moreover, we discovered that the transcriptional repressor Slug is an important functional regulator of human breast progenitor cell lineage commitment and differentiation and that it is aberrantly expressed in BRCA1mut/+ tissues. Slug expression is necessary for increased basal-like phenotypes prior to and following neoplastic transformation. These findings demonstrate that the genetic background of patient populations, in addition to affecting incidence rates, significantly impacts progenitor cell fate commitment and, therefore, tumor phenotype. PMID:21295272

  20. Breast cancer risk and genetic ancestry: a case-control study in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Carolina; Bertoni, Bernardo; Hidalgo, Pedro C; Artagaveytia, Nora; Ackermann, Elizabeth; Barreto, Isabel; Cancela, Paula; Cappetta, Mónica; Egaña, Ana; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Heinzen, Silvina; Hooker, Stanley; Román, Estela; Sans, Mónica; Kittles, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    Uruguay exhibits one of the highest rates of breast cancer in Latin America, similar to those of developed nations, the reasons for which are not completely understood. In this study we investigated the effect that ancestral background has on breast cancer susceptibility among Uruguayan women. We carried out a case-control study of 328 (164 cases, 164 controls) women enrolled in public hospitals and private clinics across the country. We estimated ancestral proportions using a panel of nuclear and mitochondrial ancestry informative markers (AIMs) and tested their association with breast cancer risk. Nuclear individual ancestry in cases was (mean ± SD) 9.8 ± 7.6% African, 13.2 ± 10.2% Native American and 77.1 ± 13.1% European, and in controls 9.1 ± 7.5% African, 14.7 ± 11.2% Native American and 76.2 ± 14.2% European. There was no evidence of a difference in nuclear or mitochondrial ancestry between cases and controls. However, European mitochondrial haplogroup H was associated with breast cancer (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.1, 3.5). We have not found evidence that overall genetic ancestry differs between breast cancer patients and controls in Uruguay but we detected an association of the disease with a European mitochondrial lineage, which warrants further investigation.

  1. Therapeutic targeting of ERBB2 in breast cancer: understanding resistance in the laboratory and combating it in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Fabi, Alessandra; Mottolese, Marcella; Segatto, Oreste

    2014-07-01

    ERBB2 gene amplification occurs in about one quarter of breast carcinomas (BCs) and identifies a distinct clinical subset of BC. The introduction in the clinic of Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to the ERBB2 extracellular domain, has had a great impact on the therapeutic management of ERBB2+ BC. Yet, not all patients respond to Trastuzumab and resistance develops also among patients that initially benefit from Trastuzumab-based regimens. Pre-clinical studies have discovered several mechanisms through which tumor cells may escape from Trastuzumab-mediated ERBB2 inhibition. These include rewiring of the ErbB signaling network, loss of ERBB2 expression, expression of ERBB2 isoforms refractory to Trastuzumab inhibition, vicarious signaling by non-ErbB tyrosine kinases and constitutive activation of downstream signaling routes, such as the PI3K pathway. While the relative contribution of each of these mechanisms to establishing Trastuzumab resistance in the clinical setting is not fully understood, much attention has been focused on abating resistance by achieving complete blockade of ERBB2-containing dimers. This approach, propelled by the development of novel anti-ERBB2 therapeutics, has led to the recent approval of Lapatinib, Pertuzumab and T-DM1 as additional anti-ERBB2 therapeutics in BC. However, full success is far from being achieved and resistance to ERBB2 targeting remains a relevant problem in the clinical management of BC. Herein, we provide an overview of biological and molecular bases underpinning resistance to ERBB2 therapeutics in BC, discuss outstanding issues in the field of ERBB2 therapeutic targeting and elaborate on future directions of translational research on ERBB2+ breast cancer.

  2. Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer: Psychological and Social Impact

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small minority of women for whom the test may be helpful. The psychological, emotional and social implications of genetic testing also are worth considering, both for yourself and for members of your ... test results, including: Anxiety about developing cancer. Having an ...

  3. Prognostic and therapeutic value of mitochondrial serine hydroxyl-methyltransferase 2 as a breast cancer biomarker.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lahong; Chen, Zhaojun; Xue, Dan; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Xiyong; Luh, Frank; Hong, Liquan; Zhang, Hang; Pan, Feng; Liu, Yuhua; Chu, Peiguo; Zheng, Shu; Lou, Guoqiang; Yen, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial serine hydroxylmethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2) is a key enzyme in the serine/glycine synthesis pathway. SHMT2 has been implicated as a critical component for tumor cell survival. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value and efficiency of SHMT2 as a biomarker in patients with breast cancer. Individual and pooled survival analyses were performed on five independent breast cancer microarray datasets. Gene signatures enriched by SHMT2 were also analyzed in these datasets. SHMT2 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay in 128 breast cancer cases. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that SHMT2 was significantly associated with gene signatures of mitochondrial module, cancer invasion, metastasis and poor survival among breast cancer patients (p<0.05). The clinical relevance of SHMT2 was validated on IHC data. The mitochondrial localization of SHMT2 protein was visualized on IHC staining. Independent and pooled analysis confirmed that SHMT2 expression was associated with breast cancer tumor aggressiveness (TNM staging and Elson grade) in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). The prognostic performance of SHMT2 mRNA was comparable to other gene signatures and proved superior to TNM staging. Further analysis results indicated that SHMT2 had better prognostic value for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer patients, compared to ER-positive patients. In cases involving stage IIb breast cancer, chemotherapy significantly extended survival time among patients with high SHMT2 expression. These results indicate that SHMT2 may be a valuable prognostic biomarker in ER-negative breast cancer cases. Furthermore, SHMT2 may be a potential target for breast cancer treatment and drug discovery.

  4. A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    target with therapeutics to treat cancer. Thus, novel high throughput strategies are needed to identify and functionally characterize cancer genes. An...and regulatory pathways, anatomical structures, and physiological and behavioral characteristics are also well conserved from mice to humans. To...We have further characterized one of the identified genes, Grik3, and have found that it regualtes the cell cycle, but not apoptosis, by inducing the

  5. Genetics of breast cancer: a topic in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shiovitz, S.; Korde, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    A hereditary predisposition to breast cancer significantly influences screening and follow-up recommendations for high-risk women. However, in patients with a suggestive personal and/or family history, a specific predisposing gene is identified in <30% of cases. Up to 25% of hereditary cases are due to a mutation in one of the few identified rare, but highly penetrant genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, TP53, CDH1, and STK11), which confer up to an 80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. An additional 2%–3% of cases are due to a mutation in a rare, moderate-penetrance gene (e.g. CHEK2, BRIP1, ATM, and PALB2), each associated with a twofold increase in risk. Prediction models suggest that there are unlikely to be additional yet to be identified high-penetrance genes. Investigation of common, low-penetrance alleles contributing to risk in a polygenic fashion has yielded a small number of suggestive single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), but the contributive risk of an individual SNP is quite small. Mutation testing is currently recommended for individual genes in the appropriate clinical setting where there is a high index of suspicion for a specific mutated gene or syndrome. Next-generation sequencing offers a new venue for risk assessment. At the present time, there are clear clinical guidelines for individuals with a mutation in a high-penetrance gene. Otherwise, standard models are used to predict an individual's lifetime risk by clinical and family history rather than genomic information. PMID:25605744

  6. Cathepsin D inhibitors as potential therapeutics for breast cancer treatment: Molecular docking and bioevaluation against triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Anantaraju, Hasitha Shilpa; Battu, Madhu Babu; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2016-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to discover small molecule inhibitors against Cathepsin D (CatD) (EC.3.4.23.5), a clinically proven prognostic marker for breast cancer, and to explore the mechanisms by which CatD could be a useful therapeutic target for triple-positive and triple-negative breast cancers (TPBC & TNBC). The crystal structure of CatD at 2.5 Å resolution (PDB: 1LYB), which was complexed with Pepstatin A, was selected for computer-aided molecular modeling. The methods used in our study were pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. Virtual screening was performed to identify small molecules from an in-house database and a large commercial chemical library. Cytotoxicity studies were performed on human normal cell line HEK293T and growth inhibition studies on breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-468. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis, in vitro enzyme assay, and cell cycle analysis ascertained the validity of the selected molecules. A set of 28 molecules was subjected to an in vitro fluorescence-based inhibitory activity assay, and among them six molecules exhibited >50 % inhibition at 25μM. These molecules also exhibited good growth inhibition against TPBC and TNBC cancer types. Among them, molecules 1 and 17 showed single-digit micromolar GI50 values against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

  7. Characterization of PI (breast cancer cell special peptide) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and its potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Change; Hong, Min; Geng, Jiwei; Zhou, Huahua; Dong, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most important aspects of molecular targeted therapeutic approaches for tumors. A small molecule targeting carrier plays an important role in this process. PI, a new peptide found in our phage library, has been specifically suggested, combined with the human triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB‑231, and may be developed as a targeting/individualization therapy strategy to be applied in breast cancer research. In this study, we further investigated whether this peptide could carry exogenous protein to the target cells by forming a fusion peptide. PI-GST and PI-TK were cloned into plasmids and used for expression studies, analyses of PI-mediated protein delivery efficiency, and to investigations into the effect of PI on thymidine kinase/ganciclovir-mediated cytotoxicity. Biodistribution profiles were also investigated in vivo. The results showed the PI fusion protein was expressed correctly in vitro, and could carry GST into the target cells. Under certain conditions, PI-TK sensitizes cells to ganciclovir more efficiently than TK. In vivo there was a trend for increased inhibition of tumor growth with PI-TK when ganciclovir was present. Therefore, our results suggest the potential of PI as a new specific target carrier in breast cancer therapy.

  8. Genetic Alterations in Familial Breast Cancer: Mapping and Cloning Genes Other Than BRCAl

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    cancer in female Cowden patients (-30%) DAMD17-94-J-4307 makes it a strong candidate for a breast cancer susceptibility gene (Hanssen and Fryns ...suppressor for these cancers as well (Jones et al. 1994; Zedenius et al. 1995). In patients with Cowden disease (CD; MIM 158350 [Hanssen and Fryns ...3660-3663 Hanssen AMN, Fryns JP (1995) Cowden syndrome. J Med Genet 32:117-119 Henle W, Henle G (1970) Evidence for a relation of Epstein- Barr

  9. Therapeutic siRNAs for dominant genetic skin disorders including pachyonychia congenita.

    PubMed

    Leachman, Sancy A; Hickerson, Robyn P; Hull, Peter R; Smith, Frances J D; Milstone, Leonard M; Lane, E Birgitte; Bale, Sherri J; Roop, Dennis R; McLean, W H Irwin; Kaspar, Roger L

    2008-09-01

    The field of science and medicine has experienced a flood of data and technology associated with the human genome project. Over 10,000 human diseases have been genetically defined, but little progress has been made with respect to the clinical application of this knowledge. A notable exception to this exists for pachyonychia congenita (PC), a rare, dominant-negative keratin disorder. The establishment of a non-profit organization, PC Project, has led to an unprecedented coalescence of patients, scientists, and physicians with a unified vision of developing novel therapeutics for PC. Utilizing the technological by-products of the human genome project, such as RNA interference (RNAi) and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), physicians and scientists have collaborated to create a candidate siRNA therapeutic that selectively inhibits a mutant allele of KRT6A, the most commonly affected PC keratin. In vitro investigation of this siRNA demonstrates potent inhibition of the mutant allele and reversal of the cellular aggregation phenotype. In parallel, an allele-specific quantitative real-time RT-PCR assay has been developed and validated on patient callus samples in preparation for clinical trials. If clinical efficacy is ultimately demonstrated, this "first-in-skin" siRNA may herald a paradigm shift in the treatment of dominant-negative genetic disorders.

  10. Long noncoding RNAs and tumorigenesis: genetic associations, molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Caiguo

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains a large number of nonprotein-coding sequences. Recently, new discoveries in the functions of nonprotein-coding sequences have demonstrated that the "Dark Genome" significantly contributes to human diseases, especially with regard to cancer. Of particular interest in this review are long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which comprise a class of nonprotein-coding transcripts that are longer than 200 nucleotides. Accumulating evidence indicates that a large number of lncRNAs exhibit genetic associations with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Our current understanding of the molecular bases of these lncRNAs that are associated with cancer indicate that they play critical roles in gene transcription, translation, and chromatin modification. Therapeutic strategies based on the targeting of lncRNAs to disrupt their expression or their functions are being developed. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the genetic associations and the aberrant expression of lncRNAs in cancer, with a particular focus on studies that have revealed the molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in tumorigenesis. In addition, we also discuss different therapeutic strategies that involve the targeting of lncRNAs.

  11. Unraveling new therapeutic targets of coronary artery disease by genetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death and physical disabilities in developed countries, even though efforts to identify and target causal factors such as hypertension and dyslipidemia have brought tremendous improvements in prevention and treatment. A rapid advance in technology has unraveled new genetic variants associated with CAD and also provided great opportunities to identify novel pathogenic mechanisms and to develop new drugs with higher specificity. Whole-genome sequencing and whole-exome sequencing has made it possible to find rare alleles that are responsible for CAD in small, affected families and case-control studies in a very efficient manner. At present, genome-wide association studies have identified more than 50 loci that explain approximately 10% of the heritability of CAD, most of which is unrelated to traditional risk factors. Mendelian randomization studies enable identification of causal factors among numerous biomarkers and to narrow down promising therapeutic targets. This review highlights new genetic approaches and demonstrates the extent to which the outcome contributes to the finding of new therapeutic targets.

  12. The Contributions of Breast Density and Common Genetic Variation to Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, V. Shane; Scott, Christopher G.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ziv, Elad; Jensen, Matthew R.; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Whaley, Dana H.; Olson, Janet E.; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin C.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Norman, Aaron D.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Purrington, Kristen S.; Easton, Douglas F.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fasching, Peter A.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated whether a 76-locus polygenic risk score (PRS) and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density were independent risk factors within three studies (1643 case patients, 2397 control patients) using logistic regression models. We incorporated the PRS odds ratio (OR) into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk-prediction model while accounting for its attributable risk and compared five-year absolute risk predictions between models using area under the curve (AUC) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. BI-RADS density and PRS were independent risk factors across all three studies (P interaction = .23). Relative to those with scattered fibroglandular densities and average PRS (2nd quartile), women with extreme density and highest quartile PRS had 2.7-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74 to 4.12) increased risk, while those with low density and PRS had reduced risk (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.51). PRS added independent information (P < .001) to the BCSC model and improved discriminatory accuracy from AUC = 0.66 to AUC = 0.69. Although the BCSC-PRS model was well calibrated in case-control data, independent cohort data are needed to test calibration in the general population. PMID:25745020

  13. The contributions of breast density and common genetic variation to breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Celine M; Pankratz, V Shane; Scott, Christopher G; Haeberle, Lothar; Ziv, Elad; Jensen, Matthew R; Brandt, Kathleen R; Whaley, Dana H; Olson, Janet E; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin C; Jud, Sebastian M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Tice, Jeffrey A; Norman, Aaron D; Cunningham, Julie M; Purrington, Kristen S; Easton, Douglas F; Sellers, Thomas A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated whether a 76-locus polygenic risk score (PRS) and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density were independent risk factors within three studies (1643 case patients, 2397 control patients) using logistic regression models. We incorporated the PRS odds ratio (OR) into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk-prediction model while accounting for its attributable risk and compared five-year absolute risk predictions between models using area under the curve (AUC) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. BI-RADS density and PRS were independent risk factors across all three studies (P interaction = .23). Relative to those with scattered fibroglandular densities and average PRS (2(nd) quartile), women with extreme density and highest quartile PRS had 2.7-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74 to 4.12) increased risk, while those with low density and PRS had reduced risk (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.51). PRS added independent information (P < .001) to the BCSC model and improved discriminatory accuracy from AUC = 0.66 to AUC = 0.69. Although the BCSC-PRS model was well calibrated in case-control data, independent cohort data are needed to test calibration in the general population.

  14. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    PubMed

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services.

  15. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-07-05

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells.

  16. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells. PMID:26894976

  17. Rats: gnawing through the barriers to understanding genetic susceptibility and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Anneke C

    2011-10-12

    Advances in genotyping technology have provided us with a large number of genetic loci associated with cancer susceptibility; however, our ability to understand the functional effects of the genetic variants of these loci remains limited. In the previous issue, Smits and colleagues demonstrate the use of congenic rat strains to discover that the Mcs5a breast cancer susceptibility locus is most likely acting through the immune system, via novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. This challenges our conventional thinking of cancer susceptibility and gene regulation pathways, and illustrates the potential for rodent models to help us functionally characterize polymorphisms of cancer-associated loci.

  18. [Psychological aspects of predictive genetic diagnosis in breast and ovarian carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tiefensee, I; Klusmann, D

    1998-01-01

    Mutations on the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, that predispose women to breast and ovarian cancer were localised in 1990 (Hall et al. 1990, Narod et al. 1991). With the improvement of the test procedures questions concerning the pros and cons of genetic diagnostic are growing in importance, especially because there are only few scientific studies on the social and psychological consequences of this development. In this article the demands to be made on genetic counselling, the present practice of tests employed in Germany and some "typical" problems of the decision and the consequences of the tests are described.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Mckenna; Snyder, Nicole A.; Housman, Genevieve; Leary, Meghan; Lapinska, Karolina; Heerboth, Sarah; Willbanks, Amber; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance. PMID:27213343

  20. Triple-negative breast cancer risk in women is defined by the defect of estrogen signaling: preventive and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies strongly support that triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) may be distinct entities as compared with estrogen receptor (ER)+ tumors, suggesting that the etiologic factors, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic possibilities may vary by molecular subtypes. Many investigations propose that reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use differently or even quite inversely affect the risk of TNBCs and ER+ cancers. Controversies concerning the exact role of even the same risk factor in TNBC development justify that the biological mechanisms behind the initiation of both TNBCs and non-TNBCs are completely obscure. To arrive at a comprehensive understanding of the etiology of different breast cancer subtypes, we should also reconsider our traditional concepts and beliefs regarding cancer risk factors. Malignancies are multicausal, but the disturbance of proper estrogen signaling seems to be a crucial risk factor for the development of mammary cancers. The grade of defect in metabolic and hormonal equilibrium is directly associated with TNBC risk for women during their whole life. Inverse impact of menopausal status or parity on the development of ER+ and ER− breast cancers may not be possible; these controversial results derive from the misinterpretation of percentage-based statistical evaluations. Exogenous or parity-associated excessive estrogen supply is suppressive against breast cancer, though the lower the ER expression of tumors, the weaker the anticancer capacity. In women, the most important preventive strategy against breast cancers – included TNBCs – is the strict control and maintenance of hormonal equilibrium from early adolescence through the whole lifetime, particularly during the periods of great hormonal changes. PMID:24482576

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and behavior of physicians regarding predictive genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marzuillo, Carolina; De Vito, Corrado; Boccia, Stefania; D'Addario, Maddalena; D'Andrea, Elvira; Santini, Paola; Boccia, Antonio; Villari, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility is an emerging technology in medicine. This study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and professional behavior of Italian physicians regarding the use of predictive genetic tests for breast and colorectal cancer, including the BRCA1/2 and APC tests. A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of Italian physicians was performed in 2010 through a self-administered questionnaire. A response rate of 69.6% (1079 questionnaires) was achieved. A significant lack of knowledge was detected, particularly for APC testing. Less than half of the physicians agreed on the importance of efficacy and cost-effectiveness evidence in the selection of predictive genetic tests to be offered to the patients. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that education had a positive influence on knowledge, attitudes and, to a lesser extent, professional use. The factor most strongly related to the physicians' use of genetic testing was patients requests for breast (odds ratio=12.65; 95% confidence interval 7.77-20.59) or colorectal cancer tests (odds ratio=7.02; 95% confidence interval 3.61-13.64). A high level of interest for specific training was reported by almost all physicians surveyed. Targeted educational programs are needed to improve the expertise of physicians, and, ultimately, to enhance the appropriate use of genetic tests in clinical practice. © 2013.

  2. Could HER2 Heterogeneity Open New Therapeutic Options in Patients with HER2-Primary Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Zr-trastuzumab PET / CT . Two of nine patients with suspicious foci had biopsy-proven HER2-positive metastases. Thus, 89 Zr-trastuzumab PET / CT may...into clinical use, and a more specific radiotracer will be needed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, HER2, tumor heterogeneity, PET / CT , 89Zr...KEYWORDS: Breast cancer Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) Tumor heterogeneity PET / CT Targeted imaging 89Zr-trastuzumab 3

  3. A Systems Biology Approach to Evaluate Ezrin as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    cancers. Existing breast cancer therapies target proteins whose effects are limited to certain subsets of breast cancer patients. We hypothesize that...characterization of the major cross-reacting allergens from the pollen of Parthenium hysterophorus". Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, India 1989...allergen in Parthenium pollen . J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 98:903-912. Neetu Gupta, P. Sriramarao, R. Kori, and P. V. Subba Rao. 1995. Immunochemical

  4. New Therapeutic Approaches and Prognostic Assays for Breast Cancer: Radiolabeled Ligands and Antibodies and Quantitative PCR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    techniques . In recent years, due to increased aware- tissues by this approach. Our results described here ness and periodic screening procedures, tumors...P, Kurman RJ, Wu XC, Eley JW, Austin D, polyacrylamide gels. This lower mobility may be due to et al (1994) Histological characteristics of breast...potential regulatory factor in breast tumors. Int. J. Cancer, 72: 937-941, 1997. 22. Speirs, V., Parks, A. T., Kerin, M. J., Walton, D. S., Carleton , P

  5. Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer Susceptibility in African American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    variable (likely v not likely) based on the distribution of responses. Halbert et al 7968 JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY Copyright © 2005 by the American...ONC/COM v GMP) in the regression model. Referral site was not associated signifi- cantly with family history of cancer (2 0.74; P .69) but was...Stopfer c, Susan Domchek d, Chanita Hughes Halbert e,* a Genetic Counseling Training Program, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA, United States b

  6. Common genetic determinants of breast-cancer risk in East Asian women: a collaborative study of 23 637 breast cancer cases and 25 579 controls

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Qiuyin; Sung, Hyuna; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Long, Jirong; Dennis, Joe; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Cai, Hui; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Dunning, Alison M.; Benitez, Javier; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Tessier, Daniel; Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jong-Young; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Wenjin; Ji, Bu-Tian; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, In Nee; Wong, Tien Y.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lee, Soo Chin; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ren, Zefang; Haiman, Christopher A.; Sueta, Aiko; Kim, Mi Kyung; Khoo, Ui Soon; Iwasaki, Motoki; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Wen, Wanqing; Hall, Per; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Easton, Douglas F.; Kang, Daehee

    2013-01-01

    In a consortium including 23 637 breast cancer patients and 25 579 controls of East Asian ancestry, we investigated 70 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 67 independent breast cancer susceptibility loci recently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted primarily in European-ancestry populations. SNPs in 31 loci showed an association with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in a direction consistent with that reported previously. Twenty-one of them remained statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons with the Bonferroni-corrected significance level of <0.0015. Eight of the 70 SNPs showed a significantly different association with breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status at P < 0.05. With the exception of rs2046210 at 6q25.1, the seven other SNPs showed a stronger association with ER-positive than ER-negative cancer. This study replicated all five genetic risk variants initially identified in Asians and provided evidence for associations of breast cancer risk in the East Asian population with nearly half of the genetic risk variants initially reported in GWASs conducted in European descendants. Taken together, these common genetic risk variants explain ∼10% of excess familial risk of breast cancer in Asian populations. PMID:23535825

  7. Breast cancer stem-like cells: clinical implications and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    TUDORAN, OANA MIHAELA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, being also the leading cause of cancer death among female population, including in Romania. Resistance to therapy represents a major problem for cancer treatment. Current cancer treatments are both expensive and induce serious side effects; therefore ineffective therapies are both traumatic and pricy. Characterizing predictive markers that can identify high-risk patients could contribute to dedicated/personalized therapy to improve the life quality and expectancy of cancer patients. Moreover, there are some markers that govern specific tumor molecular features that can be targeted with specific therapies for those patients who are most likely to benefit. The identification of stem cells in both normal and malignant breast tissue have lead to the hypothesis that breast tumors arise from breast cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and that these cells influence tumor’s response to therapy. CSCs have similar self-renewal properties to normal stem cells, however the balance between the signaling pathways is altered towards tumor formation In this review, we discuss the molecular aspects of breast CSCs and the controversies regarding their use in the diagnosis and treatment decision of breast cancer patients. PMID:27152067

  8. Different therapeutic effects of distinct KISS1 fragments on breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Yi

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. In these studies, a metastasis suppressor gene, KISS1 and its truncated fragment, were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. In addition, KISS1 expression was downregulated in MDA-MB-157 cell line using a KISS1-specific siRNA. The effects of KISS1 on breast cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro were then identified. Our results indicate that KISS1 can induce apoptosis and inhibit mobility of breast cancer cells. Moreover, the expression of KISS1 in established xenografted tumors was associated with a decrease in tumor size and weight. Accordingly, the survival rate of these mice was significantly higher compared to that of mice bearing tumors that did not express KISS1. We also confirm that KISS1 could decrease the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The plasma levels of metastin and the number of CTCs were significantly positively correlated. Furthermore, we found that KISS1 can inactivate p-MEK and p-ERK. Overall, these studies demonstrate the antitumor activity of KISS1 in the breast cancer cell lines and provide insight into relevant mechanisms that may lead to novel treatments for breast cancer.

  9. Simvastatin down-regulates differential genetic profiles produced by organochlorine mixtures in primary breast cell (HMEC).

    PubMed

    Rivero, Javier; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; D Boada, Luis; Pestano, Jose; P Luzardo, Octavio; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; F Valerón, Pilar

    2017-04-25

    Women all over the world are exposed to an unavoidable contamination by organochlorine pesticides and other chemical pollutants. Many of them are considered as xenoestrogens and have been associated with the development and progression of breast cancer. We have demonstrated that the most prevalent pesticide mixtures found in healthy women and in women diagnosed with breast cancer modulates the gene expression in human epithelial mammary cells. Statins are well-known cholesterol-depleting agents acting as inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Since the early 1990s, it has been known that statins could be successfully used in cancer therapy, including breast cancer, but the exact mechanism behind anti-tumor activity of the statins remains unclear. In the present study we evaluated the effect of simvastatin in the gene expression pattern induced by realistic organochlorine mixtures found in breast cancer patients. The gene expression of 94 genes related with the cell signaling pathways were assessed. Our results indicate that simvastatin exerts a global down regulating effect on successfully determined genes (78.7%), thus attenuating the effects induced by organochlorine mixtures on the gene profile of human mammary epithelial cells. This effect was more evident on genes whose function is the ATP-binding process (that also were particularly up-regulated by pesticide mixtures). We also found that MERTK (a proto-oncogene which is overexpressed in several malignancies) and PDGFRB (a member of the platelet-derived growth factor family whose expression is high in breast-cancer cells that have become resistant to endocrine therapy) were among the genes with a higher differential regulation by simvastatin. Since resistance to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is closely related to MERKT, our findings would enhance the possible utility of statins in breast cancer treatment, i.e. improving therapeutic results combining statins with tyrosine Kinase inhibitors.

  10. New Strategies in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: The Evolving Genetic and Therapeutic Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami B.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Deininger, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The classical BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) include essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and myelofibrosis (MF). While these clonal disorders share certain clinical and genetic features, MF in particular is distinct for its complex mutational landscape, severe disease phenotype and poor prognosis. The genetic complexity inherent to MF has made this disease extremely challenging to treat. Pharmacologic JAK inhibition has proven to be a transformative therapy in MPNs, alleviating symptom burden and improving survival, but has been hampered by off-target toxicities and, as monotherapy, has shown limited effects on mutant allele burden. In this review, we discuss the genetic heterogeneity contributing to the pathogenesis of MPNs, focusing on novel driver and epigenetic mutations and how they relate to combination therapeutic strategies. We discuss results from ongoing studies of new JAK inhibitors and report on new drugs and drug combinations that have demonstrated success in early preclinical and clinical trials, including Type II JAK inhibitors, anti-fibrotic agents and telomerase inhibitors. PMID:26933174

  11. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Stoff-Khalili, MA; Dall, P; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for breast cancer, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. The delineation of the molecular basis of breast cancer provides the possibility of specific intervention by gene therapy through the introduction of genetic material for therapeutic purposes. In this regard, several gene therapy approaches for carcinoma of the breast have been developed. These approaches can be divided into six broad categories: (1) mutation compensation, (2) molecular chemotherapy, (3) proapoptotic gene therapy, (4) antiangiogenic gene therapy, (5) genetic immunopotentiation, and (6) genetic modulation of resistance/sensitivity. Clinical trials for breast cancer have been initiated to evaluate safety, toxicity, and efficacy. Combined modality therapy with gene therapy and chemotherapy or radiation therapy has shown promising results. It is expected that as new therapeutic targets and approaches are identified and advances in vector design are realized, gene therapy will play an increasing role in clinical breast cancer treatment. PMID:16410823

  12. Hereditary breast/ovarian and colorectal cancer genetics knowledge in a national sample of US physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wideroff, L; Vadaparampil, S; Greene, M; Taplin, S; Olson, L; Freedman, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinically relevant genetics knowledge is essential for appropriate assessment and management of inherited cancer risk, and for effective communication with patients. This national physician survey assessed knowledge regarding basic cancer genetics concepts early in the process of introduction of predictive genetic testing for breast/ovarian and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndromes. Methods: A stratified random sample was selected from the American Medical Association Masterfile of all licensed physicians. In total, 1251 physicians (820 in primary care, 431 in selected subspecialties) responded to a 15 minute questionnaire (response rate 71%) in 1999–2000. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify demographic and practice characteristics associated with accurate response to three knowledge questions. Results: Of the study population, 37.5% was aware of paternal inheritance of BRCA1/2 mutations, and 33.8% recognised that these mutations occur in <10% of breast cancer patients. Only 13.1% accurately identified HNPCC gene penetrance as ⩾50%. Obstetrics/gynaecology physicians, oncologists, and general surgeons were significantly more likely than general and family practitioners to respond accurately to the breast/ovarian questions, as were gastroenterologists to the HNPCC question. Conclusions: These nationally representative data indicate limited physician knowledge about key cancer genetics concepts in 1999–2000, particularly among general primary care physicians. Specialists were more knowledgeable about syndromes they might treat or refer elsewhere. Recent dissemination of practice guidelines and continued expansion of relevant clinical literature may enhance knowledge over time. In addition to educational efforts to assist physicians with the growing knowledge base, more research is needed to characterise the organisational changes required within the healthcare system to provide effective cancer

  13. HER2 in situ hybridization in breast cancer: clinical implications of polysomy 17 and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Wedad M; Rüschoff, Josef; Bilous, Michael; Coudry, Renata A; Dowsett, Mitch; Osamura, Robert Y; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; van de Vijver, Marc; Viale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab-containing therapy is a standard of care for patients with HER2+ breast cancer. HER2 status is routinely assigned using in situ hybridization to assess HER2 gene amplification, but interpretation of in situ hybridization results may be challenging in tumors with chromosome 17 polysomy or intratumoral genetic heterogeneity. Apparent chromosome 17 polysomy, defined by increased chromosome enumeration probe 17 (CEP17) signal number, is a common genetic aberration in breast cancer and represents an alternative mechanism for increasing HER2 copy number. Some studies have linked elevated CEP17 count ('polysomy') with adverse clinicopathologic features and HER2 overexpression, although there are numerous discrepancies in the literature. There is evidence that elevated CEP17 ('polysomy') count might account for trastuzumab response in tumors with normal HER2:CEP17 ratios. Nonetheless, recent studies establish that apparent 'polysomy' (CEP17 increase) is usually related to focal pericentromeric gains rather than true polysomy. Assigning HER2 status may also be complex where multiple cell subclones with distinct HER2 amplification characteristics coexist within the same tumor. Such genetic heterogeneity affects up to 40% of breast cancers when assessed according to a College of American Pathologists guideline, although other definitions have been proposed. Recent data have associated heterogeneity with unfavorable clinicopathologic variables and poor prognosis. Genetically heterogeneous tumors harboring HER2-amplified subclones have the potential to benefit from trastuzumab, but this has yet to be evaluated in clinical studies. In this review, we discuss the implications of apparent polysomy 17 and genetic heterogeneity for assigning HER2 status in clinical practice. Among our recommendations, we support the use of mean HER2 copy number rather than HER2:CEP17 ratio to define HER2 positivity in cases where coamplification of the centromere might mask HER2

  14. Differentiation between genetic mutations of breast cancer by breath volatolomics

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qing-Ling; Pan, Yue-Yin; Kayal, Haneen; Khoury, Kayan; Liu, Hu; Davies, Michael P.A.; Haick, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Mapping molecular sub-types in breast cancer (BC) tumours is a rapidly evolving area due to growing interest in, for example, targeted therapy and screening high-risk populations for early diagnosis. We report a new concept for profiling BC molecular sub-types based on volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For this purpose, breath samples were collected from 276 female volunteers, including healthy, benign conditions, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and malignant lesions. Breath samples were analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and artificially intelligent nanoarray technology. Applying the non-parametric Wilcoxon/Kruskal-Wallis test, GC-MS analysis found 23 compounds that were significantly different (p < 0.05) in breath samples of BC patients with different molecular sub-types. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) of the nanoarray identified unique volatolomic signatures between cancer and non-cancer cases (83% accuracy in blind testing), and for the different molecular sub-types with accuracies ranging from 82 to 87%, sensitivities of 81 to 88% and specificities of 76 to 96% in leave-one-out cross-validation. These results demonstrate the presence of detectable breath VOC patterns for accurately profiling molecular sub-types in BC, either through specific compound identification by GC-MS or by volatolomic signatures obtained through statistical analysis of the artificially intelligent nanoarray responses. PMID:26540569

  15. Association of Genetic Susceptibility Variants for Type 2 Diabetes with Breast Cancer Risk in Women of European Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. Results The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at P < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92 – 0.95, P = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02 – 1.06, P = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95 – 0.99, P = 8.05E-04). Conclusions We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk. PMID:27053251

  16. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at p < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.92-0.95, p = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06, p = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR 0.97, 95 % CI = 0.95-0.99, p = 8.05E-04). We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk.

  17. Genetic changes at specific stages of breast cancer progression detected by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuxia; Niu, Yun; Wang, Xiaowei; Wei, Li; Lu, Song

    2009-02-01

    Although a simple linear progression model for breast cancer has already been proposed, its validity still remains controversial. Especially, the genetic and molecular features of breast cancer at different stages during the development and progression, as well as their relationship, have rarely been studied under the same experimental conditions simultaneously. According to these limitations in this research area, the current study applied comparative genomic hybridization technique to investigate genomic changes in 15 cases of breast atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 15 cases of ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS), and 15 cases of invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC) and the relationship among the genetic changes. Thirty commonly altered regions that were identified included known (gains of 1q,8q, 17q,20q,Xq and losses of 8p,13q,16q,17p,22q) and several uncharacterized (gains of 2q,5p, 10p,12q,16p,18q, etc. and losses of 11p13-pter,11q,14q,Xp, etc). The overall frequency of copy number losses was higher in IDC than that in DCIS (P = 0.013). ADH showed more frequent gain of 17q than that in IDC (P = 0.007), and IDC exhibited a higher frequency for the loss of 22q than that in ADH (P = 0.018). On one hand, several common genomic changes shared by ADH, DCIS, and IDC make a linear relationship for these three lesions possible. On the other hand, the heterogeneity has also showed clonal diversification and different pathways of breast cancer progression. The regions of chromosomal copy number alterations may bring new insights into the strategy for tumor progression blocking and the discovery of new potential targets for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Wouter; Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Seliger, Barbara; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Wang, Ena; Miller, Lance D; Marincola, Francesco M; Ceccarelli, Michele; Bedognetti, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity.

  19. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  20. Fine-mapping of breast cancer susceptibility loci characterizes genetic risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; John, Esther M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Deming, Sandra L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Nyante, Sarah; Palmer, Julie R.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Stram, Daniel O.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 19 common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Testing of the index signals found through GWAS and fine-mapping of each locus in diverse populations will be necessary for characterizing the role of these risk regions in contributing to inherited susceptibility. In this large study of breast cancer in African-American women (3016 cases and 2745 controls), we tested the 19 known risk variants identified by GWAS and replicated associations (P < 0.05) with only 4 variants. Through fine-mapping, we identified markers in four regions that better capture the association with breast cancer risk in African Americans as defined by the index signal (2q35, 5q11, 10q26 and 19p13). We also identified statistically significant associations with markers in four separate regions (8q24, 10q22, 11q13 and 16q12) that are independent of the index signals and may represent putative novel risk variants. In aggregate, the more informative markers found in the study enhance the association of these risk regions with breast cancer in African Americans [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, P = 2.8 × 10−24 versus OR = 1.04, P = 6.1 × 10−5]. In this detailed analysis of the known breast cancer risk loci, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk that better characterize their association with breast cancer in women of African ancestry. PMID:21852243

  1. Preparation and therapeutic application of docetaxel-loaded poly(d,l-lactide) nanofibers in preventing breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiuxia; Li, Zhi; Yang, Yi; Guo, Gang; Luo, Feng; Chen, Zhengqiong; Yang, Ying; Qian, ZhiYong; Shi, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-d,l-lactide (PDLLA) nanofibers and evaluate their therapeutic effect in preventing local breast cancer recurrence. DTX was incorporated into biodegradable PDLLA nanofibers by electrospinning. The surface morphology of the DTX/PDLLA nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and wide angle X-ray diffraction. The in vitro release behavior of DTX from the fiber mats was also studied in detail. The cytotoxicity of DTX/PDLLA nanofibers was evaluated by MTT assay in 4T1 breast cancer cells. Flow cytometry revealed that DTX/PDLLA nanofibers exhibited apoptotic activity in 4T1 cells. In vivo antitumor efficacy of DTX/PDLLA nanofibers was evaluated in BALB/c mice bearing local breast tumors. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor resection decreased obviously in mice treated with subcutaneously (16.7%) administered DTX-loaded PDLLA nanofibers, compared with the blank PDLLA nanofibers (88.9%), systemic (75.0%) or locally (77.8%) administered DTX and the control group (100%) (p < 0.05). Finally, after subcutaneous transplantation in mice, the DTX/PDLLA scaffolds presented excellent biocompatibility, as exhibited by the minimal presence of inflammatory cells in the region surrounding the scaffolds. Our results suggest that DTX/PDLLA nanofibers could have great potential for clinical application requiring local chemotherapy.

  2. Genetic services for hereditary breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers - physicians' awareness, use and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J C; Cappelli, M; Miller, F; Wilson, B J; Grunfeld, E; Peeters, C; Hunter, A G W; Gilpin, C; Prakash, P

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the Ministry of Health in Ontario, Canada, introduced a publicly funded program to provide genetic services for hereditary breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. We surveyed physicians to determine their awareness, use and satisfaction with this program. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 25% of Ontario family physicians and all gynecologists, oncologists (radiation, surgical and medical), gastroenterologists and general surgeons. Response rate was 49% (n = 1,427). Awareness of genetic testing for breast/ovarian cancer was high (91%) but less for colorectal cancer (60%). Use of services was associated with physician age of 40 or greater, urban location, confidence in knowledge of referral criteria and core competencies in genetics, and awareness of the program and where to refer. Almost half were dissatisfied with notification about the program. Ontario physicians are aware of cancer genetics services, and use is associated with increased knowledge of services, and confidence in skills. They would like more timely services and education about hereditary cancers and susceptibility testing. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Risk perceptions, worry, and attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Linda D; Reeve, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the unique associations of risk perceptions and worry with attitudes about genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility. Women (general practitioner clinic attenders, university students, and first-degree relatives of breast cancer survivors; N = 303) read information about genetic testing and completed measures assessing perceived cancer risk, cancer worry, and genetic testing attitudes and beliefs. Worry was associated with greater interest in genetic testing, stronger beliefs that testing has detrimental emotional consequences, and positive beliefs about benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. Perceived risk was unrelated to interest and associated with more skeptical beliefs about emotional consequences and benefits of testing and risk-reducing surgeries. At low worry levels, testing interest increased with more positive beliefs about testing benefits; at high worry levels, interest was high regardless of benefits beliefs. The findings support Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of self-regulation delineating interactive influences of risk-related cognitions and emotions on information processing and behavior.

  4. SRC family kinases as novel therapeutic targets to treat breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Huang, Wen-Chien; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chenyu; Lowery, Frank J; Ding, Zhaoxi; Guo, Hua; Wang, Hai; Huang, Suyun; Sahin, Aysegul A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2013-09-15

    Despite better control of early-stage disease and improved overall survival of patients with breast cancer, the incidence of life-threatening brain metastases continues to increase in some of these patients. Unfortunately, other than palliative treatments there is no effective therapy for this condition. In this study, we reveal a critical role for Src activation in promoting brain metastasis in a preclinical model of breast cancer and we show how Src-targeting combinatorial regimens can treat HER2(+) brain metastases in this model. We found that Src was hyperactivated in brain-seeking breast cancer cells derived from human cell lines or from patients' brain metastases. Mechanistically, Src activation promoted tumor cell extravasation into the brain parenchyma via permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier. When combined with the EGFR/HER2 dual-targeting drug lapatinib, an Src-targeting combinatorial regimen prevented outgrowth of disseminated breast cancer cells through the induction of cell-cycle arrest. More importantly, this combinatorial regimen inhibited the outgrowth of established experimental brain metastases, prolonging the survival of metastases-bearing mice. Our results provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of Src-targeting regimens to treat patients with breast cancer suffering from brain metastasis. ©2013 AACR.

  5. Sensitizing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Taxol with Shikonin in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Joan; Jackson, Kasey; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Shikonin, a small-molecule natural product which inhibits the activity of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), has been studied as an anti-cancer drug candidate in human cancer models. Here, our results demonstrate that shikonin is able to sensitize human breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by paclitaxel (taxol). Human breast adenocarcinoma MBA-MD-231 cells, which have higher levels of PKM2 expression and activity compared with MCF-7 cells, were selected to study further. The concentrations of shikonin and taxol were first selected at which they did not significantly induce cytotoxicity when treated alone, whereas the combination induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, PKM2 activity was decreased by shikonin, but not by the combination treatment. To identify the potential targets of this combination, human phospho-kinase antibody array analysis was performed and results indicated that the combination treatment inhibited the activation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6 kinases, which are known to contribute to breast cancer progression. Finally, how the combination affects breast cancer cell growth in vivo was tested using a xenograft tumor model. The results indicated that shikonin plus taxol prolonged animal survival and reduced tumor size than the vehicle treatment group. In summary, our results suggest that shikonin has a potential as an adjuvant for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24710512

  6. Sensitizing the therapeutic efficacy of taxol with shikonin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Liu, Joan; Jackson, Kasey; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Shikonin, a small-molecule natural product which inhibits the activity of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), has been studied as an anti-cancer drug candidate in human cancer models. Here, our results demonstrate that shikonin is able to sensitize human breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by paclitaxel (taxol). Human breast adenocarcinoma MBA-MD-231 cells, which have higher levels of PKM2 expression and activity compared with MCF-7 cells, were selected to study further. The concentrations of shikonin and taxol were first selected at which they did not significantly induce cytotoxicity when treated alone, whereas the combination induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, PKM2 activity was decreased by shikonin, but not by the combination treatment. To identify the potential targets of this combination, human phospho-kinase antibody array analysis was performed and results indicated that the combination treatment inhibited the activation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6 kinases, which are known to contribute to breast cancer progression. Finally, how the combination affects breast cancer cell growth in vivo was tested using a xenograft tumor model. The results indicated that shikonin plus taxol prolonged animal survival and reduced tumor size than the vehicle treatment group. In summary, our results suggest that shikonin has a potential as an adjuvant for breast cancer therapy.

  7. Biomarker Identification in Breast Cancer: Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling and Pathways to Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Kafetzopoulou, Liana E.; Boocock, David J.; Dhondalay, Gopal Krishna R.; Powe, Desmond G.; Ball, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies have associated beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling with breast cancer pathways such as progression and metastasis. These findings have been supported by clinical and epidemiological studies which examined the effect of beta-blocker therapy on breast cancer metastasis, recurrence and mortality. Results from these studies have provided initial evidence for the inhibition of cell migration in breast cancer by beta-blockers and have introduced the beta-adrenergic receptor pathways as a target for therapy. This paper analyzes gene expression profiles in breast cancer patients, utilising Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to identify molecular signatures corresponding to possible disease management pathways and biomarker treatment strategies associated with beta-2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) cell signaling. The adrenergic receptor relationship to cancer is investigated in order to validate the results of recent studies that suggest the use of beta-blockers for breast cancer therapy. A panel of genes is identified which has previously been reported to play an important role in cancer and also to be involved in the beta-adrenergic receptor signaling. PMID:24688711

  8. Helping Eve overcome ADAM: G-quadruplexes in the ADAM-15 promoter as new molecular targets for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert V; Gaerig, Vanessa C; Simmons, Taesha; Brooks, Tracy A

    2013-12-05

    ADAM-15, with known zymogen, secretase, and disintegrin activities, is a catalytically active member of the ADAM family normally expressed in early embryonic development and aberrantly expressed in various cancers, including breast, prostate and lung. ADAM-15 promotes extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, a soluble ligand for the HER2/neu receptor, leading to activation, increased motility, and proliferation. Targeted downregulation of both ADAM-15 and HER2/neu function synergistically kills breast cancer cells, but to date there are no therapeutic options for decreasing ADAM-15 function or expression. In this vein, we have examined a unique string of guanine-rich DNA within the critical core promoter of ADAM-15. This region of DNA consists of seven contiguous runs of three or more consecutive guanines, which, under superhelical stress, can relax from duplex DNA to form an intrastrand secondary G-quadruplex (G4) structure. Using biophysical and biological techniques, we have examined the G4 formation within the entire and various truncated regions of the ADAM-15 promoter, and demonstrate strong intrastrand G4 formation serving to function as a biological silencer element. Characterization of the predominant G4 species formed within the ADAM-15 promoter will allow for specific drug targeting and stabilization, and the further development of novel, targeted therapeutics.

  9. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer: how the latest results are improving therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hanfang; Rugo, Hope S

    2015-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease, and approximately 25% of patients with HER2+ early breast cancer still relapse after adjuvant trastuzumab-based treatment. HER2 is a validated therapeutic target that remains relevant throughout the disease process. Recently, a number of novel HER2 targeted agents have become available, including lapatinib (a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER2 and the epidermal growth factor re